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  1. Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR): An Item Response Theory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pilkonis, Paul A.; Kim, Yookyung; Yu, Lan; Morse, Jennifer Q.

    2013-01-01

    The Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR) include 3 scales for anxious, ambivalent attachment (excessive dependency, interpersonal ambivalence, and compulsive care-giving), 3 for avoidant attachment (rigid self-control, defensive separation, and emotional detachment), and 1 for secure attachment. The scales include items (ranging from 6–16 in their original form) scored by raters using a 3-point format (0 = absent, 1 = present, and 2 = strongly present) and summed to produce a total score. Item response theory (IRT) analyses were conducted with data from 414 participants recruited from psychiatric outpatient, medical, and community settings to identify the most informative items from each scale. The IRT results allowed us to shorten the scales to 5-item versions that are more precise and easier to rate because of their brevity. In general, the effective range of measurement for the scales was 0 to +2 SDs for each of the attachment constructs; that is, from average to high levels of attachment problems. Evidence for convergent and discriminant validity of the scales was investigated by comparing them with the Experiences of Close Relationships–Revised (ECR–R) scale and the Kobak Attachment Q-sort. The best consensus among self-reports on the ECR–R, informant ratings on the ECR–R, and expert judgments on the Q-sort and the AAR emerged for anxious, ambivalent attachment. Given the good psychometric characteristics of the scale for secure attachment, however, this measure alone might provide a simple alternative to more elaborate procedures for some measurement purposes. Conversion tables are provided for the 7 scales to facilitate transformation from raw scores to IRT-calibrated (theta) scores. PMID:24033268

  2. Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR): an item response theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Pilkonis, Paul A; Kim, Yookyung; Yu, Lan; Morse, Jennifer Q

    2014-01-01

    The Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR) include 3 scales for anxious, ambivalent attachment (excessive dependency, interpersonal ambivalence, and compulsive care-giving), 3 for avoidant attachment (rigid self-control, defensive separation, and emotional detachment), and 1 for secure attachment. The scales include items (ranging from 6-16 in their original form) scored by raters using a 3-point format (0 = absent, 1 = present, and 2 = strongly present) and summed to produce a total score. Item response theory (IRT) analyses were conducted with data from 414 participants recruited from psychiatric outpatient, medical, and community settings to identify the most informative items from each scale. The IRT results allowed us to shorten the scales to 5-item versions that are more precise and easier to rate because of their brevity. In general, the effective range of measurement for the scales was 0 to +2 SDs for each of the attachment constructs; that is, from average to high levels of attachment problems. Evidence for convergent and discriminant validity of the scales was investigated by comparing them with the Experiences of Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) scale and the Kobak Attachment Q-sort. The best consensus among self-reports on the ECR-R, informant ratings on the ECR-R, and expert judgments on the Q-sort and the AAR emerged for anxious, ambivalent attachment. Given the good psychometric characteristics of the scale for secure attachment, however, this measure alone might provide a simple alternative to more elaborate procedures for some measurement purposes. Conversion tables are provided for the 7 scales to facilitate transformation from raw scores to IRT-calibrated (theta) scores.

  3. GAMMA DETECTOR RESPONSE/SOIL CONCENTRATION CORRELATION STUDY AT THE AAR MANUFACTURING, INC. SITE, LIVONIA, MICHIGAN

    SciTech Connect

    ALTIC, NICK A

    2013-03-22

    At the NRC's request, ORAU conducted surveys of the AAR Manufacturing site during the period of September 25 through September 27, 2012. The survey activities included walkover surveys and sampling activities. Once the survey team was onsite, the NRC personnel decided to forgo survey activities in the New Addition and the pickling area. Areas of the planned study boundary were inaccessible due to overgrowth/large pieces of concrete covering the soil surface; therefore, the study boundary was redefined. Gamma walkover scans of the site boundary and front yard identified multiple areas of elevated gamma radiation. As a result, two judgmental samples were collected. Sample results were above thorium background levels The answer to the PSQ relating to the relationship between thorium concentration in soil and NaI instrument response is Yes. NaI instrument response can be used as a predictor of Th-232 concentration in the 0 to 1 m layer. An R2 value of 0.79 was determined for the surface soil relationship, thus satisfying the DQOs. Moreover, the regression was cross-checked by comparing the predicted Th-232 soil core concentration to the average Th-232 concentration (Section 5.3.2). Based on the cross-check, the regression equation provides a reasonable estimate for the Th-232 concentration at the judgmental locations. Consideration must be given when applying this equation to other soil areas of the site. If the contamination was heterogeneously distributed, and not distributed in a discrete layer as it was in the study area, then using the regression equation to predict Th-232 concentration would not be applicable.

  4. Activation of the amino acid response modulates lineage specification during differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jixiu; Hamazaki, Takashi; Tang, Tiffany A.; Terada, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    In somatic cells, a collection of signaling pathways activated by amino acid limitation have been identified and referred to as the amino acid response (AAR). Despite the importance of possible detrimental effects of nutrient limitation during in vitro culture, the AAR has not been investigated in embryonic stem cells (ESC). AAR activation caused the expected increase in transcription factors that mediate specific AAR pathways, as well as the induction of asparagine synthetase, a terminal AAR target gene. Neither AAR activation nor stable knockdown of activating transcription factor (Atf) 4, a transcriptional mediator of the AAR, adversely affected ESC self-renewal or pluripotency. Low-level induction of the AAR over a 12-day period of embryoid body differentiation did alter lineage specification such that the primitive endodermal, visceral endodermal, and endodermal lineages were favored, whereas mesodermal and certain ectodermal lineages were suppressed. Knockdown of Atf4 further enhanced the AAR-induced increase in endodermal formation, suggesting that this phenomenon is mediated by an Atf4-independent mechanism. Collectively, the results indicate that, during differentiation of mouse embryoid bodies in culture, the availability of nutrients, such as amino acids, can influence the formation of specific cell lineages. PMID:23736538

  5. A specialized citric acid cycle requiring succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) confers acetic acid resistance on the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO(2) loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels.

  6. Responses to the AAR-Teagle White Paper: "The Religious Studies Major in a Post-9/11 World"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jane S.; Buckley, James J.; Jensen, Tim; Floyd-Thomas, Stacey

    2011-01-01

    In October 2008 The American Academy of Religion published the findings of an eighteen month study (conducted with funding from the Teagle Foundation) on "The Religious Studies Major in a Post-9/11 World: New Challenges, New Opportunities." Re-published here, this AAR-Teagle White Paper provides the opportunity for four respondents to raise issues…

  7. Cloning of genes responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, M; Takemura, H; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1990-04-01

    Five acetic acid-sensitive mutants of Acetobacter aceti subsp. aceti no. 1023 were isolated by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three recombinant plasmids that complemented the mutations were isolated from a gene bank of the chromosome DNA of the parental strain constructed in Escherichia coli by using cosmid vector pMVC1. One of these plasmids (pAR1611), carrying about a 30-kilobase-pair (kb) fragment that conferred acetic acid resistance to all five mutants, was further analyzed. Subcloning experiments indicated that a 8.3-kb fragment was sufficient to complement all five mutations. To identify the mutation loci and genes involved in acetic acid resistance, insertional inactivation was performed by insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene derived from E. coli plasmid pACYC177 into the cloned 8.3-kb fragment and successive integration into the chromosome of the parental strain. The results suggested that three genes, designated aarA, aarB, and aarC, were responsible for expression of acetic acid resistance. Gene products of these genes were detected by means of overproduction in E. coli by use of the lac promoter. The amino acid sequence of the aarA gene product deduced from the nucleotide sequence was significantly similar to those of the citrate synthases (CSs) of E. coli and other bacteria. The A. aceti mutants defective in the aarA gene were found to lack CS activity, which was restored by introduction of a plasmid containing the aarA gene. A mutation in the CS gene of E. coli was also complemented by the aarA gene. These results indicate that aarA is the CS gene.

  8. Comprehensive Profiling of Amino Acid Response Uncovers Unique Methionine-Deprived Response Dependent on Intact Creatine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohu; Keenan, Melissa M.; Wu, Jianli; Lin, Chih-An; Dubois, Laura; Thompson, J. Will; Freedland, Stephen J.; Murphy, Susan K.; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Besides being building blocks for protein synthesis, amino acids serve a wide variety of cellular functions, including acting as metabolic intermediates for ATP generation and for redox homeostasis. Upon amino acid deprivation, free uncharged tRNAs trigger GCN2-ATF4 to mediate the well-characterized transcriptional amino acid response (AAR). However, it is not clear whether the deprivation of different individual amino acids triggers identical or distinct AARs. Here, we characterized the global transcriptional response upon deprivation of one amino acid at a time. With the exception of glycine, which was not required for the proliferation of MCF7 cells, we found that the deprivation of most amino acids triggered a shared transcriptional response that included the activation of ATF4, p53 and TXNIP. However, there was also significant heterogeneity among different individual AARs. The most dramatic transcriptional response was triggered by methionine deprivation, which activated an extensive and unique response in different cell types. We uncovered that the specific methionine-deprived transcriptional response required creatine biosynthesis. This dependency on creatine biosynthesis was caused by the consumption of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) during creatine biosynthesis that helps to deplete SAM under methionine deprivation and reduces histone methylations. As such, the simultaneous deprivation of methionine and sources of creatine biosynthesis (either arginine or glycine) abolished the reduction of histone methylation and the methionine-specific transcriptional response. Arginine-derived ornithine was also required for the complete induction of the methionine-deprived specific gene response. Collectively, our data identify a previously unknown set of heterogeneous amino acid responses and reveal a distinct methionine-deprived transcriptional response that results from the crosstalk of arginine, glycine and methionine metabolism via arginine

  9. Comprehensive profiling of amino acid response uncovers unique methionine-deprived response dependent on intact creatine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohu; Keenan, Melissa M; Wu, Jianli; Lin, Chih-An; Dubois, Laura; Thompson, J Will; Freedland, Stephen J; Murphy, Susan K; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-04-01

    Besides being building blocks for protein synthesis, amino acids serve a wide variety of cellular functions, including acting as metabolic intermediates for ATP generation and for redox homeostasis. Upon amino acid deprivation, free uncharged tRNAs trigger GCN2-ATF4 to mediate the well-characterized transcriptional amino acid response (AAR). However, it is not clear whether the deprivation of different individual amino acids triggers identical or distinct AARs. Here, we characterized the global transcriptional response upon deprivation of one amino acid at a time. With the exception of glycine, which was not required for the proliferation of MCF7 cells, we found that the deprivation of most amino acids triggered a shared transcriptional response that included the activation of ATF4, p53 and TXNIP. However, there was also significant heterogeneity among different individual AARs. The most dramatic transcriptional response was triggered by methionine deprivation, which activated an extensive and unique response in different cell types. We uncovered that the specific methionine-deprived transcriptional response required creatine biosynthesis. This dependency on creatine biosynthesis was caused by the consumption of S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) during creatine biosynthesis that helps to deplete SAM under methionine deprivation and reduces histone methylations. As such, the simultaneous deprivation of methionine and sources of creatine biosynthesis (either arginine or glycine) abolished the reduction of histone methylation and the methionine-specific transcriptional response. Arginine-derived ornithine was also required for the complete induction of the methionine-deprived specific gene response. Collectively, our data identify a previously unknown set of heterogeneous amino acid responses and reveal a distinct methionine-deprived transcriptional response that results from the crosstalk of arginine, glycine and methionine metabolism via arginine

  10. Calibration of amino acid racemization (AAR) kinetics in United States mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain Quaternary mollusks using 87Sr/ 86Sr analyses: Evaluation of kinetic models and estimation of regional Late Pleistocene temperature history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wehmiller, J. F.; Harris, W.B.; Boutin, B.S.; Farrell, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of amino acid racemization (AAR) for estimating ages of Quaternary fossils usually requires a combination of kinetic and effective temperature modeling or independent age calibration of analyzed samples. Because of limited availability of calibration samples, age estimates are often based on model extrapolations from single calibration points over wide ranges of D/L values. Here we present paired AAR and 87Sr/ 86Sr results for Pleistocene mollusks from the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA. 87Sr/ 86Sr age estimates, derived from the lookup table of McArthur et al. [McArthur, J.M., Howarth, R.J., Bailey, T.R., 2001. Strontium isotopic stratigraphy: LOWESS version 3: best fit to the marine Sr-isotopic curve for 0-509 Ma and accompanying Look-up table for deriving numerical age. Journal of Geology 109, 155-169], provide independent age calibration over the full range of amino acid D/L values, thereby allowing comparisons of alternative kinetic models for seven amino acids. The often-used parabolic kinetic model is found to be insufficient to explain the pattern of racemization, although the kinetic pathways for valine racemization and isoleucine epimerization can be closely approximated with this function. Logarithmic and power law regressions more accurately represent the racemization pathways for all amino acids. The reliability of a non-linear model for leucine racemization, developed and refined over the past 20 years, is confirmed by the 87Sr/ 86Sr age results. This age model indicates that the subsurface record (up to 80m thick) of the North Carolina Coastal Plain spans the entire Quaternary, back to ???2.5Ma. The calibrated kinetics derived from this age model yield an estimate of the effective temperature for the study region of 11??2??C., from which we estimate full glacial (Last Glacial Maximum - LGM) temperatures for the region on the order of 7-10??C cooler than present. These temperatures compare favorably with independent paleoclimate information

  11. A Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase (MEK)-dependent Transcriptional Program Controls Activation of the Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1) Gene during Amino Acid Limitation*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jixiu; Balasubramanian, Mukundh N.; Donelan, William; Fu, Lingchen; Hayner, Jaclyn; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Kilberg, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) limitation in mammalian cells triggers a collection of signaling cascades jointly referred to as the AA response (AAR). In human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma, the early growth response 1 (EGR1) gene was induced by either AA deprivation or endoplasmic reticulum stress. AAR-dependent EGR1 activation was discovered to be independent of the well characterized GCN2-ATF4 pathway and instead dependent on MEK-ERK signaling, one of the MAPK pathways. ChIP showed that constitutively bound ELK1 at the EGR1 proximal promoter region was phosphorylated after AAR activation. Increased p-ELK1 binding was associated with increased de novo recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the EGR1 promoter. EGR1 transcription was not induced in HEK293T cells lacking endogenous MEK activity, but overexpression of exogenous constitutively active MEK in HEK293T cells resulted in increased basal and AAR-induced EGR1 expression. ChIP analysis of the human vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) gene, a known EGR1-responsive gene, revealed moderate increases in AAR-induced EGR1 binding within the proximal promoter and highly inducible binding to a site within the first intron. Collectively, these data document a novel AA-activated MEK-ERK-ELK1 signaling mechanism. PMID:25028509

  12. A Recurrent Loss-of-Function Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase (AARS) Mutation in Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 2N (CMT2N)

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Heather M.; Sakaguchi, Reiko; Giblin, William; Wilson, Thomas E.; Biesecker, Leslie; Lupski, James R.; Talbot, Kevin; Vance, Jeffery M.; Züchner, Stephan; Lee, Yi-Chung; Kennerson, Marina; Hou, Ya-Ming; Nicholson, Garth; Antonellis, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease comprises a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, and impaired sensation in the extremities. Four genes encoding an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) have been implicated in CMT disease. ARSs are ubiquitously expressed, essential enzymes that ligate amino acids to cognate tRNA molecules. Recently, a p.Arg329His variant in the alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) gene was found to segregate with dominant axonal CMT type 2N (CMT2N) in two French families; however, the functional consequence of this mutation has not been determined. To investigate the role of AARS in CMT, we performed a mutation screen of the AARS gene in patients with peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed that p.Arg329His AARS also segregated with CMT disease in a large Australian family. Aminoacylation and yeast viability assays showed that p.Arg329His AARS severely reduces enzyme activity. Genotyping analysis indicated that this mutation arose on three distinct haplotypes, and the results of bisulfite sequencing suggested that methylation-mediated deamination of a CpG dinucleotide gives rise to the recurrent p.Arg329His AARS mutation. Together, our data suggest that impaired tRNA charging plays a role in the molecular pathology of CMT2N, and that patients with CMT should be directly tested for the p.Arg329His AARS mutation. PMID:22009580

  13. ATF4-dependent Regulation of the JMJD3 Gene during Amino Acid Deprivation Can Be Rescued in Atf4-deficient Cells by Inhibition of Deacetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jixiu; Fu, Lingchen; Balasubramanian, Mukundh N.; Anthony, Tracy; Kilberg, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Following amino acid deprivation, the amino acid response (AAR) induces transcription from specific genes through a collection of signaling mechanisms, including the GCN2-eIF2-ATF4 pathway. The present report documents that the histone demethylase JMJD3 is an activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-dependent target gene. The JMJD3 gene contains two AAR-induced promoter activities and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that the AAR leads to enhanced ATF4 recruitment to the C/EBP-ATF response element (CARE) upstream of Promoter-1. AAR-induced histone modifications across the JMJD3 gene locus occur upon ATF4 binding. Jmjd3 transcription is not induced in Atf4-knock-out cells, but the AAR-dependent activation was rescued by inhibition of histone deacetylation with trichostatin A (TSA). The TSA rescue of AAR activation in the absence of Atf4 also occurred for the Atf3 and C/EBP homology protein (Chop) genes, but not for the asparagine synthetase gene. ChIP analysis of the Jmjd3, Atf3, and Chop genes in Atf4 knock-out cells documented that activation of the AAR in the presence of TSA led to specific changes in acetylation of histone H4. The results suggest that a primary function of ATF4 is to recruit histone acetyltransferase activity to a sub-set of AAR target genes. Thus, absolute binding of ATF4 to these particular genes is not required and no ATF4 interaction with the general transcription machinery is necessary. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that ATF4 functions as a pioneer factor to alter chromatin structure and thus, enhance transcription in a gene-specific manner. PMID:22955275

  14. Abscisic Acid Synthesis and Response

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is one of the “classical” plant hormones, i.e. discovered at least 50 years ago, that regulates many aspects of plant growth and development. This chapter reviews our current understanding of ABA synthesis, metabolism, transport, and signal transduction, emphasizing knowledge gained from studies of Arabidopsis. A combination of genetic, molecular and biochemical studies has identified nearly all of the enzymes involved in ABA metabolism, almost 200 loci regulating ABA response, and thousands of genes regulated by ABA in various contexts. Some of these regulators are implicated in cross-talk with other developmental, environmental or hormonal signals. Specific details of the ABA signaling mechanisms vary among tissues or developmental stages; these are discussed in the context of ABA effects on seed maturation, germination, seedling growth, vegetative stress responses, stomatal regulation, pathogen response, flowering, and senescence. PMID:24273463

  15. Crystallization and biochemical characterization of the human spliceosomal Aar2-Prp8(RNaseH) complex.

    PubMed

    Santos, Karine; Preussner, Marco; Heroven, Anna Christina; Weber, Gert

    2015-11-01

    In eukaryotes, the removal of nuclear noncoding sequences (pre-mRNA splicing) is catalyzed by the spliceosome, which consists of five ribonucleoprotein particles (U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6 snRNPs, each with a respective snRNA) and a plethora of protein factors that aid spliceosomal maturation, assembly, activation and disassembly. Recently, the U5 snRNP maturation factor Aar2p from baker's yeast has been characterized structurally and biochemically. Aar2p binds to the RNaseH (RH) and Jab1/MPN domains of the highly conserved U5-specific Prp8p, which forms a framework for the spliceosomal catalytic centre. Thereby, Aar2p sterically excludes Brr2p, a helicase essential for the catalytic activation of the spliceosome, from Prp8p binding. At the same time, Aar2p blocks U4/U6 di-snRNA binding to Prp8p. Aar2p therefore prevents premature spliceosome activation and its functions are regulated by reversible phosphorylation. To date, little is known about the hypothetical human Aar2 (hsAar2) orthologue C20ORF4. This study identifies C20ORF4 (i) as part of the HeLa proteome by Western blotting and (ii) as a true Aar2 orthologue which binds to the RH domain (hsRH) of Prp8 and corroborates an evolutionary link between yeast and human Aar2 function. An elaborate strategy was devised to crystallize hsAar2 in complex with hsRH. The analysis of initial weakly diffracting crystals obtained by in situ proteolysis and homology modelling guided the design of an hsAar2 construct in which an internal loop was replaced by three serines (hsAar2(Δloop)). A complex of hsAar2(Δloop) and hsRH crystallized in space group C2; the crystals diffracted to 2.35 Å resolution and were suitable for structure determination by molecular-replacement approaches. The study presented here suggests a connection between Aar2 and the spliceosome in human cells and paves the way for structural studies of human Aar2. PMID:26527271

  16. Citraturic response to oral citric acid load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Alpern, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible that some orally administered citrate may appear in urine by escaping oxidation in vivo. To determine whether this mechanism contributes to the citraturic response to potassium citrate, we measured serum and urinary citrate for 4 hours after a single oral load of citric acid (40 mEq.) in 6 normal subjects. Since citric acid does not alter acid-base balance, the effect of absorbed citrate could be isolated from that of alkali load. Serum citrate concentration increased significantly (p less than 0.05) 30 minutes after a single oral dose of citric acid and remained significantly elevated for 3 hours after citric acid load. Commensurate with this change, urinary citrate excretion peaked at 2 hours and gradually decreased during the next 2 hours after citric acid load. In contrast, serum and urinary citrate remained unaltered following the control load (no drug). Differences of the citratemic and citraturic effects between phases were significant (p less than 0.05) at 2 and 3 hours. Urinary pH, carbon dioxide pressure, bicarbonate, total carbon dioxide and ammonium did not change at any time after citric acid load, and did not differ between the 2 phases. No significant difference was noted in serum electrolytes, arterialized venous pH and carbon dioxide pressure at any time after citric acid load and between the 2 phases. Thus, the citraturic and citratemic effects of oral citric acid are largely accountable by provision of absorbed citrate, which has escaped in vivo degradation.

  17. Internal structure of the Aar Massif: What can we learn in terms of exploration for deep geothermal energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Baumberger, Roland; Wehrens, Philip; Schubert, Raphael; Berger, Alfons; Maeder, Urs; Spillmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The successful use of deep geothermal energy requires 3D flow paths, which allow an efficient heat exchange between the surrounding host rocks and the circulating fluids. Recent attempts to exploit this energy resource clearly demonstrate that the new technology is facing sever problems. Some major problems are related to the prediction of permeability, the 3D structure of the flow paths and the mechanical responses during elevated fluid pressures at depths of several kilometers. Although seemingly new in a technical perspective, nature is facing and solving similar problems since the beginning of the Alpine orogeny. Based on detailed studies in the Hasli Valley (Aar Massif) we can demonstrate that deformation and fluid flow are strongly localized along mechanical anisotropies (e.g. lithological variations, brittle and ductile faults). Some of them already evolved during Variscan and post-Variscan times. Interestingly, these inherited structures are reactivated over and over again during the Alpine orogeny. Their reactivation occurred at depths of ~13-15 km with elevated temperatures (400-475°C) and involved both ductile and brittle deformation processes. Brittle deformation in form of hydrofracking was always present due to the circulating fluids. It is this process, which was and still is responsible for seismic activity. With progressive uplift and exhumation of the Aar Massif, ductile deformation structures became replaced by brittle cataclasites and fault gouges during fault activity at shallower crustal levels. Existing hydrotest data from the Grimsel Test Site (Nagra's underground research laboratory) indicate that these brittle successors of the ductile shear zones are domains of enhanced recent fluid percolation. Note that although being exposed today, the continuation of these fault structures are still active at depth in both brittle and ductile deformation modes, a fact that can be inferred from recent uplift rates and the active seismicity. On the

  18. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats.

    PubMed

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as "junk" sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in shaping

  19. Structural modeling of tissue-specific mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS2) defects predicts differential effects on aminoacylation

    PubMed Central

    Euro, Liliya; Konovalova, Svetlana; Asin-Cayuela, Jorge; Tulinius, Már; Griffin, Helen; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Schara, Ulrike; Thorburn, David R.; Suomalainen, Anu; Chihade, Joseph; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of mitochondrial protein synthesis is dependent on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNAs. The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing have revealed the importance of the mtARS proteins for mitochondrial pathophysiology since nearly every nuclear gene for mtARS (out of 19) is now recognized as a disease gene for mitochondrial disease. Typically, defects in each mtARS have been identified in one tissue-specific disease, most commonly affecting the brain, or in one syndrome. However, mutations in the AARS2 gene for mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS) have been reported both in patients with infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and in patients with childhood to adulthood-onset leukoencephalopathy. We present here an investigation of the effects of the described mutations on the structure of the synthetase, in an effort to understand the tissue-specific outcomes of the different mutations. The mtAlaRS differs from the other mtARSs because in addition to the aminoacylation domain, it has a conserved editing domain for deacylating tRNAs that have been mischarged with incorrect amino acids. We show that the cardiomyopathy phenotype results from a single allele, causing an amino acid change R592W in the editing domain of AARS2, whereas the leukodystrophy mutations are located in other domains of the synthetase. Nevertheless, our structural analysis predicts that all mutations reduce the aminoacylation activity of the synthetase, because all mtAlaRS domains contribute to tRNA binding for aminoacylation. According to our model, the cardiomyopathy mutations severely compromise aminoacylation whereas partial activity is retained by the mutation combinations found in the leukodystrophy patients. These predictions provide a hypothesis for the molecular basis of the distinct tissue-specific phenotypic outcomes. PMID:25705216

  20. MicroRNA-16 is putatively involved in the NF-κB pathway regulation in ulcerative colitis through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) mRNA targeting

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ting; Zhou, Yu; Feng, Xiao; Ye, Shicai; Wang, Hao; Wu, Weiyun; Tan, Wenkai; Yu, Caiyuan; Hu, Juxiang; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Zonghao; Pei, Xinyu; Luo, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by targeting the 3′-untranslated region of their target genes. Altered expression of miR-16 is reported in human ulcerative colitis (UC), but its role in the development of the disease remains unclear. Adenosine through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) could inhibit nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in inflammation. Here we identified overexpression of miR-16 and down-regulation of A2aAR in the colonic mucosa of active UC patients. We demonstrated that miR-16 negatively regulated the expression of the A2aAR at the post-transcriptional level. Furthermore, transfection of miR-16 mimics promoted nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 protein and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-8 in colonic epithelial cells. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor could reverse these effects in cells. The A2aAR-mediated effects of miR-16 on the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway were confirmed by the A2aAR knockdown assay. Our results suggest that miR-16 regulated the immune and inflammatory responses, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of the A2aAR to control the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27476546

  1. Identification and analysis of aarP, a transcriptional activator of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed Central

    Macinga, D R; Parojcic, M M; Rather, P N

    1995-01-01

    The aarP gene has been identified in a search for activators of the 2-N-acetyltransferase [encoded by aac(2')-Ia] in Providencia stuartii. Introduction of aarP into P. stuartii on a multicopy plasmid resulted in a 9.9-fold increase in the accumulation of beta-galactosidase from an aac(2')-lacZ fusion. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated that this increased aac(2')-Ia expression occurred at the level of mRNA accumulation. The deduced AarP protein was 15,898 Da in size and exhibited significant homology to a number of transcriptional activators in the AraC/XyIS family, including TetD,Rob, MarA, and SoxS. The similarity of AarP to the MarA and SoxS proteins prompted an investigation to determine whether AarP is involved in activation of genes in either the multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype or redox stress (SoxRS) system. Introduction of aarP on a multicopy plasmid into either P. stuartii or Escherichia coli conferred a Mar phenotype with higher levels of resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin. Multiple copies of aarP in E. coli also resulted in activation of the endonuclease IV gene (nfo), a gene in the SoxRS regulon of E. coli. The function of aarP in its single-copy state was addressed by using allelic replacement to construct an aarP::Cm disruption, which resulted in a fivefold reduction in the accumulation of aac(2')-Ia mRNA. Analysis of aarP regulation showed that aarP mRNA accumulation was slightly increased by exposure to tetracycline and dramatically increased in cells containing the aarB3 (aar3) mutation, which was previously shown to increase transcription of the aac(2')-Ia gene. (P.N. Rather, E. Oroz, K.J. Shaw, R. Hare, and G. Miller, J. Bacteriol. 175:6492-6498). PMID:7768849

  2. Acid drainage response to surface limestone layers

    SciTech Connect

    Geidel, G.; Caruccio, F.T.

    1982-12-01

    A 150 acre drainage basin in an unreclaimed coal strip mine in east-central Ohio was studied and extensively monitored to determine the effect of a surface application of limestone on the ground water quality. Prior to the limestone treatment the ground and surface water of the basin was acidic due to pyrite oxidation in the spoil. In order to assess the effect of the limestone application the basin was divided into seven sub-basins, five of which were treated and two which served as controls. The seeps from the treated sub-basins with low acid concentrations became alkaline due to neutralization but after a long dry period, they returned to their acid condition. The moderately and highly acidic seeps showed a decline in the acid concentrations which could be attributed to a combination of neutralization and a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation. The results of this field study and simultaneous laboratory experiments showed that under natural conditions, with no limestone application, the acidity generated by pyrite oxidation in a backfill decreased. A surface application of limestone slightly enhanced the decrease in acidity by both neutralization and decreasing the rate of pyrite oxidation. However, the limestone application did not provide sufficient alkalinity to produce either neutral or alkaline discharges from the abandoned coal strip mine site.

  3. Characterization of aarA, a pleiotrophic negative regulator of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed Central

    Rather, P N; Orosz, E

    1994-01-01

    We have utilized transposon mutagenesis to obtain insertional mutations in Providencia stuartii that activate the chromosomal aac(2')-la gene. Two closely linked mini-Tn5Cm insertions were obtained in a locus designated aarA, and a single insertion was obtained in a separate locus, aarC. Nucleotide sequence analysis, complementation studies, and localization of the sites of mini-Tn5Cm insertion have allowed the identification of the aarA coding region. The deduced AarA protein had a molecular mass of 31,086 kDa and displayed characteristics of an integral membrane protein. A strain deleted for the aarA gene by allelic exchange showed at least a fourfold increase in the accumulation of aac(2')-la mRNA and an eightfold increase in aminoglycoside resistance. Mutations in aarA were pleiotrophic and also resulted in loss of pigmentation and a deficiency in cell separation during division. Images PMID:8051030

  4. Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. )

    1991-06-01

    Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

  5. Cloning, DNA sequencing and heterologous expression of the gene for thermostable N-acylamino acid racemase from Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, S; Hatano, K

    1995-03-01

    The gene encoding the novel enzyme N-acylamino acid racemase (AAR) was cloned in recombinant phage lambda-4 from the DNA library of Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60, a rare actinomycete, using antiserum against the enzyme. The cloned gene was subcloned and transformed in Escherichia coli JM105 using pUC118 as a vector. The AAR gene consists of an open-reading frame of 1104 nucleotides, which specifies a 368-amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 39411Da. The molecular mass deduced from the AAR gene is in good agreement with the subunit molecular mass (40kDa) of AAR from Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60. The guanosine plus cytosine content of the AAR gene was about 70%. Although the AAR gene uses the unusual initiation codon GTG, the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli using the lac promoter of pUC118. The amount of the enzyme produced by the transformant was 16 times that produced by Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60. When the unusual initiation codon GTG was changed to ATG, the enzyme productivity of the transformant increased to more than 37 times that of Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60. In the comparison of the DNA sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of AAR with those of known racemases and epimerases in data bases, no significant sequence homology was found. However, AAR resembles mandelate racemase in that requires metal ions for enzyme activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  7. Heart Rate Response and Lactic Acid Concentration in Squash Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Paula; And Others

    1978-01-01

    It was concluded that playing squash is an activity that results in heart rate responses of sufficient intensity to elicit aerobic training effects without producing high lactic acid concentration in the blood. (MM)

  8. Neutralization of Tumor Acidity Improves Antitumor Responses to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Kodumudi, Krithika N; El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; Russell, Shonagh; Weber, Amy M; Luddy, Kimberly; Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Mulé, James J; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Cancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint blockade or adoptive T-cell transfer, can lead to durable responses in the clinic, but response rates remain low due to undefined suppression mechanisms. Solid tumors are characterized by a highly acidic microenvironment that might blunt the effectiveness of antitumor immunity. In this study, we directly investigated the effects of tumor acidity on the efficacy of immunotherapy. An acidic pH environment blocked T-cell activation and limited glycolysis in vitro. IFNγ release blocked by acidic pH did not occur at the level of steady-state mRNA, implying that the effect of acidity was posttranslational. Acidification did not affect cytoplasmic pH, suggesting that signals transduced by external acidity were likely mediated by specific acid-sensing receptors, four of which are expressed by T cells. Notably, neutralizing tumor acidity with bicarbonate monotherapy impaired the growth of some cancer types in mice where it was associated with increased T-cell infiltration. Furthermore, combining bicarbonate therapy with anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD1, or adoptive T-cell transfer improved antitumor responses in multiple models, including cures in some subjects. Overall, our findings show how raising intratumoral pH through oral buffers therapy can improve responses to immunotherapy, with the potential for immediate clinical translation. PMID:26719539

  9. Neutralization of Tumor Acidity Improves Antitumor Responses to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Kodumudi, Krithika N; El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; Russell, Shonagh; Weber, Amy M; Luddy, Kimberly; Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Mulé, James J; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Cancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint blockade or adoptive T-cell transfer, can lead to durable responses in the clinic, but response rates remain low due to undefined suppression mechanisms. Solid tumors are characterized by a highly acidic microenvironment that might blunt the effectiveness of antitumor immunity. In this study, we directly investigated the effects of tumor acidity on the efficacy of immunotherapy. An acidic pH environment blocked T-cell activation and limited glycolysis in vitro. IFNγ release blocked by acidic pH did not occur at the level of steady-state mRNA, implying that the effect of acidity was posttranslational. Acidification did not affect cytoplasmic pH, suggesting that signals transduced by external acidity were likely mediated by specific acid-sensing receptors, four of which are expressed by T cells. Notably, neutralizing tumor acidity with bicarbonate monotherapy impaired the growth of some cancer types in mice where it was associated with increased T-cell infiltration. Furthermore, combining bicarbonate therapy with anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD1, or adoptive T-cell transfer improved antitumor responses in multiple models, including cures in some subjects. Overall, our findings show how raising intratumoral pH through oral buffers therapy can improve responses to immunotherapy, with the potential for immediate clinical translation.

  10. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  11. Alkali - Aggregate reaction (AAR) A brief history of discovery of tis basic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Leps, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    Alkali Aggregate Reaction (AAR), also variously known as Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR) and even Alkali Carbonate Reaction (ACR), has troubled and challenged those of us since the 1930`s who would have liked to think of portland cement concrete and aggregates as a simple, reliable, inert, enduring construction material. Its complex and not easily understood chemistry successfully defied the understanding of the engineering fraternity for many decades. After all, civil engineers, architects, and construction engineers are not chemists or petrographers, and are only minimally laboratory-oriented or trained. Furthermore, the almost infinite variety of minerals which Nature has provided in the form of rocks and aggregates indeed constituted a nearly insurmountable challenge to the ready development of a credible understanding of the chemistry of expanding concrete. Accordingly, although a few talented pioneers such as E.A. Stephenson in 1916, J.C. Pearson & G.F. Loughlin in 1923, Professor R.J. Holden in 1935, and F. M. Lea & C.H. Desch in 1935, nibbled at the edges of understanding how gels were formed in the alkali-aggregate interaction process, it was not until 1940 when an engineer, Thomas E. Stanton, dared to publish a preliminary but understandable view of what causes portland cement concrete to expand. The writer`s interest in AAR began as far back as 1946 when the importance of the problem was repeatedly brought to his attention by Ralph W. Spencer, then Chief Civil Engineer of Southern California Edison Company, who was the writer`s supervisor in planning, designing and contracting the construction of many major projects, including dams. Previously as well as subsequently, the writer`s interest was enhanced by friendships and association with pioneers of AAR such as Professor Roy Carlson, Professor R.E. Davis, Lewis H. Tuthill, R.F. Blanks, and Roger Rhoades. The writer regrets never having met Thomas E. Stanton and his chief chemist, G.H.P.

  12. Rapid acid treatment of Escherichia coli: transcriptomic response and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Geetha; Wilks, Jessica C; Fitzgerald, Devon M; Jones, Brian D; BonDurant, Sandra S; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2008-01-01

    Background Many E. coli genes show pH-dependent expression during logarithmic growth in acid (pH 5–6) or in base (pH 8–9). The effect of rapid pH change, however, has rarely been tested. Rapid acid treatment could distinguish between genes responding to external pH, and genes responding to cytoplasmic acidification, which occurs transiently following rapid external acidification. It could reveal previously unknown acid-stress genes whose effects are transient, as well as show which acid-stress genes have a delayed response. Results Microarray hybridization was employed to observe the global gene expression of E. coli K-12 W3110 following rapid acidification of the external medium, from pH 7.6 to pH 5.5. Fluorimetric observation of pH-dependent tetR-YFP showed that rapid external acidification led to a half-unit drop in cytoplasmic pH (from pH 7.6 to pH 6.4) which began to recover within 20 s. Following acid treatment, 630 genes were up-regulated and 586 genes were down-regulated. Up-regulated genes included amino-acid decarboxylases (cadA, adiY, gadA), succinate dehydrogenase (sdhABCD), biofilm-associated genes (bdm, gatAB, and ymgABC), and the Gad, Fur and Rcs regulons. Genes with response patterns consistent with cytoplasmic acid stress were revealed by addition of benzoate, a membrane-permeant acid that permanently depresses cytoplasmic pH without affecting external pH. Several genes (yagU, ygiN, yjeI, and yneI) were up-regulated specifically by external acidification, while other genes (fimB, ygaC, yhcN, yhjX, ymgABC, yodA) presented a benzoate response consistent with cytoplasmic pH stress. Other genes (the nuo operon for NADH dehydrogenase I, and the HslUV protease) showed delayed up-regulation by acid, with expression rising by 10 min following the acid shift. Conclusion Transcriptomic profiling of E. coli K-12 distinguished three different classes of change in gene expression following rapid acid treatment: up-regulation with or without recovery, and

  13. Oxalic acid-mediated stress responses in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yue; Strelkov, Stephen E; Kav, Nat N V

    2009-06-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) occurs extensively in nature and plays diverse roles, especially in pathogenic processes involving various plant pathogens. However, proteome changes and modifications of signaling and oxidative network of plants in response to OA are not well understood. In order to investigate the responses of Brassica napus toward OA, a proteome analysis was conducted employing 2-DE with MS/MS. A total of 37 proteins were identified as responding to OA stress, of which 13 were up-regulated and 24 were down-regulated. These proteins were categorized into several functional groups including protein processing, RNA processing, photosynthesis, signal transduction, stress response, and redox homeostasis. Investigation of the effect of OA on phytohormone signaling and oxidative responses revealed that jasmonic acid-, ethylene-, and abscisic acid-mediated signaling pathways appear to increase at later time points, whereas those pathways mediated by salicylic acid appear to be suppressed. Moreover, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and oxalic acid oxidase, but not NADPH oxidase, were suppressed by OA stress. Our findings are discussed within the context of the proposed role(s) of OA during infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and subsequent disease progression. PMID:19526549

  14. Acid tolerance response (ATR) of microbial communities during the enhanced biohydrogen process via cascade acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoqin; Xia, Yan; Yan, Qun; Shen, Wei; Zhao, Mingxing

    2014-03-01

    Enhanced biohydrogen production via cascade acid stress on microbial communities, structure patterns of the microbial communities revealed by PLFAs, and the succession of biohydrogen related species against cascade acid stress were all investigated. It was found that hydrogen production could be improved from 48.7 to 79.4mL/gVS after cascade acid stress. In addition, the Gram negative (G(-)) bacteria were found to be more tolerant to organic acids than those of the Gram positive (G(+)) bacteria, regardless of the dominance of G(+) bacteria within the microbial communities. Moreover, Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium aciditolerans and Azospira oryzae, were proved to be enriched, and then might play indispensable roles for the enhanced biohydrogen production after cascade acid stress, as which were responsible for the biohydrogen accumulation, acid tolerance and nitrogen removal, respectively.

  15. TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES OF MOUSE EMBRYO CULTURES EXPOSED TO BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transcriptional responses of mouse embryo cultures exposed to bromochloroacetic acid

    Edward D. Karoly?*, Judith E. Schmid* and E. Sidney Hunter III*
    ?Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and *Reproductive Tox...

  16. An enhanced system for unnatural amino acid mutagenesis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Young, Travis S; Ahmad, Insha; Yin, Jun A; Schultz, Peter G

    2010-01-15

    We report a new vector, pEVOL, for the incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins in Escherichia coli using evolved Methanocaldococcus jannaschii aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase(s) (aaRS)/suppressor tRNA pairs. This new system affords higher yields of mutant proteins through the use of both constitutive and inducible promoters to drive the transcription of two copies of the M. jannaschii aaRS gene. Yields were further increased by coupling the dual-aaRS promoter system with a newly optimized suppressor tRNA(CUA)(opt) in a single-vector construct. The optimized suppressor tRNA(CUA)(opt) afforded increased plasmid stability compared with previously reported vectors for unnatural amino acid mutagenesis. To demonstrate the utility of this new system, we introduced 14 mutant aaRS into pEVOL and compared their ability to insert unnatural amino acids in response to three independent amber nonsense codons in sperm whale myoglobin or green fluorescent protein. When cultured in rich media in shake flasks, pEVOL was capable of producing more than 100 mg/L mutant GroEL protein. The versatility, increased yields, and increased stability of the pEVOL vector will further facilitate the expression of proteins with unnatural amino acids. PMID:19852970

  17. Renal acidification responses to respiratory acid-base disorders.

    PubMed

    Madias, Nicolaos E

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory acid-base disorders are those abnormalities in acid-base equilibrium that are expressed as primary changes in the arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2). An increase in PaCO2 (hypercapnia) acidifies body fluids and initiates the acid-base disturbance known as respiratory acidosis. By contrast, a decrease in PaCO2 (hypocapnia) alkalinizes body fluids and initiates the acid-base disturbance known as respiratory alkalosis. The impact on systemic acidity of these primary changes in PaCO2 is ameliorated by secondary, directional changes in plasma [HCO3¯] that occur in 2 stages. Acutely, hypercapnia or hypocapnia yields relatively small changes in plasma [HCO3¯] that originate virtually exclusively from titration of the body's nonbicarbonate buffers. During sustained hypercapnia or hypocapnia, much larger changes in plasma [HCO3¯] occur that reflect adjustments in renal acidification mechanisms. Consequently, the deviation of systemic acidity from normal is smaller in the chronic forms of these disorders. Here we provide an overview of the renal acidification responses to respiratory acid-base disorders. We also identify gaps in knowledge that require further research.

  18. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  19. A NASA F/A-18, participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project, flies over the Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA F/A-18 is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. The 300-gallon aerial refueling store seen on the belly of the aircraft carries fuel and a refueling drogue. This aircraft acts as a tanker in the study to develop an aerodynamic model for future automated aerial refueling, especially of unmanned vehicles.

  20. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  1. SMALL ACIDIC PROTEIN1 acts with RUB modification components, the COP9 signalosome, and AXR1 to regulate growth and development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Akari; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Biswas, Kamal Kanti; Rahman, Abidur; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Narumi, Issay; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Oono, Yutaka

    2012-09-01

    Previously, a dysfunction of the SMALL ACIDIC PROTEIN1 (SMAP1) gene was identified as the cause of the anti-auxin resistant1 (aar1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). SMAP1 is involved in the response pathway of synthetic auxin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and functions upstream of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid protein degradation step in auxin signaling. However, the exact mechanism by which SMAP1 functions in auxin signaling remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that SMAP1 is required for normal plant growth and development and the root response to indole-3-acetic acid or methyl jasmonate in the auxin resistant1 (axr1) mutation background. Deletion analysis and green fluorescent protein/glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays showed that SMAP1 physically interacts with the CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC9 SIGNALOSOME (CSN) via the SMAP1 F/D region. The extremely dwarf phenotype of the aar1-1 csn5a-1 double mutant confirms the functional role of SMAP1 in plant growth and development under limiting CSN functionality. Our findings suggest that SMAP1 is involved in the auxin response and possibly in other cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase-regulated signaling processes via its interaction with components associated with RELATED TO UBIQUITIN modification.

  2. The Front of the Aar Massif: A Crustal-Scale Ramp Anticline?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Mock, Samuel; Wehrens, Philip; Baumberger, Roland; Berger, Alfons; Wangenheim, Cornelia; Glotzbach, Christoph; Kissling, Edi

    2015-04-01

    The front of the Aar Massif (Swiss Central Alps) is characterized by Paleozoic basement rocks exposed at altitudes of more than 4600m above sea level, followed by a steeply north dipping Mesozoic sedimentary cover and overlying Helvetic nappes. The sediments turn into subhorizontal orientations just few kilometers to the N, where the top of the basement is situated at depths of about 7000m below sea level. What is the origin of this vertical jump of about 12000m of the basement rocks over such short horizontal distances? Recent structural investigations at the Basement-Cover contact indicate a complex structural evolution involving reactivation of extensional faults and inversion of half-grabens during early compressional stages. In the internal parts of the Aar Massif a general steepening of the faults resulted with progressive compression. In the northern frontal part, however, a new spaced cleavage evolved, which is dipping with 20-30° to the SE. In places, the new cleavage in the basement rocks is intense and pervasive and correlates with a steepening of the basement-cover contact and its offsets of several tens to hundreds of meters. Hence strain is strongly partitioned in a large number of high strain zones, which cover a cumulative thickness of at least 2000m, eventually even much more considering subsurface continuation. The Mesozoic sediments affected by this large-scale deformation zone are either intensely ductile folded in the case of limestones or faulted and imbricated in the case of dolomites. These differences in deformation style result from the deformation conditions of about < 250-300°C, where calcite still deforms in a ductile manner, while dolomite and crystalline basement preferentially undergo brittle deformation in combination of dissolution-precipitation processes. In a large-scale point of view, we suggest that the high strain domain in the crystalline basement in fact represents a crustal-scale several kilometers wide shear zone, which

  3. Halogen and trace element geochemistry in Mid-Ocean Ridge basalts from the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. S.; Seo, J. H.; Park, S. H.; Kim, T.

    2015-12-01

    Australian-Antarctic Ridge (AAR) is an extension of easternmost SE Indian Mid-Ocean Ridge (MOR).We collected volcanic glasses from the "in-axis" of the KR1 and KR2 MOR, and the overlapping zones of the KR1 MOR and the nearby seamounts ("KR1 mixing"). We determined trace and halogen elements in the glasses. Halogen concentrations and its ratios in the glasses are important to understand the mantle metasomatism and volatile recycling. 52 of the collected glasses are "primitive" (higher than 6 wt% MgO), while 3 of them have rather "evolved" composition (MgO wt% of 1.72, 2.95 and 4.15). K2O concentrations and Th/Sc ratios in the glasses show a negative correlation with its MgO concentration. Incompatible element ratios such as La/Sm are rather immobile during a magma differentiation so the ratios are important to understand mantle composition (Hofmann et al. 2003). La/Sm ratios in the glasses are 0.95 ~ 3.28 suggesting that the AAR basalts can be classified into T-MORB and E-MORB (Schilling et al., 1983). La/Sm ratios are well-correlated with incompatible elements such as U, Ba, Nb, and negatively correlated with compatible elements such as Sc, Eu2+, Mg. The AAR glasses contain detectable halogen elements. The "KR1 mixing" glasses in halogen elements are more abundant than "in-axis" the glasses. Cl is the least variable element compared to the other halogens such as Br and I in the AAR. The "KR1 mixing" glasses have the largest variations of Br/Cl ratios compared to the "in-axis" glasses. The Cl/Br and Th/Sc ratios in the "in-axis" glasses and in the "KR1 mixing" glasses show positive and negative correlations, respectively. The Br-rich glasses in the "KR1 mixing" zone might be explained by a recycled Br-rich oceanic slab of paleo-subduction or by a hydrothermal alteration in the AAR. I composition in the glasses does not show a correlation other trace elements. The K/Cl and K/Ti ratios in the AAR glasses are similar to the basalts from the Galapagos Spreading Center

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids modulate neonatal cytokine response to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Michael M; Lin, Hong; Foley, Elizabeth; Tsang, Valerie; Rhee, Eunice; Perlman, Jeffrey; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal immune response is characterized by an uncompensated pro-inflammatory response that can lead to inflammation-related morbidity and increased susceptibility to infection. We investigated the effects of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) pre-treatment on cytokine secretion to low-concentration endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) in THP-1 monocytes and neonatal cord blood (CB) from healthy full-term infants. Pre-treatment of THP-1 cells, with either n-3 PUFA at 25 or 100 μM significantly reduced IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 secretion while DHA, but not EPA, reduced TNF-α response to LPS. DHA inhibition was stronger compared to EPA and effective at the low concentration. The same concentrations of n-3 PUFAs inhibited IL-12 but not IL-10 cytokine response in whole CB from 9 infants pre-treated for 24 h. To assess clinical relevance for acute response to LPS, the effects of low-concentration DHA at 25 μM or 12.5 μM were assessed before and after LPS exposure of isolated CB mononuclear cells from 20 infants for 1 h. When added before or after LPS, physiologic DHA treatment produced significant concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-8 secretion. The results demonstrate prophylactic and therapeutic modulation of neonatal cytokine response to LPS and provide proof-of-concept that low-concentration administration of n-3 PUFA could attenuate or resolve neonatal inflammatory response.

  5. Hemicrania continua evolving from cluster headache responsive to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Lambru, Giorgio; Castellini, Paola; Bini, Annamaria; Evangelista, Andrea; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, Paola

    2008-10-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a rare type of primary headache characterized by a prompt and enduring response to indomethacin. We describe a patient who suffered from cluster headache evolving into ipsilateral HC, who does not tolerate a long-term indomethacin therapy. The case was complex in terms of diagnosis, associated comorbidity, and choice of treatment; after several trials with different therapeutic regimens, we started the patient on a therapy with valproic acid and obtained an improvement of her HC.

  6. Acid tolerance response of Bordetella bronchiseptica in avirulent phase.

    PubMed

    Fingermann, M; Hozbor, D

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for respiratory diseases in many mammalian hosts, including humans. This pathogen has been shown as able to persist inside the host cells, even in the phagosomes that are acidified to pH 4.5-5.0 after bacterial infection. Here we evaluated the resistance of B. bronchiseptica to survive under acidic conditions. In particular we analyzed the bacterial capacity to develop the mechanism known as acid tolerance response (ATR). Our studies were mainly focused on the avirulent phase of the bacteria since this phenotypic phase was reported to be more resistant to environmental stress conditions than the virulent phase. Results from B. bronchiseptica in virulent phase were also included for comparison purposes. In fact, for B. bronchiseptica 9.73 bacteria in virulent phase we observed that the viability of bacteria does not decrease significantly when grown at pH as low as 4.5, but it is affected when the pH of the medium was equal to or less than 4.0. After acid-adaptation at pH 5.5 for several hours, the survival rate of B. bronchiseptica 9.73 at lethal pH 4.0 for 6h was increased. Interestingly, the avirulent phase mediated by the two-component BvgAS system conferred further resistance to lethal acid challenge and a marked increase in the magnitude of the expressed ATR. The ATR for this avirulent phase seems to be associated with changes in LPS and surface protein profiles. 2D-gel electrophoresis revealed at least 25 polypeptides differentially expressed, 17 of which were only expressed or over-expressed under acid conditions. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, 10 of these differentially expressed polypeptides were identified. PMID:26640052

  7. Acid tolerance response of Bordetella bronchiseptica in avirulent phase.

    PubMed

    Fingermann, M; Hozbor, D

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for respiratory diseases in many mammalian hosts, including humans. This pathogen has been shown as able to persist inside the host cells, even in the phagosomes that are acidified to pH 4.5-5.0 after bacterial infection. Here we evaluated the resistance of B. bronchiseptica to survive under acidic conditions. In particular we analyzed the bacterial capacity to develop the mechanism known as acid tolerance response (ATR). Our studies were mainly focused on the avirulent phase of the bacteria since this phenotypic phase was reported to be more resistant to environmental stress conditions than the virulent phase. Results from B. bronchiseptica in virulent phase were also included for comparison purposes. In fact, for B. bronchiseptica 9.73 bacteria in virulent phase we observed that the viability of bacteria does not decrease significantly when grown at pH as low as 4.5, but it is affected when the pH of the medium was equal to or less than 4.0. After acid-adaptation at pH 5.5 for several hours, the survival rate of B. bronchiseptica 9.73 at lethal pH 4.0 for 6h was increased. Interestingly, the avirulent phase mediated by the two-component BvgAS system conferred further resistance to lethal acid challenge and a marked increase in the magnitude of the expressed ATR. The ATR for this avirulent phase seems to be associated with changes in LPS and surface protein profiles. 2D-gel electrophoresis revealed at least 25 polypeptides differentially expressed, 17 of which were only expressed or over-expressed under acid conditions. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, 10 of these differentially expressed polypeptides were identified.

  8. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongjin; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Xiong, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. PMID:27264339

  9. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  10. Collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Kuja, A.; Shriner, D.; Perrigan, S.; Irving, P.; Lee, J.; Troiano, J.; Cullinan, V.

    1988-06-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain or dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. When the laboratory by trial effect was removed, lack of fit to the Mitscherlich function was insignificant. Thus, a single mathematical model satisfactorily characterized the relationship between acidity and mean plant response.

  11. Is amino acid racemization a useful tool for screening for ancient DNA in bone?

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Matthew J.; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.; Rohland, Nadin; Shapiro, Beth; Dobberstein, Reimer C.; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Hofreiter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many rare and valuable ancient specimens now carry the scars of ancient DNA research, as questions of population genetics and phylogeography require larger sample sets. This fuels the demand for reliable techniques to screen for DNA preservation prior to destructive sampling. Only one such technique has been widely adopted: the extent of aspartic acid racemization (AAR). The kinetics of AAR are believed to be similar to the rate of DNA depurination and therefore a good measure of the likelihood of DNA survival. Moreover, AAR analysis is only minimally destructive. We report the first comprehensive test of AAR using 91 bone and teeth samples from temperate and high-latitude sites that were analysed for DNA. While the AAR range of all specimens was low (0.02–0.17), no correlation was found between the extent of AAR and DNA amplification success. Additional heating experiments and surveys of the literature indicated that d/l Asx is low in bones until almost all the collagen is lost. This is because aspartic acid is retained in the bone within the constrained environment of the collagen triple helix, where it cannot racemize for steric reasons. Only if the helix denatures to soluble gelatin can Asx racemize readily, but this soluble gelatine is readily lost in most burial environments. We conclude that Asx d/l is not a useful screening technique for ancient DNA from bone. PMID:19493899

  12. Response of gonococcal clinical isolates to acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Pettit, R K; McAllister, S C; Hamer, T A

    1999-02-01

    This study examined the response to acidic conditions of four gonococcal isolates -NRL38874 (Proto/IB-2), NRL38884 (Pro/IA-2), NRL38953 (Proto/IB-3) and NRL39029 (Pro/IA-3) - obtained from various sites in patients in whom a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease had been made by laparoscopic examination. Acid tolerance of the clinical isolates was strain and growth phase dependent. Growth of the four strains on solid media was undetectable below pH 5.8. In liquid culture, strain NRL38884 did not survive below pH 5.2; strains NRL38874, NRL38953 and NRL39029 survived to pH 4.5. Between pH 4.2 and pH 5.1, the latter three strains exhibited a peak in survival at pH 4.6-4.7 during log phase, suggesting that there may be a distinct acid tolerance system operating at this pH. SDS-PAGE of whole-cell, total membrane and outer-membrane fractions of the four strains prepared from pH 7.2 and pH 6.1 plate cultures revealed numerous differences in protein composition. Acidic conditions reduced the expression of the reduction modifiable outer-membrane protein Rmp, and induced the expression of many membrane proteins, including gonococcal hsp63. Immunoblotting studies with matched serum samples and strains from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease indicated that IgG recognition of outer-membrane components from strains cultured in acidic and neutral conditions was quite different. The results suggest that the immune system interacts with unique outer-membrane constituents on gonococci colonising sites at different pH.

  13. Lake Biel Holocene sediment record before and after the Aare river deviation (1878 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannet, Alice; Corella, Juan Pablo; Kremer, Katrina; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    Lake sediments are excellent archives of environmental and climate changes as well as human impact on lake- and river-systems. Lake Biel is a medium-sized peri-alpine lake in Switzerland, with a maximum depth of 74 m, and lies at an altitude of 429 m a.s.l. Lake Biel, which formed during the Pleistocene by glacial erosion, is part of the Aare river system. Our study focuses on the south-west part of the lake basin where the lake sedimentation was originally (i.e. naturally) mainly controlled by autochthonous sedimentation. This area is currently under a strong influence of water and sediment input from this river catchment since the Aare river deviation through the Hagneck canal in 1878. A 10.05 m long composite sediment sequence, cored from a 52 m water depth in September 2011, was built from two long cores retrieved with the ETH Zurich/Eawag Uwitec system. A radiocarbon age model indicates that the retrieved sedimentary sequence spans the last 7500 years. The upper sediments were correlated to previous short core radionuclide stratigraphy for the 1.5 m upper part (Thevenon et al., 2013). Magnetic susceptibility and density were measured by Geotek MultiSensor Core Logger at 0.5 cm resolution. Granulometry was measured with a CILAS grain sizer every 10 cm, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was carried out using an Avaatech core scanner at 1-cm resolution. This technique provides semi-quantitative information of the sediment elemental composition and shows how runoff and river input (Ti, Al, Si) or redox conditions (Fe/Mn) vary through time. Lake Biel sediment record suggests marked environmental changes with runoff decrease linked to climate and vegetation change during Atlantic chronobiozone, as well as a complex climate-human impact during the 'La Tène' and Roman cultural times. The most prominent recorded feature is the 10-times increase of sediment rate that occurred after the Aare river deviation through the Hagneck canal into Lake Biel in 1878. This artificial

  14. A NASA F/A-18, participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project, flies over the Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA F/A-18 flies over the Dryden Flight Research Center and Rogers Dry Lake on December 11, 2002. The aircraft is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. The 300-gallon aerial refueling store seen on the belly of the aircraft carries fuel and a refueling drogue. This aircraft acts as a tanker in the study to develop an aerodynamic model for future automated aerial refueling, especially of unmanned vehicles.

  15. Acid and base stress and transcriptomic responses in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Jessica C; Kitko, Ryan D; Cleeton, Sarah H; Lee, Grace E; Ugwu, Chinagozi S; Jones, Brian D; BonDurant, Sandra S; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2009-02-01

    Acid and base environmental stress responses were investigated in Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis AG174 cultures in buffered potassium-modified Luria broth were switched from pH 8.5 to pH 6.0 and recovered growth rapidly, whereas cultures switched from pH 6.0 to pH 8.5 showed a long lag time. Log-phase cultures at pH 6.0 survived 60 to 100% at pH 4.5, whereas cells grown at pH 7.0 survived <15%. Cells grown at pH 9.0 survived 40 to 100% at pH 10, whereas cells grown at pH 7.0 survived <5%. Thus, growth in a moderate acid or base induced adaptation to a more extreme acid or base, respectively. Expression indices from Affymetrix chip hybridization were obtained for 4,095 protein-encoding open reading frames of B. subtilis grown at external pH 6, pH 7, and pH 9. Growth at pH 6 upregulated acetoin production (alsDS), dehydrogenases (adhA, ald, fdhD, and gabD), and decarboxylases (psd and speA). Acid upregulated malate metabolism (maeN), metal export (czcDO and cadA), oxidative stress (catalase katA; OYE family namA), and the SigX extracytoplasmic stress regulon. Growth at pH 9 upregulated arginine catabolism (roc), which generates organic acids, glutamate synthase (gltAB), polyamine acetylation and transport (blt), the K(+)/H(+) antiporter (yhaTU), and cytochrome oxidoreductases (cyd, ctaACE, and qcrC). The SigH, SigL, and SigW regulons were upregulated at high pH. Overall, greater genetic adaptation was seen at pH 9 than at pH 6, which may explain the lag time required for growth shift to high pH. Low external pH favored dehydrogenases and decarboxylases that may consume acids and generate basic amines, whereas high external pH favored catabolism-generating acids.

  16. Acidic chitinase primes the protective immune response to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; de Queiroz Prado, Rafael; Sciurba, Joshua; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Smith, Allen D; Mentink-Kane, Margaret; White, Sandra; Thompson, Robert W; Cheever, Allen W; Bock, Kevin; Moore, Ian; Fitz, Lori J; Urban, Joseph F; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is known to be induced by allergens and helminths, yet its role in immunity is unclear. Using AMCase-deficient mice, we show that AMCase deficiency reduced the number of group 2 innate lymphoid cells during allergen challenge but was not required for establishment of type 2 inflammation in the lung in response to allergens or helminths. In contrast, AMCase-deficient mice showed a profound defect in type 2 immunity following infection with the chitin-containing gastrointestinal nematodes Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. The impaired immunity was associated with reduced mucus production and decreased intestinal expression of the signature type 2 response genes Il13, Chil3, Retnlb, and Clca1. CD103(+) dendritic cells, which regulate T cell homing, were also reduced in mesenteric lymph nodes of infected AMCase-deficient mice. Thus, AMCase functions as a critical initiator of protective type 2 responses to intestinal nematodes but is largely dispensable for allergic responses in the lung. PMID:27043413

  17. Human saliva and taste responses to acids varying in anions, titratable acidity, and pH.

    PubMed

    Norris, M B; Noble, A C; Pangborn, R M

    1984-02-01

    Twenty subjects recorded perceived sourness of solutions of citric + fumaric and of citric + tartaric acids, at pH 3.5 and titratable acidity (TiA) of 4.0 g/l on a moving chart, while parotid saliva flow was recorded via a sialometer . Sourness intensity and flow were greater when citric was the minor acid than when it was dominant. Subjects varied widely in calculated volume of saliva reservoir, but not flow rate (time to 2/3 reservoir vol.). In tartaric-fumaric acid mixtures varying in pH (3.0-3.75) at a constant TiA of 4.0 g/l, and varying in TiA (3.7-4.6 g/l) at a constant pH of 3.5, sourness intensity and parotid flow increased with acidity and decreased with pH. However, eight subjects with a high flow (HF = 1.2 +/- 0.28 g/2 min) and nine subjects with a low flow (LF = 0.43 +/- 0.11 g/2 min) differed widely: (a) In response to variation in stimulus pH and TiA, HF demonstrated marked alteration in flow, but little change in sourness ; LF responded at a lower absolute level, but showed marked changes in sourness and little change in flow; (b) Salivary pH was higher and Na+ was three times greater for the HF than for the LF subjects; and (c) Salivary Ca++ showed a direct relationship with flow and pH among the HF, but an inverse relationship for the LF subjects.

  18. Reduced lipolysis response to adipose afferent reflex involved in impaired activation of adrenoceptor-cAMP-PKA-hormone sensitive lipase pathway in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Ren, Xing-Sheng; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) causes adipose afferent reflex (AAR) and sympathetic activation. This study is to investigate the effects of AAR on lipolysis and the mechanisms of attenuated lipolysis response to enhanced AAR in obesity. Obesity was caused by high-fat diet for 12 weeks in rats. AAR was induced by injection of capsaicin into inguinal WAT or electrical stimulation of epididymal WAT afferent nerve. AAR caused sympathetic activation, which was enhanced in obesity rats. AAR increased cAMP levels and PKA activity, promoted hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin phosphorylation, and increased lipolysis in WAT, which were attenuated in obesity rats. PKA activity, cAMP, perilipin and β-adrenoceptor levels were reduced, while HSL was upregulated in adipocytes from obesity rats. In primary adipocytes, isoproterenol increased cAMP levels and PKA activity, promoted HSL and perilipin phosphorylation, and increased lipolysis, which were attenuated in obesity rats. The attenuated effects of isoproterenol in adipocytes from obesity rats were prevented by a cAMP analogue dbcAMP. The results indicate that reduced lipolysis response to enhanced AAR in obesity is attributed to the impaired activation of β-adrenoceptor-cAMP-PKA-HSL pathway. Increased cAMP level in adipocytes rectifies the attenuated lipolysis in obesity. PMID:27694818

  19. Leaf closure in the venus flytrap: an Acid growth response.

    PubMed

    Williams, S E; Bennett, A B

    1982-12-10

    The rapid closure of leaves in the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) involves irreversible cell enlargement, which can be initiated by acidifying the cell walls to pH 4.50 and below. Leaves infiltrated with neutral buffers that keep the pH above 4.50 to 4.75 will not close in response to stimulation of their trigger hairs even though the action potentials that ordinarily cause closure are produced. During the 1 to 3 seconds required for closure about 29 percent of the cellular adenosine triphosphate is lost. It is likely that this adenosine triphosphate is used in very rapid transport of hydrogen ions from the motor cells and that the movement is due to a mechanism of "acid growth."

  20. Cellular Response to Linear and Branched Poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Whitty, Elizabeth G; Maniego, Alison R; Bentwitch, Sharon A; Guillaneuf, Yohann; Jones, Mark R; Gaborieau, Marianne; Castignolles, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    Poly(acrylic acid-co-sodium acrylate) (PNaA) is a pH-responsive polymer with potential in anticancer drug delivery. The cytotoxicity and intracellular effects of 3-arm star, hyperbranched and linear PNaA were investigated with L1210 progenitor leukemia cells and L6 myoblast cells. Free solution capillary electrophoresis demonstrated interactions of PNaA with serum proteins. In a 72 h MTT assay most PNaAs exhibited a IC50 between 7 and 14 mmol L(-1), showing that precipitation may be a sufficient purification for PNaA dilute solutions. Dialyzed 3-arm star and hyperbranched PNaA caused an increase in L6 cell viability, challenging the suitability of MTT as cytotoxicity assay for PNaA. Fluorescent confocal microscopy revealed merging of cellular lipids after exposure to PNaA, likely caused by serum starvation.

  1. Farnesylation mediates brassinosteroid biosynthesis to regulate abscisic acid responses.

    PubMed

    Northey, Julian G B; Liang, Siyu; Jamshed, Muhammad; Deb, Srijani; Foo, Eloise; Reid, James B; McCourt, Peter; Samuel, Marcus A

    2016-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is a post-translational modification involving the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl isoprenoid to the carboxy terminus of select proteins(1-3). Although the roles of this lipid modification are clear in both fungal and animal signalling, many of the mechanistic functions of farnesylation in plant signalling are still unknown. Here, we show that CYP85A2, the cytochrome P450 enzyme that performs the last step in brassinosteroid biosynthesis (conversion of castasterone to brassinolide)(4), must be farnesylated to function in Arabidopsis. Loss of either CYP85A2 or CYP85A2 farnesylation results in reduced brassinolide accumulation and increased plant responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and overall drought tolerance, explaining previous observations(5). This result not only directly links farnesylation to brassinosteroid biosynthesis but also suggests new strategies to maintain crop yield under challenging climatic conditions. PMID:27455172

  2. Saturated fatty acids trigger TLR4-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Rocha, D M; Caldas, A P; Oliveira, L L; Bressan, J; Hermsdorff, H H

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) mediate infection-induced inflammation and sterile inflammation by endogenous molecules. Among the TLR family, TLR4 is the best understood. However, while its downstream signaling pathways have been well defined, not all ligands of TLR4 are currently known. Current evidence suggests that saturated fatty acids (SFA) act as non-microbial TLR4 agonists, and trigger its inflammatory response. Thus, our present review provides a new perspective on the potential mechanism by which SFAs could modulate TLR4-induced inflammatory responses: (1) SFAs can be recognized by CD14-TLR4-MD2 complex and trigger inflammatory pathways, similar to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). (2) SFAs lead to modification of gut microbiota with an overproduction of LPS after a high-fat intake, enhancing this natural TLR4 ligand. (3) In addition, this metabolic endotoxemia leads to an oxidative stress thereby producing atherogenic lipids - oxLDL and oxidized phospholipids - which trigger CD36-TLR4-TLR6 inflammatory response. (4) Also, the high SFA consumption increases the lipemia and the mmLDL and oxLDL formation through oxidative modifications of LDL. The mmLDL, unlike oxLDL, is involved in activation of the CD14-TLR4-MD2 inflammatory pathway. Those molecules can induce TLR4 inflammatory response by MyD88-dependent and/or MyD88-independent pathways that, in turn, promotes the expression of proinflammatory transcript factors such as factor nuclear kappa B (NF-κB), which plays a crucial role in the induction of inflammatory mediators (cytokines, chemokines, or costimulatory molecules) implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases. PMID:26687466

  3. Retinoic acid response element in the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3: implications for regulation of retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Duester, G; Shean, M L; McBride, M S; Stewart, M J

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid regulation of one member of the human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family was demonstrated, suggesting that the retinol dehydrogenase function of ADH may play a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway for retinoic acid. Promoter activity of human ADH3, but not ADH1 or ADH2, was shown to be activated by retinoic acid in transient transfection assays of Hep3B human hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping experiments identified a region in the ADH3 promoter located between -328 and -272 bp which confers retinoic acid activation. This region was also demonstrated to confer retinoic acid responsiveness on the ADH1 and ADH2 genes in heterologous promoter fusions. Within a 34-bp stretch, the ADH3 retinoic acid response element (RARE) contains two TGACC motifs and one TGAAC motif, both of which exist in RAREs controlling other genes. A block mutation of the TGACC sequence located at -289 to -285 bp eliminated the retinoic acid response. As assayed by gel shift DNA binding studies, the RARE region (-328 to -272 bp) of ADH3 bound the human retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR beta) and was competed for by DNA containing a RARE present in the gene encoding RAR beta. Since ADH catalyzes the conversion of retinol to retinal, which can be further converted to retinoic acid by aldehyde dehydrogenase, these results suggest that retinoic acid activation of ADH3 constitutes a positive feedback loop regulating retinoic acid synthesis. Images PMID:1996113

  4. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 11. Historical changes in surface-water acid-base chemistry in response to acidic deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Small, M.J.; Kingston, J.C.; Bernert, J.A.; Thomas, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the analyses reported in the State of Science report are to: identify the lake and stream populations in the United States that have experienced chronic changes in biologically significant constituents of surface water chemistry (e.g. pH, Al) in response to acidic deposition; quantify biologically meaningful historical changes in chronic surface water chemistry associated with acidic deposition, with emphasis on ANC, pH, and Al; estimate the proportion of lakes nor acidic that were not acidic in pre-industrial times; estimate the proportional response of each of the major chemical constituents that have changed in response to acidic deposition using a subset of statistically selected Adirondack lakes for which paleolimnological reconstructions of pre-industrial surface water chemistry have been performed; evaluate and improve, where appropriate and feasible, empirical models of predicting changes in ANC; and evaluate the response of seepage lakes to acidic deposition.

  5. Boronic acid shell-crosslinked dextran-b-PLA micelles for acid-responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziwei; Yao, Xuemei; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Li; He, Chaoliang; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-11-01

    Herein, 3-carboxy-5-nitrophenylboronic acid (CNPBA) shell-crosslinked micelles based on amphiphilic dextran-block-polylactide (Dex-b-PLA) are prepared and used for efficient intracellular drug deliveries. Due to the reversible pH-dependent binding with diols to form boronate esters, CNPBA modified Dex-b-PLA shows excellent pH-sensitivity. In neutral aqueous conditions, CNPBA-Dex-b-PLA forms shell-crosslinked micelles to enable DOX loading, while in acid conditions, the boronate esters hydrolyze and the micelles de-crosslink to release loaded DOX. In vitro release studies indicate that the release of the DOX cargo is minimized at physiological conditions, while there is a burst release in response to low pHs. The cell viability of CNPBA-Dex-b-PLA investigated by MTT assay was more than 90%, indicating that, as a drug delivery system, CNPBA-Dex-b-PLA has good cytocompatibility. These features suggest that the pH-responsive biodegradable CNPBA-Dex-b-PLA can efficiently load and deliver DOX into tumor cells and enhance the inhibition of cellular proliferation in vitro, providing a favorable platform as a drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  6. In vivo response to dynamic hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer L; Tuler, Jeremy; Braden, Rebecca; Schüp-Magoffin, Pamela; Schaefer, Jacquelyn; Kretchmer, Kyle; Christman, Karen L; Engler, Adam J

    2013-07-01

    Tissue-specific elasticity arises in part from developmental changes in extracellular matrix over time, e.g. ~10-fold myocardial stiffening in the chicken embryo. When this time-dependent stiffening has been mimicked in vitro with thiolated hyaluronic acid (HA-SH) hydrogels, improved cardiomyocyte maturation has been observed. However, host interactions, matrix polymerization, and the stiffening kinetics remain uncertain in vivo, and each plays a critical role in therapeutic applications using HA-SH. Hematological and histological analysis of subcutaneously injected HA-SH hydrogels showed minimal systemic immune response and host cell infiltration. Most importantly, subcutaneously injected HA-SH hydrogels exhibited time-dependent porosity and stiffness changes at a rate similar to hydrogels polymerized in vitro. When injected intramyocardially host cells begin to actively degrade HA-SH hydrogels within 1week post-injection, continuing this process while producing matrix to nearly replace the hydrogel within 1month post-injection. While non-thiolated HA did not degrade after injection into the myocardium, it also did not elicit an immune response, unlike HA-SH, where visible granulomas and macrophage infiltration were present 1month post-injection, likely due to reactive thiol groups. Altogether these data suggest that the HA-SH hydrogel responds appropriately in a less vascularized niche and stiffens as had been demonstrated in vitro, but in more vascularized tissues, in vivo applicability appears limited.

  7. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  8. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates pleiotropic responses in skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Baptiste, Gael; Yang Zhao; Khoury, Chamel; Greenwood, Michael T.; E-mail: michael.greenwood@mcgill.ca

    2005-10-07

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent modulator of growth, cell survival, and apoptosis. Although all four LPA receptors are expressed in skeletal muscle, very little is known regarding the role they play in this tissue. We used RT-PCR to demonstrate that cultured skeletal muscle C2C12 cells endogenously express multiple LPA receptor subtypes. The demonstration that LPA mediates the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase and Akt/PKB in C2C12 cells is consistent with the widely observed mitogenic properties of LPA. In spite of these observations, LPA did not induce proliferation in C2C12 cells. Paradoxically, we found that prolonged treatment of C2C12 cells with LPA led to caspase 3 and PARP cleavage as well as the activation of stress-associated MAP kinases JNK and p38. In spite of these typically pro-apoptotic responses, LPA did not induce cell death. Blocking ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB activation with specific pharmacological inhibitors, nevertheless, stimulated LPA-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that both mitogenic and apoptotic responses serve to counterbalance the effects of LPA in cultured C2C12 cells.

  10. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment.

  11. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  12. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A.; López-Climent, María F.; Casaretto, José A.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  13. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid is required for normal alcohol response behaviors in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Richard C; Mathies, Laura D; Davies, Andrew G; Bettinger, Jill C

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a widespread societal problem, for which there are few treatments. There are significant genetic and environmental influences on abuse liability, and understanding these factors will be important for the identification of susceptible individuals and the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, the level of response to alcohol is strongly predictive of subsequent alcohol abuse. Level of response is a combination of counteracting responses to alcohol, the level of sensitivity to the drug and the degree to which tolerance develops during the drug exposure, called acute functional tolerance. We use the simple and well-characterized nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans to model the acute behavioral effects of ethanol to identify genetic and environmental factors that influence level of response to ethanol. Given the strong molecular conservation between the neurobiological machinery of worms and humans, cellular-level effects of ethanol are likely to be conserved. Increasingly, variation in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels has been implicated in complex neurobiological phenotypes in humans, and we recently found that fatty acid levels modify ethanol responses in worms. Here, we report that 1) eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is required for the development of acute functional tolerance, 2) dietary supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid is sufficient for acute tolerance, and 3) dietary eicosapentaenoic acid can alter the wild-type response to ethanol. These results suggest that genetic variation influencing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels may be important abuse liability loci, and that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may be an important environmental modulator of the behavioral response to ethanol.

  14. The Omega-3 Fatty Acid Eicosapentaenoic Acid Is Required for Normal Alcohol Response Behaviors in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, Richard C.; Mathies, Laura D.; Davies, Andrew G.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a widespread societal problem, for which there are few treatments. There are significant genetic and environmental influences on abuse liability, and understanding these factors will be important for the identification of susceptible individuals and the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, the level of response to alcohol is strongly predictive of subsequent alcohol abuse. Level of response is a combination of counteracting responses to alcohol, the level of sensitivity to the drug and the degree to which tolerance develops during the drug exposure, called acute functional tolerance. We use the simple and well-characterized nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans to model the acute behavioral effects of ethanol to identify genetic and environmental factors that influence level of response to ethanol. Given the strong molecular conservation between the neurobiological machinery of worms and humans, cellular-level effects of ethanol are likely to be conserved. Increasingly, variation in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels has been implicated in complex neurobiological phenotypes in humans, and we recently found that fatty acid levels modify ethanol responses in worms. Here, we report that 1) eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is required for the development of acute functional tolerance, 2) dietary supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid is sufficient for acute tolerance, and 3) dietary eicosapentaenoic acid can alter the wild-type response to ethanol. These results suggest that genetic variation influencing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels may be important abuse liability loci, and that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may be an important environmental modulator of the behavioral response to ethanol. PMID:25162400

  15. Factors affecting the response of lung clearance systems to acid aerosols: role of exposure concentration, exposure time, and relative acidity.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, R B

    1989-02-01

    The ability of the lungs to clear deposited material is essential for maintenance of lung homeostasis. Acid aerosols have been shown to alter the efficiency of this process. This paper assesses the role of acid aerosol exposure concentration (C), exposure time (T), and relative acidity in producing changes in clearance from both the tracheobronchial tree and respiratory region of the lungs of rabbits. The response was found to be due to total exposure, i.e., some combination form of C x T, and was also related to relative acidity.

  16. Excellent amino acid racemization results from Holocene sand dollars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosnik, M.; Kaufman, D. S.; Kowalewski, M.; Whitacre, K.

    2015-12-01

    Amino acid racemization (AAR) is widely used as a cost-effective method to date molluscs in time-averaging and taphonomic studies, but it has not been attempted for echinoderms despite their paleobiological importance. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of AAR geochronology in Holocene aged Peronella peronii (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) collected from Sydney Harbour (Australia). Using standard HPLC methods we determined the extent of AAR in 74 Peronella tests and performed replicate analyses on 18 tests. We sampled multiple areas of two individuals and identified the outer edge as a good sampling location. Multiple replicate analyses from the outer edge of 18 tests spanning the observed range of D/Ls yielded median coefficients of variation < 4% for Asp, Phe, Ala, and Glu D/L values, which overlaps with the analytical precision. Correlations between D/L values across 155 HPLC injections sampled from 74 individuals are also very high (pearson r2 > 0.95) for these four amino acids. The ages of 11 individuals spanning the observed range of D/L values were determined using 14C analyses, and Bayesian model averaging was used to determine the best AAR age model. The averaged age model was mainly composed of time-dependent reaction kinetics models (TDK, 71%) based on phenylalanine (Phe, 94%). Modelled ages ranged from 14 to 5539 yrs, and the median 95% confidence interval for the 74 analysed individuals is ±28% of the modelled age. In comparison, the median 95% confidence interval for the 11 calibrated 14C ages was ±9% of the median age estimate. Overall Peronella yields exceptionally high-quality AAR D/L values and appears to be an excellent substrate for AAR geochronology. This work opens the way for time-averaging and taphonomic studies of echinoderms similar to those in molluscs.

  17. Response of soybean seed germination to cadmium and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting Ting; Wu, Peng; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution and acid rain are the main environmental issues, and they often occur in the same agricultural region. Nevertheless, up to now, little information on the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain action on crops were presented. Here, we investigated the combined effect of Cd(2+) and acid rain on the seed germination of soybean. The results indicated that the single treatment with the low level of Cd(2+) (0.18, 1.0, 3.0 mg L(-1)) or acid rain (pH ≥3.0) could not affect the seed germination of soybean, which was resulted in the increased activities of peroxidase and catalase. The single treatment with the high concentration of Cd(2+) (>6 mg L(-1)) or acid rain at pH 2.5 decreased the activities of peroxidase and catalase, damaged the cell membrane and then decreased the seed germination of soybean. Meanwhile, the same toxic effect was observed in the combined treatment with Cd(2+) and acid rain, and the combined treatment had more toxic effect than the single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain. Thus, the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain had more potential threat to the seed germination of soybean than the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain.

  18. Response of soybean seed germination to cadmium and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting Ting; Wu, Peng; Wang, Li Hong; Zhou, Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) pollution and acid rain are the main environmental issues, and they often occur in the same agricultural region. Nevertheless, up to now, little information on the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain action on crops were presented. Here, we investigated the combined effect of Cd(2+) and acid rain on the seed germination of soybean. The results indicated that the single treatment with the low level of Cd(2+) (0.18, 1.0, 3.0 mg L(-1)) or acid rain (pH ≥3.0) could not affect the seed germination of soybean, which was resulted in the increased activities of peroxidase and catalase. The single treatment with the high concentration of Cd(2+) (>6 mg L(-1)) or acid rain at pH 2.5 decreased the activities of peroxidase and catalase, damaged the cell membrane and then decreased the seed germination of soybean. Meanwhile, the same toxic effect was observed in the combined treatment with Cd(2+) and acid rain, and the combined treatment had more toxic effect than the single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain. Thus, the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain had more potential threat to the seed germination of soybean than the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain. PMID:21479540

  19. Octanoic acid in alcohol-responsive essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    McCrossin, Gayle; Lungu, Codrin; Considine, Elaine; Toro, Camilo; Nahab, Fatta B.; Auh, Sungyoung; Buchwald, Peter; Grimes, George J.; Starling, Judith; Potti, Gopal; Scheider, Linda; Kalowitz, Daniel; Bowen, Daniel; Carnie, Andrea; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess safety and efficacy of an oral, single, low dose of octanoic acid (OA) in subjects with alcohol-responsive essential tremor (ET). Methods: We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, phase I/II clinical trial evaluating the effect of 4 mg/kg OA in 19 subjects with ET. The primary outcome was accelerometric postural tremor power of the dominant hand 80 minutes after administration. Secondary outcomes included digital spiral analysis, pharmacokinetic sampling, as well as safety measures. Results: OA was safe and well tolerated. Nonserious adverse events were mild (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 1) and equally present after OA and placebo. At the primary outcome, OA effects were not different from placebo. Secondary outcome analyses of digital spiral analysis, comparison across the entire time course in weighted and nonweighted accelerometry, as well as nondominant hand tremor power did not show a benefit of OA over placebo. The analysis of individual time points showed that OA improved tremor at 300 minutes (dominant hand, F1,16 = 5.49, p = 0.032 vs placebo), with a maximum benefit at 180 minutes after OA (both hands, F1,16 = 6.1, p = 0.025). Conclusions: Although the effects of OA and placebo at the primary outcome were not different, secondary outcome measures suggest superiority of OA in reducing tremor at later time points, warranting further trials at higher dose levels. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that a single 4-mg/kg dose of OA is not effective in reducing postural tremor in patients with ET at a primary outcome of 80 minutes, but is effective for a secondary outcome after 180 minutes. PMID:23408867

  20. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 Regulates Salicylic Acid and Abscisic Acid Signaling, and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Micol-Ponce, Rosa; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Xu, Qian; Barrero, José María; Micol, José Luis; Ponce, María Rosa

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic regulatory states can persist through mitosis and meiosis, but the connection between chromatin structure and DNA replication remains unclear. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 (ICU2) encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α, and null alleles of ICU2 have an embryo-lethal phenotype. Analysis of icu2-1, a hypomorphic allele of ICU2, demonstrated that ICU2 functions in chromatin-mediated cellular memory; icu2-1 strongly impairs ICU2 function in the maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks but does not seem to affect ICU2 polymerase activity. To better understand the global function of ICU2 in epigenetic regulation, here we performed a microarray analysis of icu2-1 mutant plants. We found that the genes up-regulated in the icu2-1 mutant included genes encoding transcription factors and targets of the Polycomb Repressive Complexes. The down-regulated genes included many known players in salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and accumulation, ABA signaling and ABA-mediated responses. In addition, we found that icu2-1 plants had reduced SA levels in normal conditions; infection by Fusarium oxysporum induced SA accumulation in the En-2 wild type but not in the icu2-1 mutant. The icu2-1 plants were also hypersensitive to salt stress and exogenous ABA in seedling establishment, post-germination growth and stomatal closure, and accumulated more ABA than the wild type in response to salt stress. The icu2-1 mutant also showed high tolerance to the oxidative stress produced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT). Our results uncover a role for ICU2 in the regulation of genes involved in ABA signaling as well as in SA biosynthesis and accumulation.

  1. Physiological and transcriptional responses and cross protection of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 under acid stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renhui; Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Shah, Nagendra P; Tao, Xueying; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Acid tolerance responses (ATR) in Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 were investigated at physiological and molecular levels. A comparison of composition of cell membrane fatty acids (CMFA) between acid-challenged and unchallenged cells showed that acid adaptation evoked a significantly higher percentage of saturated fatty acids and cyclopropane fatty acids in acid-challenged than in unchallenged cells. In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR analysis in acid-adapted cells at different pH values (ranging from 3.0 to 4.0) indicated that several genes were differently regulated, including those related to proton pumps, amino acid metabolism, sugar metabolism, and class I and class III stress response pathways. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and production of alkali was significantly upregulated. Upon exposure to pH 4.5 for 2 h, a higher survival rate (higher viable cell count) of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 was achieved following an additional challenge to 40 mM hydrogen peroxide for 60 min, but no difference in survival rate of cells was found with further challenge to heat, ethanol, or salt. Therefore, we concluded that the physiological and metabolic changes of acid-treated cells of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 help the cells resist damage caused by acid, and further initiated global response signals to bring the whole cell into a state of defense to other stress factors, especially hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Adaptive response and tolerance to weak acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a genome-wide view.

    PubMed

    Mira, Nuno P; Teixeira, Miguel Cacho; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Weak acids are widely used as food preservatives (e.g., acetic, propionic, benzoic, and sorbic acids), herbicides (e.g., 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), and as antimalarial (e.g., artesunic and artemisinic acids), anticancer (e.g., artesunic acid), and immunosuppressive (e.g., mycophenolic acid) drugs, among other possible applications. The understanding of the mechanisms underlying the adaptive response and resistance to these weak acids is a prerequisite to develop more effective strategies to control spoilage yeasts, and the emergence of resistant weeds, drug resistant parasites or cancer cells. Furthermore, the identification of toxicity mechanisms and resistance determinants to weak acid-based pharmaceuticals increases current knowledge on their cytotoxic effects and may lead to the identification of new drug targets. This review integrates current knowledge on the mechanisms of toxicity and tolerance to weak acid stress obtained in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae using genome-wide approaches and more detailed gene-by-gene analysis. The major features of the yeast response to weak acids in general, and the more specific responses and resistance mechanisms towards a specific weak acid or a group of weak acids, depending on the chemical nature of the side chain R group (R-COOH), are highlighted. The involvement of several transcriptional regulatory networks in the genomic response to different weak acids is discussed, focusing on the regulatory pathways controlled by the transcription factors Msn2p/Msn4p, War1p, Haa1p, Rim101p, and Pdr1p/Pdr3p, which are known to orchestrate weak acid stress response in yeast. The extrapolation of the knowledge gathered in yeast to other eukaryotes is also attempted.

  3. Cyclopropanation of membrane unsaturated fatty acids is not essential to the acid stress response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris.

    PubMed

    To, Thi Mai Huong; Grandvalet, Cosette; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle

    2011-05-01

    Cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) are synthetized in situ by the transfer of a methylene group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to a double bond of unsaturated fatty acid chains of membrane phospholipids. This conversion, catalyzed by the Cfa synthase enzyme, occurs in many bacteria and is recognized to play a key role in the adaptation of bacteria in response to a drastic perturbation of the environment. The role of CFAs in the acid tolerance response was investigated in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. A mutant of the cfa gene was constructed by allelic exchange. The cfa gene encoding the Cfa synthase was cloned and introduced into the mutant to obtain the complemented strain for homologous system studies. Data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) validated that the mutant could not produce CFA. The CFA levels in both the wild-type and complemented strains increased upon their entry to stationary phase, especially with acid-adapted cells or, more surprisingly, with ethanol-adapted cells. The results obtained by performing quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments showed that transcription of the cfa gene was highly induced by acidity (by 10-fold with cells grown at pH 5.0) and by ethanol (by 9-fold with cells grown with 6% ethanol) in comparison with that in stationary phase. Cell viability experiments were performed after an acidic shock on the mutant strain, the wild-type strain, and the complemented strain, as a control. The higher viability level of the acid-adapted cells of the three strains after 3 h of shock proved that the cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids is not essential for L. lactis subsp. cremoris survival under acidic conditions. Moreover, fluorescence anisotropy data showed that CFA itself could not maintain the membrane fluidity level, particularly with ethanol-grown cells.

  4. Physiological responses of Daphnia pulex to acid stress

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Anna K; Pirow, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Background Acidity exerts a determining influence on the composition and diversity of freshwater faunas. While the physiological implications of freshwater acidification have been intensively studied in teleost fish and crayfish, much less is known about the acid-stress physiology of ecologically important groups such as cladoceran zooplankton. This study analyzed the extracellular acid-base state and CO2 partial pressure (PCO2), circulation and ventilation, as well as the respiration rate of Daphnia pulex acclimated to acidic (pH 5.5 and 6.0) and circumneutral (pH 7.8) conditions. Results D. pulex had a remarkably high extracellular pH of 8.33 and extracellular PCO2 of 0.56 kPa under normal ambient conditions (pH 7.8 and normocapnia). The hemolymph had a high bicarbonate concentration of 20.9 mM and a total buffer value of 51.5 meq L-1 pH-1. Bicarbonate covered 93% of the total buffer value. Acidic conditions induced a slight acidosis (ΔpH = 0.16–0.23), a 30–65% bicarbonate loss, and elevated systemic activities (tachycardia, hyperventilation, hypermetabolism). pH 6.0 animals partly compensated the bicarbonate loss by increasing the non-bicarbonate buffer value from 2.0 to 5.1 meq L-1 pH-1. The extracellular PCO2 of pH 5.5 animals was significantly reduced to 0.33 kPa, and these animals showed the highest tolerance to a short-term exposure to severe acid stress. Conclusion Chronic exposure to acidic conditions had a pervasive impact on Daphnia's physiology including acid-base balance, extracellular PCO2, circulation and ventilation, and energy metabolism. Compensatory changes in extracellular non-bicarbonate buffering capacity and the improved tolerance to severe acid stress indicated the activation of defense mechanisms which may result from gene-expression mediated adjustments in hemolymph buffer proteins and in epithelial properties. Mechanistic analyses of the interdependence between extracellular acid-base balance and CO2 transport raised the question of

  5. Modeling soil response to acidic deposition in nonsulfate adsorbing soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, P.R.; Grigal, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    A simple semiempirical model for the prediction of changes in soil pH and base saturation with acidic deposition was developed. In steady-state ecosystems acidic deposition results in losses of basic cations from exchange sites. In the model, depletion of exchangeable bases is calculated from the difference between input acidity and output of H/sup +/ and Al/sup 3 +/ in water percolating through the solum. A correction for the decrease in bicarbonate weathering is made but sulfate adsorption is not considered. Estimates including the effect of increased mineral weathering with decreased pH can be made if the natural weathering rate is known and if the order with respect to H/sup +/ is known for the rate expression for soil weathering. The model predicted laboratory data for the acidification of samples for three soil horizons. For a fourth horizon, that was formed in contact with bedrock and high in weatherable minerals, the model overestimated the effect of the acid. Model predictions using soil data showed a slow decrease in soil pH and base saturation until the pH region of Al buffering was attained and then a new steady-state was achieved. The pH and base saturation in the Al buffering region was similar to that found in very acid soils under forest vegetation.

  6. A collaborative effort to model plant response to acidic rain

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.; Irving, P.; Kuja, A.; Lee, J.; Shriner, D.; Troiano, J.; Perrigan, S.; Cullinan, V.

    1989-01-01

    Radish plants were exposed three times per week to simulated acidic rain at pH values of 2.6 to 5.4 over the course of four weeks in trials performed at Argonne, Illinois; Ithaca and Upton, New York; Corvallis, Oregon; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and Toronto, Canada. Uniform genotype, soil media and planting techniques, treatment procedures, biological measurements, and experimental design were employed. Growth of plants differed among trials as a result of variation in greenhouse environmental conditions according to location and facilities. Larger plants underwent greater absolute but lower relative reductions in biomass after exposure to the higher levels of acidity. A generalized Mitscherlich function was used to model the effects of acidity of simulated rain on dry mass of hypocotyls using data from three laboratories that performed duplicate trials. The remaining data, from three other laboratories that performed only one trial each, were used to test the model. 14 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Plasma omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status and monounsaturated fatty acids are altered by chronic social stress and predict endocrine responses to acute stress in titi monkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disturbances in fatty acid (FA) metabolism may link chronic psychological stress, endocrine responsiveness, and psychopathology. Therefore, lipid metabolome-wide responses and their relationships with endocrine (cortisol; insulin; adiponectin) responsiveness to acute stress (AS) were assessed in a ...

  8. Adaptive on-line classification for EEG-based brain computer interfaces with AAR parameters and band power estimates.

    PubMed

    Vidaurre, C; Schlögl, A; Cabeza, R; Scherer, R; Pfurtscheller, G

    2005-11-01

    We present the result of on-line feedback Brain Computer Interface experiments using adaptive and non-adaptive feature extraction methods with an on-line adaptive classifier based on Quadratic Discriminant Analysis. Experiments were performed with 12 naïve subjects, feedback was provided from the first moment and no training sessions were needed. Experiments run in three different days with each subject. Six of them received feedback with Adaptive Autoregressive parameters and the rest with logarithmic Band Power estimates. The study was done using single trial analysis of each of the sessions and the value of the Error Rate and the Mutual Information of the classification were used to discuss the results. Finally, it was shown that even subjects starting with a low performance were able to control the system in a few hours: and contrary to previous results no differences between AAR and BP estimates were found.

  9. Transcriptome shifts in response to furfural and acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2010-05-01

    Furfural and acetic acid are two prevalent inhibitors to microorganisms during cellulosic ethanol production, but molecular mechanisms of tolerance to these inhibitors are still unclear. In this study, genome-wide transcriptional responses to furfural and acetic acid were investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using microarray analysis. We found that 103 and 227 genes were differentially expressed in the response to furfural and acetic acid, respectively. Furfural downregulated genes related to transcriptional control and translational control, while it upregulated stress-responsive genes. Furthermore, furfural also interrupted the transcription of genes involved in metabolism of essential chemicals, such as etrahydrofolate, spermidine, spermine, and riboflavin monophosphate. Acetic acid downregulated genes encoding mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and regulation and upregulated genes related to amino acid metabolism. The results revealed that furfural and acetic acid had effects on multiple aspects of cellular metabolism on the transcriptional level and that mitochondria might play important roles in response to both furfural and acetic acid. This research has provided insights into molecular response to furfural and acetic acid in S. cerevisiae, and it will be helpful to construct more resistant strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  10. Magnetic fabric (AMS, AAR) of the Santa Marta batholith (northern Colombia) and the shear deformation along the Caribbean Plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Carlos A.; Bustamante, Camilo; Archanjo, Carlos J.

    2016-10-01

    Anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anhysteretic remanence (AAR) were measured in the Santa Marta Batholith formed by subduction of the Caribbean Plate beneath the northern South America. The batholith, elongated in the N-S direction, records multiple pulses of quartzdiorite to tonalite and granodiorite magmas between 58 and 49 Ma. The high mean magnetic susceptibility (4 × 10-3 SI) combined with thermomagnetic and partial magnetic remanence measurements indicate that the magnetic susceptibility depends on Ti-poor magnetite. AMS is defined by ellipsoids that are dominantly oblate. The foliation was used to distinguish a narrow band of E-trending magnetic structures that separate the batholith in two lobes. The southern lobe is characterized by foliations that are broadly parallel to the contact with the wall rocks, while the northern lobe by foliations oblique to the batholith elongation. Late tonalitic magmas dated at c. 50 Ma record, in turn, a fabric apparently controlled by E-trending tectonic events. Partial AAR indicates that the subfabrics of magnetite with different grain sizes are nearly parallel to AMS, therefore discarding the possibility of superposed fabrics with different orientations. The magnetic fabric pattern is consistent with a magma emplaced in an arc setting deformed by a dextral shear. Synthetic extensional shear bands localize the magmatic deformation along East-trending corridors that probably were exploited to emplace the late magmatic pulses. Accretion of the Eocene batholith and the Late Cretaceous metasedimentary host-rocks to the South American continent defines a major strike-slip shear suture that resulted from the oblique convergence of the Caribbean Plate.

  11. DIETARY AMINO ACID RESPONSES OF BROILER CHICKENS: A REVIEW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In commercial practice, formulating diets to adequate amino acid (AA) minimums is critical to optimize live production and meat yield of broiler chickens. The modern broiler has lower feed intake per unit BW gain while having the potential to accrete more white meat than the commercial broiler of p...

  12. An Alternative Retinoic Acid-responsive Stra6 Promoter Regulated in Response to Retinol Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Kristian B.; Kashyap, Vasundhra; Scandura, Joseph; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin A (retinol) is essential for many biological functions. The Stra6 protein binds the serum retinol-binding protein, RBP4, and acts in conjunction with the enzyme lecithin:retinol acyltransferase to facilitate retinol uptake in some cell types. We show that in embryonic stem (ES) cells and in some tissues, the Stra6 gene encodes two distinct mRNAs transcribed from two different promoters. Whereas both are all-trans-retinoic acid (RA)-responsive in ES cells, the downstream promoter contains a half-site RA response element (RARE) and drives an ∼13-fold, RA-associated increase in luciferase reporter activity. We employed CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to show that the endogenous RARE is required for RA-induced transcription of both Stra6 isoforms. We further demonstrate that in ES cells, 1) both RARγ and RXRα are present at the Stra6 RARE; 2) RA increases co-activator p300 (KAT3B) binding and histone H3 Lys-27 acetylation at both promoters; 3) RA decreases Suz12 levels and histone H3 Lys-27 trimethylation epigenetic marks at both promoters; and 4) these epigenetic changes are diminished in the absence of RARγ. In the brains of WT mice, both the longer and the shorter Stra6 transcript (Stra6L and Stra6S, respectively) are highly expressed, whereas these transcripts are found only at low levels in RARγ−/− mice. In the brains of vitamin A-deficient mice, both Stra6L and Stra6S levels are decreased. In contrast, in the vitamin A-deficient kidneys, the Stra6L levels are greatly increased, whereas Stra6S levels are decreased. Our data show that kidneys respond to retinol deficiency by differential Stra6 promoter usage, which may play a role in the retention of retinol when vitamin A is low. PMID:25544292

  13. Microbial community potentially responsible for acid and metal release from an Ostrobothnian acid sulfate soil

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaofen; Lim Wong, Zhen; Sten, Pekka; Engblom, Sten; Österholm, Peter; Dopson, Mark; Nakatsu, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Soils containing an approximately equal mixture of metastable iron sulfides and pyrite occur in the boreal Ostrobothnian coastal region of Finland, termed ‘potential acid sulfate soil materials’. If the iron sulfides are exposed to air, oxidation reactions result in acid and metal release to the environment that can cause severe damage. Despite that acidophilic microorganisms catalyze acid and metal release from sulfide minerals, the microbiology of acid sulfate soil (ASS) materials has been neglected. The molecular phylogeny of a depth profile through the plough and oxidized ASS layers identified several known acidophilic microorganisms and environmental clones previously identified from acid- and metal-contaminated environments. In addition, several of the 16S rRNA gene sequences were more similar to sequences previously identified from cold environments. Leaching of the metastable iron sulfides and pyrite with an ASS microbial enrichment culture incubated at low pH accelerated metal release, suggesting microorganisms capable of catalyzing metal sulfide oxidation were present. The 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of species similar to Acidocella sp. and other clones identified from acid mine environments. These data support that acid and metal release from ASSs was catalyzed by indigenous microorganisms adapted to low pH. PMID:23369102

  14. Photosynthetic and growth responses of Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric and nitric acid depositions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang-Fang; Ding, Hui-Ming; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Jing-Jing; Yang, Song-Yu; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A continuing rise in acid deposition can cause forest degradation. In China, acid deposition has converted gradually from sulfuric acid deposition (SAD) to nitric acid deposition (NAD). However, the differing responses of photosynthesis and growth to depositions of sulfuric vs. nitric acid have not been well studied. In this study, 1-year-old seedlings of Schima superba, a dominant species in subtropical forests, were treated with two types of acid deposition SO4 (2-)/NO3 (-) ratios (8:1 and 0.7:1) with two applications (foliar spraying and soil drenching) at two pH levels (pH 3.5 and pH 2.5) over a period of 18 months. The results showed that the intensity, acid deposition type, and spraying method had significant effects on the physiological characteristics and growth performance of seedlings. Acid deposition at pH 2.5 via foliar application reduced photosynthesis and growth of S. superba, especially in the first year. Unlike SAD, NAD with high acidity potentially alleviated the negative effects of acidity on physiological properties and growth, probably due to a fertilization effect that improved foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. Our results suggest that trees were damaged mainly by direct acid stress in the short term, whereas in the long term, soil acidification was also likely to be a major risk to forest ecosystems. Our data suggest that the shift in acid deposition type may complicate the ongoing challenge of anthropogenic acid deposition to ecosystem stability.

  15. Relationship between the acid-induced cough response and airway responsiveness and obstruction in children with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, T.; Mochizuki, H.; Tokuyama, K.; Morikawa, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In children with asthma little is known about the direct effect of the bronchoconstrictor and bronchodilator response on the cough threshold, or the relationship between bronchial responsiveness and the cough threshold. A study was undertaken to determine the effect of histamine-induced bronchoconstriction and salbutamol-induced bronchodilatation on the cough threshold in response to inhaled acetic acid, and to examine the relationship between the acetic acid cough threshold and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to histamine in children with asthma. METHODS: Nineteen children with asthma (16 boys) of mean (SE) age 10.6 (0.6) years were enrolled in the study. On day 1 each underwent a histamine inhalation challenge to determine the provocative concentration causing a fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of more than 20% (PC20) as an index of individual bronchial hyperresponsiveness. On day 2 the acetic acid cough threshold was determined before and just after the inhalation of the PC20 concentration of histamine, and then salbutamol (1 mg/m2) was inhaled to relieve the bronchoconstriction. Ten of the 19 patients (eight boys) of mean age 12.2 (0.7) years also tried acetic acid inhalation challenge just after salbutamol inhalation. RESULTS: There was no relationship between the bronchial responsiveness to histamine and acetic acid cough threshold in these patients. The acetic acid cough threshold after histamine inhalation was similar to that before histamine, although FEV1 decreased after histamine. In the 10 patients who also tried acetic acid inhalation challenge after salbutamol the cough threshold did not change. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that acid-induced cough sensitivity and bronchomotor tone are independently regulated in children with asthma. PMID:8779132

  16. Comparison of the effects of three different (-)-hydroxycitric acid preparations on food intake in rats: response.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Harry G; Bagchi, Manashi; Bagchi, Debasis

    2006-01-01

    A response to Louter-van de Haar J, Wielinga PY, Scheurink AJ, Nieuwenhuizen AG: Comparison of the effects of three different (-)-hydroxycitric acid preparations on food intake in rats. Nutr Metabol 2005, 2:23. PMID:16846513

  17. Fade and tachyphylaxis of gastric acid secretory response to pentagastrin in rat isolated gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hirst, B H; Holland, J; Parsons, M E; Price, C A

    1988-12-01

    1. Gastric acid secretory responses to pentagastrin were characterized in the rat isolated gastric mucosa. In particular, the mechanisms underlying fade, declining response upon continued stimulation, and tachyphylaxis, progressively reduced responses upon repeated stimulation, were investigated. 2. Pentagastrin, 10(-9)-10(-7) M, resulted in concentration-related increases in acid secretion, with a mean maximum of 2.65 mumol cm-2 h-1 in response to pentagastrin, 10(-7) M. Higher concentrations of pentagastrin produced sub-maximal secretory rates; we define this as auto-inhibition. The responses to all concentrations of pentagastrin demonstrated fade. The rate of fade was correlated with the maximum acid secretory rate, declining at about 36% of the peak over the first 16 min. 3. The PO2, PCO2, [HCO3-], pH, [glucose], [lactate], [Na+] and [K+] did not decline during the fade of the acid secretory response to pentagastrin, 10(-7) M. Addition of a second aliquot of pentagastrin was not able to reverse fade, but these tissues were responsive to histamine. Replacement of the serosal solution, before addition of a second aliquot of pentagastrin, increased the acid response from 3% to 24% of the first response. 4. Serosal solution from donor tissues, allowed to respond to pentagastrin and then the acid secretion to fade, was able to stimulate secretion in fresh recipient tissues, although at lower rates. 5. Acid secretory responses to a second dose of pentagastrin were not significantly different, whether the tissues were previously unstimulated, or stimulated with pentagastrin washed out after attaining its peak secretory response (after 10-20 min). The second response was significantly reduced if the first response was allowed to fade with the pentagastrin in contact for 100 min; i.e. fade significantly influenced the extent of tachyphylaxis. 6. Proglumide, 10(-2) M, a gastrin receptor antagonist, and omeprazole, 10(-5) M, an inhibitor of the gastric (H+ + K

  18. Arsanilic acid-induced blindness in swine: electroretinographic and visually evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Witzel, D A; Smith, E L; Beerwinkle, K R; Johnson, J H

    1976-05-01

    Arsanilic acid (1,000 ppm) caused blindness in pigs within 25 to 30 days. The visually evoked response was "nonrecordable" in blind pigs, but was consistently recordable in normal pigs. The electroretinographic response was recordable in both normal and blind pigs, and significant differences were not apparent between results of tests of the 2 groups. Optic disk atrophy was noted ophthalmoscopically; lesions of the optic nerve are probably responsible for the nonrecordable visually evoked response.

  19. Production of Cell Wall Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Barley Aleurone Layers in Response to Gibberellic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Taiz, Lincoln; Honigman, William A.

    1976-01-01

    The cell walls of barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya) aleurone layers undergo extensive degradation during the tissue's response to gibberellic acid. Previous work had shown that these cell walls consist almost entirely of arabinoxylan. In this study we show that gibberellic acid stimulates endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity in isolated aleurone layers. In addition, gibberellic acid enhances the activity of two glycosidases: β-xylopyranosidase and α-arabinofuranosidase. No gibberellic acid-stimulated cellulase activity was detected. Germination studies showed a similar pattern of enzyme development in intact seeds. Images PMID:16659683

  20. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Pel, Roel; Ellers, Jacintha

    2009-10-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, PUFAs are particularly unstable and susceptible to peroxidation, hence subtle differences in fatty acid composition can be challenging to detect. We determined the fatty acid composition in springtail (Collembola) in response to two temperatures (5 degrees C and 25 degrees C). First, we tested different sample preparation methods to maximize PUFAs. Treatments consisted of different solvents for primary lipid extraction, mixing with antioxidant, flushing with inert gas, and using different temperature exposures during saponification. Especially slow saponification at low temperature (90 min at 70 degrees C) in combination with replacement of headspace air with nitrogen during saponification and methylation maximized PUFAs for GC analysis. Applying these methods to measure thermal responses in fatty acid composition, the data showed that the (maximized) proportion of C(20) PUFAs increased at low acclimation temperature. However, C(18) PUFAs increased at high acclimation temperature, which is contrary to expectations. Our study illustrates that PUFA levels in lipids may often be underestimated and this may hamper a correct interpretation of differential responses of fatty acid composition. PMID:19557745

  1. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Pel, Roel; Ellers, Jacintha

    2009-10-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, PUFAs are particularly unstable and susceptible to peroxidation, hence subtle differences in fatty acid composition can be challenging to detect. We determined the fatty acid composition in springtail (Collembola) in response to two temperatures (5 degrees C and 25 degrees C). First, we tested different sample preparation methods to maximize PUFAs. Treatments consisted of different solvents for primary lipid extraction, mixing with antioxidant, flushing with inert gas, and using different temperature exposures during saponification. Especially slow saponification at low temperature (90 min at 70 degrees C) in combination with replacement of headspace air with nitrogen during saponification and methylation maximized PUFAs for GC analysis. Applying these methods to measure thermal responses in fatty acid composition, the data showed that the (maximized) proportion of C(20) PUFAs increased at low acclimation temperature. However, C(18) PUFAs increased at high acclimation temperature, which is contrary to expectations. Our study illustrates that PUFA levels in lipids may often be underestimated and this may hamper a correct interpretation of differential responses of fatty acid composition.

  2. Injectable and Glucose-Responsive Hydrogels Based on Boronic Acid-Glucose Complexation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yizhou; Wang, Weiheng; Veiseh, Omid; Appel, Eric A; Xue, Kun; Webber, Matthew J; Tang, Benjamin C; Yang, Xi-Wen; Weir, Gordon C; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2016-08-30

    Injectable hydrogels have been widely used for a number of biomedical applications. Here, we report a new strategy to form an injectable and glucose-responsive hydrogel using the boronic acid-glucose complexation. The ratio of boronic acid and glucose functional groups is critical for hydrogel formation. In our system, polymers with 10-60% boronic acid, with the balance being glucose-modified, are favorable to form hydrogels. These hydrogels are shear-thinning and self-healing, recovering from shear-induced flow to a gel state within seconds. More importantly, these polymers displayed glucose-responsive release of an encapsulated model drug. The hydrogel reported here is an injectable and glucose-responsive hydrogel constructed from the complexation of boronic acid and glucose within a single component polymeric material.

  3. MNL1 regulates weak acid-induced stress responses of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ramsdale, Mark; Selway, Laura; Stead, David; Walker, Jan; Yin, Zhikang; Nicholls, Susan M; Crowe, Jonathan; Sheils, Emma M; Brown, Alistair J P

    2008-10-01

    MNL1, the Candida albicans homologue of an orphan Msn2-like gene (YER130c in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has no known function. Here we report that MNL1 regulates weak acid stress responses. Deletion of MNL1 prevents the long-term adaptation of C. albicans cells to weak acid stresses and compromises their global transcriptional response under these conditions. The promoters of Mnl1-dependent genes contain a novel STRE-like element (SLE) that imposes Mnl1-dependent, weak acid stress-induced transcription upon a lacZ reporter in C. albicans. The SLE (HHYYCCCCTTYTY) is related to the Nrg1 response element (NRE) element recognized by the transcriptional repressor Nrg1. Deletion of NRG1 partially restores the ability of C. albicans mnl1 cells to adapt to weak acid stress, indicating that Mnl1 and Nrg1 act antagonistically to regulate this response. Molecular, microarray, and proteomic analyses revealed that Mnl1-dependent adaptation does not occur in cells exposed to proapoptotic or pronecrotic doses of weak acid, suggesting that Ras-pathway activation might suppress the Mnl1-dependent weak acid response in dying cells. Our work defines a role for this YER130c orthologue in stress adaptation and cell death. PMID:18653474

  4. Antifungal Activity and Biochemical Response of Cuminic Acid against Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xing; Feng, Juntao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora blight of pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici Leonian is a destructive disease throughout the world. Cuminic acid, extracted from the seed of Cuminum cyminum L., belongs to the benzoic acid chemical class. In this study, the sensitivity and biochemical response of P. capsici to cuminic acid was determined. The mean EC50 (50% effective concentration) values for cuminic acid in inhibiting mycelial growth and zoospore germination of the 54 studied P. capsici isolates were 14.54 ± 5.23 μg/mL and 6.97 ± 2.82 μg/mL, respectively. After treatment with cuminic acid, mycelial morphology, sporangium formation and mycelial respiration were significantly influenced; cell membrane permeability and DNA content increased markedly, but pyruvic acid content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, and ATPase activity decreased compared with the untreated control. In pot experiments, cuminic acid exhibited both protective and curative activity. Importantly, POD and PAL activity of the pepper leaves increased after being treated with cuminic acid. These indicated that cuminic acid not only showed antifungal activity, but also could improve the defense capacity of the plants. All the results suggested that cuminic acid exhibits the potential to be developed as a new phytochemical fungicide, and this information increases our understanding of the mechanism of action of cuminic acid against Phytophthora capsici. PMID:27294911

  5. Putative ABC transporter responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the membrane fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins that were produced in response to acetic acid. A 60-kDa protein, named AatA, which was mostly induced by acetic acid, was prepared; aatA was cloned on the basis of its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. AatA, consisting of 591 amino acids and containing ATP-binding cassette (ABC) sequences and ABC signature sequences, belonged to the ABC transporter superfamily. The aatA mutation with an insertion of the neomycin resistance gene within the aatA coding region showed reduced resistance to acetic acid, formic acid, propionic acid, and lactic acid, whereas the aatA mutation exerted no effects on resistance to various drugs, growth at low pH (adjusted with HCl), assimilation of acetic acid, or resistance to citric acid. Introduction of plasmid pABC101 containing aatA under the control of the Escherichia coli lac promoter into the aatA mutant restored the defect in acetic acid resistance. In addition, pABC101 conferred acetic acid resistance on E. coli. These findings showed that AatA was a putative ABC transporter conferring acetic acid resistance on the host cell. Southern blot analysis and subsequent nucleotide sequencing predicted the presence of aatA orthologues in a variety of acetic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The fermentation with A. aceti containing aatA on a multicopy plasmid resulted in an increase in the final yield of acetic acid.

  6. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  7. [Exudation and accumulation of citric acid in common bean in response to Al toxicity stress].

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Yan, Xiaolong; Zheng, Shaoling; Wang, Xiurong

    2002-03-01

    Significant differences in the exudation and accumulation of citric acid in common bean genotypes were observed in response to Al toxicity stress by hydroponic cultural experiments. Secreted citric acid increased with increasing external concentrations of Al3+ which ranged from 0 to 50 mumol.L-1, while ranged from 50 to 80 mumol.L-1, secreted citric acid decreased with increasing external concentrations of Al3+. Among different genotypic common beans, citric acid secreted in G19842 was the largest, while Al uptake per unit dry weight in G19842 was the least. No difference in the accumulation of citric acid in leaves was found among different genotypic common beans, while the size of the content of citric acid in roots was G19842 > AFR > ZPV > G5273. The amount of citric acid exuded was smaller induced by phosphorus deficiency than that induced by Al toxicity stress. Exposure to 50 mumol.L-1 LaCl3 could not induce the exudation of citric acid, and it implied that the exudation and accumulation of citric acid in common bean was an important physiological response of resistance to Al toxicity stress.

  8. [Association of fatty acid metabolism with systemic inflammatory response in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Denisenko, Y K; Novgorodtseva, T P; Zhukova, N V; Antonuk, M V; Lobanova, E G; Kalinina, E P

    2016-03-01

    We examined composition of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NFAs), erythrocyte fatty acids, levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with different type of the inflammatory response. The results of our study show that asthma and COPD in remission are associated with changes in the composition NFAs of plasma, FA of erythrocytes, level eicosanoid despite the difference in the regulation of immunological mechanisms of systemic inflammation. These changes are characterized by excessive production of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites (thromboxane B2, leukotriene B4) and deficiency of their functional antagonist, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3). The recognized association between altered fatty acid composition and disorders of the immune mechanisms of regulation of systemic inflammation in COPD and asthma demonstrated the important role of fatty acids and their metabolites in persistence of inflammatory processes in diseases of the respiratory system in the condition of remission. PMID:27420629

  9. Essential role for retinoic acid in the promotion of CD4+ T cell effector responses via retinoic acid receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J.A.; Cannons, J.L.; Grainger, J.R.; Santos, L.M. Dos; Hand, T.W.; Naik, S.; Wohlfert, E.A.; Chou, D.B.; Oldenhove, G.; Robinson, M.; Grigg, M.E.; Kastenmayer, R.; Schwartzberg, P.L.; Belkaid, Y.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Vitamin A and its metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), have recently been implicated in the regulation of immune homeostasis via the peripheral induction of regulatory T cells. Here we show that RA is also required to elicit proinflammatory CD4+ helper T cell responses to infection and mucosal vaccination. Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) is the critical mediator of these effects. Strikingly, antagonism of RAR signaling and deficiency in RARα(Rara−/−) results in a cell autonomous CD4+ T cell activation defect. Altogether, these findings reveal a fundamental role for the RA/RARα axis in the development of both regulatory and inflammatory arms of adaptive immunity and establish nutritional status as a broad regulator of adaptive T cell responses. PMID:21419664

  10. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant. PMID:25031459

  11. Lake Biel sediment record during the last 7500 years and impact of the Aare river deviation in 1878 AD.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeannet, Alice; Corella, Juan Pablo; Reusch, Anna; Kremer, Katrina; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2013-04-01

    Lake sediments are excellent archives of environmental and climate changes as well as human impact on lake- and river-systems. Lake Biel is a medium-sized peri-alpine lake (Switzerland) with a maximum depth of 74 m and lies at 429 m asl. Our study focuses on the south-west basin, where the lake sedimentation was naturally mainly controlled by autochthonous sedimentation, and is now, since the artificial Aare river deviation through the Hagneck canal in 1878 AD, under the strong influence of water and sediment input from its catchment. A 10.05-m-long composite sediment sequence, cored in 2011 at 52 m water depth, was built from two cores retrieved with an Uwitec system. The cored sedimentary sequence begins in 1975 and spans the last 7500 years, as dated by seven 14C analyses and 210Pb/137Cs activity profiles. Magnetic susceptibility and density were measured with a Geotek MSCL at 0.5 cm resolution, granulometry with a CILAS grain sizer every 10 cm and X-ray fluorescence measurements were carried out using an Avaatech core scanner at 1-cm resolution. Lake Biel sediment record is subdivided in four main units. The lowest Unit A (651-1005 cm; 7355 to 5075 BP), with dark greyish clayey silty laminated layers and sedimentation rates between 0.10 to 0.29 cm/yr, shows stable low values for almost all proxies, excepted for allochtonous elements which increase between 7000-6000 BP. By analogy with Unit C facies (see below), Unit A is interpreted as influenced by the Aare river which probably flew into the south-west basin at that time. Unit B1 (651-343 cm, 5075 to 2036 BP) has lower sedimentation rate (0.10 cm/yr), high Ca/Ti ratio, light sediment color, constant clayey silty grain size and varying elemental profiles which point to the dominant influence of autochtonous lake processes influenced by climate. From the beginning of Unit B2 (343-147 cm, 2036 to 1878 AD) sediment grain size increases which possibly reflects a human influence over the lake system. The greatest

  12. Estimating the gas transfer velocity: a prerequisite for more accurate and higher resolution GHG fluxes (lower Aare River, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, S.; Perez, K.; Schubert, C. J.; Eugster, W.; Wehrli, B.; Del Sontro, T.

    2013-12-01

    Currently, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from lakes, reservoirs and rivers are readily investigated due to the global warming potential of those gases and the role these inland waters play in the carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of high spatiotemporally-resolved emission estimates, and how to accurately assess the gas transfer velocity (K) remains controversial. In anthropogenically-impacted systems where run-of-river reservoirs disrupt the flow of sediments by increasing the erosion and load accumulation patterns, the resulting production of carbonic greenhouse gases (GH-C) is likely to be enhanced. The GH-C flux is thus counteracting the terrestrial carbon sink in these environments that act as net carbon emitters. The aim of this project was to determine the GH-C emissions from a medium-sized river heavily impacted by several impoundments and channelization through a densely-populated region of Switzerland. Estimating gas emission from rivers is not trivial and recently several models have been put forth to do so; therefore a second goal of this project was to compare the river emission models available with direct measurements. Finally, we further validated the modeled fluxes by using a combined approach with water sampling, chamber measurements, and highly temporal GH-C monitoring using an equilibrator. We conducted monthly surveys along the 120 km of the lower Aare River where we sampled for dissolved CH4 (';manual' sampling) at a 5-km sampling resolution, and measured gas emissions directly with chambers over a 35 km section. We calculated fluxes (F) via the boundary layer equation (F=K×(Cw-Ceq)) that uses the water-air GH-C concentration (C) gradient (Cw-Ceq) and K, which is the most sensitive parameter. K was estimated using 11 different models found in the literature with varying dependencies on: river hydrology (n=7), wind (2), heat exchange (1), and river width (1). We found that chamber fluxes were always higher than boundary

  13. A one- and two-dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty path of the AARE (Advanced Analysis for Reactor Engineering) modular code system

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.W.; Dudziak, D.J.; Higgs, C.E.; Stepanek, J.

    1988-01-01

    AARE, a code package to perform Advanced Analysis for Reactor Engineering, is a linked modular system for fission reactor core and shielding, as well as fusion blanket, analysis. Its cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty path presently includes the cross-section processing and reformatting code TRAMIX, cross-section homogenization and library reformatting code MIXIT, the 1-dimensional transport code ONEDANT, the 2-dimensional transport code TRISM, and the 1- and 2- dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty code SENSIBL. IN the present work, a short description of the whole AARE system is given, followed by a detailed description of the cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty path. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  14. An attempt to validate the ultra-accelerated microbar and the concrete performance test with the degree of AAR-induced damage observed in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Merz, Christine

    2013-07-15

    There is little knowledge about the relation between AAR-induced damage observed in structures and the expansion potential obtained with accelerated tests. In this study, aggregates used in structures damaged by AAR were tested with the microbar test (MBT/AFNOR XP 18-594) and the concrete performance test (CPT/AFNOR P18-454). After the tests, the samples were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the results, the significance of the microbar test has to be examined very critically. The agreement of measured expansion, reacted rock types and the composition of the reaction products between the on-site concrete and the reproduced concrete subjected to the CPT clearly indicates that the reaction mechanisms in the structure and in the concrete performance test are comparable. As such, the concrete performance test seems to be an appropriate tool to test the potential reactivity of specific concrete mixtures.

  15. GID1 modulates stomatal response and submergence tolerance involving abscisic acid and gibberellic acid signaling in rice.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao; Chang, Yu; Huang, Fei; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-11-01

    Plant responses to abiotic stresses are coordinated by arrays of growth and developmental programs. Gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) play critical roles in the developmental programs and environmental responses, respectively, through complex signaling and metabolism networks. However, crosstalk between the two phytohormones in stress responses remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF 1 (GID1), a soluble receptor for GA, regulates stomatal development and patterning in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The gid1 mutant showed impaired biosynthesis of endogenous ABA under drought stress conditions, but it exhibited enhanced sensitivity to exogenous ABA. Scanning electron microscope and infrared thermal image analysis indicated an increase in the stomatal conductance in the gid1 mutant under drought conditions. Interestingly, the gid1 mutant had increased levels of chlorophyll and carbohydrates under submergence conditions, and showed enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging ability and submergence tolerance compared with the wild-type. Further analyses suggested that the function of GID1 in submergence responses is partially dependent on ABA, and GA signaling by GID1 is involved in submergence tolerance by modulating carbohydrate consumption. Taken together, these findings suggest GID1 plays distinct roles in stomatal response and submergence tolerance through both the ABA and GA signaling pathways in rice.

  16. This NASA Dryden F/A-18 is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. F/A-18 (No

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA Dryden F/A-18 is participating in the Automated Aerial Refueling (AAR) project. F/A-18 (No. 847) is acting as an in-flight refueling tanker in the study to develop analytical models for an automated aerial refueling system for unmanned vehicles. A 300-gallon aerodynamic pod containing air-refueling equipment is seen beneath the fuselage. The hose and refueling basket are extended during an assessment of their dynamics on the F/A-18A.

  17. In vitro release of arachidonic acid and in vivo responses to respirable fractions of cotton dust

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, T.A.; Edwards, J.H.; Al-Zubaidy, T.S.; Brown, R.C.; Poole, A.; Nicholls, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It was considered that the fall in lung function seen after exposure to cotton dust may be attributable in part to the activity of arachidonic acid metabolites, such as leucotrienes as well as to the more established release of histamine by cotton dust. However, we found that cotton and barley dusts elicited poor release of arachidonic acid from an established macrophage like cell line compared with that observed with other organic dusts. In the experimental animal, pulmonary cellular responses to both cotton and barley dust were similar to those evoked by moldy hay and pigeon dropping dusts, although after multiple doses a more severe response was seen to cotton and barley. Since both moldy hay and pigeon droppings elicit a greater arachidonic acid release than cotton or barley, a role for arachidonic acid in inducing the cellular response is less likely than other factors. There are limitations to our conclusions using this system, i.e., the arachidonic acid may be released in a nonmetabolized form, although it is noted that the two dusts with the greatest arachidonic acid release produce their clinical responses in humans largely by hypersensitivity mechanisms.

  18. Tectonic control on the late stage exhumation of the Aar Massif (Switzerland): Constraints from apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinecker, John; DanišíK, Martin; Schmid, Claudia; Glotzbach, Christoph; Rahn, Meinert; Frisch, Wolfgang; Spiegel, Cornelia

    2008-12-01

    We examine the hypothesis that Pliocene exhumation of the external massifs in the central Alps is controlled by climatic change. New thermochronological data from the western Gastern-Aar massif are used to investigate the timing, extent, and reasons for Neogene exhumation. Our data reveal that exhumation was constant with 0.5 km/Ma over the last 10 Ma in the north. In the southern part, exhumation was of the same order until ˜3.5 Ma but then increased gradually toward the south to values of up to 1.2 km/Ma, resulting in overall northward tilting of the western Aar massif. We explain this accelerated exhumation in the south after ˜3.5 Ma mainly by tectonic denudation in the footwall of the Rhône-Simplon fault and discuss changes in deep crustal configuration, which may have triggered south directed normal faulting. We propose that the Rhône river was structurally trapped by the Rhône-Simplon normal fault zone, which additionally enhanced erosion in the southern section of the Aar massif. Climatic forcing may have an impact in the very late stage of exhumation due to Alpine glaciation in the late Pliocene.

  19. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  20. Photosynthetic and growth responses of Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric and nitric acid depositions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang-Fang; Ding, Hui-Ming; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Jing-Jing; Yang, Song-Yu; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A continuing rise in acid deposition can cause forest degradation. In China, acid deposition has converted gradually from sulfuric acid deposition (SAD) to nitric acid deposition (NAD). However, the differing responses of photosynthesis and growth to depositions of sulfuric vs. nitric acid have not been well studied. In this study, 1-year-old seedlings of Schima superba, a dominant species in subtropical forests, were treated with two types of acid deposition SO4 (2-)/NO3 (-) ratios (8:1 and 0.7:1) with two applications (foliar spraying and soil drenching) at two pH levels (pH 3.5 and pH 2.5) over a period of 18 months. The results showed that the intensity, acid deposition type, and spraying method had significant effects on the physiological characteristics and growth performance of seedlings. Acid deposition at pH 2.5 via foliar application reduced photosynthesis and growth of S. superba, especially in the first year. Unlike SAD, NAD with high acidity potentially alleviated the negative effects of acidity on physiological properties and growth, probably due to a fertilization effect that improved foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. Our results suggest that trees were damaged mainly by direct acid stress in the short term, whereas in the long term, soil acidification was also likely to be a major risk to forest ecosystems. Our data suggest that the shift in acid deposition type may complicate the ongoing challenge of anthropogenic acid deposition to ecosystem stability. PMID:26797956

  1. Low oleic acid-derived repression of jasmonic acid-inducible defense responses requires the WRKY50 and WRKY51 proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Signaling induced upon a reduction in oleic acid (18:1) levels simultaneously up-regulates salicylic acid (SA)-mediated responses and inhibits jasmonic acid (JA)-inducible defenses, resulting in enhanced resistance to biotrophs but increased susceptibility to necrotrophs. SA and the signaling compon...

  2. Physiological responses to acid stress by Saccharomyces cerevisiae when applying high initial cell density

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhong-peng; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    High initial cell density is used to increase volumetric productivity and shorten production time in lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation. Comparison of physiological parameters in high initial cell density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of acetic, formic, levulinic and cinnamic acids demonstrated general and acid-specific responses of cells. All the acids studied impaired growth and inhibited glycolytic flux, and caused oxidative stress and accumulation of trehalose. However, trehalose may play a role other than protecting yeast cells from acid-induced oxidative stress. Unlike the other acids, cinnamic acid did not cause depletion of cellular ATP, but abolished the growth of yeast on ethanol. Compared with low initial cell density, increasing initial cell density reduced the lag phase and improved the bioconversion yield of cinnamic acid during acid adaptation. In addition, yeast cells were able to grow at elevated concentrations of acid, probable due to the increase in phenotypic cell-to-cell heterogeneity in large inoculum size. Furthermore, the specific growth rate and the specific rates of glucose consumption and metabolite production were significantly lower than at low initial cell density, which was a result of the accumulation of a large fraction of cells that persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. PMID:27620460

  3. Individual Variation in Lipidomic Profiles of Healthy Subjects in Response to Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Nording, Malin L.; Yang, Jun; Georgi, Katrin; Hegedus Karbowski, Christine; German, J. Bruce; Weiss, Robert H.; Hogg, Ronald J.; Trygg, Johan; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zivkovic, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Conflicting findings in both interventional and observational studies have resulted in a lack of consensus on the benefits of ω3 fatty acids in reducing disease risk. This may be due to individual variability in response. We used a multi-platform lipidomic approach to investigate both the consistent and inconsistent responses of individuals comprehensively to a defined ω3 intervention. Methods The lipidomic profile including fatty acids, lipid classes, lipoprotein distribution, and oxylipins was examined multi- and uni-variately in 12 healthy subjects pre vs. post six weeks of ω3 fatty acids (1.9 g/d eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and 1.5 g/d docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]). Results Total lipidomic and oxylipin profiles were significantly different pre vs. post treatment across all subjects (p=0.00007 and p=0.00002 respectively). There was a strong correlation between oxylipin profiles and EPA and DHA incorporated into different lipid classes (r2=0.93). However, strikingly divergent responses among individuals were also observed. Both ω3 and ω6 fatty acid metabolites displayed a large degree of variation among the subjects. For example, in half of the subjects, two arachidonic acid cyclooxygenase products, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2), and a lipoxygenase product, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) significantly decreased post intervention, whereas in the other half they either did not change or increased. The EPA lipoxygenase metabolite 12-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (12-HEPE) varied among subjects from an 82% decrease to a 5,000% increase. Conclusions Our results show that certain defined responses to ω3 fatty acid intervention were consistent across all subjects. However, there was also a high degree of inter-individual variability in certain aspects of lipid metabolism. This lipidomic based phenotyping approach demonstrated that individual responsiveness to ω3 fatty acids is highly variable and measurable, and could be

  4. Noncanonical Amino Acids Improve the pH-response of pHLIP Insertion at Tumor Acidity **

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Chee-Huat; Klees, Lukas M.; Langenbacher, Rachel; Yao, Lan; An, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The pH-Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP) offers the potential to deliver drugs selectively to the cytoplasm of cancer cells based on tumor acidosis. The WT pHLIP inserts into membrane with a pH50 of 6.1 while most solid tumors have extracellular pH (pHe) of 6.5-7.0. To close this gap, a SAR study was carried out to search for pHLIP variants with improved pH-response. We learned that (a) replacing Asp25 with α-aminoadipic acid (Aad) adjusts the pH50 to 6.74, matching average tumor acidity, and (b) replacing Asp14 with γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) increases the sharpness of pH-response (i.e. transition over 0.5 instead of 1 pH unit). These effects are additive — the Asp14Gla/Asp25Aad double variant shows a pH50 of 6.79, with sharper transition than Asp25Aad. Further, the advantage of the double variant over WT pHLIP in terms of cargo delivery was demonstrated in turn-on fluorescence assays and anti-proliferation studies (using paclitaxel as cargo) in A549 lung cancer cells at pH 6.6. PMID:25650762

  5. Increased acid responsiveness in vagal sensory neurons in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youtian; Liu, Zhenyu; Yu, Xiaoyun; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Undem, Bradley J; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-07-15

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized with eosinophils and mast cells predominated allergic inflammation in the esophagus and present with esophageal dysfunctions such as dysphagia, food impaction, and heartburn. However, the underlying mechanism of esophageal dysfunctions is unclear. This study aims to determine whether neurons in the vagal sensory ganglia are modulated in a guinea pig model of EoE. Animals were actively sensitized by ovalbumin (OVA) and then challenged with aerosol OVA inhalation for 2 wk. This results in a mild esophagitis with increases in mast cells and eosinophils in the esophageal wall. Vagal nodose and jugular neurons were disassociated, and their responses to acid, capsaicin, and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist AMG-9810 were studied by calcium imaging and whole cell patch-clamp recording. Compared with naïve animals, antigen challenge significantly increased acid responsiveness in both nodose and jugular neurons. Their responses to capsaicin were also increased after antigen challenge. AMG-9810, at a concentration that blocked capsaicin-evoked calcium influx, abolished the increase in acid-induced activation in both nodose and jugular neurons. Vagotomy strongly attenuated those increased responses of nodose and jugular neurons to both acid and capsaicin induced by antigen challenge. These data for the first time demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge significantly increases acid responsiveness in vagal nodose and jugular ganglia neurons. This sensitization effect is mediated largely through TRPV1 and initiated at sensory nerve endings in the peripheral tissues. Allergen-induced enhancement of responsiveness to noxious stimulation by acid in sensory nerve may contribute to the development of esophageal dysfunctions such as heartburn in EoE.

  6. GFAP and alpha1a-AR staining and nuclear morphometry of oligodendrogliomas by confocal microscopy and image analysis: useful parameters for predicting survival in oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto; Figols, Javier; Alvira, Mariano; Uranga-Ocio, José A; García-Poblete, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study attempts to evaluate the GFAP and alpha1a-AR staining and morphometrical nuclear features of oligodendrogliomas and their prognostic implications as compared to present histopathology classification and their survival outcome. Study design Surgical specimens from 24 patients with oligodendrogliomas during the period 1981–2000 were included. These cases were classified into two groups defined by the grade of the neoplasm: Group I: oligodendrogliomas grade II; Group II: oligodendrogliomas grade III and two groups based on the outcome status: Group of the alive cases and group of the death cases. Death rate for the groups were obtained by patients' charts. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the groups with respect to the morphometrical nuclear variables; area, perimeter, aspect, axes (major and minor), diameters (max, mean and min.), radius (max. and min.) margination, ratio of perimeter-area, roundness and sizes (length and width). In addition, an immunofluorescence method for GFAP and 1a-AR were performed and their area, density and intensity of staining were analyzed. Results Semiautomated quantitative morphometrical results showed that the variables of nuclear area (GII 48.87 μm2 vs. GIII 43.45 μm2 p-value = 0.02), aspect (GII 1.39 vs. GIII 1.55 p-value = 0.03), axis minor (GII 6.66 μm vs. GIII 6.01 μm p-value = 0.003), diameter minor (GII 5.93 μm vs. GIII 5.27 μm p-value = 0.002), radius minor (GII 2.64 μm vs. GIII 2.25 μm p-value = 0,003), perimeter-area (GII 0.0007 vs. GIII 0.0006 p-value = 0.04), size width (GII 6.60 μm vs. GIII 5.96 μm p-value = 0,003), and density of alpha1a-AR staining (GII 121.38 vs. GIII 146.03 p-value = 0.05) were statistically significant in regard of grade; and that the sum of density of GFAP (p-value = 0.01) and the intensity of alpha1a-AR (p-value = 0.01) were statistically significant in predicting survival. Conclusion These results suggest that some nuclear morphometrical features and the

  7. pH-responsive fatty acid self-assembly transition induced by UV light.

    PubMed

    Arnould, Audrey; Gaillard, Cedric; Fameau, Anne-Laure

    2015-11-15

    Fatty acids are natural, pH-responsive surfactants. Their properties can be tuned by adding CO2 or by applying light which modify solution pH. We investigated photoresponsive systems based on fatty acids with different chain lengths in the presence of a photoacid generator (PAG). Under UV irradiation, photolysis of the PAG in aqueous solution resulted in a decrease in pH, triggering a change in fatty acid assembly. Using a multi-scale approach before and after UV irradiation, we characterized the effect of this pH decrease on the nature of the fatty acid self-assemblies. At the molecular scale, pH and infrared spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the fatty acid ionization state. At the microscopic scale, the self-assembled structure was characterized using small-angle neutron scattering and microscopy. We showed that UV irradiation tuned the ionization state of the fatty acid molecules which in turn triggered a transition from spherical micelles to vesicles or lamellar phases, depending on fatty acid chain length. We studied the foaming properties of these systems before and after UV irradiation. We showed that after UV irradiation, foam stability was drastically enhanced as a result of a change in self-assembly. Our approach can be easily extended to various pH-responsive surfactants.

  8. Effect of co-ingestion of amino acids with rice on glycaemic and insulinaemic response.

    PubMed

    Soong, Yean Yean; Lim, Joseph; Sun, Lijuan; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2015-12-14

    Consumption of high glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic response (GR) food such as white rice has been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have reported the ability of individual amino acids to reduce GR of carbohydrate-rich foods. Because of the bitter flavour of amino acids, they have rarely been used to reduce GR. We now report the use of a palatable, preformed amino acid mixture in the form of essence of chicken. In all, sixteen healthy male Chinese were served 68 or 136 ml amino acid mixture together with rice, or 15 or 30 min before consumption of white rice. Postprandial blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations were measured at fasting and every 15 min after consumption of the meal until 60 min after the consumption of the white rice. Subsequent blood samples were taken at 30-min intervals until 210 min. The co-ingestion of 68 ml of amino acid mixture with white rice produced the best results in reducing the peak blood glucose and GR of white rice without increasing the insulinaemic response. It is postulated that amino acid mixtures prime β-cell insulin secretion and peripheral tissue uptake of glucose. The use of ready-to-drink amino acid mixtures may be a useful strategy for lowering the high-GI rice diets consumed in Asia. PMID:26420496

  9. Effect of co-ingestion of amino acids with rice on glycaemic and insulinaemic response.

    PubMed

    Soong, Yean Yean; Lim, Joseph; Sun, Lijuan; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2015-12-14

    Consumption of high glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic response (GR) food such as white rice has been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have reported the ability of individual amino acids to reduce GR of carbohydrate-rich foods. Because of the bitter flavour of amino acids, they have rarely been used to reduce GR. We now report the use of a palatable, preformed amino acid mixture in the form of essence of chicken. In all, sixteen healthy male Chinese were served 68 or 136 ml amino acid mixture together with rice, or 15 or 30 min before consumption of white rice. Postprandial blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations were measured at fasting and every 15 min after consumption of the meal until 60 min after the consumption of the white rice. Subsequent blood samples were taken at 30-min intervals until 210 min. The co-ingestion of 68 ml of amino acid mixture with white rice produced the best results in reducing the peak blood glucose and GR of white rice without increasing the insulinaemic response. It is postulated that amino acid mixtures prime β-cell insulin secretion and peripheral tissue uptake of glucose. The use of ready-to-drink amino acid mixtures may be a useful strategy for lowering the high-GI rice diets consumed in Asia.

  10. Gustatory responsiveness to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jenny; Maitz, Anna; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2014-03-29

    The gustatory responsiveness of four adult spider monkeys to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids was assessed in two-bottle preference tests of brief duration (1min). We found that Ateles geoffroyi responded with significant preferences for seven amino acids (glycine, l-proline, l-alanine, l-serine, l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-lysine) when presented at a concentration of 100mM and/or 200mM and tested against water. At the same concentrations, the animals significantly rejected five amino acids (l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, l-valine, l-cysteine, and l-isoleucine) and were indifferent to the remaining tastants. Further, the results show that the spider monkeys discriminated concentrations as low as 0.2mM l-lysine, 2mM l-glutamic acid, 10mM l-proline, 20mM l-valine, 40mM glycine, l-serine, and l-aspartic acid, and 80mM l-alanine from the alternative stimulus, with individual animals even scoring lower threshold values. A comparison between the taste qualities of the proteinogenic amino acids as described by humans and the preferences and aversions observed in the spider monkeys suggests a fairly high degree of agreement in the taste quality perception of these tastants between the two species. A comparison between the taste preference thresholds obtained with the spider monkeys and taste detection thresholds reported in human subjects suggests that the taste sensitivity of A. geoffroyi for the amino acids tested here might match that of Homo sapiens. The results support the assumption that the taste responses of spider monkeys to proteinogenic amino acids might reflect an evolutionary adaptation to their frugivorous and thus protein-poor diet. PMID:24480073

  11. Glutathione is involved in physiological response of Candida utilis to acid stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Li; Dong, Ying-Ying; Wei, Gong-Yuan; Qi, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Candida utilis often encounters an acid stress environment when hexose and pentose are metabolized to produce acidic bio-based materials. In order to reveal the physiological role of glutathione (GSH) in the response of cells of this industrial yeast to acid stress, an efficient GSH-producing strain of C. utilis CCTCC M 209298 and its mutants deficient in GSH biosynthesis, C. utilis Δgsh1 and Δgsh2, were used in this study. A long-term mild acid challenge (pH 3.5 for 6 h) and a short-term severe acid challenge (pH 1.5 for 2 h) were conducted at 18 h during batch culture of the yeast to generate acid stress conditions. Differences in the physiological performances among the three strains under acid stress were analyzed in terms of GSH biosynthesis and distribution; intracellular pH; activities of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase; intracellular ATP level; and ATP/ADP ratio. The intracellular GSH content of the yeast was found to be correlated with changes in physiological data, and a higher intracellular GSH content led to greater relief of cells to the acid stress, suggesting that GSH may be involved in protecting C. utilis against acid stress. Results presented in this manuscript not only increase our understanding of the impact of GSH on the physiology of C. utilis but also help us to comprehend the mechanism underlying the response to acid stress of eukaryotic microorganisms. PMID:26346268

  12. Physiological and proteomic analysis of Lactobacillus casei in response to acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; He, Guiqiang; Zhang, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei by a combined physiological and proteomic analysis. To optimize the ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 1 h at different pHs, and then acid challenged at pH 3.5. The result showed that acid adaptation improved acid tolerance, and the highest survival was observed in cells adapted at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the acid-adapted cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, and lower inner permeability compared with the cells without adaptation. Proteomic analysis was performed upon acid adaptation to different pHs (pH 6.5 vs. pH 4.5) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A total of 24 proteins that exhibited at least 1.5-fold differential expression were identified. Four proteins (Pgk, LacD, Hpr, and Galm) involved in carbohydrate catabolism and five classic stress response proteins (GroEL, GrpE, Dnak, Hspl, and LCAZH_2811) were up-regulated after acid adaptation at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Validation of the proteomic data was performed by quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional regulation of all selected genes showed a positive correlation with the proteomic patterns of the identified proteins. Results presented in this study may be useful for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and may help in formulating new strategies to improve the industrial performance of this species during acid stress. PMID:25062817

  13. Linkage between the bacterial acid stress and stringent responses: the structure of the inducible lysine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kanjee, Usheer; Gutsche, Irina; Alexopoulos, Eftichia; Zhao, Boyu; El Bakkouri, Majida; Thibault, Guillaume; Liu, Kaiyin; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Snider, Jamie; Pai, Emil F; Houry, Walid A

    2011-03-01

    The Escherichia coli inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI/CadA, together with the inner-membrane lysine-cadaverine antiporter, CadB, provide cells with protection against mild acidic conditions (pH∼5). To gain a better understanding of the molecular processes underlying the acid stress response, the X-ray crystal structure of LdcI was determined. The structure revealed that the protein is an oligomer of five dimers that associate to form a decamer. Surprisingly, LdcI was found to co-crystallize with the stringent response effector molecule ppGpp, also known as the alarmone, with 10 ppGpp molecules in the decamer. ppGpp is known to mediate the stringent response, which occurs in response to nutrient deprivation. The alarmone strongly inhibited LdcI enzymatic activity. This inhibition is important for modulating the consumption of lysine in cells during acid stress under nutrient limiting conditions. Hence, our data provide direct evidence for a link between the bacterial acid stress and stringent responses. PMID:21278708

  14. Inflammation in response to n3 fatty acids in a porcine obesity model.

    PubMed

    Faris, Richard J; Boddicker, Rebecca L; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Li, Jenny; Jones, Douglas E; Spurlock, Michael E

    2012-12-01

    Fatty acids have distinct cellular effects related to inflammation and insulin sensitivity. Dietary saturated fat activates toll-like receptor 4, which in turn can lead to chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, and adipose tissue macrophage infiltration. Conversely, n3 fatty acids are generally antiinflammatory and promote insulin sensitivity, in part via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Ossabaw swine are a useful biomedical model of obesity. We fed Ossabaw pigs either a low-fat control diet or a diet containing high-fat palm oil with or without additional n3 fatty acids for 30 wk to investigate the effect of saturated fats and n3 fatty acids on obesity-linked inflammatory markers. The diet did not influence the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, TNFα, IL6, or IL12. In addition, n3 fatty acids attenuated the increase in inflammatory adipose tissue CD16(-)CD14(+) macrophages induced by high palm oil. High-fat diets with and without n3 fatty acids both induced hyperglycemia without hyperinsulinemia. The high-fat only group but not the high-fat group with n3 fatty acids showed reduced insulin sensitivity in response to insulin challenge. This effect was not mediated by decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase B. Therefore, in obese Ossabaw swine, n3 fatty acids partially attenuate insulin resistance but only marginally change inflammatory status and macrophage phenotype in adipose tissue.

  15. Good and bad protons: genetic aspects of acidity stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Shavrukov, Yuri; Hirai, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Physiological aspects of acidity stress in plants (synonymous with H(+) rhizotoxicity or low-pH stress) have long been a focus of research, in particular with respect to acidic soils where aluminium and H(+) rhizotoxicities often co-occur. However, toxic H(+) and Al(3+) elicit different response mechanisms in plants, and it is important to consider their effects separately. The primary aim of this review was to provide the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of the specific reactions to low-pH stress in growing plants. A comparison of the results gleaned from quantitative trait loci analysis and global transcriptome profiling of plants in response to high proton concentrations revealed a two-stage genetic response: (i) in the short-term, proton pump H(+)-ATPases present the first barrier in root cells, allocating an excess of H(+) into either the apoplast or vacuole; the ensuing defence signaling system involves auxin, salicylic acid, and methyl jasmonate, which subsequently initiate expression of STOP and DREB transcription factors as well as chaperone ROF; (2) the long-term response includes other genes, such as alternative oxidase and type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, which act to detoxify dangerous reactive oxygen species in mitochondria, and help plants better manage the stress. A range of transporter genes including those for nitrate (NTR1), malate (ALMT1), and heavy metals are often up-regulated by H(+) rhizotoxicity. Expansins, cell-wall-related genes, the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt and biochemical pH-stat genes also reflect changes in cell metabolism and biochemistry in acidic conditions. However, the genetics underlying the acidity stress response of plants is complicated and only fragmentally understood.

  16. Influence of betulinic acid on lymphocyte subsets and humoral immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Jine, Y; Lis, M; Szczypka, M; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, B

    2012-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpene found in many plant species, among others, in the bark of white birch Betula alba. Betulinic acid was reported to display a wide range of biological effects, including antiviral, antiparasitic, antibacterial, anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. The effects of betulinic acid (50, 5, 0.5 mg/kg) administered orally five times at 24 hours intervals to non-immunized and red blood cells (SRBC)-immunized mice were determined. The present study examined the total number of lymphocytes in the thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, and the percentage of subsets of T cells (CD4+CD8+, CD4CD8, CD4+, CD8+) in thymus,T (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, as well as white blood cell (WBC) and differential leukocyte counts in non-immunized mice, and humoral immune response in SRBC-immunized mice. SRBC was injected 24 hours after administration of the last dose of betulinic acid. It was found that betulinic acid administered orally five times at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg increased the total number of thymocytes, splenocytes, lymphocytes of mesenteric lymph node cells, and the weight ratio of the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes in non-immunized mice. Betulinic acid also changed the percentage of T cell subsets in the thymus and T and B lymphocytes in peripheral lymphatic organs. The effects of betulinic acid on T and B cell subpopulations depended on the dose applied. The strongest stimulating effect of betulinic acid was observed when the drug was administered at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg. Five exposures to betulinic acid (0.5 mg/kg) decreased the percentage of immature CD4+CD8+ thymic cells with corresponding increases in the percentage and absolute count of mature, single-positive CD4+ thymocytes and decreased the percentage and total count of CD3+ splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells with corresponding decreases in the percentage and absolute count of CD4+ and CD8+ cells

  17. Quantifying bile acid malabsorption helps predict response and tailor sequestrant therapy.

    PubMed

    Orekoya, Oluwafikunayo; McLaughlin, John; Leitao, Eugenia; Johns, Wendy; Lal, Simon; Paine, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Although recognised as a cause of chronic diarrhoea for over forty years, diagnostic tests and treatments for bile acid malabsorption (BAM) remain controversial. Recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines highlighted the lack of evidence in the field, and called for further research. This retrospective study explores the BAM subtype and severity, the use and response to bile acid sequestrants (BAS) and the prevalence of abnormal colonic histology. 264 selenium-75-labelled homocholic acid conjugated taurine (SeHCAT)-tested patient records were reviewed and the severity and subtype of BAM, presence of colonic histopathology and response to BAS were recorded. 53% of patients tested had BAM, with type-2 BAM in 45% of patients with presumed irritable bowel syndrome. Colonic histological abnormalities were similar overall between patients with (29%) or without (23%) BAM (p = 0.46) and between BAM subtypes, with no significant presence of inflammatory changes. 63% of patients with BAM had a successful BAS response which showed a trend to decreased response with reduced severity. Colestyramine was unsuccessful in 44% (38/87) and 45% of these (17/38) were related to medication intolerance, despite a positive SeHCAT. 47% (7/15) of colestyramine failures had a successful colesevelam response. No patient reported colesevelam intolerance. Quantifying severity of BAM appears to be useful in predicting BAS response. Colesevelam was better tolerated than colestyramine and showed some efficacy in colestyramine failures. Colestyramine failure should not be used to exclude BAM. Colonic histology is of no relevance.

  18. Dual acid-responsive supramolecular nanoparticles as new anticancer drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunran; Chen, Xiaofei; Yao, Xuemei; Chen, Li; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Considering the specific pH gradients of tumour microenvironments, a dual acid-responsive drug delivery system, which can respond to the tumor extracellular and intercellular pH stimuli, has been fabricated via simple host-guest recognition. Firstly, we synthesise 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzaldehyde modified dextran (Dex-TMBA) and mPEG-imine-β-cyclodextrin (PIC), respectively. And then, through the host-guest recognition between the cyclodextrin (CD) of PIC and the benzene ring of Dex-TMBA, a kind of dual acid-responsive supramolecular drug delivery system can be fabricated. Under neutral pH conditions, anticancer drugs can be loaded by forming supramolecular nanoparticles via the host-guest recognition. While, at tumor extracellular pH (∼6.8), the acid-labile benzoic-imine of PIC cleaves and the nanoparticles are amino positively charged to facilitate cell internalization. Subsequently, due to the hydrolysis of acetal bonds in Dex-TMBA under significantly increased acidity in subcellular compartments such as the endosomes (∼5.3), the loaded doxorubicin releases from the endocytosed drug delivery. This dual acid-responsive nanoparticles can efficiently load and release drugs, acting as drug delivery systems for enhancing anticancer efficiency. PMID:26438891

  19. Dynamics of Responses in Compatible Potato - Potato virus Y Interaction Are Modulated by Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Baebler, Špela; Stare, Katja; Kovač, Maja; Blejec, Andrej; Prezelj, Nina; Stare, Tjaša; Kogovšek, Polona; Pompe-Novak, Maruša; Rosahl, Sabine; Ravnikar, Maja; Gruden, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of the potato – Potato virus Y (PVY) compatible interaction in relation to salicylic acid - controlled pathways we performed experiments using non-transgenic potato cv. Désirée, transgenic NahG-Désirée, cv. Igor and PVYNTN, the most aggressive strain of PVY. The importance of salicylic acid in viral multiplication and symptom development was confirmed by pronounced symptom development in NahG-Désirée, depleted in salicylic acid, and reversion of the effect after spraying with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (a salicylic acid - analogue). We have employed quantitative PCR for monitoring virus multiplication, as well as plant responses through expression of selected marker genes of photosynthetic activity, carbohydrate metabolism and the defence response. Viral multiplication was the slowest in inoculated potato of cv. Désirée, the only asymptomatic genotype in the study. The intensity of defence-related gene expression was much stronger in both sensitive genotypes (NahG-Désirée and cv. Igor) at the site of inoculation than in asymptomatic plants (cv. Désirée). Photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism gene expression differed between the symptomatic and asymptomatic phenotypes. The differential gene expression pattern of the two sensitive genotypes indicates that the outcome of the interaction does not rely simply on one regulatory component, but similar phenotypical features can result from distinct responses at the molecular level. PMID:22194976

  20. Antioxidant responses to simulated acid rain and heavy metal deposition in birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Koricheva, J; Roy, S; Vranjic, J A; Haukioja, E; Hughes, P R; Hänninen, O

    1997-01-01

    This study measured the responses of different anti-oxidants in 2-year-old birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings subjected to simulated acid rain (pH 4.0) and heavy metals (Cu/Ni), applied alone or in combination for 2 months. The applied concentrations of pollutants did not significantly affect seedling biomass or total glutathione levels. Acid rain alone increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity both in leaves and roots, while heavy metals alone inhibited SOD activity in roots. Both acid rain and heavy metals applied singly increased ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities in leaves but decreased activities in roots. In contrast, acid rain and heavy metal treatments increased glutathione reductase (GR) activity in roots but not in leaves. Spraying birch seedlings with a mixture of acid rain and heavy metals increased SOD, APX and GPX activities in leaves and GR activity in roots. However, the effects of mixed pollutants on enzyme activities usually were less than the summed effects of individual pollutants. Enzyme responses also depended on where pollutants were applied: spraying pollutants onto the shoots initiated higher responses in SOD, APX and GPX than did application to the soil surface, while the opposite was true for GR.

  1. Dietary fatty acids and immune response to food-borne bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Lisa M; Balan, Kannan V; Babu, Uma S

    2013-05-01

    Functional innate and acquired immune responses are required to protect the host from pathogenic bacterial infections. Modulation of host immune functions may have beneficial or deleterious effects on disease outcome. Different types of dietary fatty acids have been shown to have variable effects on bacterial clearance and disease outcome through suppression or activation of immune responses. Therefore, we have chosen to review research across experimental models and food sources on the effects of commonly consumed fatty acids on the most common food-borne pathogens, including Salmonella sp., Campylobacter sp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Altogether, the compilation of literature suggests that no single fatty acid is an answer for protection from all food-borne pathogens, and further research is necessary to determine the best approach to improve disease outcomes. PMID:23698167

  2. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  3. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  4. Light and acid dual-responsive organogel formation based on m-methyl red derivative.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinhua; Gao, Aiping; Lv, Haiting; Wu, Yan; Wang, Xiuxiu; Fan, Yang

    2013-12-01

    A new gelator 1 that included m-methyl red was synthesized and fully characterized. It was found that the organogel of 1 was stable in DMSO even if the organogel was stimulated by acid or light. The organogel was thoroughly characterized using various microscopic techniques including field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. The organogel exhibited tunable structures and optical properties under different stimulation. The regular nanoring structure was turned into microspheres after the organogel in DMSO was stimulated at 254 nm light or acid. At the same time, the color of molecule 1 in gel state and solution state was all changed after stimulation by light or acid. The hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking were found to be the main driving forces for gel formation. This dual-responsive gel held promise for soft materials application in upscale smart responsive materials. PMID:24135789

  5. Response to oxalic acid as a resistance assay for Sclerotinia minor in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response to oxalic acid was evaluated as a potential assay for screening peanut breeding lines for resistance to Sclerotinia blight caused by Sclerotinia minor. Detached stems of seven Spanish- and six runner-type peanut cultivars and advanced breeding lines, varying in resistance to Sclerotinia bl...

  6. Proteomic characterization of acid stress response in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Dominic; Phadwal, Kanchan; Mäenpää, Pirkko

    2006-06-01

    A comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE coupled with MALDI-MS and LC-MS/MS was performed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to identify protein candidates involved in acid stress response in cyanobacteria. Comparison of soluble proteins from the cytoplasmic fraction of cells grown on media set at pH 7.5 and 5.5 using 2-DE identified four proteins, which showed significant changes in the abundance. Surprisingly, several general stress proteins, either the heat shock family proteins or chaperonins, did not show perceptible fold changes in response to acidity. Compared to the cytoplasmic proteome, the periplasmic proteome showed remarkable changes as a function of external pH. Protein expression profiling at different external pH, i.e., 9.0, 7.5, 6.0 and 5.5, allowed classifying the periplasmic proteins depending on their preferential expression patterns towards acidity or alkalinity. Among the acid- and base-induced proteins, oxalate decarboxylase and carbonic anhydrase were already known for their role in pH homeostasis. Several unknown proteins from the periplasm, that showed significant changes in response to pH, provide ideal targets for further studies in understanding pH stress response in cyanobacteria. This study also identified 14 novel proteins, hitherto unknown from the periplasmic space of Synechocystis. PMID:16691555

  7. Short chain fatty acid production and glucose responses by methane producers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation by gut microbiota has been linked to physiologic responses in the host. Methanogenic gut bacteria may remove more carbon from indigestible food matrices especially poorly digested carbohydrates. We sought to assess the effects of methane production on short chain fatty acid (SCFA) con...

  8. Response of DOC in acid-sensitive Maine lakes to decreasing sulfur deposition (1993 - 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, sulfur deposition has decreased across the northeastern United States. As a result, sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams have also decreased and many surface waters have become less acidic. Over the same time period, th...

  9. Functional Photoacoustic Imaging of Gastric Acid Secretion Using pH-Responsive Polyaniline Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Xiao, Hong; Yoon, Soon Joon; Liu, Chengbo; Matsuura, Drew; Tai, Wanyi; Song, Liang; O'Donnell, Matthew; Cheng, Du; Gao, Xiaohu

    2016-09-01

    A stomach functional imaging technique based on photoacoustics achieves noninvasive gastric acid secretory assessment utilizing pH-responsive polyaniline nanoprobes. A testing protocol mimicking clinical practice is established using a mouse model. After imaging, the nanoprobes are excreted outside the body without inducing systematic toxicity. Further optimization and translation of this technology can help alleviate patients' suffering and side effects.

  10. Gene-related strain variation of Staphylococcus aureus for homologous resistance response to acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soomin; Ahn, Sooyeon; Lee, Heeyoung; Kim, Won-Il; Kim, Hwang-Yong; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Kim, Se-Ri; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Yoon, Yohan

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus strains to the acidic condition of tomato in response to environmental stresses, such as heat and acid. S. aureus ATCC 13565, ATCC 14458, ATCC 23235, ATCC 27664, and NCCP10826 habituated in tomato extract at 35°C for 24 h were inoculated in tryptic soy broth. The culture suspensions were then subjected to heat challenge or acid challenge at 60°C and pH 3.0, respectively, for 60 min. In addition, transcriptional analysis using quantitative real-time PCR was performed to evaluate the expression level of acid-shock genes, such as clpB, zwf, nuoF, and gnd, from five S. aureus strains after the acid habituation of strains in tomato at 35°C for 15 min and 60 min in comparison with that of the nonhabituated strains. In comparison with the nonhabituated strains, the five tomato-habituated S. aureus strains did not show cross protection to heat, but tomato-habituated S. aureus ATCC 23235 showed acid resistance. In quantitative real-time-PCR analysis, the relative expression levels of acid-shock genes (clpB, zwf, nuoF, and gnd) were increased the most in S. aureus ATCC 23235 after 60 min of tomato habituation, but there was little difference in the expression levels among the five S. aureus strains after 15 min of tomato habituation. These results indicate that the variation of acid resistance of S. aureus is related to the expression of acid-shock genes during acid habituation. PMID:25285500

  11. Targeting amino acid metabolism in cancer growth and anti-tumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ananieva, Elitsa

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in amino acid metabolism have revealed that targeting amino acid metabolic enzymes in cancer therapy is a promising strategy for the development of novel therapeutic agents. There are currently several drugs in clinical trials that specifically target amino acid metabolic pathways in tumor cells. In the context of the tumor microenvironment, however, tumor cells form metabolic relationships with immune cells, and they often compete for common nutrients. Many tumors evolved to escape immune surveillance by taking advantage of their metabolic flexibility and redirecting nutrients for their own advantage. This review outlines the most recent advances in targeting amino acid metabolic pathways in cancer therapy while giving consideration to the impact these pathways may have on the anti-tumor immune response. PMID:26629311

  12. Plants having modified response to ethylene by transformation with an ETR nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  13. Proteomic analysis of the molecular response of Raji cells to maslinic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Yap, W H; Khoo, K S; Lim, S H; Yeo, C C; Lim, Y M

    2012-01-15

    Maslinic acid, a natural pentacyclic triterpene has been shown to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in some tumour cell lines. We studied the molecular response of Raji cells towards maslinic acid treatment. A proteomics approach was employed to identify the target proteins. Seventeen differentially expressed proteins including those involved in DNA replication, microtubule filament assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking, cell signaling, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal organization were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS. The down-regulation of stathmin, Ran GTPase activating protein-1 (RanBP1), and microtubule associated protein RP/EB family member 1 (EB1) were confirmed by Western blotting. The study of the effect of maslinic acid on Raji cell cycle regulation showed that it induced a G1 cell cycle arrest. The differential proteomic changes in maslinic acid-treated Raji cells demonstrated that it also inhibited expression of dUTPase and stathmin which are known to induce early S and G2 cell cycle arrests. The mechanism of maslinic acid-induced cell cycle arrest may be mediated by inhibiting cyclin D1 expression and enhancing the levels of cell cycle-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 protein. Maslinic acid suppressed nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity which is known to stimulate expression of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory gene products. These results suggest that maslinic acid affects multiple signaling molecules and inhibits fundamental pathways regulating cell growth and survival in Raji cells. PMID:21893403

  14. Responses of Pisum sativum L. to exogenous indole acetic acid application under manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Savita; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Maurya, Jagat Narayan

    2011-06-01

    Responses of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings to manganese (50, 100 and 250 μM) and indole acetic acid (10 and 100 μM) treatments were investigated. Single and combined exposure of pea to manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass, chlorophyll, carotenoids, protein and nitrogen while ammonium content increased compared to the control. Combined treatment of pea with 250 μM manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass by 54% and 51%, chlorophyll and carotenoids by 31% and 26%, root and shoot protein by 47% and 44%, and root and shoot nitrogen by 44% and 40%, respectively. Activities of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were decreased by the exposure of manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid while glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased. Combined application of 250 μM manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot glutamine synthetase activity by 44% and 39%, and glutamate synthase activity by 39% and 37% while root and shoot glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased by 47% and 42%, respectively compared to the control. In contrast, application of 10 μM indole acetic acid together with manganese decreased the negative impacts of manganese, and promoted seedling growth compared to the manganese treatments alone. This study has shown that 10 μM indole acetic acid protected pea seedlings appreciably from manganese toxicity by regulating ammonium content and the activities of enzymes of ammonium assimilation, while 100 μM of indole acetic acid exhibited opposite response under manganese toxicity. PMID:21516457

  15. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  16. Effects of temporal variations in the acidity of rain on crop response to acidic deposition (Task Force Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The variation of rainfall pH from one event to another may have important biological consequences in several respects. A few rainfall events, or even only one, at low pH values may be more damaging than the same total hydrogen ion deposition spread out over a larger number of events with higher pH values. The variation of rainfall pH within events may also affect biological response. For example, during the early stages of an event, acid precipitation may be less effective in damaging vegetation since the water falling on the plant surfaces is continually being washed off by the subsequent rain. On the other hand, that rainwater which falls during the very last stages of an event remains on the vegetation until it evaporates. Since the concentration of contaminants remaining in solution on the leaves in these circumstances steadily increasing during evaporation, this particular rain may have a significantly greater effect. Of course, there is also a third hypothesis to the effect that it is primarily the total hydrogen ion deposition received by plant surfaces over a long period of time (conceivably, over an entire growing season) which is the most important parameter due to the cumulative stress imposed on the plant tissue over the entire period of exposure. The proposed experiments will determine which of these hypotheses best represents the response of a particular, economically-important crop species to the impact of more realistically programmed, acid rain simulant treatments. Design of the experiments is discussed.

  17. Ascorbic acid attenuates the pressor response to voluntary apnea in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Brittney J; Patel, Hardikkumar M; Muller, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that postmenopausal women have an augmented blood pressure response to voluntary apnea compared to premenopausal women. Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and healthy aging are associated with increased oxidative stress, which may impair cardiovascular function. Restoring physiological responses could have clinical relevance since transient surges in blood pressure are thought to be an important stimulus for end-organ damage in aging and disease. We tested the hypothesis that acute antioxidant infusion improves physiological responses to voluntary apnea in healthy postmenopausal women (n = 8, 64 ± 2 year). We measured beat-by-beat mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and brachial artery blood flow velocity (BBFV, Doppler ultrasound) following intravenous infusion of normal saline and ascorbic acid (∼3500 mg). Subjects performed maximal voluntary end-expiratory apneas and changes (Δ) from baseline were compared between infusions. The breath hold duration and oxygen saturation nadir were similar between saline (29 ± 6 sec, 94 ± 1%) and ascorbic acid (29 ± 5 sec, 94 ± 1%). Ascorbic acid attenuated the pressor response to voluntary apnea (ΔMAP: 6 ± 2 mmHg) as compared to saline (ΔMAP: 12 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.034) and also attenuated forearm vasoconstriction (ΔBBFV: 4 ± 9 vs. −12 ± 7%, P = 0.049) but did not affect ΔHR. We conclude that ascorbic acid lowers the blood pressure response to voluntary apnea in postmenopausal women by inhibiting vasoconstriction in the limb vasculature. Whether ascorbic acid has similar effects in OSA patients remains to be prospectively tested. PMID:25907792

  18. Acid-responsive properties of fibrils from heat-induced whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Hua; Wang, Jing; Dong, Shi-Rong; Cheng, Wen; Kong, Bao-Hua; Tan, Jun-Yan

    2016-08-01

    The heat-induced fibrils of whey protein concentrate (WPC) have demonstrated an acid-responsive property; that is, the fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation as pH was adjusted to 1.8, 6.5, and back to 1.8. We investigated the microstructure, driving force, and thermal stability of 3.0% (wt) WPC nanofibrils adjusted between pH 6.5 and 1.8 twice. The results showed that the nanofibrils had acid-responsive properties and good thermal stability after reheating for 10h at 90°C and adjusting pH from 1.8 to 6.5 to 1.8. The content of WPC fibril aggregates was not much different with the prolongation of heating times during pH variation. Although the nanofibrils' structure could be destroyed only by changing the pH, the essence of this destruction might only form fiber fragments, polymers that would restore a fibrous structure upon returning to pH 1.8. A described model for the acid-responsive assembly of fibrils of WPC was proposed. The fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation by weaker noncovalent interactions (surface hydrophobicity) as pH changed from 1.8 to 6.5 back to 1.8. However, the fibrils lost the acid-responsive properties because much more S-S (disulfide) formation occurred when the solution was adjusted to pH 6.5 and reheated. Meanwhile, fibrils still possessed acid-responsive properties when reheated at pH 1.8, and the content of fibrils slightly increased with a further reduction of α-helix structure. PMID:27265171

  19. Change in the plasmid copy number in acetic acid bacteria in response to growth phase and acetic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Naoki; Astuti, Wiwik; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Plasmids pGE1 (2.5 kb), pGE2 (7.2 kb), and pGE3 (5.5 kb) were isolated from Gluconacetobacter europaeus KGMA0119, and sequence analyses revealed they harbored 3, 8, and 4 genes, respectively. Plasmid copy numbers (PCNs) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR at different stages of bacterial growth. When KGMA0119 was cultured in medium containing 0.4% ethanol and 0.5% acetic acid, PCN of pGE1 increased from 7 copies/genome in the logarithmic phase to a maximum of 12 copies/genome at the beginning of the stationary phase, before decreasing to 4 copies/genome in the late stationary phase. PCNs for pGE2 and pGE3 were maintained at 1-3 copies/genome during all phases of growth. Under a higher concentration of ethanol (3.2%) the PCN for pGE1 was slightly lower in all the growth stages, and those of pGE2 and pGE3 were unchanged. In the presence of 1.0% acetic acid, PCNs were higher for pGE1 (10 copies/genome) and pGE3 (6 copies/genome) during the logarithmic phase. Numbers for pGE2 did not change, indicating that pGE1 and pGE3 increase their PCNs in response to acetic acid. Plasmids pBE2 and pBE3 were constructed by ligating linearized pGE2 and pGE3 into pBR322. Both plasmids were replicable in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus and G. europaeus, highlighting their suitability as vectors for acetic acid bacteria.

  20. Change in the plasmid copy number in acetic acid bacteria in response to growth phase and acetic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Naoki; Astuti, Wiwik; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Plasmids pGE1 (2.5 kb), pGE2 (7.2 kb), and pGE3 (5.5 kb) were isolated from Gluconacetobacter europaeus KGMA0119, and sequence analyses revealed they harbored 3, 8, and 4 genes, respectively. Plasmid copy numbers (PCNs) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR at different stages of bacterial growth. When KGMA0119 was cultured in medium containing 0.4% ethanol and 0.5% acetic acid, PCN of pGE1 increased from 7 copies/genome in the logarithmic phase to a maximum of 12 copies/genome at the beginning of the stationary phase, before decreasing to 4 copies/genome in the late stationary phase. PCNs for pGE2 and pGE3 were maintained at 1-3 copies/genome during all phases of growth. Under a higher concentration of ethanol (3.2%) the PCN for pGE1 was slightly lower in all the growth stages, and those of pGE2 and pGE3 were unchanged. In the presence of 1.0% acetic acid, PCNs were higher for pGE1 (10 copies/genome) and pGE3 (6 copies/genome) during the logarithmic phase. Numbers for pGE2 did not change, indicating that pGE1 and pGE3 increase their PCNs in response to acetic acid. Plasmids pBE2 and pBE3 were constructed by ligating linearized pGE2 and pGE3 into pBR322. Both plasmids were replicable in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus and G. europaeus, highlighting their suitability as vectors for acetic acid bacteria. PMID:25575969

  1. Stream ecosystem response to chronic deposition of N and acid at the Bear Brook Watershed, Maine.

    PubMed

    Simon, Kevin S; Chadwick, Michael A; Huryn, Alexander D; Valett, H Maurice

    2010-12-01

    The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a long-term, paired watershed experiment that addresses the effects of acid and nitrogen (N) deposition on whole watersheds. To examine stream response at BBWM, we synthesized data on organic matter dynamics, including leaf breakdown rates, organic matter inputs and standing stocks, macroinvertebrate secondary production, and nutrient uptake in treated and reference streams at the BBWM. While N concentrations in stream water and leaves have increased, the input, standing stocks, and breakdown rates of leaves, as well as macroinvertebrate production, were not responsive to acid and N deposition. Both chronic and acute increases of N availability have saturated uptake of nitrate in the streams. Recent experimental increases in phosphorus (P) availability enhanced stream capacity to take up nitrate and altered the character of N saturation. These results show how the interactive effects of multiple factors, including environmental flow regime, acidification, and P availability, may constrain stream response to chronic N deposition.

  2. Epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibit vasopressin response in toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Schlondorff, D.; Petty, E.; Oates, J.A.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN )

    1987-09-01

    In addition to cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, the kidney can also metabolize arachidonic acid by a NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 enzyme to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); furthermore, 5,6-EET has been shown to alter electrolyte transport across isolated renal tubules. The authors examined the effects of three ({sup 14}C-labeled)-EETs (5,6-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EET) on osmotic water flow across toad urinary bladder. All three EETs reversibly inhibited vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water flow with 5,6- and 11,12-EET being the most potent. The effects appeared to be independent of prostaglandins EETs inhibited the water flow response to forskolin but not the response to adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or 8-BrcAMP, consistent with an effect on cAMP generation. To determine whether these effects were due to the EETs or to products of their metabolism, they examined the effects of their vicinal diol hydrolysis products, the dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Nonenzymatic conversion of labeled 5,6-EET to its vicinal diol occurred rapidly in the buffer, whereas 11,12-EET was hydrolyzed in a saturable manner only when incubated in the presence of bladder tissue. The dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids formed inhibited water flow in a manner paralleling that of the EETs. The data support the hypothesis that EETs and their physiologically active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites inhibit vasopressin-stimulated water flow predominantly via inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  3. Lipid binding protein response to a bile acid library: a combined NMR and statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, Simona; Pagano, Katiuscia; Boulton, Stephen; Zanzoni, Serena; Melacini, Giuseppe; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Primary bile acids, differing in hydroxylation pattern, are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and, once formed, can undergo extensive enzyme-catalysed glycine/taurine conjugation, giving rise to a complex mixture, the bile acid pool. Composition and concentration of the bile acid pool may be altered in diseases, posing a general question on the response of the carrier (bile acid binding protein) to the binding of ligands with different hydrophobic and steric profiles. A collection of NMR experiments (H/D exchange, HET-SOFAST, ePHOGSY NOESY/ROESY and (15) N relaxation measurements) was thus performed on apo and five different holo proteins, to monitor the binding pocket accessibility and dynamics. The ensemble of obtained data could be rationalized by a statistical approach, based on chemical shift covariance analysis, in terms of residue-specific correlations and collective protein response to ligand binding. The results indicate that the same residues are influenced by diverse chemical stresses: ligand binding always induces silencing of motions at the protein portal with a concomitant conformational rearrangement of a network of residues, located at the protein anti-portal region. This network of amino acids, which do not belong to the binding site, forms a contiguous surface, sensing the presence of the bound lipids, with a signalling role in switching protein-membrane interactions on and off.

  4. Physiological responses of root-less epiphytic plants to acid rain.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Bačkor, Martin; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2011-03-01

    Selected physiological responses of Tillandsia albida (Bromeliaceae) and two lichens (Hypogymnia physodes and Xanthoria parietina) exposed to simulated acid rain (AR) over 3 months were studied. Pigments were depressed in all species being affected the most in Tillandsia. Amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were elevated and soluble proteins decreased only in AR-exposed Hypogymnia. Free amino acids were slightly affected among species and only glutamate sharply decreased in AR-exposed Xanthoria. Slight increase in soluble phenols but decrease in flavonoids in almost all species suggests that the latter are not essential for tolerance to AR. Almost all phenolic acids in Tillandsia leaves decreased in response to AR and activities of selected enzymes (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, polyphenol oxidase, ascorbate- and guaiacol-peroxidase) were enhanced by AR. In lichens, considerable increase in metabolites (physodalic acid, atranorin and parietin) in response to AR was found but amount of ergosterol was unchanged. Macronutrients (K, Ca, Mg) decreased more pronouncedly in comparison with micronutrients in all species. Xanthoria showed higher tolerance in comparison with Hypogymnia, suggesting that could be useful for long-term biomonitoring.

  5. Physiological responses of root-less epiphytic plants to acid rain.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Bačkor, Martin; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2011-03-01

    Selected physiological responses of Tillandsia albida (Bromeliaceae) and two lichens (Hypogymnia physodes and Xanthoria parietina) exposed to simulated acid rain (AR) over 3 months were studied. Pigments were depressed in all species being affected the most in Tillandsia. Amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were elevated and soluble proteins decreased only in AR-exposed Hypogymnia. Free amino acids were slightly affected among species and only glutamate sharply decreased in AR-exposed Xanthoria. Slight increase in soluble phenols but decrease in flavonoids in almost all species suggests that the latter are not essential for tolerance to AR. Almost all phenolic acids in Tillandsia leaves decreased in response to AR and activities of selected enzymes (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, polyphenol oxidase, ascorbate- and guaiacol-peroxidase) were enhanced by AR. In lichens, considerable increase in metabolites (physodalic acid, atranorin and parietin) in response to AR was found but amount of ergosterol was unchanged. Macronutrients (K, Ca, Mg) decreased more pronouncedly in comparison with micronutrients in all species. Xanthoria showed higher tolerance in comparison with Hypogymnia, suggesting that could be useful for long-term biomonitoring. PMID:21161375

  6. Translation quality control is critical for bacterial responses to amino acid stress

    PubMed Central

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J.; Ibba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression relies on quality control for accurate transmission of genetic information. One mechanism that prevents amino acid misincorporation errors during translation is editing of misacylated tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. In the absence of editing, growth is limited upon exposure to excess noncognate amino acid substrates and other stresses, but whether these physiological effects result solely from mistranslation remains unclear. To explore if translation quality control influences cellular processes other than protein synthesis, an Escherichia coli strain defective in Tyr-tRNAPhe editing was used. In the absence of editing, cellular levels of aminoacylated tRNAPhe were elevated during amino acid stress, whereas in the wild-type strain these levels declined under the same growth conditions. In the editing-defective strain, increased levels of aminoacylated tRNAPhe led to continued synthesis of the PheL leader peptide and attenuation of pheA transcription under amino acid stress. Consequently, in the absence of editing, activation of the phenylalanine biosynthetic operon becomes less responsive to phenylalanine limitation. In addition to raising aminoacylated tRNA levels, the absence of editing lowered the amount of deacylated tRNAPhe in the cell. This reduction in deacylated tRNA was accompanied by decreased synthesis of the second messenger guanosine tetraphosphate and limited induction of stringent response-dependent gene expression in editing-defective cells during amino acid stress. These data show that a single quality-control mechanism, the editing of misacylated aminoacyl-tRNAs, provides a critical checkpoint both for maintaining the accuracy of translation and for determining the sensitivity of transcriptional responses to amino acid stress. PMID:26858451

  7. Acidic mist reduces foliar membrane-associated calcium and impairs stomatal responsiveness in red spruce.

    PubMed

    Borer, Catherine H; Schaberg, Paul G; DeHayes, Donald H

    2005-06-01

    Acidic deposition can leach essential pools of calcium (Ca) directly from plant foliage. Because of the central role of Ca in environmental signal transduction, disruptions of labile foliar Ca pools could impair physiological responses to a variety of environmental stimuli and stressors. We investigated the possibility that acidic mist-induced depletion of membrane-associated Ca (mCa), which is one form of labile Ca, may alter stomatal responsiveness to water stress, a process known to include Ca in signal transduction cascades. Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings were exposed to either pH 3.0 or pH 5.0 mist treatments for one growing season. Foliar nutrition was assessed following treatments, and declines in stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis were measured on current-year shoots following stem excision. Seedlings exposed to pH 3.0 acidic mist treatments had reduced mCa relative to the pH 5.0 treated seedlings. Seedlings subjected to the pH 3.0 acidic mist treatment exhibited impaired stomatal functions, including a smaller maximum aperture, slower closure and an increased lag time between stomatal closure and photosynthetic decline following experimental water stress. Delayed stomatal closure could undermine desiccation avoidance mechanisms. Previous work has demonstrated that acidic mist treatments deplete mCa in red spruce and impair cold tolerance, with similar effects in other species. The results we present provide further evidence that acidic mist-induced mCa depletion may cause disruption of a broad range of plant stress responses.

  8. Expression of the ethylene response factor gene TSRF1 enhances abscisic acid responses during seedling development in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Yang, Yuhong; Zhang, Zhijin; Chen, Jia; Wang, Xue-Chen; Huang, Rongfeng

    2008-10-01

    Ethylene response factor (ERF) proteins function as multiple regulators in the interaction of different stress-responsive pathways. During investigating the interaction of ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) pathways, several GCC-box-binding repressors of ERF proteins have been reported to repress both ethylene- and ABA-related responses, but it is unclear how GCC-box-binding activator ERF proteins are involved in this interaction. Previously, we isolated an ERF protein tomato stress-responsive factor 1 (TSRF1) from tomato by yeast one hybrid, and showed that TSRF1 as a transcriptional activator physically interacts with GCC box, and activates the expression of GCC box-containing genes and enhances resistance to pathogens, while ABA treatment alters the binding ability of TSRF1 with this element and decreases resistance to pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Here, we further report that TSRF1 is able to interact with a GCC box-like sequence (indicated as CE1/GCC in this paper) containing the core sequence of ZmABI4-binding-CE1-like element, and regulates ABA responses. Overexpression of TSRF1 in tobacco enhances ABA sensitivity during germination, cotyledon expansion and root elongation. Biochemical and molecular analyses demonstrate that TSRF1 interacts with CE1/GCC. Importantly, ABA treatment enhances the interaction of TSRF1 with the ABA-responsive element and subsequently increasing the expression of ABA-responsive or CE1/GCC-containing genes. In addition, TSRF1 also promotes the expression of senescence-associated genes and tobacco seedling senescence in response to ABA. These results show that TSRF1, a GCC-box-binding activator in plant pathogen resistance, positively regulates ABA-related plant developmental processes.

  9. Ciliary subcellular localization of TGR5 determines the cholangiocyte functional response to bile acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Masyuk, Anatoliy I.; Huang, Bing Q.; Radtke, Brynn N.; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Masyuk, Tatyana V.; Gradilone, Sergio A.

    2013-01-01

    TGR5, the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor that transmits bile acid signaling into a cell functional response via the intracellular cAMP signaling pathway, is expressed in human and rodent cholangiocytes. However, detailed information on the localization and function of cholangiocyte TGR5 is limited. We demonstrated that in human (H69 cells) and rat cholangiocytes, TGR5 is localized to multiple, diverse subcellular compartments, with its strongest expression on the apical plasma, ciliary, and nuclear membranes. To evaluate the relationship between ciliary TGR5 and the cholangiocyte functional response to bile acid signaling, we used a model of ciliated and nonciliated H69 cells and demonstrated that TGR5 agonists induce opposite changes in cAMP and ERK levels in cells with and without primary cilia. The cAMP level was increased in nonciliated cholangiocytes but decreased in ciliated cells. In contrast, ERK signaling was induced in ciliated cholangiocytes but suppressed in cells without cilia. TGR5 agonists inhibited proliferation of ciliated cholangiocytes but activated proliferation of nonciliated cells. The observed differential effects of TGR5 agonists were associated with the coupling of TGR5 to Gαi protein in ciliated cells and Gαs protein in nonciliated cholangiocytes. The functional responses of nonciliated and ciliated cholangiocytes to TGR5-mediated bile acid signaling may have important pathophysiological significance in cilia-related liver disorders (i.e., cholangiociliopathies), such as polycystic liver disease. In summary, TGR5 is expressed on diverse cholangiocyte compartments, including a primary cilium, and its ciliary localization determines the cholangiocyte functional response to bile acid signaling. PMID:23578785

  10. Functional convergence of oxylipin and abscisic acid pathways controls stomatal closure in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Kolla, Venkat A; Wang, Chang-Quan; Nasafi, Zainab; Hicks, Derrick R; Phadungchob, Bpantamars; Chehab, Wassim E; Brandizzi, Federica; Froehlich, John; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-03-01

    Membranes are primary sites of perception of environmental stimuli. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are major structural constituents of membranes that also function as modulators of a multitude of signal transduction pathways evoked by environmental stimuli. Different stresses induce production of a distinct blend of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids, "oxylipins." We employed three Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes to examine the oxylipin signature in response to specific stresses and determined that wounding and drought differentially alter oxylipin profiles, particularly the allene oxide synthase branch of the oxylipin pathway, responsible for production of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA). Specifically, wounding induced both 12-OPDA and JA levels, whereas drought induced only the precursor 12-OPDA. Levels of the classical stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) were also mainly enhanced by drought and little by wounding. To explore the role of 12-OPDA in plant drought responses, we generated a range of transgenic lines and exploited the existing mutant plants that differ in their levels of stress-inducible 12-OPDA but display similar ABA levels. The plants producing higher 12-OPDA levels exhibited enhanced drought tolerance and reduced stomatal aperture. Furthermore, exogenously applied ABA and 12-OPDA, individually or combined, promote stomatal closure of ABA and allene oxide synthase biosynthetic mutants, albeit most effectively when combined. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Brassica napus verified the potency of this combination in inducing stomatal closure in plants other than Arabidopsis. These data have identified drought as a stress signal that uncouples the conversion of 12-OPDA to JA and have revealed 12-OPDA as a drought-responsive regulator of stomatal closure functioning most effectively together with ABA. PMID:24429214

  11. Antioxidant response of soybean seedlings to joint stress of lanthanum and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Wang, Weimin

    2013-11-01

    Excess of rare earth elements in soil can be a serious environmental stress on plants, in particular when acid rain coexists. To understand how such a stress affects plants, we studied antioxidant response of soybean leaves and roots exposed to lanthanum (0.06, 0.18, and 0.85 mmol L(-1)) under acid rain conditions (pH 4.5 and 3.0). We found that low concentration of La3+ (0.06 mmol L(-1)) did not affect the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and peroxidase) whereas high concentration of La3+ (≥0.18 mmol L(-1)) did. Compared to treatment with acid rain (pH 4.5 and pH 3.0) or La3+ alone, joint stress of La3+ and acid rain affected more severely the activity of catalase and peroxidase, and induced more H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. When treated with high level of La3+ (0.85 mmol L(-1)) alone or with acid rain (pH 4.5 and 3.0), roots were more affected than leaves regarding the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, physiological function, and growth. The severity of oxidative damage and inhibition of growth caused by the joint stress associated positively with La3+ concentration and soil acidity. These results will help us understand plant response to joint stress, recognize the adverse environmental impact of rare earth elements in acidic soil, and develop measures to eliminate damage caused by such joint stress.

  12. Effects of diets high in unsaturated Fatty acids on socially induced stress responses in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Matthias; Millesi, Eva; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Wallner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), such as omega-3 and omega-6 poly- and omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acids are important nutrients and major components of neuronal cell membranes. They play a major role in modulating brain functions and physiology and may therefore diminish behavioral and physiological stress reactions in corroboration with decreased cortisol concentrations. Functionally, cortisol itself can modulate several behaviors and also the fatty acid metabolism in the long term. But only little is known about the behavioral and physiological influences of dietary UFAs in a social group, where individuals are regularly exposed to stressful situations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary UFAs on saliva cortisol concentrations and behavioral responses in socially confronted guinea pigs. Three groups of animals were additionally supplemented with 500 mg chia seeds (high in omega-3), walnuts (high in omega-6), or peanuts (high in omega-9) per kg bodyweight each day and compared to a control group. During social confrontation saliva cortisol concentrations significantly increased in all groups, which was accompanied by a loss in bodyweight. However, cortisol levels remained lower in the chia and walnut groups compared to controls. Additionally, the walnut group displayed significantly increased locomotion, while no differences between groups were detected in socio-positive, sexual, or aggressive behaviors. Total plasma omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 fatty acids were significantly increased in the corresponding groups, due to the dietary supplementations. However, a significant decrease in plasma omega-3 and an increase in plasma n-6 fatty acids were detected in the chia group when comparing the measurements before and after social confrontation. We conclude that both omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids can diminish behavioral and physiological stress responses to the social environment, enabling individuals to cope

  13. Acute exposure to realistic acid fog: effects on respiratory function and airway responsiveness in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Leduc, D; Fally, S; De Vuyst, P; Wollast, R; Yernault, J C

    1995-11-01

    Naturally occurring fogs in industrialized cities are contaminated by acidic air pollutants. In Brussels, Belgium, the pH of polluted fogwater may be as low as 3 with osmolarity as low as 30 mOsm. In order to explore short-term respiratory effects of a realistic acid-polluted fog, we collected samples of acid fog in Brussels, Belgium, which is a densely populated and industrialized city, we defined characteristics of this fog and exposed asthmatic volunteers at rest through a face mask to fogs with physical and chemical characteristics similar to those of natural fogs assessed in this urban area. Fogwater was sampled using a screen collector where droplets are collected by inertial impaction and chemical content of fogwater was assessed by measurement of conductivity, pH, visible colorimetry, high pressure liquid chromatography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry over a period of one year. The fogwater composition was dominated by NH4+ and SO4- ions. First we evaluated the possible effect of fog acidity alone. For this purpose 14 subjects with asthma were exposed at rest for 1 hr [mass median aerodynamic diameter to a large-particle (MMAD), 9 microns] aerosol with H2SO4 concentration of 500 micrograms/m3 (pH 2.5) and osmolarity of 300 mOsm. We did not observe significant change in pulmonary function or bronchial responsiveness to metacholine. In the second part of the work, 10 asthmatic subjects were exposed to acid fog (MMAD, 7 microns) containing sulfate and ammonium ions (major ions recovered in naturally occurring fogs) with pH 3.5 and osmolarity 30 mOsm. Again, pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity were not modified after inhalation of this fog. It was concluded that short-term exposure to acid fog reproducing acidity and hypoosmolarity of natural polluted fogs does not induce bronchoconstriction and does not change bronchial responsiveness in asthmatics.

  14. Effects of Diets High in Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Socially Induced Stress Responses in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Matthias; Millesi, Eva; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Wallner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), such as omega-3 and omega-6 poly- and omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acids are important nutrients and major components of neuronal cell membranes. They play a major role in modulating brain functions and physiology and may therefore diminish behavioral and physiological stress reactions in corroboration with decreased cortisol concentrations. Functionally, cortisol itself can modulate several behaviors and also the fatty acid metabolism in the long term. But only little is known about the behavioral and physiological influences of dietary UFAs in a social group, where individuals are regularly exposed to stressful situations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary UFAs on saliva cortisol concentrations and behavioral responses in socially confronted guinea pigs. Three groups of animals were additionally supplemented with 500 mg chia seeds (high in omega-3), walnuts (high in omega-6), or peanuts (high in omega-9) per kg bodyweight each day and compared to a control group. During social confrontation saliva cortisol concentrations significantly increased in all groups, which was accompanied by a loss in bodyweight. However, cortisol levels remained lower in the chia and walnut groups compared to controls. Additionally, the walnut group displayed significantly increased locomotion, while no differences between groups were detected in socio-positive, sexual, or aggressive behaviors. Total plasma omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 fatty acids were significantly increased in the corresponding groups, due to the dietary supplementations. However, a significant decrease in plasma omega-3 and an increase in plasma n-6 fatty acids were detected in the chia group when comparing the measurements before and after social confrontation. We conclude that both omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids can diminish behavioral and physiological stress responses to the social environment, enabling individuals to cope

  15. Antioxidant response of soybean seedlings to joint stress of lanthanum and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Wang, Weimin

    2013-11-01

    Excess of rare earth elements in soil can be a serious environmental stress on plants, in particular when acid rain coexists. To understand how such a stress affects plants, we studied antioxidant response of soybean leaves and roots exposed to lanthanum (0.06, 0.18, and 0.85 mmol L(-1)) under acid rain conditions (pH 4.5 and 3.0). We found that low concentration of La3+ (0.06 mmol L(-1)) did not affect the activity of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and peroxidase) whereas high concentration of La3+ (≥0.18 mmol L(-1)) did. Compared to treatment with acid rain (pH 4.5 and pH 3.0) or La3+ alone, joint stress of La3+ and acid rain affected more severely the activity of catalase and peroxidase, and induced more H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. When treated with high level of La3+ (0.85 mmol L(-1)) alone or with acid rain (pH 4.5 and 3.0), roots were more affected than leaves regarding the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes, physiological function, and growth. The severity of oxidative damage and inhibition of growth caused by the joint stress associated positively with La3+ concentration and soil acidity. These results will help us understand plant response to joint stress, recognize the adverse environmental impact of rare earth elements in acidic soil, and develop measures to eliminate damage caused by such joint stress. PMID:23653318

  16. The NASA Dryden AAR Project: A Flight Test Approach to an Aerial Refueling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Jennifer L.; Murray, James E.; Campos, Norma V.

    2004-01-01

    The integration of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) into controlled airspace has generated a new era of autonomous technologies and challenges. Autonomous aerial refueling would enable UAVs to travel further distances and loiter for extended periods over time-critical targets. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center recently has completed a flight research project directed at developing a dynamic hose and drogue system model to support the development of an automated aerial refueling system. A systematic dynamic model of the hose and drogue system would include the effects of various influences on the system, such as flight condition, hose and drogue type, tanker type and weight, receiver type, and tanker and receiver maneuvering. Using two NASA F/A-18 aircraft and a conventional hose and drogue aerial refueling store from the Navy, NASA has obtained flight research data that document the response of the hose and drogue system to these effects. Preliminary results, salient trends, and important lessons are presented.

  17. FGF21 mediates the lipid metabolism response to amino acid starvation

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa-Coelho, Ana Luísa; Relat, Joana; Hondares, Elayne; Pérez-Martí, Albert; Ribas, Francesc; Villarroya, Francesc; Marrero, Pedro F.; Haro, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Lipogenic gene expression in liver is repressed in mice upon leucine deprivation. The hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), which is critical to the adaptive metabolic response to starvation, is also induced under amino acid deprivation. Upon leucine deprivation, we found that FGF21 is needed to repress expression of lipogenic genes in liver and white adipose tissue, and stimulate phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase in white adipose tissue. The increased expression of Ucp1 in brown adipose tissue under these circumstances is also impaired in FGF21-deficient mice. Our results demonstrate the important role of FGF21 in the regulation of lipid metabolism during amino acid starvation. PMID:23661803

  18. Arginine-responsive terbium luminescent hybrid sensors triggered by two crown ether carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lasheng; Tang, Ke; Ding, Xiaoping; Wang, Qianming; Zhou, Zhan; Xiao, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Crown ether carboxylic acids constitute main building blocks for the synthesis of terbium containing covalent cross-linked luminescent materials. Both the complexes and the hybrid nanomaterials could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water. More importantly, they were found to have a profound effect on the luminescence responses to arginine compared with glutamic acid, histidine, tryptophan, threonine, tyrosine and phenylalanine in aqueous environment. The present study provided the possibility of using a host-guest mechanism as a way of signal transduction based on lanthanide supramolecular hybrid materials.

  19. Role of p53 in the cellular response following oleic acid accumulation in Chang liver cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Ah Young; Chang, Seung-Hee; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Jae-Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of fatty acids triggers the harmful cellular response called lipotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the cellular response following accumulation of oleic acid (OA), a monounsaturated fatty acid, in human Chang liver cells. OA droplets were distributed freely in the cytoplasm and/or degraded within lysosomes. OA exposure increased ATP production and concomitantly dilated mitochondria. At 24h after OA exposure, cell viability decreased slightly and was coupled with a reduction in mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, the alteration in cell viability was also associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species and changes in the cell cycle. Moreover, OA treatment increased the expression of autophagy- and apoptotic cell death-related proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we investigated the role of p53, a tumor suppressor protein, in the cellular response elicited by OA accumulation. OA-induced changes in cell viability and ATP production were rescued to control levels when cells were pretreated with pifithrin-alpha (PTA), a p53 inhibitor. By contrast, the expressions of LC3-II and perilipin, proteins required for lipophagy, were down-regulated by PTA pretreatment. Taken together, our results suggest that p53 plays a key role in the cellular response elicited by OA accumulation in Chang liver cells.

  20. Dietary fatty acid modulation of mucosally-induced tolerogenic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Harbige, L S; Fisher, B A

    2001-11-01

    Immunological unresponsiveness or hyporesponsiveness (tolerance) can be induced by feeding protein antigens to naive animals. Using a classical oral ovalbumin gut-induced tolerance protocol in BALB/c mice we investigated the effects of dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on high-and low-dose oral tolerance (and in non-tolerised animals, i.e. effects of antigen challenge alone) in relation to lymphoproliferative, cytokine and antibody responses. Fish oil rich in long-chain n-3 fatty acids decreased both T-helper (Th) 1- and Th2-like responses. In contrast, borage (Borago officinalis) oil rich in n-6 PUFA, of which gamma-linolenic acid is rapidly metabolised to longer-chain n-6 PUFA, increased Thl-like responses and decreased Th2-like responses, and possibly enhanced suppressor cell or Th3-like activity. These findings are in general agreement with other studies on the effects of long chain n-3 PUFA on immune system functions, and characterise important differences between long-chain n-3 and n-6 PUFA, defining more precisely and broadly the immunological regulatory mechanisms involved. They are also discussed in relation to autoimmune disease. PMID:12069397

  1. Taste in chimpanzee: I. The summated response to sweeteners and the effect of gymnemic acid.

    PubMed

    Hellekant, G; Ninomiya, Y; DuBois, G E; Danilova, V; Roberts, T W

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate further with electrophysiological and behavioral techniques the similarity between the sense of taste of humans and chimpanzees, especially with regard to the effects of gymnemic acid. Gymnemic acid (GA) is a powerful suppressor of sweet taste in humans but lacks this ability in nonprimates and lower primates. The summated taste responses from the chorda tympani nerve were recorded in nine adult chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes. The results show that all tested compounds that taste to humans elicited nerve responses in chimpanzees. GA suppressed or abolished the response to all sweeteners, but had no effects on the responses to the nonsweet compounds. The suppression varied from complete abolishment (aspartame, saccharin), to about 50% reduction (xylitol). When the effect of GA was tested on concentration series, 20% remained of the response to sucrose, whereas the responses to aspartame and saccharin were basically abolished. Higher concentrations of GA suppressed more. The effects of GA developed also in the presence of saccharin, but seemed less pronounced. The behavioral results were obtained with a one-bottle preference technique before and after GA. The results demonstrated that after exposure of the tongue to GA, the animals' liking for sweet diminished. These results parallel psychophysical and electrophysiological findings in humans. The way GA suppressed sweet taste in chimpanzees added one more characteristic to those that set chimpanzees apart from monkeys and close to humans.

  2. Lipid metabolic dose response to dietary alpha-linolenic acid in monk parrot (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Petzinger, Christina; Heatley, J J; Bailey, Christopher A; Bauer, John E

    2014-03-01

    Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) are susceptible to atherosclerosis, a progressive disease characterized by the formation of plaques in the arteries accompanied by underlying chronic inflammation. The family of n-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA), have consistently been shown to reduce atherosclerotic risk factors in humans and other mammals. Some avian species have been observed to convert α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) to EPA and DHA (Htin et al. in Arch Geflugelk 71:258-266, 2007; Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013). Therefore, the metabolic effects of including flaxseed oil, as a source of ALA, in the diet at three different levels (low, medium, and high) on the lipid metabolism of Monk parrots was evaluated through measuring plasma total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), triacylglycerols (TAG), and phospholipid fatty acids. Feed intake, body weight, and body condition score were also assessed. Thus the dose and possible saturation response of increasing dietary ALA at constant linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LNA) concentration on lipid metabolism in Monk parrots (M. monachus) was evaluated. Calculated esterified cholesterol in addition to plasma TC, FC, and TAG were unaltered by increasing dietary ALA. The high ALA group had elevated levels of plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3, 22:5n-3). The medium and high ALA groups had suppressed plasma phospholipid 20:2n-6 and adrenic acid (22:4n-6, ADA) compared to the low ALA group. When the present data were combined with data from a previous study (Petzinger et al. in J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr, 2013) a dose response to dietary ALA was observed when LNA was constant. Plasma phospholipid ALA, EPA, DPAn-3, DHA, and total n-3 were positively correlated while 20:2n-6, di-homo-gamma-linoleic acid (20:3n-6Δ7), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), ADA, and total n-6 were inversely correlated with dietary en% ALA.

  3. Effects of simulated acid rain on yield response of two soybean cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, P.M.; Banwart, W.L.; Hassett, J.J.; Finke, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted for 3 yrs. to determine the effects of simulated acid rain on seed yield of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, 'Amsoy 71' and 'Williams 82'. Plants were treated biweekly with simulated rain of pH 5.6, 4.6, 4.2, 3.8, 3.4, and 3.0. For Amsoy 71 there was a linear decrease in yield with increasing rainfall acidity for 1 of 3 yrs but no significant effects for the other two. Thus, acid rain appears to reduce the yield of some soybean cultivars slightly, but this effect is not consistent from year to year. Amsoy 71 and Williams 82 soybean treated with the most-acidic rain, pH 3.0, resulted in average yields for the 3 yrs of the study of approximately 3% and 4% lower than the average yields for the other treatments, respectively. However, calculations from the response functions developed have shown that, at current levels of rainfall acidities, the effects on yield are very small. With an increase in rainfall acidity of 50% in Illinois, the predicted yield decrease for Amsoy 71 and Williams 82 soybean would be less than 1%. Similarly, the expected increase in yield of these cultivars would be 1% or less if acidity in the rainfall were reduced by 50%. While there may be beneficial effects of reduced S and N oxide emissions, these results suggest the resultant lower rainfall acidities are not likely to produce noticeable changes in soybean yields.

  4. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:25940300

  5. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

  6. Marsh plant response to metals: Exudation of aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2016-03-01

    Metal exposure is known to induce the production and secretion of substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere by plant roots. Knowledge on this matter is extensive for soil plants but still considerably scarce regarding marsh plants roots adapted to high salinity media. Phragmites australis and Halimione portulacoides, two marsh plants commonly distributed in European estuarine salt marshes, were used to assess the response of roots of both species, in terms of ALMWOAs exudation, to Cu, Ni and Cd exposure (isolated and in mixture since in natural environment, they are exposed to mixture of metals). As previous studies were carried out in unrealistic and synthetic media, here a more natural medium was selected. Therefore, in vitro experiments were carried out, with specimens of both marsh plants, and in freshwater contaminated with two different Cu, Ni and Cd concentrations (individual metal and in mixture). Both marsh plants were capable of liberating ALMWOAs into the surrounding medium. Oxalic, citric and maleic acids were found in P. australis root exudate solutions and oxalic and maleic acids in H. portulacoides root exudate solutions. ALMWOA liberation by both plants was plant species and metal-dependent. For instance, Cu affected the exudation of oxalic acid by H. portulacoides and of oxalic and citric acids by P. australis roots. In contrast, Ni and Cd did not stimulate any specific response. Regarding the combination of all metals, H. portulacoides showed a similar response to that observed for Cu individually. However, in the P. australis case, at high metal concentration mixture, a synergetic effect led to the increase of oxalic acid levels in root exudate solution and to a decrease of citric acid liberation. A correlation between ALMWOAs exudation and metal accumulation could not be established. P. australis and H. portulacoides are considered suitable metal phytoremediators of estuarine impacted areas

  7. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guohua; Liu, Xingzhao; Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types.

  8. Response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests of different maturity in southern China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guohua; Liu, Xingzhao; Chen, Xiaomei; Qiu, Qingyan; Zhang, Deqiang; Chu, Guowei; Liu, Juxiu; Liu, Shizhong; Zhou, Guoyi

    2013-01-01

    The response of soil respiration to acid rain in forests, especially in forests of different maturity, is poorly understood in southern China despite the fact that acid rain has become a serious environmental threat in this region in recent years. Here, we investigated this issue in three subtropical forests of different maturity [i.e. a young pine forest (PF), a transitional mixed conifer and broadleaf forest (MF) and an old-growth broadleaved forest (BF)] in southern China. Soil respiration was measured over two years under four simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments (CK, the local lake water, pH 4.5; T1, water pH 4.0; T2, water pH 3.5; and T3, water pH 3.0). Results indicated that SAR did not significantly affect soil respiration in the PF, whereas it significantly reduced soil respiration in the MF and the BF. The depressed effects on both forests occurred mostly in the warm-wet seasons and were correlated with a decrease in soil microbial activity and in fine root biomass caused by soil acidification under SAR. The sensitivity of the response of soil respiration to SAR showed an increasing trend with the progressive maturity of the three forests, which may result from their differences in acid buffering ability in soil and in litter layer. These results indicated that the depressed effect of acid rain on soil respiration in southern China may be more pronounced in the future in light of the projected change in forest maturity. However, due to the nature of this field study with chronosequence design and the related pseudoreplication for forest types, this inference should be read with caution. Further studies are needed to draw rigorous conclusions regarding the response differences among forests of different maturity using replicated forest types. PMID:23626790

  9. PTH1 Receptor Is Involved in Mediating Cellular Response to Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2012-01-01

    The molecular pathways by which long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) influence skeletal health remain elusive. Both LCPUFA and parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor (PTH1R) are known to be involved in bone metabolism while any direct link between the two is yet to be established. Here we report that LCPUFA are capable of direct, PTH1R dependent activation of extracellular ligand-regulated kinases (ERK). From a wide range of fatty acids studied, varying in chain length, saturation, and position of double bonds, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic fatty acids (DHA) caused the highest ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, EPA potentiated the effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH(1–34)) in a superagonistic manner. EPA or DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by the PTH1R antagonist and by knockdown of PTH1R. Inhibition of PTH1R downstream signaling molecules, protein kinases A (PKA) and C (PKC), reduced EPA and DHA dependent ERK phosphorylation indicating that fatty acids predominantly activate G-protein pathway and not the β-arrestin pathway. Using picosecond time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and a genetically engineered PTH1R sensor (PTH-CC), we detected conformational responses to EPA similar to those caused by PTH(1–34). PTH1R antagonist blocked the EPA induced conformational response of the PTH-CC. Competitive binding studies using fluorescence anisotropy technique showed that EPA and DHA competitively bind to and alter the affinity of PTH1 receptor to PTH(1–34) leading to a superagonistic response. Finally, we showed that EPA stimulates protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation in a PTH1R-dependent manner and affects the osteoblast survival pathway, by inhibiting glucocorticoid-induced cell death. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that LCPUFAs, EPA and DHA, can activate PTH1R receptor at nanomolar concentrations and consequently provide a putative molecular mechanism for the action of fatty acids in bone. PMID:23300710

  10. Nutrigenetic Response to Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Obese Asthmatics (NOOA): Rationale and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Jason E.; Mougey, Edward; Allayee, Hooman; Blake, Kathryn V.; Lockey, Richard; Gong, Yan; Hossain, Jobayer; Killen, Kelleigh; Lima, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled asthma is a major cause of hospitalizations and emergency room visits. Factors including obesity, African ancestry and childhood are associated with increased asthma severity. Considering the high morbidity caused by asthma, relatively few classes of drugs exist to control this common disease. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies may be needed to reduce asthma’s impact on public health. Data suggest that a high fat diet that is deficient in omega-3 fatty acids could promote both obesity and excessive inflammation, resulting in greater asthma severity. Small trials with supplemental omega-3 fatty acids have been conducted with encouraging but inconsistent results. The variability in response seen in past trials may be due to the past subjects’ genetics (specifically ALOX5 rs59439148) or their particular asthma phenotypes. Therefore, the “Nutrigenetic response to Omega-3 Fatty acids in Obese Asthmatics (NOOA)” trial is currently underway and was designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled intervention study to determine if supplemental omega-3 fatty acids improves symptoms among obese adolescents and young adults with uncontrolled asthma. Here we report the design and rationale for the NOOA trial. Participants were given either 3.18g daily of eicosapentaenoic acid and 822mg daily docosahexaenoic acid, or matched control soy oil, for 24 weeks. Change in the asthma control questionnaire score was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included spirometry, impulse oscillometry, exacerbation rate, airway biomarkers, systemic inflammation, leukotriene biosynthesis and T-lymphocyte function. NOOA may lead to a new therapeutic treatment strategy and greater understanding of the mechanistic role of diet in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:23298524

  11. Responses of soil buffering capacity to acid treatment in three typical subtropical forests.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yu, Mengxiao; Li, Kun; Shao, Yijing; Yan, Junhua

    2016-09-01

    Elevated anthropogenic acid deposition can significantly affect forest ecosystem functioning by changing soil pH, nutrient balance, and chemical leaching and so on. These effects generally differ among different forests, and the dominant mechanisms for those observed responses often vary, depending on climate, soil conditions and vegetation types. Using soil monoliths (0-40cm) from pine forest (pioneer), coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (transitional) and broadleaved forest (mature) in southern China, we conducted a leaching experiment with acid treatments at different pH levels (control: pH≈4.5; pH=3.5; pH=2.5). We found that pH3.5 treatment significantly reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in leachate from the pioneer forest soil. pH2.5 treatment significantly increased concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the pioneer forest soil, and also concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the transitional forest soil. All acid treatments had no significant effects on concentrations of these chemicals in leachate from the mature forest soil. The responses can be explained by the changes in soil pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and concentrations of Al and Fe. Our results showed that acid buffering capacity of the pioneer or transitional forest soil was lower than that of the mature forest soil. Therefore preserving mature forests in southern China is important for reducing the adverse impacts of high acid deposition on stream water quality at present and into the future. PMID:27185346

  12. Acute lung function responses to ambient acid aerosol exposures in children

    SciTech Connect

    Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Stern, B.; Franklin, C.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1989-02-01

    We examined the relationship between lung function changes and ambient acid aerosol episodes in children attending a residential summer camp. Young females (112) performed daily spirometry, and 96 were assessed on one occasion for airway hyperresponsiveness using a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Air quality measurements were performed on site and four distinct acid aerosol episodes were observed during the 41-day study. The maximum values observed during the 41-day study were: O/sub 3/ at 143 ppb; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 47.7 micrograms/m/sup 3/; and (H+) at 550 nmole/m/sup 3/. Maximum decrements of 3.5 and 7% for FEV1 and PEF, respectively, were observed to be associated with the air pollution episodes. There was some evidence of a differential lung function response to the episodes where children with a positive response to a methacholine challenge had larger decrements compared to their nonresponsive counterparts.

  13. Acute lung function responses to ambient acid aerosol exposures in children.

    PubMed

    Raizenne, M E; Burnett, R T; Stern, B; Franklin, C A; Spengler, J D

    1989-02-01

    We examined the relationship between lung function changes and ambient acid aerosol episodes in children attending a residential summer camp. Young females (112) performed daily spirometry, and 96 were assessed on one occasion for airway hyperresponsiveness using a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Air quality measurements were performed on site and four distinct acid aerosol episodes were observed during the 41-day study. The maximum values observed during the 41-day study were: O3 at 143 ppb; H2SO4 at 47.7 micrograms/m3; and [H+] at 550 nmole/m3. Maximum decrements of 3.5 and 7% for FEV1 and PEF, respectively, were observed to be associated with the air pollution episodes. There was some evidence of a differential lung function response to the episodes where children with a positive response to a methacholine challenge had larger decrements compared to their nonresponsive counterparts.

  14. The acid adaptive tolerance response in Campylobacter jejuni induces a global response, as suggested by proteomics and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Varsaki, Athanasia; Murphy, Caroline; Barczynska, Alicja; Jordan, Kieran; Carroll, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni CI 120 is a natural isolate obtained during poultry processing and has the ability to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) to acid + aerobic conditions in early stationary phase. Other strains tested they did not induce an ATR or they induced it in exponential phase. Campylobacter spp. do not contain the genes that encode the global stationary phase stress response mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes that are involved in the C. jejuni CI 120 early stationary phase ATR, as it seems to be expressing a novel mechanism of stress tolerance. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to examine the expression profile of cytosolic proteins during the C. jejuni CI 120 adaptation to acid + aerobic stress and microarrays to determine the genes that participate in the ATR. The results indicate induction of a global response that activated a number of stress responses, including several genes encoding surface components and genes involved with iron uptake. The findings of this study provide new insights into stress tolerance of C. jejuni, contribute to a better knowledge of the physiology of this bacterium and highlight the diversity among different strains. PMID:26221965

  15. Dietary omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids compete in producing tissue compositions and tissue responses.

    PubMed

    Lands, Bill

    2014-11-01

    Serious food-related health disorders may be prevented by recognizing the molecular processes that connect the dietary intake of vitamin-like fatty acids to tissue accumulation of precursors of potent hormone-like compounds that cause harmful tissue responses. Conversion of dietary 18-carbon omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids to tissue 20- and 22-carbon highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) is catalyzed by promiscuous enzymes that allow different types of fatty acid to compete among each other for accumulation in tissue HUFA. As a result, food choices strongly influence the types of accumulated tissue HUFA. However, the conversion of tissue HUFA to active hormones and their receptor-mediated actions occurs with discriminating enzymes and receptors that give more intense responses for the omega-6 and omega-3 hormones. Undesired chronic health disorders, which are made worse by excessive omega-6 hormone actions, can be prevented by eating more omega-3 fats, less omega-6 fats, and fewer calories per meal.

  16. Transcriptomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for its adaptation to sulphuric acid-induced stress.

    PubMed

    de Lucena, Rodrigo Mendonça; Elsztein, Carolina; de Barros Pita, Will; de Souza, Rafael Barros; de Sá Leitão Paiva Júnior, Sérgio; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio

    2015-11-01

    In bioethanol production plants, yeast cells are generally recycled between fermentation batches by using a treatment with sulphuric acid at a pH ranging from 2.0 to 2.5. We have previously shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to sulphuric acid treatment induce the general stress response pathway, fail to activate the protein kinase A signalling cascade and requires the mechanisms of cell wall integrity and high osmolarity glycerol pathways in order to survive in this stressful condition. In the present work, we used transcriptome-wide analysis as well as physiological assays to identify the transient metabolic responses of S. cerevisiae under sulphuric acid treatment. The results presented herein indicate that survival depends on a metabolic reprogramming of the yeast cells in order to assure the yeast cell viability by preventing cell growth under this harmful condition. It involves the differential expression of a subset of genes related to cell wall composition and integrity, oxidation-reduction processes, carbohydrate metabolism, ATP synthesis and iron uptake. These results open prospects for application of this knowledge in the improvement of industrial processes based on metabolic engineering to select yeasts resistant to acid treatment. PMID:26362331

  17. Biomolecular Interactions and Biological Responses of Emerging Two-Dimensional Materials and Aromatic Amino Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Shannahan, Jonathan; Raghavendra, Achyut J; Rao, Apparao M; Brown, Jared M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalnine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Graphene and GO were found to interact strongly with aromatic amino acids through π-π stacking, charge transfer, and H-bonding. Particularly, it was observed that both physi and chemisorption are prominent in the interactions of GO/graphene with phenylalanine and tryptophan while tyrosine exhibited strong chemisorption on graphene and GO. In contrast, BN exhibited little or no interactions, which could be attributed to localized π-electron clouds around N atoms in BN lattice. Lastly, the adsorption of amino acids on 2D materials was observed to considerably change their biological response in terms of reactive oxygen species generation. More importantly, these changes in the biological response followed the same trends observed in the physi and chemisorption measurements. PMID:27281436

  18. Increased sensitivity and variability of phytotoxicity responses in Arctic soils to a reference toxicant, boric acid.

    PubMed

    Anaka, Alison; Wickstrom, Mark; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2008-03-01

    Industrial and human activities in the Arctic regions may pose a risk to terrestrial Arctic ecosystem functions. One of the most common terrestrial toxicological end points, primary productivity, typically is assessed using a plant phytotoxicity test. Because of cryoturbation, a soil mixing process common in polar regions, we hypothesized that phytotoxicity test results in Arctic soils would be highly variable compared to other terrestrial ecosystems. The variability associated with phytotoxicity tests was evaluated using Environment Canada's standardized plant toxicity test in three cryoturbated soils from Canada's Arctic exposed to a reference toxicant, boric acid. Northern wheatgrass (Elymus lanceolatus) not only was more sensitive to toxicants in Arctic soils, its response to toxicants was more variable compared to that in temperate soils. The phytotoxicity of boric acid in cryosols was much greater than commonly reported in other soils, with a boric acid concentration of less than 150 microg/g soil needed to inhibit root and shoot growth by 20%. Large variability also was found in the phytotoxicity test results, with coefficients of variation for 10 samples ranging from 160 to 79%. The increased toxicity of boric acid in cryosols and variability in test response was not explained by soil properties. Based on our admittedly limited data set of three different Arctic soils, we recommend that more than 30 samples be taken from each control and potentially impacted area to accurately assess contaminant effects at sites in northern Canada. Such intensive sampling will insure that false-negative results for toxicant impacts in Arctic soils are minimized.

  19. Highly Lewis Acidic Arylboronate Esters Capable of Colorimetric Turn-On Response.

    PubMed

    Oehlke, Alexander; Auer, Alexander A; Schreiter, Katja; Friebe, Nadine; Spange, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    A series of boronate-π-acceptor compounds containing different types of π bridges (1,4-phenylen or thien-2,5-diyl or furan-2,5-diyl) that link the switchable boronate ester group with the efficient TCF acceptor group (TCF=2-dicyanomethylen-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran) has been synthesized. A TCF chromophore of this type undergoes transition to a donor-π-acceptor compound upon coordination of Lewis bases at the Lewis acidic boron center, which is accompanied by an enhanced intramolecular charge-transfer interaction. The Lewis acid character has been investigated by spectroscopic measurements (UV/Vis, NMR spectroscopies) as well as DFT and ab initio-based calculations. It is shown that the TCF acceptor group and thiophene or furan π-bridges directly bound to the boron atom cooperatively increase the Lewis acidity. UV/Vis titration experiments confirm fluoride binding constants in the range of up to 10(8)  M(-1) in CH2 Cl2 . In addition to the strong boron fluoride binding motif, Lewis interactions also occur with weaker Lewis bases, such as pyridine or aliphatic alcohols. The unique combination of chromophoric and Lewis acidic properties is responsible for the intense colorimetric turn-on response detectable after complex formation. PMID:26489784

  20. Biomolecular Interactions and Biological Responses of Emerging Two-Dimensional Materials and Aromatic Amino Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mallineni, Sai Sunil Kumar; Shannahan, Jonathan; Raghavendra, Achyut J; Rao, Apparao M; Brown, Jared M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    The present work experimentally investigates the interaction of aromatic amino acids viz., tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalnine with novel two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), and boron nitride (BN). Photoluminescence, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry were employed to investigate the nature of interactions and possible charge transfer between 2D materials and amino acids. Graphene and GO were found to interact strongly with aromatic amino acids through π-π stacking, charge transfer, and H-bonding. Particularly, it was observed that both physi and chemisorption are prominent in the interactions of GO/graphene with phenylalanine and tryptophan while tyrosine exhibited strong chemisorption on graphene and GO. In contrast, BN exhibited little or no interactions, which could be attributed to localized π-electron clouds around N atoms in BN lattice. Lastly, the adsorption of amino acids on 2D materials was observed to considerably change their biological response in terms of reactive oxygen species generation. More importantly, these changes in the biological response followed the same trends observed in the physi and chemisorption measurements.

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of proteins in response to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Fu, Bin; Niu, Li; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-05-01

    A proteomic study using 2-D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS was performed to characterize the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress, which is a global environmental problem and has become a serious issue in China in recent years. The emphasis of the present study was to investigate the overall protein expression changes when exposed to SiAR. Out of over 1000 protein spots reproducibly resolved, 50 of them changed their abundance by at least 2-fold. Analysis of protein expression patterns revealed that a set of proteins associated with energy production, metabolism, cell rescue, cell defense and protein folding, etc., could play important roles in mediating plant response to SiAR. In addition to this, some proteins involved in stress responses and jasmonic acid pathway are also involved in plant response to SiAR. More interestingly, the expression of several ubiquitination-related proteins changed dramatically after 32-h SiAR treatment, suggesting that they may act as a molecular marker for the injury phenotype caused by SiAR. Based on our results, we proposed a schematic model to explain the mechanisms associated with the systematic response of Arabidopsis plants to SiAR.

  2. Altered growth response to exogenous auxin and gibberellic acid by gravistimulation in pulvini of Avena sativa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, T. G.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1988-01-01

    Pulvini of excised segments from oats (Avena sativa L. cv Victory) were treated unilaterally with indoleacetic acid (IAA) or gibberellic acid (GA3) with or without gravistimulation to assess the effect of gravistimulation on hormone action. Optimum pulvinus elongation growth (millimeters) and segment curvature (degrees) over 24 hours were produced by 100 micromolar IAA in vertical segments. The curvature response to IAA at levels greater than 100 micromolar, applied to the lower sides of gravistimulated (90 degrees) pulvini, was significantly less than the response to identical levels in vertical segments. Furthermore, the bending response of pulvini to 100 micromolar IAA did not vary significantly over a range of presentation angles between 0 and 90 degrees. In contrast, the response to IAA at levels less than 10 micromolar, with gravistimulation, was approximately the sum of the responses to gravistimulation alone and to IAA without gravistimulation. This was observed over a range of presentation angles. Also, GA3 (0.3-30 micromolar) applied to the lower sides of horizontal segments significantly enhanced pulvinus growth and segment curvature, although exogenous GA3 over a range of concentrations had no effect on pulvinus elongation growth or segment curvature in vertical segments. The response to GA3 (10 micromolar) plus IAA (1.0 or 100 micromolar) was additive for either vertical or horizontal segments. These results indicate that gravistimulation produces changes in pulvinus responsiveness to both IAA and GA3 and that the changes are unique for each growth regulator. It is suggested that the changes in responsiveness may result from processes at the cellular level other than changes in hormonal sensitivity.

  3. Regulating inflammation using acid-responsive electrospun fibrous scaffolds for skin scarless healing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Cui, Wenguo; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing. PMID:24795507

  4. Regulating inflammation using acid-responsive electrospun fibrous scaffolds for skin scarless healing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Cui, Wenguo; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing.

  5. Acid-Responsive Therapeutic Polymer for Prolonging Nanoparticle Circulation Lifetime and Destroying Drug-Resistant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Piao, Ji-Gang; Gao, Feng; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-13

    How to destroy drug-resistant tumor cells remains an ongoing challenge for cancer treatment. We herein report on a therapeutic nanoparticle, aHLP-PDA, which has an acid-activated hemolytic polymer (aHLP) grafted onto photothermal polydopamine (PDA) nanosphere via boronate ester bond, in efforts to ablate drug-resistant tumors. Upon exposure to oxidative stress and/or near-infrared laser irradiation, aHLP-PDA nanoparticle responsively releases aHLP, likely via responsive cleavage of boronate ester bond, and thus responsively exhibits acid-facilitated mammalian-membrane-disruptive activity. In vitro cell studies with drug-resistant and/or thermo-tolerant cancer cells show that the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle demonstrates preferential cytotoxicity at acidic pH over physiological pH. When administered intravenously, the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle exhibits significantly prolonged blood circulation lifetime and enhanced tumor uptake compared to bare PDA nanosphere, likely owing to aHLP's stealth effects conferred by its zwitterionic nature at blood pH. As a result, the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle effectively ablates drug-resistant tumors, leading to 100% mouse survival even on the 32nd day after suspension of photothermal treatment, as demonstrated with the mouse model. This work suggests that a combination of nanotechnology with lessons learned in bacterial antibiotic resistance may offer a feasible and effective strategy for treating drug-resistant cancers often found in relapsing patients. PMID:26654626

  6. Regulating Inflammation Using Acid-Responsive Electrospun Fibrous Scaffolds for Skin Scarless Healing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Jingwen; Chen, Yigang; Yang, Zhili; Zheng, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Skin injury in adult mammals brings about a series of events and inflammation in the wounded area is initiated first and provides lots of inflammatory factors, which is critical for the final scar formation. While the postinjured skin of fetus and nude mice heals scarlessly owing to the absence of inflammation or immunodeficient, we designed a feasible acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) fibrous scaffolds via doping sodium bicarbonate to prevent excessive inflammation and achieve scarless healing finally. The morphological results of in vivo experiments revealed that animals treated with acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds exhibited alleviative inflammation, accelerated healing process, and regulated collagen deposition via interference in the collagen distribution, the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression. The lower ratios of collagen I/collagen III and TGF-β1/TGF-β3 and higher ratio of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in acid-responsive ibuprofen-loaded PLLA fibrous scaffolds group were confirmed by real-time qPCR as well. These results suggest that inhibiting the excessive inflammation will result in regular collagen distribution and appropriate ratio between the factors, which promote or suppress the scar formation, then decrease the scar area, and finally achieve the scarless healing. PMID:24795507

  7. The proteomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose conditions with amino acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Wright, Phillip C

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol yield by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose (VHG) media with an amino acid supplement was investigated. Amino acid supplementation led to positive cell responses, including reduced lag time and increased cell viability in VHG media. A quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was used to understand how amino acid supplemented S. cerevisiae responds to high osmotic conditions. iTRAQ data revealed that most proteins involved in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated under high glucose shock. Reactivation of amino acid metabolism was also observed at the end of the lag phase. The relative abundance of most identified proteins, including aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis proteins, and heat-shock proteins, remained unchanged in the hours immediately following application of glucose shock. However, the expression of these proteins increased significantly at the end of the lag phase. Furthermore, the up-regulation of trehalose and glycogen biosynthesis proteins, first maintaining then latterly increasing glycolysis pathway activity was also observed. This was verified by enhanced ethanol yields at 10 and 12 h (0.43 and 0.45 g ethanol/g glucose) compared to 2 h (0.32 g ethanol/g glucose). These data combined with relevant metabolite measurements demonstrates that enhanced ethanol fermentation under VHG conditions can be achieved with the aid of amino acid supplementation.

  8. Projection of response of trees and forests to acidic deposition and associated pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kiester, A.R.; Ford, E.D.; Avery, A.; Gay, C.; Droessler, T.

    1990-09-01

    In 1986 the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) established the Forest Response Program (FRP) to assess the effects of acidic deposition and associated pollutants on forests. Modeling studies were developed in parallel with both field studies on the pattern and trends of forest condition and physiological studies of seedlings, saplings, and branches of mature trees. The goals of the modeling effort were to simulate the dynamics of the processes by which acidic deposition and ozone affect tree physiological processes and therefore lead to changes in growth. Results from models of the physiological function of leaves, branches, roots, xylem, and canopies are presented here. These models illustrate three aspects of the dynamics of these processes. First, growth and the effects of pollutants are stochastic processes; that is, they vary randomly over time. The models help to account for the large amount of variability seen in normal field conditions. Second, some physiological processes can compensate for the effects of acidic deposition or ozone. Third, pollutants may have more than one effect on tree growth, and these effects may be synergistic. The potential nonlinearities and the variabilities demonstrated by these models lead to the conclusions that forest health effects may be developing that are not yet apparent; and for regulation of acidic deposition and associated pollutants to have a detectable effect, regulatory changes will probably have to be of substantial magnitude.

  9. Widespread sulfenic acid formation in tissues in response to hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Saurin, Adrian T.; Neubert, Hendrik; Brennan, Jonathan P.; Eaton, Philip

    2004-01-01

    A principal product of the reaction between a protein cysteinyl thiol and hydrogen peroxide is a protein sulfenic acid. Because protein sulfenic acid formation is reversible, it provides a mechanism whereby changes in cellular hydrogen peroxide concentration may directly control protein function. We have developed methods for the detection and purification of proteins oxidized in this way. The methodology is based on the arsenite-specific reduction of protein sulfenic acid under denaturing conditions and their subsequent labeling with biotin–maleimide. Arsenite-dependent signal generation was fully blocked by pretreatment with dimedone, consistent with its reactivity with sulfenic acids to form a covalent adduct that is nonreducible by thiols. The biotin tag facilitates the detection of protein sulfenic acids on Western blots probed with streptavidin–horseradish peroxidase and also their purification by streptavidin–agarose. We have characterized protein sulfenic acid formation in isolated hearts subjected to hydrogen peroxide treatment. We have also purified and identified a number of the proteins that are oxidized in this way by using a proteomic approach. Using Western immunoblotting we demonstrated that a highly significant proportion of some individual proteins (68% of total in one case) form the sulfenic derivative. We conclude that protein sulfenic acids are widespread physiologically relevant posttranslational oxidative modifications that can be detected at basal levels in healthy tissue, and are elevated in response to hydrogen peroxide. These approaches may find widespread utility in the study of oxidative stress, particularly because hydrogen peroxide is used extensively in models of disease or redox signaling. PMID:15604151

  10. Arctigenic acid, the key substance responsible for the hypoglycemic activity of Fructus Arctii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaohui; Gu, Chenchen; Wang, Kai; Ju, Jiaxing; Wang, Haiying; Ruan, Kefeng; Feng, Yi

    2015-01-15

    We have reported the antidiabetic activity of the total lignans from Fructus arctii (TLFA) against alloxan-induced diabetes in mice and rats. In this study, arctigenic acid was found to be the main metabolite in rat plasma detected by UPLC/MS and HPLC/MS/MS after oral administration of TLFA. For the first time, its hypoglycemic activity and acute oral toxicity were evaluated in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a spontaneous type 2 diabetic animal model, and ICR mice respectively. GK rats were orally given arctigenic acid (50 mg/kg) twice daily before each meal for 12 weeks. The treatment reduced the elevated plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and showed significant improvement in glucose tolerance in glucose fed hyperglycemic GK rats. We found that the hypoglycemic effect of arctigenic acid was partly due to the stimulation on insulin secretion, whereas the body weight was not affected by arctigenic acid administration in GK rats. Meanwhile, there was no observable acute toxicity of arctigenic acid treatment at the dosage of 280 mg/kg body weight daily in the acute 14-day toxicity study in mice. This study demonstrates that arctigenic acid may be the main metabolite in the rat serum after oral administration of TLFA, which showed significant hypoglycemic effect in GK rats, and low acute toxicity in ICR mice. The result prompts us that arctigenic acid is the key substance responsible for Fructus Arctii antidiabetic activity and it has a great potential to be further developed as a novel therapeutic agent for diabetes in humans.

  11. Arctigenic acid, the key substance responsible for the hypoglycemic activity of Fructus Arctii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaohui; Gu, Chenchen; Wang, Kai; Ju, Jiaxing; Wang, Haiying; Ruan, Kefeng; Feng, Yi

    2015-01-15

    We have reported the antidiabetic activity of the total lignans from Fructus arctii (TLFA) against alloxan-induced diabetes in mice and rats. In this study, arctigenic acid was found to be the main metabolite in rat plasma detected by UPLC/MS and HPLC/MS/MS after oral administration of TLFA. For the first time, its hypoglycemic activity and acute oral toxicity were evaluated in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a spontaneous type 2 diabetic animal model, and ICR mice respectively. GK rats were orally given arctigenic acid (50 mg/kg) twice daily before each meal for 12 weeks. The treatment reduced the elevated plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and showed significant improvement in glucose tolerance in glucose fed hyperglycemic GK rats. We found that the hypoglycemic effect of arctigenic acid was partly due to the stimulation on insulin secretion, whereas the body weight was not affected by arctigenic acid administration in GK rats. Meanwhile, there was no observable acute toxicity of arctigenic acid treatment at the dosage of 280 mg/kg body weight daily in the acute 14-day toxicity study in mice. This study demonstrates that arctigenic acid may be the main metabolite in the rat serum after oral administration of TLFA, which showed significant hypoglycemic effect in GK rats, and low acute toxicity in ICR mice. The result prompts us that arctigenic acid is the key substance responsible for Fructus Arctii antidiabetic activity and it has a great potential to be further developed as a novel therapeutic agent for diabetes in humans. PMID:25636881

  12. Bacillus cereus cell response upon exposure to acid environment: toward the identification of potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Noémie; Broussolle, Véronique; Postollec, Florence; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Sohier, Danièle; Coroller, Louis; Leguerinel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to adapt to different environments and evolve rapidly, allowing them to cope with their new environments. Such adaptive response and associated protections toward other lethal stresses, is a crucial survival strategy for a wide spectrum of microorganisms, including food spoilage bacteria, pathogens, and organisms used in functional food applications. The growing demand for minimal processed food yields to an increasing use of combination of hurdles or mild preservation factors in the food industry. A commonly used hurdle is low pH which allows the decrease in bacterial growth rate but also the inactivation of pathogens or spoilage microorganisms. Bacillus cereus is a well-known food-borne pathogen leading to economical and safety issues in food industry. Because survival mechanisms implemented will allow bacteria to cope with environmental changes, it is important to provide understanding of B. cereus stress response. Thus this review deals with the adaptive traits of B. cereus cells facing to acid stress conditions. The acid stress response of B. cereus could be divided into four groups (i) general stress response (ii) pH homeostasis, (iii) metabolic modifications and alkali production and (iv) secondary oxidative stress response. This current knowledge may be useful to understand how B. cereus cells may cope to acid environment such as encountered in food products and thus to find some molecular biomarkers of the bacterial behavior. These biomarkers could be furthermore used to develop new microbial behavior prediction tools which can provide insights into underlying molecular physiological states which govern the behavior of microorganisms and thus opening the avenue toward the detection of stress adaptive behavior at an early stage and the control of stress-induced resistance throughout the food chain. PMID:24106490

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  14. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Cao, Ning; Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  15. The effect of boric acid on acethylcholine, bethanechol and potasssium-evoked responses on ileum of rat.

    PubMed

    Ince, S; Turkmen, R; Yavuz, H

    2011-01-01

    1 The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of boric acid on contractions of rat isolated ileum. 2 Contractile responses expressed as Emax and pD2 for acetylcholine (10(-3)-10(-8) m, Ach), bethanechol (10(-3)-10(-8) m) and potassium (10-80 × 10(-3) m, KCl) were determined in the absence and presence of boric acid (10(-3); 5 × 10(-4); 10(-4) m). 3 The contractile response to Ach in the presence of verapamil (10(-6) or 10(-8) m) or in calcium-free Tyrode's solution was also determined in the absence and presence of boric acid. 4 Boric acid did not affect the contractile response to Ach, bethanechol or KCl. Single or cumulative treatment of boric acid did not affect ileum muscle contraction evoked by KCl. The atropine-resistant component of Ach-induced contraction and 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methiodide-resistant component of bethanechol-induced contraction were not inhibited by boric acid (10(-3) m). The contractile response to Ach was reduced in calcium-free Tyrode's solution, and the contractile response was not affected by (10(-8) m). The addition of boric acid (10(-3) m) in combination with verapamil (10(-8) m) did not significantly affect the contractile response to Ach. 5 In conclusion, boric acid does not affect contractions induced by Ach, bethanechol or potassium in rat isolated ileum.

  16. Dormancy of the barley grain is correlated with gibberellic Acid responsiveness of the isolated aleurone layer.

    PubMed

    Schuurink, R C; Sedee, N J; Wang, M

    1992-12-01

    The relationship between barley grain dormancy and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) responsiveness of aleurone layers has been investigated. Barley (Hordeum distichum L. cvs Triumph and Kristina) grains were matured under defined conditions in a phytotron. Grains of Triumph plants grown under long-day/warm conditions had lower dormancy levels than grains of plants grown under short-day/cool conditions. Aleurone layers isolated from grains of long-day Triumph plants secreted more alpha-amylase and had a higher responsiveness to GA(3) as measured by alpha-amylase secretion. Storage of the grains increased both the percentage of germination and the responsiveness of the aleurone to GA(3). Use of different sterilization methods to break dormancy confirmed the correlation between germination percentage and aleurone layer GA(3) responsiveness. The response of embryoless Triumph grains to GA(3) was lower than that of the isolated aleurone layers, suggesting a role of the starchy endosperm in regulating the GA(3) response of the aleurone layer. Grains of the cultivar Kristina harvested from short day- and long day-grown plants lacked dormancy, and their isolated aleurone layers had a similar responsiveness to GA(3) as measured by alpha-amylase secretion. The data indicate that the physiological state of the aleurone layers contributes to the percentage germination of the grains.

  17. Relationship between chloroplastic H2O2 and the salicylic acid response

    PubMed Central

    Noshi, Masahiro; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling molecules for regulating plant responses to abiotic and biotic stress and there exist source- and kind-specific pathways for ROS signaling. Recently, we created a novel system for producing H2O2 in Arabidopsis chloroplasts by chemical-dependent thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) silencing using an estrogen-inducible RNAi method. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of a large set of genes was altered in response to tAPX silencing, some of which are known to be involved in pathogen response/resistance. Furthermore, we found that tAPX silencing enhances the levels of salicylic acid (SA) and the response to SA, a central regulator for biotic stress response. In this addendum, we describe the relationship between chloroplastic H2O2 and SA in stress response, and discuss the function of the kind- and source-specific ROS signaling in SA-mediated stress response. PMID:22836499

  18. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    Ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. In this article, we provide evidence that ERF96 is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed that water

  19. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    Ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. In this article, we provide evidence that ERF96 ismore » a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed

  20. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96 is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed that water loss in ERF

  1. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    We report that ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96more » is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed

  2. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    We report that ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96 is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96’s transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed that

  3. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth and development including seed germination, leaf senescence, and fruit ripening, and of plant responses to environmental stimuli including both biotic and abiotic stresses. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are plant-specific transcription factors and are a subfamily of the AP2 (APETALA2)/ERF transcription factor family. The function of many members in this large gene family remains largely unknown. ERF96, a member of the Group IX ERF family transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional activator that is involved in plant defense response in Arabidopsis. Here we provide evidence that ERF96 is a positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) responses. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that there are a total four small ERFs in Arabidopsis including ERF95, ERF96, ERF97, and ERF98, and that ERF96 forms a cluster with ERF95 and ERF97. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERF96 is expressed in all tissues and organs examined except roots, with relatively high expression in flowers and seeds. Results from the protoplast transfection assay indicated that the EDLL motif-containing C-terminal domain is responsible for ERF96's transcriptional activity. Although loss-of-function mutant of ERF96 was morphologically similar to wild type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing ERF96 had smaller rosette size and were delayed in flowering time. In ABA sensitivity assays, we found that ERF96 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to ABA in terms of ABA inhibition of seed germination, early seedling development and root elongation. Consistent with these observations, elevated transcript levels of some ABA-responsive genes including RD29A, ABI5, ABF3, ABF4, P5CS, and COR15A were observed in the transgenic plants in the presence of ABA. However, in the absence of ABA treatment, the transcript levels of these ABA-responsive genes remained largely unchanged. Our experiments also showed that water loss in ERF96

  4. Growth responses of 53 open-pollinated loblolly pine families to ozone and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Edwards, N.T.; Hanson, P.J.

    1994-03-01

    Field exposures of 9950 containerized 12-wk-old loblolly pine (Pinustaeda L.) seedlings representing 53 commercially important, open-pollinated families were conducted to evaluate individual and interactive effects of acid rain and O{sub 3} on growth response. A 36-plot field research facility comprised of 33 open-top chambers and three open plots was used to test effects of five O{sub 3} levels that included ambient (A) and seasonally integrated levels that were 0.53, 1.10, 1.58, or 2.15 times ambient. Individual effects of three levels of simulated acid rain (pH 3.3, 4.5, and 5.2) as well as their interaction with O{sub 3} at 0.53A, 1.58A, and 2.15A levels were also included. Exposure to ambient air reduced average growth in height (26%), diameter (5%), and volume (14%) compared with growth of seedlings exposed to a 47% lower dose in charcoal filtered (CF) air. Responses to increasing O{sub 3} above ambient levels varied widely between families, became increasingly inhibitory at the highest O{sub 3} levels, but did not significantly exceed growth reductions found in ambient air. Diameter growth was reduced in most families by all levels of O{sub 3} addition. Acid rain caused a general stimulation of height growth at ambient levels (pH 4.5), while both height and diameter growth were reduced at a mean pH of 3.3. Significant antagonism between rainfall acidity and O{sub 3} effects on height and biomass increment was detected with increasing pollutant concentrations. Ozone reduced root/shoot biomass in most families, while acid rain did not. 51 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. The transcriptional stress response of Candida albicans to weak organic acids.

    PubMed

    Cottier, Fabien; Tan, Alrina Shin Min; Chen, Jinmiao; Lum, Josephine; Zolezzi, Francesca; Poidinger, Michael; Pavelka, Norman

    2015-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most important fungal pathogen of humans, causing severe infections, especially in nosocomial and immunocompromised settings. However, it is also the most prevalent fungus of the normal human microbiome, where it shares its habitat with hundreds of trillions of other microbial cells. Despite weak organic acids (WOAs) being among the most abundant metabolites produced by bacterial microbiota, little is known about their effect on C. albicans. Here we used a sequencing-based profiling strategy to systematically investigate the transcriptional stress response of C. albicans to lactic, acetic, propionic, and butyric acid at several time points after treatment. Our data reveal a complex transcriptional response, with individual WOAs triggering unique gene expression profiles and with important differences between acute and chronic exposure. Despite these dissimilarities, we found significant overlaps between the gene expression changes induced by each WOA, which led us to uncover a core transcriptional response that was largely unrelated to other previously published C. albicans transcriptional stress responses. Genes commonly up-regulated by WOAs were enriched in several iron transporters, which was associated with an overall decrease in intracellular iron concentrations. Moreover, chronic exposure to any WOA lead to down-regulation of RNA synthesis and ribosome biogenesis genes, which resulted in significant reduction of total RNA levels and of ribosomal RNA in particular. In conclusion, this study suggests that gastrointestinal microbiota might directly influence C. albicans physiology via production of WOAs, with possible implications of how this fungus interacts with its host in both health and disease. PMID:25636313

  6. Functional annotation of the transcriptome of Sorghum bicolor in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Higher plants exhibit remarkable phenotypic plasticity allowing them to adapt to an extensive range of environmental conditions. Sorghum is a cereal crop that exhibits exceptional tolerance to adverse conditions, in particular, water-limiting environments. This study utilized next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to examine the transcriptome of sorghum plants challenged with osmotic stress and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) in order to elucidate genes and gene networks that contribute to sorghum's tolerance to water-limiting environments with a long-term aim of developing strategies to improve plant productivity under drought. Results RNA-Seq results revealed transcriptional activity of 28,335 unique genes from sorghum root and shoot tissues subjected to polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced osmotic stress or exogenous ABA. Differential gene expression analyses in response to osmotic stress and ABA revealed a strong interplay among various metabolic pathways including abscisic acid and 13-lipoxygenase, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and plant defense pathways. Transcription factor analysis indicated that groups of genes may be co-regulated by similar regulatory sequences to which the expressed transcription factors bind. We successfully exploited the data presented here in conjunction with published transcriptome analyses for rice, maize, and Arabidopsis to discover more than 50 differentially expressed, drought-responsive gene orthologs for which no function had been previously ascribed. Conclusions The present study provides an initial assemblage of sorghum genes and gene networks regulated by osmotic stress and hormonal treatment. We are providing an RNA-Seq data set and an initial collection of transcription factors, which offer a preliminary look into the cascade of global gene expression patterns that arise in a drought tolerant crop subjected to abiotic stress. These resources will allow scientists to query gene expression and functional

  7. Thermo-responsive behavior of borinic acid polymers: experimental and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wen-Ming; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Fei; Sun, Xiao-Li; Lv, Xin-Hu; Li, Kang-Kang; Xu, Hai; Sun, Miao; Jäkle, Frieder

    2015-09-28

    The thermo-responsive properties of borinic acid polymers were investigated by experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies. The homopolymer poly(styrylphenyl(tri-iso-propylphenyl)borinic acid) (PBA) exhibits an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) in polar organic solvents that is tunable over a wide temperature range by addition of small amounts of H2O. The UCST of a 1 mg mL(-1) PBA solution in DMSO can be adjusted from 20 to 100 °C by varying the H2O content from ∼0-2.5%, in DMF from 0 to 100 °C (∼3-17% H2O content), and in THF from 0 to 60 °C (∼4-19% H2O). The UCST increases almost linearly from the freezing point of the solvent with higher freezing point to the boiling point of the solvent with the lower boiling point. The mechanistic aspects of this process were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The latter indicate rapid and strong hydrogen-bond formation between BOH moieties and H2O molecules, which serve as crosslinkers to form an insoluble network. Our results suggest that borinic acid-containing polymers are promising as new "smart" materials, which display thermo-responsive properties that are tunable over a wide temperature range.

  8. Folic Acid and Trastuzumab Functionalized Redox Responsive Polymersomes for Intracellular Doxorubicin Delivery in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lale, Shantanu V; Kumar, Arun; Prasad, Shyam; Bharti, Alok C; Koul, Veena

    2015-06-01

    Redox responsive biodegradable polymersomes comprising of poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactic acid-poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG-s-s-PLA-s-s-PLA-s-s-PEG] triblock copolymer with multiple disulfide linkages were developed to improve intracellular delivery and to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in breast cancer with minimal cardiotoxicity. Folic acid and trastuzumab functionalized monodispersed polymersomes of size ∼150 nm were prepared by nanoprecipitation method while achieving enhanced doxorubicin loading of ∼32% in the polymersomes. Multiple redox responsive disulfide linkages were incorporated in the polymer in order to achieve complete disintegration of polymersomes in redox rich environment of cancer cells resulting in enhanced doxorubicin release as observed in in vitro release studies, where ∼90% doxorubicin release was achieved in pH 5.0 in the presence of 10 mM glutathione (GSH) as compared to ∼20% drug release in pH 7.4. Folic acid and trastuzumab mediated active targeting resulted in improved cellular uptake and enhanced apoptosis in in vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines. In vivo studies in Ehrlich ascites tumor bearing Swiss albino mice showed enhanced antitumor efficacy and minimal cardiotoxicity of polymersomes with ∼90% tumor regression as compared to ∼38% tumor regression observed with free doxorubicin. The results highlight therapeutic potential of the polymersomes as doxorubicin delivery nanocarrier in breast cancer therapy with its superior antitumor efficacy and minimal cardiotoxicity.

  9. Thermo-responsive behavior of borinic acid polymers: experimental and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wen-Ming; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Fei; Sun, Xiao-Li; Lv, Xin-Hu; Li, Kang-Kang; Xu, Hai; Sun, Miao; Jäkle, Frieder

    2015-09-28

    The thermo-responsive properties of borinic acid polymers were investigated by experimental and molecular dynamics simulation studies. The homopolymer poly(styrylphenyl(tri-iso-propylphenyl)borinic acid) (PBA) exhibits an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) in polar organic solvents that is tunable over a wide temperature range by addition of small amounts of H2O. The UCST of a 1 mg mL(-1) PBA solution in DMSO can be adjusted from 20 to 100 °C by varying the H2O content from ∼0-2.5%, in DMF from 0 to 100 °C (∼3-17% H2O content), and in THF from 0 to 60 °C (∼4-19% H2O). The UCST increases almost linearly from the freezing point of the solvent with higher freezing point to the boiling point of the solvent with the lower boiling point. The mechanistic aspects of this process were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The latter indicate rapid and strong hydrogen-bond formation between BOH moieties and H2O molecules, which serve as crosslinkers to form an insoluble network. Our results suggest that borinic acid-containing polymers are promising as new "smart" materials, which display thermo-responsive properties that are tunable over a wide temperature range. PMID:26256052

  10. Stimuli responsive charge-switchable lipids: Capture and release of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; LaManna, Caroline M; Lusic, Hrvoje; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    Stimuli responsive lipids, which enable control over the formation, transformation, and disruption of supramolecular assemblies, are of interest for biosensing, diagnostics, drug delivery, and basic transmembrane protein studies. In particular, spatiotemporal control over a supramolecular structure can be achieved using light activated compounds to induce significant supramolecular rearrangements. As such, a family of cationic lipids are described which undergo a permanent switch in charge upon exposure to 365 nm ultraviolet (UV) light to enable the capture of negatively charged nucleic acids within the self-assembled supramolecular structure of the lipids and subsequent release of these macromolecules upon exposure to UV light and disruption of the assemblies. The lipids are composed of either two different tripeptide head groups, Lysine-Glycine-Glycine (KGG) and Glycine-Glycine-Glycine (GGG) and three different hydrocarbon chain lengths (C6, C10, or C14) terminated by a UV light responsive 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanol (NPE) protected carboxylic acid. The photolysis of the NPE protected lipid is measured as a function of time, and the resulting changes in net molecular charge are observed using zeta potential analysis for each head group and chain length combination. A proof of concept study for the capture and release of both linear DNA (calf thymus) and siRNA is presented using an ethidium bromide quenching assay where a balance between binding affinity and supramolecular stability are found to be the key to optimal nucleic acid capture and release. PMID:26896839

  11. PAD4 functions upstream from salicylic acid to control defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, N; Tootle, T L; Tsui, F; Klessig, D F; Glazebrook, J

    1998-01-01

    The Arabidopsis PAD4 gene was previously shown to be required for synthesis of camalexin in response to infection by the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 but not in response to challenge by the non-host fungal pathogen Cochliobolus carbonum. In this study, we show that pad4 mutants exhibit defects in defense responses, including camalexin synthesis and pathogenesis-related PR-1 gene expression, when infected by P. s. maculicola ES4 326. No such defects were observed in response to infection by an isogenic avirulent strain carrying the avirulence gene avrRpt2. In P. s. maculicola ES4 326-infected pad4 plants, synthesis of salicylic acid (SA) was found to be reduced and delayed when compared with SA synthesis in wild-type plants. Moreover, treatment of pad4 plants with SA partially reversed the camalexin deficiency and PR-1 gene expression phenotypes of P. s. maculicola ES4 326-infected pad4 plants. These findings support the hypothesis that PAD4 acts upstream from SA accumulation in regulating defense response expression in plants infected with P. s. maculicola ES4 326. A working model of the role of PAD4 in governing expression of defense responses is presented. PMID:9634589

  12. Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signaling by the Ethylene Response Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemian, Majid; Nambara, Eiji; Cutler, Sean; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Yuji; McCourt, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Although abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in a variety of plant growth and developmental processes, few genes that actually regulate the transduction of the ABA signal into a cellular response have been identified. In an attempt to determine negative regulators of ABA signaling, we identified mutants, designated enhanced response to ABA3 (era3), that increased the sensitivity of the seed to ABA. Biochemical and molecular analyses demonstrated that era3 mutants overaccumulate ABA, suggesting that era3 is a negative regulator of ABA synthesis. Subsequent genetic analysis of era3 alleles, however, showed that these are new alleles at the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 locus. Other mutants defective in their response to ethylene also showed altered ABA sensitivity; from these results, we conclude that ethylene appears to be a negative regulator of ABA action during germination. In contrast, the ethylene response pathway positively regulates some aspects of ABA action that involve root growth in the absence of ethylene. We discuss the response of plants to ethylene and ABA in the context of how these two hormones could influence the same growth responses. PMID:10899978

  13. Open Stomata 1 (OST1) is limiting in abscisic acid responses of Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Biswa R; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Zhang, Wei; Assmann, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Open Stomata 1 (OST1) (SnRK2.6 or SRK2E), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a positive regulator in abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal response, but OST1-regulation of K(+) and Ca(2+) currents has not been studied directly in guard cells and it is unknown whether OST1 activity is limiting in ABA-mediated stomatal responses. We employed loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches to study native ABA responses of Arabidopsis guard cells. We performed stomatal aperture bioassays, patch clamp analyses and reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements. ABA inhibition of inward K(+) channels and light-induced stomatal opening are reduced in ost1 mutants while transgenic plants overexpressing OST1 show ABA hypersensitivity in these responses. ost1 mutants are insensitive to ABA-induced stomatal closure, regulation of slow anion currents, Ca(2+) -permeable channel activation and ROS production while OST1 overexpressing lines are hypersensitive for these responses, resulting in accelerated stomatal closure in response to ABA. Overexpression of OST1 in planta in the absence of ABA application does not affect basal apertures or ion currents. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical interaction of OST1 with the inward K(+) channel KAT1, the anion channel SLAC1, and the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF. Our findings support OST1 as a critical limiting component in ABA regulation of stomatal apertures, ion channels and NADPH oxidases in Arabidopsis guard cells.

  14. In vitro pollen responses of two birch species to acidity and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.N.; Cox, R.M.

    1993-10-01

    Paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) and mountain paper birch (Betula cordifolia Regel) near the Bay of Fundy coast frequently intercept acidic advection marine fogs. Chemical deposition by these fogs is thought to be a factor contributing to the observed foliar browning symptoms associated with a marked deterioration of these trees in the area. In vitro experiments were performed to test whether pollen germination in these two birch species would be affected by acidity at levels routinely found in the fog. The combined effect of temperature with acidity was also examined. Pollen germination in both species was inhibited below pH 5.6 (P < 0.0001) and the effect of incubation temperature was also significant (P < 0.01) in both species. There was no difference in in vitro pollen germination between species (P > 0.05) in response to acidity, based on combined data from 12 trees of each; the optimum germination temperature was 22{degrees}C for B. papyrifera and 21{degrees}C for B. cordifolia.

  15. Amino Acid PET - An Imaging Option to Identify Treatment Response, Posttherapeutic Effects, and Tumor Recurrence?

    PubMed

    Galldiks, Norbert; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring in patients with primary and secondary brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced standard MRI. However, the capacity of standard MRI to differentiate neoplastic tissue from non-specific posttreatment effects may be limited particularly after therapeutic interventions such as radio- and/or chemotherapy or newer treatment options, e.g., immune therapy. Metabolic imaging using PET may provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows a more accurate diagnosis especially in clinically equivocal situations, particularly when radiolabeled amino acids are used. Amino acid PET allows a sensitive monitoring of a response to various treatment options, the early detection of tumor recurrence, and an improved differentiation of tumor recurrence from posttherapeutic effects. In the past, this method had only limited availability due to the use of PET tracers with a short half-life, e.g., C-11. In recent years, however, novel amino acid PET tracers labeled with positron emitters with a longer half-life (F-18) have been developed and clinically validated, which allow a more efficient and cost-effective application. These developments and the well-documented diagnostic performance of PET using radiolabeled amino acids suggest that its application continues to spread and that this technique may be available as a routine diagnostic tool for several indications in the field of neuro-oncology. PMID:27516754

  16. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease. PMID:26496916

  17. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a pH responsive folic acid functionalized polymeric drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; McTaggart, Matt; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    We report the computational analysis, synthesis and characterization of folate functionalized poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride), PSMA for drug delivery purpose. The selection of the proper linker between the polymer and the folic acid group was performed before conducting the synthesis using Density Functional Theory (DFT). The computational results showed the bio-degradable linker 2, 4-diaminobutyric acid, DABA as a good candidate allowing flexibility of the folic acid group while maintaining the pH sensitivity of PSMA, used as a trigger for drug release. The synthesis was subsequently carried out in multi-step experimental procedures. The functionalized polymer was characterized using InfraRed spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Dynamic Light Scattering confirming both the chemical structure and the pH responsiveness of PSMA-DABA-Folate polymers. This study provides an excellent example of how computational chemistry can be used in selection process for the functional materials and product characterization. The pH sensitive polymers are expected to be used in delivering anti-cancer drugs to solid tumors with overly expressed folic acid receptors. PMID:27183249

  19. Amino Acid PET – An Imaging Option to Identify Treatment Response, Posttherapeutic Effects, and Tumor Recurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Galldiks, Norbert; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring in patients with primary and secondary brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced standard MRI. However, the capacity of standard MRI to differentiate neoplastic tissue from non-specific posttreatment effects may be limited particularly after therapeutic interventions such as radio- and/or chemotherapy or newer treatment options, e.g., immune therapy. Metabolic imaging using PET may provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows a more accurate diagnosis especially in clinically equivocal situations, particularly when radiolabeled amino acids are used. Amino acid PET allows a sensitive monitoring of a response to various treatment options, the early detection of tumor recurrence, and an improved differentiation of tumor recurrence from posttherapeutic effects. In the past, this method had only limited availability due to the use of PET tracers with a short half-life, e.g., C-11. In recent years, however, novel amino acid PET tracers labeled with positron emitters with a longer half-life (F-18) have been developed and clinically validated, which allow a more efficient and cost-effective application. These developments and the well-documented diagnostic performance of PET using radiolabeled amino acids suggest that its application continues to spread and that this technique may be available as a routine diagnostic tool for several indications in the field of neuro-oncology. PMID:27516754

  20. Dose-dependent transitions in Nrf2-mediated adaptive response and related stress responses to hypochlorous acid in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Courtney G.; Fu Jingqi; Xue Peng; Hou Yongyong; Pluta, Linda J.; Yang Longlong; Zhang Qiang; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi Jingbo

    2009-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is potentially an important source of cellular oxidative stress. Human HOCl exposure can occur from chlorine gas inhalation or from endogenous sources of HOCl, such as respiratory burst by phagocytes. Transcription factor Nrf2 is a key regulator of cellular redox status and serves as a primary source of defense against oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response in cultured mouse macrophages in a biphasic manner. In an effort to determine whether Nrf2 pathways overlap with other stress pathways, gene expression profiling was performed in RAW 264.7 macrophages exposed to HOCl using whole genome mouse microarrays. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis on gene expression data revealed that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response and protein ubiquitination were the most sensitive biological pathways that were activated in response to low concentrations of HOCl (< 0.35 mM). Genes involved in chromatin architecture maintenance and DNA-dependent transcription were also sensitive to very low doses. Moderate concentrations of HOCl (0.35 to 1.4 mM) caused maximal activation of the Nrf2 pathway and innate immune response genes, such as IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IL-10 and chemokines. At even higher concentrations of HOCl (2.8 to 3.5 mM) there was a loss of Nrf2-target gene expression with increased expression of numerous heat shock and histone cluster genes, AP-1-family genes, cFos and Fra1 and DNA damage-inducible Gadd45 genes. These findings confirm an Nrf2-centric mechanism of action of HOCl in mouse macrophages and provide evidence of interactions between Nrf2, inflammatory, and other stress pathways.

  1. Identification of a two-component fatty acid kinase responsible for host fatty acid incorporation by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Joshua B.; Broussard, Tyler C.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Rosch, Jason W.; Jackson, Pamela; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular fatty acid incorporation into the phospholipids of Staphylococcus aureus occurs via fatty acid phosphorylation. We show that fatty acid kinase (Fak) is composed of two dissociable protein subunits encoded by separate genes. FakA provides the ATP binding domain and interacts with two distinct FakB proteins to produce acyl-phosphate. The FakBs are fatty acid binding proteins that exchange bound fatty acid/acyl-phosphate with fatty acid/acyl-phosphate presented in detergent micelles or liposomes. The ΔfakA and ΔfakB1 ΔfakB2 strains were unable to incorporate extracellular fatty acids into phospholipid. FakB1 selectively bound saturated fatty acids whereas FakB2 preferred unsaturated fatty acids. Affymetrix array showed a global perturbation in the expression of virulence genes in the ΔfakA strain. The severe deficiency in α-hemolysin protein secretion in ΔfakA and ΔfakB1 ΔfakB2 mutants coupled with quantitative mRNA measurements showed that fatty acid kinase activity was required to support virulence factor transcription. These data reveal the function of two conserved gene families, their essential role in the incorporation of host fatty acids by Gram-positive pathogens, and connects fatty acid kinase to the regulation of virulence factor transcription in S. aureus. PMID:25002480

  2. Early odontoblastic layer response to cavity preparation and acid etching in rats.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Lidija; Erman, Andreja; Stiblar-Martincic, Draga

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the early odontoblastic layer response and quantitatively to estimate the number of odontoblasts after cavity preparation with and without acid etching. Half of 56 cavities prepared on rats' first upper molars were acid etched. Qualitative and morphometric analyses were made on histological and ultrathin sections 5 min, 6 h, 24 h and 72 h post-operatively. Under the etched cavity, a greater disarrangement of odontoblasts was found, modifications in nuclear shape and condensed chromatin 5 min. post-operatively. An additional reduction of odontoblast number was detected and an increase of aspirated cell number 5 min, 6 h and 24 h post-operatively, pronounced hyperaemia 6, 24 and 72 hours post-operatively and increased odontoblast number 72 hours post-operatively, compared to unetched cavities. In conclusion, injury to the odontoblastic layer was greater, but numerical renewal of the odontoblastic layer began earlier in etched cavities compared to unetched cavities. PMID:17044256

  3. Stability studies of ascorbic acid 2-glucoside in cosmetic lotion using surface response methodology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Ying; Lee, Pei-Chi; Huang, Ling-Kuei; Lu, Li-Ping; Liao, Wayne C

    2013-03-15

    Ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G) has been widely used in cream and lotion types of cosmetic products. Thus, the degradation of AA-2G caused by the temperature change and pH variation was very critical for determining the bio-functionality of cosmetics. Response surface methodology (RSM) was introduced to study the influence of temperature and pH on the stability of AA-2G. The optimal condition of retaining AA-2G with the highest stability was determined to be 55.3°C and pH 6.4. The antioxidative activities of AA-2G including DPPH and ABTS free radical scavenging activities, metal chelating activity, and reducing ability were also determined. AA-2G was a good ascorbic acid derivative which could be used in cosmetic products as an active ingredient.

  4. Respiratory responses to laboratory-generation acid fog in healthy and asthmatic volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Avol, E.L.; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss a program to provide a first step towards assessing acute health-related effects of acid fog exposure. Polluted ambient fog was simulated in a laboratory exposure chamber. Volunteer subjects were purposely exposed and studied during periods of exercise and rest while in the challenge atmosphere. Respiratory responses were measured by methods used to assess effects of irritant gases and dry'' respirable aerosols. When a pilot study showed no obvious unfavorable effects with ambient-like pollution conditions, the exposure concentrations for the present study were extended into the occupational range, well above ambient levels. Sulfuric acid was selected for use as the test pollutant, based upon previous research experience and the availability of fog data documenting its presence during ambient fog episodes.

  5. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  6. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario

    2014-02-28

    Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100-1100mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15mg/gh were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum YX/S of 0.5g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16g/m(2).

  7. Salicylic-acid elicited phospholipase D responses in Capsicum chinense cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rodas-Junco, B A; Muñoz-Sánchez, J A; Vázquez-Flota, F; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M T

    2015-05-01

    The plant response to different stress types can occur through stimulus recognition and the subsequent signal transduction through second messengers that send information to the regulation of metabolism and the expression of defense genes. The phospholipidic signaling pathway forms part of the plant response to several phytoregulators, such as salicylic acid (SA), which has been widely used to stimulate secondary metabolite production in cell cultures. In this work, we studied the effects of SA treatment on [(32)-P]Pi phospholipid turnover and phospholipase D (PLD) activity using cultured Capsicum chinense cells. In cultured cells, the PIP2 turnover showed changes after SA treatment, while the most abundant phospholipids (PLs), such as phosphatidylcholine (PC), did not show changes during the temporal course. SA treatment significantly increased phosphatidic acid (PA) turnover over time compared to control cells. The PA accumulation in cells treated with 1-butanol showed a decrease in messengers; at the same time, there was a 1.5-fold increase in phosphatidylbutanol. These results suggest that the participation of the PLD pathway is a source of PA production, and the activation of this mechanism may be important in the cell responses to SA treatment.

  8. Early tissue response to citric acid-based micro- and nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Ji; Qiu, Hongjin; Kodali, Pradeep; Yang, Scott; Sprague, Stuart M.; Hwong, James; Koh, Jason; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2010-01-01

    Composites based on calcium phosphates and biodegradable polymers are desirable for orthopaedic applications due to their potential to mimic bone. Herein, we describe the fabrication, characterization, and in vivo response of novel citric acid-based microcomposites and nanocomposites. Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) was mixed with increasing amounts of HA nanoparticles or microparticles (up to 60 wt%), and the morphology and mechanical properties of the resulting composites were assessed. To investigate tissue response, nanocomposites, microcomposites, POC, and poly(L-lactide) (PLL) were implanted in osteochondral defects in rabbits and harvested at 6 weeks for histological evaluation. SEM confirmed increased surface roughness of microcomposites relative to nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of both types of composites increased with increasing amounts of HA (8–328 MPa), although nanocomposites with 60 wt.% HA displayed the highest strength and stiffness. Based on tissue-implant interfacial assessments, all implants integrated well with the surrounding bone and cartilage with no evidence of inflammation. Both nanocomposites and microcomposites supported bone remodeling; however, nanocomposites induced more trabecular bone formation at the tissue-implant interface. The mechanical properties of citric acid-based composites are within the range of human trabecular bone (1–1524 MPa, 211±78 MPa mean modulus) and tissue response was dependent on the size and content of HA, providing new perspectives of design and fabrication criteria for orthopaedic devices such as interference screws and fixation pins. PMID:20949482

  9. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children. PMID:25784372

  10. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children.

  11. Chlorogenic acid differentially affects postprandial glucose and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide response in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Regular coffee consumption significantly lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Coffee contains thousands of compounds; however, the specific component(s) responsible for this reduced risk is unknown. Chlorogenic acids (CGA) found in brewed coffee inhibit intestinal glucose uptake in vitro. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which CGA acts to mediate blood glucose response in vivo. Conscious, unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically catheterized and gavage-fed a standardized meal (59% carbohydrate, 25% fat, 12% protein), administered with or without CGA (120 mg·kg(-1)), in a randomized crossover design separated by a 3-day washout period. Acetaminophen was co-administered to assess the effects of CGA on gastric emptying. The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) were measured. GLP-1 response in the presence of glucose and CGA was further examined, using the human colon cell line NCI-H716. Total area under the curve (AUC) for blood glucose was significantly attenuated in rats fed CGA (p < 0.05). Despite this, no differences in plasma insulin or nonesterified fatty acids were observed, and gastric emptying was not altered. Plasma GIP response was blunted in rats fed CGA, with a lower peak concentration and AUC up to 180 min postprandially (p < 0.05). There were no changes in GLP-1 secretion in either the in vivo or in vitro study. In conclusion, CGA treatment resulted in beneficial effects on blood glucose response, with alterations seen in GIP concentrations. Given the widespread consumption and availability of coffee, CGA may be a viable prevention tool for T2D. PMID:21977912

  12. The LysR-type regulator LeuO regulates the acid tolerance response in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Bina, James E

    2015-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a neutrophilic enteric pathogen that is extremely sensitive to acid. As V. cholerae passages through the host gastrointestinal tract it is exposed to a variety of environmental stresses including low pH and volatile fatty acids. Exposure to acidic environments induces expression of the V. cholerae acid tolerance response. A key component of the acid tolerance response is the cad system, which is encoded by cadC and the cadBA operon. CadB is a lysine/cadaverine antiporter and CadA is a lysine decarboxylase and these function together to counter low intracellular and extracellular pH. CadC is a membrane-associated transcription factor that activates cadBA expression in response to acidic conditions. Herein we investigated the role of the LysR-type transcriptional regulator LeuO in the V. cholerae acid tolerance response. Transcriptional reporter assays revealed that leuO expression repressed cadC transcription, indicating that LeuO was a cadC repressor. Consistent with this, leuO expression was inversely linked to lysine decarboxylase production and leuO overexpression resulted in increased sensitivity to organic acids. Overexpression of leuO in a cadA mutant potentiated killing by organic acids, suggesting that the function of leuO in the acid tolerance response extended beyond its regulation of the cad system. Collectively, these studies have identified a new physiological role for LeuO in V. cholerae acid tolerance.

  13. Docosahexaenoic Acid Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hepatic Steatosis Involving ER Stress Response in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinying; Peng, Chuan; Ai, Yanbiao; Wang, Heng; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Li, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    The increase in fructose consumption is considered to be a risk factor for developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-treated primary mouse hepatocytes, and the changes of Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to DHA treatment. The hepatocytes were treated with fructose, DHA, fructose plus DHA, tunicamycin (TM) or fructose plus 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 24 h. Intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation was assessed by Oil Red O staining. The mRNA expression levels and protein levels related to lipid metabolism and ER stress response were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot. Fructose treatment led to obvious TG accumulation in primary hepatocytes through increasing expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), two key enzymes in hepatic de novo lipogenesis. DHA ameliorates fructose-induced TG accumulation by upregulating the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT-1α) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1). DHA treatment or pretreatment with the ER stress inhibitor PBA significantly decreased TG accumulation and reduced the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), total inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1α) and p-IRE1α. The present results suggest that DHA protects against high fructose-induced hepatocellular lipid accumulation. The current findings also suggest that alleviating the ER stress response seems to play a role in the prevention of fructose-induced hepatic steatosis by DHA. PMID:26805874

  14. Renal cortex taurine content regulates renal adaptive response to altered dietary intake of sulfur amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, R W; Gusowski, N; Dabbagh, S

    1985-01-01

    Rats fed a reduced sulfur amino acid diet (LTD) or a high-taurine diet (HTD) demonstrate a renal adaptive response. The LTD results in hypotaurinuria and enhanced brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) accumulation of taurine. The HTD causes hypertaurinuria and reduced BBMV uptake. This adaptation may relate to changes in plasma or renal cortex taurine concentration. Rats were fed a normal-taurine diet (NTD), LTD, or HTD for 14 d or they underwent: (a) 3% beta-alanine for the last 8 d of each diet; (b) 3 d of fasting; or (c) a combination of 3% beta-alanine added for 8 d and 3 d of fasting. Each maneuver lowered the cortex taurine concentration, but did not significantly lower plasma taurine values compared with controls. Increased BBMV taurine uptake occurred after each manipulation. Feeding 3% glycine did not alter the plasma, renal cortex, or urinary taurine concentrations, or BBMV uptake of taurine. Feeding 3% methionine raised plasma and urinary taurine excretion but renal tissue taurine was unchanged, as was initial BBMV uptake. Hence, nonsulfur-containing alpha-amino acids did not change beta-amino acid transport. The increase in BBMV uptake correlates with the decline in renal cortex and plasma taurine content. However, since 3% methionine changed plasma taurine without altering BBMV uptake, it is more likely that the change in BBMV uptake and the adaptive response expressed at the brush border surface relate to changes in renal cortex taurine concentrations. Finally, despite changes in urine and renal cortex taurine content, brain taurine values were unchanged, which suggests that this renal adaptive response maintains stable taurine concentrations where taurine serves as a neuromodulator. PMID:3935668

  15. Fibroblast response is enhanced by poly(L-lactic acid) nanotopography edge density and proximity

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Keith R; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    The development of scaffolds for use in tissue engineering applications requires careful choice of macroscale properties, such as mechanical characteristics, porosity and biodegradation. The micro- and nano-scale properties of the scaffold surface are also an important design criterion as these influence cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The cellular response is known to be affected by surface topography but the mechanisms governing this remain unclear. Homogenous poly(L-lactic acid) was textured with surface nanotopographies by two-stage replication molding of heterogeneous demixed polymer films. Initial cell adhesion was improved on nanotextured surfaces compared with smooth controls, but subsequent cell density was significantly reduced on the roughest surfaces. Improvements in cell response were found to correlate with focal contact and actin microfilament development. Cell response was found to trend both with the surface density of topography edges and with inter-topography spacing, indicating possible roles for edges stimulating cell adhesion/proliferation or for spacing to modulate the ability of integrin-ligand bonds to cluster and form focal adhesions. This study furthers understanding of the geometric properties of surface nanotopographies that affect cellular response. It is hoped that identification of the mechanisms governing cell-topography interactions will allow rule-based design of biomaterial surface to engineer specific cellular responses. PMID:17722548

  16. A decline of LAMP- 2 predicts ursodeoxycholic acid response in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Guo, Guan-ya; Wang, Jing-bo; Zhou, Xin-min; Yang, Qiong; Han, Zhe-yi; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Jing-wen; Cai, Yun; Ren, Xiao-li; Zhou, Xia; Chen, Rui-rui; Shi, Yong-quan; Han, Ying; Fan, Dai-ming

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical response to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is variable. We have previously reported that augmented expression of lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) was correlated with the severity of PBC. This study aimed to determine whether serum LAMP-2 could serve as a predictor of biochemical response to UDCA. The efficiency of serum LAMP-2 to predict biochemical response was assessed after 1 year of UDCA treatment in PBC patients by a retrospective analysis. We found that the basal serum LAMP-2 level was increased in PBC, especially in patients with stage III-IV (p = 0.010) or TBIL > 1 mg/dL (p = 0.014). Baseline serum LAMP-2 was higher in non-responders than that in responders, but the difference was statistically insignificant. However, after UDCA treatment, serum LAMP-2 level decreased prominently in the first 3 months, which was more obvious in responders. Further studies showed that the 35% decline of LAMP-2 after treatment for 3 months could be stated as an indicator of UDCA response with the sensitivity of 62.9% and specificity of 75.0% by Paris criteria. Meanwhile the specificity and sensitivity were identified as 63.5% and 64.1% by Barcelona criteria. Together, a decline in LAMP-2 might help to predict the response to UDCA. PMID:25894308

  17. Effect of Warm-Up on Plasma Free Fatty Acid Response and Substrate Utilization During Submaximal Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This study examined the effect of preliminary walking on free fatty acid responses and substrate utilization during a 40-minute treadmill run by experienced male distance runners. Conclusions are presented. (Author/MT)

  18. Enhanced Enzymatic Preparation of Biodiesel Using Ricinoleic Acid as Acyl Donor: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Sun, Shangde

    2016-09-01

    Castor oil methyl ester is a kind of biodiesel from castor oil. However, in those previous methods for biodiesel preparation using castor oil as feedstock, glycerol was the main by-product, which had a strong blocking effect on the immobilized enzyme activity and affected the mass transfer of reaction system. For avoiding the negative effect of glycerol on the enzymatic esterification, biodiesel was prepared using ricinoleic acid (RA) as acyl donor. Enzyme screening was also studied, and the effects of reaction temperature, molar ratio of ricinoleic acid and methanol, enzyme load, and reaction time, on the preparation of castor methyl ester were also evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the interaction effect of reaction variables (reaction temperature (30-70°C), enzyme load (2-7%; relative to the weight of total substrates), molar ratio of methanol to ricinoleic acid (2:1-10:1), and reaction time (0.5-2.5 h)) on the acid value (AV) and the degree of esterification (DE). Validation of the RSM model was verified by the good agreement between the experimental and the predicted values of AV and DE. The optimum preparation conditions were as follows: reaction temperature, 48.2°C; enzyme load, 5.8%; molar ratio of methanol to ricinoleic acid, 5.56:1; reaction time, 2.36 h. Under these conditions, the AV and DE of the esterification reaction are 10.36±1.05 mgKOH/g and 94.03±0.60%, respectively. The relationship between initial reaction rate and temperature was also established, and the activation energy (Ea) of the enzymatic esterification is 33.87 KJ/mol. PMID:27477073

  19. Rhizosphere pH responses to simulated acid rain as measured with glass microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Conkling, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a useful experimental system for studying the rhizosphere of growing roots, and to investigate the effects of bulk soil pH and foliar acid rain application on the rhizosphere pH of alfalfa, corn and soybeans. First, a study was done to compare soil pH measurements made with a standard glass pH electrode with those made using an antimony (Sb) microelectrode. Because of uncertainty with the Sb microelectrodes' response, glass pH-sensitive microelectrodes were made and tested for rhizosphere pH measurements. The influence of soil water pressure gradients in the range of {minus}10 to {minus}1500 kPa in the proximity of the pH and reference electrodes on pH measurements made with microelectrodes was studied. The effect of foliar acid rain application on the rhizosphere pH of alfalfa, corn, and soybean as a function of soil pH were studied. Alfalfa, corn, and soybean were grown into minirhizotrons containing reformed samples of both Seymour A and Bt soil horizons, and the rhizosphere pH measured. The measured in situ bulk soil pH ranged from 4.9 to 6.2 in the A horizon and from 4.0 to 5.7 in the Bt horizon. Plants received acid or non-acid foliar rain applications. Rhizosphere pH was measured using a glass pH-sensitive microelectrode. Acid rain applications caused foliar damage, but had little effect on the rhizosphere pH. The general trend was for the lateral root pH values to be slightly higher than the main root values.

  20. Effects of dietary humic and butyric acid on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid (MFG) and fat protected butyric acid (BA) has been shown to modulate energy metabolism and inflammation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of MFG and BA, alone and in combination, on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced in...

  1. Milk production responses to dietary stearic acid vary by production level in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Piantoni, P; Lock, A L; Allen, M S

    2015-03-01

    Effects of stearic acid supplementation on feed intake and metabolic and production responses of dairy cows with a wide range of milk production (32.2 to 64.4 kg/d) were evaluated in a crossover design experiment with a covariate period. Thirty-two multiparous Holstein cows (142±55 d in milk) were assigned randomly within level of milk yield to treatment sequence. Treatments were diets supplemented (2% of diet dry matter) with stearic acid (SA; 98% C18:0) or control (soyhulls). The diets were based on corn silage and alfalfa and contained 24.5% forage neutral detergent fiber, 25.1% starch, and 17.3% crude protein. Treatment periods were 21 d with the final 4 d used for data and sample collection. Compared with the control, SA increased dry matter intake (DMI; 26.1 vs. 25.2 kg/d) and milk yield (40.2 vs. 38.5 kg/d). Stearic acid had no effect on the concentration of milk components but increased yields of fat (1.42 vs. 1.35 kg/d), protein (1.19 vs. 1.14 kg/d), and lactose (1.96 vs. 1.87 kg/d). The SA treatment increased 3.5% fat-corrected milk (3.5% FCM; 40.5 vs. 38.6 kg/d) but did not affect feed efficiency (3.5% FCM/DMI, 1.55 vs. 1.53), body weight, or body condition score compared with the control. Linear interactions between treatment and level of milk yield during the covariate period were detected for DMI and yields of milk, fat, protein, lactose, and 3.5% FCM; responses to SA were positively related to milk yield of cows. The SA treatment increased crude protein digestibility (67.4 vs. 65.5%), tended to increase neutral detergent fiber digestibility (43.6 vs. 42.3%), decreased fatty acid (FA) digestibility (56.6 vs. 76.1%), and did not affect organic matter digestibility. Fatty acid yield response, calculated as the additional FA yield secreted in milk per unit of additional FA intake, was only 13.3% for total FA and 8.2% for C18:0 plus cis-9 C18:1. Low estimated digestibility of the SA supplement was at least partly responsible for the low FA yield response

  2. LACK OF EFFECT OF AGE AND ANTIOXIDANT DEPLETION ON RESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATES (CAPS) IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    2003 AAR PM Meeting
    Particulate Matter: Atmospheric Sciences,
    Exposure and the Fourth Colloquium on PM and Human Health

    LACK OF EFFECT OF AGE AND ANTIOXIDANT DEPLETION ON RESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATES (CAPs) IN RATS. JA Dye, LC Walsh, C...

  3. Zoledronic acid enhances Vδ2 T-lymphocyte antitumor response to human glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cimini, E; Piacentini, P; Sacchi, A; Gioia, C; Leone, S; Lauro, G M; Martini, F; Agrati, C

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans, responds modestly to treatment: most patients survive less than one year after diagnosis, despite both classical and innovative treatment approaches. A recent paper focused on γδ T-cell response in GBM patients, suggesting the application of an immunomodulating strategy based on γδ T-cells which is already in clinical trials for other tumors. Human Vγ2 T-cells recognize changes in the mevalonate metabolic pathway of transformed cells by activating cytotoxic response, and by cytokine and chemokine release. Interestingly, this activation may also be induced in vivo by drugs, such as zoledronic acid, that induce the accumulation of Vγ2 T-cell ligand Isopentenyl-pyrophosphate by blocking the farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase enzyme. The aim of our work is to confirm whether bisphosphonate treatment would make glioma cell lines more susceptible to lysis by in vitro expanded γδ T-cells, improving their antitumor activity. We expanded in vitro human Vγ2 T-cells by phosphoantigen stimulation and tested their activity against glioma cell lines. Co-culture with glioma cells induced Vγ2 T-cell differentiation in effector/memory cells, killing glioma cells by the release of perforin. Interestingly, glioma cells were directly affected by zoledronic acid; moreover, treatment increased their activating ability on Vγ2 T-cells, inducing an effective antitumor cytotoxic response. Taken together, our results show that aminobisphosphonate drugs may play a dual role against GBM, by directly affecting tumor cells, and by enhancing the antitumor response of Vγ2 T-cells. Our results confirm the practicability of this approach as a new immunotherapeutic strategy for GBM treatment.

  4. Behavioral and electrophysiological responses of Aedes albopictus to certain acids and alcohols present in human skin emanations.

    PubMed

    Guha, Lopamudra; Seenivasagan, T; Iqbal, S Thanvir; Agrawal, O P; Parashar, B D

    2014-10-01

    Human skin emanations attract hungry female mosquitoes toward their host for blood feeding. In this study, we report the flight orientation and electroantennogram response of Aedes albopictus females to certain unsaturated acids and alcohols found in human skin. In the Y-tube olfactometer, odors of lactic acid and 2-methyl-3-pentanol attracted 54-65% of Ae. albopictus females at all doses in a dose-dependent manner. However, at the highest dose (10(-2) g), the acids repelled 40-45% females. Attractancy (ca. 62-68%) at lower doses and repellency (ca. 30-45%) at higher doses were recorded for 3-methyl-3-pentanol and 1-octen-3-ol, while 5-hexen-1-ol, cis-2-hexen-1-ol, and trans 2-hexen-1-ol odor repelled ca. 55-65% of Ae. albopictus females at all doses. Antenna of female Ae. albopictus exhibited a dose-dependent EAG response up to 10(-3) g of L-lactic acid, trans-2-methyl-2-pentenoic acid, 2-octenoic acid, trans-2-hexen-1-ol and 1-octen-3-ol stimulations; however, the highest dose (10(-2) g) caused a little decline in the EAG response. EAG response of 9-10-fold was elicited by lactic acid, 2-octenoic acid, trans-2-hexenoic acid, and 3-methyl-3-pentanol, while cis-2-hexen-1-ol and trans-2-methyl pentenoic acid elicited 1-5-fold responses compared to solvent control. A blend of attractive compounds could be utilized in odor-baited trap for surveillance and repellent molecules with suitable formulation could be used to reduce the biting menace of mosquitoes.

  5. Behavioral and electrophysiological responses of Aedes albopictus to certain acids and alcohols present in human skin emanations.

    PubMed

    Guha, Lopamudra; Seenivasagan, T; Iqbal, S Thanvir; Agrawal, O P; Parashar, B D

    2014-10-01

    Human skin emanations attract hungry female mosquitoes toward their host for blood feeding. In this study, we report the flight orientation and electroantennogram response of Aedes albopictus females to certain unsaturated acids and alcohols found in human skin. In the Y-tube olfactometer, odors of lactic acid and 2-methyl-3-pentanol attracted 54-65% of Ae. albopictus females at all doses in a dose-dependent manner. However, at the highest dose (10(-2) g), the acids repelled 40-45% females. Attractancy (ca. 62-68%) at lower doses and repellency (ca. 30-45%) at higher doses were recorded for 3-methyl-3-pentanol and 1-octen-3-ol, while 5-hexen-1-ol, cis-2-hexen-1-ol, and trans 2-hexen-1-ol odor repelled ca. 55-65% of Ae. albopictus females at all doses. Antenna of female Ae. albopictus exhibited a dose-dependent EAG response up to 10(-3) g of L-lactic acid, trans-2-methyl-2-pentenoic acid, 2-octenoic acid, trans-2-hexen-1-ol and 1-octen-3-ol stimulations; however, the highest dose (10(-2) g) caused a little decline in the EAG response. EAG response of 9-10-fold was elicited by lactic acid, 2-octenoic acid, trans-2-hexenoic acid, and 3-methyl-3-pentanol, while cis-2-hexen-1-ol and trans-2-methyl pentenoic acid elicited 1-5-fold responses compared to solvent control. A blend of attractive compounds could be utilized in odor-baited trap for surveillance and repellent molecules with suitable formulation could be used to reduce the biting menace of mosquitoes. PMID:25049052

  6. Temperature and pH responsiveness of poly-(DMAA-co-unsaturated carboxylic acid) hydrogels synthesized by UV-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Kaetsu, Isao; Nakayama, Masashi; Sutani, Kouichi; Uchida, Kumao; Yukutake, Kouji

    2003-07-01

    Stimuli-responsive polyampholyte hydrogels were synthesized by the copolymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAA) and acrylic acid (AAc) or itaconic acid (IAc) by UV-irradiation. Temperature and pH responsiveness of these hydrogels were studied. The temperature responsiveness of poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels shown in change of water content became dull compared to that of DMAA homo-polymer hydrogel. The water content of the poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels showed a minimum at pH 8, and increased in more acidic and alkaline regions. This fact can be attributed to the coexistence of anions and cations in the poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels. The poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels were polyampholyte having both temperature responsiveness and pH responsiveness.

  7. Toxicogenomic response of Mycobacterium bovis BCG to peracetic acid and a comparative analysis of the M. bovis BCG response to three oxidative disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Nde, Chantal W; Toghrol, Freshteh; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Bentley, William E

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and infects thousands of Americans annually. Mycobacterium bovis causes tuberculosis in humans and several animal species. Peracetic acid is an approved tuberculocide in hospital and domestic environments. This study presents for the first time the transcriptomic changes in M. bovis BCG after treatment with 0.1 mM peracetic acid for 10 and 20 min. This study also presents for the first time a comparison among the transcriptomic responses of M. bovis BCG to three oxidative disinfectants: peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and hydrogen peroxide after 10 min of treatment. Results indicate that arginine biosynthesis, virulence, and oxidative stress response genes were upregulated after both peracetic acid treatment times. Three DNA repair genes were downregulated after 10 and 20 min and cell wall component genes were upregulated after 20 min. The devR-devS signal transduction system was upregulated after 10 min, suggesting a role in the protection against peracetic acid treatment. Results also suggest that peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite both induce the expression of the ctpF gene which is upregulated in hypoxic environments. Further, this study reveals that in M. bovis BCG, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid both induce the expression of katG involved in oxidative stress response and the mbtD and mbtI genes involved in iron regulation/virulence. PMID:21152916

  8. Effect of thyroxine supplementation on the response to perfluoro-n-decanoic acid (PFDA) in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gutshall, D.M.; Pilcher, G.D.; Langley, A.E.

    1988-01-01

    Perfluoro-n-decanoic acid (PFDA) is a member of a family of perfluorinated carboxylic acids that have found widespread commercial applications as lubricants, surfactants, wetting agents and corrosion inhibitors. The effects of thyroxine (T{sub 4}) supplementation on perfluoro-n-decanoic acid- (PFDA) induced decreases in food consumption, body weight, and body temperature were examined. A dose-response study was carried out with 50-, 100-, 200-, or 250-{mu}g/kg ip doses of T{sub 4} for 7 d prior to PFDA administration, and daily dosing with T{sub 4} was continued for an additional 30 d. From this study a T{sub 4} dose of 200 {mu}g/kg was chosen, and subsequent experiments were conducted with this dose. Supplementation with T{sub 4} at 200 {mu}g/kg daily alleviated the hypophagia but not the severe weight loss and hypothermia produced by PFDA treatment. Their results suggest that some component of the thyroid axis plays a role in feeding behavior. In addition, the PFDA-induced wasting syndrome and hypothermia appear to be unrelated to changes in serum thyroid hormones. The unexpected observation that severe weight loss occurred in the presence of essentially normal food intake suggests that PFDA alters basic cellular metabolic processes.

  9. Electrical resistance response of polyaniline films to water, ethanol, and nitric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hong-Xing; Li, Meng-Meng; Yang, H.; Long, Yun-Ze; Sun, Xin

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports on electrical resistance vs. aging time for the response of polyaniline films under exposure to water, ethanol and nitric acid (HNO3) solution. Camphor sulfonic acid-doped polyaniline films were prepared by a “doping-dedoping-redoping" method, the morphology and microstructures of the films were characterized by a scanning electron microscope and an x-ray diffractometer, the electrical resistance was measured by a four-probe method. It was found that a lower amount of water molecules infiltrating the film can decrease the film's resistance possibly due to an enhancement of charge carrier transfer between polyaniline chains, whereas excessive water molecules can swell inter-chain distances and result in a quick increase of resistance. The resistance of the film under exposure to ethanol increases and becomes much larger than the original value. However, HNO3 solution can decrease the film's resistance sharply possibly owing to doping effect of protonic acid. These results can help to understand the conduction mechanism in polyaniline films, and also indicate that the films have potential application in chemical sensors.

  10. Ethanol promotes saturated fatty acid-induced hepatoxicity through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Cui-Fen; Lu, Jian; Cao, Wei; Wu, Xu-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Serum palmitic acid (PA), a type of saturated fatty acid, causes lipid accumulation and induces toxicity in hepatocytes. Ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized by the liver and induces hepatic injury and inflammation. Herein, we analyzed the effects of EtOH on PA-induced lipotoxicity in the liver. Our results indicated that EtOH aggravated PA-induced apoptosis and lipid accumulation in primary rat hepatocytes in dose-dependent manner. EtOH intensified PA-caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in vitro and in vivo, and the expressions of CHOP, ATF4, and XBP-1 in nucleus were significantly increased. EtOH also increased PA-caused cleaved caspase-3 in cytoplasm. In wild type and CHOP(-/-) mice treated with EtOH and high fat diet (HFD), EtOH worsened the HFD-induced liver injury and dyslipidemia, while CHOP knockout blocked toxic effects of EtOH and PA. Our study suggested that targeting UPR-signaling pathways is a promising, novel approach to reducing EtOH and saturated fatty acid-induced metabolic complications.

  11. Growth response of Pinus ponderosa seedlings and mature tree branches to acid rain and ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J.; Helms, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Forests of the central and southern Sierra Nevada in California have been subjected to chronic damage by ozone and other atmospheric pollutants for the past several decades. Until recently, pollutant exposure of northern Sierra Nevada forests has been mild but increasing population and changes in land use throughout the Sacramento Valley and Sierra Nevada foothills may lead to increased pollutant damage in these forests. Although, better documented in other regions of the United States, little is known regarding the potential for acidic precipitation damage to Sierra Nevada forests. Only recently have studies directed towards understanding the potential interactive effects of ozone and acidic precipitation been undertaken. A key issue in resolving potential regional impacts of pollutants on forests is the extent to which research results can be scaled across genotypes and life-stages. Most of the pollution research to date has been performed using seedlings with varying degrees of genetic control. It is important to determine if the results obtained in such studies can be extrapolated to mature trees and to different genetic sources. In this paper, we present results from a one-year study examining the interactive effects of foliar exposure to acidic rain and ozone on the growth of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a conifer known to be sensitive to ozone. The response to pollutants is characterized for both seedlings and mature tree branches of three genotypes grown in a common environment.

  12. Spectrum of Membrane Morphological Responses to Antibacterial Fatty Acids and Related Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Jackman, Joshua A; Kim, Min Chul; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-09-22

    Medium-chain saturated fatty acids and related compounds (e.g., monoglycerides) represent one class of membrane-active surfactants with antimicrobial properties. Most related studies have been in vitro evaluations of bacterial growth inhibition, and there is limited knowledge about how the compounds in this class destabilize lipid bilayers, which are the purported target within the bacterial cell membrane. Herein, the interaction between three representative compounds in this class and a supported lipid bilayer platform was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation and fluorescence microscopy in order to examine membrane destabilization. The three tested compounds were lauric acid, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and glycerol monolaurate. For each compound, we discovered striking differences in the resulting morphological changes of supported lipid bilayers. The experimental trends indicate that the compounds have membrane-disruptive behavior against supported lipid bilayers principally above the respective critical micelle concentration values. The growth inhibition properties of the compounds against standard and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains were also tested. Taken together, the findings in this work improve our knowledge about how saturated fatty acids and related compounds destabilize lipid bilayers, offering insight into the corresponding molecular mechanisms that lead to membrane morphological responses. PMID:26325618

  13. Growth responses of three legume species exposed to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Ashenden, T W; Bell, S A

    1989-01-01

    Seedlings of Vicia faba L., Phaseolus multiflorus L. and Pisum sativum L. were raised during exposure to simulated acid rainfall treatments of pHs 5.6, 4.5, 3.5 and 2.5 at a rate of 30 mm per week. All three species were found to be adversely affected by the more acid pH 3.5 and pH 2.5 treatments after 7-8 weeks of exposure. There were total plant dry weight reductions of 40% for V. faba, 31% for P. sativum and 28% for P. multiflorus exposed to the pH 2.5 treatment, as compared to those grown in the control (pH 5.6 treatment). In addition, V. faba was found to be sensitive to the pH 4.5 treatment with an 18% reduction in total plant weights (compared to plants grown in the pH 5.6 treatment). In P. multiflorus, reduction in the dry weights of shoots in response to increasing acidity of rain was not accompanied by reduction in root weights, indicating an interference in the partitioning of assimilates. It is concluded that these three species, and V. faba in particular, may be growing below their potential in much of the UK.

  14. Spectrum of Membrane Morphological Responses to Antibacterial Fatty Acids and Related Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Jackman, Joshua A; Kim, Min Chul; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-09-22

    Medium-chain saturated fatty acids and related compounds (e.g., monoglycerides) represent one class of membrane-active surfactants with antimicrobial properties. Most related studies have been in vitro evaluations of bacterial growth inhibition, and there is limited knowledge about how the compounds in this class destabilize lipid bilayers, which are the purported target within the bacterial cell membrane. Herein, the interaction between three representative compounds in this class and a supported lipid bilayer platform was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation and fluorescence microscopy in order to examine membrane destabilization. The three tested compounds were lauric acid, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and glycerol monolaurate. For each compound, we discovered striking differences in the resulting morphological changes of supported lipid bilayers. The experimental trends indicate that the compounds have membrane-disruptive behavior against supported lipid bilayers principally above the respective critical micelle concentration values. The growth inhibition properties of the compounds against standard and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains were also tested. Taken together, the findings in this work improve our knowledge about how saturated fatty acids and related compounds destabilize lipid bilayers, offering insight into the corresponding molecular mechanisms that lead to membrane morphological responses.

  15. Unravelling the Structural and Molecular Basis Responsible for the Anti-Biofilm Activity of Zosteric Acid.

    PubMed

    Cattò, Cristina; Dell'Orto, Silvia; Villa, Federica; Villa, Stefania; Gelain, Arianna; Vitali, Alberto; Marzano, Valeria; Baroni, Sara; Forlani, Fabio; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The natural compound zosteric acid, or p-(sulfoxy)cinnamic acid (ZA), is proposed as an alternative biocide-free agent suitable for preventive or integrative anti-biofilm approaches. Despite its potential, the lack of information concerning the structural and molecular mechanism of action involved in its anti-biofilm activity has limited efforts to generate more potent anti-biofilm strategies. In this study a 43-member library of small molecules based on ZA scaffold diversity was designed and screened against Escherichia coli to understand the structural requirements necessary for biofilm inhibition at sub-lethal concentrations. Considerations concerning the relationship between structure and anti-biofilm activity revealed that i) the para-sulfoxy ester group is not needed to exploit the anti-biofilm activity of the molecule, it is the cinnamic acid scaffold that is responsible for anti-biofilm performance; ii) the anti-biofilm activity of ZA derivatives depends on the presence of a carboxylate anion and, consequently, on its hydrogen-donating ability; iii) the conjugated aromatic system is instrumental to the anti-biofilm activities of ZA and its analogues. Using a protein pull-down approach, combined with mass spectrometry, the herein-defined active structure of ZA was matrix-immobilized, and was proved to interact with the E. coli NADH:quinone reductase, WrbA, suggesting a possible role of this protein in the biofilm formation process. PMID:26132116

  16. Optimization of clavulanic acid production by Streptomyces daufpe 3060 by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Marques, Daniela A Viana; Cunha, Márcia N Carneiro; Araújo, Janete M; Lima-Filho, José L; Converti, Attilio; Pessoa-Jr, Adalberto; Porto, Ana L Figueiredo

    2011-04-01

    Clavulanic acid is a ß-lactam antibiotic which has a potent ß-lactamase inhibiting activity. In order to optimize its production by the new isolate Streptomyces DAUFPE 3060, the influence of two independent variables, temperature and soybean flour concentration, on clavulanic acid and biomass concentrations was investigated in 250 mL-Erlenmeyers according to a 2(2) central composite design. To this purpose, temperature and soybean flour (SF) concentration were varied in the ranges 26-34°C and 10-50 g/L, respectively, and the results evaluated utilizing the Response Surface Methodology. The experimental maximum production of clavulanic acid (629 mg/L) was obtained at 32°C and 40 g/L SF after 48 h, while the maximum biomass concentration (3.9 g/L) at 30°C and 50 g/L soybean flour, respectively. These values are satisfactorily close to those (640 mg/L and 3.75 g/L, respectively) predicted by the model, thereby demonstrating the validity of the mathematical approach adopted in this study. PMID:24031677

  17. Murine GPRC6A Mediates Cellular Responses to L-Amino Acids, but Not Osteocalcin Variants

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Patricia; Harley, Elizabeth; Lu, Yao; Stewart, Gregory D.; Fabb, Stewart; Diepenhorst, Natalie; Cremers, Béatrice; Rouillon, Marie-Hélène; Wehrle, Isabelle; Geant, Anne; Lamarche, Gwladys; Leach, Katie; Charman, William N.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Summers, Roger J.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Langmead, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotyping of Gprc6a KO mice has shown that this promiscuous class C G protein coupled receptor is variously involved in regulation of metabolism, inflammation and endocrine function. Such effects are described as mediated by extracellular calcium, L-amino acids, the bone-derived peptide osteocalcin (OCN) and the male hormone testosterone, introducing the concept of a bone-energy-metabolism-reproduction functional crosstalk mediated by GPRC6A. However, whilst the calcium and L-amino acid-sensing properties of GPRC6A are well established, verification of activity of osteocalcin at both human and mouse GPRC6A in vitro has proven somewhat elusive. This study characterises the in vitro pharmacology of mouse GPRC6A in response to its putative ligands in both recombinant and endogenous GPRC6A-expressing cells. Using cell signalling, and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin release assays, our results confirm that basic L-amino acids act as agonists of the murine GPRC6A receptor in both recombinant cells and immortalised entero-endocrine and pancreatic β-cells. In contrast, our studies do not support a role for OCN as a direct ligand for mouse GPRC6A, suggesting that the reported in vivo effects of OCN that require GPRC6A may be indirect, rather than via direct activation of the receptor. PMID:26785252

  18. Unravelling the Structural and Molecular Basis Responsible for the Anti-Biofilm Activity of Zosteric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cattò, Cristina; Dell’Orto, Silvia; Villa, Federica; Villa, Stefania; Gelain, Arianna; Vitali, Alberto; Marzano, Valeria; Baroni, Sara; Forlani, Fabio; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The natural compound zosteric acid, or p-(sulfoxy)cinnamic acid (ZA), is proposed as an alternative biocide-free agent suitable for preventive or integrative anti-biofilm approaches. Despite its potential, the lack of information concerning the structural and molecular mechanism of action involved in its anti-biofilm activity has limited efforts to generate more potent anti-biofilm strategies. In this study a 43-member library of small molecules based on ZA scaffold diversity was designed and screened against Escherichia coli to understand the structural requirements necessary for biofilm inhibition at sub-lethal concentrations. Considerations concerning the relationship between structure and anti-biofilm activity revealed that i) the para-sulfoxy ester group is not needed to exploit the anti-biofilm activity of the molecule, it is the cinnamic acid scaffold that is responsible for anti-biofilm performance; ii) the anti-biofilm activity of ZA derivatives depends on the presence of a carboxylate anion and, consequently, on its hydrogen-donating ability; iii) the conjugated aromatic system is instrumental to the anti-biofilm activities of ZA and its analogues. Using a protein pull-down approach, combined with mass spectrometry, the herein-defined active structure of ZA was matrix-immobilized, and was proved to interact with the E. coli NADH:quinone reductase, WrbA, suggesting a possible role of this protein in the biofilm formation process. PMID:26132116

  19. Transcriptional and antioxidative responses to endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Andrisic, Luka; Collinson, Emma J; Tehlivets, Oksana; Perak, Eleonora; Zarkovic, Tomislav; Dawes, Ian W; Zarkovic, Neven; Cipak Gasparovic, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with aberrant lipid and oxygen metabolism. In particular, under oxidative stress, PUFAs are prone to autocatalytic degradation via peroxidation, leading to formation of reactive aldehydes with numerous potentially harmful effects. However, the pathological and compensatory mechanisms induced by lipid peroxidation are very complex and not sufficiently understood. In our study, we have used yeast capable of endogenous PUFA synthesis in order to understand the effects triggered by PUFA accumulation on cellular physiology of a eukaryotic organism. The mechanisms induced by PUFA accumulation in S. cerevisiae expressing Hevea brasiliensis Δ12-fatty acid desaturase include down-regulation of components of electron transport chain in mitochondria as well as up-regulation of pentose-phosphate pathway and fatty acid β-oxidation at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, while no changes were observed at the transcriptional level, activities of two important enzymatic antioxidants, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase, were altered in response to PUFA accumulation. Increased intracellular glutathione levels further suggest an endogenous oxidative stress and activation of antioxidative defense mechanisms under conditions of PUFA accumulation. Finally, our data suggest that PUFA in cell membrane causes metabolic changes which in turn lead to adaptation to endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:25280400

  20. Optimization of clavulanic acid production by Streptomyces daufpe 3060 by response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Daniela A. Viana; Cunha, Márcia N. Carneiro; Araújo, Janete M.; Lima-Filho, José L.; Converti, Attilio; Pessoa-Jr, Adalberto; Porto, Ana L. Figueiredo

    2011-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a ß-lactam antibiotic which has a potent ß-lactamase inhibiting activity. In order to optimize its production by the new isolate Streptomyces DAUFPE 3060, the influence of two independent variables, temperature and soybean flour concentration, on clavulanic acid and biomass concentrations was investigated in 250 mL-Erlenmeyers according to a 22 central composite design. To this purpose, temperature and soybean flour (SF) concentration were varied in the ranges 26–34°C and 10–50 g/L, respectively, and the results evaluated utilizing the Response Surface Methodology. The experimental maximum production of clavulanic acid (629 mg/L) was obtained at 32°C and 40 g/L SF after 48 h, while the maximum biomass concentration (3.9 g/L) at 30°C and 50 g/L soybean flour, respectively. These values are satisfactorily close to those (640 mg/L and 3.75 g/L, respectively) predicted by the model, thereby demonstrating the validity of the mathematical approach adopted in this study. PMID:24031677

  1. Generation of dose-response relationships to assess the effects of acidity in precipitation on growth and productivity of vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed with several plant species in natural environments as well in a greenhouse and/or tissue culture facilities to establish dose-response functions of plant responses to simulated acidic rain in order to determine environmental risk assessments to ambient levels of acidic rain. Response functions of foliar injury, biomass of leaves and seed of soybean and pinto beans, root yields of radishes and garden beets, and reproduction of bracken fern are considered. The dose-response function of soybean seed yields with the hydrogen ion concentration of simulated acidic rainfalls was expressed by the equation y = 21.06-1.01 log x where y = seed yield in grams per plant and x = the hydrogen concentration if ..mu..eq l/sup -1/. The correlation coefficient of this relationship was -0.90. A similar dose-response function was generated for percent fertilization of ferns in a forest understory. When percent fertilization is plotted on logarithmic scale with hydrogen ion concentration of the simulated rain solution, the Y intercept is 51.18, slope -0.041 with a correlation coefficient of -0.98. Other dose-response functions were generated that assist in a general knowledge as to which plant species and which physiological processes are most impacted by acidic precipitation. Some responses did not produce convenient dose-response relationships. In such cases the responses may be altered by other environmental factors or there may be no differences among treatment means.

  2. Peripartum responses of dairy cows to prepartal feeding level and dietary fatty acid source.

    PubMed

    Hayirli, A; Keisler, D H; Doepel, L; Petit, Hélène

    2011-02-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of feeding level and oilseed supplementation during the close-up dry period on energy balance (EB), hepatic lipidosis, metabolic status, and productivity in early lactation. Seventy-seven Holstein cows were blocked according to parity and expected calving date and then assigned randomly to 1 of 6 treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial allocation with 2 feeding levels: ad libitum (AL) or 30% feed restriction (FR), and 3 dietary fatty acid sources: canola seed, linola seed, or flaxseed at 8% of dietary dry matter (DM), to enrich the rations with oleic, linoleic, or linolenic acids, respectively during the last 4 wk of gestation. After parturition, all cows were fed a common lactation diet. Cows fed AL lost less body weight (-2.9 vs. -6.0%) and body condition score (+0.67 vs. -2.30%), and consequently were in more positive EB (+4.6 vs. -0.3 Mcal) during the prepartum period than cows subjected to FR. Postpartum, FR cows lost less body weight (-9.7 vs. -12.4%) and experienced less severe negative EB (-4.5 vs. -7.0 Mcal) than AL cows. Cows fed AL had higher plasma insulin (6.8 vs. 4.4 μIU/mL) and lower nonesterified fatty acid concentrations (436 vs. 570 mEq/mL) during the close-up period than cows subjected to FR. Cows fed AL tended to have lower liver glycogen content in early lactation than cows subjected to FR (4.4 vs. 2.9 % of DM) [corrected], but had similar triglyceride content (13.1 ± 1.2 μg/g of DM). Fatty acid source did not influence response variables. In conclusion, eliminating intake depression by FR during the close-up period had positive carryover effects on EB and metabolic status during early lactation, but feeding linoleic and linolenic acids via unprotected oilseeds only had negligible effects on peripartum responses.

  3. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-01

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  4. Determining Multiple Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to an Antimicrobial Agent, Free Nitrous Acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shu-Hong; Fan, Lu; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Agulló-Barceló, Míriam; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2016-05-17

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) has recently been demonstrated as an antimicrobial agent on a range of micro-organisms, especially in wastewater-treatment systems. However, the antimicrobial mechanism of FNA is largely unknown. Here, we report that the antimicrobial effects of FNA are multitargeted. The response of a model denitrifier, Pseudomnas aeruginosa PAO1 (PAO1), common in wastewater treatment, was investigated in the absence and presence of inhibitory level of FNA (0.1 mg N/L) under anaerobic denitrifying conditions. This was achieved through coupling gene expression analysis, by RNA sequencing, and with a suite of physiological analyses. Various transcripts exhibited significant changes in abundance in the presence of FNA. Respiration was likely inhibited because denitrification activity was severely depleted, and decreased transcript levels of most denitrification genes occurred. As a consequence, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was inhibited due to the lowered cellular redox state in the FNA-exposed cultures. Meanwhile, during FNA exposure, PAO1 rerouted its carbon metabolic pathway from the TCA cycle to pyruvate fermentation with acetate as the end product as a possible survival mechanism. Additionally, protein synthesis was significantly decreased, and ribosome preservation was evident. These findings improve our understanding of PAO1 in response to FNA and contribute toward the potential application for use of FNA as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:27116299

  5. Glutathione Responsive Hyaluronic Acid Nanocapsules Obtained by Bioorthogonal Interfacial "Click" Reaction.

    PubMed

    Baier, Grit; Fichter, Michael; Kreyes, Andreas; Klein, Katja; Mailänder, Volker; Gehring, Stephan; Landfester, Katharina

    2016-01-11

    Azide-functionalized hyaluronic acid and disulfide dialkyne have been used for "click" reaction polymerization at the miniemulsion droplets interface leading to glutathione responsive nanocapsules (NCs). Inverse miniemulsion polymerization was chosen, due to its excellent performance properties, for example, tuning of size and size distribution, shell thickness/density, and high pay loading efficiency. The obtained size, size distribution, and encapsulation efficiency were checked via fluorescent spectroscopy, and the tripeptide glutathione was used to release an encapsulated fluorescent dye after cleavage of the nanocapsules shell. To show the glutathione-mediated intracellular cleavage of disulfide-containing NC shells, CellTracker was encapsulated into the nanocapsules. The cellular uptake in dendritic cells and the cleavage of the nanocapsules in the cells were studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Because of the mild reaction conditions used during the interfacial polymerization and the excellent cleavage properties, we believe that the synthesis of glutathione responsive hyaluronic acid NCs reported herein are of high interest for the encapsulation and release of sensitive compounds at high yields.

  6. Syk/Src Pathway-Targeted Inhibition of Skin Inflammatory Responses by Carnosic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jueun; Yu, Tao; Choi, Soo Jeong; Yang, Yanyan; Baek, Heung Soo; An, Soon Ae; Kwon, Lee Kyoung; Kim, Jinsol; Rho, Ho Sik; Shin, Song Seok; Choi, Wahn Soo; Hong, Sungyoul; Cho, Jae Youl

    2012-01-01

    Carnosic acid (CA) is a diterpene compound exhibiting antioxidative, anticancer, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-metabolic disorder, and hepatoprotective and neuroprotective activities. In this study, the effect of CA on various skin inflammatory responses and its inhibitory mechanism were examined. CA strongly suppressed the production of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 from keratinocyte HaCaT cells stimulated with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and retinoic acid (RA). In addition, CA blocked the release of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from RAW264.7 cells activated by the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 ligands, Gram-positive bacterium-derived peptidoglycan (PGN) and pam3CSK, and the TLR4 ligand, Gram-negative bacterium-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). CA arrested the growth of dermatitis-inducing Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms such Propionibacterium acnes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. CA also blocked the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and its upstream signaling including Syk/Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) kinase (IKK), and IκBα for NF-κB activation. Kinase assays revealed that Syk could be direct enzymatic target of CA in its anti-inflammatory action. Therefore, our data strongly suggest the potential of CA as an anti-inflammatory drug against skin inflammatory responses with Src/NF-κB inhibitory properties. PMID:22577255

  7. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 Acts in Regulating Abscisic Acid Signaling and Drought Response.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongliang; Huo, Yongjin; Wei, Yangyang; Chen, Qiansi; Xu, Ziwei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are unique endosomes containing vesicles in the lumens and play essential roles in many eukaryotic cellular processes. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 (LIP5), a positive regulator of MVB biogenesis, has critical roles in biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, whether the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling is involved in LIP5-mediated stress response is largely unknown. Here, we report that LIP5 functions in regulating ABA signaling and drought response in Arabidopsis. Analyses of a LIP5 promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct revealed substantial GUS activity in whole seedlings. The expression of LIP5 was induced by ABA and drought, and overexpression of LIP5 led to ABA hypersensitivity, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, therefore, increased drought tolerance. On the contrary, LIP5 knockdown mutants showed ABA-insensitive phenotypes and reduced drought tolerance; suggesting that LIP5 acts in regulating ABA response. Further analysis using a fluorescent dye revealed that ABA and water stress induced cell endocytosis or vesicle trafficking in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of several drought- or ABA-inducible marker genes was significantly down-regulated in the lip5 mutant seedlings. Collectively, our data suggest that LIP5 positively regulates drought tolerance through ABA-mediated cell signaling. PMID:27313589

  8. Regulation of water, salinity, and cold stress responses by salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kenji; Tada, Yasuomi

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring phenolic compound. SA plays an important role in the regulation of plant growth, development, ripening, and defense responses. The role of SA in the plant–pathogen relationship has been extensively investigated. In addition to defense responses, SA plays an important role in the response to abiotic stresses, including drought, low temperature, and salinity stresses. It has been suggested that SA has great agronomic potential to improve the stress tolerance of agriculturally important crops. However, the utility of SA is dependent on the concentration of the applied SA, the mode of application, and the state of the plants (e.g., developmental stage and acclimation). Generally, low concentrations of applied SA alleviate the sensitivity to abiotic stresses, and high concentrations of applied induce high levels of oxidative stress, leading to a decreased tolerance to abiotic stresses. In this article, the effects of SA on the water stress responses and regulation of stomatal closure are reviewed. PMID:24478784

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid circuits shape response properties of auditory cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; McFadden, Sandra L; Caspary, Donald; Salvi, Richard

    2002-07-19

    Neurons containing gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) are widely distributed throughout the primary auditory cortex (AI). We investigated the effects of endogenous GABA by comparing response properties of 110 neurons in chinchilla AI before and after iontophoresis of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, and/or CGP35348, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. GABA(A) receptor blockade significantly increased spontaneous and driven discharge rates, dramatically decreased the thresholds of many neurons, and constricted the range of thresholds across the neural population. Some neurons with 'non-onset' temporal discharge patterns developed an onset pattern that was followed by a long pause. Interestingly, the excitatory response area typically expanded on both sides of the characteristic frequency; this expansion exceeded one octave in a third of the sample. Although GABA(B) receptor blockade had little effect alone, the combination of CGP35348 and bicuculline produced greater increases in driven rate and expansion of the frequency response area than GABA(A) receptor blockade alone, suggesting a modulatory role of local GABA(B) receptors. The results suggest that local GABA inhibition contributes significantly to intensity and frequency coding by controlling the range of intensities over which cortical neurons operate and the range of frequencies to which they respond. The inhibitory circuits that generate nonmonotonic rate-level functions are separate from those that influence other response properties of AI neurons. PMID:12106684

  10. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 Acts in Regulating Abscisic Acid Signaling and Drought Response

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zongliang; Huo, Yongjin; Wei, Yangyang; Chen, Qiansi; Xu, Ziwei; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are unique endosomes containing vesicles in the lumens and play essential roles in many eukaryotic cellular processes. The Arabidopsis LYST INTERACTING PROTEIN 5 (LIP5), a positive regulator of MVB biogenesis, has critical roles in biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, whether the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling is involved in LIP5-mediated stress response is largely unknown. Here, we report that LIP5 functions in regulating ABA signaling and drought response in Arabidopsis. Analyses of a LIP5 promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct revealed substantial GUS activity in whole seedlings. The expression of LIP5 was induced by ABA and drought, and overexpression of LIP5 led to ABA hypersensitivity, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, therefore, increased drought tolerance. On the contrary, LIP5 knockdown mutants showed ABA-insensitive phenotypes and reduced drought tolerance; suggesting that LIP5 acts in regulating ABA response. Further analysis using a fluorescent dye revealed that ABA and water stress induced cell endocytosis or vesicle trafficking in a largely LIP5-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of several drought- or ABA-inducible marker genes was significantly down-regulated in the lip5 mutant seedlings. Collectively, our data suggest that LIP5 positively regulates drought tolerance through ABA-mediated cell signaling. PMID:27313589

  11. Brainstem amino acid neurotransmitters and ventilatory response to hypoxia in piglets.

    PubMed

    Hehre, Dorothy A; Devia, Carlos J; Bancalari, Eduardo; Suguihara, Cleide

    2008-01-01

    The ventilatory response to hypoxia is influenced by the balance between inhibitory (GABA, glycine, and taurine) and excitatory (glutamate and aspartate) brainstem amino acid (AA) neurotransmitters. To assess the effects of AA in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) on the ventilatory response to hypoxia at 1 and 2 wk of age, inhibitory and excitatory AA were sampled by microdialysis in unanesthetized and chronically instrumented piglets. Microdialysis samples from the NTS area were collected at 5-min intervals and minute ventilation (VE), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and arterial blood gases (ABG) were measured while the animals were in quiet sleep. A biphasic ventilatory response to hypoxia was observed in wk 1 and 2, but the decrease in VE at 10 and 15 min was more marked in wk 1. This was associated with an increase in inhibitory AA during hypoxia in wk 1. Excitatory AA levels were elevated during hypoxia in wk 1 and 2. Changes in ABP, pH, and ABG during hypoxia were not different between weeks. These data suggest that the larger depression in the ventilatory response to hypoxia observed in younger piglets is mediated by predominance of the inhibitory AA neurotransmitters, GABA, glycine, and taurine, in the NTS. PMID:18043517

  12. Impairment of innate immune responses in cirrhotic patients and treatment by branched-chain amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ikuo

    2014-06-21

    It has been reported that host defense responses, such as phagocytic function of neutrophils and natural killer (NK) cell activity of lymphocytes, are impaired in cirrhotic patients. This review will concentrate on the impairment of innate immune responses in decompensated cirrhotic patients and the effect of the treatment by branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on innate immune responses. We already reported that phagocytic function of neutrophils was significantly improved by 3-mo BCAA supplementation. In addition, the changes of NK activity were also significant at 3 mo of supplementation compared with before supplementation. Also, Fisher's ratios were reported to be significantly increased at 3 mo of BCAA supplementation compared with those before oral supplementation. Therefore, administration of BCAA could reduce the risk of bacterial and viral infection in patients with decompensated cirrhosis by restoring impaired innate immune responses of the host. In addition, it was also revealed that BCAA oral supplementation could reduce the risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients. The mechanisms of the effects will also be discussed in this review article.

  13. A Nuclear Factor Regulates Abscisic Acid Responses in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Shin, Ryoung; Schachtman, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that regulates plant growth as well as stress responses. In this study, we identified and characterized a new Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein, Nuclear Protein X1 (NPX1), which was up-regulated by stress and treatment with exogenous ABA. Stomatal closure, seed germination, and primary root growth are well-known ABA responses that were less sensitive to ABA in NPX1-overexpressing plants. NPX1-overexpressing plants were more drought sensitive, and the changes in response to drought were due to the altered guard cell sensitivity to ABA in transgenic plants and not to a lack of ABA production. The nuclear localization of NPX1 correlated with changes in the expression of genes involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABA signal transduction. To understand the function of NPX1, we searched for interacting proteins and found that an ABA-inducible NAC transcription factor, TIP, interacted with NPX1. Based on the whole plant phenotypes, we hypothesized that NPX1 acts as a transcriptional repressor, and this was demonstrated in yeast, where we showed that TIP was repressed by NPX1. Our results indicate that the previously unknown protein NPX1 acts as a negative regulator in plant response to changes in environmental conditions through the control of ABA-regulated gene expression. The characterization of this factor enhances our understanding of guard cell function and the mechanisms that plants use to modulate water loss from leaves under drought conditions. PMID:19759343

  14. Redirection of Epithelial Immune Responses by Short-Chain Fatty Acids through Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, May Young; de Zoete, Marcel R.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Strijbis, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are products of microbial fermentation that are important for intestinal epithelial health. Here, we describe that SCFAs have rapid and reversible effects on toll-like receptor (TLR) responses in epithelial cells. Incubation of HEK293 or HeLa epithelial cells with the SCFAs butyrate or propionate at physiological concentrations enhanced NF-κB activation induced by TLR5, TLR2/1, TLR4, and TLR9 agonists. NF-κB activation in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) was also increased by SCFAs. Comparative transcript analysis of HT-29 colon epithelial cells revealed that SCFAs enhanced TLR5-induced transcription of TNFα but dampened or even abolished the TLR5-mediated induction of IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1. SCFAs are known inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Butyrate or propionate caused a rapid increase in histone acetylation in epithelial cells, similar to the small molecule HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). TSA also mimicked the effects of SCFAs on TLR–NF-κB responses. This study shows that bacterial SCFAs rapidly alter the epigenetic state of host cells resulting in redirection of the innate immune response and selective reprograming of cytokine/chemokine expression. PMID:26579129

  15. PHO1 expression in guard cells mediates the stomatal response to abscisic acid in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, Céline; Ribot, Cécile; Vavasseur, Alain; Bauer, Hubert; Hedrich, Rainer; Poirier, Yves

    2012-10-01

    Stomatal opening and closing are driven by ion fluxes that cause changes in guard cell turgor and volume. This process is, in turn, regulated by environmental and hormonal signals, including light and the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). Here, we present genetic evidence that expression of PHO1 in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana is required for full stomatal responses to ABA. PHO1 is involved in the export of phosphate into the root xylem vessels and, as a result, the pho1 mutant is characterized by low shoot phosphate levels. In leaves, PHO1 was found expressed in guard cells and up-regulated following treatment with ABA. The pho1 mutant was unaffected in production of reactive oxygen species following ABA treatment, and in stomatal movements in response to light cues, high extracellular calcium, auxin, and fusicoccin. However, stomatal movements in response to ABA treatment were severely impaired, both in terms of induction of closure and inhibition of opening. Micro-grafting a pho1 shoot scion onto wild-type rootstock resulted in plants with normal shoot growth and phosphate content, but failed to restore normal stomatal response to ABA treatment. PHO1 knockdown using RNA interference specifically in guard cells of wild-type plants caused a reduced stomatal response to ABA. In agreement, specific expression of PHO1 in guard cells of pho1 plants complemented the mutant guard cell phenotype and re-established ABA sensitivity, although full functional complementation was dependent on shoot phosphate sufficiency. Together, these data reveal an important role for phosphate and the action of PHO1 in the stomatal response to ABA.

  16. Quantitative assessment of alkali-reactive aggregate mineral content through XRD using polished sections as a supplementary tool to RILEM AAR-1 (petrographic method)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Nelia; Sorensen, Bjorn E.; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.

    2012-11-15

    The mineral content of 5 aggregate samples from 4 different countries, including reactive and non-reactive aggregate types, was assessed quantitatively by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using polished sections. Additionally, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to characterize the opal-CT identified in one of the aggregate samples. Critical review of results from polished sections against traditionally powdered specimen has demonstrated that for fine-grained rocks without preferred orientation the assessment of mineral content by XRD using polished sections may represent an advantage over traditional powder specimens. Comparison of data on mineral content and silica speciation with expansion data from PARTNER project confirmed that the presence of opal-CT plays an important role in the reactivity of one of the studied aggregates. Used as a complementary tool to RILEM AAR-1, the methodology suggested in this paper has the potential to improve the strength of the petrographic method.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King Scores for Diagnosis of Esophageal Varices in Liver Cirrhosis: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han; Qi, Xingshun; Peng, Ying; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Yongguo; Liu, Xu; Sun, Xiaolin; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-12-20

    BACKGROUND Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR), FIB-4, fibrosis index (FI), and King scores might be alternatives to the use of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EVs) in liver cirrhosis. This study aimed to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy in predicting the presence and severity of EVs in liver cirrhosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients who were consecutively admitted to our hospital and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between January 2012 and June 2014 were eligible for this retrospective study. Areas under curve (AUCs) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and splenectomy. RESULTS A total of 650 patients with liver cirrhosis were included, and 81.4% of them had moderate-severe EVs. In the overall analysis, the AUCs of these non-invasive scores for predicting moderate-severe EVs and presence of any EVs were 0.506-0.6 and 0.539-0.612, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.601-0.664 and 0.596-0.662, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB or splenectomy, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.627-0.69 and 0.607-0.692, respectively. CONCLUSIONS APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King scores had modest diagnostic accuracy of EVs in liver cirrhosis. They might not be able to replace the utility of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of EVs in liver cirrhosis.

  18. The Osmoregulatory and the Amino Acid-regulated Responses of System A Are Mediated by Different Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    López-Fontanals, Marta; Rodríguez-Mulero, Silvia; Casado, F. Javier; Dérijard, Benoit; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2003-01-01

    The osmotic response of system A for neutral amino acid transport has been related to the adaptive response of this transport system to amino acid starvation. In a previous study (Ruiz-Montasell, B., M. Gómez-Angelats, F.J. Casado, A. Felipe, J.D. McGivan, and M. Pastor-Anglada. 1994. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:9569–9573), a model was proposed in which both responses were mediated by different mechanisms. The recent cloning of several isoforms of system A as well as the elucidation of a variety of signal transduction pathways involved in stress responses allow to test this model. SAT2 mRNA levels increased after amino acid deprivation but not after hyperosmotic shock. Inhibition of p38 activity or transfection with a dominant negative p38 did not alter the response to amino acid starvation but partially blocked the hypertonicity response. Inhibition of the ERK pathway resulted in full inhibition of the adaptive response of system A and no increase in SAT2 mRNA levels, without modifying the response to hyperosmolarity. Similar results were obtained after transfection with a dominant negative JNK1. The CDK2 inhibitor peptide-II decreased the osmotic response in a dose-dependent manner but did not have any effect on the adaptive response of system A. In summary, the previously proposed model of up-regulation of system A after hypertonic shock or after amino acid starvation by separate mechanisms is now confirmed and the two signal transduction pathways have been identified. The involvement of a CDK–cyclin complex in the osmotic response of system A links the activity of this transporter to the increase in cell volume previous to the entry in a new cell division cycle. PMID:12810851

  19. Physiological and transcriptional responses to high concentrations of lactic acid in anaerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Derek A; Suir, Erwin; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2008-09-01

    Based on the high acid tolerance and the simple nutritional requirements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, engineered strains of this yeast are considered biocatalysts for industrial production of high-purity undissociated lactic acid. However, high concentrations of lactic acid are toxic to S. cerevisiae, thus limiting its growth and product formation. Physiological and transcriptional responses to high concentrations of lactic acid were studied in anaerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures grown at different pH values and lactic acid concentrations, resulting in a 50% decrease in the biomass yield. At pH 5, the yield decrease was caused mostly by osmotically induced glycerol production and not by the classic weak-acid action, as was observed at pH 3. Cultures grown at pH 5 with 900 mM lactic acid revealed an upregulation of many genes involved in iron homeostasis, indicating that iron chelation occurred at high concentrations of dissociated lactic acid. Chemostat cultivation at pH 3 with 500 mM lactate, resulting in lower anion concentrations, showed an alleviation of this iron homeostasis response. Six of the 10 known targets of the transcriptional regulator Haa1p were strongly upregulated in lactate-challenged cultures at pH 3 but showed only moderate induction by high lactate concentrations at pH 5. Moreover, the haa1Delta mutant exhibited a growth defect at high lactic acid concentrations at pH 3. These results indicate that iron homeostasis plays a major role in the response of S. cerevisiae to high lactate concentrations, whereas the Haa1p regulon is involved primarily in the response to high concentrations of undissociated lactic acid.

  20. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses to High Concentrations of Lactic Acid in Anaerobic Chemostat Cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Derek A.; Suir, Erwin; van Maris, Antonius J. A.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the high acid tolerance and the simple nutritional requirements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, engineered strains of this yeast are considered biocatalysts for industrial production of high-purity undissociated lactic acid. However, high concentrations of lactic acid are toxic to S. cerevisiae, thus limiting its growth and product formation. Physiological and transcriptional responses to high concentrations of lactic acid were studied in anaerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures grown at different pH values and lactic acid concentrations, resulting in a 50% decrease in the biomass yield. At pH 5, the yield decrease was caused mostly by osmotically induced glycerol production and not by the classic weak-acid action, as was observed at pH 3. Cultures grown at pH 5 with 900 mM lactic acid revealed an upregulation of many genes involved in iron homeostasis, indicating that iron chelation occurred at high concentrations of dissociated lactic acid. Chemostat cultivation at pH 3 with 500 mM lactate, resulting in lower anion concentrations, showed an alleviation of this iron homeostasis response. Six of the 10 known targets of the transcriptional regulator Haa1p were strongly upregulated in lactate-challenged cultures at pH 3 but showed only moderate induction by high lactate concentrations at pH 5. Moreover, the haa1Δ mutant exhibited a growth defect at high lactic acid concentrations at pH 3. These results indicate that iron homeostasis plays a major role in the response of S. cerevisiae to high lactate concentrations, whereas the Haa1p regulon is involved primarily in the response to high concentrations of undissociated lactic acid. PMID:18676708

  1. Response of Fatty Acid Synthesis Genes to the Binding of Human Salivary Amylase by Streptococcus gordonii

    PubMed Central

    Nikitkova, Anna E.; Haase, Elaine M.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Gill, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, an important primary colonizer of dental plaque biofilm, specifically binds to salivary amylase via the surface-associated amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). We hypothesized that a function of amylase binding to S. gordonii may be to modulate the expression of chromosomal genes, which could influence bacterial survival and persistence in the oral cavity. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis was performed to detect genes in S. gordonii strain CH1 that were differentially expressed in response to the binding of purified human salivary amylase versus exposure to purified heat-denatured amylase. Selected genes found to be differentially expressed were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Five genes from the fatty acid synthesis (FAS) cluster were highly (10- to 35-fold) upregulated in S. gordonii CH1 cells treated with native amylase relative to those treated with denatured amylase. An abpA-deficient strain of S. gordonii exposed to amylase failed to show a response in FAS gene expression similar to that observed in the parental strain. Predicted phenotypic effects of amylase binding to S. gordonii strain CH1 (associated with increased expression of FAS genes, leading to changes in fatty acid synthesis) were noted; these included increased bacterial growth, survival at low pH, and resistance to triclosan. These changes were not observed in the amylase-exposed abpA-deficient strain, suggesting a role for AbpA in the amylase-induced phenotype. These results provide evidence that the binding of salivary amylase elicits a differential gene response in S. gordonii, resulting in a phenotypic adjustment that is potentially advantageous for bacterial survival in the oral environment. PMID:22247133

  2. Role of Acinus in Regulating Retinoic Acid-Responsive Gene Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Soprano, Kenneth J.; Soprano, Dianne Robert

    2014-01-01

    Acinus-S’ is a co-repressor for retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-dependent gene transcription and has been suggested to be involved in RNA processing. In this study the role of Acinus isoforms in regulating pre-mRNA splicing was explored using in vivo splicing assays. Both Acinus-L and Acinus-S’, with the activity of Acinus-L higher than that of Acinus-S’, increase the splicing of a retinoic acid (RA)-responsive minigene containing a weak 5′ splice site but not a RA-responsive minigene containing a strong 5′ splice site. RA treatment further enhances the splicing of the weak 5′ splice site by Acinus in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting a RA-dependent activity in addition to a RA-independent activity of Acinus. The RA-independent effect of Acinus occurs to varying degrees using minigene constructs containing several different promoters while the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is specific for transcripts derived from the minigene driven by a RA response element (RARE)-containing promoter. This suggests that the ligand-dependent splicing activity of Acinus is related to the RA-activated RAR bound to the RARE. The RRM domain is necessary for the RA-dependent splicing activity of Acinus and the RA-independent splicing activity of Acinus is repressed by RNPS1. Importantly, measurement of the splicing of endogenous human RARβ and Bcl-x in vivo demonstrates that Acinus stimulates the use of the weaker alternative 5′ splice site of these two genes in a RA-dependent manner for RARβ and a RA-independent manner for Bcl-x. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that Acinus functions in both RAR-dependent splicing and RAR-dependent transcription. PMID:25205379

  3. Poly(ortho ester amides): Acid-labile Temperature-responsive Copolymers for Potential Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rupei; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2009-01-01

    A new, convenient pathway is developed to synthesize highly hydrolytically labile poly(ortho ester amide) (POEA) copolymers that overcomes some of the major weaknesses of the traditional methods of synthesizing poly(ortho esters) and their derivatives. A diamine monomer containing a built-in, stabilized ortho ester group was synthesized and was used for polycondensation with diacid esters, giving rise to a series of POEA copolymers with unique stimuli-responsive properties. The POEA undergoes temperature-responsive, reversible sol-gel phase transition in water. Phase diagrams of the POEA/H2O mixture reveal the concentration-dependent existence of different phases, including hydrogel and opaque or clear solution. Such behavior may be attributed to the temperature-dependent hydrogen-bonding involving the amide groups in the POEA backbone and hydrophobic interactions between POEA chains, and it is tunable by selecting diacid monomers with different chemical structures. The kinetics of POEA mass loss in physiological aqueous buffers and release of a model macromolecular drug, fluorescently labeled dextran, are nearly zero-order, suggesting predominantly surface-restricted polymer erosion. The rates of polymer erosion and drug release are much faster at pH 5.0 than pH 7.4. No cytotoxicity was found for the polymer extracts and the polymer degradation products at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. The normal morphology of fibroblasts cultured directly in contact with POEA films was not altered. These novel acid-labile temperature-responsive POEA copolymers may be potentially useful for a wide range of biomedical applications such as minimal invasive delivery of controlled-release drug formulations that respond to biological temperature and acidic-pH environments in cells and tissues. PMID:19281150

  4. Stomatal response of an anisohydric grapevine cultivar to evaporative demand, available soil moisture and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Rogiers, Suzy Y; Greer, Dennis H; Hatfield, Jo M; Hutton, Ron J; Clarke, Simon J; Hutchinson, Paul A; Somers, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    Stomatal responsiveness to evaporative demand (air vapour pressure deficit (VPD)) ranges widely between species and cultivars, and mechanisms for stomatal control in response to VPD remain obscure. The interaction of irrigation and soil moisture with VPD on stomatal conductance is particularly difficult to predict, but nevertheless is critical to instantaneous transpiration and vulnerability to desiccation. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD and soil moisture was investigated in Semillon, an anisohydric Vitis vinifera L. variety whose leaf water potential (Ψ(l)) is frequently lower than that of other grapevine varieties grown under similar conditions in the warm grape-growing regions of Australia. A survey of Semillon vines across seven vineyards revealed that, regardless of irrigation treatment, midday Ψ(l) was dependent on not only soil moisture but VPD at the time of measurement. Predawn Ψ(l) was more closely correlated to not only soil moisture in dry vineyards but to night-time VPD in drip-irrigated vineyards, with incomplete rehydration during high night-time VPD. Daytime stomatal conductance was low only under severe plant water deficits, induced by extremes in dry soil. Stomatal response to VPD was inconsistent across irrigation regime; however, in an unirrigated vineyard, stomatal sensitivity to VPD-the magnitude of stomatal response to VPD-was heightened under dry soils. It was also found that stomatal sensitivity was proportional to the magnitude of stomatal conductance at a reference VPD of 1kPa. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) applied to roots of Semillon vines growing in a hydroponic system induced stomatal closure and, in field vines, petiole xylem sap ABA concentrations rose throughout the morning and were higher in vines with low Ψ(l). These data indicate that despite high stomatal conductance of this anisohydric variety when grown in medium to high soil moisture, increased concentrations of ABA as a result of very limited soil moisture may augment

  5. Transient responses of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and computerized study of the steady state and transient response of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system was completed. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of the PAFC system's operation were accomplished. Four non-linear dynamic models of the fuel cell stack, reformer, shift converters, and heat exchangers were developed based on nonhomogeneous non-linear partial differential equations, which include the material, component, energy balance, and electrochemical kinetic features. Due to a lack of experimental data for the dynamic response of the components only the steady state results were compared with data from other sources, indicating reasonably good agreement. A steady state simulation of the entire system was developed using, nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The finite difference method and trial-and-error procedures were used to obtain a solution. Using the model, a PAFC system, that was developed under NASA Grant, NCC3-17, was improved through the optimization of the heat exchanger network. Three types of cooling configurations for cell plates were evaluated to obtain the best current density and temperature distributions. The steady state solutions were used as the initial conditions in the dynamic model. The transient response of a simplified PAFC system, which included all of the major components, subjected to a load change was obtained. Due to the length of the computation time for the transient response calculations, analysis on a real-time computer was not possible. A simulation of the real-time calculations was developed on a batch type computer. The transient response characteristics are needed for the optimization of the design and control of the whole PAFC system. All of the models, procedures and simulations were programmed in Fortran and run on IBM 370 computers at Cleveland State University and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  6. Streptozotocin induced activation of oxidative stress responsive splenic cell signaling pathways: Protective role of arjunolic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep

    2010-04-15

    Present study investigates the beneficial role of arjunolic acid (AA) against the alteration in the cytokine levels and simultaneous activation of oxidative stress responsive signaling pathways in spleen under hyperglycemic condition. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight, injected in the tail vain). STZ administration elevated the levels of IL-2 as well as IFN-gamma and attenuated the level of TNF-alpha in the sera of diabetic animals. In addition, hyperglycemia is also associated with the increased production of intracellular reactive intermediates resulting with the elevation in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and reduction in intracellular antioxidant defense. Investigating the oxidative stress responsive cell signaling pathways, increased expressions (immunoreactive concentrations) of phosphorylated p65 as well as its inhibitor protein phospho IkappaBalpha and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been observed in diabetic spleen tissue. Studies on isolated splenocytes revealed that hyperglycemia caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation in the concentration of cytosolic cytochrome c as well as activation of caspase 3 leading to apoptotic cell death. Histological examination revealed that diabetic induction depleted the white pulp scoring which is in agreement with the reduced immunological response. Treatment with AA prevented the hyperglycemia and its associated pathogenesis in spleen tissue. Results suggest that AA might act as an anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory agent against hyperglycemia.

  7. Oleanolic acid controls allergic and inflammatory responses in experimental allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Martínez-García, Carmen; Martín, Rubén; Gallego-Muñoz, Patricia; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L

    2014-01-01

    Pollen is the most common aeroallergen to cause seasonal conjunctivitis. The result of allergen exposure is a strong Th2-mediated response along with conjunctival mast cell degranulation and eosinophilic infiltration. Oleanolic acid (OA) is natural a triterpene that displays strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties being an active anti-allergic molecule on hypersensitivity reaction models. However, its effect on inflammatory ocular disorders including conjunctivitis, has not yet been addressed. Hence, using a Ragweed pollen (RWP)-specific allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) mouse model we study here whether OA could modify responses associated to allergic processes. We found that OA treatment restricted mast cell degranulation and infiltration of eosinophils in conjunctival tissue and decreased allergen-specific Igs levels in EAC mice. Th2-type cytokines, secreted phospholipase A2 type-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), and chemokines levels were also significantly diminished in the conjunctiva and serum of OA-treated EAC mice. Moreover, OA treatment also suppressed RWP-specific T-cell proliferation. In vitro studies, on relevant cells of the allergic process, revealed that OA reduced the proliferative and migratory response, as well as the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators on EoL-1 eosinophils and RBL-2H3 mast cells exposed to allergic and/or crucial inflammatory stimuli such as RWP, sPLA2-IIA or eotaxin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the beneficial activity of OA in ocular allergic processes and may provide a new intervention strategy and potential therapy for allergic diseases.

  8. Immune response of the bay scallop, Argopecten irradians, after exposure to the algicide palmitoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Chi, Cheng; Giri, Sib Sankar; Jun, Jin Woo; Yun, Saekil; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Kim, Sang Guen; Park, Se Chang

    2016-10-01

    Palmitoleic acid (PA) is an effective algicide against the toxin-producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense; however, its effects on the immune system of the edible bay scallop Argopecten irradians are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of PA on the immune response in A. irradians by assessing total haemocyte counts (THC), alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), nitrite oxide (NO), glutathione (GSH), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, as well as the expression of immune-related genes (FREP, PGRP, HSP90, MnSOD, and Cu/ZnSOD) at various hours post-exposure (hpe) to the compound. THC decreased in PA-treated groups, whereas ALP increased significantly in all of the PA treatment groups at 3 hpe, after which it significantly decreased. The LDH and NO levels were significantly enhanced in the high and medium concentration group. Notably, the GSH level increased in all PA treatment groups at each time interval. Our study revealed that after treatment with different concentrations of PA, variable effects on the expression of genes involved in the immune system response were observed. The results of our study demonstrate that immersing scallops in PA at effective concentrations could result in differential effects on immune system responses and expression of immune-related genes. Specifically, PA may disrupt the endocrine system or affect signal transduction pathways in the scallops. Therefore, the present study highlights the potential risk of using the PA as an algicide to control algal bloom outbreaks in the marine environment.

  9. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids from flaxseed affect immune responses of dairy sheep around parturition.

    PubMed

    Caroprese, Mariangela; Ciliberti, Maria Giovanna; Albenzio, Marzia; Annicchiarico, Giovanni; Sevi, Agostino

    2015-11-15

    The objective of the study was to characterize the immune profile of dairy ewes fed flaxseed, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), around parturition. The hypothesis to be verified was that a physiological stressor, such as parturition, could be overcome with a nutritional manipulation in the diet of the animal in order to guarantee welfare of animals and to sustain their immune responses. Twenty Comisana ewes were divided in two groups (10 ewes/group), and fed a supplementation of whole flaxseed in the diet (FS group) or no supplementation (CON group). Blood samples were collected at parturition and then 7, 14, 21, 28, and 42 day post partum. Plasma samples were used to assess the humoral immune response after ovalbumin (OVA) immunization. At parturition, at 14 day, and 42 day post partum the level of plasma cytokines was assessed. The sheep showed a reduced responsiveness to OVA immunization. In FS ewes the IL-6 level remained unchanged until 14 day post partum and then significantly decreased from 14 day to 42 day post partum. IL-10 level was significantly higher in FS ewes than in CON ewes at 14 day. At parturition IL-1β level was significantly lower in FS ewes than in CON ewes and significantly decreased in both groups from parturition to 42 day. In conclusion, PUFA from flaxseed, as supplement in the diet of ewes around parturition can modulate sheep immune reactivity by influencing cytokine production.

  10. Diverse functional interactions between nitric oxide and abscisic acid in plant development and responses to stress.

    PubMed

    León, José; Castillo, Mari Cruz; Coego, Alberto; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Mir, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    The extensive support for abscisic acid (ABA) involvement in the complex regulatory networks controlling stress responses and development in plants contrasts with the relatively recent role assigned to nitric oxide (NO). Because treatment with exogenous ABA leads to enhanced production of NO, it has been widely considered that NO participates downstream of ABA in controlling processes such as stomata movement, seed dormancy, and germination. However, data on leaf senescence and responses to stress suggest that the functional interaction between ABA and NO is more complex than previously thought, including not only cooperation but also antagonism. The functional relationship is probably determined by several factors including the time- and place-dependent pattern of accumulation of both molecules, the threshold levels, and the regulatory factors important for perception. These factors will determine the actions exerted by each regulator. Here, several examples of well-documented functional interactions between NO and ABA are analysed in light of the most recent reported data on seed dormancy and germination, stomata movements, leaf senescence, and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses.

  11. Cell type-specific response to high intracellular loading of polyacrylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lojk, Jasna; Bregar, Vladimir B; Rajh, Maruša; Miš, Katarina; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Pirkmajer, Sergej; Veranič, Peter; Pavlin, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are a special type of NP with a ferromagnetic, electron-dense core that enables several applications such as cell tracking, hyperthermia, and magnetic separation, as well as multimodality. So far, superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) are the only clinically approved type of metal oxide NPs, but cobalt ferrite NPs have properties suitable for biomedical applications as well. In this study, we analyzed the cellular responses to magnetic cobalt ferrite NPs coated with polyacrylic acid (PAA) in three cell types: Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), mouse melanoma (B16) cell line, and primary human myoblasts (MYO). We compared the internalization pathway, intracellular trafficking, and intracellular fate of our NPs using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as quantified NP uptake and analyzed uptake dynamics. We determined cell viability after 24 or 96 hours’ exposure to increasing concentrations of NPs, and quantified the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon 24 and 48 hours’ exposure. Our NPs have been shown to readily enter and accumulate in cells in high quantities using the same two endocytic pathways; mostly by macropinocytosis and partially by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The cell types differed in their uptake rate, the dynamics of intracellular trafficking, and the uptake capacity, as well as in their response to higher concentrations of internalized NPs. The observed differences in cell responses stress the importance of evaluation of NP–cell interactions on several different cell types for better prediction of possible toxic effects on different cell and tissue types in vivo. PMID:25733835

  12. Immune response of the bay scallop, Argopecten irradians, after exposure to the algicide palmitoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Chi, Cheng; Giri, Sib Sankar; Jun, Jin Woo; Yun, Saekil; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Kim, Sang Guen; Park, Se Chang

    2016-10-01

    Palmitoleic acid (PA) is an effective algicide against the toxin-producing dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense; however, its effects on the immune system of the edible bay scallop Argopecten irradians are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of PA on the immune response in A. irradians by assessing total haemocyte counts (THC), alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), nitrite oxide (NO), glutathione (GSH), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, as well as the expression of immune-related genes (FREP, PGRP, HSP90, MnSOD, and Cu/ZnSOD) at various hours post-exposure (hpe) to the compound. THC decreased in PA-treated groups, whereas ALP increased significantly in all of the PA treatment groups at 3 hpe, after which it significantly decreased. The LDH and NO levels were significantly enhanced in the high and medium concentration group. Notably, the GSH level increased in all PA treatment groups at each time interval. Our study revealed that after treatment with different concentrations of PA, variable effects on the expression of genes involved in the immune system response were observed. The results of our study demonstrate that immersing scallops in PA at effective concentrations could result in differential effects on immune system responses and expression of immune-related genes. Specifically, PA may disrupt the endocrine system or affect signal transduction pathways in the scallops. Therefore, the present study highlights the potential risk of using the PA as an algicide to control algal bloom outbreaks in the marine environment. PMID:27542615

  13. Involvement of specific calmodulin isoforms in salicylic acid-independent activation of plant disease resistance responses.

    PubMed

    Heo, W D; Lee, S H; Kim, M C; Kim, J C; Chung, W S; Chun, H J; Lee, K J; Park, C Y; Park, H C; Choi, J Y; Cho, M J

    1999-01-19

    The Ca2+ signal is essential for the activation of plant defense responses, but downstream components of the signaling pathway are still poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that specific calmodulin (CaM) isoforms are activated by infection or pathogen-derived elicitors and participate in Ca2+-mediated induction of plant disease resistance responses. Soybean CaM (SCaM)-4 and SCaM-5 genes, which encode for divergent CaM isoforms, were induced within 30 min by a fungal elicitor or pathogen, whereas other SCaM genes encoding highly conserved CaM isoforms did not show such response. This pathogen-triggered induction of these genes specifically depended on the increase of intracellular Ca2+ level. Constitutive expression of SCaM-4 and SCaM-5 in transgenic tobacco plants triggered spontaneous induction of lesions and induces an array of systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-associated genes. Surprisingly, these transgenic plants have normal levels of endogenous salicylic acid (SA). Furthermore, coexpression of nahG gene did not block the induction of SAR-associated genes in these transgenic plants, indicating that SA is not involved in the SAR gene induction mediated by SCaM-4 or SCaM-5. The transgenic plants exhibit enhanced resistance to a wide spectrum of virulent and avirulent pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and virus. These results suggest that specific CaM isoforms are components of a SA-independent signal transduction chain leading to disease resistance.

  14. Switchable reconfiguration of nucleic acid nanostructures by stimuli-responsive DNA machines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: The base sequence in DNA dictates structural and reactivity features of the biopolymer. These properties are implemented to use DNA as a unique material for developing the area of DNA nanotechnology. The design of DNA machines represents a rapidly developing research field in the area of DNA nanotechnology. The present Account discusses the switchable reconfiguration of nucleic acid nanostructures by stimuli-responsive DNA machines, and it highlights potential applications and future perspectives of the area. Programmed switchable DNA machines driven by various fuels and antifuels, such as pH, Hg(2+) ions/cysteine, or nucleic acid strands/antistrands, are described. These include the assembly of DNA tweezers, walkers, a rotor, a pendulum, and more. Using a pH-oscillatory system, the oscillatory mechanical operation of a DNA pendulum is presented. Specifically, the synthesis and "mechanical" properties of interlocked DNA rings are described. This is exemplified with the preparation of interlocked DNA catenanes and a DNA rotaxane. The dynamic fuel-driven reconfiguration of the catenane/rotaxane structures is followed by fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of DNA machines as functional scaffolds to reconfigurate Au nanoparticle assemblies and to switch the fluorescence features within fluorophore/Au nanoparticle conjugates between quenching and surface-enhanced fluorescence states are addressed. Specifically, the fluorescence features of the different DNA machines are characterized as a function of the spatial separation between the fluorophore and Au nanoparticles. The experimental results are supported by theoretical calculations. The future development of reconfigurable stimuli-responsive DNA machines involves fundamental challenges, such as the synthesis of molecular devices exhibiting enhanced complexities, the introduction of new fuels and antifuels, and the integration of new payloads being reconfigured by the molecular devices, such as enzymes or

  15. Effect of vitamin C and folic acid on seed vigour response and phenolic-linked antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Burguieres, Elizabeth; McCue, Patrick; Kwon, Young-In; Shetty, Kalidas

    2007-05-01

    Folic acid and vitamin C were used in the concentration range of 0-500muM as exogenous growth enhancers to stimulate pea (Pisum sativum) seedling vigour. The results suggest that a concentration of 50muM folic acid and 500muM vitamin C were optimum in maximally enhancing seed vigour and potentially seedling performance according to both agronomic and biochemical seed vigour parameters. Results indicated that germination percentage, shoot weight, shoot height, and root length were enhanced in folic acid and vitamin C treated plants compared to control plants. The levels of enhanced phenolic content in response to folic acid and vitamin C treatments were highest on days 8 and 10. Evaluation of critical biochemical parameters indicated that the average glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity and proline content in response to treatments were higher than control and correlated to enhanced phenolic content and DPPH-based antioxidant activity. Key enzymes, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were also higher in response to treatments and correlated to enhanced phenolic content and DPPH-based antioxidant activity. Taken together, these studies support the hypothesis that the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway stimulates phenolic synthesis and related free-radical scavenging antioxidant activity. Further, this proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway stimulation in response to folic acid and vitamin C was also correlated to antioxidant enzyme response indicated by the stimulation of GPX, SOD, and CAT activities. Therefore, this study indicates the enhancement of seed vigour response by folic acid and vitamin C as reflected in both agronomic and biochemical responses, and this occurred through the stimulation of phenolic-linked antioxidant response that is likely positively modulated through the proline-linked pentose phosphate pathway.

  16. Adaptive response of Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 to salt and phenolic stress on the level of mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fischer, Martin A; Kirsten, Sandra; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-12-01

    Mycolata form a group of Gram-positive bacteria with unique cell envelope structures that are known for their high tolerance against antibiotics and both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. An important part of the unique surface structure of the mycolata is the presence of long chain α-alkyl-β-hydroxy fatty acids, the mycolic acids. In order to investigate the adaptive changes in the mycolic acid composition, we investigated the composition of mycolic acids during the response both to osmotic stress caused by NaCl and to 4-chlorophenol in Rhodococcus opacus PWD4. This bacterium was chosen as it is known to adapt to different kinds of stresses. In addition, it is a potential biocatalyst in bioremediation as well as for biotechnological applications. In the present study, cells of R. opacus PWD4, grown in liquid cultures, responded to toxic concentrations of NaCl by increasing the ratio between mycolic acids and membrane phospholipid fatty acids (MA/PLFA-ratio). Cells reacted to both NaCl and 4-chlorophenol by decreasing both the average chain length and the unsaturation index of their mycolic acids. These changes in mycolic acid composition correlated with increases in cell surface hydrophobicity and saturation of membrane fatty acids, demonstrating the relation between mycolic acid and phospholipid synthesis and their contribution to cell surface properties of R. opacus PWD4. PMID:27620730

  17. Adaptive response of Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 to salt and phenolic stress on the level of mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fischer, Martin A; Kirsten, Sandra; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-12-01

    Mycolata form a group of Gram-positive bacteria with unique cell envelope structures that are known for their high tolerance against antibiotics and both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. An important part of the unique surface structure of the mycolata is the presence of long chain α-alkyl-β-hydroxy fatty acids, the mycolic acids. In order to investigate the adaptive changes in the mycolic acid composition, we investigated the composition of mycolic acids during the response both to osmotic stress caused by NaCl and to 4-chlorophenol in Rhodococcus opacus PWD4. This bacterium was chosen as it is known to adapt to different kinds of stresses. In addition, it is a potential biocatalyst in bioremediation as well as for biotechnological applications. In the present study, cells of R. opacus PWD4, grown in liquid cultures, responded to toxic concentrations of NaCl by increasing the ratio between mycolic acids and membrane phospholipid fatty acids (MA/PLFA-ratio). Cells reacted to both NaCl and 4-chlorophenol by decreasing both the average chain length and the unsaturation index of their mycolic acids. These changes in mycolic acid composition correlated with increases in cell surface hydrophobicity and saturation of membrane fatty acids, demonstrating the relation between mycolic acid and phospholipid synthesis and their contribution to cell surface properties of R. opacus PWD4.

  18. Cellular Interactions and Immune Response of Spherical Nucleic Acid (SNA) Nanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massich, Matthew David

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoconjugates consist of a densely packed monolayer shell of highly-oriented oligonucleotides covalently bound to a gold nanoparticle core. The nanoconjugates exhibit several important qualities, which make them useful for various biological applications, such as antisense gene regulation strategies and the intracellular detection of biomolecules. The focus of this thesis was to characterize the nanoconjugates interaction with cultured cells and specifically the immune response to their intracellular presence. The immune response of macrophage cells to internalized nanoconjugates was studied, and due to the dense functionalization of oligonucleotides on the surface of the nanoparticle and the resulting high localized salt concentration the innate immune response to the nanoconjugates is ˜25-fold less when compared to a lipoplex carrying the same sequence. Additionally, genome-wide expression profiling was used to study the biological response of cultured cells to the nanoconjugates. The biological response of HeLa cells to gold nanoparticles stabilized by weakly bound ligands was significant, yet when these same nanoparticles were stably functionalized with covalently attached oligonucleotides the cells showed no measurable response. In human keratinocytes, the oligonucleotide sequences caused 427 genes to be differentially expressed when complexed with Dharmafect, but when the oligonucleotides were conjugated to nanoparticles only 7 genes were differentially expressed. Beyond characterizing the cellular interactions and immune response of the nanoconjugates, the optimal length of siRNA (from 19--34 base pairs) that induces the most gene knockdown while maintaining limited immune activation was determined to be 24 base pairs. Further, the SNAs were shown to be useful as a potential antiviral gene therapy by demonstrating approximately 50% knockdown of the Ebola VP35 gene. Lastly, a scanning probe-enabled method was used to rapidly

  19. L-Amino Acids Elicit Diverse Response Patterns in Taste Sensory Cells: A Role for Multiple Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pal Choudhuri, Shreoshi; Delay, Rona J.; Delay, Eugene R.

    2015-01-01

    Umami, the fifth basic taste, is elicited by the L-amino acid, glutamate. A unique characteristic of umami taste is the response potentiation by 5’ ribonucleotide monophosphates, which are also capable of eliciting an umami taste. Initial reports using human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells suggested that there is one broadly tuned receptor heterodimer, T1r1+T1r3, which detects L-glutamate and all other L-amino acids. However, there is growing evidence that multiple receptors detect glutamate in the oral cavity. While much is understood about glutamate transduction, the mechanisms for detecting the tastes of other L-amino acids are less well understood. We used calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells and taste cell clusters from the circumvallate and foliate papillae of C57BL/6J and T1r3 knockout mice to determine if other receptors might also be involved in detection of L-amino acids. Ratiometric imaging with Fura-2 was used to study calcium responses to monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine, L-arginine, and L-glutamine, with and without inosine 5’ monophosphate (IMP). The results of these experiments showed that the response patterns elicited by L-amino acids varied significantly across taste sensory cells. L-amino acids other than glutamate also elicited synergistic responses in a subset of taste sensory cells. Along with its role in synergism, IMP alone elicited a response in a large number of taste sensory cells. Our data indicate that synergistic and non-synergistic responses to L-amino acids and IMP are mediated by multiple receptors or possibly a receptor complex. PMID:26110622

  20. L-Amino Acids Elicit Diverse Response Patterns in Taste Sensory Cells: A Role for Multiple Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pal Choudhuri, Shreoshi; Delay, Rona J; Delay, Eugene R

    2015-01-01

    Umami, the fifth basic taste, is elicited by the L-amino acid, glutamate. A unique characteristic of umami taste is the response potentiation by 5' ribonucleotide monophosphates, which are also capable of eliciting an umami taste. Initial reports using human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells suggested that there is one broadly tuned receptor heterodimer, T1r1+T1r3, which detects L-glutamate and all other L-amino acids. However, there is growing evidence that multiple receptors detect glutamate in the oral cavity. While much is understood about glutamate transduction, the mechanisms for detecting the tastes of other L-amino acids are less well understood. We used calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells and taste cell clusters from the circumvallate and foliate papillae of C57BL/6J and T1r3 knockout mice to determine if other receptors might also be involved in detection of L-amino acids. Ratiometric imaging with Fura-2 was used to study calcium responses to monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine, L-arginine, and L-glutamine, with and without inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP). The results of these experiments showed that the response patterns elicited by L-amino acids varied significantly across taste sensory cells. L-amino acids other than glutamate also elicited synergistic responses in a subset of taste sensory cells. Along with its role in synergism, IMP alone elicited a response in a large number of taste sensory cells. Our data indicate that synergistic and non-synergistic responses to L-amino acids and IMP are mediated by multiple receptors or possibly a receptor complex.

  1. Different responses of two Mosla species to potassium limitation in relation to acid rain deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Gu, Bao-jing; Ge, Ying; Liu, Zhen; Jiang, De-an; Chang, Scott X; Chang, Jie

    2009-08-01

    The increasingly serious problem of acid rain is leading to increased potassium (K) loss from soils, and in our field investigation, we found that even congenerically relative Mosla species show different tolerance to K-deficiency. A hydroponic study was conducted on the growth of two Mosla species and their morphological, physiological and stoichiometric traits in response to limited (0.35 mmol K/L), normal (3.25 mmol K/L) and excessive (6.50 mmol K/L) K concentrations. Mosla hangchowensis is an endangered plant, whereas Mosla dianthera a widespread weed. In the case of M. hangchowensis, in comparison with normal K concentration, K-limitation induced a significant reduction in net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), soluble protein content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. However, leaf mass ratio (LMR) and root mass ratio (RMR) were changed little by K-limitation. In contrast, for M. dianthera, K-limitation had little effect on P(n), soluble protein content, SOD activity, and MDA concentration, but increased LMR and RMR. Critical values of N (nitrogen):K and K:P (phosphorus) ratios in the shoots indicated that limitation in acquiring K occurred under K-limited conditions for M. hangchowensis but not for M. dianthera. We found that low K content in natural habitats was a restrictive factor in the growth and distribution of M. hangchowensis, and soil K-deficiency caused by acid rain worsened the situation of M. hangchowensis, while M. dianthera could well acclimate to the increasing K-deficiency. We suggest that controlling the acid rain and applying K fertilizers may be an effective way to rescue the endangered M. hangchowensis.

  2. Ascorbic acid accumulates as a defense response to Turnip mosaic virus in resistant Brassica rapa cultivars.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ayaka; Togawa, Satoko; Hikawa, Takahiro; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Masuta, Chikara; Inukai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We initially observed that Brassica rapa cultivars containing the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance gene, Rnt1-1, accumulated a high level of endogenous ascorbic acid (AS) and dehydroascobic acid (DHA) when infected with TuMV. We here hypothesized a possible contribution of an elevated level of AS+DHA (TAA) to the Rnt1-1-mediated resistance, and conducted a series of experiments using B. rapa and Arabidopsis plants. The application of l-galactose (the key substrate in AS synthesis) to a susceptible cultivar could increase the TAA level ~2-fold, and simultaneously lead to some degree of enhanced viral resistance. To confirm some positive correlation between TAA levels and viral resistance, we analyzed two Arabidopsis knockout mutants (ao and vtc1) in the AS pathways; the TAA levels were significantly increased and decreased in ao and vtc1 plants, respectively. While the ao plants showed enhanced resistance to TuMV, vtc1 plants were more susceptible than the control, supporting our hypothesis. When we analyzed the expression profiles of the genes involved in the AS pathways upon TuMV infection, we found that the observed TAA increase was mainly brought about by the reduction of AS oxidation and activation of AS recycling. We then investigated the secondary signals that regulate endogenous TAA levels in response to viral infection, and found that jasmonic acid (JA) might play an important role in TAA accumulation. In conclusion, we reason that the elevated TAA accumulation in B. rapa plants would be at least partly mediated by the JA-dependent signaling pathway and may significantly contribute to viral resistance. PMID:27255930

  3. Ascorbic acid accumulates as a defense response to Turnip mosaic virus in resistant Brassica rapa cultivars.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ayaka; Togawa, Satoko; Hikawa, Takahiro; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Masuta, Chikara; Inukai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We initially observed that Brassica rapa cultivars containing the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) resistance gene, Rnt1-1, accumulated a high level of endogenous ascorbic acid (AS) and dehydroascobic acid (DHA) when infected with TuMV. We here hypothesized a possible contribution of an elevated level of AS+DHA (TAA) to the Rnt1-1-mediated resistance, and conducted a series of experiments using B. rapa and Arabidopsis plants. The application of l-galactose (the key substrate in AS synthesis) to a susceptible cultivar could increase the TAA level ~2-fold, and simultaneously lead to some degree of enhanced viral resistance. To confirm some positive correlation between TAA levels and viral resistance, we analyzed two Arabidopsis knockout mutants (ao and vtc1) in the AS pathways; the TAA levels were significantly increased and decreased in ao and vtc1 plants, respectively. While the ao plants showed enhanced resistance to TuMV, vtc1 plants were more susceptible than the control, supporting our hypothesis. When we analyzed the expression profiles of the genes involved in the AS pathways upon TuMV infection, we found that the observed TAA increase was mainly brought about by the reduction of AS oxidation and activation of AS recycling. We then investigated the secondary signals that regulate endogenous TAA levels in response to viral infection, and found that jasmonic acid (JA) might play an important role in TAA accumulation. In conclusion, we reason that the elevated TAA accumulation in B. rapa plants would be at least partly mediated by the JA-dependent signaling pathway and may significantly contribute to viral resistance.

  4. The Arabidopsis abscisic acid response locus ABI4 encodes an APETALA 2 domain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, R R; Wang, M L; Lynch, T J; Rao, S; Goodman, H M

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive abi4 mutants have pleiotropic defects in seed development, including decreased sensitivity to ABA inhibition of germination and altered seed-specific gene expression. This phenotype is consistent with a role for ABI4 in regulating seed responses to ABA and/or seed-specific signals. We isolated the ABI4 gene by positional cloning and confirmed its identity by complementation analysis. The predicted protein product shows homology to a plant-specific family of transcriptional regulators characterized by a conserved DNA binding domain, the APETALA 2 domain. The single mutant allele identified has a single base pair deletion, resulting in a frameshift that should disrupt the C-terminal half of the protein but leave the presumed DNA binding domain intact. Expression analyses showed that despite the seed-specific nature of the mutant phenotype, ABI4 expression is not seed specific. PMID:9634591

  5. Isolation and characterization of all-trans-retinoic acid-responsive genes in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Gaemers, I C; Van Pelt, A M; Themmen, A P; De Rooij, D G

    1998-05-01

    By way of differential screening of testis cDNA libraries from vitamin A-deficient (VAD) rats before and after administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), genes, the transcription of which was influenced by ATRA, were isolated. Most clones with an increased transcription encoded different subunits of the same mitochondrial protein complex, cytochrome c oxidase (COX). The mRNA expression of COX increased by a factor 3.9 +/- 1.5 (mean +/- SD, n = 4). This increased expression seems to reflect an increased energy demand in the ATRA-supplemented VAD testis. Also, one gene was isolated, the transcription of which was reduced to about 70% by ATRA. This gene, sulfated glycoprotein 2 (Sgp-2), is a major secretion product of Sertoli cells, the function of which is still unknown. The effect of ATRA on Sgp-2 expression may be direct, since the promoter of Sgp-2 contains a putative ATRA-responsive element (RARE). PMID:9547504

  6. Mechanistic Basis for Plant Responses to Drought Stress : Regulatory Mechanism of Abscisic Acid Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in the rapid adaptation of plants to environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Accumulated ABA in plant cells promotes stomatal closure in guard cells and transcription of stress-tolerant genes. Our understanding of ABA responses dramatically improved by the discovery of both PYR/PYL/RCAR as a soluble ABA receptor and inhibitory complex of a protein phospatase PP2C and a protein kinase SnRK2. Moreover, several structural analyses of PYR/PYL/RCAR revealed the mechanistic basis for the regulatory mechanism of ABA signaling, which provides a rational framework for the design of alternative agonists in future.

  7. The histone demethylase PHF8 governs retinoic acid response in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Maria Francisca; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Qiu, Jihui; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian; Kogan, Scott C; Dong, Shuo; So, Chi Wai Eric

    2013-03-18

    While all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has been the paradigm of targeted therapy for oncogenic transcription factors, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, and a significant number of patients still relapse and become ATRA resistant. We identified the histone demethylase PHF8 as a coactivator that is specifically recruited by RARα fusions to activate expression of their downstream targets upon ATRA treatment. Forced expression of PHF8 resensitizes ATRA-resistant APL cells, whereas its downregulation confers resistance. ATRA sensitivity depends on the enzymatic activity and phosphorylation status of PHF8, which can be pharmacologically manipulated to resurrect ATRA sensitivity to resistant cells. These findings provide important molecular insights into ATRA response and a promising avenue for overcoming ATRA resistance.

  8. Understanding and identifying amino acid repeats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Nijveen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    Amino acid repeats (AARs) are abundant in protein sequences. They have particular roles in protein function and evolution. Simple repeat patterns generated by DNA slippage tend to introduce length variations and point mutations in repeat regions. Loss of normal and gain of abnormal function owing to their variable length are potential risks leading to diseases. Repeats with complex patterns mostly refer to the functional domain repeats, such as the well-known leucine-rich repeat and WD repeat, which are frequently involved in protein–protein interaction. They are mainly derived from internal gene duplication events and stabilized by ‘gate-keeper’ residues, which play crucial roles in preventing inter-domain aggregation. AARs are widely distributed in different proteomes across a variety of taxonomic ranges, and especially abundant in eukaryotic proteins. However, their specific evolutionary and functional scenarios are still poorly understood. Identifying AARs in protein sequences is the first step for the further investigation of their biological function and evolutionary mechanism. In principle, this is an NP-hard problem, as most of the repeat fragments are shaped by a series of sophisticated evolutionary events and become latent periodical patterns. It is not possible to define a uniform criterion for detecting and verifying various repeat patterns. Instead, different algorithms based on different strategies have been developed to cope with different repeat patterns. In this review, we attempt to describe the amino acid repeat-detection algorithms currently available and compare their strategies based on an in-depth analysis of the biological significance of protein repeats. PMID:23418055

  9. Retinoic acid inhibits the cytoproliferative response to weak 50-Hz magnetic fields in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    TRILLO, MARÍA ÁNGELES; MARTÍNEZ, MARÍA ANTONIA; CID, MARÍA ANTONIA; ÚBEDA, ALEJANDRO

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that intermittent exposure to a 50-Hz magnetic field (MF) at 100 μT stimulates cell proliferation in the human neuroblastoma cell line NB69. The present study aimed to investigate whether the magnetic field-induced growth promotion also occurs at a lower magnetic flux density of 10 μT. To this purpose, NB69 cells were subjected for 42 h to intermittent exposure, 3 h on/3 h off, to a 50-Hz MF at a 10 or 100 μT magnetic flux density. The field exposure took place either in the presence or in the absence of the antiproliferative agent retinoic acid. At the end of the treatment and/or incubation period, the cell growth was estimated by hemocytometric counting and spectrophotometric analysis of total protein and DNA contents. Potential changes in DNA synthesis were also assessed through proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunolabeling. The results confirmed previously reported data that a 42-h exposure to a 50-Hz sine wave MF at 100 μT promotes cell growth in the NB69 cell line, and showed that 10 μT induces a similar proliferative response. This effect, which was significantly associated and linearly correlated with PCNA expression, was abolished by the presence of retinoic acid in the culture medium. PMID:23292364

  10. Relative quantification of phosphoproteomic changes in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves in response to abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Rattanakan, Supakan; George, Iniga; Haynes, Paul A; Cramer, Grant R

    2016-01-01

    In a previous transcriptomic analysis, abscisic acid (ABA) was found to affect the abundance of a number of transcripts in leaves of Cabernet Sauvignon grapevines with roots that had been exposed to 10 μm ABA for 2 h. Other work has indicated that ABA affects protein abundance and protein phosphorylation as well. In this study we investigated changes in protein abundance and phosphorylation of Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine leaves. Protein abundance was assessed by both label-free and isobaric-label quantitive proteomic methods. Each identified common proteins, but also additional proteins not found with the other method. Overall, several thousand proteins were identified and several hundred were quantified. In addition, hundreds of phosphoproteins were identified. Tens of proteins were found to be affected in the leaf after the roots had been exposed to ABA for 2 h, more than half of them were phosphorylated proteins. Many phosphosites were confirmed and several new ones were identified. ABA increased the abundance of some proteins, but the majority of the proteins had their protein abundance decreased. Many of these proteins were involved in growth and plant organ development, including proteins involved in protein synthesis, photosynthesis, sugar and amino-acid metabolism. This study provides new insights into how ABA regulates plant responses and acclimation to water deficits. PMID:27366326

  11. Inhibition of the gravitropic bending response of flowering shoots by salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Haya; Meir, Shimon; Halevy, Abraham H; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia

    2003-10-01

    The upward gravitropic bending of cut snapdragon, lupinus and anemone flowering shoots was inhibited by salicylic acid (SA) applied at 0.5 mM and above. This effect was probably not due to acidification of the cytoplasm, since other weak acids did not inhibit bending of snapdragon shoots. In order to study its mode of inhibitory action, we have examined in cut snapdragon shoots the effect of SA on three processes of the gravity-signaling pathway, including: amyloplast sedimentation, formation of ethylene gradient across the stem, and differential growth response. The results show that 1 mM SA inhibited differential ethylene production rates across the horizontal stem and the gravity-induced growth, without significantly inhibiting vertical growth or amyloplast sedimentation following horizontal placement. However, 5 mM SA inhibited all three gravity-induced processes, as well as the growth of vertical shoots, while increasing flower wilting. It may, therefore, be concluded that SA inhibits bending of various cut flowering shoots in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, at a low concentration SA exerts its effect in snapdragon shoots by inhibiting processes operating downstream to stimulus sensing exerted by amyloplast sedimentation. At a higher concentration SA inhibits bending probably by exerting general negative effects on various cellular processes.

  12. Changes in fatty acid composition in the giant clam Tridacna maxima in response to thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Dubousquet, Vaimiti; Gros, Emmanuelle; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Viguier, Bruno; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Bertrand, Cédric; Lecellier, Gaël J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Temperature can modify membrane fluidity and thus affects cellular functions and physiological activities. This study examines lipid remodelling in the marine symbiotic organism, Tridacna maxima, during a time series of induced thermal stress, with an emphasis on the morphology of their symbiont Symbiodinium. First, we show that the French Polynesian giant clams harbour an important proportion of saturated fatty acids (SFA), which reflects their tropical location. Second, in contrast to most marine organisms, the total lipid content in giant clams remained constant under stress, though some changes in their composition were shown. Third, the stress-induced changes in fatty acid (FA) diversity were accompanied by an upregulation of genes involved in lipids and ROS pathways. Finally, our microscopic analysis revealed that for the giant clam's symbiont, Symbiodinium, thermal stress led to two sequential cell death processes. Our data suggests that the degradation of Symbiodinium cells could provide an additional source of energy to T. maxima in response to heat stress. PMID:27543058

  13. Optimization of Acid Black 172 decolorization by electrocoagulation using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper utilizes a statistical approach, the response surface optimization methodology, to determine the optimum conditions for the Acid Black 172 dye removal efficiency from aqueous solution by electrocoagulation. The experimental parameters investigated were initial pH: 4–10; initial dye concentration: 0–600 mg/L; applied current: 0.5-3.5 A and reaction time: 3–15 min. These parameters were changed at five levels according to the central composite design to evaluate their effects on decolorization through analysis of variance. High R2 value of 94.48% shows a high correlation between the experimental and predicted values and expresses that the second-order regression model is acceptable for Acid Black 172 dye removal efficiency. It was also found that some interactions and squares influenced the electrocoagulation performance as well as the selected parameters. Optimum dye removal efficiency of 90.4% was observed experimentally at initial pH of 7, initial dye concentration of 300 mg/L, applied current of 2 A and reaction time of 9.16 min, which is close to model predicted (90%) result. PMID:23369574

  14. Macrophage response to bacteria: induction of marked secretory and cellular activities by lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R; Fischer, W; Keist, R; Bassetti, S

    1992-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) from various bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Listeria monocytogenes, were examined for the ability to induce secretory and cellular responses in a pure population of bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes. Some of the highly purified LTAs, in particular LTAs from Bacillus subtilis, S. pyogenes, E. faecalis, and Enterococcus hirae, were able to affect each of the macrophage parameters measured, i.e., reductive capacity, secretion of tumor necrosis factor and nitrite, and tumoricidal activity. As after stimulation with whole organisms or other bacterial products, secretion of tumor necrosis factor induced by these LTAs reached its maximum within the first few hours of the interaction, while secretion of nitrite and tumoricidal activity required 24 to 36 h for full expression. Other purified LTAs, i.e., LTAs from Streptococcus sanguis, S. pneumoniae, and L. monocytogenes, as well as lipomannan from Micrococcus luteus affected only some of these parameters, while native LTA from S. aureus was inactive. There was no obvious correlation between biological activity and chain length, kind of glycosyl substituents, glycolipid structures, or fatty acid composition of LTAs. Deacylation of LTAs resulted in a complete loss of activity, and deacylated LTAs did not impair the activity of their acylated counterparts, suggesting that acyl chains may be essential for binding of LTA to the cell surface. The results demonstrate that some LTA species are potent inducers of macrophage secretory and cellular activities. PMID:1500175

  15. Response of milk fatty acid composition to dietary supplementation of soy oil, conjugated linoleic acid, or both.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Schoonmaker, J P; Bradford, B J; Beitz, D C

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-six Holstein cows were blocked by parity and allotted by stage of lactation to 6 treatments to evaluate the effects of dietary soy oil, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; free acid or calcium salt), or both, on CLA content of milk. Diets were fed for 4 wk and are as follows: (1) control, (2) control + 5% soy oil, (3) control + 1% CLA, (4) control + 1% Ca(CLA)2, (5) control + 1% CLA + 4% soy oil, and (6) control + 1% Ca(CLA)2 + 4% soy oil. Rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations, blood fatty acid concentrations, milk yield, and milk composition were measured weekly or biweekly. Dry matter intake and milk yield were recorded daily. Dietary supplementation of soy oil or CLA had no effect on daily milk yield, milk protein concentration and production, or milk lactose concentration and production. Supplementation of unsaturated fatty acids as soy oil, CLA, or Ca(CLA)2 increased total fatty acid concentration in plasma, decreased milk fat concentration and production, and had no effect on rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations. The weight percentage of CLA in milk was increased from 0.4 to 0.7% with supplementation of 1% CLA, to 1.2% with supplementation of soy oil, and to 1.3% with supplementation of 1% CLA plus soy oil. Supplementation with Ca(CLA)2 or Ca(CLA)2 + soy oil increased the CLA content of milk fat to 0.9 and 1.4%, respectively. In summary, adding 5% soy oil was as effective as supplementing CLA, Ca(CLA)2, or a combination of 1% CLA (free acid or calcium salt) + 4% soy oil at increasing CLA concentrations in milk fat. Feeding CLA as the calcium salt resulted in greater concentrations of CLA in milk fat than did feeding CLA as the free acid. Dietary supplementation of 5% soy oil or 4% soy oil + 1% CLA as the free acid or the calcium salt increased the yield of CLA in milk.

  16. Comparative responses of freshwater organisms to exposures of a commercial naphthenic acid.

    PubMed

    Kinley, Ciera M; McQueen, Andrew D; Rodgers, John H

    2016-06-01

    Comparative toxicity studies using unconfounded exposures can prioritize the selection of sensitive sentinel test species and refine methods for evaluating ecological risks of complex mixtures like naphthenic acids (NAs), a group of organic acids associated with crude oils and energy-derived waters that have been a source of aquatic toxicity. The objectives of this study were to compare responses of freshwater aquatic organisms (vertebrate, invertebrates, and a macrophyte; in terms of acute toxicity) to Fluka commercial NAs and to compare measured toxicity data with peer-reviewed toxicity data for other commercial NA sources and energy-derived NA sources. Exposures were confirmed using high performance liquid chromatography. Responses (7-d LC50s/EC50) ranged from 1.9 mg L(-1) for Pimephales promelas to 56.2 mg L(-1) for Typha latifolia. Following P. promelas in order of decreasing sensitivity were Ceriodaphnia dubia (7-d LC50 = 2.8 mg L(-1)), Hyalella azteca (7-d LC50 = 4.1 mg L(-1)), Chironomus dilutus (7-d LC50 = 6.5 mg L(-1)), and T. latifolia (7-d EC50 = 56.2 mg L(-1)), indicating that in terms of sensitivities, fish > invertebrates > plant for Fluka NAs in this study. Factors that affect exposures and measurements of exposures differ among commercial and energy-derived NAs and constrain comparisons. Despite differences in exposures, fish and invertebrates were relatively sensitive to both commercial and energy-derived NA sources (based on laboratory measurements and peer-reviewed data) and could be appropriate sentinel species for risk evaluations. PMID:27016812

  17. Threshold response of stomatal closing ability to leaf abscisic acid concentration during growth.

    PubMed

    Giday, Habtamu; Fanourakis, Dimitrios; Kjaer, Katrine H; Fomsgaard, Inge S; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-08-01

    Leaf abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]) during growth influences morpho-physiological traits associated with the plant's ability to cope with stress. A dose-response curve between [ABA] during growth and the leaf's ability to regulate water loss during desiccation or rehydrate upon re-watering was obtained. Rosa hybrida plants were grown at two relative air humidities (RHs, 60% or 90%) under different soil water potentials (-0.01, -0.06, or -0.08MPa) or upon grafting onto the rootstock of a cultivar sustaining [ABA] at elevated RH. Measurements included [ABA], stomatal anatomical features, stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, and the ability of leaves, desiccated to varying degrees, to recover their weight (rehydrate) following re-watering. Transpiration efficiency (plant mass per transpired water) was also determined. Soil water deficit resulted in a lower transpiration rate and higher transpiration efficiency at both RHs. The lowest [ABA] was observed in well-watered plants grown at high RH. [ABA] was increased by soil water deficit or grafting, at both RHs. The growth environment-induced changes in stomatal size were mediated by [ABA]. When [ABA] was increased from the level of (well-watered) high RH-grown plants to the value of (well-watered) plants grown at moderate RH, stomatal responsiveness was proportionally improved. A further increase in [ABA] did not affect stomatal responsiveness to desiccation. [ABA] was positively related to the ability of dehydrated leaves to rehydrate. The data indicate a growth [ABA]-related threshold for stomatal sensitivity to desiccation, which was not apparent either for stomatal size or for recovery (rehydration) upon re-watering. PMID:24863434

  18. Activation of Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response in macrophages by hypochlorous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pi Jingbo Zhang Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Wong, Victoria; Collins, Sheila; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2008-02-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a potent oxidant generated when chlorine gas reacts with water, is important in the pathogenesis of many disorders. Transcription factor Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response represents a critical cellular defense mechanism that serves to maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and limit oxidative damage. In the present study, the effect of HOCl on Nrf2 activation was investigated in macrophages, one of the target cells of chlorine gas exposure. Exposure of RAW 264.7 macrophages to HOCl resulted in increased protein levels of Nrf2 in nuclear extractions, as well as a time- and dose-dependent increase in the expression of Nrf2 target genes, including heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione synthetase (GS). Additionally, intracellular glutathione (GSH), which is the prime scavenger for HOCl in cells, decreased within the first hour of HOCl exposure. The decline was followed by a GSH rebound that surpassed the initial basal levels by up to 4-fold. This reversal in GSH levels closely correlated with the gene expression profile of GCLC and GS. To study the mechanisms of Nrf2 activation in response to HOCl exposure, we examined the effects of several antioxidants on Nrf2-mediated response. Pretreatment with cell-permeable catalase, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or GSH-monoethyl ester markedly reduced expression of NQO-1 and GCLC under HOCl challenge conditions, suggesting intracellular ROS-scavenging capacity affects HOCl-induced Nrf2 activation. Importantly, pre-activation of Nrf2 with low concentrations of pro-oxidants protected the cells against HOCl-induced cell damage. Taken together, we provide direct evidence that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response, which protects cells from oxidative damage.

  19. Threshold response of stomatal closing ability to leaf abscisic acid concentration during growth

    PubMed Central

    Giday, Habtamu; Fanourakis, Dimitrios; Kjaer, Katrine H.; Fomsgaard, Inge S.; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-01-01

    Leaf abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]) during growth influences morpho-physiological traits associated with the plant’s ability to cope with stress. A dose–response curve between [ABA] during growth and the leaf’s ability to regulate water loss during desiccation or rehydrate upon re-watering was obtained. Rosa hybrida plants were grown at two relative air humidities (RHs, 60% or 90%) under different soil water potentials (–0.01, –0.06, or –0.08MPa) or upon grafting onto the rootstock of a cultivar sustaining [ABA] at elevated RH. Measurements included [ABA], stomatal anatomical features, stomatal responsiveness to desiccation, and the ability of leaves, desiccated to varying degrees, to recover their weight (rehydrate) following re-watering. Transpiration efficiency (plant mass per transpired water) was also determined. Soil water deficit resulted in a lower transpiration rate and higher transpiration efficiency at both RHs. The lowest [ABA] was observed in well-watered plants grown at high RH. [ABA] was increased by soil water deficit or grafting, at both RHs. The growth environment-induced changes in stomatal size were mediated by [ABA]. When [ABA] was increased from the level of (well-watered) high RH-grown plants to the value of (well-watered) plants grown at moderate RH, stomatal responsiveness was proportionally improved. A further increase in [ABA] did not affect stomatal responsiveness to desiccation. [ABA] was positively related to the ability of dehydrated leaves to rehydrate. The data indicate a growth [ABA]-related threshold for stomatal sensitivity to desiccation, which was not apparent either for stomatal size or for recovery (rehydration) upon re-watering. PMID:24863434

  20. Salicylic acid negatively affects the response to salt stress in pea plants.

    PubMed

    Barba-Espín, G; Clemente-Moreno, M J; Alvarez, S; García-Legaz, M F; Hernández, J A; Díaz-Vivancos, P

    2011-11-01

    We studied the effect of salicylic acid (SA) treatment on the response of pea plants to salinity. Sodium chloride (NaCl)-induced damage to leaves was increased by SA, which was correlated with a reduction in plant growth. The content of reduced ascorbate and glutathione in leaves of salt-treated plants increased in response to SA, although accumulation of the respective oxidised forms occurred. An increase in hydrogen peroxide also occurred in leaves of salt-exposed plants treated with SA. In the absence of NaCl, SA increased ascorbate peroxidase (APX; 100 μm) and glutathione-S transferase (GST; 50 μm) activities and increased catalase (CAT) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Salinity decreased glutathione reductase (GR) activity, but increased GST and CAT activity. In salt-stressed plants, SA also produced changes in antioxidative enzymes: 100 μm SA decreased APX but increased GST. Finally, a concentration-dependent increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was induced by SA treatment in salt-stressed plants. Induction of PR-1b was observed in NaCl-stressed plants treated with SA. The treatment with SA, as well as the interaction between salinity and SA treatment, had a significant effect on PsMAPK3 expression. The expression of PsMAPK3 was not altered by 70 mm NaCl, but was statistically higher in the absence than in the presence of SA. Overall, the results show that SA treatment negatively affected the response of pea plants to NaCl, and this response correlated with an imbalance in antioxidant metabolism. The data also show that SA treatment could enhance the resistance of salt-stressed plants to possible opportunistic pathogen attack, as suggested by increased PR-1b gene expression.

  1. The Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Induce Mouse Dendritic Cells Maturation but Reduce T-Cell Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Johan A.; Wold, Agnes E.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Östman, Sofia M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might regulate T-cell activation and lineage commitment. Here, we measured the effects of omega-3 (n-3), n-6 and n-9 fatty acids on the interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and naïve T cells. Spleen DCs from BALB/c mice were cultured in vitro with ovalbumin (OVA) with 50 μM fatty acids; α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), linoleic acid or oleic acid and thereafter OVA-specific DO11.10 T cells were added to the cultures. Fatty acids were taken up by the DCs, as shown by gas chromatography analysis. After culture with arachidonic acid or DHA CD11c+ CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD11bneg DCs expressed more CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and PDL-1, while IAd remained unchanged. However, fewer T cells co-cultured with these DCs proliferated (CellTrace Violetlow) and expressed CD69 or CD25, while more were necrotic (7AAD+). We noted an increased proportion of T cells with a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, i.e., when gating on CD4+ FoxP3+ CTLA-4+, CD4+ FoxP3+ Helios+ or CD4+ FoxP3+ PD-1+, in co-cultures with arachidonic acid- or DHA-primed DCs relative to control cultures. The proportion of putative Tregs was inversely correlated to T-cell proliferation, indicating a suppressive function of these cells. With arachidonic acid DCs produced higher levels of prostaglandin E2 while T cells produced lower amounts of IL-10 and IFNγ. In conclusion arachidonic acid and DHA induced up-regulation of activation markers on DCs. However arachidonic acid- and DHA-primed DCs reduced T-cell proliferation and increased the proportion of T cells expressing FoxP3, indicating that these fatty acids can promote induction of regulatory T cells. PMID:26619195

  2. Formic and Acetic Acids in Degradation Products of Plant Volatiles Elicit Olfactory and Behavioral Responses from an Insect Vector.

    PubMed

    George, Justin; Robbins, Paul S; Alessandro, Rocco T; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Lapointe, Stephen L

    2016-05-01

    Volatile phytochemicals play a role in orientation by phytophagous insects. We studied antennal and behavioral responses of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, vector of the citrus greening disease pathogen. Little or no response to citrus leaf volatiles was detected by electroantennography. Glass cartridges prepared with β-ocimene or citral produced no response initially but became stimulatory after several days. Both compounds degraded completely in air to a number of smaller molecules. Two peaks elicited large antennal responses and were identified as acetic and formic acids. Probing by D. citri of a wax substrate containing odorants was significantly increased by a blend of formic and acetic acids compared with either compound separately or blends containing β-ocimene and/or citral. Response surface modeling based on a 4-component mixture design and a 2-component mixture-amount design predicted an optimal probing response on wax substrate containing a blend of formic and acetic acids. Our study suggests that formic and acetic acids play a role in host selection by D. citri and perhaps by phytophagous insects in general even when parent compounds from which they are derived are not active. These results have implications for the investigation of arthropod olfaction and may lead to elaboration of attract-and-kill formulations to reduce nontarget effects of chemical control in agriculture. PMID:26857741

  3. The renal response to chronic mineral acid feeding: a re-examination of the role of systemic pH.

    PubMed

    Madias, N E; Zelman, S J

    1986-03-01

    It has been widely held that systemic acidemia represents the proximate event signaling the kidney to elicit its acidification response to chronic metabolic acidosis. However, a previous study from this laboratory has cast serious doubt on the validity of this conventional viewpoint. When a large acid load (7 mEq/kg/day) was fed chronically to dogs as HCl, H2SO4 or HNO3, net acid excretion increased similarly in all three groups of animals despite wide variability in the prevailing systemic acid-base composition. Marked or moderate hypobicarbonatemia and acidemia were observed in the HCl- or H2SO4-fed animals respectively, but strikingly, plasma [HCO3-] and pH did not change significantly from the control in the HNO3-fed animals. That study concluded that the renal response to chronic mineral acid feeding appears to be triggered, not by acidemia, but by the interplay of sodium delivery to and sodium avidity of the distal nephron as modulated by the reabsorbability of the "acid" anion. We have re-examined the above provocative conclusion in the light of the observation that the only evidence for a dissociation of the renal response from systemic acidemia in that study was derived from preprandial (8:00 a.m.) blood samples obtained some 23 hr after the ingestion of the daily acid load (administered at 9:00 a.m.). We investigated the diurnal variation of plasma acid-base composition in two groups of dogs fed chronically a large acid load (7 mEq/kg/day) as either HCl or HNO3. Both groups exhibited significant diurnal oscillations of plasma acid-base composition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3009955

  4. A borinic acid polymer with fluoride ion- and thermo-responsive properties that are tunable over a wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wen-Ming; Cheng, Fei; Jäkle, Frieder

    2014-08-18

    A new type of smart borinic acid polymer with luminescence and multiple stimuli-responsive properties is reported. In DMSO with small amounts of water, the homopolymer PBA shows a tunable upper critical solution temperature (UCST). As the amount of water increases from 0 to 2.5 % (v/v), the UCST rises linearly from 20 °C to 100 °C (boiling point of water). Thus, the thermal responsive behavior can be tuned over a wide temperature range. Furthermore, polymer solutions in DMSO show a reversible response to fluoride ions, which can be correlated to the presence of the Lewis acidic borinic acid groups. Upon addition of fluoride, the polymer becomes soluble because the functional R2BOH groups are converted into ionic [R2BF2](-) groups, but turns insoluble again upon addition of H2O, which reverses this process.

  5. Bile Acid Responses in Methane and Non-Methane Producers to Standard Breakfast Meals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids and their conjugates are important regulators of glucose homeostasis. Previous research has revealed the ratio of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid to affect insulin resistance in humans. Bile acid de-conjugation and intestinal metabolism depend on gut microbes which may be affected by hos...

  6. Dose-Response of Five Bile Acids on Serum and Liver Bile Acid Concentrations and Hepatotoxicty in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peizhen; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    Feeding bile acids (BAs) to rodents has been used to study BA signaling and toxicity in vivo. However, little is known about the effect of feeding BAs on the concentrations of BAs in serum and liver as well as the dose of the fed BAs that causes liver toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the relative hepatotoxicity of individual BAs by feeding mice cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) at concentrations of 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 3% in their diet for 7 days. The data demonstrate that (1) the ability of the fed BAs to produce hepatotoxicity is UDCA

  7. Potentiation of vasoconstriction and pressor response by low concentration of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)).

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Shin, Yoo-Sun; Kang, Seojin; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Keunyoung; Chung, Seung-Min; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2011-09-10

    A close link between arsenic exposure and hypertension has been well-established through many epidemiological reports, yet the mechanism underlying it remains unclear. Here we report that nanomolar concentrations of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a toxic trivalent methylated arsenic metabolite, can potentiate agonist-induced vasoconstriction and pressor responses. In freshly isolated rat aortic ring, exposure to nanomolar MMA(III) (100-500 nM) potentiated phenylephrine (PE)-induced vasoconstriction while at higher concentrations (≥2.5 μM), suppression of vasoconstriction and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle were observed. Potentiation of agonist-induced vasoconstriction was also observed with other contractile agonists and it was retained in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, suggesting that these events are agonist-independent and smooth muscle cell dependent. Interestingly, exposure to MMA(III) resulted in increased myosin light chain phosphorylation while PE-induced Ca2+ influx was not affected, reflecting that Ca2+ sensitization is involved. In line with this, MMA(III) enhanced agonist-induced activation of small GTPase RhoA, a key contributor to Ca2+ sensitization. Of note, treatment of MMA(III) to rats induced significantly higher pressor responses in vivo, demonstrating that this event can occur in vivo indeed. We believe that RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization and the resultant potentiation of vasoconstriction by MMA(III) may shed light on arsenic-associated hypertension.

  8. Prediction and validation of promoters involved in the abscisic acid response in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Hanke, Sebastian T; Buchta, Karl; Rensing, Stefan A

    2011-07-01

    Detection of cis-regulatory elements, such as transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), through utilization of ortholog conservation is possible only if genomic data from closely related organisms are available. An alternative approach is the detection of TFBS based on their overrepresentation in promoters of co-regulated genes. However, this approach usually suffers from a high rate of false-positive prediction. Here, we have conducted a case study using promoters of genes known to be strongly induced by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) in the model plant Physcomitrella patens, a moss. Putative TFBS were detected using three de novo motif detection tools in a strict consensus approach. The resulting motifs were validated using data from microarray expression profiling and were able to predict ABA-induced genes with high specificity (90.48%) at mediocre sensitivity (33.33%). In addition, 27 genes predicted to contain ABA-responsive TFBS were validated using real-time PCR. Here, a total of 37% of the genes could be shown to be induced upon ABA treatment, while 70% were found to be regulated by ABA. We conclude that the consensus approach for motif detection using co-regulation information can be used to identify genes that are regulated under a given stimulus. In terms of evolution, we find that the ABA response has apparently been conserved since the first land plants on the level of families involved in transcriptional regulation.

  9. Salicylic acid regulates Plasmodesmata closure during innate immune responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Sager, Ross; Cui, Weier; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Hua; Lee, Jung-Youn

    2013-06-01

    In plants, mounting an effective innate immune strategy against microbial pathogens involves triggering local cell death within infected cells as well as boosting the immunity of the uninfected neighboring and systemically located cells. Although not much is known about this, it is evident that well-coordinated cell-cell signaling is critical in this process to confine infection to local tissue while allowing for the spread of systemic immune signals throughout the whole plant. In support of this notion, direct cell-to-cell communication was recently found to play a crucial role in plant defense. Here, we provide experimental evidence that salicylic acid (SA) is a critical hormonal signal that regulates cell-to-cell permeability during innate immune responses elicited by virulent bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that direct exogenous application of SA or bacterial infection suppresses cell-cell coupling and that SA pathway mutants are impaired in this response. The SA- or infection-induced suppression of cell-cell coupling requires an enhanced desease resistance1- and nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1-dependent SA pathway in conjunction with the regulator of plasmodesmal gating Plasmodesmata-located protein5. We discuss a model wherein the SA signaling pathway and plasmodesmata-mediated cell-to-cell communication converge under an intricate regulatory loop. PMID:23749844

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid enhances tachyphylaxis of repetitive capsaicin responses in TRPV1-GFP expressing HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Kristina; Binzen, Uta; Mörz, Handan; Bugert, Peter; Schedel, Angelika; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Greffrath, Wolfgang

    2014-03-20

    Since many years acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is known for its antithrombotic, antiphlogistic and analgesic effects caused by irreversible acetylation of cyclooxygenase. ASA also inhibits capsaicin- and heat-induced responses in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, suggesting TRPV1 (transient receptor potential channel of the vanilloid receptor family, subtype 1) to be an additional target of ASA. We now studied the effect of ASA on heterologously expressed rat TRPV1 using calcium microfluorimetry. Capsaicin dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium with an EC50 of 0.29 μM in rTRPV1 expressing HEK293 cells. During repetitive stimulation the second response to capsaicin was reduced (53.4 ± 8.3% compared to vehicle control; p<0.005; Student's unpaired t-test) by 1μM ASA, a concentration much below the one needed to inhibit cyclooxygenase (IC50 of 35 μM in thromboxane B2 production assay). In contrast, calcium transients induced by a single stimulus of 0.3 or 1 μM capsaicin were not significantly reduced by 0.3 or 1 μM ASA. These data suggest that ASA increases the tachyphylaxis of rTRPV1 channel activation. Mechanisms are unknown and may be direct by e.g. stabilization of the desensitized state or indirect via inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways e.g. of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family (MAPK/ERK).

  11. Role of Indole-3-acetic Acid in Modification of Geotropic Responses in Clinostat Rotated Avena Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Dedolph, R R; Naqvi, S M; Gordon, S A

    1966-05-01

    Oat seedlings were grown in a sand medium on clinostats with horizontal axes of rotation to nullify the directional component of the gravity-force vector. Coleoptile segments from such seedlings showed an enhanced absorption of apically applied exogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid), compared to segments from vertically rotated or stationary controls. Absorption of basally applied auxin and auxin transport were unaffected by the gravity treatments. Horizontal rotation did not materially change the amount of auxin produced and transported from excised coleoptile tips: however, plants so rotated showed an enhanced curvature response to unilaterally applied auxin.Collectively, these experiments indicate that enhanced plant responses to horizontal clinostat rotation, where rates of rotation are sufficient to nullify the directional component of the gravity-force vector, are caused primarily by increases in metabolism and not by a modification of auxin availability. These data do not support recently advanced hypotheses that the polarity of auxin transport is based on gravitational sedimentation of cell inclusions.

  12. Proteome alterations in response to aristolochic acids in experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Rosenquist, Thomas; Breen, Lucas; Cao, Lulu; Clifton, James; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2012-12-01

    Strong indications have been presented that dietary poisoning with aristolochic acids (AA) is responsible for Endemic Nephropathy (EN) and AA associated cancer of the upper urinary tract (UUTC). Our recent investigation showed drastic urinary proteome changes in AA treated mice. This study was designed to identify proteome changes associated with AA nephrotoxicity in experimental animal model. The DBA and C57BL mice, which differ in AA sensitivity, were exposed to AA for 4 days. The strategy for urinary, plasma and kidney tissue proteome study of AA exposed and control mice integrated gel-based and in-solution tryptic digestion combined with LC-ESI-MS/MS. To maximize proteome coverage, plasma fractionation scheme was developed and MS compatible sequential tissue extraction procedure was established. Proteomic analyses of urinary, plasma and kidney tissue tryptic digests resulted in identification of several cytoskeletal proteins, as well as proteins involved in kidney development and inflammatory response, that are differentially expressed in both AA exposed and control mice. These proteins are consistent with renal pathogenesis of endotoxicity and cancer. This proteomic strategy could be effectively translated for unbiased discovery of potential biomarkers for EN and associated UUTC in humans. At the same time, these results highlight the significance of AA exposure with EN. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  13. Regulation of the abscisic acid-responsive gene rab28 in maize viviparous mutants.

    PubMed

    Pla, M; Gómez, J; Goday, A; Pagès, M

    1991-12-01

    We have isolated a new maize gene, rab28, that responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. This gene has been characterized by determining the sequence of the cDNA and corresponding genomic copy, and by mapping the start site of its transcript. The rab 28 gene encodes a protein of predicted molecular weight 27713 Da which shows strong homology with the Lea D-34 protein identified in cotton. The proximal promoter region contains the conserved ABA-response element, CACGTGG, reported in other plant genes to be responsible for ABA induction. rab 28 mRNA has been identified as ABA-inducible in embryos and young leaves. It is also induced by water-stress in leaves of wild-type plants. Regulation of the rab 28 gene was studied in maize viviparous mutants. The results obtained with the ABA-insensitive vp1 mutant show that rab 28 transcripts do not accumulate to a significant level during embryogenesis. Surprisingly, induction of rab 28 mRNA can be achieved in young embryos by exogenous ABA treatment. Moreover, water-stressed or ABA-treated seedlings of vp1 contain significant levels of rab 28 mRNA which is not detectable in well-watered seedlings. Regulation of the rab 28 gene in excised young embryos of ABA-deficient vp2 mutants, in which influences of the maternal environment are absent, closely resembles that found in non-mutant excised young embryos. The significance of these results is discussed.

  14. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  15. Accumulation of Amino Acids in Rhizobium sp. Strain WR1001 in Response to Sodium Chloride Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Sui-Sheng T.; Tsai, Victor Y.; Lichens, Georgia M.; Noma, Amy T.

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001, isolated from the Sonoran Desert by Eskew and Ting, was found to be able to grow in defined medium containing NaCl up to 500 mM, a concentration approaching that of sea water. Therefore, it is a valuable strain for studying the biochemical basis of salt tolerance. Intracellular free glutamate was found to increase rapidly in response to osmotic stress by NaCl. It accounted for 88% of the amino acid pool when the bacterium was grown in 500 mM NaCl. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamate biosynthesis was examined in several Rhizobium strains. Both NADH- and NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activities in various Rhizobium strains were observed. The range of activity differed considerably depending on the particular strain. KCl (500 mM) did not stimulate glutamate dehydrogenase activity, as reported in a number of bacterial strains by Measures. The low activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001 apparently cannot fulfill a biosynthetic function of glutamate formation in response to medium NaCl concentrations. PMID:16346049

  16. Temporal accumulation of salicylic acid activates the defense response against Colletotrichum in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Grellet-Bournonville, Carlos F; Martinez-Zamora, Martín G; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Díaz-Ricci, Juan Carlos

    2012-05-01

    Many authors have reported interactions between strawberry cultivars and pathogenic microorganisms, yet little is known about the mechanisms triggered in the plant. In this paper we examine the participation of the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway involved in the response of Fragaria x ananassa cv. Pájaro plants to pathogens. Strawberry plants were challenged with the virulent strain M11 of Colletotrichum acutatum, or with the avirulent strain M23 of Colletotrichum fragariae which confers resistance to the former. Our study showed that the isolate M23 induced a temporal SA accumulation that was accompanied with the induction of PR-1 gene expression in strawberry plants. Such events occured after the oxidative burst, evaluated as the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, and many hours before the protection could be detected. Similar results were obtained with exogenously applied SA. Results obtained supports the hypothesis that strawberry plants activate a SA mediated defense mechanisms that is effective against a causal agent of anthracnose. In contrast, plants inoculated with M11 did not show oxidative burst, SA accumulation or PR1 gene induction. This is the first report about a defense response signaling pathway studied in strawberry plants. PMID:22366637

  17. Cyclopiazonic acid alters serotonin-induced responses in rat thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Selli, C; Erac, Y; Tosun, M

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist BQ-123 partially inhibited cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-enhanced endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contractions suggesting enhancement of ETA receptor internalization in caveolar structures by sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca+2 ATPase (SERCA) blockade. Since serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors are reported to be localized on caveolar membranes, we investigated whether SERCA inhibition affects 5-HT-induced responses and 5-HT receptor antagonism. For this purpose, vascular responses were measured in thoracic aorta segments from male Wistar albino rats using isolated tissue experiments. Data showed that CPA inhibits 5-HT- and PE-induced contractions in intact vessels while potentiating those in endothelium-denuded. Furthermore, non-selective 5-HT receptor blocker methysergide partially inhibited CPA-induced 5-HT contractions. However, α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin totally inhibited CPA-potentiated PE contractions. We suggest that SERCA inhibition results in 5-HT receptor internalization similar to ETA receptors possibly through protein kinase C activation by increased subsarcolemmal Ca2+ levels, eventually preventing 5-HT receptor antagonism. PMID:24704610

  18. Surface properties and early murine pre-osteoblastic cell responses of phosphoric acid modified titanium surface

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Sawangmake, Chenphop; Ruangchainicom, Nanticha; Wutikornwipak, Pavitra; Kantukiti, Panisa; Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Pavasant, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Aims The present study investigated the surface properties and murine pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) responses of phosphoric acid (H3PO4) treated commercially pure titanium. Methods Titanium discs were treated with various concentration of H3PO4 (5%, 10%, and 20%; v/v) at 90 °C for 30 min. Surface properties were evaluated by profilometer, contact angle meter, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-rays. MC3T3-E1 attachment and spreading were evaluated by SEM and phalloidin immunohistochemistry staining. Results Surface roughness and wettability were not statistically difference among all experimental and control groups. Phosphate and oxygen were detected on H3PO4 treated surfaces. At 20 min, cell attachment was significantly higher in 10% and 20% H3PO4 treated groups compared to the control. Cells exhibited orientated-cytoskeleton fibers on 20% H3PO4 modified titanium surface. Though, there was no difference in cell spreading stage among all treatment groups. Conclusion H3PO4 treatment on titanium may influence early cell response, particularly on attachment and spreading. PMID:26937362

  19. Acid resistance and response to pH-induced stress in two Lactobacillus plantarum strains with probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Šeme, H; Gjuračić, K; Kos, B; Fujs, Š; Štempelj, M; Petković, H; Šušković, J; Bogovič Matijašić, B; Kosec, G

    2015-01-01

    Two new Lactobacillus plantarum strains, KR6-DSM 28780 and M5 isolated from sour turnip and traditional dried fresh cheese, respectively, were evaluated for species identity, antibiotic susceptibility, resistance to gastrointestinal conditions and adaptive response to low pH. Resistance mechanisms involved in the adaptation to acid-induced stress in these two strains were investigated by quantitative PCR of the atpA, cfa1, mleS and hisD genes. In addition to absence of antibiotic resistance, the two L. plantarum strains showed excellent survival rates at pH values as low as 2.4. Adaptive response to low pH was clearly observed in both strains; strain KR6 was superior to M5, as demonstrated by its ability to survive during 3 h incubation at pH 2.0 upon adaptation to moderately acidic conditions. In contrast, acid adaptation did not significantly affect the survival rate during simulated passage through the gastrointestinal tract. In both strains, induction of histidine biosynthesis (hisD) was upregulated during the acid adaptation response. In addition, significant upregulation of the cfa1 gene, involved in modulation of membrane fatty acid composition, was observed during the adaptation phase in strain KR6 but not in strain M5. Cells adapted to moderately acidic conditions also showed a significantly increased viability after the lyophilisation procedure, a cross-protection phenomenon providing additional advantage in probiotic application. PMID:25380802

  20. Acid resistance and response to pH-induced stress in two Lactobacillus plantarum strains with probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Šeme, H; Gjuračić, K; Kos, B; Fujs, Š; Štempelj, M; Petković, H; Šušković, J; Bogovič Matijašić, B; Kosec, G

    2015-01-01

    Two new Lactobacillus plantarum strains, KR6-DSM 28780 and M5 isolated from sour turnip and traditional dried fresh cheese, respectively, were evaluated for species identity, antibiotic susceptibility, resistance to gastrointestinal conditions and adaptive response to low pH. Resistance mechanisms involved in the adaptation to acid-induced stress in these two strains were investigated by quantitative PCR of the atpA, cfa1, mleS and hisD genes. In addition to absence of antibiotic resistance, the two L. plantarum strains showed excellent survival rates at pH values as low as 2.4. Adaptive response to low pH was clearly observed in both strains; strain KR6 was superior to M5, as demonstrated by its ability to survive during 3 h incubation at pH 2.0 upon adaptation to moderately acidic conditions. In contrast, acid adaptation did not significantly affect the survival rate during simulated passage through the gastrointestinal tract. In both strains, induction of histidine biosynthesis (hisD) was upregulated during the acid adaptation response. In addition, significant upregulation of the cfa1 gene, involved in modulation of membrane fatty acid composition, was observed during the adaptation phase in strain KR6 but not in strain M5. Cells adapted to moderately acidic conditions also showed a significantly increased viability after the lyophilisation procedure, a cross-protection phenomenon providing additional advantage in probiotic application.

  1. Maternal fatty acid desaturase genotype correlates with infant immune responses at 6 months.

    PubMed

    Muc, Magdalena; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Larsen, Jeppe M; Birch, Sune; Brix, Susanne; Bisgaard, Hans; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2015-09-28

    Breast milk long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) have been associated with changes in early life immune responses and may modulate T-cell function in infancy. We studied the effect of maternal fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genotype and breast milk LCPUFA levels on infants' blood T-cell profiles and ex vivo-produced cytokines after anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 6-month-old infants from the Copenhagen Prospective Study of Asthma in Childhood birth cohort. LCPUFA concentrations of breast milk were assessed at 4 weeks of age, and FADS SNP were determined in both mothers and infants (n 109). In general, breast milk arachidonic acid (AA) levels were inversely correlated with the production of IL-10 (r -0.25; P=0.004), IL-17 (r -0.24; P=0.005), IL-5 (r -0.21; P=0.014) and IL-13 (r -0.17; P=0.047), whereas EPA was positively correlated with the counts of blood regulatory T-cells and cytotoxic T-cells and decreased T-helper cell counts. The minor FADS alleles were associated with lower breast milk AA and EPA, and infants of mothers carrying the minor allele of FADS SNP rs174556 had higher production of IL-10 (r -0.23; P=0.018), IL-17 (r -0.25; P=0.009) and IL-5 (r -0.21; P=0.038) from ex vivo-activated immune cells. We observed no association between T-cell distribution and maternal or infant FADS gene variants. We conclude that increased maternal LCPUFA synthesis and breast milk AA are associated with decreased levels of IL-5, IL-13 (type-2 related), IL-17 (type-17 related) and IL-10 (regulatory immune responses), but not with interferon-γ and TNF-α, which could be due to an effect of the maternal FADS variants on the offspring immune response transferred via breast milk LCPUFA. PMID:26283408

  2. Amino acids modify thalamo-cortical response transformation expressed by neurons of the ventrobasal complex.

    PubMed

    Vahle-Hinz, C; Hicks, T P; Gottschaldt, K M

    1994-02-21

    The hypothesis has been tested that inhibitory mechanisms, active spatially and temporally between the input and the output of thalamic neurons, determine the nature of the information transmitted to the cerebral cortex. To enable this assessment, in barbiturate-anesthetized cats and urethane-anesthetized rats juxtacellular recordings were performed together with microiontophoretic ejection of transmitter agonists and antagonists. The effects of these drugs were studied on responses evoked by mechanical stimulation of cutaneous receptive fields (RFs) of neurons in the thalamic ventrobasal complex (VB). Neurons from different parts of the VB were investigated: 29 units were located medially, in the ventral posteromedial nucleus (VPM; facial RFs), and 11 units were located laterally, in the ventral posterolateral nucleus (VPL; forepaw and body RFs). A further eleven VB units had no detectable RF. Twenty-six neurons were tested with electrical stimulation of the somatosensory cortex (SI), 17 of these being identified as thalamo-cortical relay neurons and 5 being classified as presumed interneurons; the remaining 4 could not be activated. Four additional recordings were from trigemino-thalamic or thalamo-cortical fibers. For the quantitative assessment of the neurons' input and output, neuronal activity was induced by feedback-controlled, mechanical trapezoidal and/or sinusoidal stimuli applied to sinus hairs, fur or skin and the numbers of prepotentials and soma spikes were compared in peristimulus time histograms (PSTHs) generated simultaneously for both types of signal from 'DC' recordings. Iontophoretic administration of excitatory amino acids (EAAs) or bicuculline methiodide (BMI) increased output-input ratios in 87% of the cases tested, due to a higher rate of conversion of prepotentials into soma spikes taking place. In cases of neurons exhibiting a sustained-to-transient response pattern, changes to sustained-to-sustained patterns were demonstrated. Tests with

  3. Synthesis and characterization of dual stimuli responsive macromers based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(vinylphosphonic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D.; Hacker, Michael C.; Klouda, Leda; Ma, Brandy B.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulus responsive materials hold great promise in biological applications as they can react to changes in physiological stimuli to produce a desired effect. Stimulus responsive macromers designed to respond to temperature changes at or around 37 °C and the presence of divalent cations were synthesized from N-isopropylacrylamide, pentaerythritol diacrylate monostearate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, and vinylphosphonic acid by free radical polymerization. Monomers were incorporated into the macromers in ratios approximating the molar feed ratios, and macromers underwent thermogelation around normal body temperature (36.2 – 40.5 °C) as determined by rheology and differential scanning calorimetry. Macromers containing vinylphosphonic acid interacted with calcium ions in solution, displaying decreased sol-gel transition temperatures (27.6 – 34.4 °C in 100 mM CaCl2), with decreases of greater magnitude observed for macromers with higher relative vinylphosphonic acid content. Critical micellar concentrations also decreased in a dose-dependent manner with increased vinylphosphonic acid incorporation in solutions with CaCl2 but not in solutions with NaCl. These dually responsive macromers allow examination of the effect of increasing vinylphosphonic acid content in a macromer which holds promise in biological applications such as drug and cell delivery or tissue engineering due to the macromer responsiveness at physiological temperatures and concentrations of calcium. PMID:20121076

  4. Changes in the olfactory response to amino acids in Japanese newts after transfer from an aquatic to a terrestrial habitat.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ritsuko; Nakatani, Kei

    2010-04-01

    Amphibians are capable of smelling both volatile and water-soluble (e.g., amino acids) odorants. Adult Japanese newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster, live mostly in water, except during hibernation, but sometimes on land. To examine olfactory responses of the newts to adaptation to a short-term stay on land (land adaptation), we measured the magnitude of the olfactory response at five different time points (land adaptation time: 0, 30, 54, 90, and 114 h after transfer from an aquatic to a terrestrial habitat by using electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings. Statistical analysis by the weighted linear model (P < 0.05) indicated that the time to land adaptation had a significant effect on the magnitude of the EOG induced by 1 microM and 10 microM amino acid mixtures. Further, the slope estimates of the weighted linear model were significantly positive (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the magnitude of the EOG response to amino acid mixtures (arginine, alanine, proline, and glutamic acid) significantly increases with land adaptation time. On the other hand, we observed no significant relationship between the magnitude of the EOG response induced by an 0.05% volatile odorant mixture (isoamyl acetate, n-amyl acetate, cineole, and limonene) and land adaptation time. Our results indicate that olfactory sensitivity to amino acids significantly increases with land adaptation time in adult Japanese newts.

  5. Oleanolic Acid Controls Allergic and Inflammatory Responses in Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Carmen; Martín, Rubén; Gallego-Muñoz, Patricia; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2014-01-01

    Pollen is the most common aeroallergen to cause seasonal conjunctivitis. The result of allergen exposure is a strong Th2-mediated response along with conjunctival mast cell degranulation and eosinophilic infiltration. Oleanolic acid (OA) is natural a triterpene that displays strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties being an active anti-allergic molecule on hypersensitivity reaction models. However, its effect on inflammatory ocular disorders including conjunctivits, has not yet been addressed. Hence, using a Ragweed pollen (RWP)-specific allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) mouse model we study here whether OA could modify responses associated to allergic processes. We found that OA treatment restricted mast cell degranulation and infiltration of eosinophils in conjunctival tissue and decreased allergen-specific Igs levels in EAC mice. Th2-type cytokines, secreted phospholipase A2 type-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), and chemokines levels were also significantly diminished in the conjunctiva and serum of OA-treated EAC mice. Moreover, OA treatment also suppressed RWP-specific T-cell proliferation. In vitro studies, on relevant cells of the allergic process, revealed that OA reduced the proliferative and migratory response, as well as the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators on EoL-1 eosinophils and RBL-2H3 mast cells exposed to allergic and/or crucial inflammatory stimuli such as RWP, sPLA2-IIA or eotaxin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the beneficial activity of OA in ocular allergic processes and may provide a new intervention strategy and potential therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:24699261

  6. Identification of an insulin response element in the fatty acid synthase promoter.

    PubMed

    Moustaïd, N; Beyer, R S; Sul, H S

    1994-02-25

    We have previously reported that insulin increases fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene transcription, and that sequences responsible for positive regulation are located within the first 332 base pairs of the FAS promoter. To define minimal sequences required for insulin regulation within this region, chimeric constructs containing serial 5' deletions starting at -318 and extending through position +67 of the rat FAS gene ligated to the luciferase reporter gene were transfected into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Insulin treatment at 10 nM increased luciferase activity 2-3-fold in 3T3-L1 adipocytes transfected with constructs containing progressive deletions from -318 to -67. This stimulation of the FAS promoter activity by insulin was dose-dependent. However, no effect of insulin was observed when fusion constructs containing FAS promoter sequences spanning from -25 or from -19 to +67 were transfected into adipocytes. These results suggest that the insulin response sequences of the FAS gene may be located in the region from -67 to -25. DNase I footprinting using liver nuclear extracts revealed a protected region spanning -71 and -50 in addition to a region near the putative TATA box. Gel mobility shift assays using the sequence from -71 to -50 as a probe revealed nuclear factor(s) from mouse liver and 3T3-L1 adipocytes that specifically complexed with this sequence. Mutational analysis of this region showed that sequences between -68 and -60 are essential for recognition and interaction with a trans-acting factor(s). Moreover, when three tandem repeats of the sequences spanning -68 to -52 were linked to the SV40 promoter and used for transfection, luciferase activity increased 3.6-fold in response to insulin treatment. Thus, we have identified novel cis-acting DNA sequences responsible for insulin regulation of the FAS gene, which interact with nuclear protein(s) from liver and adipocytes and which are found to share limited homology to insulin response sequences present in other

  7. α-Tocopheryloxyacetic acid: a novel chemotherapeutic that stimulates the antitumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction α-Tocopheryloxyacetic acid (α-TEA) is a novel ether derivative of α-tocopherol that has generated interest as a chemotherapeutic agent because of its selective toxicity toward tumor cells and its ability to suppress tumor growth in various rodent and human xenograft models. We previously reported that oral α-TEA inhibited the growth of both a transplanted (4T1) and a spontaneous MMTV-PyMT mouse model of breast cancer. Methods Because little is known about the possible immunological mechanisms underlying the in vivo α-TEA effects, we evaluated the impact of α-TEA therapy on the immune response by characterizing immune cell populations infiltrating the tumor site. Results α-TEA treatment resulted in higher frequencies of activated T cells in the tumor microenvironment and twofold and sixfold higher ratios of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to regulatory T cells, respectively. This finding was correlated with an increased ability of tumor-draining lymph node cells and splenocytes from α-TEA-treated mice to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ in response to CD3 or to mediate a cytolytic response in a tumor-specific fashion, respectively. That the α-TEA-mediated antitumor effect had a T cell-dependent component was demonstrated by the partial abrogation of tumor suppression when CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were depleted. We also determined the intratumoral cytokine and chemokine profile and found that α-TEA treatment increased intratumoral IFN-γ levels but decreased interleukin (IL)-4 levels, suggesting a shift toward a TH1 response. In addition, α-TEA induced higher levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and the chemokine CCL5. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that α-TEA treatment, in addition to its direct cytotoxic effects, enhanced the anti-tumor immune response. This study provides a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of α-TEA and its effect on the immune system and may prove useful in designing immune-stimulating strategies to

  8. Variable responses of different human cancer cells to the lichen compounds parietin, atranorin, usnic acid and gyrophoric acid.

    PubMed

    Bačkorová, M; Bačkor, M; Mikeš, J; Jendželovský, R; Fedoročko, P

    2011-02-01

    One of the ways for searching for potentially new anti-cancer drugs is the testing of various naturally synthesized compounds. Lichens are a source of unique chemical agents of which some have already been proved to be effective against various cancer in vitro models. Our study reports on the sensitivity of up to nine human cancer cell lines (A2780, HeLa, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, HT-29, HCT-116 p53(+/+), HCT-116 p53(-/-), HL-60 and Jurkat) to the anti-proliferative/cytotoxic effects of four typical secondary metabolites of lichens (parietin, atranorin, usnic acid and gyrophoric acid). Variations in the dynamics of tumour cell line populations were evaluated by the MTT, clonogenic and viability assays, cell proliferation and detachment, cell cycle transition and apoptotic nuclear morphology, thereby confirming their concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. However, in comparison with parietin and gyrophoric acid, the suppression of viability and cell proliferation by usnic acid or atranorin was found to be more efficient at equitoxic doses and correlated more strongly with an increased number of floating cells or a higher apoptotic index. Moreover, the analysis of cell cycle distribution also revealed an accumulation of cells in S-phase. This study has confirmed a differential sensitivity of cancer cell lines to lichen secondary metabolites. PMID:20837130

  9. Life in heaps: a review of microbial responses to variable acidity in sulfide mineral bioleaching heaps for metal extraction.

    PubMed

    Shiers, D W; Collinson, D M; Watling, H R

    2016-09-01

    Industrial heap leaching of low grade mineral sulfide ores is catalysed by the use of acidophilic microorganisms. These microorganisms obtain energy for growth from the oxidation of reduced inorganic or organic compounds, including soluble ferrous ion, reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISC) and acid-stable organic compounds. By-products of these oxidative processes, such as soluble ferric ion and sulfuric acid create favourable chemical conditions for leaching. This review is focused on the behaviour of common bioleaching microorganisms, their responses to changing pH in an industrial setting, and how both changes and microbial responses can impact the micro and macro environment. PMID:27283362

  10. Intracellular pH modulates taste receptor cell volume and the phasic part of the chorda tympani response to acids.

    PubMed

    Lyall, Vijay; Pasley, Hampton; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Heck, Gerard L; Vinnikova, Anna K; DeSimone, John A

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between cell volume and the neural response to acidic stimuli was investigated by simultaneous measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) and cell volume in polarized fungiform taste receptor cells (TRCs) using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) in vitro and by rat chorda tympani (CT) nerve recordings in vivo. CT responses to HCl and CO2 were recorded in the presence of 1 M mannitol and specific probes for filamentous (F) actin (phalloidin) and monomeric (G) actin (cytochalasin B) under lingual voltage clamp. Acidic stimuli reversibly decrease TRC pHi and cell volume. In isolated TRCs F-actin and G-actin were labeled with rhodamine phalloidin and bovine pancreatic deoxyribonuclease-1 conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488, respectively. A decrease in pHi shifted the equilibrium from F-actin to G-actin. Treatment with phalloidin or cytochalasin B attenuated the magnitude of the pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume. The phasic part of the CT response to HCl or CO2 was significantly decreased by preshrinking TRCs with hypertonic mannitol and lingual application of 1.2 mM phalloidin or 20 microM cytochalasin B with no effect on the tonic part of the CT response. In TRCs first treated with cytochalasin B, the decrease in the magnitude of the phasic response to acidic stimuli was reversed by phalloidin treatment. The pHi-induced decrease in TRC volume induced a flufenamic acid-sensitive nonselective basolateral cation conductance. Channel activity was enhanced at positive lingual clamp voltages. Lingual application of flufenamic acid decreased the magnitude of the phasic part of the CT response to HCl and CO2. Flufenamic acid and hypertonic mannitol were additive in inhibiting the phasic response. We conclude that a decrease in pHi induces TRC shrinkage through its effect on the actin cytoskeleton and activates a flufenamic acid-sensitive basolateral cation conductance that is involved in eliciting the phasic part of the CT response to

  11. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Alissa R.; Laws, Kaitlin M.; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  12. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements.

  13. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements. PMID:23847041

  14. Listeria monocytogenes grown at 7° C shows reduced acid survival and an altered transcriptional response to acid shock compared to L. monocytogenes grown at 37° C.

    PubMed

    Ivy, R A; Wiedmann, M; Boor, K J

    2012-06-01

    Survival of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in acidic environments (e.g., in the human stomach) is vital to its transmission. Refrigerated, ready-to-eat foods have been sources of listeriosis outbreaks. The purpose of this study was to determine whether growth at a low temperature (i.e., 7°C) affects L. monocytogenes survival or gene transcription after exposure to a simulated gastric environment (i.e., acid shock at 37°C). L. monocytogenes cells grown at 7°C were less resistant to artificial gastric fluid (AGF) or acidified brain heart infusion broth (ABHI) than bacteria grown at higher temperatures (i.e., 30°C or 37°C). For L. monocytogenes grown at 7°C, stationary-phase cells were more resistant to ABHI than log-phase cells, indicating that both temperature and growth phase affect acid survival. Microarray transcriptomic analysis revealed that the number and functional categories of genes differentially expressed after acid shock differed according to both growth temperature and growth phase. The acid response of L. monocytogenes grown to log phase at 37°C involved stress-related transcriptional regulators (i.e., σ(B), σ(H), CtsR, and HrcA), some of which have been implicated in adaptation to the intracellular environment. In contrast, for bacteria grown at 7°C to stationary phase, acid exposure did not result in differential expression of the stress regulons examined. However, two large operons encoding bacteriophage-like proteins were induced, suggesting lysogenic prophage induction. The adaptive transcriptional response observed in 37°C-grown cells was largely absent in 7°C-grown cells, suggesting that temperatures commonly encountered during food storage and distribution affect the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive gastric passage and ultimately cause disease.

  15. The salt stress-induced LPA response in Chlamydomonas is produced via PLA2 hydrolysis of DGK-generated phosphatidic acid[S

    PubMed Central

    Arisz, Steven A.; Munnik, Teun

    2011-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas has frequently been used as a eukaryotic model system to study intracellular phospholipid signaling pathways in response to environmental stresses. Earlier, we found that hypersalinity induced a rapid increase in the putative lipid second messenger, phosphatidic acid (PA), which was suggested to be generated via activation of a phospholipase D (PLD) pathway and the combined action of a phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase (PLC/DGK) pathway. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was also increased and was suggested to reflect a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity based on pharmacological evidence. The question of PA's and LPA's origin is, however, more complicated, especially as both function as precursors in the biosynthesis of phospho- and galactolipids. To address this complexity, a combination of fatty acid-molecular species analysis and in vivo 32P-radiolabeling was performed. Evidence is provided that LPA is formed from a distinct pool of PA characterized by a high α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) content. This molecular species was highly enriched in the polyphosphoinositide fraction, which is the substrate for PLC to form diacylglycerol. Together with differential 32P-radiolabeling studies and earlier PLD-transphosphatidylation and PLA2-inhibitor assays, the data were consistent with the hypothesis that the salt-induced LPA response is primarily generated through PLA2-mediated hydrolysis of DGK-generated PA and that PLD or de novo synthesis [via endoplasmic reticulum - or plastid-localized routes] is not a major contributor. PMID:21900174

  16. Folic Acid Is Able to Polarize the Inflammatory Response in LPS Activated Microglia by Regulating Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Rosaria; Porro, Chiara; Trotta, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of folic acid to modulate the inflammatory responses of LPS activated BV-2 microglia cells and the signal transduction pathways involved. To this aim, the BV-2 cell line was exposed to LPS as a proinflammatory response inducer, in presence or absence of various concentrations of folic acid. The production of nitric oxide (NO) was determined by the Griess test. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and IL-10 were determined by ELISA. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS), nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, MAPKs protein, and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and SOCS3 were analyzed by western blotting. TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as iNOS dependent NO production, resulted significantly inhibited by folic acid pretreatment in LPS-activated BV-2 cells. We also observed that folic acid dose-dependently upregulated both SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in BV-2 cells, leading to an increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Finally, p-IκBα, which indirectly reflects NF-κB complex activation, and JNK phosphorylation resulted dose-dependently downregulated by folic acid pretreatment of LPS-activated cells, whereas p38 MAPK phosphorylation resulted significantly upregulated by folic acid treatment. Overall, these results demonstrated that folic acid was able to modulate the inflammatory response in microglia cells, shifting proinflammatory versus anti-inflammatory responses through regulating multiple signaling pathways. PMID:27738387

  17. Phragmites australis response to Cu in terms of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) exudation: Influence of the physiological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2014-06-01

    Plant roots have the ability to produce and secrete substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere for several purposes, including in response to metal contamination. Despite this, little is yet known about the exudation of such substances from marsh plants roots in response to metal exposure. This work aimed at assessing the influence of the physiological cycle of marsh plants on the exudation of ALMWOAs in response to Cu contamination. In vitro experiments were carried out with Phragmites australis specimens, collected in different seasons. Plant roots were exposed to freshwater contaminated with two different Cu concentrations (67 μg/L and 6.9 mg/L), being the ALMWOAs released by the roots measured. Significant differences (both qualitative and quantitative) were observed during the Phragmites australis life cycle. At growing stage, Cu stimulated the exudation of oxalic and formic acids but no significant stimulation was observed for citric acid. At developing stage, exposure to Cu caused inhibition of oxalic acid exudation whereas citric acid liberation was stimulated but only in the media spiked with the lowest Cu concentration tested. At the decaying stage, no significant variation on oxalic acid was observed, whereas the citric and formic acids release increased as a consequence of the plant exposure to Cu. The physiological cycle of Phragmites australis, and probably also of other marsh plants, is therefore an important feature conditioning plants response to Cu contamination, in terms of ALMWOAs exudation. Hence this aspect should be considered when conducting studies on rhizodeposition involving marsh plants exposed to metals and in the event of using marsh plants for phytoremediation purposes in contaminated estuarine areas.

  18. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I.; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N.; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A.; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R.; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E.; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I.; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M.; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading. PMID:26442260

  19. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading.

  20. Response surface optimization of culture medium for enhanced docosahexaenoic acid production by a Malaysian thraustochytrid

    PubMed Central

    Manikan, Vidyah; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) plays a vital role in the enhancement of human health, particularly for cognitive, neurological, and visual functions. Marine microalgae, such as members of the genus Aurantiochytrium, are rich in DHA and represent a promising source of omega-3 fatty acids. In this study, levels of glucose, yeast extract, sodium glutamate and sea salt were optimized for enhanced lipid and DHA production by a Malaysian isolate of thraustochytrid, Aurantiochytrium sp. SW1, using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized medium contained 60 g/L glucose, 2 g/L yeast extract, 24 g/L sodium glutamate and 6 g/L sea salt. This combination produced 17.8 g/L biomass containing 53.9% lipid (9.6 g/L) which contained 44.07% DHA (4.23 g/L). The optimized medium was used in a scale-up run, where a 5 L bench-top bioreactor was employed to verify the applicability of the medium at larger scale. This produced 24.46 g/L biomass containing 38.43% lipid (9.4 g/L), of which 47.87% was DHA (4.5 g/L). The total amount of DHA produced was 25% higher than that produced in the original medium prior to optimization. This result suggests that Aurantiochytrium sp. SW1 could be developed for industrial application as a commercial DHA-producing microorganism. PMID:25721623

  1. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading. PMID:26442260

  2. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid activates hTRPA1 and modulates behavioral responses to noxious cold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, William John; Camo, Maxime; Mitchell, Vanessa; Vaughan, Christopher Walter; Connor, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a major biologically active component of the creosote bush, Larrea tridentate, widely used in unregulated therapies. NDGA is a lipoxygenase inhibitor while a derivative, terameprocol, has been trialed as a chemotherapeutic agent. When investigating fatty acid activation of the human transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (hTRPA1), we found that NDGA activated the channel. Here we investigate the actions of NDGA and terameprocol at hTRPA1 and the consequences of this for noxious cold sensitivity in mice. hTRPA1 was stably expressed in HEK 293 cells (HEK 293-TRPA1) and channel activity examined by measuring changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca]i) using a fluorescent dye and activation of membrane currents using patch clamp electrophysiology. The effects of local NDGA and terameprocol application on acetone-induced paw flinching were examined in mice. NDGA (pEC50 of 5.4 ± 0.1, maximum change in fluorescence of 385 ± 30%) and terameprocol (pEC50 4.5 ± 0.2, maximum 550 ± 75%) increased [Ca]i in HEK 293-hTRPA1 cells. NDGA also induced an increase in membrane conductance in HEK 293-hTRPA1 cells. These effects were prevented by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, and were dependent on the presence of Cys621, Cys 641, and Cys 665 in hTRPA1. Neither NDGA nor terameprocol alone produced spontaneous pain behaviors in mice after hind paw injection, but both enhanced responses to acetone. NDGA and terameprocol are efficacious activators of TRPA1. NDGA should be used with care to probe lipoxygenase involvement in nociception while TRPA1 activity should be considered when considering use of these drugs in humans. PMID:25505619

  3. Hexanoic acid protects tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea by priming defence responses and reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Finiti, Ivan; de la O Leyva, María; Vicedo, Begonya; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; López-Cruz, Jaime; García-Agustín, Pilar; Real, Maria Dolores; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    Treatment with the resistance priming inducer hexanoic acid (Hx) protects tomato plants from Botrytis cinerea by activating defence responses. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR), we compared the expression profiles of three different conditions: Botrytis-infected plants (Inf), Hx-treated plants (Hx) and Hx-treated + infected plants (Hx+Inf). The microarray analysis at 24 h post-inoculation showed that Hx and Hx+Inf plants exhibited the differential expression and priming of many Botrytis-induced genes. Interestingly, we found that the activation by Hx of other genes was not altered by the fungus at this time point. These genes may be considered to be specific targets of the Hx priming effect and may help to elucidate its mechanisms of action. It is noteworthy that, in Hx and Hx+Inf plants, there was up-regulation of proteinase inhibitor genes, DNA-binding factors, enzymes involved in plant hormone signalling and synthesis, and, remarkably, the genes involved in oxidative stress. Given the relevance of the oxidative burst occurring in plant-pathogen interactions, the effect of Hx on this process was studied in depth. We showed by specific staining that reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in Hx+Inf plants was reduced and more restricted around infection sites. In addition, these plants showed higher ratios of reduced to oxidized glutathione and ascorbate, and normal levels of antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that Hx protects tomato plants from B. cinerea by regulating and priming Botrytis-specific and non-specific genes, preventing the harmful effects of oxidative stress produced by infection.

  4. Growth Performance, Meat Quality and Fatty Acid Metabolism Response of Growing Meat Rabbits to Dietary Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, R. G.; Wang, X. P.; Wang, C. Y.; Ma, M. W.; Li, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different amounts of dietary linoleic acid (LA) on growth performance, serum biochemical traits, meat quality, fatty acids composition of muscle and liver, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT 1) mRNA expression in the liver of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits. One hundred and fifty 9 wks old meat rabbits were allocated to individual cages and randomly divided into five groups. Animals in each group were fed with a diet with the following LA addition concentrations: 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 g/kg diet (as-fed basis) and LA concentrations were 0.84, 1.21, 1.34, 1.61 and 1.80% in the diet, respectively. The results showed as follows: the dietary LA levels significantly affected muscle color of LL included a* and b* of experimental rabbits (p<0.05). The linear effect of LA on serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol was obtained (p = 0.0119). The saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) contents of LL decreased and the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) content of LL increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001). The PUFA n-6 content and PUFA n-3 content in the LL was significantly affected by the dietary LA levels (p<0.01, p<0.05). The MUFAs content in the liver decreased and the PUFAs contents in the liver increased with dietary LA increase (p<0.0001). The PUFA n-6 content and the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio in the liver increased and PUFA n-3 content in the liver decreased with dietary LA increase (p<0.01). The linear effect of LA on CPT 1 mRNA expression in the liver was obtained (p = 0.0081). In summary, dietary LA addition had significant effects on liver and muscle fatty acid composition (increased PUFAs) of 9 wks old to 13 wks old growing meat rabbits, but had little effects on growth performance, meat physical traits and mRNA expression of liver relative enzyme of experimental rabbits. PMID:25049677

  5. Arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 influence human osteoblast (MG63) response to titanium surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Dean, David D; Campbell, Casey M; Gruwell, Scott F; Tindall, John W M; Chuang, Hui-Hsiu; Zhong, Weinan; Schmitz, John P; Sylvia, Victor L

    2008-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that implant surface roughness affects osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, matrix synthesis, and local factor production. Further, cell response is modulated by systemic factors, such as 1,25(OH)2D3 and estrogen as well as mechanical forces. Based on the fact that peri-implant bone healing occurs in a site containing elevated amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the hypothesis of the current study is that PGE2 and arachidonic acid (AA), the substrate used by cyclooxygenase to form PGE2, influence osteoblast response to implant surface roughness. To test this hypothesis, 4 different types of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) disks with surfaces of varying roughness (smooth Ti, R(a) 0.30 microm; smooth and acid etched Ti [SAE Ti], R(a) 0.40 microm; rough Ti, R(a) 4.3 microm; rough and acid etched Ti [RAE Ti], R(a) 4.15 (microm) were prepared. MG63 osteoblasts were seeded onto the surfaces, cultured to confluence, and then treated for the last 24 hours of culture with AA (0, 0.1, 1, and 10 nM), PGE2 (0, 1, 10, 25, and 100 nM), or the general cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (0 or 100 nM). At harvest, the effect of treatment on cell proliferation was assessed by measuring cell number and [3H]-thymidine incorporation, and the effect on cell differentiation was determined by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) specific activity. The effect of AA and PGE2 on cell number was somewhat variable but showed a general decrease on plastic and smooth surfaces and an increase on rough surfaces. In contrast, [3H]-thymidine incorporation was uniformly decreased with treatment on all surfaces. ALP demonstrated the most prominent effect of treatment. On smooth surfaces, AA and PGE2 dose-dependently increased ALP, while on rough surfaces, treatment dose-dependently decreased enzyme specific activity. Indomethacin treatment had either no effect or a slightly inhibitory effect on [3H]-thymidine incorporation on all surfaces. In contrast, indomethacin

  6. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Lina; Santos, Aline Xs; Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1), while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1) acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  7. Responses to n-3 fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementation of gestating gilts, and lactating and weaned sows.

    PubMed

    Smit, M N; Patterson, J L; Webel, S K; Spencer, J D; Cameron, A C; Dyck, M K; Dixon, W T; Foxcroft, G R

    2013-05-01

    Feeding n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) to gilts or sows has shown different responses to litter growth, pre-weaning mortality and subsequent reproductive performance of the sow. Two hypotheses were tested: (1) that feeding a marine oil-based supplement rich in protected n-3 LCPUFAs to gilts in established gestation would improve the growth performance of their litters; and (2) that continued feeding of the supplement during lactation and after weaning would offset the negative effects of lactational catabolism induced, using an established experimental model involving feed restriction of lactating primiparous sows. A total of 117 primiparous sows were pair-matched at day 60 of gestation by weight, and when possible, litter of origin, and were allocated to be either control sows (CON) fed standard gestation and lactation diets, or treated sows (LCPUFA) fed the standard diets supplemented with 84 g/day of a n-3 LCPUFA rich supplement, from day 60 of first gestation, through a 21-day lactation, and until euthanasia at day 30 of their second gestation. All sows were feed restricted during the last 7 days of lactation to induce catabolism, providing a background challenge against which to determine beneficial effects of n-3 LCPUFA supplementation on subsequent reproduction. In the absence of an effect on litter size or birth weight, n-3 LCPUFA tended to improve piglet BW gain from birth until 34 days after weaning (P = 0.06), while increasing pre-weaning mortality (P = 0.05). It did not affect energy utilization by the sow during lactation, thus not improving the catabolic state of the sows. Supplementation from weaning until day 30 of second gestation did not have an effect on embryonic weight, ovulation rate or early embryonic survival, but did increase corpora lutea (CL) weight (P = 0.001). Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were increased in sow serum and CL (P < 0.001), whereas only DHA levels increased in embryos (P

  8. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun

    2015-07-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC50 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL-1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL-1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer-drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders.

  9. Homologue gene of bile acid transporters ntcp, asbt, and ost-alpha in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss: tissue expression, effect of fasting, and response to bile acid administration.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Chisada, Shin-Ichi; Furuita, Hirofumi; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Matsunari, Hiroyuki; Iwashita, Yasuro; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    Bile acid transporters belonging to the SLC10A protein family, Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP or SLC10A1), apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2), and organic solute transporter alpha (Ost-alpha) have been known to play critical roles in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids in mammals. In this study, ntcp, asbt, and ost-alpha-1/-2 cDNA were cloned, their tissue distributions were characterized, and the effects of fasting and bile acid administration on their expression were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The structural characteristics of Ntcp, Asbt, and Ost-alpha were well conserved in trout, and three-dimensional structure analysis showed that Ntcp and Asbt were similar to each other. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that trout asbt was primarily expressed in the hindgut, while ntcp expression occurred in the brain, and ost-alpha-1/-2 was mainly expressed in the liver or ovary. Although asbt and ost-alpha-1 mRNA levels in the gut increased in response to fasting for 4 days, ost-alpha-1 expression in the liver decreased. Similarly, bile acid administration increased asbt and ost-alpha-1 expression levels in the gut, while those of ntcp and ost-alpha-2 in the liver decreased. These results suggested that the genes asbt, ntcp, and ost-alpha are involved in bile acid transport in rainbow trout.

  10. Vegetable oils rich in alpha linolenic acid increment hepatic n-3 LCPUFA, modulating the fatty acid metabolism and antioxidant response in rats.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Cervera, Miguel Ángel; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Hernandez-Rodas, María Catalina; Barrera, Cynthia; Espinosa, Alejandra; Marambio, Macarena; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3, ALA) is an essential fatty acid and the metabolic precursor of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from the n-3 family with relevant physiological and metabolic roles: eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3, DHA). Western diet lacks of suitable intake of n-3 LCPUFA and there are recommendations to increase the dietary supply of such nutrients. Seed oils rich in ALA such as those from rosa mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa), sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubis) and chia (Salvia hispanica) may constitute an alternative that merits research. This study evaluated hepatic and epididymal accretion and biosynthesis of n-3 LCPUFA, the activity and expression of Δ-5 and Δ-6 desaturase enzymes, the expression and DNA-binding activity of PPAR-α and SREBP-1c, oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidative enzymes in rats fed sunflower oil (SFO, 1% ALA) as control group, canola oil (CO, 10% ALA), rosa mosqueta oil (RMO, 33% ALA), sacha inchi oil (SIO, 49% ALA) and chia oil (ChO, 64% ALA) as single lipid source. A larger supply of ALA increased the accretion of n-3 LCPUFA, the activity and expression of desaturases, the antioxidative status, the expression and DNA-binding of PPAR-α, the oxidation of fatty acids and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, whereas the expression and DNA-binding activity of SREBP-1c transcription factor and the biosynthetic activity of fatty acids declined. Results showed that oils rich in ALA such as SIO and ChO may trigger metabolic responses in rats such as those produced by n-3 PUFA.

  11. Vegetable oils rich in alpha linolenic acid increment hepatic n-3 LCPUFA, modulating the fatty acid metabolism and antioxidant response in rats.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Cervera, Miguel Ángel; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Hernandez-Rodas, María Catalina; Barrera, Cynthia; Espinosa, Alejandra; Marambio, Macarena; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3, ALA) is an essential fatty acid and the metabolic precursor of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from the n-3 family with relevant physiological and metabolic roles: eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3, DHA). Western diet lacks of suitable intake of n-3 LCPUFA and there are recommendations to increase the dietary supply of such nutrients. Seed oils rich in ALA such as those from rosa mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa), sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubis) and chia (Salvia hispanica) may constitute an alternative that merits research. This study evaluated hepatic and epididymal accretion and biosynthesis of n-3 LCPUFA, the activity and expression of Δ-5 and Δ-6 desaturase enzymes, the expression and DNA-binding activity of PPAR-α and SREBP-1c, oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidative enzymes in rats fed sunflower oil (SFO, 1% ALA) as control group, canola oil (CO, 10% ALA), rosa mosqueta oil (RMO, 33% ALA), sacha inchi oil (SIO, 49% ALA) and chia oil (ChO, 64% ALA) as single lipid source. A larger supply of ALA increased the accretion of n-3 LCPUFA, the activity and expression of desaturases, the antioxidative status, the expression and DNA-binding of PPAR-α, the oxidation of fatty acids and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, whereas the expression and DNA-binding activity of SREBP-1c transcription factor and the biosynthetic activity of fatty acids declined. Results showed that oils rich in ALA such as SIO and ChO may trigger metabolic responses in rats such as those produced by n-3 PUFA. PMID:26995676

  12. Facilitatory effect of docosahexaenoic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate response in pyramidal neurones of rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, M; Kimura, S; Akaike, N

    1994-01-01

    1. The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) responses in the presence of glycine was investigated in pyramidal neurons acutely dissociated from rat cerebral cortex in whole-cell and single channel configurations. 2. DHA potentiated the NMDA-induced response but reduced the non-NMDA (kainate-induced) response in a concentration-dependent manner at a holding potential of -60 mV under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Arachidonic acid (AA) also potentiated the NMDA-induced response in a manner similar to DHA. Oleic acid caused a slight potentiation. However, other polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids had no such effects. 4. The facilitatory action of DHA on the NMDA-induced response was not affected by adding inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase, lipoxygenase or phospholipase A2, suggesting that DHA may exert its facilitatory effect directly on the NMDA receptor. 5. The facilitatory action of DHA was observed in the presence of a saturating dose of NMDA. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the NMDA receptor-operated single channel currents revealed that, in the presence of DHA, the open probability of the channel increased without changing the conductance, indicating that DHA may act by binding directly to a novel site on the NMDA receptor or by altering the lipid environment of the NMDA receptor and thereby potentiating the response to NMDA. 6. The results are discussed in terms of the possibility that DHA may play an important role in the genesis of long-term potentiation, at least that involving the activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:7514666

  13. Effects of RAMEA-complexed polyunsaturated fatty acids on the response of human dendritic cells to inflammatory signals

    PubMed Central

    Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Laczik, Renáta; Kun, Viktor; Szente, Lajos

    2014-01-01

    Summary The n−3 fatty acids are not produced by mammals, although they are essential for hormone synthesis and maintenance of cell membrane structure and integrity. They have recently been shown to inhibit inflammatory reactions and also emerged as potential treatment options for inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and inflammatory bowel diseases. Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity and upon inflammatory signals they produce various soluble factors among them cytokines and chemokines that act as inflammatory or regulatory mediators. In this study we monitored the effects of α-linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid solubilized in a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/ethanol 1:1 mixture or as complexed by randomly methylated α-cyclodextrin (RAMEA) on the inflammatory response of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC). The use of RAMEA for enhancing aqueous solubility of n−3 fatty acids has the unambiguous advantage over applying RAMEB (the β-cyclodextrin analog), since there is no interaction with cell membrane cholesterol. In vitro differentiated moDC were left untreated or were stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, mimicking bacterial and viral infections, respectively. The response of unstimulated and activated moDC to n−3 fatty acid treatment was tested by measuring the cell surface expression of CD1a used as a phenotypic and CD83 as an activation marker of inflammatory moDC differentiation and activation by using flow cytometry. Monocyte-derived DC activation was also monitored by the secretion level of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12, respectively. We found that RAMEA-complexed n−3 fatty acids reduced the expression of CD1a protein in both LPS and Poly(I:C) stimulated moDC significantly, but most efficiently by eicosapentaenic acid, while no significant change

  14. Identification of genes expressed in response to acid stress in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hisataka; Shibata, Yousuke; Haseyama, Youhei; Yoshino, Yuka; Suzuki, Takehiro; Kagasawa, Tsuyoshi; Kamei, Ayako; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Enami, Isao

    2005-06-01

    Plant cells are always exposed to various environmental stresses such as high light, low temperature and acid rain, and thus have to respond in order to survive these stresses. Although some mechanisms of responses to high light and low temperature etc., have been clarified, there is little information about the acclimation process to acid stress. In this study, the gene expression changes of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in response to acid stress were examined using DNA microarrays (CyanoCHIP). We compared gene expression profiles of the cells treated at pH 8 (control) and pH 3 for 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 h. As a result, we found that 32 genes were upregulated by more than 3-fold, and 29 genes were downregulated by at least 3-fold after the acid treatment. Among these upregulated genes, expressions of slr0967 and sll0939 kept-increasing until 4 h under the acid stress and increased by 7 to 16-fold after the 4 h treatment. This suggests that the products of these two genes play important roles in the acid acclimation process.

  15. Plasma amino acid response to single test meals in humans. V. Ethiopian preschool children given lowcost protein supplements.

    PubMed

    Ljungqvist, B G; Björnesjö, K B; Gebre-Medhin, M; Habte, D; Meeuwisse, G W; Mellander, O; Svanberg, U S

    1979-02-01

    The plasma amino acid response to single test meals was studied in preschool children, aged 9 months--5 years. The amount of protein given in each test meal was 1 g per kg body weight, which represented one-third of the daily intake of the children who were recovering from protein-energy malnutrition. The test meals given was gruels made from wheat mixed with a supplementary weaning food (Faffa or Superamin) or fish protein concentrate (FPC). The plasma amino acid responses were evaluated both as PAA ratios (a modification of the Longenecker and Hause method), and as deltaMR% (percentage change in the postprandial essential amino acid molar ratios according to Graham and Placko). Both evaluation models indicated that lysine, threonine and methionine were the limiting amino acids in the Faffa/wheat diet, and that lysine and threonine were limiting in the Superamin/wheat diet. All essential amino acids seemed to be supplied in adequate amounts in the FPC/wheat diet. These results were in close agreement with the amino acid score of the diets (based on chemical analysis). PMID:424653

  16. The Pepper CaOSR1 Protein Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response via Abscisic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms, and their growth and development is detrimentally affected by environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Defense mechanisms are tightly regulated and complex processes, which respond to changing environmental conditions; however, the precise mechanisms that function under adverse conditions remain unclear. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the CaOSR1 gene, which functions in the adaptive response to abiotic stress. We found that CaOSR1 gene expression in pepper leaves was up-regulated after exposure to abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and high salinity. In addition, we demonstrated that the fusion protein of CaOSR1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in the nucleus. We used CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants and CaOSR1-OX-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to show that the CaOSR1 protein regulates the osmotic stress response. CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants showed increased drought susceptibility, and this was accompanied by a high transpiration rate. CaOSR1-OX plants displayed phenotypes that were hypersensitive to ABA and hyposensitive to osmotic stress, during the seed germination and seedling growth stages; furthermore, these plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance at the adult stage, and this was characterized by higher leaf temperatures and smaller stomatal apertures because of ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, our data indicate that CaOSR1 positively regulates osmotic stress tolerance via ABA-mediated cell signaling. These findings suggest an involvement of a novel protein in ABA and osmotic stress signalings in plants. PMID:27446121

  17. Model studies of intracellular acid-base temperature responses in ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R B; Malan, A

    1976-10-01

    Measurements of intracellular pH (pHi) in air-breathing ectotherms have only been made in the steady state; these pHi indicate that protein charge state, measured as alpha imidazole (alphaIM), the fractional dissociation of protein histidine imidazole groups, is preserved when ectotherm tissues change temperature in vivo, with related changes in pHi and PCO2. In partial answer to the question of how such tissues are able to avoid disrupting transients to functions sensitive to protein charge states, model studies were carried out to assess the passive intracellular buffer system response to a combined change in body temperature and CO2 partial pressure as occurs in vivo in these species. The cell compartment was modeled as a closed volume of ternary buffer solution, containing protein imidazole (50 mM/1); phosphate (15 mM/1) and CO2-bicarbonate buffer components, permeable only to CO2 and permitted no change in buffer base. Excursions from a steady-state non-equilibrium pHi were computed to a step-change in temperature/PCO2. Computations for frog (Rana catesbeiana) striated muscle show that the calculated pHi response on the basis of estimated composition and concentration of cell buffer components, moves along the curve describing the steady-state temperature relationship. No transient away from steady-state alphaIM and carbon dioxide content need be postulated. Applications to turtle (Pseudemys scripta) striated muscle are also explored. These calculations show that ectotherm cells may be capable of responding without appreciable time for adaptation to intracellular acid-base state changes incurred by sudden alteration of body temperature in vivo, given the observed adjustments of blood PCO2 with temperature.

  18. Acid Sphingomyelinase Promotes Endothelial Stress Response in Systemic Inflammation and Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ha-Yeun; Hupe, Daniel C; Otto, Gordon P; Sprenger, Marcel; Bunck, Alexander C; Dorer, Michael J; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Gräler, Markus H; Claus, Ralf A

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis involves activation of acid sphingomyelinase (SMPD1) with subsequent generation of the bioactive mediator ceramide. We herein evaluate the hypothesis that the enzyme exerts biological effects in endothelial stress response. Plasma-secreted sphingomyelinase activity, ceramide generation and lipid raft formation were measured in human microcirculatory endothelial cells (HMEC-1) stimulated with serum obtained from sepsis patients. Clustering of receptors relevant for signal transduction was studied by immunostaining. The role of SMPD1 for macrodomain formation was tested by pharmacological inhibition. To confirm the involvement of the stress enzyme, direct inhibitors (amino bisphosphonates) and specific downregulation of the gene was tested with respect to ADAMTS13 expression and cytotoxicity. Plasma activity and amount of SMPD1 were increased in septic patients dependent on clinical severity. Increased breakdown of sphingomyelin to ceramide in HMECs was observed following stimulation with serum from sepsis patients in vitro. Hydrolysis of sphingomyelin, clustering of receptor complexes, such as the CD95L/Fas-receptor, as well as formation of ceramide enriched macrodomains were abrogated using functional inhibitors (desipramine and NB6). Strikingly, the stimulation of HMECs with serum obtained from sepsis patients or mixture of proinflammatory cytokines resulted in cytotoxicity and ADAMTS13 downregulation which was abrogated using desipramine, amino bisphosphonates and genetic inhibitors. SMPD1 is involved in the dysregulation of ceramide metabolism in endothelial cells leading to macrodomain formation, cytotoxicity and downregulation of ADAMTS13 expression. Functional inhibitors, such as desipramine, are capable of improving endothelial stress response during sepsis and might be considered as a pharmacological treatment strategy to obtain a favorable outcome. PMID:27341515

  19. The Pepper CaOSR1 Protein Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response via Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms, and their growth and development is detrimentally affected by environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Defense mechanisms are tightly regulated and complex processes, which respond to changing environmental conditions; however, the precise mechanisms that function under adverse conditions remain unclear. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the CaOSR1 gene, which functions in the adaptive response to abiotic stress. We found that CaOSR1 gene expression in pepper leaves was up-regulated after exposure to abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and high salinity. In addition, we demonstrated that the fusion protein of CaOSR1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in the nucleus. We used CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants and CaOSR1-OX-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to show that the CaOSR1 protein regulates the osmotic stress response. CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants showed increased drought susceptibility, and this was accompanied by a high transpiration rate. CaOSR1-OX plants displayed phenotypes that were hypersensitive to ABA and hyposensitive to osmotic stress, during the seed germination and seedling growth stages; furthermore, these plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance at the adult stage, and this was characterized by higher leaf temperatures and smaller stomatal apertures because of ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, our data indicate that CaOSR1 positively regulates osmotic stress tolerance via ABA-mediated cell signaling. These findings suggest an involvement of a novel protein in ABA and osmotic stress signalings in plants. PMID:27446121

  20. The regulatory network of ThbZIP1 in response to abscisic acid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Liu, Guifeng; Liu, Yujia; Nie, Xianguang; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Previously, a bZIP transcription factor from Tamarix hispida, ThbZIP1, was characterized: plants overexpressing ThbZIP1 displayed improved salt stress tolerance but were sensitive to abscisic acid (ABA). In the current study, we further characterized the regulatory network of ThbZIP1 and the mechanism of ABA sensitivity mediated by ThbZIP1. An ABF transcription factor from T. hispida, ThABF1, directly regulates the expression of ThbZIP1. Microarray analysis identified 1662 and 1609 genes that were respectively significantly upregulated or downregulated by ThbZIP1 when exposed to ABA. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the processes including “response to stimulus,” “catalytic activity,” “binding function,” and “metabolic process” were highly altered in ThbZIP1 expressing plants exposed to ABA. The gene expression in ThbZIP1 transformed plants were compared between exposed to ABA and salt on the genome scale. Genes differentially regulated by both salt and ABA treatment only accounted for 9.75% of total differentially regulated genes. GO analysis showed that structural molecule activity, organelle part, membrane-enclosed lumen, reproduction, and reproductive process are enhanced by ABA but inhibited by salt stress. Conversely, immune system and multi-organism process were improved by salt but inhibited by ABA. Transcription regulator activity, enzyme regulator activity, and developmental process were significantly altered by ABA but were not affected by salt stress. Our study provides insights into how ThbZIP1 mediates ABA and salt stress response at the molecular level. PMID:25713576

  1. Single amino-acid replacement is responsible for the stabilization of ornithine decarboxylase in HMOA cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y; Matsufuji, S; Murakami, Y; Hayashi, S

    1993-06-15

    The half-life of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in HMOA cells, a variant cell line derived from hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells, is markedly increased compared with that in the parental cell line. In the present study, we examined which of the three relevant factors is responsible for the ODC stabilization in HMOA cells, namely ODC itself, a regulatory protein antizyme and an ODC-degrading activity. SDS/PAGE analysis of radiolabeled ODC revealed that ODC from HMOA cells migrated somewhat faster than that from HTC cells, suggesting that HMOA ODC was structurally altered. Direct sequencing of reverse-transcription/polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) products of ODC mRNA from HMOA cells revealed a T to G replacement, causing a Cys441-->Trp replacement near the C-terminus. No alteration was found in the whole coding region of antizyme mRNA. An authentic mutant ODC cDNA with the same replacement was transfected and expressed in C55.7 ODC-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. Upon cycloheximide treatment, the mutant ODC activity did not decrease appreciably for at least 3 h, whereas wild-type ODC activity decreased with a half-life of 1 h. In-vitro-synthesized mutant ODC with the Cys441-->Trp (or Ala) replacement was also stable in a reticulocyte-lysate ODC-degradation system. Metabolically labeled and purified mouse ODC was degraded in HMOA cell extracts in the presence of ATP and antizyme as rapidly as in HTC cell extracts, indicating that HMOA cells have a normal ODC degrading activity. These results indicated that the single amino acid replacement, Cys441-->Trp, is responsible for the stabilization of ODC in HMOA cells and that Cys441 is important for rapid ODC turnover.

  2. Transcriptomic insights into the molecular response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to linoleic acid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, P J; Lyons, V; Higgins, V J; Rogers, P J; Bailey, T D; Wu, M J

    2013-12-01

    Eukaryotic microorganisms are constantly challenged by reactive oxygen species derived endogenously or encountered in their environment. Such adversity is particularly applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae under harsh industrial conditions. One of the major oxidants to challenge S. cerevisiae is linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LoaOOH). This study, which used genome-wide microarray analysis in conjunction with deletion mutant screening, uncovered the molecular pathways of S. cerevisiae that were altered by an arresting concentration of LoaOOH (75 μM). The oxidative stress response, iron homeostasis, detoxification through PDR transport and direct lipid β-oxidation were evident through the induction of the genes encoding for peroxiredoxins (GPX2, TSA2), the NADPH:oxidoreductase (OYE3), iron uptake (FIT2, ARN2, FET3), PDR transporters (PDR5, PDR15, SNQ2) and β-oxidation machinery (FAA2, POX1). Further, we discovered that Gpx3p, the dual redox sensor and peroxidase, is required for protection against LoaOOH, indicated by the sensitivity of gpx3Δ to a mild dose of LoaOOH (37.5 μM). Deletion of GPX3 conferred a greater sensitivity to LoaOOH than the loss of its signalling partner YAP1. Deletion of either of the iron homeostasis regulators AFT1 or AFT2 also resulted in sensitivity to LoaOOH. These novel findings for Gpx3p, Aft1p and Aft2p point to their distinct roles in response to the lipid peroxide. Finally, the expression of 89 previously uncharacterised genes was significantly altered against LoaOOH, which will contribute to their eventual annotation. PMID:24074273

  3. Acute exposure to realistic acid fog: Effects on respiratory function and airway responsiveness in asthmatics

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D.; De Vuyst, P.; Yernault, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    The biological effects of acid fog composed primarily of ammonium ions and sulfate are described. Subjects with asthma were exposed for one hour to sulfuric acid aerosol. Significant changes were not observed. Other asthma subjects were exposed to acid fog containing sulfate and ammonium ions. Again, pulmonary and bronchial function were not modified after inhalation.

  4. Intra-myocellular fatty acid metabolism plays a critical role in mediating responses to dietary restriction in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Katewa, Subhash D.; Demontis, Fabio; Kolipinski, Marysia; Hubbard, Allan; Gill, Matthew S.; Perrimon, Norbert; Melov, Simon; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Summary Changes in fat content have been associated with dietary restriction (DR), but whether they play a causal role in mediating various responses to DR remains unknown. We demonstrate that upon DR, Drosophila melanogaster shift their metabolism towards increasing both fatty acid synthesis and breakdown, which is required for various responses to DR. Inhibition of fatty acid synthesis or oxidation genes specifically in the muscle tissue inhibited lifespan extension upon DR. Furthermore, DR enhances spontaneous activity of flies which was found to be dependent on the enhanced fatty acid metabolism. This increase in activity was found to be at least partially required for the lifespan extension upon DR. Over-expression of adipokinetic hormone (dAKH), the functional ortholog of glucagon, enhances fat metabolism, spontaneous activity and lifespan. Together, these results suggest that enhanced fat metabolism in the muscle and physical activity play a key role in the protective effects of DR. PMID:22768842

  5. Hormonal diterpenoids derived from ent-kaurenoic acid are involved in the blue-light avoidance response of Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid hormones that regulate growth and development in flowering plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens has part of the GA biosynthetic pathway from geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurenoic acid via ent-kaurene, but it does not produce GA. Disruption of the ent-kaurene synthase gene in P. patens suppressed caulonemal differentiation. Application of ent-kaurene or ent-kaurenoic acid restored differentiation, suggesting that derivative(s) of ent-kaurenoic acid, but not GAs, are endogenous regulator(s) of caulonemal cell differentiation. The protonemal growth of P. patens shows an avoidance response under unilateral blue light. Physiological studies using gene mutants involved in ent-kaurene biosynthesis confirmed that diterpenoid(s) regulate the blue-light response. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings, and provide data for the ent-kaurene oxidase gene-disrupted mutant.

  6. Modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate for the sensitivity to acid rain of 21 plant species.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shihuai; Gou, Shuzhen; Sun, Baiye; Lv, Wenlin; Li, Yuanwei; Peng, Hong; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Yingjun

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity of plant species to acid rain based on the modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate (P (N)) of 21 types of plant species, subjected to the exposure of simulated acid rain (SAR) for 5 times during a period of 50 days. Variable responses of P (N) to SAR occurred depending on the type of plant. A majority (13 species) of the dosage-response relationship could be described by an S-shaped curve and be fitted with the Boltzmann model. Model fitting allowed quantitative evaluation of the dosage-response relationship and an accurate estimation of the EC(10), termed as the pH of the acid rain resulting in a P (N) 10 % lower than the reference value. The top 9 species (Camellia sasanqua, Cinnamomum camphora, etc. EC(10) ≤ 3.0) are highly endurable to very acid rain. The rare, relict plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides was the most sensitive species (EC(10) = 5.1) recommended for protection.

  7. Circulating concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) as mediators of the innate immune response in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported that temperamental cattle have greater non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and an altered innate immune response compared to calm cattle. Therefore, this trial was designed to determine if increasing energy availability via a lipid infusion or bolus dextrose inject...

  8. Food preservatives sodium benzoate and propionic acid and colorant curcumin suppress Th1-type immune response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maier, Elisabeth; Kurz, Katharina; Jenny, Marcel; Schennach, Harald; Ueberall, Florian; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2010-07-01

    Food preservatives sodium benzoate and propionic acid and colorant curcumin are demonstrated to suppress in a dose-dependent manner Th1-type immune response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro. Results show an anti-inflammatory property of compounds which however could shift the Th1-Th2-type immune balance towards Th2-type immunity.

  9. Responses of herbivore and predatory mites to tomato plants exposed to jasmonic acid seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Smart, Lesley E; Martin, Janet L; Limpalaër, Marlène; Bruce, Toby J A; Pickett, John A

    2013-10-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signalling can influence plant defense and the production of plant volatiles that mediate interactions with insects. Here, we tested whether a JA seed treatment could alter direct and indirect defenses. First, oviposition levels of herbivorous mites, Tetranychus urticae, on JA seed-treated and control tomato plants were compared. They were not significantly different on tomato cv. 'Moneymaker', however, there was a significant reduction in oviposition on treated plants in additional experiments with cv. 'Carousel'. Second, responses of predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, were assessed in a Y-tube olfactometer. Volatiles from JA seed-treated tomato cv. 'Moneymaker' plants were significantly more attractive than volatiles from control plants. Volatiles collected from plants were analysed by GC/MS, and samples from JA seed-treated plants contained more methyl salicylate and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene (TMTT) than samples from control plants. Our results indicate that JA seed treatment can make tomato plants more attractive to predatory mites, but that direct effects on herbivorous mites are variable and cultivar dependent.

  10. Histamine (H3) receptors modulate the excitatory amino acid receptor response of the vestibular afferents.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Hortencia; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2005-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of histamine-related drugs in the treatment of peripheral and central vestibular disorders may be explained by their action on the vestibular nuclei, it has also been shown that antivertigo effects can take place at the peripheral level. In this work, we examined the actions of H3 histaminergic agonists and antagonists on the afferent neuron electrical discharge in the isolated inner ear of the axolotl. Our results indicate that H3 antagonists such as thioperamide, clobenpropit, and betahistine (BH) decreased the electrical discharge of afferent neurons by interfering with the postsynaptic response to excitatory amino acid agonists. These results lend further support to the idea that the antivertigo action of histamine-related drugs may be caused, at least in part, by a decrease in the sensory input from the vestibular endorgans. The present data show that the inhibitory action of the afferent neurons discharge previously described for BH is not restricted to this molecule but is also shared by other H3 antagonists.

  11. Potential role of salicylic acid in modulating diacylglycerol homeostasis in response to freezing temperatures in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei-Juan; Xiao, Shi; Chen, Qin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    In our recent article in Molecular Plant, we reported that 3 lipase-like defense regulators SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE101 (SAG101), ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4) are involved in the regulation of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. The transcripts of SAG101, EDS1 and PAD4 were inducible by cold stress and their knockout or knockdown mutants exhibited enhanced chilling and freezing tolerance in comparison to the wild type. The freezing tolerance phenotype showed in the sag101, eds1 and pad4 mutants was correlated with the transcriptional upregulation of C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTORs (CBFs) and their regulons as well as increased levels of proline. Upon cold exposure, the sag101, eds1 and pad4 mutants showed ameliorated cell death and accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, which were highly induced by freezing stress in the wild-type leaves. Moreover, the contents of salicylic acid (SA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) were significantly decreased in the sag101, eds1 and pad4 mutants compared to the wild type. Taken together, our results suggest that the SAG101, EDS1 and PAD4 are negative regulators in the freezing response and function, at least in part, by modulating the homeostasis of SA and DAG in Arabidopsis.

  12. Differential response of immune-related genes to peptidoglycan and lipoteichoic acid challenge in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sulabh, Sourabh; Bhushan, Bharat; Panigrahi, Manjit; Verma, Ankita; Baba, Naseer Ahmad; Kumar, Pushpendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall antigens, peptidoglycan (PGN) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) challenge on immune cells present in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods: In this study, efforts have been made to investigate the effects of three combinations (10+10, 20+20 and 30+30 μg/ml) of PGN and LTA obtained from S. aureus. These antigens were used to challenge the bovine PBMCs. After 6 h of incubation quantitative, real time-polymerase chain reaction was used to study toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and major cytokine mRNA expression in bovine PBMC challenged with three different antigen blends. Results: The results indicated that mRNA level of interferon gamma is influenced by the expression of TLR-2 gene. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and IL-8 genes showed a maximum response at a dose of 10 μg of PGN and 10 μg of LTA challenge per ml of culture medium. The outcome also suggests that both IL-10 and IL-8 followed the expression pattern of TNF-α. Conclusion: A dose of 10 μg of PGN and 10 μg of LTA per ml of culture medium was found to be most suitable for challenging PBMC. PMID:27733800

  13. Translational regulation of mammalian and Drosophila citric acid cycle enzymes via iron-responsive elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N K; Pantopoulos, K; Dandekar, T; Ackrell, B A; Hentze, M W

    1996-01-01

    The posttranscriptional control of iron uptake, storage, and utilization by iron-responsive elements (IREs) and iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) provides a molecular framework for the regulation of iron homeostasis in many animals. We have identified and characterized IREs in the mRNAs for two different mitochondrial citric acid cycle enzymes. Drosophila melanogaster IRP binds to an IRE in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the iron-sulfur protein (Ip) subunit of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). This interaction is developmentally regulated during Drosophila embryogenesis. In a cell-free translation system, recombinant IRP-1 imposes highly specific translational repression on a reporter mRNA bearing the SDH IRE, and the translation of SDH-Ip mRNA is iron regulated in D. melanogaster Schneider cells. In mammals, an IRE was identified in the 5' untranslated regions of mitochondrial aconitase mRNAs from two species. Recombinant IRP-1 represses aconitase synthesis with similar efficiency as ferritin IRE-controlled translation. The interaction between mammalian IRPs and the aconitase IRE is regulated by iron, nitric oxide, and oxidative stress (H2O2), indicating that these three signals can control the expression of mitochondrial aconitase mRNA. Our results identify a regulatory link between energy and iron metabolism in vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest biological functions for the IRE/IRP regulatory system in addition to the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643505

  14. Loblolly pine and slash pine responses to acute aluminum and acid exposures.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jaroslaw; Friend, Alexander L

    2006-09-01

    In response to concerns about aluminum and HCl exposure associated with rocket motor testing and launches, survival and growth of full-sib families of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) were evaluated in a nursery bed experiment. Each species was exposed to a single soil application of aluminum chloride (0.33 M AlCl(3), pH 2.5), hydrochloric acid (0.39 M HCl, pH 0.6) or water, with or without mycorrhizal inoculation with Pisolithus tinctorius (Coker and Couch). After 20 weeks without inoculation, survival in AlCl(3) and HCl treatments averaged 52% for loblolly pine and 72% for slash pine. Inoculation improved survival of loblolly pine, receiving HCl from 49 to 73%, and of those receiving AlCl3, from 55 to 90%. Inoculation also resulted in improved survival and growth of individual families in AlCl(3), but not in HCl treatments. Results illustrate the relative resistance of both pine species to the acute treatments supplied, the improvement in resistance associated with mycorrhizal inoculation and the importance of field testing, following hydroponic screening, to verify the resistance to soil-supplied stresses.

  15. Effect of fatty acid anilides on immune responses of Swiss mice.

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, R; Ruiz-Gutierrez, V

    1992-01-01

    The possible relationship between fatty acid anilides and the toxic oil syndrome (TOS) which appeared in Spain in 1981 has been debated during recent years. These anilides have been detected as anomalous compound in toxic oils analysed. After treatment with one daily dose of 50 mg/kg of oleilanilide (88.86% pure) for 5 days, animals showed a tendency towards progressive loss of body weight and a significant increase in serum concentration of immunoglobulins. The percentage of suppressor T cells in spleen diminished significantly compared with the control group. Consequently, an increase in the helper T cells/suppressor T cells was also observed. The production of IgM and IgG in culture was significantly higher than in controls and no differences were seen in IgA synthesis. The functional studies of generation of specific IgM, IgA and IgG suppressor cells at variable doses of concanavalin A (Con A) showed paradoxical behaviour of suppressor T cells generated by low doses of Con A. A similar change occurred at higher doses of Con A. These results suggest that low-dose treatment with oleilanilides induces an alteration in the immune response in Swiss mice. PMID:1385764

  16. Response surface methodology for autolysis parameters optimization of shrimp head and amino acids released during autolysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhong; Zhang, Chaohua; Hong, Pengzhi; Ji, Hongwu

    2008-07-01

    Protein hydrolysates were prepared from the head waste of Penaens vannamei, a China seawater major shrimp by autolysis method. Autolysis conditions (viz., temperature, pH and substrate concentration) for preparing protein hydrolysates from the head waste proteins were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) using a central composite design. Model equation was proposed with regard to the effect of temperature, pH and substrate concentration. Substrate concentration at 23% (w/v), pH at 7.85 and temperature at 50°C were found to be the optimal conditions to obtain a higher degree of hydrolysis close to 45%. The autolysis reaction was nearly finished in the initial 3h. The amino acid compositions of the autolysis hydrolysates prepared using the optimized conditions in different time revealed that the hydrolysates can be used as a functional food ingredient or flavor enhancer. Endogenous enzymes in the shrimp heads had a strong autolysis capacity (AC) for releasing threonine, serine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, histidine and tryptophan. Endogenous enzymes had a relatively lower AC for releasing cystine and glycine.

  17. Usnic acid protects LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice through attenuating inflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-Qing; Mo, Zhi-Zhun; Liao, Jin-Bin; Feng, Xue-Xuan; Liang, Yong-Zhuo; Zhang, Xie; Liu, Yu-Hong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Su, Zi-Ren; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Usnic acid is a dibenzofuran derivative found in several lichen species, which has been shown to possess several activities, including antiviral, antibiotic, antitumoral, antipyretic, analgesic, antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. However, there were few reports on the effects of usnic acid on LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of our study was to explore the effect and possible mechanism of usnic acid on LPS-induced lung injury. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with usnic acid significantly improved survival rate, pulmonary edema. In the meantime, protein content and the number of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) significantly decreased, and the levels of MPO, MDA, and H2O2 in lung tissue were markedly suppressed after treatment with usnic acid. Meanwhile, the activities of SOD and GSH in lung tissue significantly increased after treatment with usnic acid. Additionally, to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of usnic acid, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in BALF were studied. The results in the present study indicated that usnic acid attenuated the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-2. Meanwhile, the improved level of IL-10 in BALF was observed. In conclusion, these data showed that the protective effect of usnic acid on LPS-induced ALI in mice might relate to the suppression of excessive inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in lung tissue. Thus, it was suggested that usnic acid might be a potential therapeutic agent for ALI.

  18. Comparison of postprandial phenolic acid excretions and glucose responses after ingestion of breads with bioprocessed or native rye bran.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Jenni; Aura, Anna-Marja; Katina, Kati; Nordlund, Emilia; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa

    2013-06-01

    Rye bran contains a high amount of phenolic acids with potential health promoting effects. However, due to binding to dietary fibre, the phenolic acids are poorly absorbed in human body. We used bioprocessing with enzymes and yeast to release phenolic acids from the fibre complex and studied the effect of bioprocessing on absorption of phenolic acids in healthy humans. White wheat breads fortified with bioprocessed or native rye bran, and wholegrain rye bread and white wheat bread as controls were served to 15 subjects in a randomized order in the cross-over design. Urine was collected at the basal state and over 24 hours in four-, eight-, and twelve-hour periods and analyzed for phenolic acids and their metabolites with gas chromatography. A total of six blood samples were taken over four hours to study the effect of the bread ingestion on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Bioprocessing of rye bran increased the proportion of free ferulic acid (FA) and soluble arabinoxylan in the bread. Ingestion of the white wheat bread fortified with bioprocessed rye bran increased (p < 0.001) urinary excretion of FA particularly during the first four hours, indicating increased absorption of FA from the small intestine. The postprandial glucose and insulin responses were similar between these breads. Bioprocessing of rye bran did not affect excretion of benzoic, phenylpropionic, and phenylacetic acid metabolites. As a conclusion, bioprocessed rye bran as compared with native rye bran increased absorption of FA from the small intestine, but did not improve postprandial glucose and insulin responses.

  19. Comparison of postprandial phenolic acid excretions and glucose responses after ingestion of breads with bioprocessed or native rye bran.

    PubMed

    Lappi, Jenni; Aura, Anna-Marja; Katina, Kati; Nordlund, Emilia; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa

    2013-06-01

    Rye bran contains a high amount of phenolic acids with potential health promoting effects. However, due to binding to dietary fibre, the phenolic acids are poorly absorbed in human body. We used bioprocessing with enzymes and yeast to release phenolic acids from the fibre complex and studied the effect of bioprocessing on absorption of phenolic acids in healthy humans. White wheat breads fortified with bioprocessed or native rye bran, and wholegrain rye bread and white wheat bread as controls were served to 15 subjects in a randomized order in the cross-over design. Urine was collected at the basal state and over 24 hours in four-, eight-, and twelve-hour periods and analyzed for phenolic acids and their metabolites with gas chromatography. A total of six blood samples were taken over four hours to study the effect of the bread ingestion on postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Bioprocessing of rye bran increased the proportion of free ferulic acid (FA) and soluble arabinoxylan in the bread. Ingestion of the white wheat bread fortified with bioprocessed rye bran increased (p < 0.001) urinary excretion of FA particularly during the first four hours, indicating increased absorption of FA from the small intestine. The postprandial glucose and insulin responses were similar between these breads. Bioprocessing of rye bran did not affect excretion of benzoic, phenylpropionic, and phenylacetic acid metabolites. As a conclusion, bioprocessed rye bran as compared with native rye bran increased absorption of FA from the small intestine, but did not improve postprandial glucose and insulin responses. PMID:23674066

  20. Potentiometric Responses of Ion-Selective Electrodes Doped with Diureidocalix[4]arene towards Un-dissociated Benzoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Agnieszka; Lhotak, Pavel; Radecka, Hanna

    2007-01-01

    Diureidocalix[4]arene have been applied as new ionophore in liquid membrane electrode (ISE) sensitive towards un-dissociated benzoic acid. The electrode demonstrated response towards benzoic acid with the detection limit 2.0 × 10-4 M which is sufficient for the determination of benzoic acid added to beverages as preservative in milimolar concentration. The selectivity coefficients measured by the matched potential method (MPM) showed its good selectivity against common anions present in drink samples. All measurements were made in presence of 1.0 × 10-2 M NaHSO4 pH 3.0 in order to reduce the influence of OH-. The applicability of diureidocalix[4]arene incorporated ISE has been checked by recovery test of benzoic acid in the presence of artificial drink matrix and by standard addition method.

  1. Optimization of polyphenol extraction from red grape pomace using aqueous glycerol/tartaric acid mixtures and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Makris, Dimitris P; Passalidi, Vassiliki; Kallithraka, Stamatina; Mourtzinos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Grape pomace is a food industry waste containing a high burden of antioxidant polyphenols and several methodologies have been developed for their efficient extraction. However, a sustainable and environmentally friendly process should involve recovery means composed of benign, non-toxic solvents, such as tartaric acid and glycerol, which are natural food constituents. In this line, this study examined the extraction of polyphenols using aqueous tartaric acid/glycerol solutions. The aim was to assess the role of acid and glycerol concentration in the extraction yield, employing a Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology. The results showed that solutions containing only glycerol (20%, w/v) are more suitable for retrieving polyphenols, flavonoids, and pigments from grape pomace, while tartaric acid exerted a negative effect in this regard, when tested at concentrations up to 2% (w/v).

  2. d-Amino Acids Modulate the Cellular Response of Enzymatic-Instructed Supramolecular Nanofibers of Small Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peptides made of d-amino acids, as the enantiomer of corresponding l-peptides, are able to resist proteolysis. It is, however, unclear or much less explored whether or how d-amino acids affect the cellular response of supramolecular nanofibers formed by enzyme-triggered self-assembly of d-peptides. In this work, we choose a cell compatible molecule, Nap-l-Phe-l-Phe-l-pTyr (LLL-1P), and systematically replace the l-amino acids in this tripeptidic precursor or its hydrogelator by the corresponding d-amino acid(s). The replacement of even one d-amino acid in this tripeptidic precursor increases its proteolytic resistance. The results of static light scattering and TEM images show the formation of nanostructures upon the addition of alkaline phosphatase, even at concentrations below the minimum gelation concentration (mgc). All these isomers are able to form ordered nanostructures and exhibit different morphologies. According to the cell viability assay on these stereochemical isomers, cells exhibit drastically different responses to the enantiomeric precursors, but almost same responses to the enantiomeric hydrogelators. Furthermore, the different cellular responses of LLL-1P and DDD-1P largely originate from the ecto-phosphatases catalyzed self-assembly of DDD-1 on the surface of cells. Therefore, this report not only illustrates a new way for tailoring the properties of supramolecular assemblies, but also provides new insights to answering the fundamental question of how mammalian cells respond to enzymatic formation of nanoscale supramolecular assemblies (e.g., nanofibers) of d-peptides. PMID:25230147

  3. [Acid stress response of Salmonella and its relationship with virulence--a review].

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Zhao, Mingwen; Yao, Yufeng

    2014-04-01

    As successful enteric bacteria, Salmonella spp. has to overcome the extreme acid condition in the stomach before invading into host intestinal epithelial cells. Salmonella spp. has evolved an adaptation to its replicative niche in the acidic environment. This review summarizes acid resistant characteristics of Salmonella, and introduces several mechanisms to acid resistance, including keeping internal pH homeostatic, synthesizing acid shock protein through several regulatory pathways and altering membrane character. The achievements will be significant for understanding and controlling Salmonella infections in the future.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  5. Assessing amino acid racemization variability in coral intra-crystalline protein for geochronological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, Erica J.; Tomiak, Peter J.; Collins, Matthew J.; Hellstrom, John; Tudhope, Alexander W.; Lough, Janice M.; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.

    2012-06-01

    Over 500 Free Amino Acid (FAA) and corresponding Total Hydrolysed Amino Acid (THAA) analyses were completed from eight independently-dated, multi-century coral cores of massive Porites sp. colonies. This dataset allows us to re-evaluate the application of amino acid racemization (AAR) for dating late Holocene coral material, 20 years after Goodfriend et al. (GCA56 (1992), 3847) first showed AAR had promise for developing chronologies in coral cores. This re-assessment incorporates recent method improvements, including measurement by RP-HPLC, new quality control approaches (e.g. sampling and sub-sampling protocols, statistically-based data screening criteria), and cleaning steps to isolate the intra-crystalline skeletal protein. We show that the removal of the extra-crystalline contaminants and matrix protein is the most critical step for reproducible results and recommend a protocol of bleaching samples in NaOCl for 48 h to maximise removal of open system proteins while minimising the induced racemization. We demonstrate that AAR follows closed system behaviour in the intra-crystalline fraction of the coral skeletal proteins. Our study is the first to assess the natural variability in intra-crystalline AAR between colonies, and we use coral cores taken from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and Jarvis Island in the equatorial Pacific to explore variability associated with different environmental conditions and thermal histories. Chronologies were developed from THAA Asx D/L, Ala D/L, Glx D/L and FAA Asx D/L for each core and least squares Monte Carlo modelling applied in order to quantify uncertainty of AAR age determinations and assess the level of dating resolution possible over the last 5 centuries. AAR within colonies follow consistent stratigraphic aging. However, there are systematic differences in rates between the colonies, which would preclude direct comparison from one colony to another for accurate age estimation. When AAR age models are developed from

  6. Assessing amino acid racemization variability in coral intra-crystalline protein for geochronological applications.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Erica J; Tomiak, Peter J; Collins, Matthew J; Hellstrom, John; Tudhope, Alexander W; Lough, Janice M; Penkman, Kirsty E H

    2012-06-01

    Over 500 Free Amino Acid (FAA) and corresponding Total Hydrolysed Amino Acid (THAA) analyses were completed from eight independently-dated, multi-century coral cores of massive Porites sp. colonies. This dataset allows us to re-evaluate the application of amino acid racemization (AAR) for dating late Holocene coral material, 20 years after Goodfriend et al. (GCA56 (1992), 3847) first showed AAR had promise for developing chronologies in coral cores. This re-assessment incorporates recent method improvements, including measurement by RP-HPLC, new quality control approaches (e.g. sampling and sub-sampling protocols, statistically-based data screening criteria), and cleaning steps to isolate the intra-crystalline skeletal protein. We show that the removal of the extra-crystalline contaminants and matrix protein is the most critical step for reproducible results and recommend a protocol of bleaching samples in NaOCl for 48 h to maximise removal of open system proteins while minimising the induced racemization. We demonstrate that AAR follows closed system behaviour in the intra-crystalline fraction of the coral skeletal proteins. Our study is the first to assess the natural variability in intra-crystalline AAR between colonies, and we use coral cores taken from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and Jarvis Island in the equatorial Pacific to explore variability associated with different environmental conditions and thermal histories. Chronologies were developed from THAA Asx D/L, Ala D/L, Glx D/L and FAA Asx D/L for each core and least squares Monte Carlo modelling applied in order to quantify uncertainty of AAR age determinations and assess the level of dating resolution possible over the last 5 centuries. AAR within colonies follow consistent stratigraphic aging. However, there are systematic differences in rates between the colonies, which would preclude direct comparison from one colony to another for accurate age estimation. When AAR age models are developed

  7. Plasma membrane H+ and K+ transporters are involved in the weak-acid preservative response of disparate food spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Neil; Shabala, Lana; Rooney, Henrietta; Jarman, Marcus G; Davies, Julia M

    2005-06-01

    The food spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been proposed to resist weak-acid preservative stress by different means; Z. bailii by limiting influx of preservative combined with its catabolism, S. cerevisiae by active extrusion of the preservative weak-acid anion and H(+). Measurement of H(+) extrusion by exponential-phase Z. bailii cells suggest that, in common with S. cerevisiae, this yeast uses a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase to expel H(+) when challenged by weak-acid preservative (benzoic acid). Simultaneous measurement of Z. bailii net H(+) and K(+) fluxes showed that net K(+) influx accompanies net H(+) efflux during acute benzoic acid stress. Such ionic coupling is known for S. cerevisiae in short-term preservative stress. Both yeasts significantly accumulated K(+) on long-term exposure to benzoic acid. Analysis of S. cerevisiae K(+) transporter mutants revealed that loss of the high affinity K(+) uptake system Trk1 confers sensitivity to growth in preservative. The results suggest that cation accumulation is an important factor in adaptation to weak-acid preservatives by spoilage yeasts and that Z. bailii and S. cerevisiae share hitherto unsuspected adaptive responses at the level of plasma membrane ion transport.

  8. Enzymatic production of infant milk fat analogs containing palmitic acid: optimization of reactions by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Maduko, C O; Akoh, C C; Park, Y W

    2007-05-01

    Infant milk fat analogs resembling human milk fat were synthesized by an enzymatic interesterification between tripalmitin, coconut oil, safflower oil, and soybean oil in hexane. A commercially immobilized 1,3-specific lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, obtained from Rhizomucor miehei was used as a biocatalyst. The effects of substrate molar ratio, reaction time, and incubation temperature on the incorporation of palmitic acid at the sn-2 position of the triacylglycerols were investigated. A central composite design with 5 levels and 3 factors consisting of substrate ratio, reaction temperature, and incubation time was used to model and optimize the reaction conditions using response surface methodology. A quadratic model using multiple regressions was then obtained for the incorporation of palmitic acid at the sn-2 positions of glycerols as the response. The coefficient of determination (R2) value for the model was 0.845. The incorporation of palmitic acid appeared to increase with the decrease in substrate molar ratio and increase in reaction temperature, and optimum incubation time occurred at 18 h. The optimal conditions generated from the model for the targeted 40% palmitic acid incorporation at the sn-2 position were 3 mol/mol, 14.4 h, and 55 degrees C; and 2.8 mol/mol, 19.6 h, and 55 degrees C for substrate ratio (moles of total fatty acid/moles of tripalmitin), time, and temperature, respectively. Infant milk fat containing fatty acid composition and sn-2 fatty acid profile similar to human milk fat was successfully produced. The fat analogs produced under optimal conditions had total and sn-2 positional palmitic acid levels comparable to that of human milk fat. PMID:17430912

  9. Host-derived extracellular nucleic acids enhance innate immune responses, induce coagulation, and prolong survival upon infection in insects.

    PubMed

    Altincicek, Boran; Stötzel, Sabine; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Preissner, Klaus T; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2008-08-15

    Extracellular nucleic acids play important roles in human immunity and hemostasis by inducing IFN production, entrapping pathogens in neutrophil extracellular traps, and providing procoagulant cofactor templates for induced contact activation during mammalian blood clotting. In this study, we investigated the functions of extracellular RNA and DNA in innate immunity and hemolymph coagulation in insects using the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella a reliable model host for many insect and human pathogens. We determined that coinjection of purified Galleria-derived nucleic acids with heat-killed bacteria synergistically increases systemic expression of antimicrobial peptides and leads to the depletion of immune-competent hemocytes indicating cellular immune stimulation. These activities were abolished when nucleic acids had been degraded by nucleic acid hydrolyzing enzymes prior to injection. Furthermore, we found that nucleic acids induce insect hemolymph coagulation in a similar way as LPS. Proteomic analyses revealed specific RNA-binding proteins in the hemolymph, including apolipoproteins, as potential mediators of the immune response and hemolymph clotting. Microscopic ex vivo analyses of Galleria hemolymph clotting reactions revealed that oenocytoids (5-10% of total hemocytes) represent a source of endogenously derived extracellular nucleic acids. Finally, using the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as an infective agent and Galleria caterpillars as hosts, we demonstrated that injection of purified nucleic acids along with P. luminescens significantly prolongs survival of infected larvae. Our results lend some credit to our hypothesis that host-derived nucleic acids have independently been co-opted in innate immunity of both mammals and insects, but exert comparable roles in entrapping pathogens and enhancing innate immune responses. PMID:18684961

  10. Influence of Dietary Ascorbic Acid on the Immune Responses of Juvenile Korean Rockfish Sebastes schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile Korean Rockfish Sebastes schlegelii (length, 13.6 ± 1.4 cm [mean ± SD]; weight, 53.6 ± 4.2 g) were fed twice daily with diets containing varying levels of ascorbic acid (0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. Significant increases in daily weight and length occurred in fish fed more than 50 mg/kg ascorbic acid. The lysozyme activity of fish fed diets containing ascorbic acid was considerably increased in rockfish plasma at 400 mg/kg ascorbic acid and in kidney at over 50 mg/kg ascorbic acid. Total plasma immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were markedly elevated in fish fed 400 mg/kg ascorbic acid. The results suggest that dietary ascorbic acid supplementation in juvenile rockfish can induce a significant increase in growth and in immunological features such as lysozyme activity and plasma IgM levels.

  11. pH-responsive biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles based on phenylboronic acid for intracellular imaging and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengliang; Hu, Kelei; Cao, Weipeng; Sun, Yun; Sheng, Wang; Li, Feng; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-10-01

    To address current medical challenges, there is an urgent need to develop drug delivery systems with multiple functions, such as simultaneous stimuli-responsive drug release and real-time imaging. Biocompatible polymers have great potential for constructing smart multifunctional drug-delivery systems through grafting with other functional ligands. More importantly, novel biocompatible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence emission can work as theranostic nanomedicines for real-time imaging and drug delivery. Herein, we developed a highly fluorescent nanoparticle based on a phenylboronic acid-modified poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethyleneimine)(PLA-PEI) copolymer loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) for intracellular imaging and pH-responsive drug delivery. The nanoparticles exhibited superior fluorescence properties, such as fluorescence stability, no blinking and excitation-dependent fluorescence behavior. The Dox-loaded fluorescent nanoparticles showed pH-responsive drug release and were more effective in suppressing the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. In addition, the biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles could be used as a tool for intracellular imaging and drug delivery, and the process of endosomal escape was traced by real-time imaging. These pH-responsive and biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles, based on phenylboronic acid, are promising tools for intracellular imaging and drug delivery.To address current medical challenges, there is an urgent need to develop drug delivery systems with multiple functions, such as simultaneous stimuli-responsive drug release and real-time imaging. Biocompatible polymers have great potential for constructing smart multifunctional drug-delivery systems through grafting with other functional ligands. More importantly, novel biocompatible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence emission can work as theranostic nanomedicines for real-time imaging and drug delivery. Herein, we developed a highly fluorescent nanoparticle based on a

  12. Transcriptional analysis of different stress response genes in Escherichia coli strains subjected to sodium chloride and lactic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Silvio; Stephan, Roger; Hummerjohann, Jörg; Tasara, Taurai

    2014-12-01

    Survival of Escherichia coli in food depends on its ability to adapt against encountered stress typically involving induction of stress response genes. In this study, the transcriptional induction of selected acid (cadA, speF) and salt (kdpA, proP, proW, otsA, betA) stress response genes was investigated among five E. coli strains, including three Shiga toxin-producing strains, exposed to sodium chloride or lactic acid stress. Transcriptional induction upon lactic acid stress exposure was similar in all but one E. coli strain, which lacked the lysine decarboxylase gene cadA. In response to sodium chloride stress exposure, proW and otsA were similarly induced, while significant differences were observed between the E. coli strains in induction of kdpA, proP and betA. The kdpA and betA genes were significantly induced in four and three strains, respectively, whereas one strain did not induce these genes. The proP gene was only induced in two E. coli strains. Interestingly, transcriptional induction differences in response to sodium chloride stress exposure were associated with survival phenotypes observed for the E. coli strains in cheese as the E. coli strain lacking significant induction in three salt stress response genes investigated also survived poorly compared to the other E. coli strains in cheese.

  13. Metabolic flux responses to genetic modification for shikimic acid production by Bacillus subtilis strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is a key chiral starting molecule for the synthesis of the neuramidase inhibitor GS4104 against viral influenza. Microbial production of SA has been extensively investigated in Escherichia coli, and to a less extent in Bacillus subtilis. However, metabolic flux of the high SA-producing strains has not been explored. In this study, we constructed with genetic manipulation and further determined metabolic flux with 13C-labeling test of high SA-producing B. subtilis strains. Results B. subtilis 1A474 had a mutation in SA kinase gene (aroI) and accumulated 1.5 g/L of SA. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA, aroB, aroC or aroD in B. subtilis revealed that aroD had the most significantly positive effects on SA production. Simultaneous overexpression of genes for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (aroA) and SA dehydrogenase (aroD) in B. subtilis BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD resulted in SA production of 3.2 g/L. 13C-Metabolic flux assay (MFA) on the two strains BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu and BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD indicated the carbon flux from glucose to SA increased to 4.6% in BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD from 1.9% in strain BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu. The carbon flux through tricarboxylic acid cycle significantly reduced, while responses of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis to high SA production were rather weak, in the strain BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD. Based on the results from MFA, two potential targets for further optimization of SA production were identified. Experiments on genetic deletion of phosphoenoylpyruvate kinase gene confirmed its positive influence on SA production, while the overexpression of the transketolase gene did not lead to increase in SA production. Conclusion Of the genes involved in shikimate pathway in B. subtilis, aroD exerted most significant influence on SA accumulation. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA and aroD doubled SA production than its parent strain. MFA revealed metabolic flux

  14. Effects of folic acid supplementation on serum folate and plasma homocysteine concentrations in older adults: a dose-response trial.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cheryl A M; Jee, Sun Ha; Charleston, Jeanne; Narrett, Matthew; Appel, Lawrence J

    2010-10-15

    The authors' objective in this study was to estimate the changes in serum folate and homocysteine concentration that resulted from 6 weeks of supplementation with folic acid. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-response trial with a parallel-group design was conducted. A total of 133 participants aged 60-90 years (70% female, 19% nonwhite) were assigned to receive 0, 100, 400, 1,000, or 2,000 μg/day of folic acid for 6 weeks. Data were collected in the United States between June and September 1996. At baseline, median serum folate and plasma homocysteine concentrations were 5.7 ng/mL (interquartile range (25th-75th percentiles), 4.1-7.8) and 8.3 μmol/L (interquartile range, 7.1-10.0), respectively. As the folic acid dose increased, serum folate levels increased (P-trend < 0.001). There was no dose-response relation with homocysteine level among all participants. In analyses restricted to persons with the lowest serum folate concentration (<4.5 ng/mL) at baseline, there was a trend (P = 0.06) toward decreased homocysteine levels with increasing folic acid dose. In healthy, older adults with adequate folate status, folic acid supplementation is not beneficial for homocysteine reduction. However, for older adults with low serum folate levels, supplementation will improve folate status and may be beneficial for lowering homocysteine concentrations.

  15. Immune response, productivity and quality of milk from grazing goats as affected by dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Caroprese, Mariangela; Ciliberti, Maria Giovana; Santillo, Antonella; Marino, Rosaria; Sevi, Agostino; Albenzio, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to assess how diet supplemented with fish oil and linseed improve the immune profile, the production performance, and milk quality of grazing goats by a diet supplementation of fish oil or linseed. Twenty-four Garganica grazing goats were divided into three groups named control (CON), fish oil (FO) and linseed (LIN) according to the fat supplement received in their diet. In vivo immune responses were evaluated by monitoring cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in order to verify the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation on goats' health status. Goat milk samples were analysed weekly to determine milk chemical composition, fatty acid profile, and somatic cell count. Diet based on linseed supplementation (LIN) significantly increased milk yield by 30%, milk fat yield by 67%, protein yield by 34%, and casein yield by 41% as compared with CON. Fat content increased by 30% in LIN milk as compared with CON milk, and by 12% as compared with FO milk. Linseed modified milk fatty acid profile; LIN milk showed lower SFA and higher PUFA than FO milk. The modified fatty acid composition of LIN milk resulted in lower AI and TI indexes than FO and CON milk. Linseed and fish oil administration can reduce humoral immunity of goats, but has no effect in their cellular immunity. Dietary linseed supplementation in grazing dairy goat supports feeding programs to improve milk composition and quality, and a modulation of their immune responses. PMID:27033938

  16. Efficient nuclear drug translocation and improved drug efficacy mediated by acidity-responsive boronate-linked dextran/cholesterol nanoassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Yi; Lei, Qi; Yang, Bin; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Xuli; Zeng, Xuan; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-06-01

    The present study reported a lysosome-acidity-targeting bio-responsive nanovehicle self-assembled from dextran (Dex) and phenylboronic acid modified cholesterol (Chol-PBA), aiming at the nucleus-tropic drug delivery. The prominent advantage of this assembled nanoconstruction arose from its susceptibility to acidity-labile dissociation concurrently accompanied with the fast liberation of encapsulated drugs, leading to efficient nuclear drug translocation and consequently favorable drug efficacy. By elaborately exploiting NH4Cl pretreatment to interfere with the cellular endosomal acidification progression, this study clearly evidenced at a cellular level the strong lysosomal-acidity dependency of nuclear drug uptake efficiency, which was shown to be the main factor influencing the drug efficacy. The boronate-linked nanoassembly displayed nearly no cytotoxicity and can remain structural stability under the simulated physiological conditions including 10% serum and the normal blood sugar concentration. The cellular exposure to cholesterol was found to bate the cellular uptake of nanoassembly in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a cholesterol-associated mechanism of the intracellular internalization. The in vivo antitumor assessment in xenograft mouse models revealed the significant superiority of DOX-loaded Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly over the controls including free DOX and the DOX-loaded non-sensitive Dex-Chol, as reflected by the more effective tumor-growth inhibition and the better systematic safety. In terms of the convenient preparation, sensitive response to lysosomal acidity and efficient nuclear drug translocation, Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly derived from natural materials shows promising potentials as the nanovehicle for nucleus-tropic drug delivery especially for antitumor agents. More attractively, this study offers a deeper insight into the mechanism concerning the contribution of acidity-responsive delivery to the enhanced chemotherapy performance. PMID

  17. Efficient nuclear drug translocation and improved drug efficacy mediated by acidity-responsive boronate-linked dextran/cholesterol nanoassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Yi; Lei, Qi; Yang, Bin; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Xuli; Zeng, Xuan; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-06-01

    The present study reported a lysosome-acidity-targeting bio-responsive nanovehicle self-assembled from dextran (Dex) and phenylboronic acid modified cholesterol (Chol-PBA), aiming at the nucleus-tropic drug delivery. The prominent advantage of this assembled nanoconstruction arose from its susceptibility to acidity-labile dissociation concurrently accompanied with the fast liberation of encapsulated drugs, leading to efficient nuclear drug translocation and consequently favorable drug efficacy. By elaborately exploiting NH4Cl pretreatment to interfere with the cellular endosomal acidification progression, this study clearly evidenced at a cellular level the strong lysosomal-acidity dependency of nuclear drug uptake efficiency, which was shown to be the main factor influencing the drug efficacy. The boronate-linked nanoassembly displayed nearly no cytotoxicity and can remain structural stability under the simulated physiological conditions including 10% serum and the normal blood sugar concentration. The cellular exposure to cholesterol was found to bate the cellular uptake of nanoassembly in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a cholesterol-associated mechanism of the intracellular internalization. The in vivo antitumor assessment in xenograft mouse models revealed the significant superiority of DOX-loaded Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly over the controls including free DOX and the DOX-loaded non-sensitive Dex-Chol, as reflected by the more effective tumor-growth inhibition and the better systematic safety. In terms of the convenient preparation, sensitive response to lysosomal acidity and efficient nuclear drug translocation, Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly derived from natural materials shows promising potentials as the nanovehicle for nucleus-tropic drug delivery especially for antitumor agents. More attractively, this study offers a deeper insight into the mechanism concerning the contribution of acidity-responsive delivery to the enhanced chemotherapy performance.

  18. Milk fatty acid composition, rumen microbial population, and animal performances in response to diets rich in linoleic acid supplemented with chestnut or quebracho tannins in dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Buccioni, A; Pauselli, M; Viti, C; Minieri, S; Pallara, G; Roscini, V; Rapaccini, S; Marinucci, M Trabalza; Lupi, P; Conte, G; Mele, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate milk fatty acid (FA) profile, animal performance, and rumen microbial population in response to diets containing soybean oil supplemented or not with chestnut and quebracho tannins in dairy ewes. Eighteen Comisana ewes at 122±6 d in milking were allotted into 3 experimental groups. Diets were characterized by chopped grass hay administered ad libitum and by 800 g/head and day of 3 experimental concentrates containing 84.5 g of soybean oil/kg of dry matter (DM) and 52.8 g/kg of DM of bentonite (control diet), chestnut tannin extract (CHT diet), or quebracho tannin extract (QUE diet). The trial lasted 4 wk. Milk yield was recorded daily, and milk composition and blood parameters were analyzed weekly. At the end of the experiment, samples of rumen fluid were collected to analyze pH, volatile fatty acid profile, and the relative proportions of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus in the rumen microbial population. Hepatic functionality, milk yield, and gross composition were not affected by tannin extracts, whereas milk FA composition was characterized by significant changes in the concentration of linoleic acid (CHT +2.77% and QUE +9.23%), vaccenic acid (CHT +7.07% and QUE +13.88%), rumenic acid (CHT -1.88% and QUE +24.24%), stearic acid (CHT + 8.71% and QUE -11.45%), and saturated fatty acids (CHT -0.47% and QUE -3.38%). These differences were probably due to the ability of condensed versus hydrolyzable tannins to interfere with rumen microbial metabolism, as indirectly confirmed by changes in the relative proportions of B. fibrisolvens and B. proteoclasticus populations and by changes in the molar proportions of volatile fatty acids. The effect of the CHT diet on the milk FA profile and microbial species considered in this trial was intermediate between that of QUE and the control diet, suggesting a differential effect of condensed and hydrolyzable tannins on rumen microbes. Compared with control animals

  19. Increased dietary sodium chloride concentrations reduce endogenous amino acid flow and influence the physiological response to the ingestion of phytic acid by broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, A J; Bedford, M R; Ravindran, V; Selle, P H

    2011-10-01

    A total of 240 Ross 308 broilers were used to investigate the effect of sodium (1·5 or 2·5 g/kg), phytate-P (0 or 3·2 g/kg), and phytase (0 or 1000 FTU/kg; 2x2x2 factorial) on endogenous amino acid flow using the enzyme-hydrolysed casein method. The ingestion of phytate increased endogenous amino acid flow (∼30%) compared with the phytate-free control diets. Phytase reduced endogenous amino acid flow only when fed in concert with phytate, resulting in a significant phytate x phytase interaction. Increasing dietary sodium concentration from 1·5 to 2·5 g/kg reduced endogenous amino acid flow by around 10%. This reduction of endogenous flow was particularly evident in diets which contained phytate, resulting in a significant sodium x phytate interaction for several amino acids, including Thr and Ser. Further, high sodium concentrations muted the effect of phytase resulting in a significant sodium x phytase interaction for some amino acids. The concentration of Asp, Thr, Ser and some other amino acids was increased in the endogenous protein in response to the ingestion of phytate. Both sodium and phytase essentially restored the composition of endogenous protein to that of the phytate-free control. Further, as both sodium and phytase had similar effects there were significant interactions between sodium and phytase for most amino acids, such that one was only effective in the absence of the other. These data confirm previous reports that phytate is a nutritional aggressor, causing quantitative and qualitative changes in endogenous protein flow. However, this is the first report which has shown that dietary sodium concentrations play a role in the severity of this antinutritional effect and consequently may blunt the efficacy of exogenous phytase. The mechanism is obscure, though it has been previously demonstrated that sodium can disrupt phytate:protein complexes, thus mitigating one of the mechanisms by which phytate exerts its antinutritional effect.

  20. Retinoic acid activates human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene through binding of RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer to a novel retinoic acid response element in the promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Fang; Liu Yan; Liu Li; Wu Kailang; Wei Wei; Zhu Ying . E-mail: yingzhu@whu.edu.cn; Wu Jianguo . E-mail: wu9988@vip.sina.com

    2007-04-06

    Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) catalyzes nitric oxide (NO) which has a significant effect on tumor suppression and cancer therapy. Here we revealed the detailed molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of hiNOS expression induced by retinoic acid (RA). We showed that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer was important in hiNOS promoter activation, hiNOS protein expression, and NO production. Serial deletion and site-directed mutation analysis revealed two half-sites of retinoic acid response element (RARE) spaced by 5 bp located at -172 to -156 in the hiNOS promoter. EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} directly bound to this RARE of hiNOS promoter. Our results suggested the identification of a novel RARE in the hiNOS promoter and the roles of the nuclear receptors (RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha}) in the induction of hiNOS by RA.

  1. Bacteria-triggered systemic immunity in barley is associated with WRKY and ETHYLENE RESPONSIVE FACTORs but not with salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sanjukta; Wenig, Marion; Langen, Gregor; Sharma, Sapna; Kugler, Karl G; Knappe, Claudia; Hause, Bettina; Bichlmeier, Marlies; Babaeizad, Valiollah; Imani, Jafargholi; Janzik, Ingar; Stempfl, Thomas; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Mayer, Klaus F X; Vlot, A Corina

    2014-12-01

    Leaf-to-leaf systemic immune signaling known as systemic acquired resistance is poorly understood in monocotyledonous plants. Here, we characterize systemic immunity in barley (Hordeum vulgare) triggered after primary leaf infection with either Pseudomonas syringae pathovar japonica (Psj) or Xanthomonas translucens pathovar cerealis (Xtc). Both pathogens induced resistance in systemic, uninfected leaves against a subsequent challenge infection with Xtc. In contrast to systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), systemic immunity in barley was not associated with NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 or the local or systemic accumulation of salicylic acid. Instead, we documented a moderate local but not systemic induction of abscisic acid after infection of leaves with Psj. In contrast to salicylic acid or its functional analog benzothiadiazole, local applications of the jasmonic acid methyl ester or abscisic acid triggered systemic immunity to Xtc. RNA sequencing analysis of local and systemic transcript accumulation revealed unique gene expression changes in response to both Psj and Xtc and a clear separation of local from systemic responses. The systemic response appeared relatively modest, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction associated systemic immunity with the local and systemic induction of two WRKY and two ETHYLENE RESPONSIVE FACTOR (ERF)-like transcription factors. Systemic immunity against Xtc was further associated with transcriptional changes after a secondary/systemic Xtc challenge infection; these changes were dependent on the primary treatment. Taken together, bacteria-induced systemic immunity in barley may be mediated in part by WRKY and ERF-like transcription factors, possibly facilitating transcriptional reprogramming to potentiate immunity.

  2. AV3V lesions attenuate the cardiovascular responses produced by blood-borne excitatory amino acid analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Beltz, T. G.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Systemic injections of the excitatory amino acid (EAA) analogs, kainic acid (KA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), produce a pressor response in conscious rats that is caused by a centrally mediated activation of sympathetic drive and the release of arginine vasopressin (AVP). This study tested the hypothesis that the tissue surrounding the anteroventral part of the third ventricle (AV3V) plays a role in the expression of the pressor responses produced by systemically injected EAA analogs. Specifically, we examined whether prior electrolytic ablation of the AV3V region would affect the pressor responses to KA and NMDA (1 mg/kg iv) in conscious rats. The KA-induced pressor response was smaller in AV3V-lesioned than in sham-lesioned rats (11 +/- 2 vs. 29 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). After ganglion blockade, KA produced a pressor response in sham-lesioned but not AV3V-lesioned rats (+27 +/- 3 vs. +1 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). The KA-induced pressor response in ganglion-blocked sham-lesioned rats was abolished by a vasopressin V1-receptor antagonist. Similar results were obtained with NMDA. The pressor response to AVP (10 ng/kg iv) was slightly smaller in AV3V-lesioned than in sham-lesioned ganglion-blocked rats (45 +/- 3 vs. 57 +/- 4 mmHg; P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the pressor responses to systemically injected EAA analogs are smaller in AV3V-lesioned rats. The EAA analogs may produce pressor responses by stimulation of EAA receptors in the AV3V region, or the AV3V region may play an important role in the expression of these responses.

  3. Arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid generate oxidative stress response in human bladder cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Eblin, K.E. . E-mail: eblin@pharmacy.arizona.edu; Bowen, M.E.; Cromey, D.W.; Bredfeldt, T.G.; Mash, E.A.; Lau, S.S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2006-11-15

    Arsenicals have commonly been seen to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can lead to DNA damage and oxidative stress. At low levels, arsenicals still induce the formation of ROS, leading to DNA damage and protein alterations. UROtsa cells, an immortalized human urothelial cell line, were used to study the effects of arsenicals on the human bladder, a site of arsenical bioconcentration and carcinogenesis. Biotransformation of As(III) by UROtsa cells has been shown to produce methylated species, namely monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], which has been shown to be 20 times more cytotoxic. Confocal fluorescence images of UROtsa cells treated with arsenicals and the ROS sensing probe, DCFDA, showed an increase of intracellular ROS within five min after 1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M As(III) treatments. In contrast, 50 and 500 nM MMA(III) required pretreatment for 30 min before inducing ROS. The increase in ROS was ameliorated by preincubation with either SOD or catalase. An interesting aspect of these ROS detection studies is the noticeable difference between concentrations of As(III) and MMA(III) used, further supporting the increased cytotoxicity of MMA(III), as well as the increased amount of time required for MMA(III) to cause oxidative stress. These arsenical-induced ROS produced oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by an increase in 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) with either 50 nM or 5 {mu}M MMA(III) exposure. These findings provide support that MMA(III) cause a genotoxic response upon generation of ROS. Both As(III) and MMA(III) were also able to induce Hsp70 and MT protein levels above control, showing that the cells recognize the ROS and respond. As(III) rapidly induces the formation of ROS, possibly through it oxidation to As(V) and further metabolism to MMA(III)/(V). These studies provide evidence for a different mechanism of MMA(III) toxicity, one that MMA(III) first interacts with cellular components before an ROS response is generated, taking longer

  4. An Ancestral Role for CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 Proteins in Both Ethylene and Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Yuki; Pierik, Ronald; Kelly, Steven; Sakuta, Masaaki; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2015-09-01

    Land plants have evolved adaptive regulatory mechanisms enabling the survival of environmental stresses associated with terrestrial life. Here, we focus on the evolution of the regulatory CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) component of the ethylene signaling pathway that modulates stress-related changes in plant growth and development. First, we compare CTR1-like proteins from a bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (representative of early divergent land plants), with those of more recently diverged lycophyte and angiosperm species (including Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]) and identify a monophyletic CTR1 family. The fully sequenced P. patens genome encodes only a single member of this family (PpCTR1L). Next, we compare the functions of PpCTR1L with that of related angiosperm proteins. We show that, like angiosperm CTR1 proteins (e.g. AtCTR1 of Arabidopsis), PpCTR1L modulates downstream ethylene signaling via direct interaction with ethylene receptors. These functions, therefore, likely predate the divergence of the bryophytes from the land-plant lineage. However, we also show that PpCTR1L unexpectedly has dual functions and additionally modulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. In contrast, while AtCTR1 lacks detectable ABA signaling functions, Arabidopsis has during evolution acquired another homolog that is functionally distinct from AtCTR1. In conclusion, the roles of CTR1-related proteins appear to have functionally diversified during land-plant evolution, and angiosperm CTR1-related proteins appear to have lost an ancestral ABA signaling function. Our study provides new insights into how molecular events such as gene duplication and functional differentiation may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of regulatory mechanisms in plants.

  5. Salicylic acid induces differential antioxidant response in spring maize under high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Palak; Kaur, Kamaljit; Gupta, Anil K

    2016-06-01

    High temperature is one of the important stress factors that affect crops in tropical countries. Plants do evolve or adopt different mechanisms to overcome such stress for survival. It is an interesting subject and has attracted many researchers to work upon. Here, we studied the effect of salicylic acid (SA) on seedling growth and antioxidative defense system in two spring maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes viz., CML-32 (relatively heat tolerant) and LM-11 (relatively heat susceptible), under high temperature stress. High temperature induced greater reduction in dry biomass of LM-1 1 seedlings as compared to those of CML-32. There was a parallel increase in ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in the roots of CML-32 seedlings. However, the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase decreased and the contents of H202, proline and malonaldialdehyde (MDA) increased in seedlings of both the genotypes. Application of SA (400 µM) led to increased dry biomass in heat stressed CML-32 seedlings. It improved the efficiency of Halliwell-Asada pathway in roots of CML-32 seedlings as was evidenced by the enhanced ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. The activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase increased in both the tissues of LM-11 seedlings, whereas in CML-32, it was only in shoots, after SA application. Peroxidase activity increased in SA treated seedlings of both the genotypes, though the increase was comparatively higher in CML-32. The contents of H₂O₂ and MDA decreased and that of proline increased in SA treated seedlings of both the genotypes, under stress conditions. It may be concluded that SA induced differential antioxidant response by upregulating Halliwell-Asada pathway in roots and attaining high POX activity in both the tissues of CML-32 seedlings, under high temperature stress.

  6. Soil solution response to experimentally reduced acid deposition in a forest ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Alewell, C.; Matzner, E.; Bredemeier, M.; Blanch, K.

    1997-05-01

    In order to measure and predict reversibility of soil solution acidification under experimentally reduced acid input, a manipulation study with artificial {open_quote}preindustrial{close_quote} throughfall was established. A roof was installed underneath the canopy in a Norway Spruce stand of the German Soiling area. Water failing onto the roof was adjusted to clean rain concentrations before redistribution. Soil solutions were collected with suction cup lysimeters at various depths and were analyzed for major ions. The response of soil solution chemistry in the upper soil (10 cm depth) to a reduction of N, SO{sub 4}, and H input was rapid. While NO{sub 3} concentration in deeper soil layers reached input levels after 2 yr of treatment, SO{sub 4} concentration in the seepage water at 1 m depth remained high relative to the reduced input due to a release of formerly stored S from the soil. Aluminum concentration followed a similar pattern as the SO{sub 4} concentrations. The ion concentrations in soil leachate were predicted reasonably well using the MAGIC model with the measured SO{sub 4} sorption isotherms and the throughfall fluxes as model input Although the parameters of the Langmuir isotherm had no significant influence to the prediction of SO{sub 4} concentration in the upper soil layer, they were crucial for the prediction of SO{sub 4} dynamics in deeper soil layers. The model predicted that the reversibility of soil acidification at the Soiling area is delayed for decades due to the release of soil SO{sub 4}. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Salicylic acid induces differential antioxidant response in spring maize under high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Palak; Kaur, Kamaljit; Gupta, Anil K

    2016-06-01

    High temperature is one of the important stress factors that affect crops in tropical countries. Plants do evolve or adopt different mechanisms to overcome such stress for survival. It is an interesting subject and has attracted many researchers to work upon. Here, we studied the effect of salicylic acid (SA) on seedling growth and antioxidative defense system in two spring maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes viz., CML-32 (relatively heat tolerant) and LM-11 (relatively heat susceptible), under high temperature stress. High temperature induced greater reduction in dry biomass of LM-1 1 seedlings as compared to those of CML-32. There was a parallel increase in ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in the roots of CML-32 seedlings. However, the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase decreased and the contents of H202, proline and malonaldialdehyde (MDA) increased in seedlings of both the genotypes. Application of SA (400 µM) led to increased dry biomass in heat stressed CML-32 seedlings. It improved the efficiency of Halliwell-Asada pathway in roots of CML-32 seedlings as was evidenced by the enhanced ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. The activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase increased in both the tissues of LM-11 seedlings, whereas in CML-32, it was only in shoots, after SA application. Peroxidase activity increased in SA treated seedlings of both the genotypes, though the increase was comparatively higher in CML-32. The contents of H₂O₂ and MDA decreased and that of proline increased in SA treated seedlings of both the genotypes, under stress conditions. It may be concluded that SA induc