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Sample records for acid sample preparation

  1. Hands-free sample preparation platform for nucleic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Baier, T; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Gransee, R; Crombé, A; Schmahl, S; Paulus, C; Drese, K S; Keegan, H; Martin, C; O'Leary, J J; Furuberg, L; Solli, L; Grønn, P; Falang, I M; Karlgård, A; Gulliksen, A; Karlsen, F

    2009-12-01

    A Lab-On-Chip system with an instrument is presented which is capable of performing total sample preparation and automated extraction of nucleic acid from human cell samples fixed in a methanol based solution. The target application is extraction of mRNA from cervical liquid based cytology specimens for detection of transformed HPV-infections. The device accepts 3 ml of sample and performs the extraction in a disposable polymer chip of credit card size. All necessary reagents for cell lysis, washing, and elution are stored on-chip and the extraction is performed in two filter stages; one for cell pre-concentration and the other for nucleic acid capture. Tests performed using cancer cell lines and cervical liquid based cytology specimens confirm the extraction of HPV-mRNA by the system. PMID:19904407

  2. Nucleic acid sample preparation using spontaneous biphasic plug flow.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter C; Strotman, Lindsay N; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Erwin; O'Connell, Rachel; Loeb, Jennifer M; Berry, Scott M; Beebe, David J

    2013-09-17

    Nucleic acid (NA) extraction and purification has become a common technique in both research and clinical laboratories. Current methods require repetitive wash steps with a pipet that are laborious and time-consuming, making the procedure inefficient for clinical settings. We present here a simple technique that relies on spontaneous biphasic plug flow inside a capillary to achieve sample preparation. By filling the sample with oil, aqueous contaminants were displaced from the captured NA without pipetting wash buffers or use of external force and equipment. mRNA from mammalian cell culture was purified, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed similar threshold cycle values as those obtained from a commercially available kit. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral-like particles were spiked into serum and a 5-fold increase in viral RNA extraction yield was achieved compared to the conventional wash method. In addition, viral RNA was successfully purified from human whole blood, and a limit of detection of approximately 14 copies of RNA extracted per sample was determined. The results demonstrate the utility of the current technique for nucleic acid purification for clinical purposes, and the overall approach provides a potential method to implement nucleic acid testing in low-resource settings.

  3. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    DOEpatents

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  4. Sample preparation for measurement of plasma mycophenolic acid concentrations using chromatographically functionalized magnetic micro-particles.

    PubMed

    König, Katrin; Vogeser, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing chromatographically modified magnetic micro-particles is an innovative principle of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of small molecules in complex biomedical samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Since no vacuum or pressure has to be applied-in contrast to cartridge based solid phase extraction protocols-the principle's main characteristics are potentially straightforward automation and a high extraction performance (in terms of µg of extraction material per µL of sample). Following first descriptions of the approach, this article reports, the validation of a magnetic particle-based, analytical method for the quantification of the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid in plasma. This sample preparation technology has shown a good performance for this clinically relevant analyte. As a result, we conclude that further work towards the implementation of this technology in a multi- analyte approach on robotic systems, aiming towards a fully automated process, is justified. PMID:23221116

  5. Development of SPME method for concomitant sample preparation of rocuronium bromide and tranexamic acid in plasma.

    PubMed

    Gorynski, Krzysztof; Bojko, Barbara; Kluger, Michael; Jerath, Angela; Wąsowicz, Marcin; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    A high-throughput method using solid-phase microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (SPME-LC-MS/MS) for determination of tranexamic acid and rocuronium bromide in human plasma was developed and validated. Standard analytical approaches employ acidification of the sample due to the instability of rocuronium bromide in collected plasma samples. However, acidification affects the binding equilibrium of the drug and consequently no information on the free/bound concentration can be obtained. Contrary to these protocols, the proposed method requires minimum sample handling and no ion pairing and/or derivatization procedure. A weak cation exchange coating was chosen as the best extracting phase for selected drugs, guaranteed a good recovery, minimum carry-over, reusability and reproducibility. SPME procedure met all Food and Drug Administration acceptance criteria for bioanalytical assays at three concentration levels, for both selected drugs. Post-extraction addition experiments showed that matrix effect was less than ±3%. Here, a weak cation exchange thin-film solid-phase microextraction (WCX TF-SPME) approach is presented, offering effective cleanup procedure and full quantitation of the drugs in plasma, undoubtedly one the most challenging matrices with regards to its complexity. In addition, the 96-well plate format of WCX TF-SPME system provides considerable advantages, such as high throughput analysis for up to 96 samples in 35min (22s/sample), requirement of small amounts of plasma samples (0.8mL), and a simple sample preparation protocol, all of which shows a promise for possible on-site application in hospitals to monitor concentrations of the drugs in close to real time. PMID:24525565

  6. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  7. Study of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of amino acids in human sweat by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Povedano, M M; Calderón-Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-01-01

    The determination of physiological levels of amino acids is important to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases and nutritional status of individuals. Amino acids are frequently determined in biofluids such as blood (serum or plasma) and urine; however, there are less common biofluids with different concentration profiles of amino acids that could be of interest. One of these biofluids is sweat that can be obtained in a non-invasive manner and is characterized by low complex composition. The analysis of amino acids in human sweat requires the development of sample preparation strategies according to the sample matrix and small collected volume. The influence of sample preparation on the quantitative analysis of amino acids in sweat by LC-MS/MS has been assessed through a comparison between two strategies: dilution of sweat and centrifugal microsolid-phase extraction (c-μSPE). In both cases, several dilution factors were assayed for in-depth knowledge of the matrix effects, and the use of c-μSPE provided the best results in terms of accuracy. The behavior of the target analytes was a function of the dilution factor, thus providing a pattern for sample preparation that depended on the amino acid to be determined. The concentration of amino acids in sweat ranges between 6.20 ng mL(-1) (for homocysteine) and 259.77 µg mL(-1) (for serine) with precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, within 1.1-21.4%.

  8. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-20

    The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

  9. Strategies for automated sample preparation, nucleic acid purification, and concentration of low-target-number nucleic acids in environmental and food processing samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Holman, David A.; Schuck, Beatrice L.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a rapid, automated system for nucleic acid purification and concentration from environmental and food processing samples. Our current approach involves off-line filtration and cell lysis (ballistic disintegration) functions in appropriate buffers followed by automated nucleic acid capture and purification on renewable affinity matrix microcolumns. Physical cell lysis and renewable affinity microcolumns eliminate the need for toxic organic solvents, enzyme digestions or other time- consuming sample manipulations. Within the renewable affinity microcolumn, we have examined nucleic acid capture and purification efficiency with various microbead matrices (glass, polymer, paramagnetic), surface derivitization (sequence-specific capture oligonucleotides or peptide nucleic acids), and DNA target size and concentration under variable solution conditions and temperatures. Results will be presented comparing automated system performance relative to benchtop procedures for both clean (pure DNA from a laboratory culture) and environmental (soil extract) samples, including results which demonstrate 8 minute purification and elution of low-copy nucleic acid targets from a crude soil extract in a form suitable for PCR or microarray-based detectors. Future research will involve the development of improved affinity reagents and complete system integration, including upstream cell concentration and cell lysis functions and downstream, gene-based detectors. Results of this research will ultimately lead to improved processes and instrumentation for on-line, automated monitors for pathogenic micro-organisms in food, water, air, and soil samples.

  10. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  11. Microscopic and mesoscopic structural features of an activated carbon sample, prepared from sorghum via activation by phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László; Rubio-Arroyo, Manuel F.; Aguilar-López, Sergio; Pizio, Orest

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation of a new activated carbon sample from sorghum. ► Characterization by adsorption/desorption methods. ► Determination of the structure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. ► The sample is amorphous and contains distorted graphene fragments. ► A characteristic nanoscale distance is established from the radial distribution function. -- Abstract: An acidic chemical activation procedure has been used for preparing activated carbon with a surface area exceeding 1000 m{sup 2}/g from sorghum. In order to reveal structural features, synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed. The structure of the material has been characterized by the total scattering structure factor and the radial distribution function describing short-range arrangement of atoms at distances of the order of a few atomic diameters as well as correlations at a longer scale, of the order of nanometers. The atomic arrangement has been found to be consistent with that of amorphous graphite-like carbon. As far as the mesoscopic structure is concerned, the presence of a characteristic distance is suggested on the basis of the clear nanometer scale oscillations of the radial distribution function, which distance may be assigned as the mesopore size in the material. It is suggested that the approach devized here may later be applied routinely for other activated carbon samples, too, for characterizing atomic and nanoscale order simultaneously.

  12. Rapid and automated sample preparation for nucleic acid extraction on a microfluidic CD (compact disk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jitae; Kido, Horacio; Zoval, Jim V.; Gagné, Dominic; Peytavi, Régis; Picard, François J.; Bastien, Martine; Boissinot, Maurice; Bergeron, Michel G.; Madou, Marc J.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid and automated preparation of PCR (polymerase chain reaction)-ready genomic DNA was demonstrated on a multiplexed CD (compact disk) platform by using hard-to-lyse bacterial spores. Cell disruption is carried out while beadcell suspensions are pushed back and forth in center-tapered lysing chambers by angular oscillation of the disk - keystone effect. During this lysis period, the cell suspensions are securely held within the lysing chambers by heatactivated wax valves. Upon application of a remote heat to the disk in motion, the wax valves release lysate solutions into centrifuge chambers where cell debris are separated by an elevated rotation of the disk. Only debris-free DNA extract is then transferred to collection chambers by capillary-assisted siphon and collected for heating that inactivates PCR inhibitors. Lysing capacity was evaluated using a real-time PCR assay to monitor the efficiency of Bacillus globigii spore lysis. PCR analysis showed that 5 minutes' CD lysis run gave spore lysis efficiency similar to that obtained with a popular commercial DNA extraction kit (i.e., IDI-lysis kit from GeneOhm Sciences Inc.) which is highly efficient for microbial cell and spore lysis. This work will contribute to the development of an integrated CD-based assay for rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  13. Preparing Protein Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Cindy Barnes of University Space Research Association (USRA) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center pipettes a protein solution in preparation to grow crystals as part of NASA's structural biology program. Research on Earth helps scientists define conditions and specimens they will use in space experiments.

  14. Effect of sample preparation on the measurement of sugars, organic acids, and polyphenols in apple fruit by mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Sylvie; Scibisz, Iwona; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Renard, Catherine M G C

    2012-04-11

    The objectives of this study were (i) to test different conditions of freezing, thawing, and grinding during sample preparation and (ii) to evaluate the possibility of using mid-infrared spectroscopy for analyzing the composition of sugars, organic acids, and polyphenols in apples. Seven commercial apple cultivars were chosen for their large variability in composition (total polyphenols from 406 to 1033 mg kg(-1) fresh weight). The different conditions of sample preparation affected only the phenolic compounds and not sugars or organic acids. The regression models of the mid-infrared spectra showed a good ability to estimate sugar and organic acid contents (R(2) ≥ 0.96), except for citric acid. Good predictions were obtained for total phenolic, flavan-3-ols, and procyanidins (R(2) ≥ 0.94) provided oxidation was avoided during sample preparation. A rapid and simple procedure was then proposed for phenolic compounds using sodium fluoride during sample homogenization at ambient temperature and freeze-drying before spectra acquisition. PMID:22409403

  15. Routine sample preparation and HPLC analysis for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) determination in wheat plants and Arabidopsis leaf tissues.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Gabriella; Janda, T; Pál, Magda

    2014-06-01

    Plants have developed various mechanisms to protect themselves against oxidative stress. One of the most important non-enzymatic antioxidants is ascorbic acid. There is thus a need for a rapid, sensitive method for the analysis of the reduced and oxidised forms of ascorbic acid in crop plants. In this paper a simple, economic, selective, precise and stable HPLC method is presented for the detection of ascorbate in plant tissue. The sensitivity, the short retention time and the simple isocratic elution mean that the method is suitable for the routine quantification of ascorbate in a high daily sample number. The method has been found to be better than previously reported methods, because of the use of an economical, readily available mobile phase, UV detection and the lack of complicated extraction procedures. The method has been tested on Arabidopsis plants with different ascorbate levels and on wheat plants during Cd stress.

  16. Urea free and more efficient sample preparation method for mass spectrometry based protein identification via combining the formic acid-assisted chemical cleavage and trypsin digestion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuaibin; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-10-30

    A formic acid (FA)-assisted sample preparation method was presented for protein identification via mass spectrometry (MS). Detailedly, an aqueous solution containing 2% FA and dithiothreitol was selected to perform protein denaturation, aspartic acid (D) sites cleavage and disulfide linkages reduction simultaneously at 108°C for 2h. Subsequently, FA wiped off via vacuum concentration. Finally, iodoacetamide (IAA) alkylation and trypsin digestion could be performed ordinally. A series of model proteins (BSA, β-lactoglobulin and apo-Transferrin) were treated respectively using such method, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. The identified peptide number was increased by ∼ 80% in comparison with the conventional urea-assisted sample preparation method. Moreover, BSA identification was achieved efficiently down to femtomole (25 ± 0 sequence coverage and 16 ± 1 peptides) via such method. In contrast, there were not peptides identified confidently via the urea-assisted method before desalination via the C18 zip tip. The absence of urea in this sample preparation method was an advantage for the more favorable digestion and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The performances of two methods for the real sample (rat liver proteome) were also compared, followed by a nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry system analysis. As a result, 1335 ± 43 peptides were identified confidently (false discovery rate <1%) via FA-assisted method, corresponding to 295 ± 12 proteins (of top match=1 and requiring 2 unique peptides at least). In contrast, there were only 1107 ± 16 peptides (corresponding to 231 ± 10 proteins) obtained from the conventional urea-assisted method. It was serving as a more efficient protein sample preparation method for researching specific proteomes better, and providing assistance to develop other proteomics analysis methods

  17. Statistical evaluation of fatty acid profile and cholesterol content in fish (common carp) lipids obtained by different sample preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Spiric, Aurelija; Trbovic, Dejana; Vranic, Danijela; Djinovic, Jasna; Petronijevic, Radivoj; Matekalo-Sverak, Vesna

    2010-07-01

    the second principal component (PC2) is recorded by C18:3 n-3, and C20:3 n-6, being present in a higher amount in the samples treated by the modified Soxhlet extraction, while C22:5 n-3, C20:3 n-3, C22:1 and C20:4, C16 and C18 negatively influence the score values of the PC2, showing significantly increased level in the samples treated by ASE method. Hotelling's paired T-square test used on the first three principal components for confirmation of differences in individual fatty acid content obtained by ASE and Soxhlet method in carp muscle showed statistically significant difference between these two data sets (T(2)=161.308, p<0.001).

  18. Microfluidic Tools for Biological Sample Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S R; Ness, K; Dzenitis, J; Benett, B; Bettencourt, K; Hamilton, J; Fisher, K; Krulevitch, P

    2002-04-10

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. To support detection instruments, we are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. We are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Sample preparation functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure, dielectrophoresis, and solid phase extraction. We are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow and investigating small-scale detection methods.

  19. Free Amino Acid Profiles from 'Pinot Noir' Grapes are Influenced by Vine N-status and Sample Preparation Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the impact of extraction method on ammonia, free amino acids, and YAN (yeast assimilable nitrogen) concentrations in 'Pinot noir' berries obtained from a vine nutrition study (altered supply of N, P, or K). Berries were either juiced or exhaustively extracted as whole berries pri...

  20. 40 CFR 761.323 - Sample preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Remediation Waste Samples § 761.323 Sample preparation. (a) The comparison study requires analysis of a... soil. (2) PCB remediation waste may contain interferences which confound or hamper sample extraction... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample preparation. 761.323...

  1. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Medical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Francis; Rhee, Minsoung; Singh, Anup; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reliable diagnoses are invaluable in clinical care. Samples (e.g., blood, urine, and saliva) are collected and analyzed for various biomarkers to quickly and sensitively assess disease progression, monitor response to treatment, and determine a patient's prognosis. Processing conventional samples entails many manual time-consuming steps. Consequently, clinical specimens must be processed by skilled technicians before antigens or nucleic acids are detected, and these are often present at dilute concentrations. Recently, several automated microchip technologies have been developed that potentially offer many advantages over traditional bench-top extraction methods. The smaller length scales and more refined transport mechanisms that characterize these microfluidic devices enable faster and more efficient biomarker enrichment and extraction. Additionally, they can be designed to perform multiple tests or experimental steps on one integrated, automated platform. This review explores the current research on microfluidic methods of sample preparation that are designed to aid diagnosis, and covers a broad spectrum of extraction techniques and designs for various types of samples and analytes. PMID:26290952

  2. Final Report BW Sample Collection& Preparation Device

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R P; Belgrader, P; Meyer, G; Benett, W J; Richards, J B; Hadley, D R; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-01-31

    The objective of this project was to develop the technique needed to prepare a field collected sample for laboratory analysis and build a portable integrated biological detection instrument with new miniaturized and automated sample purification capabilities. The device will prepare bacterial spores, bacterial vegetative cells, and viral particles for PCR amplification.

  3. Microscale sample preparation for PCR of C. difficile infected stool

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Sara; Atkinson, Christopher D.; Bartoo, Aaron C.; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Boylan, Michael O.; Schwartz, John H.; Klapperich, Catherine; Singh, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a microfluidic sample preparation chip for human stool samples infected with Clostridium difficile. We established a polymerase chain reaction able to distinguish C. difficile in the presence of several other organisms found in the normal intestinal flora. A protocol for on-chip extraction of nucleic acids from clinical samples is described that can detect target DNA down to 5.0×10−3 ng of template. The assay and sample preparation chip were then validated using known positive and known negative clinical samples. The work presented has potential applications in both the developed and developing world. PMID:19505511

  4. Sub-sampling and preparing forensic samples for pollen analysis.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Mark

    2004-09-01

    The main forensic application of palynology is in providing associative evidence, assisting to prove or disprove a link between people and objects with places or with other people. Although identification and interpretation of pollen is a specialist job, sub-sampling and preparing pollen samples for analysis may be carried out by non-specialists. As few forensic laboratories have residing palynologists, laboratories may wish to reduce the cost of analysis or risk of contamination by doing their own sub-sampling and preparation. Presented is a practical guide for sub-sampling and preparing forensic samples for pollen analysis, providing a complete standard procedure for both the palynologist and non-specialist. Procedures for sub-sampling include a wide variety of materials commonly collected for forensic analysis (soil, clothing and other fabrics, footwear, twine and rope, firearms, granulated materials, plant and animal material, and illicit drugs), many of which palynologists will not be familiar with. Procedures for preparation of samples (pollen concentration) are presented as a detailed, step-by-step method. Minimizing the risks of laboratory and cross-sample contamination during sub-sampling and preparation is emphasized.

  5. Sample preparation followed by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis for monitoring muconic acid as a biomarker of occupational exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Shahtaheri, Seyed Jamaleddin; Ghamari, Farhad; Golbabaei, Farideh

    2005-01-01

    Factors affecting solid phase extraction (SPE) of trans,trans-muconic acid (ttMA), as a benzene biomarker, including sample pH, sample concentration, sample volume, sample flow rate, washing solvent, elution solvent, and type of sorbent were evaluated. Extracted samples were determined by HPLC-UV (high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet). The analytical column was C18, UV wave length was 259 nm, and the mobile phase was H(2)O/methanol/acetic acid run at flow rate of 1 ml/min. A strong anion exchange silica cartridge was found successful in simplifying SPE. There was a significant difference between recoveries of ttMA when different factors were used (p < .001). An optimum recovery was obtained when sample pH was adjusted at 7. There was no significant difference when different sample concentrations were used (p > .05). The optimized method was then validated with 3 different pools of samples showing good reproducibility over 6 consecutive days and 6 within-day experiments.

  6. Analysis of monofluoroacetic acid in urine by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry and preparation of the positive sample by the bioconversion from monofluoroacetamide to monofluoroacetic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Min; Cai, Zeng-Xuan; Zhang, Jing-Shun; Ren, Yiping; Han, Jian-Long

    2016-08-01

    Whether as a rodenticide or as a natural product, monofluoroacetic acid (FAcOH) may cause poisoning to humans or animals for its high acute toxicity. Urine is one of the most typical specimens for forensic diagnosis when poisoning case about FAcOH happens. The positive sample containing FAcOH plays a key role for the development of an accurate and reliable analytical method. The bioconversion from monofluoroacetamide (FAcNH2) to FAcOH in urine in vitro was studied for the preparation of positive urine sample containing FAcOH without standard spiking or animal experiment. The average bioconversion rates were 0%, 18.6% and 41.3% when incubated the FAcNH2 spiked urine in vitro for 21days at -20°C, room temperature (RT) and 37°C, respectively. Afterwards, a fast and sensitive analytical method was developed for determination of FAcOH in urine. Samples were diluted with water containing formic acid and cleaned with polymeric anion exchange (PAX) cartridge. The acid eluate was neutralized with ammonium hydroxide and directly measured by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using basic mobile phase condition. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of FAcOH in urine were 2 and 5ngmL(-1), respectively. The linear range was 5-1000ngmL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of r=0.9993 in urine calibrated with internal standard. The recoveries at four spiking levels (5, 10, 50 and 500ngmL(-1) in urine) were 87.2%-107% with relative standard deviations ranged between 4.3%-8.8%. PMID:27284971

  7. 40 CFR 761.323 - Sample preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comparison study. Do not use unrelated materials such as clay soil or dredged sediments in place of sandy... Remediation Waste Samples § 761.323 Sample preparation. (a) The comparison study requires analysis of a... comparison study must meet the following three requirements. (1) The samples must either be taken from...

  8. Soil sample preparation using microwave digestion for uranium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MOHAGHEGHI,AMIR H.; PRESTON,ROSE; AKBARZADEH,MANSOOR; BAKHTIAR,STEVEN

    2000-04-05

    A new sample preparation procedure has been developed for digestion of soil samples for uranium analysis. The technique employs a microwave oven digestion system to digest the sample and to prepare it for separation chemistry and analysis. The method significantly reduces the volume of acids used, eliminates a large fraction of acid vapor emissions, and speeds up the analysis time. The samples are analyzed by four separate techniques: Gamma Spectrometry, Alpha Spectroscopy using the open digestion method, Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) using open digestion, and KPA by Microwave digestion technique. The results for various analytical methods are compared and used to confirm the validity of the new procedure. The details of the preparation technique along with its benefits are discussed.

  9. [Recent advances in sample preparation methods of plant hormones].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Lus; Wu, Dapeng; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-04-01

    Plant hormones are a group of naturally occurring trace substances which play a crucial role in controlling the plant development, growth and environment response. With the development of the chromatography and mass spectroscopy technique, chromatographic analytical method has become a widely used way for plant hormone analysis. Among the steps of chromatographic analysis, sample preparation is undoubtedly the most vital one. Thus, a highly selective and efficient sample preparation method is critical for accurate identification and quantification of phytohormones. For the three major kinds of plant hormones including acidic plant hormones & basic plant hormones, brassinosteroids and plant polypeptides, the sample preparation methods are reviewed in sequence especially the recently developed methods. The review includes novel methods, devices, extractive materials and derivative reagents for sample preparation of phytohormones analysis. Especially, some related works of our group are included. At last, the future developments in this field are also prospected.

  10. Optimising uncertainty in physical sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Lyn, Jennifer A; Ramsey, Michael H; Damant, Andrew P; Wood, Roger

    2005-11-01

    Uncertainty associated with the result of a measurement can be dominated by the physical sample preparation stage of the measurement process. In view of this, the Optimised Uncertainty (OU) methodology has been further developed to allow the optimisation of the uncertainty from this source, in addition to that from the primary sampling and the subsequent chemical analysis. This new methodology for the optimisation of physical sample preparation uncertainty (u(prep), estimated as s(prep)) is applied for the first time, to a case study of myclobutanil in retail strawberries. An increase in expenditure (+7865%) on the preparatory process was advised in order to reduce the s(prep) by the 69% recommended. This reduction is desirable given the predicted overall saving, under optimised conditions, of 33,000 pounds Sterling per batch. This new methodology has been shown to provide guidance on the appropriate distribution of resources between the three principle stages of a measurement process, including physical sample preparation.

  11. Powder dispensing robot for sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Fermier, Adam M; Troisi, John; Heritage, Erin C; Drexel, Melissa A; Gallea, Pablo; Swinney, Kelly A

    2003-06-01

    An automated powder dispensing station capable of transferring milligram quantities (1-100 mg) of powder for sample preparation was developed and integrated into a commercial robotic workstation (Zymark Prelude). The system's performance was optimized with respect to vacuum flow rate and powder transfer tube cross sectional area, and shown to possess excellent powder dispensing accuracy (RSD = < or = 0.1% for target weights < or = 15 mg) and precision (RSD = 3.43%) for a vanillin sample. Using the commercial features of the Zymark Prelude workstation (liquid handling, weighing, and vortexing/mixing) and the custom powder dispensing station, multiple sets of analytical calibration standards were prepared and subsequently analyzed by FIA in order to assess the system's robustness for sample preparation.

  12. Comparative clinical sample preparation of DNA and RNA viral nucleic acids for a commercial deep sequencing system (Illumina MiSeq(®)).

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; de Camargo Tozato, Claudia; Malossi, Camila Dantas; da Cruz, Tais Fukuta; Cavalcante, Raíssa Vasconcelos; Kurissio, Jacqueline Kazue; Cagnini, Didier Quevedo; Rodrigues, Marianna Vaz; Biondo, Alexander Welker; Araujo, João Pessoa

    2015-08-01

    Sequence-independent methods for viral discovery have been widely used for whole genome sequencing of viruses. Different protocols for viral enrichment, library preparation and sequencing have increasingly been more available and at lower costs. However, no study to date has focused on optimization of viral sample preparation for commercial deep sequencing. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to evaluate an In-House enzymatic protocol for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) synthesis and also compare the use of a commercially available kit protocol (Nextera XT, Illumina Inc, San Diego, CA, USA) and its combination with a library quantitation kit (Kapa, Kapa Biosystems, Wilmington, MA, USA) for deep sequencing (Illumina Miseq). Two RNA viruses (canine distemper virus and dengue virus) and one ssDNA virus (porcine circovirus type 2) were tested with the optimized protocols. The tested method for dsDNA synthesis has shown satisfactory results and may be used in laboratory setting, particularly when enzymes are already available. Library preparation combining commercial kits (Nextera XT and Kapa) has yielded more reads and genome coverage, probably due to a lack of small fragment recovering at the normalization step of Nextera XT. In addition, libraries may be diluted or concentrated to provide increase on genome coverage with Kapa quantitation.

  13. Methods for preparation of deuterated amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pshenichnikova, A.B.; Karnaukhova, E.N.; Zvonkova, E.N.

    1995-03-01

    The current state and prospects for the use of amino acids labeled with stable isotopes are considered. Methods for the preparation of deuterated amino acids, including synthetic, chemicoenzymatic, and biosynthetic ones, and deuterium exchange reactions are summarized. Problems in the preparation of optically pure amino acids are discussed. 120 refs., 15 figs.

  14. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed. PMID:26753274

  15. 40 CFR 761.323 - Sample preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample preparation. 761.323 Section 761.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... PROHIBITIONS Self-Implementing Alternative Extraction and Chemical Analysis Procedures for Non-liquid...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.1107 - Sample media and sample system preparation; sample system assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample media and sample system... Special Pollutants Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds § 1065.1107 Sample media and sample system preparation; sample system assembly. This section describes the appropriate types of sample media and the...

  17. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully. PMID:17143595

  18. Application of hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation to the preparation of industrial effluent samples prior to free and total cyanide determinations by spectrophotometric flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Cristina Baptista; de Carvalho, Maria de Fátima Batista; Meirelles, Francis Assis; Santiago, Vânia Maria Junqueira; Santelli, Ricardo Erthal

    2007-02-01

    A sample preparation procedure for the quantitative determination of free and total cyanides in industrial effluents has been developed that involves hydrocyanic acid vapor generation via focused microwave radiation. Hydrocyanic acid vapor was generated from free cyanides using only 5 min of irradiation time (90 W power) and a purge time of 5 min. The HCN generated was absorbed into an accepting NaOH solution using very simple glassware apparatus that was appropriate for the microwave oven cavity. After that, the cyanide concentration was determined within 90 s using a well-known spectrophotometric flow injection analysis system. Total cyanide analysis required 15 min irradiation time (90 W power), as well as chemical conditions such as the presence of EDTA-acetate buffer solution or ascorbic acid, depending on the effluent to be analyzed (petroleum refinery or electroplating effluents, respectively). The detection limit was 0.018 mg CN l(-1) (quantification limit of 0.05 mg CN l(-1)), and the measured RSD was better than 8% for ten independent analyses of effluent samples (1.4 mg l(-1) cyanide). The accuracy of the procedure was assessed via analyte spiking (with free and complex cyanides) and by performing an independent sample analysis based on the standard methodology recommended by the APHA for comparison. The sample preparation procedure takes only 10 min for free and 20 min for total cyanide, making this procedure much faster than traditional methodologies (conventional heating and distillation), which are time-consuming (they require at least 1 h). Samples from oil (sour and stripping tower bottom waters) and electroplating effluents were analyzed successfully.

  19. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  20. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this...

  1. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this...

  2. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this...

  3. Study on Dicarboxylic Acids in Aerosol Samples with Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α, ω-dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50 μL. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2–C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m3. PMID:24729915

  4. Preparation of graphene thin films for radioactive samples.

    PubMed

    Roteta, Miguel; Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Mejuto, Marcos; Rucandio, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    A new method for the preparation of conductive thin films is presented. The metallization of VYNS films guarantees the electrical conductivity but it results in the breaking of a high proportion of them. Graphene, a two-dimensional nanostructure of monolayer or few layers graphite has attracted a great deal of attention because of its excellent properties such as a good chemical stability, mechanical resistance and extraordinary electronic transport properties. In this work, the possibilities of graphene have been explored as a way to produce electrical conductive thin films without an extra metallization process. The procedure starts with preparing homogenous suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in conventional VYNS solutions. Ultra-sonication is used to ensure a good dispersibility of rGO. Graphene oxide (GO) is prepared via oxidation of graphite and subsequent exfoliation by sonication. Different chemically rGO were obtained by reaction with hydrazine sulfate, sodium borohydride, ascorbic acid and hydroiodic acid as reducing agents. The preparation of the thin graphene films is done in a similar way as the conventional VYNS foil preparation procedure. Drops of the solution are deposited onto water. The graphene films have been used to prepare sources containing some electron capture radionuclides ((109)Cd, (55)Fe, (139)Ce) with an activity in the order of 3kBq. The samples have been measured to test the attainable low energy electron efficiency and the energy resolution of Auger and conversion electrons by 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence measurements. The 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence setup includes a pressurized proportional counter and a NaI(Tl) detector. Tests with different pressures up to 1000kPa were carried out. All these tests show similar values in both parameters (efficiency and resolution) as those obtained by using the conventional metallized films without the drawback of the high percentage of broken films.

  5. Preparation of graphene thin films for radioactive samples.

    PubMed

    Roteta, Miguel; Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Mejuto, Marcos; Rucandio, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    A new method for the preparation of conductive thin films is presented. The metallization of VYNS films guarantees the electrical conductivity but it results in the breaking of a high proportion of them. Graphene, a two-dimensional nanostructure of monolayer or few layers graphite has attracted a great deal of attention because of its excellent properties such as a good chemical stability, mechanical resistance and extraordinary electronic transport properties. In this work, the possibilities of graphene have been explored as a way to produce electrical conductive thin films without an extra metallization process. The procedure starts with preparing homogenous suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in conventional VYNS solutions. Ultra-sonication is used to ensure a good dispersibility of rGO. Graphene oxide (GO) is prepared via oxidation of graphite and subsequent exfoliation by sonication. Different chemically rGO were obtained by reaction with hydrazine sulfate, sodium borohydride, ascorbic acid and hydroiodic acid as reducing agents. The preparation of the thin graphene films is done in a similar way as the conventional VYNS foil preparation procedure. Drops of the solution are deposited onto water. The graphene films have been used to prepare sources containing some electron capture radionuclides ((109)Cd, (55)Fe, (139)Ce) with an activity in the order of 3kBq. The samples have been measured to test the attainable low energy electron efficiency and the energy resolution of Auger and conversion electrons by 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence measurements. The 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence setup includes a pressurized proportional counter and a NaI(Tl) detector. Tests with different pressures up to 1000kPa were carried out. All these tests show similar values in both parameters (efficiency and resolution) as those obtained by using the conventional metallized films without the drawback of the high percentage of broken films. PMID:26651168

  6. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Mariella, Raymond P.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  7. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-05-28

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural

  8. Spectral Reproducibility and Quantification of Peptides in MALDI of Samples Prepared by Micro-Spotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Yong Jin; Park, Kyung Man; Ahn, Sung Hee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Myung Soo

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we reported that MALDI spectra of peptides became reproducible when temperature was kept constant. Linear calibration curves derived from such spectral data could be used for quantification. Homogeneity of samples was one of the requirements. Among the three popular matrices used in peptide MALDI [i.e., α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), and sinapinic acid (SA)], homogeneous samples could be prepared by conventional means only for CHCA. In this work, we showed that sample preparation by micro-spotting improved the homogeneity for all three cases.

  9. Research for amino acids in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Rash, J. J.; Aue , W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    The study was primarily directed toward the examination of Apollo 14 lunar fines for indigenous amino acids or materials which could be converted to amino acids on hydrolysis with 6 N hydrochloric acid. Initial experiments were conducted to confirm the integrity of the derivatization reactions and reagents, and to optimize the gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) instrumental and chromatographic system for the separation and flame ionization detection of the amino acid derivatives. In studies on the recovery of amino acids added to lunar fines, low recoveries were obtained when 10 ng of each amino acid were added to 50 mg of virgin fines, but the subsequent addition of 50 ng of each to the previously extracted sample resulted in much higher recoveries.

  10. Sample preparation techniques in trace element analysis of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagj, Marina; Jakšić, M.; Orlić, I.; Valković, V.

    1985-06-01

    Sample preparation techniques for the analysis of water for trace elements using X-ray emission spectroscopy are described. Fresh water samples for the analysis of transition metals were prepared by complexation with ammonium-pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (APDC) and filtering through a membrane filter. Analyses of water samples for halogenes was done on samples prepared by precipitation with AgNO 3 and subsequent filtration. Two techniques for seawater preparation for uranium determination are described, viz. precipitation with APDC in the presence of iron (II) as a carrier and complexation with APDC followed with adsorption on activated carbon. In all cases trace element levels at 10 -3 μg/g were measured.

  11. Rapid Automated Sample Preparation for Biological Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Shusteff, M

    2011-03-04

    Our technology utilizes acoustic, thermal, and electric fields to separate out contaminants such as debris or pollen from environmental samples, lyse open cells, and extract the DNA from the lysate. The objective of the project is to optimize the system described for a forensic sample, and demonstrate its performance for integration with downstream assay platforms (e.g. MIT-LL's ANDE). We intend to increase the quantity of DNA recovered from the sample beyond the current {approx}80% achieved using solid phase extraction methods. Task 1: Develop and test an acoustic filter for cell extraction. Task 2: Develop and test lysis chip. Task 3: Develop and test DNA extraction chip. All chips have been fabricated based on the designs laid out in last month's report.

  12. Ultra-Fast Sample Preparation for High-Throughput Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Hixson, Kim K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-06-21

    Sample preparation oftentimes can be the Achilles Heel of any analytical process and in the field of proteomics, preparing samples for mass spectrometric analysis is no exception. Current goals, concerning proteomic sample preparation on a large scale, include efforts toward improving reproducibility, reducing the time of processing and ultimately the automation of the entire workflow. This chapter reviews an array of recent approaches applied to bottom-up proteomics sample preparation to reduce the processing time down from hours to minutes. The current state-of-the-art in the field uses different energy inputs like microwave, ultrasound or pressure to perform the four basic steps in sample preparation: protein extraction, denaturation, reduction and alkylation, and digestion. No single energy input for enhancement of proteome sample preparation has become the universal gold standard. Instead, a combination of different energy inputs tend to produce the best results. This chapter further describes the future trends in the field such as the hyphenation of sample preparation with downstream detection and analysis systems. Finally, a detailed protocol describing the combined use of both pressure cycling technology and ultrasonic energy inputs to hasten proteomic sample preparation is presented.

  13. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dicarboxylic acids associated with airborne particulate matter were measured during a summer period in Philadelphia that included multiple air pollution episodes. Samples were collected for two ten hour periods each day using a high volume sampler with two quartz fiber filters in...

  14. Snow White Trench Prepared for Sample Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The informally named 'Snow White' trench is the source for the next sample to be acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander for analysis by the wet chemistry lab.

    The Surface Stereo Imager on Phoenix took this shadow-enhanced image of the trench, on the eastern end of Phoenix's work area, on Sol 103, or the 103rd day of the mission, Sept. 8, 2008. The trench is about 23 centimeters (9 inches) wide.

    The wet chemistry lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Curatorial Works for the Hayabusa-Returned Sample and Preparation for Hayabusa2 Sample Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yada, T.; Abe, M.; Okada, T.; Yurimoto, H.; Uesugi, M.; Karouji, Y.; Nakato, A.; Hashiguchi, M.; Nishimura, M.; Kumagai, K.; Matsui, S.; Yoshitake, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Nakano, Y.; Kawasaki, N.; Fujimoto, M.

    2016-08-01

    We continue describing Hayabusa-returned samples after its return in 2010. The number of described particles reaches around 650 and >540 of them are identified as Itokawa origin. We also start preparation for Hayabusa2 sample curation.

  16. Novel Sample-handling Approach for XRD Analysis with Minimal Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrazin, P.; Chipera, S.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Feldman, S.; Vaniman, D.; Bryson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Sample preparation and sample handling are among the most critical operations associated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. These operations require attention in a laboratory environment, but they become a major constraint in the deployment of XRD instruments for robotic planetary exploration. We are developing a novel sample handling system that dramatically relaxes the constraints on sample preparation by allowing characterization of coarse-grained material that would normally be impossible to analyze with conventional powder-XRD techniques.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 2, Sample preparation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for sample preparation methods. Covered are: acid digestion for metals analysis, fusion of Hanford tank waste solids, water leach of sludges/soils/other solids, extraction procedure toxicity (simulate leach in landfill), sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy, acid digestion for radiochemical analysis, leach preparation of solids for free cyanide analysis, aqueous leach of solids for anion analysis, microwave digestion of glasses and slurries for ICP/MS, toxicity characteristic leaching extraction for inorganics, leach/dissolution of activated metal for radiochemical analysis, extraction of single-shell tank (SST) samples for semi-VOC analysis, preparation and cleanup of hydrocarbon- containing samples for VOC and semi-VOC analysis, receiving of waste tank samples in onsite transfer cask, receipt and inspection of SST samples, receipt and extrusion of core samples at 325A shielded facility, cleaning and shipping of waste tank samplers, homogenization of solutions/slurries/sludges, and test sample preparation for bioassay quality control program.

  18. Sample Preparation for Electron Probe Microanalysis—Pushing the Limits

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Joseph D.; Engle, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    There are two fundamental considerations in preparing samples for electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The first one may seem obvious, but we often find it is overlooked. That is, the sample analyzed should be representative of the population from which it comes. The second is a direct result of the assumptions in the calculations used to convert x-ray intensity ratios, between the sample and standard, to concentrations. Samples originate from a wide range of sources. During their journey to being excited under the electron beam for the production of x rays there are many possibilities for sample alteration. Handling can contaminate samples by adding extraneous matter. In preparation, the various abrasives used in sizing the sample by sawing, grinding and polishing can embed themselves. The most accurate composition of a contaminated sample is, at best, not representative of the original sample; it is misleading. Our laboratory performs EPMA analysis on customer submitted samples and prepares over 250 different calibration standards including pure elements, compounds, alloys, glasses and minerals. This large variety of samples does not lend itself to mass production techniques, including automatic polishing. Our manual preparation techniques are designed individually for each sample. The use of automated preparation equipment does not lend itself to this environment, and is not included in this manuscript. The final step in quantitative electron probe microanalysis is the conversion of x-ray intensities ratios, known as the “k-ratios,” to composition (in mass fraction or atomic percent) and/or film thickness. Of the many assumptions made in the ZAF (where these letters stand for atomic number, absorption and fluorescence) corrections the localized geometry between the sample and electron beam, or takeoff angle, must be accurately known. Small angular errors can lead to significant errors in the final results. The sample preparation technique then becomes very

  19. Efficient Sample Preparation from Complex Biological Samples Using a Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate (with immobilized analyte-bound PMPs). In this paper, we explore the third and least studied method for PMP-based sample preparation using a platform termed Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions (SLIDE). SLIDE leverages principles of surface tension and patterned hydrophobicity to create a simple-to-operate platform for sample isolation (cells, DNA, RNA, protein) and preparation (cell staining) without the need for time-intensive wash steps, use of immiscible fluids, or precise pinning geometries. Compared to other standard isolation protocols using PMPs, SLIDE is able to perform rapid sample preparation with low (0.6%) carryover of contaminants from the original sample. The natural recirculation occurring within the pinned droplets of SLIDE make possible the performance of multistep cell staining protocols within the SLIDE by simply resting the lid over the various sample droplets. SLIDE demonstrates a simple easy to use platform for sample preparation on a range of complex biological samples. PMID:24927449

  20. [Current methods for preparing samples on working with hematology analyzers].

    PubMed

    Tsyganova, A V; Pogorelov, V M; Naumova, I N; Kozinets, G I; Antonov, V S

    2011-03-01

    The paper raises a problem of preparing samples in hematology. It considers whether the preanalytical stage is of importance in hematological studies. The use of disposal vacuum blood collection systems is shown to solve the problem in the standardization of a blood sampling procedure. The benefits of the use of close tube hematology analyzers are also considered. PMID:21584966

  1. Preparation of privatization samples for envelopes `A` and `C`

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    As part of the TWRS Privatization process, the DOE has committed to provide each of the two contractors who submitted successful bids with ten 125 mL samples of Hanford tank waste meeting chemical and radionuclide criteria specified as Waste Envelope A, B, and C. This test plan describes how the samples will be prepared before shipment.

  2. Preparation of bone samples in the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory for AMS radiocarbon dating.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, N; Goslar, T

    2002-12-01

    In the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory, a system for preparation of samples for AMS dating has been built. At first it was used to produce graphite targets from plant macrofossils and sediments. In this study we extended its capabilities with the preparation of bones. We dealt with 3 methods; the first was the classical Longin method of collagen extraction, the second one included additional treatment of powdered bone in alkali solution, while in the third one carboxyl carbon was separated from amino acids obtained after hydrolysis of protein. The suitability of the methods was tested on 2 bone samples. Most of our samples gave ages > 40 kyr BP, suggesting good performance of the adapted methods, except for one sample prepared with simple Longin method. For routine preparation of bones we chose the Longin method with additional alkali treatment.

  3. Reduction of 7-ketolithocholic acid to chenodeoxycholic acid by rat liver preparations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amuro, Y; Yamade, W; Nakano, T; Hayashi, E; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1985-08-16

    The formation of chenodeoxycholic acid via 7-ketolithocholic acid by rat liver preparations was examined in vitro. Results showed that a rat liver preparation reduced 7-ketolithocholic acid mainly to chenodeoxycholic acid and to ursodeoxycholic acid in a smaller amount, and that the reductase required NADPH but not NADH as coenzyme and was mainly localized in the microsomes. PMID:4016150

  4. Automation of preparation of nonmetallic samples for analysis by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmann, A.; Willay, G.

    1986-01-01

    For a rapid preparation of solutions intended for analysis by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, an automatic device called Plasmasol was developed. This apparatus used the property of nonwettability of glassy C to fuse the sample in an appropriate flux. The sample-flux mixture is placed in a composite crucible, then heated at high temperature, swirled until full dissolution is achieved, and then poured into a water-filled beaker. After acid addition, dissolution of the melt, and filling to the mark, the solution is ready for analysis. The analytical results obtained, either for oxide samples or for prereduced iron ores show that the solutions prepared with this device are undistinguished from those obtained by manual dissolutions done by acid digestion or by high temperature fusion. Preparation reproducibility and analytical tests illustrate the performance of Plasmasol.

  5. Sample preparation prior to molecular amplification: complexities and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Butot, Sophie; Zuber, Sophie; Baert, Leen

    2014-02-01

    Molecular amplification using Reverse Transcription quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR) is currently considered as the gold standard to detect enteric human pathogenic viruses such as norovirus and hepatitis A virus in food and water. However, the molecular-based detection requires an adequate sampling strategy and a sample preparation specific for viruses. Sampling for enteric human viruses in water and food should not necessarily follow bacterial sampling plans. The development of a reference detection method including sample preparation as proposed in ISO/TS 15216 represents a milestone to facilitate the evaluation of the performance and eventually validation of future virus detection methods. The potential viral infectivity linked to a positive PCR result is a remaining issue and pretreatments allowing the differentiation of infectious viruses would be useful for future risk assessments. PMID:24441295

  6. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  7. Method and apparatus for the preparation of liquid samples for determination of boron

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the preparation of a liquid sample for the quantitative determination of boron by flame photometry. The sample is combined in a vessel with sulfuric acid, and an excess of methanol is added thereto. The methanol reacts with any boron present in the sample to form trimethyl borate which is volatilized by the heat of reaction between the excess methanol and sulfuric acid. The volatilized trimethyl borate is withdrawn from the vessel by either a partial vacuum or a positive pressure and is rapidly transferred to a standard flame photometer. The method is free of interference from typical boron concomitants.

  8. Method and apparatus for the preparation of liquid samples for determination of boron

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    A method and apparatus are described for the preparation of a liquid sample for the quantitative determination of boron by flame photometry. The sample is combined in a vessel with sulfuric acid, and an excess of methanol is added thereto. The methanol reacts with any boron present in the sample to form trimethyl borate which is volatilized by the heat of reaction between the excess methanol and sulfuric acid. The volatilized trimethyl borate is withdrawn from the vessel by either a partial vacuum or a positive pressure and is rapidly transferred to a standard flame photometer. The method is free of interference from typical boron concomitants.

  9. Method and apparatus for the preparation of liquid samples for determination of boron

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.

    1986-03-04

    A method and apparatus for the preparation of a liquid sample for the quantitative determination of boron by flame photometry. The sample is combined in a vessel with sulfuric acid, and an excess of methanol is added thereto. The methanol reacts with any boron present in the sample to form trimethyl borate which is volatilized by the heat of reaction between the excess methanol and sulfuric acid. The volatilized trimethyl borate is withdrawn from the vessel by either a partial vacuum or a positive pressure and is rapidly transferred to a standard flame photometer. The method is free of interference from typical boron concomitants.

  10. Surfactant roles in modern sample preparation techniques: a review.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Morteza; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-09-01

    The pressure to decrease organic solvent usage in laboratories is increasing. Thus miniaturization and improvement of sample handling using alternatives is a challenge that has been discussed by several researchers. From this perspective, surfactant-based sample preparations were an educated choice. Since the introduction of cloud point extraction by Watanabe, considerable studies have been focused on the chemical properties of surfactants in the extraction methods. The unique properties of surfactants make them flexible agents for different miniaturized sample preparation techniques based on solid- or liquid-phase extraction. As a result, the use of surfactants with different roles in sample-preparation methodologies (such as surfactant as an emulsifier, surfactant rich phase as an extraction medium, ion pair-based extraction, hemimicelle/admicelle extraction, surfactant-coated magnetic nanoparticle, solid-phase microextraction with micellar desorption) is an important contribution to minimizing the problems arising from preliminary operations, which are the weakest step in analytical measurement. This paper reviews the literature dealing with the application of surfactant-based sample preparations to the separation and the preconcentration of organic and inorganic species. PMID:22887709

  11. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  12. Sample preparation for quantitation of tritium by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Dingley, Karen H; Roberts, Mark L; Velsko, Carol A; Love, Adam H

    2002-12-15

    The capability to prepare samples accurately and reproducibly for analysis of tritium (3H) content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) greatly facilitates isotopic tracer studies in which attomole levels of 3H can be measured in milligram-sized samples. A method has been developed to convert the hydrogen of organic samples to a solid, titanium hydride, which can be analyzed by AMS. Using a two-step process, the sample is first oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. In the second step, the water is transferred within a heated manifold into a quartz tube, reduced to hydrogen gas using zinc, and reacted with titanium powder. The 3H/1H ratio of the titanium hydride is measured by AMS and normalized to standards whose ratios were determined by decay counting to calculate the amount of 3H in the original sample. Water, organic compounds, and biological samples with 3H activities measured by liquid scintillation counting were utilized to develop and validate the method. The 3H/1H ratios were quantified in samples that spanned 5 orders of magnitude, from 10(-10) to 10(-15), with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10(-15), which is equivalent to 0.02 dpm tritium/mg of material. Samples smaller than 2 mg were analyzed following addition of 2 mg of a tritium-free-hydrogen carrier. Preparation of organic standards containing both 14C and 3H in 2-mg organic samples demonstrated that this sample preparation methodology can also be applied to quantify both of these isotopes from a single sample. PMID:12510750

  13. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Preparing validation study samples. 761.392 Section 761.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination...

  14. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  15. Preparation of water samples for carbon-14 dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feltz, H.R.; Hanshaw, Bruce B.

    1963-01-01

    For most natural water, a large sample is required to provide the 3 grams of carbon needed for a carbon-14 determination. A field procedure for isolating total dissolved-carbonate species is described. Carbon dioxide gas is evolved by adding sulfuric acid to the water sample; the gas is then collected in a sodium hydroxide trap by recycling in a closed system. The trap is then transported to the dating laboratory where the carbon-14 is counted.

  16. Properties of Copolymers of Aspartic Acid and Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acids Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartic acid may be prepared chemically or by the fermentation of carbohydrates. Currently, low molecular weight polyaspartic acids are prepared commercially by heating aspartic acid at high temperatures (greater than 220 degrees C) for several hours in the solid state. In an effort to develop a ...

  17. Investigation into Alternative Sample Preparation Techniques for the Determination of Heavy Metals in Stationary Source Emission Samples Collected on Quartz Filters

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Sharon L.; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring stationary source emissions for heavy metals generally requires the use of quartz filters to collect samples because of the high temperature and high moisture sampling environment. The documentary standard method sample preparation technique in Europe, EN 14385, uses digestion in hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid (HF/HNO3) followed by complexing with boric acid (H3BO3) prior to analysis. However, the use of this method presents a number of problems, including significant instrumental drift during analysis caused by the matrix components, often leading to instrument breakdown and downtime for repairs, as well as posing significant health and safety risks. The aim of this work was to develop an alternative sample preparation technique for emissions samples on quartz filters. The alternative techniques considered were: (i) acid digestion in a fluoroboric acid (HBF4) and HNO3 mixture and (ii) acid extraction in an aqua regia (AR) mixture (HCl and HNO3). Assessment of the effectiveness of these options included determination of interferences and signal drift, as well as validating the different methods by measurement of matrix certified reference materials (CRMs), and comparing the results obtained from real test samples and sample blanks to determine limits of detection. The results showed that the HBF4/HNO3 mixture provides the most viable alternative to the documentary standard preparation technique. PMID:25407906

  18. Preparation of SELEX Samples for Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tolle, Fabian; Mayer, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Fuelled by massive whole genome sequencing projects such as the human genome project, enormous technological advancements and therefore tremendous price drops could be achieved, rendering next-generation sequencing very attractive for deep sequencing of SELEX libraries. Herein we describe the preparation of SELEX samples for Illumina sequencing, based on the already established whole genome sequencing workflow. We describe the addition of barcode sequences for multiplexing and the adapter ligation, avoiding associated pitfalls. PMID:26552817

  19. Magnetically driven solid sample preparation for centrifugal microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Duford, David A; Peng, Dan D; Salin, Eric D

    2009-06-01

    A prototype for solid sample preparation on centrifugal microfluidic devices has been designed and characterized. The system uses NdFeB magnets in both the centrifugal device and a fixed base. As the centrifugal device rotates, the magnets move and spin in their chambers creating a pulverizing mechanical motion. This technique was successfully applied to the dissolution of potassium ferricyanide (K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)]), a hard colored crystal. A 0.10 g sample was completely dissolved in 3 s in 1.0 mL of water while rotating at 1000 rpm. This is a 300-fold improvement over static dissolution. PMID:19422186

  20. Sample preparation and detection device for infectious agents

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy W.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Yu, June

    2003-06-10

    A sample preparation and analysis device which incorporates both immunoassays and PCR assays in one compact, field-portable microchip. The device provides new capabilities in fluid and particle control which allows the building of a fluidic chip with no moving parts, thus decreasing fabrication cost and increasing the robustness of the device. The device can operate in a true continuous (not batch) mode. The device incorporates magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumps to move the fluid through the system, acoustic mixing and fractionation, dielectropheretic (DEP) sample concentration and purification, and on-chip optical detection capabilities.

  1. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    1994-05-10

    An apparatus is described for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed. 1 figures.

  2. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed.

  3. Sampling of illicit drugs for quantitative analysis--part III: sampling plans and sample preparations.

    PubMed

    Csesztregi, T; Bovens, M; Dujourdy, L; Franc, A; Nagy, J

    2014-08-01

    The findings in this paper are based on the results of our drug homogeneity studies and particle size investigations. Using that information, a general sampling plan (depicted in the form of a flow-chart) was devised that could be applied to the quantitative instrumental analysis of the most common illicit drugs: namely heroin, cocaine, amphetamine, cannabis resin, MDMA tablets and herbal cannabis in 'bud' form (type I). Other more heterogeneous forms of cannabis (type II) were found to require alternative, more traditional sampling methods. A table was constructed which shows the sampling uncertainty expected when a particular number of random increments are taken and combined to form a single primary sample. It also includes a recommended increment size; which is 1 g for powdered drugs and cannabis resin, 1 tablet for MDMA and 1 bud for herbal cannabis in bud form (type I). By referring to that table, individual laboratories can ensure that the sampling uncertainty for a particular drug seizure can be minimised, such that it lies in the same region as their analytical uncertainty for that drug. The table shows that assuming a laboratory wishes to quantitatively analyse a seizure of powdered drug or cannabis resin with a 'typical' heterogeneity, a primary sample of 15×1 g increments is generally appropriate. The appropriate primary sample for MDMA tablets is 20 tablets, while for herbal cannabis (in bud form) 50 buds were found to be appropriate. Our study also showed that, for a suitably homogenised primary sample of the most common powdered drugs, an analytical sample size of between 20 and 35 mg was appropriate and for herbal cannabis the appropriate amount was 200 mg. The need to ensure that the results from duplicate or multiple incremental sampling were compared, to demonstrate whether or not a particular seized material has a 'typical' heterogeneity and that the sampling procedure applied has resulted in a 'correct sample', was highlighted and the setting

  4. Sampling of illicit drugs for quantitative analysis--part III: sampling plans and sample preparations.

    PubMed

    Csesztregi, T; Bovens, M; Dujourdy, L; Franc, A; Nagy, J

    2014-08-01

    The findings in this paper are based on the results of our drug homogeneity studies and particle size investigations. Using that information, a general sampling plan (depicted in the form of a flow-chart) was devised that could be applied to the quantitative instrumental analysis of the most common illicit drugs: namely heroin, cocaine, amphetamine, cannabis resin, MDMA tablets and herbal cannabis in 'bud' form (type I). Other more heterogeneous forms of cannabis (type II) were found to require alternative, more traditional sampling methods. A table was constructed which shows the sampling uncertainty expected when a particular number of random increments are taken and combined to form a single primary sample. It also includes a recommended increment size; which is 1 g for powdered drugs and cannabis resin, 1 tablet for MDMA and 1 bud for herbal cannabis in bud form (type I). By referring to that table, individual laboratories can ensure that the sampling uncertainty for a particular drug seizure can be minimised, such that it lies in the same region as their analytical uncertainty for that drug. The table shows that assuming a laboratory wishes to quantitatively analyse a seizure of powdered drug or cannabis resin with a 'typical' heterogeneity, a primary sample of 15×1 g increments is generally appropriate. The appropriate primary sample for MDMA tablets is 20 tablets, while for herbal cannabis (in bud form) 50 buds were found to be appropriate. Our study also showed that, for a suitably homogenised primary sample of the most common powdered drugs, an analytical sample size of between 20 and 35 mg was appropriate and for herbal cannabis the appropriate amount was 200 mg. The need to ensure that the results from duplicate or multiple incremental sampling were compared, to demonstrate whether or not a particular seized material has a 'typical' heterogeneity and that the sampling procedure applied has resulted in a 'correct sample', was highlighted and the setting

  5. Optimization for Peptide Sample Preparation for Urine Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-02-25

    Analysis of native or endogenous peptides in biofluids can provide valuable insights into disease mechanisms. Furthermore, the detected peptides may also have utility as potential biomarkers for non-invasive monitoring of human diseases. The non-invasive nature of urine collection and the abundance of peptides in the urine makes analysis by high-throughput ‘peptidomics’ methods , an attractive approach for investigating the pathogenesis of renal disease. However, urine peptidomics methodologies can be problematic with regards to difficulties associated with sample preparation. The urine matrix can provide significant background interference in making the analytical measurements that it hampers both the identification of peptides and the depth of the peptidomics read when utilizing LC-MS based peptidome analysis. We report on a novel adaptation of the standard solid phase extraction (SPE) method to a modified SPE (mSPE) approach for improved peptide yield and analysis sensitivity with LC-MS based peptidomics in terms of time, cost, clogging of the LC-MS column, peptide yield, peptide quality, and number of peptides identified by each method. Expense and time requirements were comparable for both SPE and mSPE, but more interfering contaminants from the urine matrix were evident in the SPE preparations (e.g., clogging of the LC-MS columns, yellowish background coloration of prepared samples due to retained urobilin, lower peptide yields) when compared to the mSPE method. When we compared data from technical replicates of 4 runs, the mSPE method provided significantly improved efficiencies for the preparation of samples from urine (e.g., mSPE peptide identification 82% versus 18% with SPE; p = 8.92E-05). Additionally, peptide identifications, when applying the mSPE method, highlighted the biology of differential activation of urine peptidases during acute renal transplant rejection with distinct laddering of specific peptides, which was obscured for most proteins

  6. Combining Electrochemical Sensors with Miniaturized Sample Preparation for Rapid Detection in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bunyakul, Natinan; Baeumner, Antje J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical analyses benefit world-wide from rapid and reliable diagnostics tests. New tests are sought with greatest demand not only for new analytes, but also to reduce costs, complexity and lengthy analysis times of current techniques. Among the myriad of possibilities available today to develop new test systems, amperometric biosensors are prominent players—best represented by the ubiquitous amperometric-based glucose sensors. Electrochemical approaches in general require little and often enough only simple hardware components, are rugged and yet provide low limits of detection. They thus offer many of the desirable attributes for point-of-care/point-of-need tests. This review focuses on investigating the important integration of sample preparation with (primarily electrochemical) biosensors. Sample clean up requirements, miniaturized sample preparation strategies, and their potential integration with sensors will be discussed, focusing on clinical sample analyses. PMID:25558994

  7. Combining electrochemical sensors with miniaturized sample preparation for rapid detection in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Bunyakul, Natinan; Baeumner, Antje J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical analyses benefit world-wide from rapid and reliable diagnostics tests. New tests are sought with greatest demand not only for new analytes, but also to reduce costs, complexity and lengthy analysis times of current techniques. Among the myriad of possibilities available today to develop new test systems, amperometric biosensors are prominent players-best represented by the ubiquitous amperometric-based glucose sensors. Electrochemical approaches in general require little and often enough only simple hardware components, are rugged and yet provide low limits of detection. They thus offer many of the desirable attributes for point-of-care/point-of-need tests. This review focuses on investigating the important integration of sample preparation with (primarily electrochemical) biosensors. Sample clean up requirements, miniaturized sample preparation strategies, and their potential integration with sensors will be discussed, focusing on clinical sample analyses. PMID:25558994

  8. Preparation of samples for polymerase chain reaction in situ.

    PubMed

    Nuovo, G J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the key variables in sample and reagent preparation needed for successful polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in situ. Tissue or cell preparations should be fixed in a cross linking fixative, such as 10% buffered formalin, preferably from 15 to 48 hours. Tissues should be embedded in paraffin; cell preparations can be fixed when near confluence, then physically removed and processed. When possible three samples (4 microM tissue sections or 1-5000 cells) should be placed on silane coated glass slides. Digestion in pepsin (2 mg/ml) for 30 min is adequate for DNA detection by PCR in situ hybridization whereas optimal protease digestion time is variable and related to formalin fixation time for reverse transcriptase (RT) in situ PCR. RT in situ PCR requires an overnight digestion with DNase. The amplifying solution should contain 4.5 mM MgCl2, 0.05% bovine serum albumin, and, for RNA analysis, the reporter nucleotide. A false positive signal would be evident with incorporation of the reporter nucleotide for DNA targets due to DNA repair; this can be avoided with frozen, fixed tissues and the hot start maneuver. Otherwise, one needs to use a labeled probe and a hybridization step to detect amplified DNA targets in paraffin embedded tissues.

  9. Comparison of Butyric acid concentrations in ordinary and probiotic yogurt samples in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vaseji, N; Mojgani, N; Amirinia, C; Iranmanesh, M

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Butyric acid has many applications in chemical, food and pharmaceutical industries. Applications of butyric acid are as an additive to food, flavorings, varnishes, perfumes, pharmaceuticals and disinfectants. Butyric acid concentrations have positive impact on the quality control of milk, yogurt and other probiotic dairy products. The present investigation was undertaken to determine and compare the concentrations of butyric acid (C4) in the ordinary and probiotic yogurt samples by GC method. Materials and Methods Probiotic yogurt samples were prepared under laboratory scale conditions using two different commercial starters ABY1 and 211, while ordinary yogurt samples lacked the probiotic starter cultures. All samples were analyzed in duplicate, for C4 concentrations by gas chromatography after day 1, 2, 10 and 20 of production, during storage at 4°C. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan test. Results The level of the mentioned fatty acid in ABY1 yogurt sample was significantly higher (0.2%) than in 211 samples (0.17%). These values were significantly lower in ordinary yogurt samples and only 0.07% was recorded in these samples on first day of storage which decreased gradually during storage. The level of reduction in the yogurt samples tested during different time intervals was not similar in all the examined samples, and some showed enhanced reduction than other samples. Conclusions Compared to ordinary yogurt samples, probiotic yogurt samples used in study showed higher levels of butyric acid with increased shelf life. PMID:22973475

  10. Leaching of metals from steel samples in peracetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabutani, Tomoki; Nakamura, Takamasa; Takayabagi, Toshio

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, leaching behavior of metallic species from steel samples in peracetic acid was investigated. We compared the leaching efficiency between peracetic acid and acetic acid to estimate the role of peroxo functional group for the leaching. As a result, peracetic acid enhanced the leaching ability of metallic species from the high speed steel and the alloy steel samples. MoO3, Mo, MO2C, W, WO3, VC and MnO2 were effectively leached by peracetic acid, while the stainless steel had a high resistance against corrosion by peracetic acid.

  11. Comparison of methods for the preparation of sewage sludge samples prior to the spectrophotometric determination of phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, S.A.; Jenniss, S.W.; Ciuffo, M.; Alberts, R.

    1986-01-01

    Three procedures for the preparation of sewage sludge samples prior to the colorimetric determination of phosphorus as molybdenum blue were evaluated. Using samples of the US EPA's municipal digested sludge as a reference material, sulfuric acid/ammonium persulfate digestion, muffle furnace ignition followed by extraction of the ash with hydrochloric acid, and direct extraction of the sewage sludge with sodium bicarbonate solution were compared in terms of phosphorus recovery as determined by colorimetric measurements. On the basis of phosphorus recovery, the samples prepared by muffle furnace ignition/hydrochloric acid extraction of the ash showed the best accuracy and precision. This procedure was also superior in terms of the time and effort expended in the preparation of the sewage sludge samples.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid content is significantly higher in ghrita prepared by traditional Ayurvedic method

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kalpana S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ghee (clarified butter) also known as ghrita, has been utilized for thousands of years in Ayurveda. Ghee is mostly prepared by traditional method in Indian households or by direct cream method at industry level. Ayurvedic classics mention that ghrita made from cow milk is superior. However, there is no scientific comparison available on preparation methods and essential fatty acids content of ghrita. Objective: To investigate fatty acid composition of ghrita prepared by traditional/Ayurvedic method and commercial method (direct cream method). Materials and Methods: Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME) extracted from ghrita samples were analysed on Gas Chromatography (GC) Shimadzu B using capillary column BPX70 (0.32 mm*60 m, ID of 0.25 mm). The fatty acids in the samples were identified by comparing peaks with the external standard 68A (Nu-Chek-Prep, Inc.USA). Significant differences between the experimental groups were assessed by analysis of variance. Results: Distribution of fatty acids was compared in ghrita samples prepared by traditional method and direct cream method which is commercially used. Saturated fatty acids were predominant in both the groups. Mono unsaturated fatty acids and poly unsaturated fatty acids were in the range of 17-18% and 3-6% respectively. DHA content was significantly higher in ghee prepared by traditional method using curd starter fermentation. Conclusion: The findings suggested that ghrita prepared by traditional ayurvedic methods contains higher amount of DHA; Omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which is a major component of retinal and brain tissues and remains important in prevention of various diseases. PMID:24948858

  13. Comparison of sample preparation methods for the recovery of foodborne pathogens from fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ri; Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Won-Il; Park, Kyeong-Hun; Yun, Hye-Jeong; Chung, Duck Hwa; Yun, Jong Chul; Ryu, Kyoung Yul

    2012-07-01

    Sample preparation methods (pummeling, pulsifying, sonication, and shaking by hand) were compared for achieving maximum recovery of foodborne pathogens from iceberg lettuce, perilla leaves, cucumber, green pepper, and cherry tomato. Antimicrobial and dehydration effects also were examined to investigate causes of poor recovery of pathogens. Each produce type was inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus at 6.0 log CFU/cm(2), and samples were prepared using the four methods. Bacterial populations recovered from the five types of produce were significantly different (P < 0.05) according to sample preparation methods and produce type. The bacterial populations recovered from pummeled and pulsified samples were higher (P < 0.05) than those recovered from sonicated and hand-shaken samples, except for cherry tomato. The number of bacteria recovered from produce was reduced (P < 0.05) from that of the inoculum by 0.16 to 2.69 log CFU/cm(2). Although extracts of iceberg lettuce, perilla leaves, cucumber, and green pepper had no antimicrobial activity, the populations of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, B. cereus, and L. monocytogenes in cherry tomato extract were slightly reduced after these treatments (P < 0.05). The pathogen populations on perilla leaves and cherry tomatoes decreased by >2 log CFU/cm(2) after exposure to 40% relative humidity for 1 h. No reduction was observed when the five pathogens were exposed to 90% relative humidity. These data suggest that pummeling and pulsifying are optimal sample preparation methods for detection of microorganisms. Acidic produce such as cherry tomato should be treated with a method that does not cause sample breakdown so that acid stress on the bacteria can be minimized. Dehydration stress also affects recovery of pathogens from produce. PMID:22980003

  14. Distribution and Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; McLain, H. L.; Noble, S. K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of organic compounds on the lunar surface has been a question of interest from the Apollo era to the present. Investigations of amino acids immediately after collection of lunar samples yielded inconclusive identifications, in part due to analytical limitations including insensitivity to certain compounds, an inability to separate enantiomers, and lack of compound-specific isotopic measurements. It was not possible to determine if the detected amino acids were indigenous to the lunar samples or the result of terrestrial contamination. Recently, we presented initial data from the analysis of amino acid abundances in 12 lunar regolith samples and discussed those results in the context of four potential amino acid sources [5]. Here, we expand on our previous work, focusing on amino acid abundances and distributions in seven regolith samples and presenting the first compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios measured for amino acids in a lunar sample.

  15. Sample preparation and EFTEM of Meat Samples for Nanoparticle Analysis in Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, L.; Dudkiewicz, A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used in industry for personal care products and the preparation of food. In the latter application, their functions include the prevention of microbes' growth, increase of the foods nutritional value and sensory quality. EU regulations require a risk assessment of the nanoparticles used in foods and food contact materials before the products can reach the market. However, availability of validated analytical methodologies for detection and characterisation of the nanoparticles in food hampers appropriate risk assessment. As part of a research on the evaluation of the methods for screening and quantification of Ag nanoparticles in meat we have tested a new TEM sample preparation alternative to resin embedding and cryo-sectioning. Energy filtered TEM analysis was applied to evaluate thickness and the uniformity of thin meat layers acquired at increasing input of the sample demonstrating that the protocols used ensured good stability under the electron beam, reliable sample concentration and reproducibility.

  16. Sample preparation induced artifacts in cryo-electron tomographs

    PubMed Central

    Plevka, P.; Battisti, A.J.; Winkler, D.C.; Tars, K.; Holdaway, H.A.; Bator, C.M.; Rossmann, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of sample preparation and of the exposure to an electron beam on particles in cryo-electron tomographs. Various virus particles with icosahedral symmetry were examined, allowing a comparison of symmetrically related components that should be identical in structure but might be affected differently by these imaging artifacts. Comparison of tomographic reconstructions with previously determined structures established by an independent method showed that neither freezing nor electron beam exposure produced a significant amount of shrinkage along the z axis (thickness). However, we observed damage to regions of the particles located close to the surface of the vitreous ice. PMID:23040048

  17. Preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters

    DOEpatents

    Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J.; Zoeller, J.R.

    1998-09-15

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic acid, ester or anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising an oxide of niobium.

  18. Preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters

    DOEpatents

    Gogate, Makarand Ratnakar; Spivey, James Jerry; Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic acid, ester or anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising an oxide of niobium.

  19. An apparatus for preparing benthic samples aboard ship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, Phillip N.; Girard, Thomas L.; Stapanian, Martin A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a safe and effective apparatus for washing and reducing the volume of benthic samples collected by grab samplers aboard ship. The sample is transferred directly from the dredge to the apparatus and then washed with water pumped through pipes in the apparatus and from onboard hoses. Wastewater and materials smaller than 0.541 mm in diameter are washed overboard. Larger materials, including benthic organisms, collect on an upper 0.64-cm screen and on a lower 30-mm-mesh stainless steel bolt cloth. A collection jar is screwed into the bottom of the apparatus. Therefore, transfer of sample material from the apparatus to the jar is quick and easy. This apparatus has several advantages for use aboard ship over others described in the literature, especially in rough seas, in cold weather, and at night. The apparatus provides a safe and convenient platform for washing and reducing samples, and samples can be prepared while the vessel is traveling at full speed.

  20. Automated sample preparation for cholesterol determination in foods.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J H; McIntyre, P; Zdunek, J

    1995-12-22

    An automated sample preparation system has been developed for the determination of cholesterol in a wide range of matrices. Isolation of cholesterol is performed with a robotic arm coupled with a series of modular stations. Samples are introduced into the system which adds the appropriate reagents, carries out the saponification, pH adjustment, solid-phase extraction and drying steps. This system was evaluated using 15 different food matrices. The average recovery for NIST standards exceeded 97%. A solution of n-hexane-2-propanol was substituted for the traditional methanol-chloroform extraction. Manual pH adjustment was replaced with a buffer. Manual and automated methods were compared and no difference was observed at the 95% confidence level.

  1. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  2. S- to N-Palmitoyl Transfer During Proteomic Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuhuan; Bachschmid, Markus M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    N-palmitoylation has been reported in a number of proteins and suggested to play an important role in protein localization and functions. However, it remains unclear whether N-palmitoylation is a direct enzyme-catalyzed process, or results from intramolecular S- to N-palmitoyl transfer. Here, using the S-palmitoyl peptide standard, GCpalmLGNAK, as the model system, we observed palmitoyl migration from the cysteine residue to either the peptide N-terminus or the lysine side chain during incubation in both neutral and slightly basic buffers commonly used in proteomic sample preparation. Palmitoyl transfer can take place either intra- or inter-molecularly, with the peptide N-terminus being the preferred migration site, presumably because of its lower basicity. The extent of intramolecular palmitoyl migration was low in the system studied, as it required the formation of an entropically unfavored macrocycle intermediate. Intermolecular palmitoyl transfer, however, remained a tangible problem, and may lead to erroneous reporting of in vivo N-palmitoylation. It was found that addition of the MS-compatible detergent RapiGest could significantly inhibit intermolecular palmitoyl transfer, as well as thioester hydrolysis and DTT-induced thioester cleavage. Finally, palmitoyl transfer from the cysteine residue to the peptide N-terminus can also occur in the gas phase, during collision-induced dissociation, and result in false identification of N-palmitoylation. Therefore, one must be careful with both sample preparation and interpretation of tandem mass spectra in the study of N-palmitoylation.

  3. Sample preparation of metal alloys by electric discharge machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electric discharge machining was investigated as a noncontaminating method of comminuting alloys for subsequent chemical analysis. Particulate dispersions in water were produced from bulk alloys at a rate of about 5 mg/min by using a commercially available machining instrument. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by results obtained when acidified dispersions were substituted for true acid solutions in an established spectrochemical method. The analysis results were not significantly different for the two sample forms. Particle size measurements and preliminary results from other spectrochemical methods which require direct aspiration of liquid into flame or plasma sources are reported.

  4. Preparation of Soybean Seed Samples for FT-IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,S.; Pietrzak, L.

    2005-01-01

    Typical preparation of seed samples for infrared (IR) microspectroscopy involves imbibition of the seed for varying time periods followed by cryosectioning. Imbibition, however, may initiate germination even at 4 C with associated changes in the chemistry of the sample. We have found that it is possible to section seeds that are sufficiently hard, such as soybeans, on a standard laboratory microtome without imbibition. The use of dry sectioning of unimbibed seeds is reported here, as well as a comparison of different mounting media and modes of analysis. Glycerol, Tissue-Tek, and ethanol were used as mounting media, and the quality of the resulting spectra was assessed. Ethanol was the preferred mountant, because it dried quickly with no residue and thus did not interfere with the spectrum of interest. Analysis in transmission mode using barium fluoride windows to hold the samples was compared with transmission-reflection analysis with sections mounted on special infrared-reflecting slides. The two modes of analysis performed well in different regions of the spectrum. The mode of analysis (transmission vs. transmission-reflection) should be based on the components of greatest interest in the sample.

  5. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-12-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  6. Preparation and characterization Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang for esterification fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulloh, Abdulloh; Aminah, Nanik Siti; Triyono, Mudasir, Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-03-01

    Catalyst preparation and characterization of Al3+-bentonite for esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid has been done. Al3+-bentonite catalyst was prepared from natural bentonite of Turen Malang through cation exchange reaction using AlCl3 solution. The catalysts obtained were characterized by XRD, XRF, pyridine-FTIR and surface area analyser using the BET method. Catalyst activity test of Al3+-bentonite for esterification reaction was done at 65°C using molar ratio of metanol-fatty acid of 30:1 and 0.25 g of Al3+-bentonite catalyst for the period of ½, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours. Based on the characterization results, the Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst has a d-spacing of 15.63 Ǻ, acid sites of Brönsted and Lewis respectively of 230.79 µmol/g and 99.39 µmol/g, surface area of 507.3 m2/g and the average of radius pore of 20.09 Å. GC-MS analysis results of the oil phase after esterification reaction showed the formation of biodiesel (FAME: Fatty acid methyl ester), namely methyl palmitate, methyl oleate and methyl linoleate. The number of conversions resulted in esterification reaction using Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst was 74.61%, 37.75%, and 20, 93% for the esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively.

  7. Rapid Filtration Separation-Based Sample Preparation Method for Bacillus Spores in Powdery and Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Isabel, Sandra; Boissinot, Maurice; Charlebois, Isabelle; Fauvel, Chantal M.; Shi, Lu-E; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Paquin, Amélie T.; Bastien, Martine; Stewart, Gale; Leblanc, Éric; Sato, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    Authorities frequently need to analyze suspicious powders and other samples for biothreat agents in order to assess environmental safety. Numerous nucleic acid detection technologies have been developed to detect and identify biowarfare agents in a timely fashion. The extraction of microbial nucleic acids from a wide variety of powdery and environmental samples to obtain a quality level adequate for these technologies still remains a technical challenge. We aimed to develop a rapid and versatile method of separating bacteria from these samples and then extracting their microbial DNA. Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii was used as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. We studied the effects of a broad variety of powdery and environmental samples on PCR detection and the steps required to alleviate their interference. With a benchmark DNA extraction procedure, 17 of the 23 samples investigated interfered with bacterial lysis and/or PCR-based detection. Therefore, we developed the dual-filter method for applied recovery of microbial particles from environmental and powdery samples (DARE). The DARE procedure allows the separation of bacteria from contaminating matrices that interfere with PCR detection. This procedure required only 2 min, while the DNA extraction process lasted 7 min, for a total of <10 min. This sample preparation procedure allowed the recovery of cleaned bacterial spores and relieved detection interference caused by a wide variety of samples. Our procedure was easily completed in a laboratory facility and is amenable to field application and automation. PMID:22210204

  8. An instrument for automated purification of nucleic acids from contaminated forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Broemeling, David J; Pel, Joel; Gunn, Dylan C; Mai, Laura; Thompson, Jason D; Poon, Hiron; Marziali, Andre

    2008-02-01

    Forensic crime scene sample analysis, by its nature, often deals with samples in which there are low amounts of nucleic acids, on substrates that often lead to inhibition of subsequent enzymatic reactions such as PCR amplification for STR profiling. Common substrates include denim from blue jeans, which yields indigo dye as a PCR inhibitor, and soil, which yields humic substances as inhibitors. These inhibitors frequently co-extract with nucleic acids in standard column or bead-based preps, leading to frequent failure of STR profiling. We present a novel instrument for DNA purification of forensic samples that is capable of highly effective concentration of nucleic acids from soil particulates, fabric, and other complex samples including solid components. The novel concentration process, known as SCODA, is inherently selective for long charged polymers such as DNA, and therefore is able to effectively reject known contaminants. We present an automated sample preparation instrument based on this process, and preliminary results based on mock forensic samples.

  9. DSC sample preparation for Al-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Starink, M.J.; Hobson, A.J.; Gregson, P.J.

    1996-06-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) is a useful technique for the study of phase transformations and has been widely applied to study precipitation in aluminium alloys. In the present work the effect of sample preparation during DSC heating of a monolithic 8090 (Al-Cu-Mg-Li-Zr) alloy and an 8090 MMC is investigated. The 8090 alloy system seems especially suited for such a study since the main precipitation reactions which occur in this alloy (GPB-zone, {delta}{prime}(Al{sub 3}Li) and S{prime}(Al{sub 2}CuMg) formation) cover a wide range of different types of precipitation reactions. DSC experiments were performed with a Shimadzu DSC-50 employing a nitrogen gas flow using a heating rate of 10 C/min. DSC curves were corrected for the baseline of the DSC and for heat capacity of the alloys following a procedure outlined elsewhere. Hence, the presented DSC curves represent heat flows due to reactions only.

  10. Integrated systems for DNA sample preparation and detection in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Anheier, Norman C., Jr.; Holman, David A.; Tsukuda, Toyoko; Kingsley, Mark T.; Brockman, Fred J.; Price, John M.; Grate, Jay W.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2000-12-01

    Field-portable sensor system are currently needed for the detection and characterization of biological pathogens in the environment. Nucleic acid analysis is frequently the method of choice for discriminating between pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria in environmental samples, however standard protocols are difficult to automate and current microfluidic devices are not configured to analyze environmental samples. In this paper, we describe an automated DNA sample processing system and demonstrate its use for the extraction of bacterial DNA form water and sediment samples. Two challenges in environmental sample analysis are the need to process relatively large sample volumes in order to obtain detectable quantities of DNA present at low concentrations, and the need to purify DNA form a complex sample matrix for downstream detection. These problems are addressed by using sequential injection fluid handling techniques for precise manipulation of the required volumes, and renewable separation columns for automatically trapping and releasing microparticles that are used for sample purification. The renewable microcolumns are used for both bacterial cell concentration and DNA purification. The purified bacterial DNA is then amplified using an on-line PCR module in order to produce detectable quantities of the target DNA.

  11. The role of sample preparation in interpretation of trace element concentration variability in moss bioindication studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Lamothe, P.J.; Crock, J.G.; Galuszka, A.; Dolegowska, S.

    2011-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in plant bioindicators are often determined to assess the quality of the environment. Instrumental methods used for trace element determination require digestion of samples. There are different methods of sample preparation for trace element analysis, and the selection of the best method should be fitted for the purpose of a study. Our hypothesis is that the method of sample preparation is important for interpretation of the results. Here we compare the results of 36 element determinations performed by ICP-MS on ashed and on acid-digested (HNO3, H2O2) samples of two moss species (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) collected in Alaska and in south-central Poland. We found that dry ashing of the moss samples prior to analysis resulted in considerably lower detection limits of all the elements examined. We also show that this sample preparation technique facilitated the determination of interregional and interspecies differences in the chemistry of trace elements. Compared to the Polish mosses, the Alaskan mosses displayed more positive correlations of the major rock-forming elements with ash content, reflecting those elements' geogenic origin. Of the two moss species, P. schreberi from both Alaska and Poland was also highlighted by a larger number of positive element pair correlations. The cluster analysis suggests that the more uniform element distribution pattern of the Polish mosses primarily reflects regional air pollution sources. Our study has shown that the method of sample preparation is an important factor in statistical interpretation of the results of trace element determinations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  12. MALDI MS sample preparation by using paraffin wax film: systematic study and application for peptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Chen, Ruibing; Ma, Mingming; Li, Lingjun

    2008-01-15

    Recently developed sample preparation techniques employing hydrophobic sample support have improved the detection sensitivity and mass spectral quality of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). These methods concentrate the samples on target by minimizing the sample area via the solvent repellent effect of the target surface. In the current study, we employed the use of paraffin wax film (Parafilm M) for improved MALDI MS analysis of low-abundance peptide mixtures, including neuronal tissue releasate and protein tryptic digests. This thin film was found to strongly repel polar solvents including water, methanol, and acetonitrile, which enabled the application of a wide range of sample preparation protocols that involved the use of various organic solvents. A "nanoliter-volume deposition" technique employing a capillary column has been used to produce tiny ( approximately 400 microm) matrix spots of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid on the film. By systematically optimizing the sample volume, solvent composition, and film treatment, the Parafilm M substrate in combination with the nanoliter-volume matrix deposition method allowed dilute sample to be concentrated on the film for MALDI MS analysis. Peptide mixtures with nanomolar concentrations have been detected by MALDI time-of-flight and MALDI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers. Overall, the use of Parafilm M enabled improved sensitivity and spectral quality for the analysis of complex peptide mixtures.

  13. Ultrasound: a subexploited tool for sample preparation in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Luque de Castro, M D; Delgado-Povedano, M M

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics, one of the most recently emerged "omics", has taken advantage of ultrasound (US) to improve sample preparation (SP) steps. The metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial has experienced a dissimilar development that has depended on the area (vegetal or animal) and the SP step. Thus, vegetal metabolomics and US assisted leaching has received the greater attention (encompassing subdisciplines such as metallomics, xenometabolomics and, mainly, lipidomics), but also liquid-liquid extraction and (bio)chemical reactions in metabolomics have taken advantage of US energy. Also clinical and animal samples have benefited from US assisted SP in metabolomics studies but in a lesser extension. The main effects of US have been shortening of the time required for the given step, and/or increase of its efficiency or availability for automation; nevertheless, attention paid to potential degradation caused by US has been scant or nil. Achievements and weak points of the metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial are discussed and possible solutions to the present shortcomings are exposed. PMID:24331041

  14. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin K; Barker, Trevor M; Crozier, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable.

  15. [Preparation of ferulic acid, senkyunolide I and senkyunolide H from Ligusticum chuanxiong by preparative HPLC].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yao-Kun; Liang, Shuang; Hong, Yan-Long; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Shen, Lan; Du, Yan; Feng, Yi

    2013-06-01

    Preparative HPLC was used to prepare ferulic acid, senkyunolide I and senkyunolide H from Ligusticum chuanxiong. The separation was conducted on a Shim-Pack Prep-ODS (20.0 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm) column with the mobile phase of methanol-0.2% glacial acetic acid (50:50)at the flow rate of 5 mL x min(-1). The detection wavelength was 278 nm, and the purity of each compound was detected by HPLC analysis. Spectral data analyses including UV, ESI-MS and NMR were used to identify their structures. This method is simple, fast, which is suitable for preparation of standard reference of ferulic acid, senkyunolide I and senkyunolide H from L. chuanxiong and can meet the requirement of new drug research and development. PMID:24066590

  16. [Study on preparation process of artesunate polylactic acid microspheres].

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu-Wang; Wang, Wei; Fang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Fu-Gen; Cai, Zhao-Bin

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the preparation process and in vitro release behavior of artesunate polylactic acid microspheres, in order to prepare an artesunate polylactic acid (PLA) administration method suitable for hepatic arterial embolization. With PLA as the material and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the emulsifier, O/W emulsion/solvent evaporation method was adopted to prepare artesunate polylactic acid microspheres, and optimize the preparation process. With drug loading capacity, encapsulation efficiency and particle size as indexes, a single factor analysis was made on PLA concentration, PVA concentration, drug loading ratio and stirring velocity. Through an orthogonal experiment, the optimal processing conditions were determined as follows: PLA concentration was 9. 0% , PVA concentration was 0. 9% , drug loading ratio was 1:2 and stirring velocity was 1 000 r x min(-1). According to the verification of the optimal process, microsphere size, drug loading and entrapment rate of artesunate polylactic acid microspheres were (101.7 +/- 0.37) microm, (30.8 +/- 0.84)%, (53.6 +/- 0.62)%, respectively. The results showed that the optimal process was so reasonable and stable that it could lay foundation for further studies.

  17. Preparation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides

    DOEpatents

    Spivey, J.J.; Gogate, M.R.; Zoeller, J.R.; Tustin, G.C.

    1998-01-20

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising mixed oxides of vanadium, phosphorus and, optionally, a third component selected from titanium, aluminum or, preferably silicon.

  18. Preparation of .alpha., .beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides

    DOEpatents

    Spivey, James Jerry; Gogate, Makarand Ratnakav; Zoeller, Joseph Robert; Tustin, Gerald Charles

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and anhydrides thereof which comprises contacting formaldehyde or a source of formaldehyde with a carboxylic anhydride in the presence of a catalyst comprising mixed oxides of vanadium, phosphorus and, optionally, a third component selected from titanium, aluminum or, preferably silicon.

  19. Method for preparing 6-.beta.-halopenicillanic acids

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Erik I.; Kran-Nielsen, Mogens P.; Von Daehne, Welf

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a new and improved method for the preparation of a compound of the formula I ##STR1## in which R stands for halogen, giving rise to high yields of substantially pure 6.beta.-halopenicillanic acids, obtained in one step.

  20. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Udey, R. N.; Corzett, T. H.; Alcaraz, A.

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  1. Preparation of MIP-based QCM nanosensor for detection of caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, Aytaç; Karanfil, Gamze; Kuş, Mahmut; Sönmezoğlu, Savaş; Say, Rıdvan

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, a new caffeic acid imprinted quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) nanosensor has been designed for selective assignation of caffeic acid in plant materials. Methacrylamidoantipyrine-iron(III) [MAAP-Fe(III)] as metal-chelating monomer has been used to prepare selective molecular imprinted polymer (MIP). MIP film for detection of caffeic acid has been developed on QCM electrode and selectivity experiments and analytical performance of caffeic acid imprinted QCM nanosensor has been studied. The caffeic acid imprinted QCM nanosensor has been characterized by AFM. After the characterization studies, imprinted and non-imprinted nanosensors was connected to QCM system for studies of connection of the target molecule, selectivity and the detection of amount of target molecule in real samples. The detection limit was found to be 7.8 nM. The value of Langmuir constant (b) (4.06 × 10(6)) that was acquired using Langmuir graph demonstrated that the affinity of binding sites was strong. Also, selectivity of prepared caffeic acid imprinted nanosensor was found as being high compared to chlorogenic acid. Finally, the caffeic acid levels in plant materials was determined by the prepared QCM nanosensor.

  2. Infrared biospectroscopy for a fast qualitative evaluation of sample preparation in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Kuligowski, Julia; Pérez-Guaita, David; Escobar, Javier; Lliso, Isabel; de la Guardia, Miguel; Lendl, Bernhard; Vento, Máximo; Quintás, Guillermo

    2014-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been increasingly used in biomedicine to study the dynamic metabolomic responses of biological systems under different physiological or pathological conditions. To obtain an integrated snapshot of the system, metabolomic methods in biomedicine typically analyze biofluids (e.g. plasma) that require clean-up before being injected into LC-MS systems. However, high resolution LC-MS is costly in terms of resources required for sample and data analysis and care must be taken to prevent chemical (e.g. ion suppression) or statistical artifacts. Because of that, the effect of sample preparation on the metabolomic profile during metabolomic method development is often overlooked. This work combines an Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and a multivariate exploratory data analysis for a cost-effective qualitative evaluation of major changes in sample composition during sample preparation. ATR-FTIR and LC-time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) data from the analysis of a set of plasma samples precipitated using acetonitrile, methanol and acetone performed in parallel were used as a model example. Biochemical information obtained from the analysis of the ATR-FTIR and LC-TOFMS data was thoroughly compared to evaluate the strengths and shortcomings of FTIR biospectroscopy for assessing sample preparation in metabolomics studies. Results obtained show the feasibility of ATR-FTIR for the evaluation of major trends in the plasma composition changes among different sample pretreatments, providing information in terms of e.g., amino acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates overall contents comparable to those found by LC-TOFMS.

  3. The origin of amino acids in lunar regolith samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5-651.1 ppb in 6 M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D- and L-β-amino-n-butyric acid (β-ABA), DL-α-amino-n-butyric acid, γ-amino-n-butyric acid, β-alanine, and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic β-ABA were present in some samples. We also examined seven samples from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 that had been previously allocated to a non-curation laboratory, as well as two samples of terrestrial dunite from studies of lunar module engine exhaust that had been stored in the same laboratory. The amino acid content of these samples suggested that contamination had occurred during non-curatorial storage. We measured the compound-specific carbon isotopic ratios of glycine, β-alanine, and L-alanine in Apollo regolith sample 70011 and found values of -21‰ to -33‰. These values are consistent with those seen in terrestrial biology and, together with the enantiomeric compositions of the proteinogenic amino acids, suggest that terrestrial biological contamination is a primary source of the

  4. Preparation and evaluations in vitro of oxaliplatin polylactic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhaoyuan; Sun, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Ju, Fang; Chen, Qian; Gao, Wen; Wei, Haitian

    2013-08-01

    The oxaliplatin nanoparticles were prepared with polylactic acid matrix, orthogonal test was applied to optimize the prescriptions, and the qualities of oxaliplatin nanoparticles were characterized by the shape, particle size, encapsulation efficiency (EE), and drug loading (DL). Oxaliplatin nanoparticle was prepared by solution replacement method. The formation of 0.25% Tween80, DMF-water 1:8 (v/v), oxaliplatin-polylactic acid 1:5 (w/w), and 20 mg/ml polylactic acid showed the suitable EE (17.4 ± 0.47%), DL (3.52 ± 0.07%). We observed the shape of oxaliplatin nanoparticles through SEM. The average size of the particles was 120.5 ± 8.7 nm, which was detected by N5 submicron particle size analyzer.

  5. Acid digestion of geological and environmental samples using open-vessel focused microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Vivien F; Toms, Andrew; Longerich, Henry P

    2002-01-01

    The application of open vessel focused microwave acid digestion is described for the preparation of geological and environmental samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method is compared to conventional closed-vessel high pressure methods which are limited in the use of HF to break down silicates. Open-vessel acid digestion more conveniently enables the use of HF to remove Si from geological and plant samples as volatile SiF4, as well as evaporation-to-dryness and sequential acid addition during the procedure. Rock reference materials (G-2 granite, MRG-1 gabbros, SY-2 syenite, JA-1 andesite, and JB-2 and SRM-688 basalts) and plant reference materials (BCR and IAEA lichens, peach leaves, apple leaves, Durham wheat flour, and pine needles) were digested with results comparable to conventional hotplate digestion. The microwave digestion method gave poor results for granitic samples containing refractory minerals, however fusion was the preferred method of preparation for these samples. Sample preparation time was reduced from several days, using conventional hotplate digestion method, to one hour per sample using our microwave method. PMID:11936112

  6. Acid digestion of geological and environmental samples using open-vessel focused microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Vivien F; Toms, Andrew; Longerich, Henry P

    2002-01-01

    The application of open vessel focused microwave acid digestion is described for the preparation of geological and environmental samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method is compared to conventional closed-vessel high pressure methods which are limited in the use of HF to break down silicates. Open-vessel acid digestion more conveniently enables the use of HF to remove Si from geological and plant samples as volatile SiF4, as well as evaporation-to-dryness and sequential acid addition during the procedure. Rock reference materials (G-2 granite, MRG-1 gabbros, SY-2 syenite, JA-1 andesite, and JB-2 and SRM-688 basalts) and plant reference materials (BCR and IAEA lichens, peach leaves, apple leaves, Durham wheat flour, and pine needles) were digested with results comparable to conventional hotplate digestion. The microwave digestion method gave poor results for granitic samples containing refractory minerals, however fusion was the preferred method of preparation for these samples. Sample preparation time was reduced from several days, using conventional hotplate digestion method, to one hour per sample using our microwave method.

  7. Sample collection and preparation of biofluids and extracts for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Gwénaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Metabonomics is a cross-disciplinary science that overlaps with analytical chemistry, biology, and statistical analysis. The techniques commonly used are proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). Applying (1)H NMR on cell extracts provides a rapid and comprehensive screening of the most abundant metabolites allowing the quantitation of typically 20-70 compounds (depending on the type of sample) including amino and organic acids, sugars, amines, nucleosides, phenolic compounds, osmolytes, and lipids produced at sublevel millimolar concentrations. The sample preparation is usually kept minimal making the method particularly suited to high-throughput analysis (up to 100 samples/24 h with the use of a 60-holder autosampler). This chapter describes procedures for profiling liquids and solids of biological origin from plants, food, microbes, and mammalian systems. PMID:25677143

  8. Preparation, characterization and catalytic properties of MCM-48 supported tungstophosphoric acid mesoporous materials for green synthesis of benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Chen, Xi; Chen, Ya; Zheng, Xiu-Cheng

    2014-03-15

    MCM-48 and tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) were prepared and applied for the synthesis of HPW/MCM-48 mesoporous materials. The characterization results showed that HPW/MCM-48 obtained retained the typical mesopore structure of MCM-48, and the textural parameters decreased with the increase loading of HPW. The catalytic oxidation results of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde with 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} indicated that HPW/MCM-48 was an efficient catalyst for the green synthesis of benzoic acid. Furthermore, 35 wt% HPW/MCM-48 sample showed the highest activity under the reaction conditions. Highlights: • 5–45 wt% HPW/MCM-48 mesoporous catalysts were prepared and characterized. • Their catalytic activities for the green synthesis of benzoic acid were investigated. • HPW/MCM-48 was approved to be an efficient catalyst. • 5 wt% HPW/MCM-48 exhibited the highest catalytic activity.

  9. Analysis of Carbohydrate and Fatty Acid Marker Abundance in Ricin Toxin Preparations for Forensic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Moran, James J.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Melville, Angela M.

    2010-07-15

    One challenge in the forensic analysis of ricin samples is determining the method and extent of sample preparation. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a protein purification through removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein constituents in the seed are the castor oil and carbohydrates. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil, which comprises roughly half the seed weight. The carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. We used derivatization of carbohydrate and fatty acid markers followed by identification and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to assess compositional changes in ricin samples purified by different methods. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicated steps for oil removal had occurred. Changes to the carbohydrate content of the sample were also observed following protein precipitation. The differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose indicated removal of the major carbohydrate fraction of the seed and enrichment of the protein content. Taken together, these changes in fatty acid and carbohydrate abundance are indicative of the preparation method used for each sample.

  10. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING LIQUID FOOD SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.29)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the extraction and preparation of a liquid food sample for analysis of acidic persistent organic pollutants such as acid herbicides, pentachlorphenol, and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-phenol. It covers the extraction, concentration and derivatization of samples that are t...

  11. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING SOLID FOOD SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.28)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the extraction and preparation of a solid food sample for analysis of acidic persistent organic pollutants such as acid herbicides, pentachlorphenol, and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-phenol. It covers the extraction, concentration and derivatization of samples that are to...

  12. Surface and catalytic properties of acid metal carbons prepared by the sol gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado-Serrano, J.; Rojas-Cervantes, M. L.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Gómez-Serrano, V.

    2006-06-01

    The sol-gel method has been applied for the synthesis of a series of acid metal-carbon xerogels (with M = V, Cr, Mo and Ni) by polymerisation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in the presence of metallic precursors. A blank sample was also prepared without any metal addition. The xerogels were heated in nitrogen at 1000 °C to obtain the pyrolysed products. The samples were characterised by different techniques such as thermal-mass spectrometry analysis, gas physisorption, and mercury porosimetry. In addition, the acid character of the pyrolysed products was tested by the Claisen-Schmidt condensation between benzaldehyde and acetophenone for the formation of chalcones.

  13. Preparation, characterization and catalytic properties of MCM-48 supported tungstophosphoric acid mesoporous materials for green synthesis of benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Chen, Xi; Chen, Ya; Zheng, Xiu-Cheng

    2014-03-01

    MCM-48 and tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) were prepared and applied for the synthesis of HPW/MCM-48 mesoporous materials. The characterization results showed that HPW/MCM-48 obtained retained the typical mesopore structure of MCM-48, and the textural parameters decreased with the increase loading of HPW. The catalytic oxidation results of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde with 30% H2O2 indicated that HPW/MCM-48 was an efficient catalyst for the green synthesis of benzoic acid. Furthermore, 35 wt% HPW/MCM-48 sample showed the highest activity under the reaction conditions.

  14. Determination of the presence of hyaluronic acid in preparations containing amino acids: the molecular weight characterization.

    PubMed

    Bellomaria, A; Nepravishta, R; Mazzanti, U; Marchetti, M; Piccioli, P; Paci, M

    2014-10-15

    Several pharmaceutical preparations contain hyaluronic acid in the presence of a large variety of low molecular weight charged molecules like amino acids. In these mixtures, it is particularly difficult to determine the concentration and the molecular weight of the hyaluronic acid fragments. In fact zwitterionic compounds in high concentration behave by masking the hyaluronic acid due to the electrostatic interactions between amino acids and hyaluronic acid. In such conditions the common colorimetric test of the hyaluronic acid determination appears ineffective and in the (1)H NMR spectra the peaks of the polymer disappear completely. By a simple separation procedure the presence of hyaluronic acid was revealed by the DMAB test and (1)H NMR while its average molecular weight in the final product was determined by DOSY NMR spectroscopy alone. The latter determination is very important due to the healthy effects of some sizes of this polymer's fragments. PMID:25078662

  15. Adsorption of bile acid by chitosan salts prepared with cinnamic acid and analogue compounds.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshifumi; Nagaki, Kumiko; Kofuji, Kyouko; Sanae, Fujiko; Kontani, Hitoshi; Kawashima, Susumu

    2006-01-01

    A chitosan (CS) powder treated with cinnamic acid and an analogue compound (CN) was prepared as CS-CN. Using it, bile acid adsorption by CS-CN and the release of CN were investigated in vitro. When CS-CN was soaked in a taurocholate solution, it released CN and simultaneously adsorbed the bile acid. For CS-CN prepared with cinnamic acid, the amount of CN released was 0.286 +/- 0.001 mmol/g CS-CN; the amount of taurocholate adsorbed was 0.284 +/- 0.003 mmol/g CS-CN. These two functions were recognized on alginate or pectin gel beads containing CS-CN. The amount of released CN was altered extensively by the species of CN used for gel-bead preparation. Results suggest that CS-CN is a candidate for complementary medicine to prevent lifestyle-related diseases.

  16. Total airborne mold particle sampling: evaluation of sample collection, preparation and counting procedures, and collection devices.

    PubMed

    Godish, Diana; Godish, Thad

    2008-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate (i) procedures used to collect, prepare, and count total airborne mold spore/particle concentrations, and (ii) the relative field performance of three commercially available total airborne mold spore/particle sampling devices. Differences between factory and laboratory airflow calibration values of axial fan-driven sampling instruments (used in the study) indicated a need for laboratory calibration using a mass flow meter to ensure that sample results were accurately calculated. An aniline blue-amended Calberla's solution adjusted to a pH of 4.2-4.4 provided good sample mounting/counting results using Dow Corning high vacuum grease, Dow Corning 280A adhesive, and Dow Corning 316 silicone release spray for samples collected using mini-Burkard and Allergenco samplers. Count variability among analysts was most pronounced in 5% counts of relatively low mold particle deposition density samples and trended downward with increased count percentage and particle deposition density. No significant differences were observed among means of 5, 10, and 20% counts and among analysts; a significant interaction effect was observed between analysts' counts and particle deposition densities. Significantly higher mini-Burkard and Air-O-Cell total mold spore/particle counts for 600x vs. 400x (1.9 and 2.3 x higher, respectively), 1000x vs. 600x (1.9 and 2.2 x higher, respectively) and 1000x vs. 400x (3.6 and 4.6 x higher, respectively) comparisons indicated that 1000x magnification counts best quantified total airborne mold spore/particles using light microscopy, and that lower magnification counts may result in unacceptable underreporting of airborne mold spore/particle concentrations. Modest but significantly higher (1.2x) total mold spore concentrations were observed with Allergenco vs. mini-Burkard samples collected in co-located, concurrently operated sampler studies; moderate but significantly higher mini-Burkard count values (1.4x) were

  17. An Efficient Protocol for Preparation of Gallic Acid from Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb by Combination of Macroporous Resin and Preparative High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zou, Denglang; Chen, Tao; Chen, Chen; Li, Hongmei; Liu, Yongling; Li, Yulin

    2016-08-01

    In this article, macroporous resin column chromatography and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography were applied for preparation of gallic acid from Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb. In the first step, six kinds of resins were investigated by adsorption and desorption tests and AB-8 macroporous resin was selected for the enrichment of gallic acid. As a result, 20 g of gallic acid at a purity of 71% could be separated from 100 g of crude extract in which the content of gallic acid was 16.7% and the recovery of gallic acid reached 85.0%. In the second step, preparative high-performance liquid chromatography was selected to purify gallic acid. As a result, 640 mg of gallic acid at a purity of 99.1% was obtained from 1 g of sample in 35 min. The results demonstrated that macroporous resin coupled with preparative high-performance liquid chromatography was suitable for preparation of gallic acid from T. bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb. PMID:27076561

  18. An Efficient Protocol for Preparation of Gallic Acid from Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb by Combination of Macroporous Resin and Preparative High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zou, Denglang; Chen, Tao; Chen, Chen; Li, Hongmei; Liu, Yongling; Li, Yulin

    2016-08-01

    In this article, macroporous resin column chromatography and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography were applied for preparation of gallic acid from Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb. In the first step, six kinds of resins were investigated by adsorption and desorption tests and AB-8 macroporous resin was selected for the enrichment of gallic acid. As a result, 20 g of gallic acid at a purity of 71% could be separated from 100 g of crude extract in which the content of gallic acid was 16.7% and the recovery of gallic acid reached 85.0%. In the second step, preparative high-performance liquid chromatography was selected to purify gallic acid. As a result, 640 mg of gallic acid at a purity of 99.1% was obtained from 1 g of sample in 35 min. The results demonstrated that macroporous resin coupled with preparative high-performance liquid chromatography was suitable for preparation of gallic acid from T. bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb.

  19. [Intake of folic acid in the total daily diet--effect of food preparation on its folic acid content].

    PubMed

    Müller, H

    1995-03-01

    The folic acid content of total daily diet was determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The contents of tetrahydrofolic acid (THF), 5-methyl-THF and 5-formyl-THF were differentiated. The mean of the folic acid content of the total daily diet samples determined analytically was 205 +/- 60 micrograms and the mean of the individual ingredients of the samples was 401 +/- 78 micrograms, which implies that about 50% of folic acid is destroyed by common household food preparation methods. If the contents of pteroylglutamic acid (PteGlu) and 10-formyl-PteGlu (which cannot be determined analytically) are added, it can be assumed that the folic acid content with only be reduced by about 40%. THF and 5-methyl-THF proved to be less stable than 5-formyl-THF. The monoglutamate portion of the total folat content was higher in the total diet samples than in the individual foodstuffs as a consequence of the action of the enzyme "deconjugase" which is released when the matrix of food-stuffs is destroyed.

  20. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Clague, David S.; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2009-03-17

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  1. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Clague, David S.; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2006-07-25

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  2. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  3. Preparation and properties of poly 2'-O-ethylcytidylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Kielanowska, M; Shugar, D

    1976-01-01

    Poly 2'0-ethylcytidylic acid (poly (Ce)) was prepared by polymerization of 2'-0-ethylcytidine-5'-pyrophosphate with Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase in the presence of Mn++, and its properties compared with those of poly (rC), poly (Cm) and poly (dC). The neutral form of pOLY (Ce) exhibits properties similar to those of poly (rC) and poly (Cm). It also forms an acid twin-stranded helix with a transition pH of 5.9 in 0.1 M NaCl. The neutral form readily forms a double-stranded helical complex with poly (rI). Relative to poly (Cm), replacement of the 2'-0-methyl by 2-0-ethyl leads to increased enhancement of the thermal stabilities of both the acid helical form of poly (Ce) and its complex with poly (rI). PMID:5710

  4. Aquatic hazard assessment of a commercial sample of naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Swigert, James P; Lee, Carol; Wong, Diana C L; White, Russell; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents chemical composition and aquatic toxicity characteristics of a commercial sample of naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are derived from the refining of petroleum middle distillates and can contribute to refinery effluent toxicity. NAs are also present in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), but differences in the NAs compositions from these sources precludes using a common aquatic toxicity dataset to represent the aquatic hazards of NAs from both origins. Our chemical characterization of a commercial sample of NAs showed it to contain in order of abundance, 1-ring>2-ring>acyclic>3-ring acids (∼84%). Also present were monoaromatic acids (7%) and non-acids (9%, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocyclic compounds). While the acyclic acids were only the third most abundant group, the five most abundant individual compounds were identified as C(10-14) n-acids (n-decanoic acid to n-tetradecanoic acid). Aquatic toxicity testing of fish (Pimephales promelas), invertebrate (Daphnia magna), algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) showed P. promelas to be the most sensitive species with 96-h LL50=9.0 mg L(-1) (LC50=5.6 mg L(-1)). Acute EL50 values for the other species ranged 24-46 mg L(-1) (EC50 values ranged 20-30 mg L(-1)). Biomimetic extraction via solid-phase-microextraction (BE-SPME) suggested a nonpolar narcosis mode of toxic action for D. magna, P. subcapitata, and V. fischeri. The BE analysis under-predicted fish toxicity, which indicates that a specific mode of action, besides narcosis, may be a factor for fishes. PMID:25434270

  5. Aquatic hazard assessment of a commercial sample of naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Swigert, James P; Lee, Carol; Wong, Diana C L; White, Russell; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents chemical composition and aquatic toxicity characteristics of a commercial sample of naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are derived from the refining of petroleum middle distillates and can contribute to refinery effluent toxicity. NAs are also present in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), but differences in the NAs compositions from these sources precludes using a common aquatic toxicity dataset to represent the aquatic hazards of NAs from both origins. Our chemical characterization of a commercial sample of NAs showed it to contain in order of abundance, 1-ring>2-ring>acyclic>3-ring acids (∼84%). Also present were monoaromatic acids (7%) and non-acids (9%, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocyclic compounds). While the acyclic acids were only the third most abundant group, the five most abundant individual compounds were identified as C(10-14) n-acids (n-decanoic acid to n-tetradecanoic acid). Aquatic toxicity testing of fish (Pimephales promelas), invertebrate (Daphnia magna), algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) showed P. promelas to be the most sensitive species with 96-h LL50=9.0 mg L(-1) (LC50=5.6 mg L(-1)). Acute EL50 values for the other species ranged 24-46 mg L(-1) (EC50 values ranged 20-30 mg L(-1)). Biomimetic extraction via solid-phase-microextraction (BE-SPME) suggested a nonpolar narcosis mode of toxic action for D. magna, P. subcapitata, and V. fischeri. The BE analysis under-predicted fish toxicity, which indicates that a specific mode of action, besides narcosis, may be a factor for fishes.

  6. Sample preparation methods for subsequent determination of metals and non-metals in crude oil--a review.

    PubMed

    Mello, Paola A; Pereira, Juliana S F; Mesko, Marcia F; Barin, Juliano S; Flores, Erico M M

    2012-10-01

    In this review sample preparation strategies used for crude oil digestion in last ten years are discussed focusing on further metals and non-metals determination. One of the main challenges of proposed methods has been to overcome the difficulty to bring crude oil samples into solution, which should be compatible with analytical techniques used for element determination. On this aspect, this review summarizes the sample preparation methods for metals and non metals determination in crude oil including those based on wet digestion, combustion, emulsification, extraction, sample dilution with organic solvents, among others. Conventional methods related to wet digestion with concentrated acids or combustion are also covered, with special emphasis to closed systems. Trends in sample digestion, such as microwave-assisted digestion using diluted acids combined with high-efficiency decomposition systems are discussed. On the other hand, strategies based on sample dilution in organic solvents and procedures recommended for speciation analysis are reported as well as the use of direct analysis in view of the recent importance for crude oil field. A compilation concerning sample preparation for crude oil provided by official methods as well as certified reference materials available for accuracy evaluation is also presented and discussed. PMID:22975177

  7. Cations in mammalian cells and chromosomes: Sample preparation protocols affect elemental abundances by SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi-Setti, R.; Gavrilov, K. L.; Neilly, M. E.

    2006-07-01

    The focus of our current research aims at detailing and quantifying the presence of cations, primarily Ca and Mg, in mammalian cells and chromosomes throughout the different stages of the cell cycle, using our high resolution scanning ion microprobe, the UC-SIM. The 45 keV Ga + probe of this instrument, typically ˜40 nm in diameter, carries a current of 30-40 pA, appropriate for surface SIMS studies, but limited in sample erosion rate for dynamic SIMS mapping over cell-size areas, of order 100 μm × 100 μm. Practical and reliable use of this probe toward the above SIMS goals requires a careful matching of the latter factors with the physical and chemical consequences of sample preparation protocols. We examine here how the preferred sample cryo-preservation methodologies such as freeze-fracture and lyophilization affect high resolution SIMS analysis, and, from this standpoint, develop and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of fast alternate approaches to drying frozen samples. The latter include the use of methanol, ethanol, and methanol/acetic acid fixative. Methanol-dried freeze-fractured samples preserve histological morphology and yield Ca and Mg distributions containing reliable differential dynamical information, when compared with those following lyophilization.

  8. Optimization on preparation condition of polyunsaturated fatty acids nanoliposome prepared by Mozafari method.

    PubMed

    Rasti, B; Jinap, S; Mozafari, M R; Abd-Manap, M Y

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the application of the response surface methodology (design) to develop an optimal preparation condition (independent variables) namely shear rate (600-1000 rpm), mixing time (30-60 min), and sonication time (10-20 min) for polyunsaturated fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) nanoliposomes. Fifteen lipid mixtures were generated by the Box-Behnken design and nanoliposomes were prepared by the Mozafari (direct hydration and without using organic solvents) method. Nanoliposomes were characterized with respect to entrapment efficiency (EE) and vesicle size as Y1 and Y2 dependent variables, respectively. The results were then applied to estimate the coefficients of response surface model and to find the optimal preparation conditions with maximum EE and minimum vesicle size. The response surface analysis exhibited that the significant (p < 0.05) second-order polynomial regression equations were successfully fitted for all dependent variables with no significant (p > 0.05) lack of fit for the reduced models. The response optimization of experiments was the shear rate: 795 rpm; mixing time: 60 min; and sonication time: 10 min. The optimal nanoliposome had an average diameter of 81.4 nm and EE of 100%. The experimental results of optimal nanoliposomes characterization confirmed an accurate fitness of the predicted values by reduced response surface models. PMID:24099144

  9. EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting

  10. Multi-element determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn content in vegetable oils samples by high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry and microemulsion sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Luana S; Barbosa, José T P; Fernandes, Andréa P; Lemos, Valfredo A; Santos, Walter N L Dos; Korn, Maria Graças A; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the microemulsification as sample preparation procedure for determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn in vegetable oils samples by High-Resolution Continuum Source Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS). Microemulsions were prepared by mixing samples with propan-1-ol and aqueous acid solution, which allowed the use of inorganic aqueous standards for the calibration. To a sample mass of 0.5g, 100μL of hydrochloric acid and propan-1-ol were added and the resulting mixture diluted to a final volume of 10mL. The sample was manually shaken resulting in a visually homogeneous system. The main lines were selected for all studied metals and the detection limits (3σ, n=10) were 0.12, 0.62, 0.58 and 0.12mgkg(-1) for Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 5% to 11 % in samples spiked with 0.25 and 1.5μgmL(-1) of each metal, respectively. Recoveries varied from 89% to 102%. The proposed method was applied to the determination of Cu, Fe, Ni and Zn in soybean, olive and sunflower oils. PMID:23140735

  11. Preview of the NASA NNWG NDE Sample Preparation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presents a step-by-step how-to fabrication documentation of every kind of sample that is fabricated for MSFC by UA Huntsville, including photos and illustrations. The tabulation of what kind of samples are being fabricated for what NDE method, detailed instructions/documentation of the inclusion/creation of defects, detailed specifications for materials, processes, and equipment, case histories and/or experiences with the different fabrication methods and defect inclusion techniques, discussion of pitfalls and difficulties associated with sample fabrication and defect inclusion techniques, and a discussion of why certain fabrication techniques are needed as related to the specific NDE methods are included in this presentation.

  12. Intelligent front-end sample preparation tool using acoustic streaming.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Erika J.; McClain, Jaime L.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Edwards, Thayne L.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Branch, Darren W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Anderson, John Mueller; James, Conrad D.; Smith, Gennifer; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel

    2009-09-01

    We have successfully developed a nucleic acid extraction system based on a microacoustic lysis array coupled to an integrated nucleic acid extraction system all on a single cartridge. The microacoustic lysing array is based on 36{sup o} Y cut lithium niobate, which couples bulk acoustic waves (BAW) into the microchannels. The microchannels were fabricated using Mylar laminates and fused silica to form acoustic-fluidic interface cartridges. The transducer array consists of four active elements directed for cell lysis and one optional BAW element for mixing on the cartridge. The lysis system was modeled using one dimensional (1D) transmission line and two dimensional (2D) FEM models. For input powers required to lyse cells, the flow rate dictated the temperature change across the lysing region. From the computational models, a flow rate of 10 {micro}L/min produced a temperature rise of 23.2 C and only 6.7 C when flowing at 60 {micro}L/min. The measured temperature changes were 5 C less than the model. The computational models also permitted optimization of the acoustic coupling to the microchannel region and revealed the potential impact of thermal effects if not controlled. Using E. coli, we achieved a lysing efficacy of 49.9 {+-} 29.92 % based on a cell viability assay with a 757.2 % increase in ATP release within 20 seconds of acoustic exposure. A bench-top lysing system required 15-20 minutes operating up to 58 Watts to achieve the same level of cell lysis. We demonstrate that active mixing on the cartridge was critical to maximize binding and release of nucleic acid to the magnetic beads. Using a sol-gel silica bead matrix filled microchannel the extraction efficacy was 40%. The cartridge based magnetic bead system had an extraction efficiency of 19.2%. For an electric field based method that used Nafion films, a nucleic acid extraction efficiency of 66.3 % was achieved at 6 volts DC. For the flow rates we tested (10-50 {micro}L/min), the nucleic acid extraction

  13. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... forwarding to a licensed cottonseed chemist for analysis and grading. The duplicate shall be sealed and retained by the sampler until the original official sample shall have been analyzed by a licensed...

  14. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... forwarding to a licensed cottonseed chemist for analysis and grading. The duplicate shall be sealed and retained by the sampler until the original official sample shall have been analyzed by a licensed...

  15. Hydroxyapatite-phosphonoformic acid hybrid compounds prepared by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turki, Thouraya; Othmani, Masseoud; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Bouzouita, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatites were prepared in the presence of different amounts of phosphonoformic acid (PFA) via the hydrothermal method. The obtained powders were characterized through chemical analysis, XRD, IR, 31P MAS-NMR, TEM, and TG-TDA. The XRD showed that the PFA did not affect the apatite composition. Indeed, only a reduction of the crystallite size was noted. After grafting of PFA, the IR spectroscopy revealed the appearance of new bands belonging to HPO42- and carboxylate groups of the apatite and organic moiety, respectively. Moreover, the 31P MAS-NMR spectra exhibited a peak with a low intensity assigned to the terminal phosphonate group of the organic moiety in addition to that of the apatite. Based on these results, a reaction mechanism involving the surface hydroxyl groups (tbnd Casbnd OH) of the apatite and the carboxyl group of the acid was proposed.

  16. Atmospheric pressure microwave sample preparation procedure for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and kjeldahl nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Collins, L W; Chalk, S J; Kingston, H M

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave digestion method has been developed for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and Kjeldahl nitrogen in complex matrices. In comparison to the digestion steps in EPA Methods 365.4 (total phosphorus) and 351.x (Kjeldahl nitrogen), this method requires less time, eliminates the need for a catalyst, and reduces the toxicity of the waste significantly. It employs a microwave-assisted digestion step, using refluxing borosilicate glass vessels at atmospheric pressure. Traditionally, this method has a time-consuming sample preparation step and generates toxic waste through the use of heavy metal catalysts. These advantages are gained by the combination of a high boiling point acid (sulfuric acid) and the application of focused microwave irradiation, which enhances the digestion process by direct energy coupling. NIST standard reference materials 1572 (citrus leaves), 1577a (bovine liver), and 1566 (oyster tissue) and tryptophan were analyzed to validate the method. Phosphorus concentrations were determined by the colorimetric ascorbic acid method outlined in EPA Method 365.3. Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were determined using EPA Method 351.1. The results of the analyses showed good precision and are in excellent agreement with the NIST published values for both elements.

  17. Sample preparation for arsenic speciation in terrestrial plants--a review.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Clarice D B; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is an element widely present in nature. Additionally, it may be found as different species in several matrices and therefore it is one of the target elements in chemical speciation. Although the number of studies in terrestrial plants is low, compared to matrices such as fish or urine, this number is raising due to the fact that this type of matrix are closely related to the human food chain. In speciation analysis, sample preparation is a critical step and several extraction procedures present drawbacks. In this review, papers dealing with extraction procedures, analytical methods, and studies of species conservation in plants cultivated in terrestrial environment are critically discussed. Analytical procedures based on extractions using water or diluted acid solutions associated with HPLC-ICP-MS are good alternatives, owing to their versatility and sensitivity, even though less expensive strategies are shown as feasible choices. PMID:24054594

  18. Sample preparation for arsenic speciation in terrestrial plants--a review.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Clarice D B; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2013-10-15

    Arsenic is an element widely present in nature. Additionally, it may be found as different species in several matrices and therefore it is one of the target elements in chemical speciation. Although the number of studies in terrestrial plants is low, compared to matrices such as fish or urine, this number is raising due to the fact that this type of matrix are closely related to the human food chain. In speciation analysis, sample preparation is a critical step and several extraction procedures present drawbacks. In this review, papers dealing with extraction procedures, analytical methods, and studies of species conservation in plants cultivated in terrestrial environment are critically discussed. Analytical procedures based on extractions using water or diluted acid solutions associated with HPLC-ICP-MS are good alternatives, owing to their versatility and sensitivity, even though less expensive strategies are shown as feasible choices.

  19. Sample preparation of solid samples for metal determination by atomic spectroscopy - An overview and selected recent applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, J.; Hardaway, C.; Bobbadi, K.; Reddy, A.

    2006-07-01

    Classical methods involving dry dissolution, wet decomposition, and microwave methods for digestion/dissolution of solid samples for metal determination by various atomic spectroscopic techniques are discussed. Recent applications of solid sample preparation are presented including soils, sediments, food, cosmetics, oils, and coal.

  20. An automated microfluidic sample preparation system for laser scanning cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eric; Menon, Vidya; Geddie, William; Sun, Yu

    2011-04-01

    Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is emerging as a clinical tool. In one application a "Clatch" slide, named after the inventor, is used in conjunction with LSC for cell surface marker immunophenotyping of patient samples. The slide requires time consuming and laborious pipetting steps, making a test tedious and prone to handling errors. The Clatch slide also uses a significant number of cells, limiting the number of analyses on paucicellular samples. This paper presents an automated microfluidic system consisting of a control circuit, a microfluidic system, and an aluminum frame, capable of performing immunophenotyping procedures. This prototype system reduces 36 pipetting steps to 1, reduces the amount of cell sample from 180 μL to 56 μL, and shortens the time used by technicians.

  1. Enhanced spot preparation for liquid extractive sampling and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; King, Richard C.

    2015-09-22

    A method for performing surface sampling of an analyte, includes the step of placing the analyte on a stage with a material in molar excess to the analyte, such that analyte-analyte interactions are prevented and the analyte can be solubilized for further analysis. The material can be a matrix material that is mixed with the analyte. The material can be provided on a sample support. The analyte can then be contacted with a solvent to extract the analyte for further processing, such as by electrospray mass spectrometry.

  2. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE... decontaminate a surface contaminated with a spill from liquid of a known concentration, contaminate (spike) the... sampling area. Contain any liquids which spill or flow off the surface. Allow the spiking solution to...

  3. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE... decontaminate a surface contaminated with a spill from liquid of a known concentration, contaminate (spike) the... sampling area. Contain any liquids which spill or flow off the surface. Allow the spiking solution to...

  4. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE... decontaminate a surface contaminated with a spill from liquid of a known concentration, contaminate (spike) the... sampling area. Contain any liquids which spill or flow off the surface. Allow the spiking solution to...

  5. Microsystem strategies for sample preparation in biological detection.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Bennett, Dawn Jonita; Manginell, Monica; Okandan, Murat; Acrivos, Andreas; Brozik, Susan Marie; Khusid, Boris

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop microdevice strategies for dealing with samples to be examined in biological detection systems. This includes three sub-components: namely, microdevice fabrication, sample delivery to the microdevice, and sample processing within the microdevice. The first component of this work focused on utilizing Sandia's surface micromachining technology to fabricate small volume (nanoliter) fluidic systems for processing small quantities of biological samples. The next component was to develop interfaces for the surface-micromachined silicon devices. We partnered with Micronics, a commercial company, to produce fluidic manifolds for sample delivery to our silicon devices. Pressure testing was completed to examine the strength of the bond between the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer and the silicon chip. We are also pursuing several other methods, both in house and external, to develop polymer-based fluidic manifolds for packaging silicon-based microfluidic devices. The second component, sample processing, is divided into two sub-tasks: cell collection and cell lysis. Cell collection was achieved using dielectrophoresis, which employs AC fields to collect cells at energized microelectrodes, while rejecting non-cellular particles. Both live and dead Staph. aureus bacteria have been collected using RF frequency dielectrophoresis. Bacteria have been separated from polystyrene microspheres using frequency-shifting dielectrophoresis. Computational modeling was performed to optimize device separation performance, and to predict particle response to the dielectrophoretic traps. Cell lysis is continuing to be pursued using microactuators to mechanically disrupt cell membranes. Novel thermal actuators, which can generate larger forces than previously tested electrostatic actuators, have been incorporated with and tested with cell lysis devices. Significant cell membrane distortion has been observed, but more experiments need to be conducted to

  6. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  7. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  8. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  9. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  10. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for...

  11. Effects of Sample Preparation on the Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.

    2015-05-22

    While reflectance spectroscopy is a useful tool in identifying molecular compounds, laboratory measurement of solid (particularly powder) samples often is confounded by sample preparation methods. For example, both the packing density and surface roughness can have an effect on the quantitative reflectance spectra of powdered samples. Recent efforts in our group have focused on developing standard methods for measuring reflectance spectra that accounts for sample preparation, as well as other factors such as particle size and provenance. In this work, the effect of preparation method on sample reflectivity was investigated by measuring the directional-hemispherical spectra of samples that were hand-packed as well as pressed into pellets using an integrating sphere attached to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results show that the methods used to prepare the sample have a substantial effect on the measured reflectance spectra, as do other factors such as particle size.

  12. Sample preparation and assay refinements for pathogen detection platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Daniel V.; Kearns, Elizabeth A.; Leskinen, Stephaney D.; Magaña, Sonia; Stroot, Joyce M.; Hunter, Dawn M.; Schlemmer, Sarah M.

    2009-02-01

    Food-borne and waterborne microbial pathogens are a potential problem in biowarfare and public health. Such pathogens can affect the health, combat readiness, and effectiveness of the warfighter in a battlefield environment and present potential threats to the civilian population through intentional or natural contamination of food and water. Conventional procedures to detect and identify microbial pathogens in food, water, and other materials can take days to perform and may provide inconclusive information. Research at the University of South Florida's Advanced Biosensors Laboratory (ABL) focuses on development of sample processing procedures and biosensor-based assays for rapid detection of biothreat agents. Rapid processing methods, including use of an automated concentrator of microorganisms in water, have been developed for complex matrix samples including ground beef, apple juice, produce, potable water and recreational water, enabling such samples to be directly tested by biosensor assays for target analytes. Bacillus atrophaeus spores and other bacteria can be concentrated from potable and recreational water at low levels with a dead-end hollow-fiber ultrafiltration concentration system. Target bacteria recovered by these processing procedures can be identified by evanescent wave, fiber optic biosensors or other detection platforms. Fiber optic biosensor assays have been improved to include subsequent PCR analysis and viability determination of captured target bacteria using broth enrichment and/or ATP luminescence.

  13. Sample preparation in determination of lead in garden vegetables by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Preer, J R; Stephens, B R; Bland, C W

    1982-07-01

    Dry and wet ashing methods have been used in the analysis of garden vegetables for Pb. The reliability of wet ashing has been verified by the method of standard additions. Comparison of dry and wet ashing showed good agreement for a variety of garden vegetables. Sample size was more strictly limited for the wet-ashed samples, which led to lower sensitivity. Vegetable samples are commonly analyzed for a number of trace elements, which introduces additional constraints on sample preparation, notably because of Cd loss on dry ashing. Pretreatment with HNO3/H2SO4 ash aid eliminated Cd loss. Reliability of dry ashing with pretreatment was shown with NBS SRM Orchard Leaves, Pine Needles, Spinach, and Tomato Leaves. The analysis was insensitive to ashing temperature in the range 480-625 degrees C. A practical detection limit for the method is about 2 ppm Pb, dry weight basis (DWB). Care must be exercised to avoid contamination of the sample with lead at this level by improper handling. Segregation and acid washing of glassware and protection of the sample from contact with any object not demonstrably clean was necessary. No evidence was found of Pb contamination at this level from tap water washing of fresh vegetables, forced-air oven drying, or grinding with mortar and pestle. No special clean room facilities or laboratory air purification measures were used. Sensitivity was increased 3-fold by extraction with dithizone in CHCl3 followed by back-extraction into dilute HCl. Detection limits were not improved, however, because of variation in the extraction results. The instrumental method for assessing effective correction for back-ground absorbance showed adequate compensation, although comparison of direct and extractive determinations showed a small but significant difference between the methods of about 1 ppm Pb (DWB).

  14. Preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Ken'ichi; Fukubayashi, Yumeto

    2010-03-01

    A convenient method using commercial aqueous concentrated HCl (conc. HCl; 35%, w/w) as an acid catalyst was developed for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from sterol esters, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, and FFAs for gas-liquid chromatography (GC). An 8% (w/v) solution of HCl in methanol/water (85:15, v/v) was prepared by diluting 9.7 ml of conc. HCl with 41.5 ml of methanol. Toluene (0.2 ml), methanol (1.5 ml), and the 8% HCl solution (0.3 ml) were added sequentially to the lipid sample. The final HCl concentration was 1.2% (w/v). This solution (2 ml) was incubated at 45 degrees C overnight or heated at 100 degrees C for 1-1.5 h. The amount of FFA formed in the presence of water derived from conc. HCl was estimated to be <1.4%. The yields of FAMEs were >96% for the above lipid classes and were the same as or better than those obtained by saponification/methylation or by acid-catalyzed methanolysis/methylation using commercial anhydrous HCl/methanol. The method developed here could be successfully applied to fatty acid analysis of various lipid samples, including fish oils, vegetable oils, and blood lipids by GC. PMID:19759389

  15. Preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for gas-liquid chromatography[S

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Ken'ichi; Fukubayashi, Yumeto

    2010-01-01

    A convenient method using commercial aqueous concentrated HCl (conc. HCl; 35%, w/w) as an acid catalyst was developed for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from sterol esters, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, and FFAs for gas-liquid chromatography (GC). An 8% (w/v) solution of HCl in methanol/water (85:15, v/v) was prepared by diluting 9.7 ml of conc. HCl with 41.5 ml of methanol. Toluene (0.2 ml), methanol (1.5 ml), and the 8% HCl solution (0.3 ml) were added sequentially to the lipid sample. The final HCl concentration was 1.2% (w/v). This solution (2 ml) was incubated at 45°C overnight or heated at 100°C for 1–1.5 h. The amount of FFA formed in the presence of water derived from conc. HCl was estimated to be <1.4%. The yields of FAMEs were >96% for the above lipid classes and were the same as or better than those obtained by saponification/methylation or by acid-catalyzed methanolysis/methylation using commercial anhydrous HCl/methanol. The method developed here could be successfully applied to fatty acid analysis of various lipid samples, including fish oils, vegetable oils, and blood lipids by GC. PMID:19759389

  16. Sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide for graphene preparation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-12-06

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable.

  17. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-12-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable.

  18. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable. PMID:24310650

  19. Preparation of polyaniline nanostructures doped with different dicarboxylic acids through template-free method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuanyu; Wang, Yu

    2014-09-01

    In this article nanoscaled polyanilines (PANI) were prepared based on template-free method in the presence of dicarboxylic acid dopants (e.g. D-tartaric acid, succinic acid, maleic acid and fumaric acid). The trans-cis isomerization of butenedioic acid played an important role in the formation of nanostructures from the plane-like to nanofibers, and the PANI doped with maleic acid (MA) had larger diameter, higher crystallinity and conductivity than PANI doped with fumaric acid (FA).

  20. Simultaneous determination of mefenamic and tolfenamic acids in real samples by terbium-sensitized luminescence.

    PubMed

    Pulgarín, J A Murillo; Molina, A Alañón; Ferreras, F Martínez

    2012-11-01

    A simple luminescent methodology for the simultaneous determination of mefenamic and tolfenamic acids in pharmaceutical preparations and human urine is proposed. Since the native fluorescence of both analytes is not intense, the method takes advantage of the lanthanide-sensitized luminescence, which provides a higher sensitivity. Due to the strong overlapping between the luminescence spectra of both terbium complexes, the use of luminescence decay curves to resolve mixtures of the analytes is proposed, since these curves are more selective. A factorial design with three levels per factor coupled to a central composite design was selected to obtain a calibration matrix of thirteen standards plus eight blank samples that was processed using a partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. In order to assess the goodness of the proposed method, a prediction set of synthetic samples was analyzed, obtaining recovery percentages between 90 and 104 %. Limits of detection, calculated by means of a new criterion, were 14.85 μg L(-1) and 15.89 μg L(-1) for tolfenamic and mefenamic acids, respectively. The method was tested in a pharmaceutical preparation containing mefenamic acid, obtaining recovery percentages close to 100 %. Finally, the simultaneous determination of both fenamates in human urine samples was successfully carried out by means of a correction of the above-explained model. No extraction method neither prior separation of the analytes were needed.

  1. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  2. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  3. Cellular fatty-acid analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki commercial preparations.

    PubMed

    Adams, D Jack; Gurr, Susan; Hogge, Jason

    2005-02-01

    Cellular fatty acid (CFA) composition of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) preparations was determined by use of the MIDI Sherlock microbial identification system on a Hewlett-Packard 5890 gas chromatograph. Four commercial preparations--one Btk sample obtained from the U.S. Forest Service, one Btk sample obtained from Dugway Proving Ground, and Btk and Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) preparations obtained from American Type Culture Collection (ATCC)--were analyzed and evaluated. This study demonstrated the capability to detect the strain variation in the bacterial species Btk and to clearly differentiate strain variants on the basis of qualitative and quantitative differences in hydrolyzable whole CFA compositions in the preparations examined. We conclude that CFA analysis may be used to identify commercial products but that a more intensive study would be required to evaluate the potential of CFA to provide an inexpensive screening tool applicable to several levels of isolate or product evaluation, including how applied preparations might interact with natural populations over time.

  4. Preparation and biological assessment of hydroxycinnamic acid amides of polyamines.

    PubMed

    Fixon-Owoo, Solomon; Levasseur, Frédéric; Williams, Keith; Sabado, Thomas N; Lowe, Mike; Klose, Markus; Joffre Mercier, A; Fields, Paul; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2003-06-01

    Many plants contain hydroxycinnamic acid conjugates of polyamines that are remarkably similar in general structure to the acylated polyamines found in spider and wasp toxins. In an effort to determine whether these compounds might play a role in the chemical defense of plants against arthropod pests we synthesized a variety of analogues of the coumaric (4-hydroxycinnamic) acid conjugates of di-, tri-, and tetraamines using common protection and acylation strategies. N(1)- and N(8)-coumaroyl spermidine were tested in feeding trials with insect larvae including the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis), the tobacco budworm (Heliothis verescens) and the oblique banded leaf roller (Choristoneura rosaceana). Antifeedant assays with the rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae were also performed. Neither the naturally occurring coumaric acid conjugates of polyamines nor their analogues showed notable toxicity towards insects, despite precautions to maintain these easily oxidized materials in the wet diet. However, more direct bioassays of these compounds on glutamate dependent neuroreceptors including the deep abdominal extensor muscles of crayfish, or mammalian NMDA, delta2, and AMPA receptors, clearly showed that these compounds were inhibitory. N(1)-Coumaoryl spermine, a dodecyl and a cyclohexyl analogue were especially active at NMDA NR1/NR2B receptors. The latter had an IC(50) of 300 microM in the crayfish. N(1)-Coumaroyl spermine had an IC(50) in the crayfish preparation of 70-300 microM and against the mammalian NR1/NR2B receptor of 38 nM. Structure-activity variations show similar trends of length and hydrophobicity as has been seen previously with analogues of spider toxins. We conclude from this work that while the coumaric acid polyamine conjugates are active when directly applied to neuroreceptors, they show no overt toxicity when ingested by insect larvae.

  5. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DERMAL WIPE AND SURFACE WIPE SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.27)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method for extracting and preparing a dermal or surface wipe sample for analysis of acidic persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this standard operating procedure. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mas...

  6. Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids in Methanolic Extracts, Infusions and Tinctures from Commercial Samples of Lemon Balm.

    PubMed

    Arceusz, Agnieszka; Wesolowski, Marek; Ulewicz-Magulska, Beata

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of flavonoids (rutin, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol) and phenolic acids (gallic, p-coumaric, rosmarinic, syringic, caffeic, chlorogenic, ellagic, ferulic) in lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) commonly used as a culinary, aromatic and medicinal herb. A rapid and reliable HPLC procedure was developed to determine the phenolic compounds in methanolic extracts, infusions and tinctures prepared from lemon balm. Except for myricetin and quercetin, as well as ellagic, gallic and rosmarinic acids, higher levels of the analytes under study were determined in the methanolic extracts (up to 22 mg/g of dry weight, DW), than in infusions (up to 5 mg/g DW). Tinctures were the poorest in flavonoids and phenolic acids (below 550 μg/g DW), except for ellagic and rosmarinic acids, which were quantified in tinctures at higher levels (mg/g DW). To sum up, the flavonoids were extracted more effectively in the infusions and tinctures than the phenolic acids. Statistically significant correlations were found between phenolic acids, possibly owing to similar biochemical pathways of the compounds. The hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses have also shown that the samples of lemon balm could be differentiated based on the levels of flavonoids and phenolic acids. PMID:26197530

  7. Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids in Methanolic Extracts, Infusions and Tinctures from Commercial Samples of Lemon Balm.

    PubMed

    Arceusz, Agnieszka; Wesolowski, Marek; Ulewicz-Magulska, Beata

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of flavonoids (rutin, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol) and phenolic acids (gallic, p-coumaric, rosmarinic, syringic, caffeic, chlorogenic, ellagic, ferulic) in lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) commonly used as a culinary, aromatic and medicinal herb. A rapid and reliable HPLC procedure was developed to determine the phenolic compounds in methanolic extracts, infusions and tinctures prepared from lemon balm. Except for myricetin and quercetin, as well as ellagic, gallic and rosmarinic acids, higher levels of the analytes under study were determined in the methanolic extracts (up to 22 mg/g of dry weight, DW), than in infusions (up to 5 mg/g DW). Tinctures were the poorest in flavonoids and phenolic acids (below 550 μg/g DW), except for ellagic and rosmarinic acids, which were quantified in tinctures at higher levels (mg/g DW). To sum up, the flavonoids were extracted more effectively in the infusions and tinctures than the phenolic acids. Statistically significant correlations were found between phenolic acids, possibly owing to similar biochemical pathways of the compounds. The hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses have also shown that the samples of lemon balm could be differentiated based on the levels of flavonoids and phenolic acids.

  8. A multi-step transmission electron microscopy sample preparation technique for cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials.

    PubMed

    Weiss Brennan, Claire V; Walck, Scott D; Swab, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    A new technique for the preparation of heavily cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials for examination in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is described in detail. In this study, cross-sectional TEM samples were prepared from indented silicon carbide (SiC) bulk ceramics, although this technique could also be applied to other brittle and/or multiphase materials. During TEM sample preparation, milling-induced damage must be minimized, since in studying deformation mechanisms, it would be difficult to distinguish deformation-induced cracking from cracking occurring due to the sample preparation. The samples were prepared using a site-specific, two-step ion milling sequence accompanied by epoxy vacuum infiltration into the cracks. This technique allows the heavily cracked, brittle ceramic material to stay intact during sample preparation and also helps preserve the true microstructure of the cracked area underneath the indent. Some preliminary TEM results are given and discussed in regards to deformation studies in ceramic materials. This sample preparation technique could be applied to other cracked and/or heavily damaged materials, including geological materials, archaeological materials, fatigued materials, and corrosion samples.

  9. Accurate analysis of taurine, anserine, carnosine and free amino acids in a cattle muscle biopsy sample.

    PubMed

    Imanari, Mai; Higuchi, Mikito; Shiba, Nobuya; Watanabe, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We have established an analysis method for some free amino acids (FAAs), as well as taurine (Tau), anserine (Ans) and carnosine (Car), in a fresh biopsy sample from cattle muscle. A series of model biopsy samples, corresponding to the mixtures of lean meat, fat and connective tissue, was prepared and showed high correlation coefficients between the compound concentration and the 3-methylhistidine (3-MeHis) content derived from hydrolysis of the biopsy sample (r = 0.74-0.95, P < 0.01). Interference from blood contamination could not be neglected, because the concentration of some FAAs in blood was comparable to that in muscle. However, it was possible to control the contamination of Tau, Ans, Car, glutamic acid, glutamine, asparatic acid and alanine to less than 5.0% when the blood contamination was controlled to less than 23%.These results suggest the necessity of measuring 3-MeHis as an index of lean meat and hemoglobin as an index of blood contamination when compounds in muscle biopsy samples are evaluated. We have carried out a series of these analyses using one biopsy sample and reveal differences in Tau, Ans, Car and some FAAs in beef muscle after different feeding regimes.

  10. Preparation of Amperometric Glucose Biosensor Based on 4-Mercaptobenzoic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Endo, Hideaki; Izumi, Mitsuru

    A novel glucose biosensor was fabricated by a combination of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid and the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Because of the catalysis of Prussian Blue contained in the LB film layers, the prepared amperometric biosensor worked at a very low potential range around 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The optimum operating conditions for glucose biosensor were investigated by varying the glucose oxidase immobilization time, the applied potential and the pH of buffer solution. The steady-state current responses of the glucose biosensor showed a good linear relationship to glucose concentrations from 0.1 mM to 154 mM.

  11. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing.

  12. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing. PMID:5410553

  13. Nanoparticle preparation of Mefenamic acid by electrospray drying

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkepali, Nurul Karimah Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu Anuar, Nornizar; Naim, M. Nazli; Bakar, Mohd Rushdi Abu

    2014-02-24

    Nanoparticles preparation of Mefenamic acid (MA) by using an electrospray drying method was conducted in this study. Electrospray drying is a process that uses electrostatic force to disperse a conductive liquid stream into fine charged droplets through the coulomb fission of charges in the liquid and finally dry into fine particles. Electrospray drying modes operation usually in Taylor cone jet, and it was formed by controlling applied voltage and liquid flow rate. A conductive liquid (2.77–8.55μScm{sup −1}) which is MA solution was prepared by using acetone with concentration 0.041 and 0.055 M before pumping at a flow rate of 3–6ml/h. By applying the applied voltage at 1.3–1.5 kV, Taylor cone jet mode was formed prior to the electrospray. During electrospray drying process, solvent evaporation from the droplet was occurring that leads to coulomb disruption and may generate to nanoparticles. The dried nanoparticles were collected on a grounded substrate that was placed at varying distance from the electrospray. MA particle with size range of 100–400 nm were produced by electrospray drying process. Characterization of particles by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that particles formed into polymorph I.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of microemulsion systems containing salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Alia A; Nour, Samia A; Sakran, Wedad S; El-Mancy, Shereen Mohamed Sameh

    2009-01-01

    Microemulsions (MEs) are clear, thermodynamically stable systems. They were used to solubilize drugs and to improve topical drug availability. Salicylic acid (SA) is a keratolytic agent used in topical products with antimicrobial actions. The objective of this work was to prepare and evaluate SA ME systems. Different concentrations of SA were incorporated in an ME base composed of isopropyl myristate, water, and Tween 80: propylene glycol in the ratio of 15:1. Three ME systems were prepared: S2%, S5%, and S10% which contain 2%, 5%, and 10% of SA, respectively. Evaluation by examination under cross-polarizing microscope, measuring of percent transmittance, pH measurement, determination of the specific gravity, assessment of rheological properties, and accelerated stability study were carried out. The data showed that the addition of SA markedly affected the physical properties of the base. All systems were not affected by accelerated stability tests. Stability study for 6 months under ambient conditions was carried out for S10%. No remarkable changes were recorded except a decrease in the viscosity value after 1 month. The results suggested that ME could be a suitable vehicle for topical application of different concentrations of SA. PMID:19757081

  15. Preparation and evaluation of microemulsion systems containing salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Alia A; Nour, Samia A; Sakran, Wedad S; El-Mancy, Shereen Mohamed Sameh

    2009-01-01

    Microemulsions (MEs) are clear, thermodynamically stable systems. They were used to solubilize drugs and to improve topical drug availability. Salicylic acid (SA) is a keratolytic agent used in topical products with antimicrobial actions. The objective of this work was to prepare and evaluate SA ME systems. Different concentrations of SA were incorporated in an ME base composed of isopropyl myristate, water, and Tween 80: propylene glycol in the ratio of 15:1. Three ME systems were prepared: S2%, S5%, and S10% which contain 2%, 5%, and 10% of SA, respectively. Evaluation by examination under cross-polarizing microscope, measuring of percent transmittance, pH measurement, determination of the specific gravity, assessment of rheological properties, and accelerated stability study were carried out. The data showed that the addition of SA markedly affected the physical properties of the base. All systems were not affected by accelerated stability tests. Stability study for 6 months under ambient conditions was carried out for S10%. No remarkable changes were recorded except a decrease in the viscosity value after 1 month. The results suggested that ME could be a suitable vehicle for topical application of different concentrations of SA.

  16. SIMPLE, SENSITIVE AND SELECTIVE SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY OF NAPROXEN IN PURE, PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATION AND HUMAN SERUM SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Two simple, rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of naproxen in pure, pharmaceutical preparation and human serum samples. These methods are based on the formation of yellow ion-pair complexes between naproxen and two sulfophthalein acid dyes, namely bromocresol green (BCG method) and bromothymol blue (BTB method). The resulting complexes were measured at 424 nm (BCG method) and at 422 nm (BTB method). The effects of variables such as reagent concentration and reaction time were investigated to optimize the procedure. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range of 10-105 µg/mL and 5-85 µg/mL and the detection limits were found to be 0.347 and 0.31 µg/mL for BCG and BTB methods, respectively. The developed methods have been successfully applied for the determination of naproxen in bulk drugs, pharmaceutical formulations and human serum samples with good accuracy and precision. The results are comparable to those of reference methods, and hence are recommended for quality control and routine analysis.

  17. Two Dimensional Polyamides Prepared From Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids And Amines.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Huang, Zhi Heng; Wright, Stacy C.; Danzig, Morris; Taylor, Andrew C.

    2002-07-17

    A polyamide and a process for preparing the polyamide are disclosed. The process comprises reacting in a reaction mixture a monomer selected from unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of unsaturated carboxylic acids, anhydrides of unsaturated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof, and a first amine to form an intermediate reaction product in the reaction mixture, wherein the first amine is selected from RR.sub.1 NH, RNH.sub.2, RR.sub.1 NH.sub.2.sup.+, RNH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof, wherein R and R.sub.1 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, and reacting the intermediate reaction product and a second amine to form a polyamide, wherein the second amine is selected from R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH, R.sub.2 NH.sub.2, R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH.sub.2.sup.+, R.sub.2 NH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof wherein R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, wherein multiple of the R, R.sub.1, R.sub.2, and R.sub.3 are in vertically aligned spaced relationship along a backbone formed by the polyamide. In one version of the invention, the monomer is selected from maleic anhydride, maleic acid esters, and mixtures thereof. In another version of the invention, the first amine is an alkylamine, such as tetradecylamine, and the second amine is a polyalkylene polyamine, such as pentaethylenehexamine. In yet another version of the invention, the first amine and the second amine are olefinic or acetylenic amines, such as the reaction products of an alkyldiamine and an acetylenic carboxylic acid. The first amine and the second amine may be the same or different depending on the desired polyamide polymer structure.

  18. Preparation and characterization of glycyrrhetinic acid-modified stearic acid-grafted chitosan micelles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Sun, Yong; Wang, Jiangjun; Yan, Guowen; Cui, Zhaoyuan; Yin, Hongli; Wei, Haitian

    2015-01-01

    Stearic acid-grafted chitosan (CS-SA) and glycyrrhetinic acid-conjugated stearic acid-grafted chitosan (GA-CS-SA) were synthesized and were further used for the preparation of micelles. The substitution degree (SD) of SA and GA on CS was measured. The physicochemical properties of CS-SA and GA-CS-SA micelles such as critical micelle concentration (CMC), aggregation number of hydrophobic micro-domain (AN), particle size, zeta potential, and morphology were also determined. The CMC of GA-CS-SA was about 17.49 μg/mL, which was relatively low. Its AN was 2.09. The GA-CS-SA micelles showed spherical shape with mean diameter of 121.1 nm and had positive charge, which suggested that GA-CS-SA could be a good carrier of cancer drug.

  19. U13C cell extract of Pichia pastoris--a powerful tool for evaluation of sample preparation in metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Stefan; Haberhauer-Troyer, Christina; Klavins, Kristaps; Russmayer, Hannes; Steiger, Matthias G; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2012-11-01

    Quantitative metabolic profiling is preceded by dedicated sample preparation protocols. These multistep procedures require detailed optimization and thorough validation. In this work, a uniformly (13)C-labeled (U(13)C) cell extract was used as a tool to evaluate the recoveries and repeatability precisions of the cell extraction and the extract treatment. A homogenous set of biological replicates (n = 15 samples of Pichia pastoris) was prepared for these fundamental experiments. A range of less than 30 intracellular metabolites, comprising amino acids, nucleotides, and organic acids were measured both in monoisotopic (12)C and U(13)C form by LC-MS/MS employing triple quadrupole MS, reversed phase chromatography, and HILIC. Recoveries of the sample preparation procedure ranging from 60 to 100% and repeatability precisions below 10% were obtained for most of the investigated metabolites using internal standardization approaches. Uncertainty budget calculations revealed that for this complex quantification task, in the optimum case, total combined uncertainty of 12% could be achieved. The optimum case would be represented by metabolites, easy to extract from yeast with high and precise recovery. In other cases the total combined uncertainty was significantly higher.

  20. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  1. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  2. Microwave-assisted sample preparation of coal and coal fly ash for subsequent metal determination

    SciTech Connect

    Srogi, K.

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to review microwave-assisted digestion of coal and coal fly ash. A brief description of microwave heating principles is presented. Microwave-assisted digestion appears currently to be the most popular preparation technique, possibly due to the comparatively rapid sample preparation and the reduction of contamination, compared to the conventional hot-plate digestion methods.

  3. Effects of Sample Preparation on the Mechanical Properties of AlMgB14

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu,D.; Chen, B.; Cook, B.; Kruger, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction we have studied the behaviour of two different preparations of the super hard material AlMgB14 at pressures up to 41 GPa. Analysis of lattice parameter data from the high-pressure x-ray measurements provides a bulk modulus (K) of 196 GPa and a pressure derivative of the bulk modulus (K') of 4.2 for sample 1, which was prepared by comminuting the elements and then hot pressing the sample. For sample 2, which was prepared by comminuting the elements and then cold pressing, K=264 GPa and K'=3.7. The differences in K and K' clearly demonstrate that sample preparation significantly affects the mechanical properties of AlMgB14.

  4. Preparation of pure microbiological samples for pyrolysis gas-liquid chromatography studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial samples were prepared for pyrolysis gas-liquid chromatography using cells grown on membrane filters. Pyrochromatograms were reproducible when cells harvested from the filters were pyrolyzed without being washed.

  5. Coagulant properties of Moringa oleifera protein preparations: application to humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andréa F S; Paiva, Patrícia M G; Teixeira, José A C; Brito, António G; Coelho, Luana C B B; Nogueira, Regina

    2012-01-01

    This work aimed to characterize the coagulant properties of protein preparations from Moringa oleifera seeds in the removal of humic acids from water. Three distinct preparations were assayed, namely extract (seeds homogenized with 0.15 M NaCl), fraction (extract precipitated with 60% w/v ammonium sulphate) and cMoL (protein purified with guar gel column chromatography). The extract showed the highest coagulant activity in a protein concentration between 1 mg/L and 180 mg/L at pH 7.0. The zeta potential of the extract (-10 mV to -15 mV) was less negative than that of the humic acid (-41 mV to -42 mV) in a pH range between 5.0 and 8.0; thus, the mechanism that might be involved in this coagulation activity is adsorption and neutralization of charges. Reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was observed in water samples containing 9 mg/L carbon as humic acid when treated with 1 mg/L of the extract. A decrease in colour and in the aromatic content of the treated water was also observed. These results suggested that the extract from M. oleifera seeds in a low concentration (1 mg/L) can be an interesting natural alternative for removing humic acid from water in developing countries. The extract dose determined in the present study does not impart odour or colour to the treated water.

  6. Hybrid molecular probe for nucleic acid analysis in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chaoyong James; Martinez, Karen; Lin, Hui; Tan, Weihong

    2006-08-01

    The ability to detect changes in gene expression, especially in real-time and with sensitivity sufficient enough to monitor small variations in a single-cell, will have considerable value in biomedical research and applications. Out of the many available molecular probes for intracellular monitoring of nucleic acids, molecular beacon (MB) is the most frequently used probe with the advantages of high sensitivity and selectivity. However, any processes in which the MB stem-loop structure is broken will result in a restoration of the fluorescence in MB. This brings in a few possibilities for false positive signal such as nuclease degradation, protein binding, thermodynamic fluctuation, solution composition variations (such as pH, salt concentration) and sticky-end pairing. These unwanted processes do exist inside living cells, making nucleic acid monitoring inside living cells difficult. We have designed and synthesized a hybrid molecular probe (HMP) for intracellular nucleic acid monitoring to overcome these problems. HMP has two DNA probes, one labeled with a donor and the other an acceptor. The two DNA probes are linked by a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker, with each DNA being complementary to adjacent areas of a target sequence. Target binding event brings the donor and acceptor in proximity, resulting in quenching of the donor fluorescence and enhancement of the acceptor emission. The newly designed HMP has high sensitivity, selectivity, and fast hybridization kinetics. The probe is easy to design and synthesize. HMP does not generate any false positive signal upon digestion by nuclease, binding by proteins, forming complexes by sticky-end pairing, or by other molecular interaction processes. HMP is capable of selectively detecting nucleic acid targets from cellular samples.

  7. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one

  8. Sample preparation method for glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses yields higher seam strength

    SciTech Connect

    Cvecek, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Strauss, J.; Wolf, M.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-05-01

    Glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses allows joining without the need of an absorber or a preheating and postheating process. However, cracks generated during the welding process substantially impair the joining strength of the welding seams. In this paper a sample preparation method is described that prevents the formation of cracks. The measured joining strength of samples prepared by this method is substantially higher than previously reported values.

  9. Proteomic Challenges: Sample Preparation Techniques for Microgram-Quantity Protein Analysis from Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Peter; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins regulate many cellular functions and analyzing the presence and abundance of proteins in biological samples are central focuses in proteomics. The discovery and validation of biomarkers, pathways, and drug targets for various diseases can be accomplished using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. However, with mass-limited samples like tumor biopsies, it can be challenging to obtain sufficient amounts of proteins to generate high-quality mass spectrometric data. Techniques developed for macroscale quantities recover sufficient amounts of protein from milligram quantities of starting material, but sample losses become crippling with these techniques when only microgram amounts of material are available. To combat this challenge, proteomicists have developed micro-scale techniques that are compatible with decreased sample size (100 μg or lower) and still enable excellent proteome coverage. Extraction, contaminant removal, protein quantitation, and sample handling techniques for the microgram protein range are reviewed here, with an emphasis on liquid chromatography and bottom-up mass spectrometry-compatible techniques. Also, a range of biological specimens, including mammalian tissues and model cell culture systems, are discussed. PMID:25664860

  10. Defining a sample preparation workflow for advanced virus detection and understanding sensitivity by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christopher J; Feng, Szi Fei; Duncan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (also known as deep sequencing or massively parallel sequencing) for adventitious agent detection is an evolving field that is steadily gaining acceptance in the biopharmaceutical industry. In order for this technology to be successfully applied, a robust method that can isolate viral nucleic acids from a variety of biological samples (such as host cell substrates, cell-free culture fluids, viral vaccine harvests, and animal-derived raw materials) must be established by demonstrating recovery of model virus spikes. In this report, we implement the sample preparation workflow developed by Feng et. al. and assess the sensitivity of virus detection in a next-generation sequencing readout using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We describe a theoretical model to estimate the detection of a target virus in a cell lysate or viral vaccine harvest sample. We show that nuclease treatment can be used for samples that contain a high background of non-relevant nucleic acids (e.g., host cell DNA) in order to effectively increase the sensitivity of sequencing target viruses and reduce the complexity of data analysis. Finally, we demonstrate that at defined spike levels, nucleic acids from a panel of model viruses spiked into representative cell lysate and viral vaccine harvest samples can be confidently recovered by next-generation sequencing.

  11. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/− 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 104 and 108 CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  12. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection.

  13. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  14. Novel sample preparation technique with needle-type micro-extraction device for volatile organic compounds in indoor air samples.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Ikuo; Mizuguchi, Ayako; Fujimura, Koji; Kawakubo, Susumu; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2012-10-01

    A novel needle-type sample preparation device was developed for the effective preconcentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air before gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. To develop a device for extracting a wide range of VOCs typically found in indoor air, several types of particulate sorbents were tested as the extraction medium in the needle-type extraction device. To determine the content of these VOCs, air samples were collected for 30min with the packed sorbent(s) in the extraction needle, and the extracted VOCs were thermally desorbed in a GC injection port by the direct insertion of the needle. A double-bed sorbent consisting of a needle packed with divinylbenzene and activated carbon particles exhibited excellent extraction and desorption performance and adequate extraction capacity for all the investigated VOCs. The results also clearly demonstrated that the proposed sample preparation method is a more rapid, simpler extraction/desorption technique than traditional sample preparation methods. PMID:22975183

  15. Optimisation Of Preparation And Measurement Protocols For Luminescence Dating Of Small Samples From A Suite Of Porcelains And Faiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbridge, C. I.; Rodrigues, A. L.; Dias, M. I.; Prudencio, M. I.; Cardoso, G.

    Experiments designed to evaluate protocols for preparation and luminescence measurement of small samples (<100 mg) from high fired ceramics are described. These include: additive TL of untreatedmaterial; multiple stimulation (Predose TL, OSL, TL) of hydrofluoric washed fragments; Simplified Predose and SAR OSL of silicate powders from hydrochloric and fluorosilicic acid treatment. The 110°C TL signal in the Simplified Predose technique minimised required sample size, but growth with cumulative predose was sub-linear. For exponential extrapolations 11/26 faience samples yielded results within 1σ of typological expectations, but substantial scatter was interpreted as relating to radiation quenching effects. Extrapolation errors were investigated by deactivating samples and regenerating their predose responses. Acid treatment of cores drilled from sherds enabled preparation of mineral and grain-size fractions while avoiding crushing effects, and damage to or contamination by the glaze and decoration. Results of luminescence measurements indicate that future work should focus on the use of open detection filter combinations to increase signal levels, to enable quenching corrections in predose measurements and the use of high temperature TL signals.

  16. Sample preparation for thermo-gravimetric determination and thermo-gravimetric characterization of refuse derived fuel.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T; Bronson, B; Gogolek, P; Mehrani, P

    2016-02-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) is a useful method for characterizing fuels. In the past it has been applied to the study of refuse derived fuel (RDF) and related materials. However, the heterogeneity of RDF makes the preparation of small representative samples very difficult and this difficulty has limited the effectiveness of TGA for characterization of RDF. A TGA method was applied to a variety of materials prepared from a commercially available RDF using a variety of procedures. Applicability of TGA method to the determination of the renewable content of RDF was considered. Cryogenic ball milling was found to be an effective means of preparing RDF samples for TGA. When combined with an effective sample preparation, TGA could be used as an alternative method for assessing the renewable content of RDF.

  17. Expanding the application of the tablet processing workstation to support the sample preparation of oral suspensions.

    PubMed

    Opio, Alex Manuel; Nickerson, Beverly; Xue, Gang; Warzeka, John; Norris, Ken

    2011-06-01

    Sample preparation is the most time-consuming part of the analytical method for powder for oral suspension (POS) assay, purity, and preservative analysis, as this involves multiple dilution and filtration steps. The Tablet Processing Workstation (TPW) was used to automate the sample preparation of a POS formulation. Although the TPW is typically used to automate the preparation of solid oral dosage forms and powders, it contains all of the necessary components to perform POS sample preparation. The TPW exhibited acceptable repeatability in testing 3 lots using 10 replicate preparations per lot. Acceptable linearity of the drug and preservative in the presence of excipients was demonstrated over the range corresponding to 50-150% of intent. Accuracy showed suitable recoveries for all points evaluated. TPW results were shown to correlate to results obtained with the manual method. The TPW method was used to prepare samples in support of manufacturing scale-up efforts. With the efficiencies gained using the TPW, it was possible to analyze a large number of samples generated during process development activities for the POS formulation with minimal human intervention. The extensive data enabled trending of the manufacturing development runs and helped to identify optimization strategies for the process.

  18. Searching for Amino Acids in Meteorites and Comet Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie Elsila

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry plays an important role in the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology, which strives to understand the origin, distribution, and evolution of life throughout the universe. Chemical techniques are used to search for and characterize the basic ingredients for life, from the elements through simple molecules and up to the more complex compounds that may serve as the ingredients for life. The Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory at NASA Goddard uses state-of-the-art laboratory analytical instrumentation in unconventional ways to examine extraterrestrial materials and tackle some of the big questions in astrobiology. This talk will discuss some of the instrumentation and techniques used for these unique samples, as well as some of our most interesting results. The talk will present two areas of particular interest in our laboratory: (1) the search for chiral excesses in meteoritic amino acids, which may help to explain the origin of homochirality in life on Earth; and (2) the detection of amino acids and amines in material returned by NASA's Stardust mission, which rendevouzed with a cornet and brought back cometary particles to the Earth.

  19. Critical comparison of sample preparation strategies for shotgun proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples: insights from liver tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing field of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue proteomics holds promise for improving translational research. Direct tissue trypsinization (DT) and protein extraction followed by in solution digestion (ISD) or filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) are the most common workflows for shotgun analysis of FFPE samples, but a critical comparison of the different methods is currently lacking. Experimental design DT, FASP and ISD workflows were compared by subjecting to the same label-free quantitative approach three independent technical replicates of each method applied to FFPE liver tissue. Data were evaluated in terms of method reproducibility and protein/peptide distribution according to localization, MW, pI and hydrophobicity. Results DT showed lower reproducibility, good preservation of high-MW proteins, a general bias towards hydrophilic and acidic proteins, much lower keratin contamination, as well as higher abundance of non-tryptic peptides. Conversely, FASP and ISD proteomes were depleted in high-MW proteins and enriched in hydrophobic and membrane proteins; FASP provided higher identification yields, while ISD exhibited higher reproducibility. Conclusions These results highlight that diverse sample preparation strategies provide significantly different proteomic information, and present typical biases that should be taken into account when dealing with FFPE samples. When a sufficient amount of tissue is available, the complementary use of different methods is suggested to increase proteome coverage and depth. PMID:25097466

  20. Preparation of alginate beads containing a prodrug of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Tsai; Di Pasqua, Anthony J.; He, Weiling; Tsai, Tsuimin; Sueda, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Yong; Jay, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A penta-ethyl ester prodrug of the radionuclide decorporation agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), which exists as an oily liquid, was encapsulated in alginate beads by the ionotropic gelation method. An optimal formulation was found by varying initial concentrations of DTPA pentaethyl ester, alginate polymer, Tween 80 surfactant and calcium chloride. All prepared alginate beads were ~1.6 mm in diameter, and the optimal formulation had loading and encapsulation efficiencies of 91.0 ± 1.1 and 72.6 ± 2.2%, respectively, and only 3.2 ± 0.8% water absorption after storage at room temperature in ~80% relative humidity. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that DTPA penta-ethyl ester did not react with excipients during formation of the DTPA penta-ethyl ester-containing alginate beads. Release of prodrug from alginate beads was via anomalous transport, and its stability enhanced by encapsulation. Collectively, these data suggest that this solid dosage form may be suitable for oral administration after radionuclide contamination. PMID:23399237

  1. Elimination of the artefact peaks in capillary electrophoresis determination of glutamate by using organic solvents in sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Campos, Camila Dalben Madeira; de Campos Braga, Patricia Aparecida; Reyes, Felix Guillermo Reyes; da Silva, José Alberto Fracassi

    2015-11-01

    Focusing on the demand from the food industry for fast and reliable alternative methods to control the quality of food products, we present in this paper a method for amino acid separation and glutamic acid quantification in complex matrices employing capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection. We demonstrate by simulation and experimentally the use of organic solvents in sample preparation to prevent peak splitting and increase stacking in capillary electrophoretic separations of amino acids. Additionally, we obtained results for glutamic acid quantification comparable to those obtained via traditional methods used at industrial sites. We tested premium and low-cost samples with large variations in their glutamic acid content, which demonstrated the wide range of applicability of the method presented herein. The results of the proposed capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection based capillary electrophoresis method agreed with those obtained by an enzymatic detector and ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, considering a confidence level of 95%. PMID:26332708

  2. Reducing Spatial Heterogeneity of MALDI Samples with Marangoni Flows During Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yin-Hung; Cai, Yi-Hong; Lee, Hsun; Ou, Yu-Meng; Hsiao, Chih-Hao; Tsao, Chien-Wei; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates a method to prepare homogeneous distributions of analytes to improve data reproducibility in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Natural-air drying processes normally result in unwanted heterogeneous spatial distributions of analytes in MALDI crystals and make quantitative analysis difficult. This study demonstrates that inducing Marangoni flows within drying droplets can significantly reduce the heterogeneity problem. The Marangoni flows are accelerated by changing substrate temperatures to create temperature gradients across droplets. Such hydrodynamic flows are analyzed semi-empirically. Using imaging mass spectrometry, changes of heterogeneity of molecules with the change of substrate temperature during drying processes are demonstrated. The observed heterogeneities of the biomolecules reduce as predicted Marangoni velocities increase. In comparison to conventional methods, drying droplets on a 5 °C substrate while keeping the surroundings at ambient conditions typically reduces the heterogeneity of biomolecular ions by 65%-80%. The observation suggests that decreasing substrate temperature during droplet drying processes is a simple and effective means to reduce analyte heterogeneity for quantitative applications.

  3. Reducing Spatial Heterogeneity of MALDI Samples with Marangoni Flows During Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yin-Hung; Cai, Yi-Hong; Lee, Hsun; Ou, Yu-Meng; Hsiao, Chih-Hao; Tsao, Chien-Wei; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates a method to prepare homogeneous distributions of analytes to improve data reproducibility in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Natural-air drying processes normally result in unwanted heterogeneous spatial distributions of analytes in MALDI crystals and make quantitative analysis difficult. This study demonstrates that inducing Marangoni flows within drying droplets can significantly reduce the heterogeneity problem. The Marangoni flows are accelerated by changing substrate temperatures to create temperature gradients across droplets. Such hydrodynamic flows are analyzed semi-empirically. Using imaging mass spectrometry, changes of heterogeneity of molecules with the change of substrate temperature during drying processes are demonstrated. The observed heterogeneities of the biomolecules reduce as predicted Marangoni velocities increase. In comparison to conventional methods, drying droplets on a 5 °C substrate while keeping the surroundings at ambient conditions typically reduces the heterogeneity of biomolecular ions by 65%-80%. The observation suggests that decreasing substrate temperature during droplet drying processes is a simple and effective means to reduce analyte heterogeneity for quantitative applications. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27126469

  4. Preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, J. L.; Browner, R.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) are considered. Analysis of samples from wet oxidation experiments, the development of ion chromatographic techniques utilizing conventional high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment, and an investigation of techniques for interfacing an ion chromatograph (IC) with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICPOES) are discussed.

  5. Planning for a Mars in situ sample preparation and distribution (SPAD) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaty, D. W.; Miller, S.; Zimmerman, W.; Bada, J.; Conrad, P.; Dupuis, E.; Huntsberger, T.; Ivlev, R.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, B. G.; Lindstrom, D.; Lorenzoni, L.; Mahaffy, P.; McNamara, K.; Papanastassiou, D.; Patrick, S.; Peters, S.; Rohatgi, N.; Simmonds, J. J.; Spray, J.; Swindle, T. D.; Tamppari, L.; Treiman, A.; Wolfenbarger, J. K.; Zent, A.

    2004-01-01

    For Mars in situ landed missions, it has become increasingly apparent that significant value may be provided by a shared system that we call a Sample Preparation and Distribution (SPAD) System. A study was conducted to identify the issues and feasibility of such a system for these missions that would provide common functions for: receiving a variety of sample types from multiple sample acquisition systems; conducting preliminary characterization of these samples with non-destructive science instruments and making decisions about what should happen to the samples; performing a variety of sample preparation functions; and, finally, directing the prepared samples to additional science instruments for further analysis. Scientific constraints on the functionality of the system were identified, such as triage, contamination management, and various sample preparation steps, e.g., comminution, splitting, rock surfacing, and sieving. Some simplifying strategies were recommended and an overall science flow was developed. Engineering functional requirements were also investigated and example architectures developed. Preliminary conclusions are that shared SPAD facility systems could indeed add value to future Mars in situ landed missions if they are designed to respond to the particular requirements and constraints of those missions, that such a system appears feasible for consideration, and that certain standards should be developed for key SPAD interfaces.

  6. Preparation and characterization of microporous fibers for sample preparation and LC-MS determination of drugs.

    PubMed

    Buszewski, Boguslaw; Nowaczyk, Jacek; Ligor, Tomasz; Olszowy, Pawel; Ligor, Magdalena; Wasiniak, Bartlomiej; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen K; Amann, Anton

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of polypyrrole (PPy) fibers for solid phase microextraction (SPME). PPy coatings were obtained during the electrochemical polymerization process. The utility of various metal wires (Fe, Cu, Ag, Cu/Ag, kanthal and medical stainless steel) as a support for polymers was compared. Various experimental conditions of the synthesis process such as scan rate, voltage limits and number of scans and deposition time were applied. The average polymer thickness was in the range of 7-125 microm and its weight was in the scope of 0.65-5.6 mg. Different techniques, mainly elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, microscopy, and chromatography were performed for the characterization of obtained fibers with microporous structure. The extraction efficiency of cardiovascular drugs (metoprolol, propranolol, oxprenolol, propafenone and mexiletine) by means of fibers was tested. The concentration of mentioned compounds in standard solution was in the span of 10-150 ng/mL. LC-MS was employed for determination of drugs in desorption solution. LODs varied from 0.013 to 1.51 ng/mL for metoprolol and mexiletine respectively. The repeatability of extraction was obtained with the RSD values lower than 10%. PMID:19569094

  7. Reduction of 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme preparations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amuro, Y; Yamade, W; Kudo, K; Yamamoto, T; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1989-01-01

    The formation of chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acids from 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver preparations was examined in vitro. Liver preparations were incubated with 7-ketolithocholic acid at pH 5.5 in a sodium-potassium-phosphate buffer containing NADPH or NADH. The products formed were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed that chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acids could be formed from 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme(s). The enzyme(s) required NADPH but not NADH as coenzyme and was localized largely in the microsomes. The conjugated 7-ketolithocholic acid, especially the taurine conjugated, was predominantly reduced to chenodeoxycholic acid, whereas the unconjugated 7-ketolithocholic acid was not reduced well to either chenodeoxycholic acid or ursodeoxycholic acid. Thus the reduction of 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme(s) was found to be dependent on whether the substrate was conjugated or not. PMID:2912152

  8. Glass sample preparation and performance investigations. [solar x-ray imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1992-01-01

    This final report details the work performed under this delivery order from April 1991 through April 1992. The currently available capabilities for integrated optical performance modeling at MSFC for large and complex systems such as AXAF were investigated. The Integrated Structural Modeling (ISM) program developed by Boeing for the U.S. Air Force was obtained and installed on two DECstations 5000 at MSFC. The structural, thermal and optical analysis programs available in ISM were evaluated. As part of the optomechanical engineering activities, technical support was provided in the design of support structure, mirror assembly, filter wheel assembly and material selection for the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program. As part of the fabrication activities, a large number of zerodur glass samples were prepared in different sizes and shapes for acid etching, coating and polishing experiments to characterize the subsurface damage and stresses produced by the grinding and polishing operations. Various optical components for AXAF video microscope and the x-ray test facility were also fabricated. A number of glass fabrication and test instruments such as a scatter plate interferometer, a gravity feed saw and some phenolic cutting blades were fabricated, integrated and tested.

  9. Sample preparation method for isolation of single-cell types from mouse liver for proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Hou, Yufang; Chen, Huahai; Wei, Handong; Lin, Weiran; Li, Jichang; Zhang, Ming; He, Fuchu; Jiang, Ying

    2011-09-01

    It becomes increasingly clear that separation of pure cell populations provides a uniquely sensitive and accurate approach to protein profiling in biological systems and opens up a new area for proteomic analysis. The method we described could simultaneously isolate population of hepatocytes (HCs), hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (KCs) and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) by a combination of collagenase-based density gradient centrifugation and magnetic activated cell sorting with high purity and yield for the first time. More than 98% of the isolated HCs were positive for cytokeratin 18, with a viability of 91%. Approximately 97% of the isolated HSCs expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein with a viability of 95%. Nearly 98% of isolated KCs expressed F4/80 with a viability of 94%. And the purity of LSECs reached up to 91% with a viability of 94%. And yield for HCs, HSCs, LSECs and KCs were 6.3, 1.3, 2.6 and 5.0 million per mouse. This systematic isolation method enables us to study the proteome profiling of different types of liver cells with high purity and yield, which is especially useful for sample preparation of Human Liver Proteome Project.

  10. Development of a high vacuum sample preparation system for helium mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Das, N. K.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    A high vacuum sample preparation system for the 3He/4He ratio mass spectrometer (Helix SFT) has been developed to remove all the gaseous constituents excluding helium from the field gases. The sample preparation system comprises of turbo molecular pump, ion pump, zirconium getter, pipettes and vacuum gauges with controller. All these are fitted with cylindrical SS chamber using all metal valves. The field samples are initially treated with activated charcoal trap immersed in liquid nitrogen to cutoff major impurities and moisture present in the sample gas. A sample of 5 ml is collected out of this stage at a pressure of 10-2 mbar. This sample is subsequently purified at a reduced pressure of 10-7 mbar before it is injected into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. The sample pressure was maintained below 10-7 mbar with turbo molecular vacuum pumps and ion pumps. The sample gas passes through several getter elements and a cold finger with the help of manual high vacuum valves before it is fed to the mass spectrometer. Thus the high vacuum sample preparation system introduces completely clean, dry and refined helium sample to the mass spectrometer for best possible analysis of isotopic ratio of helium.

  11. Preparation and characterization of poly(acrylic acid)-hydroxyethyl cellulose graft copolymer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, E S

    2012-10-01

    Poly(acrylic acid) hydroxyethyl cellulose [poly(AA)-HEC] graft copolymer was prepared by polymerizing acrylic acid (AA) with hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) using potassium bromate/thiourea dioxide (KBrO(3)/TUD) as redox initiation system. The polymerization reaction was carried out under a variety of conditions including concentrations of AA, KBrO(3) and TUD, material to liquor ratio and polymerization temperature. The polymerization reaction was monitored by withdrawing samples from the reaction medium and measuring the total conversion. The rheological properties of the poly(AA)-HEC graft copolymer were investigated. The total conversion and rheological properties of the graft copolymer depended on the ratio of KBrO(3) to TUD and on acrylic acid concentration as well as temperature and material to liquor ratio. Optimum conditions of the graft copolymer preparation were 30 mmol KBrO(3) and 30 mmol TUD/100g HEC, 100% AA (based on weight of HEC), duration 2h at temperature 50 °C using a material to liquor ratio of 1:10. PMID:22840022

  12. Preparation and characterization of novel hybrid of chitosan-g-lactic acid and montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Depan, Dilip; Kumar, Annamalai Pratheep; Singh, Raj Pal

    2006-08-01

    The utilization of biopolymers and the development of organic-inorganic hybrids are ever increasing interest of material science researchers around the globe for various applications. The present attempt is intended to prepare nanocomposites of lactic acid grafted chitosan and layered silicates. Nanocomposites were prepared by dissolving chitosan and dispersing sodium montmorillonite in aqueous solution of L-lactic acid with subsequent heating and film casting. They were characterized by conventional techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetric analysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The results from polar optical and transmission electron microscopic measurements are also discussed. Sorption behavior of samples has been followed by measuring swelling degree and contact angle. The films have shown enhanced hydrophilicity when compared with polylactic acid (PLA). Issues on the interactions of polycationic chitosan with clay are also discussed. It is observed that nanocomposites are exhibiting better thermal and physical properties than neat chitosan-g-LA and PLA. PMID:16673390

  13. Design and construction of a sample preparation chamber for atomic beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, C.

    1992-05-01

    A new type of atomic beam scattering spectrometer was built to advance the usefulness of the atomic beam scattering technique as a surface dynamics probe. The facility was not only built to investigate the typical alkali halide samples such as NaCl, NaF, and LiF, but also to investigate metallic surfaces. Metal samples are more complicated to study, due to their reactive surfaces and the sample preparation process. A surface analysis chamber was constructed as an attachment to the scattering facility to treat samples under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and then transfer these samples into the scattering facility. This surface analysis chamber is referred to as the sample preparation chamber and is the basis for this thesis.

  14. Impact of sample preparation on mineralogical analysis of zero-valent iron reactive barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Debra Helen; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Roh, Yul

    2003-03-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) are increasingly being used to remediate contaminated ground water. Corrosion of Fe{sup 0} filings and the formation of precipitates can occur when the PRB material comes in contact with ground water and may reduce the lifespan and effectiveness of the barrier. At present, there are no routine procedures for preparing and analyzing the mineral precipitates from Fe{sup 0} PRB material. These procedures are needed because mineralogical composition of corrosion products used to interpret the barrier processes can change with iron oxidation and sample preparation. The objectives of this study were (i) to investigate a method of preparing Fe{sup 0} reactive barrier material for mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and (ii) to identify Fe mineral phases and rates of transformations induced by different mineralogical preparation techniques. Materials from an in situ Fe{sup 0} PRB were collected by undisturbed coring and processed for XRD analysis after different times since sampling for three size fractions and by various drying treatments. We found that whole-sample preparation for analysis was necessary because mineral precipitates occurred within the PRB material in different size fractions of the samples. Green rusts quickly disappeared from acetone-dried samples and were not present in air-dried and oven-dried samples. Maghemite/magnetite content increased over time and in oven-dried samples, especially after heating to 105 C. We conclude that care must be taken during sample preparation of Fe{sup 0} PRB material, especially for detection of green rusts, to ensure accurate identification of minerals present within the barrier system.

  15. A review of toxicity from topical salicylic acid preparations.

    PubMed

    Madan, Raman K; Levitt, Jacob

    2014-04-01

    Topical salicylic acid is often used in dermatologic conditions because of its keratolytic, bacteriostatic, fungicidal, and photoprotective properties. The bioavailability of salicylic acid differs depending on the vehicle used and pH of transcellular fluids. Although rare, salicylic acid toxicity (salicylism) can occur from topical application. Physicians should be mindful of the potential for salicylism or even death from topically applied salicylic acid.

  16. Pilot study of a rapid and minimally instrumented sputum sample preparation method for molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Tanya M; Weigel, Kris M; Lakey Becker, Annie; Ontengco, Delia; Narita, Masahiro; Tolstorukov, Ilya; Doebler, Robert; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Niemz, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) enables rapid and sensitive diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), which facilitates treatment and mitigates transmission. Nucleic acid extraction from sputum constitutes the greatest technical challenge in TB NAAT for near-patient settings. This report presents preliminary data for a semi-automated sample processing method, wherein sputum is disinfected and liquefied, followed by PureLyse(®) mechanical lysis and solid-phase nucleic acid extraction in a miniaturized, battery-operated bead blender. Sputum liquefaction and disinfection enabled a >10(4) fold reduction in viable load of cultured Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) spiked into human sputum, which mitigates biohazard concerns. Sample preparation via the PureLyse(®) method and a clinically validated manual method enabled positive PCR-based detection for sputum spiked with 10(4) and 10(5) colony forming units (cfu)/mL M.tb. At 10(3) cfu/mL sputum, four of six and two of six samples amplified using the comparator and PureLyse(®) method, respectively. For clinical specimens from TB cases and controls, the two methods provided 100% concordant results for samples with 1 mL input volume (N = 41). The semi-automated PureLyse(®) method therefore performed similarly to a validated manual comparator method, but is faster, minimally instrumented, and can be integrated into TB molecular diagnostic platforms designed for near-patient low-resource settings. PMID:26785769

  17. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Cancer.gov

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  18. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, M. Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g−1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g−1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g−1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g−1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g−1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g−1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  19. A green analytical method using ultrasound in sample preparation for the flow injection determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yebra, M Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5-30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2-4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h(-1) were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4-25.61 μg g(-1) for iron, 5.74-18.30 μg g(-1) for manganese, and 33.27-57.90 μg g(-1) for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75-9.90 μg g(-1) for iron, 0.47-5.05 μg g(-1) for manganese, and 1.55-15.12 μg g(-1) for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  20. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.; Schoenung, Julie M.; van Rooyen, Isabella J.; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2015-09-09

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpled discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.

  1. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    DOE PAGES

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.; Schoenung, Julie M.; van Rooyen, Isabella J.; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2015-09-09

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpledmore » discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.« less

  2. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    SciTech Connect

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01

    The world’s most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  3. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  4. Preparation and adsorption property of xylan/poly(acrylic acid) magnetic nanocomposite hydrogel adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Baichen; Jing, Zhanxin; Wang, Haihong

    2015-03-15

    Adsorbents based on natural polysaccharides have attracted increasing interest because of their low-cost and biodegradability, particularly, polysaccharide-based nanocomposite adsorbents. In this study the xylan/poly(acrylic acid) magnetic nanocomposite hydrogel adsorbent was prepared from wheat straw xylan and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and its adsorption property was studied on methylene blue removal. The prepared hydrogel adsorbent had a semi-interpenetrating network structure and exhibited a macro-porous structure with interconnected porous channels. Super-paramagnetic characteristic behavior was observed from magnetic analysis using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The optimum condition for methylene blue adsorption on the adsorbent was found at pH 8 with an adsorbent dosage of 3g/L and an initial concentration of 400mg/L, and the removal percentage reached above 90%. The adsorption isotherm of methylene blue on the prepared hydrogel adsorbent was fitted to the Langmuir model, and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model could describe the adsorption process. All obtained results indicated that the prepared hydrogel adsorbent is promising for water treatment applications. PMID:25542101

  5. Fast derivatization of fatty acids in different meat samples for gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ingrid Lima; Claus, Thiago; Oliveira Santos Júnior, Oscar; Almeida, Vitor Cinque; Magon, Thiago; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergilio

    2016-07-22

    In order to analyze the composition of fatty acids employing gas chromatography as the separation method, a derivatization of lipids using esterification and transesterification reactions is needed. The methodologies currently available are time consuming and use large amounts of sample and reagents. Thus, this work proposes a new procedure to carry out the derivatization of fatty acids without the need for prior extraction of lipids. The use of small amounts of sample (100mg) allows the analysis to be performed in specific parts of animals, in most cases without having them slaughtered. Another benefit is the use of small amounts of reagents (only 2mL of NaOH/Methanol and H2SO4/Methanol). The use of an experimental design procedure (Design Expert software) allows the optimization of the alkaline and acid reaction times. The procedure was validated for five minutes in both steps. The method was validated for bovine fat, beef, chicken, pork, fish and shrimp meats. The results for the merit figures of accuracy (from 101.07% to 109.18%), precision (RSDintra-day (from 0.65 to 3.93%), RSDinter-day (from 1.57 to 5.22%)), linearity (R(2)=0.9864) and robustness confirmed that the new method is satisfactory within the linear range of 2-30% of lipids in the sample. Besides the benefits of minimizing the amount of samples and reagents, the procedure enables gas chromatography sample preparation in a very short time compared with traditional procedures. PMID:27320376

  6. Two-in-one sample preparation for plan-view TEM.

    PubMed

    Sáfrán, György; Szász, Noémi; Sáfrán, Eszter

    2015-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation requires special skills, it is time consuming and costly, hence, an increase of the efficiency is of primary importance. This article describes a method that duplicates the yield of the conventional mechanical and ion beam preparation of plan-view TEM samples. As a modification of the usual procedures, instead of one two different samples are comprised in a single specimen. The two pre-cut slabs, one from each samples, are embedded side by side in the window of a 3 mm dia Ti disk and the specimen is thinned mechanically and by ion milling until perforation that occurs at the interface of the two different slabs. That, with proper implementation, provides acceptable size thin area for the TEM study of both samples. The suitability of the two-in-one method has been confirmed through examples.

  7. Optimizing Frozen Sample Preparation for Laser Microdissection: Assessment of CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®.

    PubMed

    Golubeva, Yelena G; Smith, Roberta M; Sternberg, Lawrence R

    2013-01-01

    Laser microdissection is an invaluable tool in medical research that facilitates collecting specific cell populations for molecular analysis. Diversity of research targets (e.g., cancerous and precancerous lesions in clinical and animal research, cell pellets, rodent embryos, etc.) and varied scientific objectives, however, present challenges toward establishing standard laser microdissection protocols. Sample preparation is crucial for quality RNA, DNA and protein retrieval, where it often determines the feasibility of a laser microdissection project. The majority of microdissection studies in clinical and animal model research are conducted on frozen tissues containing native nucleic acids, unmodified by fixation. However, the variable morphological quality of frozen sections from tissues containing fat, collagen or delicate cell structures can limit or prevent successful harvest of the desired cell population via laser dissection. The CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®, a commercial device that improves cryosectioning outcomes on glass slides has been reported superior for slide preparation and isolation of high quality osteocyte RNA (frozen bone) during laser dissection. Considering the reported advantages of CryoJane for laser dissection on glass slides, we asked whether the system could also work with the plastic membrane slides used by UV laser based microdissection instruments, as these are better suited for collection of larger target areas. In an attempt to optimize laser microdissection slide preparation for tissues of different RNA stability and cryosectioning difficulty, we evaluated the CryoJane system for use with both glass (laser capture microdissection) and membrane (laser cutting microdissection) slides. We have established a sample preparation protocol for glass and membrane slides including manual coating of membrane slides with CryoJane solutions, cryosectioning, slide staining and dissection procedure, lysis and RNA extraction that facilitated

  8. Effect of Oral Coadministration of Ascorbic Acid with Ling Zhi Preparation on Pharmacokinetics of Ganoderic Acid A in Healthy Male Subjects: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Tawasri, Patcharanee; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Tharatha, Somsak

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-phase crossover study was to determine the effect of ascorbic acid on pharmacokinetics of ganoderic acid A, an important biologically active triterpenoid compound with anticancer activities, following oral administration of water extract of fruiting bodies of Ling Zhi in 12 healthy male subjects. Each subject was randomized to receive either one of the two regimens: (1) a single dose of 3,000 mg of the Ling Zhi preparation or (2) a single dose of 3,000 mg of the Ling Zhi preparation in combination with 2,500 mg of ascorbic acid. After a washout period of at least two weeks, subjects were switched to receive the alternate regimen. Blood samples were collected in each phase immediately before dosing and at specific time points for 8 hours after dosing. Plasma ganoderic acid A concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters analyzed were maximal plasma concentration (Cmax), time to reach peak concentration (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), and half-life (t1/2). An oral coadministration of ascorbic acid with Ling Zhi preparation did not significantly alter the pharmacokinetic parameters of ganoderic acid A in healthy male subjects. PMID:27747224

  9. Total Sample Conditioning and Preparation of Nanoliter Volumes for Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Stefan A; Albiez, Stefan; Opara, Nadia; Chami, Mohamed; Schmidli, Claudio; Bieri, Andrej; Padeste, Celestino; Stahlberg, Henning; Braun, Thomas

    2016-05-24

    Electron microscopy (EM) entered a new era with the emergence of direct electron detectors and new nanocrystal electron diffraction methods. However, sample preparation techniques have not progressed and still suffer from extensive blotting steps leading to a massive loss of sample. Here, we present a simple but versatile method for the almost lossless sample conditioning and preparation of nanoliter volumes of biological samples for EM, keeping the sample under close to physiological condition. A microcapillary is used to aspirate 3-5 nL of sample. The microcapillary tip is immersed into a reservoir of negative stain or trehalose, where the sample becomes conditioned by diffusive exchange of salt and heavy metal ions or sugar molecules, respectively, before it is deposited as a small spot onto an EM grid. We demonstrate the use of the method to prepare protein particles for imaging by transmission EM and nanocrystals for analysis by electron diffraction. Furthermore, the minute sample volume required for this method enables alternative strategies for biological experiments, such as the analysis of the content of a single cell by visual proteomics, fully exploiting the single molecule detection limit of EM. PMID:27074622

  10. Electric transport measurements on bulk, polycrystalline MgB2 samples prepared at various reaction temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Inoue, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Murakami, M.; Hartmann, U.

    2016-03-01

    A series of disk-shaped, bulk MgB2 superconductors (sample diameter up to 4 cm) was prepared in order to improve the performance for superconducting super-magnets. Several samples were fabricated using a solid state reaction in pure Ar atmosphere from 750 to 950oC in order to determine the optimum processing parameters to obtain the highest critical current density as well as large trapped field values. Additional samples were prepared with added silver (up to 10 wt.-%) to the Mg and B powder. Magneto-resistance data and I/V-characteristics were recorded using an Oxford Instruments Teslatron system. From Arrhenius plots, we determine the TAFF pinning potential, U 0. The I/V-characteristics yield detailed information on the current flow through the polycrystalline samples. The current flow is influenced by the presence of pores in the samples. Our analysis of the achieved critical currents together with a thorough microstructure investigation reveals that the samples prepared at temperatures between 775°C and 805°C exhibit the smallest grains and the best connectivity between them, while the samples fabricated at higher reaction temperatures show a reduced connectivity and lower pinning potential. Doping the samples with silver leads to a considerable increase of the pinning potential and hence, the critical current densities.

  11. [Sample preparation methods for chromatographic analysis of organic components in atmospheric particulate matter].

    PubMed

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-09-01

    The determination of organic composition in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is of great importance in understanding how PM affects human health, environment, climate, and ecosystem. Organic components are also the scientific basis for emission source tracking, PM regulation and risk management. Therefore, the molecular characterization of the organic fraction of PM has become one of the priority research issues in the field of environmental analysis. Due to the extreme complexity of PM samples, chromatographic methods have been the chief selection. The common procedure for the analysis of organic components in PM includes several steps: sample collection on the fiber filters, sample preparation (transform the sample into a form suitable for chromatographic analysis), analysis by chromatographic methods. Among these steps, the sample preparation methods will largely determine the throughput and the data quality. Solvent extraction methods followed by sample pretreatment (e. g. pre-separation, derivatization, pre-concentration) have long been used for PM sample analysis, and thermal desorption methods have also mainly focused on the non-polar organic component analysis in PM. In this paper, the sample preparation methods prior to chromatographic analysis of organic components in PM are reviewed comprehensively, and the corresponding merits and limitations of each method are also briefly discussed.

  12. Process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid and salts thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I.

    1994-01-01

    A process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid (1) and salts thereof from a glucose source containing 1,4-linked glucose as a substituent is described. The process uses an alkali metal hdyroxide and hydrogen peroxide to convert the glucose source to (1). The compound (1) is useful as a chemical intermediate to naturally occurring fatty acids and is used to prepare 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid-gamma-lactone (2) and furanone (3), particularly stereoisomers of these compounds.

  13. Process For The Preparation Of 3,4-Dihyd Roxybutanoic Acid And Salts Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I.

    1994-06-07

    A process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid (1) and salts thereof from a glucose source containing 1,4-linked glucose as a substituent is described. The process uses an alkali metal hdyroxide and hydrogen peroxide to convert the glucose source to (1). The compound (1) is useful as a chemical intermediate to naturally occurring fatty acids and is used to prepare 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid-gamma-lactone (2) and furanone (3), particularly stereoisomers of these compounds.

  14. Is trichloroacetic acid an insufficient sample quencher of redox reactions?

    PubMed

    Curbo, Sophie; Reiser, Kathrin; Rundlöf, Anna-Klara; Karlsson, Anna; Lundberg, Mathias

    2013-03-01

    The global protein thiol pool has been reported to play a major role in the defense against oxidative stress as a redox buffer similar to glutathione. The present study uses a novel method to visualize cellular changes of the global protein thiol pool in response to induced oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, the results showed an uneven distribution of protein thiols in resting cells with no apparent change in their level or distribution in response to diamide as has been reported previously. Further analysis revealed that thiol pool oxidation is artificially high due to insufficient activity of the widely used sample quencher trichloroacetic acid (TCA). This suggests that previously published articles based on TCA as a quencher should be interpreted with caution as TCA could have caused similar artifacts. Overall, the results presented here question the major role for the global thiol pool in the defense against oxidative stress. Instead our hypothesis is that the fraction of proteins involved in response to oxidative stress is much smaller than previously anticipated in support of a fine-tuned cell signaling by redox regulation.

  15. Automated sample preparation and LC-MS for high-throughput ADME quantification.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Desmond

    2002-01-01

    Bioanalytical groups in the pharmaceutical industry provide quantitative data to support all stages of drug discovery. The increased use of 96-well plates and robotic liquid handling systems, the availability of robust triple quadruple mass spectrometers, and developments in chromatographic and samples preparation techniques, have all increased the rate at which this data can be generated. This review describes currently used methods and emerging technologies for automation of high-throughput quantitative bioanalysis. The focus is on recent applications of sample preparation and chromatography techniques compatible with detection by triple quadruple mass spectrometers.

  16. Preparation and characterization of SPION functionalized via caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, A.; Amir, Md.; Günerb, S.; Sözeri, H.

    2015-12-01

    Caffeic acid coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION-CFA) was synthesized by reflux method. The structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) techniques. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the presence of CA on the surface of SPION. The theoretical analyzes performed on recorded room temperature VSM spectrum confirmed the formation of superparamagnetic nature of SPION-CFA. The particle size dependent Langevin function was applied to determine the average magnetic particle dimension (Dmag) around 11.93 nm. In accordance, the average crystallite and particle sizes were obtained as 11.40 nm and ~12.00 nm from XRD and TEM measurements. The extrapolated specific saturation magnetization (σs) is 44.11 emu/g and measured magnetic moment is 1.83 μB. These parameters assign small order of magnetization for NPs with respect to bulk Fe3O4. Magnetic anisotropy was offered as uniaxial and calculated effective anisotropy constant (Keff) is 34.82×104 Erg/g. The size-dependent saturation magnetization suggests the existence of a magnetically inactive layer as 1.035 nm for SPION-CFA.

  17. Analysis of Underivatized Amino Acids in Geological Samples Using Ion-Pairing Liquid Chromatography and Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, De-Ling; Beegle, Luther W.; Kanik, Isik

    2008-04-01

    The capability of detecting biomarkers, such as amino acids, in chemically complex field samples is essential to establishing the knowledge required to search for chemical signatures of life in future planetary explorations. However, due to the complexities of in situ investigations, it is important to establish a new analytical scheme that utilizes a minimal amount of sample preparation. This paper reports the feasibility of a novel and sensitive technique, which has been established to quantitate amino acids in terrestrial crust samples directly without derivatization using volatile ion-pairing liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization source. Adequate separation of 20 underivatized amino acids was achieved on a C18 capillary column within 26 min with nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) as ion-pairing reagent. Each amino acid was identified from its retention time as well as from its characteristic parent-to-daughter ion transition. Using tandem mass spectrometry as a detection technique allows co-elution of some amino acids, as it is more specific than traditional spectrophotometric methods. In the present study, terrestrial samples collected from 3 different locations were analyzed for their water-extractable free amino acid contents, following the removal of metal and organic interferences via ion exchange procedures. This is the first time that amino acids in geological samples were directly determined quantitatively without complicated derivatization steps. Depending on the amino acid, the detection limits varied from 0.02 to 5.7 pmol with the use of a 1 μl sample injection loop.

  18. Analysis of underivatized amino acids in geological samples using ion-pairing liquid chromatography and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, De-Ling; Beegle, Luther W; Kanik, Isik

    2008-04-01

    The capability of detecting biomarkers, such as amino acids, in chemically complex field samples is essential to establishing the knowledge required to search for chemical signatures of life in future planetary explorations. However, due to the complexities of in situ investigations, it is important to establish a new analytical scheme that utilizes a minimal amount of sample preparation. This paper reports the feasibility of a novel and sensitive technique, which has been established to quantitate amino acids in terrestrial crust samples directly without derivatization using volatile ion-pairing liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization source. Adequate separation of 20 underivatized amino acids was achieved on a C(18) capillary column within 26 min with nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) as ion-pairing reagent. Each amino acid was identified from its retention time as well as from its characteristic parent-to-daughter ion transition. Using tandem mass spectrometry as a detection technique allows co-elution of some amino acids, as it is more specific than traditional spectrophotometric methods. In the present study, terrestrial samples collected from 3 different locations were analyzed for their water-extractable free amino acid contents, following the removal of metal and organic interferences via ion exchange procedures. This is the first time that amino acids in geological samples were directly determined quantitatively without complicated derivatization steps. Depending on the amino acid, the detection limits varied from 0.02 to 5.7 pmol with the use of a 1 microl sample injection loop. PMID:18393689

  19. Towards Routine Backside SIMS Sample Preparation for Efficient Support of Advanced IC Process Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopstaken, M. J. P.; Cabral, C.; Pfeiffer, D.; Molella, C.; Ronsheim, P.

    2009-09-01

    Backside Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) profiling is a seemingly simple option to circumvent commonly observed depth resolution degradation in conventional front-side SIMS. However, large practical barriers in backside sample preparation prohibit a wider and more routine use of backside SIMS. Here, we explore the use of XeF2 dry etching instead of wet etching for removal of the residual Si-substrate. The former process is essentially isotropic with similar etch rates for the different crystallographic orientations and highly selective towards the dense thermal oxide (BOX). This eliminates the need for high-precision polishing of individual samples, reducing the substrate removal to a few coarse and relatively rapid polishing steps only. Moreover, XeF2 etching can be performed in unattended fashion and simultaneously on multiple samples, greatly increasing volume and turn-around time for backside sample preparation. Here we have explained the different practical aspects and demonstrated the feasibility of this novel approach for backside preparation for different front-end (S/D contact silicide metal, high-k metal gate) and back-end (ECD-Copper) of line applications. In conclusion, availability of a robust and reliable procedure for backside SIMS sample preparation with rapid turn-around is highly beneficial for a more efficient analytical support of advanced IC process development.

  20. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  1. Sample collection and preparation of biofluids and extracts for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M; Al-Talla, Zeyad A; Kharbatia, Najeh M

    2015-01-01

    To maximize the utility of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in metabonomics research, all stages of the experimental design should be standardized, including sample collection, storage, preparation, and sample separation. Moreover, the prerequisite for any GC-MS analysis is that a compound must be volatile and thermally stable if it is to be analyzed using this technique. Since many metabolites are nonvolatile and polar in nature, they are not readily amenable to analysis by GC-MS and require initial chemical derivatization of the polar functional groups in order to reduce the polarity and to increase the thermal stability and volatility of the analytes. In this chapter, an overview is presented of the optimum approach to sample collection, storage, and preparation for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabonomics with particular focus on urine samples as example of biofluids.

  2. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A.; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target’s nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer’s heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers. PMID:27362424

  3. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers.

  4. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers. PMID:27362424

  5. Development and Evaluation of a Micro- and Nanoscale Proteomic Sample Preparation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haixing H.; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Clauss, Therese R.W.; Anderson, David J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Sforza, Daniel M.; Pallavicini, Maria; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-10-05

    Efficient and effective sample preparation of micro- and nano-scale (micro- and nano-gram) clinical specimens for proteomic applications is often difficult due to losses during the processing steps. Herein we describe a simple “single-tube” preparation protocol appropriate for small proteomic samples using the organic co-solvent, trifluoroethanol (TFE). TFE facilitates both protein extraction and protein denaturation without requiring a separate cleanup step, thus minimizing sample loss. The performance of the TFE method was initially evaluated by comparing to traditional detergent-based methods on relatively large scale sample processing using human breast cancer cells and mouse brain tissue. The results demonstrated that the TFE protocol provided comparable results to the traditional detergent-based protocols for larger samples (milligrams), based on both sample recovery and peptide/protein identification. The effectiveness of this protocol for micro- and nano-scale sample processing was then evaluated for the extraction of proteins/peptides and shown effective for small mouse brain tissue samples (~ 20 μg total protein content) and also for samples of ~ 5 000 human breast cancer MCF-7 cells (~ 500 ng total protein content), where the detergent-based methods were ineffective due to losses during cleanup and transfer steps.

  6. InP sample preparation for the TEM by photochemical etching, ion milling, and chemical thinning.

    PubMed

    Lowes, T D; Cassidy, D T

    1992-11-01

    Photochemical etching (PCE) as a method for preparation of InP semiconductor plan view samples for the transmission electron microscope is demonstrated and compared to the methods of ion milling and chemical thinning. PCE can produce small area samples for TEM analysis quickly and accurately. Also, the resulting thin regions are surrounded by a built-in stabilizing structure that improves handleability and reduces the occurrence of handling induced fracture.

  7. GraFix: sample preparation for single-particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Berthold; Fischer, Niels; Golas, Monika Mariola; Sander, Bjoern; Dube, Prakash; Boehringer, Daniel; Hartmuth, Klaus; Deckert, Jochen; Hauer, Florian; Wolf, Elmar; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Urlaub, Henning; Herzog, Franz; Peters, Jan Michael; Poerschke, Dietmar; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stark, Holger

    2008-01-01

    We developed a method, named GraFix, that considerably improves sample quality for structure determination by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). GraFix uses a glycerol gradient centrifugation step in which the complexes are centrifuged into an increasing concentration of a chemical fixation reagent to prevent aggregation and to stabilize individual macromolecules. The method can be used to prepare samples for negative-stain, cryo-negative-stain and, particularly, unstained cryo-EM. PMID:18157137

  8. Laser ablation in liquids: an efficient sample preparation technique in ICP elemental analysis of art materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Kozhukh, N. M.; Muravitskaya, E. V.; Rosantsev, V. A.; Belkov, M. V.; Ershov-Pavlov, E. A.

    2007-06-01

    Laser ablation in liquid media is proposed as a new sample preparation technique in elemental composition analysis of art pigments using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Solid samples are transformed to colloidal solutions of nanosized analyte particles. This makes the technique compatible with convevtional solutionbased standardization. The dissociation of particles in solution is improved, which increases the accuracy of quantitative ICP measurements.

  9. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry of bone-Impact of sample preparation and measurement conditions.

    PubMed

    Henss, Anja; Hild, Anne; Rohnke, Marcus; Wenisch, Sabine; Janek, Juergen

    2015-06-07

    Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) enables the simultaneous detection of organic and inorganic ions and fragments with high mass and spatial resolution. Due to recent technical developments, ToF-SIMS has been increasingly applied in the life sciences where sample preparation plays an eminent role for the quality of the analytical results. This paper focusses on sample preparation of bone tissue and its impact on ToF-SIMS analysis. The analysis of bone is important for the understanding of bone diseases and the development of replacement materials and new drugs for the cure of diseased bone. The main purpose of this paper is to find out which preparation process is best suited for ToF-SIMS analysis of bone tissue in order to obtain reliable and reproducible analytical results. The influence of the embedding process on the different components of bone is evaluated using principal component analysis. It is shown that epoxy resin as well as methacrylate based plastics (Epon and Technovit) as embedding materials do not infiltrate the mineralized tissue and that cut sections are better suited for the ToF-SIMS analysis than ground sections. In case of ground samples, a resin layer is smeared over the sample surface due to the polishing step and overlap of peaks is found. Beside some signals of fatty acids in the negative ion mode, the analysis of native, not embedded samples does not provide any advantage. The influence of bismuth bombardment and O2 flooding on the signal intensity of organic and inorganic fragments due to the variation of the ionization probability is additionally discussed. As C60 sputtering has to be applied to remove the smeared resin layer, its effect especially on the organic fragments of the bone is analyzed and described herein.

  10. In vitro preparation of amelogenin nanoparticles carrying nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Johan; Bülow, Leif

    2014-06-01

    Amelogenin, a matrix protein involved in biomineralization of enamel, can self-assemble to form nanospheres in a pH-dependent manner. Nucleic acids (single-stranded, double-stranded, and plasmid DNA, as well as RNA) could be co-precipitated with amelogenin, demonstrating a strong binding of nucleic acids to amelogenin. The amounts of co-precipitated nucleic acids were analyzed and binding levels upto 90 μg DNA/mg amelogenin was achieved. The co-precipitation could also be carried out in a bacterial cell homogenate, and no bacterial proteins were found in the amelogenin aggregates, suggesting specificity for nucleic acid binding. Dynamic light scattering showed that amelogenin nanosphere structure is maintained upon DNA binding with an upto 2.6 nm increase in diameter. The reported binding of nucleic acids to amelogenin can be explored practically for nucleic acid separation.

  11. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    DOE PAGES

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powdermore » prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.« less

  12. The influence of target preparation and mode of irradiation on PIXE analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galuszka, Janusz; Jarczyk, Lucjan; Rokita, Eugeniusz; Strzalkowski, Adam; Sych, Marek

    1984-04-01

    The following methods of target preparation were examined and compared: dry ashing at high temperature, low temperature ashing in plasma asher, wet ashing, lyophilization at a temperature of 35°C, cryofixation with drying in vacuum and dehydration in alcohol with drying in vacuum. All these techniques were applied to prepare targets from five different rat organs: liver, kidney, brain, lung and muscle tissue. The dried and powdered sample material was pressed into pellets or was distributed on formvar film. The evaporation of the thin carbon layer on the investigated target and placing of the thin carbon film in front of a target were also tested. The targets were irradiated in vacuum using an external beam in the air chamber. The influence of the method of target preparation on the detection limits, time requirements and escape of elements from the sample material is discussed.

  13. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollock, G.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of d-alanine and d-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other d-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of d-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than d-alanine and d-aspartic acid. These d-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria. ?? 1978.

  14. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  15. Practical preparation procedures for docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles using polylactic acid-co-glycolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Chang-Gu; Noh, Young-Wook; Baek, Jong-Suep; Lim, Ji-Ho; Hwang, Chan-Ju; Na, Young-Guk; Shin, Sang-Chul; Cho, Cheong-Weon

    2011-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles fabricated from the biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), are the most intensively investigated polymers for drug delivery systems. The objective of this study was to explore fully the development of a PLGA nanoparticle drug delivery system for alternative preparation of a commercial formulation. In our nanoparticle fabrication, our purpose was to compare various preparation parameters. Methods Docetaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by a single emulsion technique and solvent evaporation. The nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy for surface morphology, dynamic light scattering for size and zeta potential, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for surface chemistry, and high-performance liquid chromatography for in vitro drug release kinetics. To obtain a smaller particle, 0.2% polyvinyl alcohol, 0.03% D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS), 2% Poloxamer 188, a five-minute sonication time, 130 W sonication power, evaporation with magnetic stirring, and centrifugation at 8000 rpm were selected. To increase encapsulation efficiency in the nanoparticles, certain factors were varied, ie, 2–5 minutes of sonication time, 70–130 W sonication power, and 5–25 mg drug loading. Results A five-minute sonication time, 130 W sonication power, and a 10 mg drug loading amount were selected. Under these conditions, the nanoparticles reached over 90% encapsulation efficiency. Release kinetics showed that 20.83%, 40.07%, and 51.5% of the docetaxel was released in 28 days from nanoparticles containing Poloxamer 188, TPGS, or polyvinyl alcohol, respectively. TPGS and Poloxamer 188 had slower release kinetics than polyvinyl alcohol. It was predicted that there was residual drug remaining on the surface from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Conclusion Our research shows that the choice of surfactant is important for controlled release of

  16. Soil and Water – What is Detectable through Microbiological Sample Preparation Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concerns of a potential terrorist’s use of biological agents in soil and ground water are articulated by comparisons to major illnesses in this Country involving contaminated drinking water sources. Objectives are focused on the importance of sample preparation in the rapid, ...

  17. Standardized Sample Preparation Using a Drop-on-Demand Printing Platform

    PubMed Central

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Hazard detection systems must be evaluated with appropriate test material concentrations under controlled conditions in order to accurately identify and quantify unknown residues commonly utilized in theater. The existing assortment of hazard reference sample preparation methods/techniques presents a range of variability and reproducibility concerns, making it increasingly difficult to accurately assess optically- based detection technologies. To overcome these challenges, we examined the optimization, characterization, and calibration of microdroplets from a drop-on-demand microdispenser that has a proven capability for the preparation of energetic reference materials. Research presented herein focuses on the development of a simplistic instrument calibration technique and sample preparation protocol for explosive materials testing based on drop-on-demand technology. Droplet mass and reproducibility were measured using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy. The results presented here demonstrate the operational factors that influence droplet dispensing for specific materials (e.g., energetic and interferents). Understanding these parameters permits the determination of droplet and sample uniformity and reproducibility (typical R2 values of 0.991, relative standard deviation or RSD ≤ 5%), and thus the demonstrated maturation of a successful and robust methodology for energetic sample preparation. PMID:23653050

  18. Direct preparation of spherically agglomerated salicylic acid crystals during crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Y; Okumura, M; Takenaka, H; Kojima, A

    1984-11-01

    Needle-like salicylic acid crystals were transformed into a spherically shaped dense form during crystallization by the spherical crystallization technique. Agitation of a mixture of ethanol-water-chloroform containing salicylic acid yielded spherically agglomerated salicylic acid crystals. The crystallinity of the agglomerated salicylic acid the amount of ethanol in the solvent mixture was decreased. The wettability of the agglomerated crystals increased when the amount of ethanol in the solvent mixture was decreased, and this enhanced the dissolution rate of the crystals. The remarkable improvements in the flow and packing of the agglomerated crystals enabled the direct compression of the crystals.

  19. Preparative two-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the purification of complex pharmaceutical samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinong; Zeng, Lu; Pham, Catherine; Xu, Rongda

    2014-01-10

    A new preparative two-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system (2D LC-LC/MS) has been designed and implemented to enhance capability and resolving power for the separation and purification of pharmaceutical samples. The system was constructed by modifications of a conventional preparative LC/MS instrument with the addition of a set of switching valves and a sample loop, as well as interfacing a custom software program with MassLynx. The system integrates two chromatographic separations from the first and second dimensions into a single automated run to perform the purification of a target compound from a complex mixture without intermediate steps of sample preparation. The chromatography in the first dimension, operated in the heart-cutting mode, separates the target compound from the impurities by mass-triggered fractionation based on its molecular weight. This purified fraction from the first dimension is stored in the sample loop, and then gets transferred to the second column by using at-column dilution. A control software program, coined Prep 2D LCMS, was designed to integrate with MassLynx to retrieve data acquisition status. All of the chromatographic hardware components used in this preparative 2D LC-LC/MS system are from the original open access preparative LC/MS system, which has high level of robustness and affords easy and user-friendly operation. The new system is very versatile and capable of collecting multiple fractions with different masses under various purification modes as configured in the methods, such as conventional one-dimensional (1D) purification and/or 2D purification. This new preparative 2D LC-LC/MS system is therefore the ideal tool for medicinal chemistry lab in drug discovery environment. PMID:24309715

  20. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 μm, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 μm), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction. PMID:25530679

  1. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  2. Gel-aided sample preparation (GASP)--a simplified method for gel-assisted proteomic sample generation from protein extracts and intact cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-04-01

    We describe a "gel-assisted" proteomic sample preparation method for MS analysis. Solubilized protein extracts or intact cells are copolymerized with acrylamide, facilitating denaturation, reduction, quantitative cysteine alkylation, and matrix formation. Gel-aided sample preparation has been optimized to be highly flexible, scalable, and to allow reproducible sample generation from 50 cells to milligrams of protein extracts. This methodology is fast, sensitive, easy-to-use on a wide range of sample types, and accessible to nonspecialists. PMID:25515006

  3. Validation of Internal Controls for Extraction and Amplification of Nucleic Acids from Enteric Viruses in Water Samples ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kitajima, Masaaki; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Nol, Chea; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors that reduce viral nucleic acid extraction efficiency and interfere with cDNA synthesis and/or polymerase activity affect the molecular detection of viruses in aquatic environments. To overcome these significant problems, we developed a methodology for assessing nucleic acid yields and DNA amplification efficiencies for environmental water samples. This involved adding particles of adenovirus type 5 and murine norovirus and newly developed primer-sharing controls, which are amplified with the same primer pairs and result in the same amplicon sizes as the targets, to these samples. We found that nucleic acid loss during the extraction process, rather than reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) inhibition, more significantly attributed to underestimation of the presence of viral genomes in the environmental water samples tested in this study. Our success rate for satisfactorily amplifying viral RNAs and DNAs by RT-PCR was higher than that for obtaining adequate nucleic acid preparations. We found that inhibitory properties were greatest when we used larger sample volumes. A magnetic silica bead-based RNA extraction method effectively removed inhibitors that interfere with viral nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the inhibitory properties of environmental water samples by using both control virus particles and primer-sharing controls. PMID:21602369

  4. Validation of internal controls for extraction and amplification of nucleic acids from enteric viruses in water samples.

    PubMed

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kitajima, Masaaki; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Nol, Chea; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-07-01

    Inhibitors that reduce viral nucleic acid extraction efficiency and interfere with cDNA synthesis and/or polymerase activity affect the molecular detection of viruses in aquatic environments. To overcome these significant problems, we developed a methodology for assessing nucleic acid yields and DNA amplification efficiencies for environmental water samples. This involved adding particles of adenovirus type 5 and murine norovirus and newly developed primer-sharing controls, which are amplified with the same primer pairs and result in the same amplicon sizes as the targets, to these samples. We found that nucleic acid loss during the extraction process, rather than reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) inhibition, more significantly attributed to underestimation of the presence of viral genomes in the environmental water samples tested in this study. Our success rate for satisfactorily amplifying viral RNAs and DNAs by RT-PCR was higher than that for obtaining adequate nucleic acid preparations. We found that inhibitory properties were greatest when we used larger sample volumes. A magnetic silica bead-based RNA extraction method effectively removed inhibitors that interfere with viral nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the inhibitory properties of environmental water samples by using both control virus particles and primer-sharing controls.

  5. Community-Level Physiological Profiling of Microbial Communities in Constructed Wetlands: Effects of Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Button, Mark; Weber, Kela; Nivala, Jaime; Aubron, Thomas; Müller, Roland Arno

    2016-03-01

    Community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) using BIOLOG® EcoPlates™ has become a popular method for characterizing and comparing the functional diversity, functional potential, and metabolic activity of heterotrophic microbial communities. The method was originally developed for profiling soil communities; however, its usage has expanded into the fields of ecotoxicology, agronomy, and the monitoring and profiling of microbial communities in various wastewater treatment systems, including constructed wetlands for water pollution control. When performing CLPP on aqueous samples from constructed wetlands, a wide variety of sample characteristics can be encountered and challenges may arise due to excessive solids, color, or turbidity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of different sample preparation methods on CLPP performed on a variety of aqueous samples covering a broad range of physical and chemical characteristics. The results show that using filter paper, centrifugation, or settling helped clarify samples for subsequent CLPP analysis, however did not do so as effectively as dilution for the darkest samples. Dilution was able to provide suitable clarity for the darkest samples; however, 100-fold dilution significantly affected the carbon source utilization patterns (CSUPs), particularly with samples that were already partially or fully clear. Ten-fold dilution also had some effect on the CSUPs of samples which were originally clear; however, the effect was minimal. Based on these findings, for this specific set of samples, a 10-fold dilution provided a good balance between ease of use, sufficient clarity (for dark samples), and limited effect on CSUPs. The process and findings outlined here can hopefully serve future studies looking to utilize CLPP for functional analysis of microbial communities and also assist in comparing data from studies where different sample preparation methods were utilized. PMID:26563413

  6. Community-Level Physiological Profiling of Microbial Communities in Constructed Wetlands: Effects of Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Button, Mark; Weber, Kela; Nivala, Jaime; Aubron, Thomas; Müller, Roland Arno

    2016-03-01

    Community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) using BIOLOG® EcoPlates™ has become a popular method for characterizing and comparing the functional diversity, functional potential, and metabolic activity of heterotrophic microbial communities. The method was originally developed for profiling soil communities; however, its usage has expanded into the fields of ecotoxicology, agronomy, and the monitoring and profiling of microbial communities in various wastewater treatment systems, including constructed wetlands for water pollution control. When performing CLPP on aqueous samples from constructed wetlands, a wide variety of sample characteristics can be encountered and challenges may arise due to excessive solids, color, or turbidity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of different sample preparation methods on CLPP performed on a variety of aqueous samples covering a broad range of physical and chemical characteristics. The results show that using filter paper, centrifugation, or settling helped clarify samples for subsequent CLPP analysis, however did not do so as effectively as dilution for the darkest samples. Dilution was able to provide suitable clarity for the darkest samples; however, 100-fold dilution significantly affected the carbon source utilization patterns (CSUPs), particularly with samples that were already partially or fully clear. Ten-fold dilution also had some effect on the CSUPs of samples which were originally clear; however, the effect was minimal. Based on these findings, for this specific set of samples, a 10-fold dilution provided a good balance between ease of use, sufficient clarity (for dark samples), and limited effect on CSUPs. The process and findings outlined here can hopefully serve future studies looking to utilize CLPP for functional analysis of microbial communities and also assist in comparing data from studies where different sample preparation methods were utilized.

  7. Automated sample preparation for radiogenic and non-traditional metal isotope analysis by MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, M. P.; Romaniello, S. J.; Gordon, G. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    High throughput analysis is becoming increasingly important for many applications of radiogenic and non-traditional metal isotopes. While MC-ICP-MS instruments offer the potential for very high sample throughout, the requirement for labor-intensive sample preparation and purification procedures remains a substantial bottleneck. Current purification protocols require manually feeding gravity-driven separation columns, a process that is both costly and time consuming. This bottleneck is eliminated with the prepFAST-MC™, an automated, low-pressure ion exchange chromatography system that can process from 1 to 60 samples in unattended operation. The syringe-driven system allows sample loading, multiple acid washes, column conditioning and elution cycles necessary to isolate elements of interest and automatically collect up to 3 discrete eluent fractions at user-defined intervals (time, volume and flow rate). Newly developed protocols for automated purification of uranium illustrates high throughput (>30 per run), multiple samples processed per column (>30), complete (>99%) matrix removal, high recovery (> 98%, n=25), and excellent precision (2 sigma =0.03 permil, n=10). The prepFAST-MC™ maximizes sample throughput and minimizes costs associated with personnel and consumables providing an opportunity to greatly expand research horizons in fields where large isotopic data sets are required, including archeology, geochemistry, and climate/environmental science

  8. Applied Focused Ion Beam Techniques for Sample Preparation of Astromaterials for Integrated Nano-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N E; Kearsley, A T; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R M; Dai, Z R; Ishii, H A; Hutcheon, I D; Bajt, S; Snead, C J; Weber, P K; Bradley, J P

    2007-02-20

    Sample preparation is always a critical step in study of micrometer sized astromaterials available for study in the laboratory, whether their subsequent analysis is by electron microscopy or secondary ion mass spectrometry. A focused beam of gallium ions has been used to prepare electron transparent sections from an interplanetary dust particle, as part of an integrated analysis protocol to maximize the mineralogical, elemental, isotopic and spectroscopic information extracted from one individual particle. In addition, focused ion beam techniques have been employed to extract cometary residue preserved on the rims and walls of micro-craters in 1100 series aluminum foils that were wrapped around the sample tray assembly on the Stardust cometary sample collector. Non-ideal surface geometries and inconveniently located regions of interest required creative solutions. These include support pillar construction and relocation of a significant portion of sample to access a region of interest. Serial sectioning, in a manner similar to ultramicrotomy, is a significant development and further demonstrates the unique capabilities of focused ion beam microscopy for sample preparation of astromaterials.

  9. Ultimate Backside Sample Preparation For Ultra Thin High-k/Metal Gate Stack Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, M.; Veillerot, M.; Martinez, E.; Fabbri, J. M.; Boujamaa, R.; Barnes, J. P.; Bertin, F.

    2011-11-01

    Backside sample preparation is a well known method to help circumvent undesired effects and artifacts in the analysis of a sample or device structure. However it remains challenging in the case of thin layers analysis since only a fraction of the original sample must remain while removing all of the substrate and maintaining a smooth and flat surface suitable for analysis. Here we present a method adapted to the preparation of ultra thin layers grown on pure Si substrates. It consists in a mechanical polishing up to a few remaining microns, followed by a dedicated wet etch. This method can be operated in a routine fashion and yields an extremely flat and smooth surface, without any remaining Si from substrate. It therefore allows precise analysis of the layers of interests with various characterization techniques.

  10. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Lu, Huijie; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community.

  11. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  12. Amino acid preservation in saline halite core samples: Analogs for Martian dry evaporitic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J.; Aubrey, A.; Lowenstein, T.; Timofeeff, M.

    2008-12-01

    in the deepest core section. This may indicate some recent amino acid contribution to the pool of certain amino acids. Racemization rates can be calculated from the equation: ln[(1+D/L)/(1-D/L)] - ln [(1+D/L)/(1-D/L)]t=0 = 2ki(time) where ki is the first-order rate constant for the interconversion of the enantiomers. Using the D/L ratios at the top of the core for the t = 0 term gives kasp = 3.5x10exp-5 y-1 and 1.3x10exp-5 y-1 for the 18 and 70 ka samples, respectively. For valine, the values are kval = 5.6x10exp-6 y-1 and 7.3x10exp-6 y-1. Extrapolating these values to the average surface temperatures on Mars indicates that the chirality of these amino acids would be preserved for billions of years. Thus, closed basin lacustrine and dry desert valley regions with evaporite-rich deposits are suitable environments in the search for preserved biosignatures on Mars. References [1] Bibring, J.P., et al., Science 307, 1576 (2005) [2] Klinghofer, G., et al., Science 306, 1740 (2004) [3] Osterloo, M.M., et al., Science 319, 1651 (2008) [4] Squyres, S.W., et al., Nature 443, E1 (2006) [5] Lowenstein, T.K., et al., Geology 27, 3 (1999) [6] Glavin, D., et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 185,1 (2001) [7] Aubrey, A. D., et al., in preparation, Nature Geo. Sci.

  13. Automatic non-metallic sample preparation for inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, A. A.; Willay, G. M. H.

    A device to prepare a solution for analysis by plasma spectrometry or AAS in less than 7 min has been developed. This apparatus makes use of the practical properties of a "composite crucible" allowing the total recovery of the melted product and eliminating the cleaning of the crucible. Because of high frequency heating and continuous swirling, the fusion is rapid and complete. All sequences of the fusion process are controlled by a microprocessor. Six programs allow a choice of different operation parameters for the dissolution of various kinds of either mineral or metallic products. For the latter, preoxidation can be achieved during the first fusion cycle at relatively low temperature. This apparatus is used to prepare oxide samples and pre-reduced iron ores from steel plants. Standard deviations characterizing the reproducibility of the preparation and the repeatibility of the measurements are given. ICP-AES analysis of the samples prepared by automatic fusion-dilution gave the same accuracy than those prepared manually by fusion in the muffle furnace or by wet chemical digestion.

  14. An enzyme-based DNA preparation method for application to forensic biological samples and degraded stains.

    PubMed

    Lounsbury, Jenny A; Coult, Natalie; Miranian, Daniel C; Cronk, Stephen M; Haverstick, Doris M; Kinnon, Paul; Saul, David J; Landers, James P

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of DNA from forensic samples typically uses either an organic extraction protocol or solid phase extraction (SPE) and these methods generally involve numerous sample transfer, wash and centrifugation steps. Although SPE has been successfully adapted to the microdevice, it can be problematic because of lengthy load times and uneven packing of the solid phase. A closed-tube enzyme-based DNA preparation method has recently been developed which uses a neutral proteinase to lyse cells and degrade proteins and nucleases [14]. Following a 20 min incubation of the buccal or whole blood sample with this proteinase, DNA is polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ready. This paper describes the optimization and quantitation of DNA yield using this method, and application to forensic biological samples, including UV- and heat-degraded whole blood samples on cotton or blue denim substrates. Results demonstrate that DNA yield can be increased from 1.42 (±0.21)ng/μL to 7.78 (±1.40)ng/μL by increasing the quantity of enzyme per reaction by 3-fold. Additionally, there is a linear relationship between the amount of starting cellular material added and the concentration of DNA in the solution, thereby allowing DNA yield estimations to be made. In addition, short tandem repeat (STR) profile results obtained using DNA prepared with the enzyme method were comparable to those obtained with a conventional SPE method, resulting in full STR profiles (16 of 16 loci) from liquid samples (buccal swab eluate and whole blood), dried buccal swabs and bloodstains and partial profiles from UV or heat-degraded bloodstains on cotton or blue denim substrates. Finally, the DNA preparation method is shown to be adaptable to glass or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microdevices with little impact on STR peak height but providing a 20-fold reduction in incubation time (as little as 60 s), leading to a ≥1 h reduction in DNA preparation time.

  15. Surface textural analysis of quartz grains by scanning electron microscopy (SEM): From sample preparation to environmental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, K.; Vandenberghe, N.; Elsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Surface microtextures on quartz grains provide an insight into the sedimentary history of clastic sediments. Not only information on the depositional environment is provided, but also in some cases, successive sedimentary cycles can be recognised. Sample preparation and SEM imaging are the initial, and therefore crucial, steps in the study of microtextures. A sample preparation procedure using 15% hydrochloric acid and 50 g/L tetrasodium pyrophosphate solutions removes most of the grain coatings and adhering particles. The study of microtextures on 1300 quartz grains from a wide variety of environments was complemented with the reference works and atlases (Krinsley and Doornkamp, 1973; Le Ribault, 1977; Higgs, 1979; Mahaney, 2002) to construct an interpretation scheme allowing to differentiate between fluvial, marine, eolian, glacial and diagenetic/alteration environments based on microtextures. In a case study, the known littoral setting of two samples was confirmed by using the interpretation scheme for quartz microtextures. Furthermore, successive reworking of the grains in eolian and intertidal environments was recognised.

  16. Volatile fatty acid evolution in biomass mixture composts prepared in open and closed bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Plachá, Daniela; Raclavská, Helena; Kučerová, Martina; Kuchařová, Jana

    2013-05-01

    In this study we observed the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) during the composting process of compost heaps in two different bioreactors (open and closed) at three different depths (0, 40 and 80 cm). The compost was prepared as a mixture of bio-waste, horse manure, grass and sawdust to ensure sufficient pH conditions in compost heaps. VFA contents in the composting materials were analysed weekly over 14-119 d. The degradation process was monitored, along with temperature, pH, total organic carbon, oxidizable carbon and mono- and oligosaccharides. VFA contents were evaluated with regard to the depth of the sample site in the compost heap and to conditions in the bioreactors. The maximum VFA occurrence was observed during the first 35 d; acetic and propionic acids in particular were determined to occur in each sample. Considerable variations in their formation and elimination were observed in the two bioreactors as well as at the various depths in the compost heaps. Significant correlations were found between individual VFAs, as well as between VFA concentrations and organic carbon contents.

  17. Porous texture of activated carbons prepared by phosphoric acid activation of woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Díez, M. A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.; Fernández González, C.; Cuerda-Correa, E. M.; Macías-García, A.

    2004-11-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared using chestnut, cedar and walnut wood shavings from furniture industries located in the Comunidad Autónoma de Extremadura (SW Spain). Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) at different concentrations (i.e. 36 and 85 wt.%) has been used as activating agent. ACs have been characterized from the results obtained by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Moreover, the fractal dimension (D) has been calculated in order to determine the AC surface roughness degree. Optimal textural properties of ACs have been obtained by chemical activation with H3PO4 36 wt.%. This is corroborated by the slightly lower values of D for samples treated with H3PO4 85 wt.%.

  18. SAMPLING ARTIFACT ESTIMATES FOR ALKANES, HOPANES, AND ALIPHATIC CARBOXYLIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  19. Sequential injection titration method using second-order signals: determination of acidity in plant oils and biodiesel samples.

    PubMed

    del Río, Vanessa; Larrechi, M Soledad; Callao, M Pilar

    2010-06-15

    A new concept of flow titration is proposed and demonstrated for the determination of total acidity in plant oils and biodiesel. We use sequential injection analysis (SIA) with a diode array spectrophotometric detector linked to chemometric tools such as multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). This system is based on the evolution of the basic specie of an acid-base indicator, alizarine, when it comes into contact with a sample that contains free fatty acids. The gradual pH change in the reactor coil due to diffusion and reaction phenomenona allows the sequential appearance of both species of the indicator in the detector coil, recording a data matrix for each sample. The SIA-MCR-ALS method helps to reduce the amounts of sample, the reagents and the time consumed. Each determination consumes 0.413ml of sample, 0.250ml of indicator and 3ml of carrier (ethanol) and generates 3.333ml of waste. The frequency of the analysis is high (12 samples h(-1) including all steps, i.e., cleaning, preparing and analysing). The utilized reagents are of common use in the laboratory and it is not necessary to use the reagents of perfect known concentration. The method was applied to determine acidity in plant oil and biodiesel samples. Results obtained by the proposed method compare well with those obtained by the official European Community method that is time consuming and uses large amounts of organic solvents.

  20. Optimal sample preparation conditions for the determination of uranium in biological samples by kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA).

    PubMed

    Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Adams, P R; Carmichael, A J

    2000-12-15

    Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a proven technique for rapid, precise, and accurate determination of uranium in aqueous solutions. Uranium analysis of biological samples require dry-ashing in a muffle furnace between 400 and 600 degrees C followed by wet-ashing with concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to digest the organic component in the sample that interferes with uranium determination by KPA. The optimal dry-ashing temperature was determined to be 450 degrees C. At dry-ashing temperatures greater than 450 degrees C, uranium loss was attributed to vaporization. High temperatures also caused increased background values that were attributed to uranium leaching from the glass vials. Dry-ashing temperatures less than 450 degrees C result in the samples needing additional wet-ashing steps. The recovery of uranium in urine samples was 99.2+/-4.02% between spiked concentrations of 1.98-1980 ng (0.198-198 microg l(-1)) uranium, whereas the recovery in whole blood was 89.9+/-7.33% between the same spiked concentrations. The limit of quantification in which uranium in urine and blood could be accurately measured above the background was determined to be 0.05 and 0.6 microg l(-1), respectively. PMID:11130202

  1. Fuel properties of heptadecene isomers prepared via tandem isomerization-decarboxylation of oleic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heptadecene isomers were prepared via tandem isomerization-decarboxylation of oleic acid using catalytic triruthenium dodecacarbonyl [Ru3(CO)12]. Chromatographic and spectroscopic characterization of the isolated heptadecene mixture indicated that it consisted of 96% internal isomers and 4% aromatic...

  2. Comparison of the effects of three different (-)-hydroxycitric acid preparations on food intake in rats: response.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Harry G; Bagchi, Manashi; Bagchi, Debasis

    2006-01-01

    A response to Louter-van de Haar J, Wielinga PY, Scheurink AJ, Nieuwenhuizen AG: Comparison of the effects of three different (-)-hydroxycitric acid preparations on food intake in rats. Nutr Metabol 2005, 2:23. PMID:16846513

  3. Graphite sample preparation for AMS in a high pressure and temperature press

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, M.; Mysen, B.O.; Polach, H.

    1984-01-01

    A high pressure-high temperature press is used to make target material for accelerator mass spectrometry. Graphite was produced from typical 14C samples including oxalic acid and carbonates. Beam strength of 12C was generally adequate, but random radioactive contamination by 14C made age measurements impractical. ?? 1984.

  4. Graphite sample preparation for AMS in a high pressure and temperature press

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, Meyer; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Polach, Henry

    1984-01-01

    A high pressure-temperature press is used to make target material for accelerator mass spectrometry. Graphite was produced from typical **1**4C samples including oxalic acid and carbonates. Beam strength of **1**2C was generally adequate, but random radioactive contamination by **1**4C made age measurements impractical.

  5. Preparation and recovery of methacrylic acid and its esters

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, P.J.; Hite, J.R.

    1986-07-15

    This patent describes a process for the vapor phase catalytic oxydehydrogenation of isobutyric acid or its esters to form methacrylic acid or its esters wherein the gaseous product is condensed and purified. The improvement described here consists of adding to the gaseous product at or about the point of its condensation from 1 to 6000 ppm of a surfactant material selected from the group consisting of an anionic a cationic and non-ionic surfactant.

  6. Reference samples for use in analytical geochemistry: their availability, preparation, and appropriate use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    A large number of certified and other reference samples are available for use in analytical geochemistry. Certified materials are preferred, but of much more limited availability than other reference samples for most geochemical applications. The availability of rock, sediment, soil, water, and plant reference samples is outlined; ore and mineral separate reference samples are not included in the discussion. The preparation of these materials, including the establishment of certified or recommended concentrations, is then reviewed. It is shown that comparable quality can be achieved for both certified and recommended concentrations, though it has not always been achieved in the past. Finally, the most appropriate ways to use reference samples in quality control and instrumental calibration are discussed. ?? 1992.

  7. SRAT CHEMISTRY AND ACID CONSUMPTION DURING SIMULATED DWPF MELTER FEED PREPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D; David Best, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-12-03

    Due to higher than expected hydrogen generation during the Tank 51-Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification run, DWPF engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to expand the ongoing catalytic hydrogen generation program. The work presented in this Technical Report was identified as part of SRNL/Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) meetings to define potential causes of catalytic hydrogen generation as well as from an external technical review panel commissioned to evaluate SRNL hydrogen related data and programs. New scope included improving the understanding of SRAT/SME process chemistry, particularly as it related to acid consumption and hydrogen generation. The expanded hydrogen program scope was covered under the technical task request (TTR): HLW-DWPF-TTR-2007-0016. A task technical and quality assurance plan (TT&QAP) was issued to cover focus areas raised in meetings with LWO plus a portion of the recommendations made by the review panel. A supporting analytical study plan was issued. It was also noted in the review of catalytic hydrogen generation that control of the DWPF acid stoichiometry was an important element in controlling hydrogen generation. A separate TTR was issued to investigate ways of improving the determination of the acid requirement during processing: HLWDWPF-TTR-0015. A separate TT&QAP was prepared for this task request. This report discusses some progress on this task related to developing alternative acid equations and to performing experimental work to supplement the existing database. Simulant preparation and preliminary flowsheet studies were already documented. The prior work produced a sufficient quantity of simulant for the hydrogen program and melter feed rheology testing. It also defined a suitable acid addition stoichiometry. The results presented in this report come from samples and process data obtained during sixteen 22-L SRAT/SME simulations that were performed in the second half of 2007 to produce eight SME

  8. Fast sample preparation for analysis of tablets and capsules: the ball-mill extraction method.

    PubMed

    Kok, S J; Debets, A J

    2001-11-01

    A new ball-mill extraction method for solid dosage forms was developed. It was used for tablets, and compared with a conventional (powdering and sonication) method applied in pharmaceutical analysis of solid dosage forms. The ball-mill sample preparation procedure is both quantitative and fast. No powdering, weighing and sonication steps are needed in the sample preparation. The complete procedure takes 2 min (milling and extraction) and 5 min (centrifugation), respectively, much less than the conventional method in which sample preparation takes approximately 45-90 min. The samples are centrifuged in the mill vial, which saves time and avoids evaporation of solvent. Stainless steel extraction vials with different diameters were fabricated to enable the use of various extraction volumes. The extraction recovery was tested using various types of tablets (small, large and extended release tablets) with active compounds at low and higher concentrations, recoveries were comparable with the conventional method. The relative small investment and simplicity of the method makes it excellently suited for use in various pharmaceutical (development and quality assurance) laboratories. PMID:11516911

  9. Review of sample preparation techniques for the analysis of pesticide residues in soil.

    PubMed

    Tadeo, José L; Pérez, Rosa Ana; Albero, Beatriz; García-Valcárcel, Ana I; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the sample preparation techniques used for the analysis of pesticides in soil. The present status and recent advances made during the last 5 years in these methods are discussed. The analysis of pesticide residues in soil requires the extraction of analytes from this matrix, followed by a cleanup procedure, when necessary, prior to their instrumental determination. The optimization of sample preparation is a very important part of the method development that can reduce the analysis time, the amount of solvent, and the size of samples. This review considers all aspects of sample preparation, including extraction and cleanup. Classical extraction techniques, such as shaking, Soxhlet, and ultrasonic-assisted extraction, and modern techniques like pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase microextraction and QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) are reviewed. The different cleanup strategies applied for the purification of soil extracts are also discussed. In addition, the application of these techniques to environmental studies is considered.

  10. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Schroeder, Allan; Shih, Chih-Kang; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Eom, Daejin

    2015-09-15

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  11. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  12. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. PMID:26302362

  13. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  14. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest.

  15. Oxalic-acid leaching of rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples as an anomaly-accentuated technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, Henry V.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1976-01-01

    In many instances total-rock and sieved-soil and stream-sediment samples lack the sensitivity and contrast required for reconnaissance exploration and necessary in the search for blind ore deposits. Heavy-mineral concentrates incorporate the required sensitivity and contrast but are overly expensive for two reasons: time-consuming sample preparation is required to obtain them, and they cannot be easily derived from all bulk-sample types. Trace-metal-content comparisons of the oxalic-acid-leachable portions with heavy-mineral concentrates show that the leachates are equal to the heavy-mineral concentrates in sensitivity and contrast. Simplicity of preparation and the resultant cost savings are additional advantages of this proposed method.

  16. Preparation of layered thin film samples for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S. E.; Zhou, B.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J. S.; Pushp, A.; Kellock, A. J.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Chen, Y.; Hesjedal, T.

    2014-09-22

    Materials with layered van der Waals crystal structures are exciting research topics in condensed matter physics and materials science due to outstanding physical properties associated with their strong two dimensional nature. Prominent examples include bismuth tritelluride and triselenide topological insulators (TIs), which are characterized by a bulk bandgap and pairwise counter-propagating spin-polarized electronic surface states. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of ex-situ grown thin film samples has been limited by the lack of suitable surface preparation techniques. We demonstrate the shortcomings of previously successful conventional surface preparation techniques when applied to ternary TI systems which are susceptible to severe oxidation. We show that in-situ cleaving is a simple and effective technique for preparation of clean surfaces on ex-situ grown thin films for high quality ARPES measurements. The method presented here is universally applicable to other layered van der Waals systems as well.

  17. Sample-first preparation: a method for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of cyclic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Pin; Su, Chih-Lin; Chang, Hui-Chiu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2007-08-15

    A new sample preparation method for the analysis of cyclic oligosaccharides in surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) is presented. We call this new technique "sample first method", in which a sample is deposited first and then bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which serve as the SALDI matrixes, are added to the top of the sample layer. The use of the sample first method offers significant advantages for improving shot-to-shot reproducibility, enhancing the ionization efficiency of the analyte, and reducing sample preparation time as compared to the dried-droplet method, wherein samples and bare AuNPs are mixed and dried together. The relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the signal intensity as calculated from 65 sample spots was 25% when the sample first methods were applied to the analysis of beta-cyclodextrin. The results were more homogeneous as compared to the outcome using dried-droplet preparation of AuNPs (RSD=66%) and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (RSD=209%). We also found out that the optimal concentration of AuNP for ionization efficiency is 7.4 nM (4.52x10(12) particles/mL) while the lowest detectable concentration of cyclic oligosaccharides through this approach is 0.25 microM. Except for the cyclic oligosaccharide, the proposed method was also applied to the analyses of other biological samples, including neutral carbohydrate and steroid, aminothiols, and peptides as well as proteins.

  18. imFASP: An integrated approach combining in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment with microwave-assisted protein digestion for fast and efficient proteome sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Fang, Fei; Wu, Ci; Wu, Qi; Liang, Yu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    An integrated sample preparation method, termed "imFASP", which combined in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment and microwave-assisted trypsin digestion, was developed for preparation of microgram and even nanogram amounts of complex protein samples with high efficiency in 1 h. For imFASP method, proteins dissolved in 8 M urea were loaded onto a filter device with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) as 10 kDa, followed by in-situ protein preconcentration, denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Compared with traditional in-solution sample preparation method, imFASP method generated more protein and peptide identifications (IDs) from preparation of 45 μg Escherichia coli protein sample due to the higher efficiency, and the sample preparation throughput was significantly improved by 14 times (1 h vs. 15 h). More importantly, when the starting amounts of E. coli cell lysate decreased to nanogram level (50-500 ng), the protein and peptide identified by imFASP method were improved at least 30% and 44%, compared with traditional in-solution preparation method, suggesting dramatically higher peptide recovery of imFASP method for trace amounts of complex proteome samples. All these results demonstrate that the imFASP method developed here is of high potential for high efficient and high throughput preparation of trace amounts of complex proteome samples. PMID:26920773

  19. Isolation of mono-caffeoylquinic acids from tobacco waste using continuous resin-based pre-separation and preparative HPLC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lu, Dingqiang; Liang, Yao; Zhao, Hui; Luo, Min; Ling, Xiuquan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2012-06-01

    Three isomers of mono-caffeoylquinic acid, specifically, 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, were successfully isolated from a crude extract of tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum L.) wastes using continuous resin-based pre-separation and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The extract of tobacco wastes was continuously pre-separated by resin-based columns packed with D101 and XAD-4, yielding total mono-caffeoylquinic acids with a purity of 67.71% and a recovery rate of 90.06%. Variables affecting resolution and productivity of three mono-caffeoylquinic acid isomers in preparative HPLC (i.e. mobile-phase composition, pH, flow rate and loading amount) were studied. The optimum chromatographic conditions were determined to be a mobile phase consisting of 15% (v/v) methanol and aqueous acetic acid with a pH of 4.5, a flow rate of 4.0 mL/min, a loading amount of 4 mL and a detection wavelength of 360 nm. From 300 mg of loading sample, 56.3 mg of 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 92.8 mg of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and 73.1 mg of 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid were obtained in a single run, each with a purity of over 98% by HPLC. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by ESI-MS, (1) H-NMR and (13) C-NMR spectral data.

  20. [Preparation of sub-standard samples and XRF analytical method of powder non-metallic minerals].

    PubMed

    Kong, Qin; Chen, Lei; Wang, Ling

    2012-05-01

    In order to solve the problem that standard samples of non-metallic minerals are not satisfactory in practical work by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) analysis with pressed powder pellet, a method was studied how to make sub-standard samples according to standard samples of non-metallic minerals and to determine how they can adapt to analysis of mineral powder samples, taking the K-feldspar ore in Ebian-Wudu, Sichuan as an example. Based on the characteristic analysis of K-feldspar ore and the standard samples by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, combined with the principle of the same or similar between the sub-standard samples and unknown samples, the experiment developed the method of preparation of sub-standard samples: both of the two samples above mentioned should have the same kind of minerals and the similar chemical components, adapt mineral processing, and benefit making working curve. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a method for determination of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO, MgO, K2O and Na2O of K-feldspar ore by XRF was established. Thedetermination results are in good agreement with classical chemical methods, which indicates that this method was accurate.

  1. An introduction to sample preparation and imaging by cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Rebecca F.; Walker, Matt; Siebert, C. Alistair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (EM) is a versatile technique that can be used to image biological specimens ranging from intact eukaryotic cells to individual proteins >150 kDa. There are several strategies for preparing samples for imaging by EM, including negative staining and cryogenic freezing. In the last few years, cryo-EM has undergone a ‘resolution revolution’, owing to both advances in imaging hardware, image processing software, and improvements in sample preparation, leading to growing number of researchers using cryo-EM as a research tool. However, cryo-EM is still a rapidly growing field, with unique challenges. Here, we summarise considerations for imaging of a range of specimens from macromolecular complexes to cells using EM. PMID:26931652

  2. Optimization of proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehensive protein characterization of pathogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Manes, Nathan P.; Ansong, Charles; Shi, Liang; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Takane; Wong, Scott; Estep, Ryan D.; Heffron, Fred; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-12-19

    The elucidation of critical functional pathways employed by pathogens and hosts during an infectious cycle is both challenging and central to our understanding of infectious diseases. In recent years, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been used as a powerful tool to identify key pathogenesis-related proteins and pathways. Despite the analytical power of mass spectrometry-based technologies, samples must be appropriately prepared to characterize the functions of interest (e.g. host-response to a pathogen or a pathogen-response to a host). The preparation of these protein samples requires multiple decisions about what aspect of infection is being studied, and it may require the isolation of either host and/or pathogen cellular material.

  3. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory.

  4. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory. PMID:27404623

  5. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2015-06-02

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid involves reacting diethyl oxalate with sodium ethoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding ethyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxybutenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with aqueous sodium hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  6. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2016-03-22

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid involves reacting diethyl oxalate with an alkoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding ethyl cyanoacetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with an aqueous hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  7. Sample preparation for the analysis of flavors and off-flavors in foods.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, J G; Conte, E D; Kim, Y; Holcomb, M; Sutherland, J B; Miller, D W

    2000-06-01

    Off-flavors in foods may originate from environmental pollutants, the growth of microorganisms, oxidation of lipids, or endogenous enzymatic decomposition in the foods. The chromatographic analysis of flavors and off-flavors in foods usually requires that the samples first be processed to remove as many interfering compounds as possible. For analysis of foods by gas chromatography (GC), sample preparation may include mincing, homogenation, centrifugation, distillation, simple solvent extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, pressurized-fluid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, Soxhlet extraction, or methylation. For high-performance liquid chromatography of amines in fish, cheese, sausage and olive oil or aldehydes in fruit juice, sample preparation may include solvent extraction and derivatization. Headspace GC analysis of orange juice, fish, dehydrated potatoes, and milk requires almost no sample preparation. Purge-and-trap GC analysis of dairy products, seafoods, and garlic may require heating, microwave-mediated distillation, purging the sample with inert gases and trapping the analytes with Tenax or C18, thermal desorption, cryofocusing, or elution with ethyl acetate. Solid-phase microextraction GC analysis of spices, milk and fish can involve microwave-mediated distillation, and usually requires adsorption on poly(dimethyl)siloxane or electrodeposition on fibers followed by thermal desorption. For short-path thermal desorption GC analysis of spices, herbs, coffee, peanuts, candy, mushrooms, beverages, olive oil, honey, and milk, samples are placed in a glass-lined stainless steel thermal desorption tube, which is purged with helium and then heated gradually to desorb the volatiles for analysis. Few of the methods that are available for analysis of food flavors and off-flavors can be described simultaneously as cheap, easy and good.

  8. [New synthesis of the anticoagulant pentasaccharide idraparinux and preparation of its analogues containing sulfonic acid moieties].

    PubMed

    Herczeg, Mihály

    2012-01-01

    Two novel synthetic pathways were elaborated for the preparation of idraparinux, a heparin-related fully O-sulfated, O-methylated anticoagulant pentasaccharide. Both methods based upon a [2+3] block synthesis utilizing the same trisaccharide acceptor which was coupled to either a uronic acid disaccharide donor or its nonoxidized precursor. Two bioisosteric sulfonic acid analogues of idraparinux were also prepared, in which two or three primary sulfate esters were replaced by sodium-sulfonatomethyl moieties. The sulfonic acid groups were formed on a monosaccharide level and the obtained carbohydrate sulfonic acid esters were found to be excellent donors and acceptors in the glycosylation reactions. The disulfonic-acid analogue was prepared in a [2+3] block synthesis by using a trisaccharide disulfonic acid as an acceptor and a glucuronide disaccharide as a donor. For the synthesis of the pentasaccharide trisulfonic acid, a more-efficient approach, which involved elongation of the trisaccharide acceptor with a non-oxidized precursor of the glucuronic acid followed by post-glycosidation oxidation at the tetrasaccharide level and a subsequent [1+4] coupling reaction, was elaborated. In vitro evaluation of the anticoagulant activity of the reference compound idraparinux and the new sulfonic acid derivatives revealed that the disulfonate analogue inhibited the blood-coagulation-proteinase factor Xa with outstanding efficacy; however, the introduction of the third sulfonic acid moiety resulted in a notable decrease in the anti-Xa activity.

  9. [New synthesis of the anticoagulant pentasaccharide idraparinux and preparation of its analogues containing sulfonic acid moieties].

    PubMed

    Herczeg, Mihály

    2012-01-01

    Two novel synthetic pathways were elaborated for the preparation of idraparinux, a heparin-related fully O-sulfated, O-methylated anticoagulant pentasaccharide. Both methods based upon a [2+3] block synthesis utilizing the same trisaccharide acceptor which was coupled to either a uronic acid disaccharide donor or its nonoxidized precursor. Two bioisosteric sulfonic acid analogues of idraparinux were also prepared, in which two or three primary sulfate esters were replaced by sodium-sulfonatomethyl moieties. The sulfonic acid groups were formed on a monosaccharide level and the obtained carbohydrate sulfonic acid esters were found to be excellent donors and acceptors in the glycosylation reactions. The disulfonic-acid analogue was prepared in a [2+3] block synthesis by using a trisaccharide disulfonic acid as an acceptor and a glucuronide disaccharide as a donor. For the synthesis of the pentasaccharide trisulfonic acid, a more-efficient approach, which involved elongation of the trisaccharide acceptor with a non-oxidized precursor of the glucuronic acid followed by post-glycosidation oxidation at the tetrasaccharide level and a subsequent [1+4] coupling reaction, was elaborated. In vitro evaluation of the anticoagulant activity of the reference compound idraparinux and the new sulfonic acid derivatives revealed that the disulfonate analogue inhibited the blood-coagulation-proteinase factor Xa with outstanding efficacy; however, the introduction of the third sulfonic acid moiety resulted in a notable decrease in the anti-Xa activity. PMID:23230650

  10. Preparation of polyethylene sacks for collection of precipitation samples for chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Bricker, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Polyethylene sacks are used to collect precipitation samples. Washing polyethylene with acetone, hexane, methanol, or nitric acid can change the adsorptive characteristics of the polyethylene. In this study, simulated precipitation at pH 4.5 was in contact with the polyethylene sacks for 21 days; subsamples were removed for chemical analysis at 7, 14, and 21 days after intitial contact. Sacks washed with acetone adsorbed iron and lithium; sacks washed with hexane adsorbed barium, iron , and lithium; sacks washed with methanol adsorbed calcium and iron; and sacks washed with 0.30 N nitric acid adsorbed iron. Leaching the plastic sacks with 0.15 N nitric acid did not result in 100-percent recovery of any of the adsorbed metals. Washing polyethylene sacks with dilute nitric acid caused the pH of the simulated precipitation to be decreased by 0.2 pH unit after 1 week of contact with the polyethylene. The specific conductance increased by 10 microsiemens per centimeter. Contamination of precipitation samples by lead was determined to be about 0.1 microgram per liter from contact with precleaned polyethylene sacks. No measurable contamination of precipitation samples by zinc occurred. (USGS)

  11. Optimization of proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehensive protein characterization of pathogenic systems.

    PubMed

    Mottaz-Brewer, Heather M; Norbeck, Angela D; Adkins, Joshua N; Manes, Nathan P; Ansong, Charles; Shi, Liang; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Takane; Wong, Scott W; Estep, Ryan D; Heffron, Fred; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D

    2008-12-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a powerful analytical tool for investigating pathogens and their interactions within a host. The sensitivity of such analyses provides broad proteome characterization, but the sample-handling procedures must first be optimized to ensure compatibility with the technique and to maximize the dynamic range of detection. The decision-making process for determining optimal growth conditions, preparation methods, sample analysis methods, and data analysis techniques in our laboratory is discussed herein with consideration of the balance in sensitivity, specificity, and biomass losses during analysis of host-pathogen systems.

  12. On the preparation of electron sensor using LiRbSO4 samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Muraikhi, M.; Kassem, M. E.; Gaafar, M.; Abdel Gawad, M. M. H.; Ragab, I. M.

    2005-01-01

    The dielectric spectroscopy of metal-metal sulfate LiRbSO4 samples are described with particular emphasis on sensor performance to be used in the field of radiation. The obtained results as the effect of different electron energy beams at fixed dose, 0.5 Gy, showed abrupt change of the electrical properties (electrical conductivity, capacitance, and loss tangent). The results can be explained on the basis of radiation-induced defects followed by radiation quenching. The prepared samples can be used in the field of radiation dosimeter.

  13. Preparation of acid-fast microscopy smears for proficiency testing and quality control.

    PubMed Central

    Smithwick, R W; Stratigos, C B

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing smears for proficiency testing and quality control in acid-fast microscopy. The work was prompted by the increased demand for acid-fast bacilli positive smears with characteristic microscopic appearance and among-smear uniformity. PMID:353070

  14. Sample Preparation Approaches for iTRAQ Labeling and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Christos; Moore, J Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of global quantification strategies utilized in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) are an attractive option for examining the relative amounts of proteins in different samples. The inherent complexity of mammalian proteomes and the diversity of protein physicochemical properties mean that complete proteome coverage is still unlikely from a single analytical method. Numerous options exist for reducing protein sample complexity and resolving digested peptides prior to MS analysis. Indeed, the reliability and efficiency of protein identification and quantitation from an iTRAQ workflow strongly depend on sample preparation upstream of MS. Here we describe our methods for: (1) total protein extraction from immortalized cells; (2) subcellular fractionation of murine tissue; (3) protein sample desalting, digestion, and iTRAQ labeling; (4) peptide separation by strong cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography; and (5) peptide separation by isoelectric focusing.

  15. DNA isolation and sample preparation for quantification of adduct levels by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dingley, Karen H; Ubick, Esther A; Vogel, John S; Ognibene, Ted J; Malfatti, Michael A; Kulp, Kristen; Haack, Kurt W

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive technique used for the quantification of adducts following exposure to carbon-14- or tritium-labeled chemicals, with detection limits in the range of one adduct per 10(11)-10(12) nucleotides. The protocol described in this chapter provides an optimal method for isolating and preparing DNA samples to measure isotope-labeled DNA adducts by AMS. When preparing samples, special precautions must be taken to avoid cross-contamination of isotope among samples and produce a sample that is compatible with AMS. The DNA isolation method described is based upon digestion of tissue with proteinase K, followed by extraction of DNA using Qiagen isolation columns. The extracted DNA is precipitated with isopropanol, washed repeatedly with 70 % ethanol to remove salt, and then dissolved in water. DNA samples are then converted to graphite or titanium hydride and the isotope content measured by AMS to quantify adduct levels. This method has been used to reliably generate good yields of uncontaminated, pure DNA from animal and human tissues for analysis of adduct levels.

  16. DNA isolation and sample preparation for quantification of adduct levels by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dingley, Karen H; Ubick, Esther A; Vogel, John S; Ognibene, Ted J; Malfatti, Michael A; Kulp, Kristen; Haack, Kurt W

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive technique used for the quantification of adducts following exposure to carbon-14- or tritium-labeled chemicals, with detection limits in the range of one adduct per 10(11)-10(12) nucleotides. The protocol described in this chapter provides an optimal method for isolating and preparing DNA samples to measure isotope-labeled DNA adducts by AMS. When preparing samples, special precautions must be taken to avoid cross-contamination of isotope among samples and produce a sample that is compatible with AMS. The DNA isolation method described is based upon digestion of tissue with proteinase K, followed by extraction of DNA using Qiagen isolation columns. The extracted DNA is precipitated with isopropanol, washed repeatedly with 70 % ethanol to remove salt, and then dissolved in water. DNA samples are then converted to graphite or titanium hydride and the isotope content measured by AMS to quantify adduct levels. This method has been used to reliably generate good yields of uncontaminated, pure DNA from animal and human tissues for analysis of adduct levels. PMID:24623226

  17. Simple Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Assisted Sample Preparation Method for LC-MS-based Proteomic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Shi, Tujin; Wang, Lu; Gao, Xiaoli; Su, Dian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-03-10

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is one of the most popular laboratory reagents used for highly efficient biological sample extraction; however, SDS presents a significant challenge to LC-MS-based proteomic analyses due to its severe interference with reversed-phase LC separations and electrospray ionization interfaces. This study reports a simple SDS-assisted proteomic sample preparation method facilitated by a novel peptide-level SDS removal protocol. After SDS-assisted protein extraction and digestion, SDS was effectively (>99.9%) removed from peptides through ion substitution-mediated DS- precipitation with potassium chloride (KCl) followed by {approx}10 min centrifugation. Excellent peptide recovery (>95%) was observed for less than 20 {mu}g of peptides. Further experiments demonstrated the compatibility of this protocol with LC-MS/MS analyses. The resulting proteome coverage from this SDS-assisted protocol was comparable to or better than those obtained from other standard proteomic preparation methods in both mammalian tissues and bacterial samples. These results suggest that this SDS-assisted protocol is a practical, simple, and broadly applicable proteomic sample processing method, which can be particularly useful when dealing with samples difficult to solubilize by other methods.

  18. Sample preparation: a critical step in the analysis of cholesterol oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christiana A; Constantinou, Michalis S; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P

    2014-02-15

    In recent years, cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) have drawn scientific interest, particularly due to their implications on human health. A big number of these compounds have been demonstrated to be cytotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. The main source of COPs is through diet, and particularly from the consumption of cholesterol-rich foods. This raises questions about the safety of consumers, and it suggests the necessity for the development of a sensitive and a reliable analytical method in order to identify and quantify these components in food samples. Sample preparation is a necessary step in the analysis of COPs in order to eliminate interferences and increase sensitivity. Numerous publications have, over the years, reported the use of different methods for the extraction and purification of COPs. However, no method has, so far, been established as a routine method for the analysis of COPs in foods. Therefore, it was considered important to overview different sample preparation procedures and evaluate the different preparative parameters, such as time of saponification, the type of organic solvents for fat extraction, the stationary phase in solid phase extraction, etc., according to recovery, precision and simplicity.

  19. Process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid and salts thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hollingsworth, Rawle I.

    1994-01-01

    A process for the preparation of 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid (1) and salts thereof from a glucose source containing 1,4-1inked glucose as a substituent is described. The process uses an alkali metal hdyroxide and hydrogen peroxide to convert the glucose source to (1). The compound (1) is useful as a chemical intermediate to naturally occurring fatty acids and is used to prepare 3,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid-gamma-lactone (2) and furanone (3), particularly stereoisomers of these compounds.

  20. Preparation and evaluation of lignosulfonates as a dispersant for gypsum paste from acid hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Seiichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to effectively utilize a by-product of the acid saccharification process of woody materials, the chemical conversion of guaiacyl sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), one of the acid hydrolysis lignins, into water-soluble sulfonated products with high dispersibitity was investigated. At first, SAL was phenolated (P-SAL) to enhance the solubility and reactivity. Lignosulfonates were prepared from P-SAL by three methods of hydroxymethylation followed by neutral sulfonation (two-step method), sulfomethylation (one-step method) and arylsulfonation. Surprisingly, all prepared lignosulfonates possessed 30 to 70% higher dispersibility for gypsum paste than the commercial lignosulfonate. Evaluation of the preparations for gypsum paste suggested that the higher molecular weights and sulfur contents of the preparations increased their dispersibility. PMID:15491828

  1. Preparation and evaluation of lignosulfonates as a dispersant for gypsum paste from acid hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Seiichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to effectively utilize a by-product of the acid saccharification process of woody materials, the chemical conversion of guaiacyl sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), one of the acid hydrolysis lignins, into water-soluble sulfonated products with high dispersibitity was investigated. At first, SAL was phenolated (P-SAL) to enhance the solubility and reactivity. Lignosulfonates were prepared from P-SAL by three methods of hydroxymethylation followed by neutral sulfonation (two-step method), sulfomethylation (one-step method) and arylsulfonation. Surprisingly, all prepared lignosulfonates possessed 30 to 70% higher dispersibility for gypsum paste than the commercial lignosulfonate. Evaluation of the preparations for gypsum paste suggested that the higher molecular weights and sulfur contents of the preparations increased their dispersibility.

  2. Electrochemical biosensing platform using hydrogel prepared from ferrocene modified amino acid as highly efficient immobilization matrix.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fengli; Zhang, Yi; Rasooly, Avraham; Yang, Minghui

    2014-01-21

    To increase the loading of glucose oxidase (GOx) and simplify glucose biosensor fabrication, hydrogel prepared from ferrocene (Fc) modified amino acid phenylalanine (Phe, F) was utilized for the incorporation of GOx. The synthesized hydrogel displays good biocompatibility and contains a significant number of Fc moieties, which can be considered as an ideal matrix to immobilize enzymes for the preparation of mediator-based biosensors. The hydrogel was studied by scanning electron microscopy, which indicated that it was composed of nanofibers with a diameter of around 50-100 nm and length extended to 1 mm. With the addition of GOx into the hydrogel and by directly dropping the resulting biocomposite onto the electrode surface, a glucose biosensor, that displays good performance due to improved enzyme loading and efficient electron transfer, can be simply constructed. The favorable network structure and good biocompatibility of the hydrogel could effectively avoid enzyme leakage and maintain the bioactivity of the enzymes, which resulted in good stability of the biosensor. The biosensor was utilized for the detection of glucose in blood samples with results comparable to those obtained from the hospital. The hydrogel as a functional component of an amperometric biosensor has implications for future development of biosensors and for clinical applications. PMID:24383679

  3. Lab-on-a-chip modules for detection of highly pathogenic bacteria: from sample preparation to detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julich, S.; Kopinč, R.; Hlawatsch, N.; Moche, C.; Lapanje, A.; Gärtner, C.; Tomaso, H.

    2014-05-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems are innovative tools for the detection and identification of microbial pathogens in human and veterinary medicine. The major advantages are small sample volume and a compact design. Several fluidic modules have been developed to transform analytical procedures into miniaturized scale including sampling, sample preparation, target enrichment, and detection procedures. We present evaluation data for single modules that will be integrated in a chip system for the detection of pathogens. A microfluidic chip for purification of nucleic acids was established for cell lysis using magnetic beads. This assay was evaluated with spiked environmental aerosol and swab samples. Bacillus thuringiensis was used as simulant for Bacillus anthracis, which is closely related but non-pathogenic for humans. Stationary PCR and a flow-through PCR chip module were investigated for specific detection of six highly pathogenic bacteria. The conventional PCR assays could be transferred into miniaturized scale using the same temperature/time profile. We could demonstrate that the microfluidic chip modules are suitable for the respective purposes and are promising tools for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Future developments will focus on the integration of these separate modules to an entire lab-on-a-chip system.

  4. TEM sample preparation using a new nanofabrication technique combining electron-beam-induced deposition and low-energy ion milling.

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki; Tanaka, Miyoko; Takeguchi, Masaki; Song, Minghui; Furuya, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    A new TEM sample preparation technique using electron-beam-induced deposition combined with low-energy ion milling was used to fabricate for two different shapes of sample, conical and plate. High-quality HREM images can be obtained from samples prepared by this technique. A desired sample position can be obtained with high accuracy, and the total sample preparation time can be much less than conventional techniques. Because the gas deposition system used can easily be integrated in a conventional SEM, the method can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a SEM and an ion milling machine.

  5. Improved sample preparation and counting techniques for enhanced tritium measurement sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Aalseth, C.; Bailey, V. L.; Mace, E. K.; Overman, C.; Seifert, A.; Wilcox Freeburg, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Tritium (T) measurements offer insight to a wealth of environmental applications including hydrologic tracking, discerning ocean circulation patterns, and aging ice formations. However, the relatively short half-life of T (12.3 years) limits its effective age dating range. Compounding this limitation is the decrease in atmospheric T content by over two orders of magnitude (from 1000-2000 TU in 1962 to < 10 TU currently) since the cessation of above ground nuclear testing in the 1960's. We are developing sample preparation methods coupled to direct counting of T via ultra-low background proportional counters which, when combined, offer improved T measurement sensitivity (~4.5 mmoles of H2 equivalent) and will help expand the application of T age dating to smaller sample sizes linked to persistent environmental questions despite the limitations above. For instance, this approach can be used to T date ~ 2.2 mmoles of CH4 collected from sample-limited systems including microbial communities, soils, or subsurface aquifers and can be combined with radiocarbon dating to distinguish the methane's formation age from C age in a system. This approach can also expand investigations into soil organic C where the improved sensitivity will permit resolution of soil C into more descriptive fractions and provide direct assessments of the stability of specific classes of organic matter in soils environments. We are employing a multiple step sample preparation system whereby organic samples are first combusted with resulting CO2 and H2O being used as a feedstock to synthesize CH4. This CH4 is mixed with Ar and loaded directly into an ultra-low background proportional counter for measurement of T β decay in a shallow underground laboratory. Analysis of water samples requires only the addition of geologic CO2 feedstock with the sample for methane synthesis. The chemical nature of the preparation techniques enable high sample throughput with only the final measurement requiring T decay

  6. Preventing and Removing Contamination in a Natural Radiocarbon Sample Preparation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zermeno, P; Kurdyla, D K; Buchholz, B A; Heller, S J; Frantz, B R; Brown, T A; Kashgarian, M

    2002-10-25

    The introduction of elevated {sup 14}C contamination into a natural radiocarbon sample preparation laboratory can occur through many different pathways. The most difficult to control is the introduction of contaminated samples from outside labs. Laboratories can remain {sup 14}C contaminated as a result of earlier tracer based research, even if ''hot'' work has not occurred in the laboratories in decades. Prior to accepting samples from outside collaborators, it is recommended that the collaborators test their labs for {sup 14}C contamination. Any surface in a lab that has high use by multiple people has the potential to be contaminated. The standard procedure for determining whether a collaborator's lab is contaminated consists of swiping lab surfaces with small glass fiber filters wetted with alcohol and measuring them for {sup 14}C content using AMS. Volatile {sup 14}C can be detected by using aerosol monitors consisting of fine soot that is depleted in {sup 14}C. These monitors can be set out in the laboratory in question to check for volatile {sup 14}C contamination. In the event that a hot sample is introduced in the natural radiocarbon sample prep laboratory, all sample submission should be stopped until the lab is declared clean. Samples already being processed should be completed along with {sup 14}C depleted material and measured by AMS. This will help determine if the contaminated samples have affected other samples in the laboratory. After a contamination event, the laboratory and associated equipment requires cleaning or disposal. All surfaces and equipment should be wiped down with acetone or ethanol. All chemicals in use should be disposed of in the appropriate waste containers and those waste containers removed from the lab. Once the natural radiocarbon laboratory has been thoroughly ''cleaned'', several background samples consisting of {sup 14}C depleted material should be processed through the lab and measured by AMS before unknown samples are

  7. Preparation and characterization of ambazone salt with nicotinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacsó, I.; Muresan-Pop, M.; Borodi, Gh.; Bratu, I.

    2012-02-01

    Salt formation is a good method of increasing solubility, dissolution rate and consequently the bioavailability of poor soluble acidic or basic drugs. The aim of this study was to obtain and to investigate the structural properties of the compound that was obtained by solvent drop grinding method at room temperature starting from the 1:1 molar ratios of ambazone (AMB) and nicotinic acid (NA). The obtained compound (AMB•NA) was investigated by thermal analysis (DSC, TG-DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The difference between the patterns of AMB•NA and of the starting compounds evidenced the formation of a salt. Using X-ray powder diffraction data, the lattice parameters were determined. The thermal and FTIR measurements on the pure compounds and on the (1:1) grinding mixture of AMB with NA confirm the salt formation.

  8. Controlled antibody release from gelatin for on-chip sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichen; Wasserberg, Dorothee; Breukers, Christian; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Beck, Markus

    2016-05-10

    A practical way to realize on-chip sample preparation for point-of-care diagnostics is to store the required reagents on a microfluidic device and release them in a controlled manner upon contact with the sample. For the development of such diagnostic devices, a fundamental understanding of the release kinetics of reagents from suitable materials in microfluidic chips is therefore essential. Here, we study the release kinetics of fluorophore-conjugated antibodies from (sub-) μm thick gelatin layers and several ways to control the release time. The observed antibody release is well-described by a diffusion model. Release times ranging from ∼20 s to ∼650 s were determined for layers with thicknesses (in the dry state) between 0.25 μm and 1.5 μm, corresponding to a diffusivity of 0.65 μm(2) s(-1) (in the swollen state) for our standard layer preparation conditions. By modifying the preparation conditions, we can influence the properties of gelatin to realize faster or slower release. Faster drying at increased temperatures leads to shorter release times, whereas slower drying at increased humidity yields slower release. As expected in a diffusive process, the release time increases with the size of the antibody. Moreover, the ionic strength of the release medium has a significant impact on the release kinetics. Applying these findings to cell counting chambers with on-chip sample preparation, we can tune the release to control the antibody distribution after inflow of blood in order to achieve homogeneous cell staining.

  9. [Quantitative analysis of seven phenolic acids in eight Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations by quantitative analysis of multi-components with single-marker].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-jun; Zhang, Li; Guo, Qing; Kou, Jun-ping; Yu, Bo-yang; Gu, Dan-hua

    2015-04-01

    The study aims to develop a unified method to determine seven phenolic acids (neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-caffeoylquinic acid, caffeic acid, isochlorogenic acid B, isochlorogenic acid A and isochlorogenic acid C) contained in honeysuckle flower that is the monarch drug of all the eight Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations using quantitative analysis of multi-components by single-marker (QAMS). Firstly, chlorogenic acid was used as a reference to get the average relative correction factors (RCFs) of the other phenolic acids in ratios to the reference; columns and instruments from different companies were used to validate the durability of the achieved RCFs in different levels of standard solutions; and honeysuckle flower extract was used as the reference substance to fix the positions of chromatographic peaks. Secondly, the contents of seven phenolic acids in eight different Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations samples were calculated based on the RCFs durability. Finally, the quantitative results were compared between QAMS and the external standard (ES) method. The results have showed that the durability of the achieved RCFs is good (RSD during 0.80% - 2.56%), and there are no differences between the quantitative results of QAMS and ES (the relative average deviation < 0.93%). So it can be successfully used to the quantitative control of honeysuckle flower principally prescribed in Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations. PMID:26223132

  10. Factors Affecting Immunogenic Activity of Mycobacterial Ribosomal and Ribonucleic Acid Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Youmans, Anne S.; Youmans, Guy P.

    1969-01-01

    By following careful procedures, mycobacterial ribosomal fractions and ribonucleic acid (RNA) prepared by ethyl alcohol precipitation were obtained which have immunogenic activities similar to the viable attenuated H37Ra cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from which they were obtained. This comparison was based on the amount of ribonucleic acid (RNA) present. These preparations consisted of approximately 63% RNA and 37% protein; no deoxyribonucleic acid or polysaccharide was detected by chemical tests. A high correlation was found between the immunogenic activity of a preparation and the per cent increase in hyperchromicity at 260 nm of a ribonuclease-hydrolyzed portion. Final concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate higher than 0.25% when used for the preparation of the ribosomal fractions and RNA resulted in significantly lower immune responses and greater variation between experiments. This was not related to the amount of protein present. The stability of the ribosomal and RNA preparations was tested under a variety of conditions. The need for a good protective adjuvant again was shown since mouse serum readily hydrolyzed the RNA. Equal immunity was obtained after immunization by the intraperitoneal and subcutaneous routes; however, no immune response was obtained when the intravenous route was used. Preliminary results with RNA prepared with phenol showed that it was more easily degraded during preparation. This resulted in a lower immune response than was obtained with the RNA prepared with ethyl alcohol. PMID:4979447

  11. Sample preparation module for bacterial lysis and isolation of DNA from human urine

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Sara; Zhang, Jane Y.; Singh, Satish; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Silica impregnated polymer monolithic columns may provide a simple method for lysing and extracting DNA from bacteria inside of microfluidic chips. Here we use Escherichia coli as a test organism for a point of care thermoplastic microfluidic module designed to take in a urine sample, mix it with lysis buffer, and perform a hybrid chemical/mechanical lysis and solid phase extraction of nucleic acids from the sample. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, we doped human hematuric urine samples with E. coli at concentrations ranging from 101–105 colony-forming units/mL (CFU/mL) to simulate patient samples. We then performed on-chip lysis and DNA extraction. The bacterial DNA was amplified using real-time PCR demonstrating lysis and isolation down to 101 CFU/mL. Results were comparable to a commercial kit at higher concen trations and performed better at recovering DNA at lower concentrations. PMID:19130239

  12. Polydopamine-coated magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective solid-phase extraction of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid from radix scrophulariae sample.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuli; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing; Luo, Ningjing

    2016-04-01

    We describe novel cinnamic acid polydopamine-coated magnetic imprinted polymers for the simultaneous selective extraction of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid from radix scrophulariae sample. The novel magnetic imprinted polymers were synthesized by surface imprinting polymerization using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the support material, cinnamic acid as the template and dopamine as the functional monomer. The magnetic imprinted polymers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results revealed that the magnetic imprinted polymers had outstanding magnetic properties, high adsorption capacity, selectivity and fast kinetic binding toward cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid. Coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography, the extraction conditions of the magnetic imprinted polymers as a magnetic solid-phase extraction sorbent were investigated in detail. The proposed imprinted magnetic solid phase extraction procedure has been used for the purification and enrichment of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid successfully from radix scrophulariae extraction sample with recoveries of 92.4-115.0% for cinnamic acid, 89.4-103.0% for ferulic acid and 86.6-96.0% for caffeic acid.

  13. Removal of interfering substances in samples prepared for two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Biological samples may contain contaminants that interfere with analysis by two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis. Lysates or biological fluids are complex mixtures that contain a wide variety of nonprotein substances in addition to the proteins to be analyzed. These substances often interfere with the resolution of the electrophoretic separation or the visualization of the result. Macromolecules (e.g., polysaccharides and DNA) can interfere with electrophoretic separation by clogging gel pores. Small ionic molecules can impair isoelectric focusing (IEF) separation by rendering the sample too conductive. Other substances (e.g., phenolics and lipids) can bind to proteins, influencing their electrophoretic properties or solubility. In many cases, measures to remove interfering substances can result in significantly clearer 2-D patterns with more visible spots and better resolution. It should be borne in mind, however, that analysis of samples by 2-D electrophoresis is usually most successful and informative when performed with minimally processed samples, so it is important that any steps taken to remove interfering substance be appropriate to the sample and only performed when necessary. Procedures for the removal of interfering substances therefore represent a compromise between removing nonprotein contaminants, and minimizing interference with the integrity and relative abundances of the sample proteins. This chapter presents a number of illustrative examples of optimized sample preparation methods in which specific interfering substances are removed by a variety of different strategies.

  14. A novel sample preparation method to avoid influence of embedding medium during nano-indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yujie; Wang, Siqun; Cai, Zhiyong; Young, Timothy M.; Du, Guanben; Li, Yanjun

    2013-02-01

    The effect of the embedding medium on the nano-indentation measurements of lignocellulosic materials was investigated experimentally using nano-indentation. Both the reduced elastic modulus and the hardness of non-embedded cell walls were found to be lower than those of the embedded samples, proving that the embedding medium used for specimen preparation on cellulosic material during nano-indentation can modify cell-wall properties. This leads to structural and chemical changes in the cell-wall constituents, changes that may significantly alter the material properties. Further investigation was carried out to detect the influence of different vacuum times on the cell-wall mechanical properties during the embedding procedure. Interpretation of the statistical analysis revealed no linear relationships between vacuum time and the mechanical properties of cell walls. The quantitative measurements confirm that low-viscosity resin has a rapid penetration rate early in the curing process. Finally, a novel sample preparation method aimed at preventing resin diffusion into lignocellulosic cell walls was developed using a plastic film to wrap the sample before embedding. This method proved to be accessible and straightforward for many kinds of lignocellulosic material, but is especially suitable for small, soft samples.

  15. Automated sample preparation facilitated by PhyNexus MEA purification system for oligosaccharide mapping of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Prater, Bradley D; Anumula, Kalyan R; Hutchins, Jeff T

    2007-10-15

    A reproducible high-throughput sample cleanup method for fluorescent oligosaccharide mapping of glycoproteins is described. Oligosaccharides are released from glycoproteins using PNGase F and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid (anthranilic acid, AA). A PhyNexus MEA system was adapted for automated isolation of the fluorescently labeled oligosaccharides from the reaction mixture prior to mapping by HPLC. The oligosaccharide purification uses a normal-phase polyamide resin (DPA-6S) in custom-made pipette tips. The resin volume, wash, and elution steps involved were optimized to obtain high recovery of oligosaccharides with the least amount of contaminating free fluorescent dye in the shortest amount of time. The automated protocol for sample cleanup eliminated all manual manipulations with a recycle time of 23 min. We have reduced the amount of excess AA by 150-fold, allowing quantitative oligosaccharide mapping from as little as 500 ng digested recombinant immunoglobulin G (rIgG). This low sample requirement allows early selection of a cell line with desired characteristics (e.g., oligosaccharide profile and high specific productivity) for the production of glycoprotein drugs. In addition, the use of Tecan or another robotic platform in conjunction with this method should allow the cleanup of 96 samples in 23 min, a significant decrease in the amount of time currently required to process such a large number of samples.

  16. Adsorption properties of biomass-based activated carbon prepared with spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ouyang, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbon prepared from spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation had been employed as the adsorbent for ethylene and n-butane at room temperature. Prepared activated carbon was characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. It was confirmed that pore structure played an important role during the adsorption testes. Adsorption isotherms of ethylene and n-butane fitted well with Langmuir equation. The prepared samples owned better adsorption capacity for n-butane than commercial activated carbon. Isosteric heats of adsorptions at different coverage were calculated through Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Micropore filling effect was explained in a thermodynamic way.

  17. Actuation Behavior of Polylactic Acid Fiber Films Prepared by Electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Nobeshima, Taiki; Ishii, Yuya; Sakai, Heisuke; Uemura, Sei; Yoshida, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    A poly-DL-lactide (PLA) fiber film was prepared using the electrospinning method. This film consisted of randomly oriented PLA nanofibers. Consequently, it had sponge-like structure and was quite soft compared to PLA films prepared by spin coating. The average diameter of the fibers and the density of the film were 730 nm and 20%, respectively. By applying a voltage, the PLA film was subjected to electric-field-induced strain: expansion and compression in the thickness direction. When a voltage of -200 V was applied to the film, its thickness shrank from 13.5 µm to 10.0 µm (a 26% reduction). Electric-field-induced strain can occur via two different mechanisms: The first is electrostrictive behavior. That. is, in a highly electric field region, a change of film thickness occurs (compression only) from the electrostatic force between electrodes. The second mechanism is piezoelectric-like behavior that occurs in racemic PLA, wherein a PLA nanofiber is expanded and compressed by applying positive and negative voltage. Such piezoelectric-like behavior was not observed in spin-coated PLA films.

  18. Actuation Behavior of Polylactic Acid Fiber Films Prepared by Electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Nobeshima, Taiki; Ishii, Yuya; Sakai, Heisuke; Uemura, Sei; Yoshida, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    A poly-DL-lactide (PLA) fiber film was prepared using the electrospinning method. This film consisted of randomly oriented PLA nanofibers. Consequently, it had sponge-like structure and was quite soft compared to PLA films prepared by spin coating. The average diameter of the fibers and the density of the film were 730 nm and 20%, respectively. By applying a voltage, the PLA film was subjected to electric-field-induced strain: expansion and compression in the thickness direction. When a voltage of -200 V was applied to the film, its thickness shrank from 13.5 µm to 10.0 µm (a 26% reduction). Electric-field-induced strain can occur via two different mechanisms: The first is electrostrictive behavior. That. is, in a highly electric field region, a change of film thickness occurs (compression only) from the electrostatic force between electrodes. The second mechanism is piezoelectric-like behavior that occurs in racemic PLA, wherein a PLA nanofiber is expanded and compressed by applying positive and negative voltage. Such piezoelectric-like behavior was not observed in spin-coated PLA films. PMID:27451629

  19. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R E

    1991-08-20

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) and radiocalcium ({sup 41}Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS {sup 14}C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO{sub 2} to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high {sup 13}C{sup {minus}} ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, {sup 14}C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP.

  20. Evaluation of neon focused ion beam milling for TEM sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Pekin, T C; Allen, F I; Minor, A M

    2016-10-01

    Gallium-based focused ion beams generated from liquid-metal sources are widely used in micromachining and sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy, with well-known drawbacks such as sample damage and contamination. In this work, an alternative (neon) focused ion beam generated by a gas field-ionization source is evaluated for the preparation of electron-transparent specimens. To do so, electron-transparent sections of Si and an Al alloy are prepared with both Ga and Ne ion beams for direct comparison. Diffraction-contrast imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are used to evaluate the relative damage induced by the two beams, and cross-sections of milled trenches are examined to compare the implantation depth with theoretical predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that for the beam voltages and materials systems investigated, Ne ion beam milling does not significantly reduce the focused ion beam induced artefacts. However, the Ne ion beam does enable more precise milling and may be of interest in cases where Ga contamination cannot be tolerated. PMID:27172066

  1. Methods of biological fluids sample preparation - biogenic amines, methylxanthines, water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Płonka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In recent years demands on the amount of information that can be obtained from the analysis of a single sample have increased. For time and economic reasons it is necessary to examine at the same time larger number of compounds, and compounds from different groups. This can best be seen in such areas as clinical analysis. In many diseases, the best results for patients are obtained when treatment fits the individual characteristics of the patient. Dosage monitoring is important at the beginning of therapy and in the full process of treatment. In the treatment of many diseases biogenic amines (dopamine, serotonin) and methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine, caffeine) play an important role. They are used as drugs separately or in combination with others to support and strengthen the action of other drugs - for example, the combination of caffeine and paracetamol. Vitamin supplementation may be also an integral part of the treatment process. Specification of complete sample preparation parameters for extraction of the above compounds from biological matrices has been reviewed. Particular attention was given to the preparation stage and extraction methods. This review provides universal guidance on establishing a common procedures across laboratories to facilitate the preparation and analysis of all discussed compounds. PMID:25381720

  2. Evaluation of neon focused ion beam milling for TEM sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Pekin, T C; Allen, F I; Minor, A M

    2016-10-01

    Gallium-based focused ion beams generated from liquid-metal sources are widely used in micromachining and sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy, with well-known drawbacks such as sample damage and contamination. In this work, an alternative (neon) focused ion beam generated by a gas field-ionization source is evaluated for the preparation of electron-transparent specimens. To do so, electron-transparent sections of Si and an Al alloy are prepared with both Ga and Ne ion beams for direct comparison. Diffraction-contrast imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are used to evaluate the relative damage induced by the two beams, and cross-sections of milled trenches are examined to compare the implantation depth with theoretical predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that for the beam voltages and materials systems investigated, Ne ion beam milling does not significantly reduce the focused ion beam induced artefacts. However, the Ne ion beam does enable more precise milling and may be of interest in cases where Ga contamination cannot be tolerated.

  3. Extraction Chromatographic Methods in the Sample Preparation Sequence for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Plutonium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Farawila, Anne F.; Douglas, Matthew; Haney, Morgan M.; Peterson, Steve L.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2011-10-17

    A sample preparation sequence for actinide isotopic analysis by TIMS is described that includes column-based extraction chromatography as the first separation step, followed by anion exchange column separations. The sequence is designed to include a wet ashing step after the extraction chromatography to prevent any leached extractant or oxalic acid eluent reagents from interfering with subsequent separations, source preparation, or TIMS ionization. TEVA-resin and DGA-resin materials, containing extractants that consist only of C, N, O, and H atoms, were investigated for isolation of plutonium. Radiotracer level studies confirmed expected high yields from column-based separation procedures. Femtogram-level studies were carried out with TIMS detection, using multiple isotopic spikes through the separation sequence. Pu recoveries were 87% and 86% for TEVA- and DGA-resins separations respectively. The Pu recoveries from 400 {mu}L anion-exchange column separations were 89% and 93% for trial sequences incorporating TEVA and DGA-resin. Thus, a prior extraction chromatography step in the sequence did not interfere with the subsequent anion exchange separation when a simple wet ash step was carried out in between these column separations. The average measurement efficiency, for Pu, encompassing the chemical separation recoveries and the TIMS ionization efficiency, was 2.73 {+-} 0.77% (2-sigma) for the DGA-resin trials and 2.67 {+-} 0.54% for the TEVA-resin trials, compared to 3.41% and 2.37% (average 2.89%) for two spikes in the experimental set. These compare with an average measurement efficiency of 2.78 {+-} 1.70%, n = 33 from process benchmark analyses using Pu spikes processed through a sequence of oxalate precipitation, wet ash, iron hydroxide precipitation, and anion exchange column separations. We conclude that extraction chromatography can be a viable separation procedure as part of a multistep sequence for TIMS sample preparation.

  4. Extraction chromatographic methods in the sample preparation sequence for thermal ionization mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Grate, Jay W; O'Hara, Matthew J; Farawila, Anne F; Douglas, Matthew; Haney, Morgan M; Petersen, Steven L; Maiti, Tapas C; Aardahl, Christopher L

    2011-12-01

    A sample preparation sequence for actinide isotopic analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is described that includes column-based extraction chromatography as the first separation step, followed by anion-exchange column separations. The sequence is designed to include a wet ashing step after the extraction chromatography to prevent any leached extractant or oxalic acid eluent reagents from interfering with subsequent separations, source preparation, or TIMS ionization. TEVA resin and DGA resin materials, containing extractants that consist only of C, N, O, and H atoms, were investigated for isolation of plutonium. Radiotracer level studies confirmed expected high yields from column-based separation procedures. Femtogram-level studies were carried out with TIMS detection, using multiple monoisotopic spikes applied sequentially throughout the separation sequence. Pu recoveries were 87% and 86% for TEVA and DGA resin separations, respectively. The Pu recoveries from 400 μL anion-exchange column separation sequences were 89% and 93% for trial sequences incorporating TEVA and DGA resin. Thus, a prior extraction chromatography step in the sequence did not interfere with the subsequent anion-exchange separation when a simple wet ash step was carried out in between these column separations. The average measurement efficiency for Pu, encompassing the chemical separation recoveries and the TIMS ionization efficiency, was 2.73% ± 0.77% (2σ) for the DGA resin trials and 2.67% ± 0.54% for the TEVA resin trials, compared to 3.41% and 2.37% (average 2.89%) for two control trials. These compare with an average measurement efficiency of 2.78% ± 1.70%, n = 33 from process benchmark analyses using Pu spikes processed through a sequence of oxalate precipitation, wet ash, iron hydroxide precipitation, and anion-exchange column separations. We conclude that extraction chromatography can be a viable separation procedure as part of a multistep sequence for TIMS

  5. Extraction chromatographic methods in the sample preparation sequence for thermal ionization mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Grate, Jay W; O'Hara, Matthew J; Farawila, Anne F; Douglas, Matthew; Haney, Morgan M; Petersen, Steven L; Maiti, Tapas C; Aardahl, Christopher L

    2011-12-01

    A sample preparation sequence for actinide isotopic analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is described that includes column-based extraction chromatography as the first separation step, followed by anion-exchange column separations. The sequence is designed to include a wet ashing step after the extraction chromatography to prevent any leached extractant or oxalic acid eluent reagents from interfering with subsequent separations, source preparation, or TIMS ionization. TEVA resin and DGA resin materials, containing extractants that consist only of C, N, O, and H atoms, were investigated for isolation of plutonium. Radiotracer level studies confirmed expected high yields from column-based separation procedures. Femtogram-level studies were carried out with TIMS detection, using multiple monoisotopic spikes applied sequentially throughout the separation sequence. Pu recoveries were 87% and 86% for TEVA and DGA resin separations, respectively. The Pu recoveries from 400 μL anion-exchange column separation sequences were 89% and 93% for trial sequences incorporating TEVA and DGA resin. Thus, a prior extraction chromatography step in the sequence did not interfere with the subsequent anion-exchange separation when a simple wet ash step was carried out in between these column separations. The average measurement efficiency for Pu, encompassing the chemical separation recoveries and the TIMS ionization efficiency, was 2.73% ± 0.77% (2σ) for the DGA resin trials and 2.67% ± 0.54% for the TEVA resin trials, compared to 3.41% and 2.37% (average 2.89%) for two control trials. These compare with an average measurement efficiency of 2.78% ± 1.70%, n = 33 from process benchmark analyses using Pu spikes processed through a sequence of oxalate precipitation, wet ash, iron hydroxide precipitation, and anion-exchange column separations. We conclude that extraction chromatography can be a viable separation procedure as part of a multistep sequence for TIMS

  6. [PREPARATIONS OF PAMIDRONOVIC ACID IN COMPLEX TREATMENT ON OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA].

    PubMed

    Zyma, A M; Guk, Yu M; Magomedov, O M; Gayko, O G; Kincha-Polishchuk, T A

    2015-07-01

    Modern view of drug therapy in the complex treatment of orthopedic manifestations of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) was submitted. Developed and tested system of drug correction of structural and functional state of bone tissue (BT) using drugs pamidronovic acid, depending on osteoporosis severity and type of disease. Such therapy is appropriate to apply both independently and in conjunction with surgery to correct deformations of long bones of the lower extremities. Effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed methods of drug therapy was proved, most patients resume features walking and support. PMID:26591224

  7. Rapid Microbial Sample Preparation from Blood Using a Novel Concentration Device

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Anna K.; Campbell, Jennifer; Wirz, Holger; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate care for bacteremic patients is dictated by the amount of time needed for an accurate diagnosis. However, the concentration of microbes in the blood is extremely low in these patients (1–100 CFU/mL), traditionally requiring growth (blood culture) or amplification (e.g., PCR) for detection. Current culture-based methods can take a minimum of two days, while faster methods like PCR require a sample free of inhibitors (i.e., blood components). Though commercial kits exist for the removal of blood from these samples, they typically capture only DNA, thereby necessitating the use of blood culture for antimicrobial testing. Here, we report a novel, scaled-up sample preparation protocol carried out in a new microbial concentration device. The process can efficiently lyse 10 mL of bacteremic blood while maintaining the microorganisms’ viability, giving a 30‑μL final output volume. A suite of six microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans) at a range of clinically relevant concentrations was tested. All of the microorganisms had recoveries greater than 55% at the highest tested concentration of 100 CFU/mL, with three of them having over 70% recovery. At the lowest tested concentration of 3 CFU/mL, two microorganisms had recoveries of ca. 40–50% while the other four gave recoveries greater than 70%. Using a Taqman assay for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA)to prove the feasibility of downstream analysis, we show that our microbial pellets are clean enough for PCR amplification. PCR testing of 56 spiked-positive and negative samples gave a specificity of 0.97 and a sensitivity of 0.96, showing that our sample preparation protocol holds great promise for the rapid diagnosis of bacteremia directly from a primary sample. PMID:25675242

  8. Sample collection and amino acids analysis of extracellular fluid of mouse brain slices with low flow push-pull perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Torres, G; Williams, L; Featherstone, D E; Shippy, S A

    2015-10-01

    Brain tissue slices are a common neuroscience model that allows relatively sophisticated analysis of neuronal networks in a simplified preparation. Most experimental methodology utilizes electrophysiological tools to probe these model systems. The work here demonstrates the adaptation of low-flow push-pull perfusion sampling (LFPS) to a brain slice system. LFPS is used to sample from the hippocampus of mouse brain slices. Perfusate amino acid levels are quantified following sampling with capillary electrophoresis. Glutamate was measured from the CA1 region of the hippocampus in slices taken from a cystine-glutamate transporter deletion mutant, xCT(-/-), and the background strain C57BL/6J. Sampling is performed over up to 6.5 h with standard tissue slice preparation and experimentation methods. Four amino acids were quantified to demonstrate the ability to perform LFPS and show good agreement with published literature. Perfusate glutamate levels are found to be significantly lower with xCT(-/-) slices (1.9(±0.5) μM) relative to controls (4.90(±1.1) μM). But, experiments with control slices show a significant decrease in glutamate over the 6 h sampling period that are not seen with xCT(-/-) slices. Increasing the LFPS sample collection rate during the first 90 min of sampling did not show a sampling artifact in perfusate glutamate content. Sampling immediately following slicing did not show an early increasing glutamate level that would be indicative of a significant contribution from blood or tissue damage. The data presented here show a complementarity to electrophysiological studies of tissue slices. The ability to characterize extracellular fluid chemical content with LFPS in these slices provides an alternative data stream for probing neurochemical signaling networks in brain tissue slices. PMID:26299259

  9. Preparation and characterization of biomass carbon-based solid acid catalyst for the esterification of oleic acid with methanol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiantian; Li, Zhilong; Li, Wei; Shi, Congjiao; Wang, Yun

    2013-04-01

    A solid acid catalyst, prepared by sulfonating carbonized corn straw, was proved to be an efficient and environmental benign catalyst for the esterification of oleic acid and methanol. Various synthetic parameters, such as carbonization temperature and time were systematically examined. It was found that the catalyst exhibited the highest acid density of 2.64 mmol/g by NaOH titration. A quantitative yield (98%) of ester was achieved, using the most active sulfonated catalyst at 333 K with a 7 wt.% catalyst/oleic acid ratio for 4h, at a 7:1 M ratio of methanol/oleic acid, while the commercial available Amberlyst-15 only gave 85% yield under the same reaction condition.

  10. Automated protein hydrolysis delivering sample to a solid acid catalyst for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic protein hydrolysis system using strong cation-exchange resins as solid acid catalysts. Examining several kinds of inorganic solid acids and cation-exchange resins, we found that a few cation-exchange resins worked as acid catalysts for protein hydrolysis when heated in the presence of water. The most efficient resin yielded amounts of amino acids that were over 70% of those recovered after conventional hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid and resulted in amino acid compositions matching the theoretical values. The solid-acid hydrolysis was automated by packing the resin into columns, combining the columns with a high-performance liquid chromatography system, and heating them. The amino acids that constitute a protein can thereby be determined, minimizing contamination from the environment.

  11. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    SciTech Connect

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  12. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastián C.

    2006-03-01

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon® seat, and Kalrez® O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  13. Biological sample preparation and {sup 41}Ca AMS measurement at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Southon, J.R.; Bench, G.S.; McAninch, J.E.; Serfass, R.E.; Fang, Y.; King, J.C.; Woodhouse, L.R.

    1994-10-10

    Calcium metabolism in biology may be better understood by the use of {sup 41}Ca labels, although detection by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is required. Methodologies for preparation of urine samples and subsequent AMS measurement were investigated. Novel attempts at preparing CaH{sub 2} were unsuccessful, but CaF{sub 2} of sufficient purity could be produced by precipitation of calcium from urine as oxalate, followed by separation of calcium by cation exchange chromatography and washing the CaF{sub 2} precipitate. The presence of some remaining impurities could be compensated for by selecting the appropriate accelerated ion charge state for AMS. The use of projectile x rays for isobar discrimination was explored as an alternative to the conventional dE/dx device.

  14. Improved Butanol-Methanol (BUME) Method by Replacing Acetic Acid for Lipid Extraction of Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Mutya; Wang, Miao; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica; Han, Xianlin

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of lipids from biological samples is a critical step in lipidomics, especially for shotgun lipidomics where lipid extracts are directly infused into a mass spectrometer. The butanol-methanol (BUME) extraction method was originally developed to extract lipids from plasma samples with 1 % acetic acid. Considering some lipids are sensitive to acidic environments, we modified this protocol by replacing acetic acid with lithium chloride solution and extended the modified extraction to tissue samples. Although no significant reduction of plasmalogen levels in the acidic BUME extracts of rat heart samples was found, the modified method was established to extract various tissue samples, including rat liver, heart, and plasma. Essentially identical profiles of the majority of lipid classes were obtained from the extracts of the modified BUME and traditional Bligh-Dyer methods. However, it was found that neither the original, nor the modified BUME method was suitable for 4-hydroxyalkenal species measurement in biological samples. PMID:27245345

  15. Correlating Mineralogy and Amino Acid Contents of Milligram-Scale Murchison Carbonaceous Chondrite Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron, S.; Berger, Eve L.; Locke, Darren R.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, have been found to be indigenous in most of the carbonaceous chondrite groups. The abundances of amino acids, as well as their structural, enantiomeric and isotopic compositions differ significantly among meteorites of different groups and petrologic types. This suggests that there is a link between parent-body conditions, mineralogy and the synthesis and preservation of amino acids (and likely other organic molecules). However, elucidating specific causes for the observed differences in amino acid composition has proven extremely challenging because samples analyzed for amino acids are typically much larger ((is) approximately 100 mg powders) than the scale at which meteorite heterogeneity is observed (sub mm-scale differences, (is) approximately 1-mg or smaller samples). Thus, the effects of differences in mineralogy on amino acid abundances could not be easily discerned. Recent advances in the sensitivity of instrumentation have made possible the analysis of smaller samples for amino acids, enabling a new approach to investigate the link between mineralogical con-text and amino acid compositions/abundances in meteorites. Through coordinated mineral separation, mineral characterization and highly sensitive amino acid analyses, we have performed preliminary investigations into the relationship between meteorite mineralogy and amino acid composition. By linking amino acid data to mineralogy, we have started to identify amino acid-bearing mineral phases in different carbonaceous meteorites. The methodology and results of analyses performed on the Murchison meteorite are presented here.

  16. Muramic acid as a measure of microbial biomass in estuarine and marine samples.

    PubMed Central

    King, J D; White, D C

    1977-01-01

    Muramic acid, a component of the muramyl peptide found only in the cell walls of bacteria and blue-green algae, furnishes a measure of detrital or sedimentary procaryotic biomass. A reproducible assay involving acid hydrolysis, preparative thin-layer chromatographic purification, and colorimetric analysis of lactate released from muramic acid by alkaline hydrolysis is described. Comparison of semitropical estuarine detritus, estuarine muds, and sediments from anaerobic Black Sea cores showed muramic acid levels of 100 to 700 microng/g (dry weight), 34 microng/g, and 1.5 to 14.9 microng/g, respectively. Enzymatic assays of lactate from muramic acid gave results 10- to 20-fold higher. Radioactive pulse-labeling studies showed that [14C]acetate is rapidly incorporated into muramic acid by the detrital microflora. Subsequent loss of 14C, accompanied by nearly constant levels of total muramic acid, indicated active metabolism in procaryotic cell walls. PMID:869528

  17. Some new aspects of low-temperature lithium cobalt oxides prepared through citric acid precursor route

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikary, K.; Takahashi, Masao; Kikkawa, Shinichi

    1998-12-01

    Low-temperature (LT) lithium cobalt oxides were prepared at 300 C by the solid-state reaction between Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, having various starting compositions Li{sub 1+x}CoO{sub 2} with x = {minus}0.2, 0.0, 0.2, and 0.4. A finely mixed precursor of the reacting compounds was obtained in molten citric acid. The morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the homogeneous observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the homogeneous and fluffy nature of the specimens, with a BET specific surface as high as 19 m{sup 2}g{sup {minus}1}. The cubic crystal lattice was found to decrease from a = 7.990 to 7.984 {angstrom} against Li/Co = 0.62 to 0.90 in molar ratio of the water-leached products. The resistivity and open circuit voltage (OCV) against lithium metal were found to be sensitive to the initial lithium content of the samples. Chemical titration showed that all of the samples contained an appreciable amount of Co{sup 2+} in addition to trivalent cobalt. XANES spectra supported the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated divalent cobalt. A model is proposed in which oxidation of divalent cobalt explains the electrochemical charge-discharge irreversibility in the initial cycle.

  18. Electrodeposited Fe-Co films prepared from a citric-acid-based plating bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, T.; Uto, H.; Shimokawa, T.; Nakano, M.; Fukunaga, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-06-01

    Electrodeposited Fe-Co films are commonly prepared in a boric-acid-based bath. In this research, we applied citric acid instead of boric acid for the plating of Fe-Co films because boron in the waste bath is restricted by environmental-protection regulations in Japan. We evaluated the effect of citric acid on the magnetic and structural properties of the films. The saturation magnetization of the Fe-Co films slightly increased while the Fe content in the Fe-Co films decreased with increasing citric acid concentration. The lowest coercivity value of 240 A/m was obtained at a citric acid concentration of 100 g/L. The plating bath with this citric acid concentration enabled us to obtain Fe-Co films with high saturation magnetizations and smooth surface morphologies.

  19. Preparation of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid by ozone treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue

    2012-06-20

    Recently, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid has been reported to have novel features, such as free radical scavenging activities, antioxidant activities, promotion of excisional wound healing, etc. In the present work, degradation of native hyaluronic acid by ozone treatment was performed for preparation of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid. The molecular weight of native hyaluronic acid was reduced from 1535 to 87 kDa for 120 min at 40°C. The rate of reduction of molecular weight was 94.33%. The FT-IR, 13C NMR, and UV-vis spectra suggested that there was no obvious modification of chemical structure of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid. The use of degradation of native hyaluronic acid by ozone treatment can be a useful alternative for production of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid.

  20. Application of a Dual-Arm Robot in Complex Sample Preparation and Measurement Processes.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Heidi; Drews, Robert Ralf; Janson, Jessica; Chinna Patlolla, Bharath Reddy; Chu, Xianghua; Klos, Michael; Thurow, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Automation systems with applied robotics have already been established in industrial applications for many years. In the field of life sciences, a comparable high level of automation can be found in the areas of bioscreening and high-throughput screening. Strong deficits still exist in the development of flexible and universal fully automated systems in the field of analytical measurement. Reasons are the heterogeneous processes with complex structures, which include sample preparation and transport, analytical measurements using complex sensor systems, and suitable data analysis and evaluation. Furthermore, the use of nonstandard sample vessels with various shapes and volumes results in an increased complexity. The direct use of existing automation solutions from bioscreening applications is not possible. A flexible automation system for sample preparation, analysis, and data evaluation is presented in this article. It is applied for the determination of cholesterol in biliary endoprosthesis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A dual-arm robot performs both transport and active manipulation tasks to ensure human-like operation. This general robotic concept also enables the use of manual laboratory devices and equipment and is thus suitable in areas with a high standardization grade.

  1. microPREP: a new laser tool for high-volume sample preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Uwe; Petsch, Tino; Krause, Michael; Höche, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Over the past fifty year, lasers have perpetuated to find new, often groundbreaking applications in science and technology. The most important features of lasers are that photons are inherently free of elemental contamination, extremely high energy densities can be focused in very small areas and the laser beam can be precisely positioned using deflection mirrors. By reducing pulse lengths from a few nanoseconds down to the picosecond or femtosecond range, material's ablation is becoming increasingly "athermal", i.e. structure damage by local heating is reduced to well below a few microns. In view of these outstanding characteristics of lasers as tools for micromachining, it is very surprising that sample preparation for microstructure diagnostics so far hasn't made use of laser technology. microPREPTM, the all-new, patented laser-micromachining tool developed by 3D-Micromac is the first instrument to make fast, clean, and efficient laser ablation available for the preparation of samples for microstructure diagnostics. Exemplified for a sample to be investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and following a three-stage approach, a supporting basic structure is cut from the feedstock first. Second, the supported structure is thinned down to a few micron of residual thickness and third, the supported and thinned structure is polished using an ion broad beam. Illustrated by numerous examples, it is shown that this technology is ready to be applied on different areas of microstructure diagnostics and has very high potential for failure diagnostics.

  2. Preparation of 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Glass, David R.

    2016-03-22

    A process for synthesizing 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate involves reacting a dialkyl oxalate with an alkoxide in ethanol to form a reaction mixture, and afterward adding an alkyl cyano acetate to the reaction mixture and allowing a reaction to proceed under conditions suitable to form a first reaction product of the formula diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and then isolating the diethyl 2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate, and afterward reacting the diethyl-2-cyano-3-hydroxy-butenedioate with an aqueous hydroxide under conditions suitable to form 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate. The 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoate may be acidified into 4-amino-2,4-dioxobutanoic acid.

  3. Selenium speciation in acidic environmental samples: application to acid rain-soil interaction at Mount Etna volcano.

    PubMed

    Floor, Geerke H; Iglesías, Mònica; Román-Ross, Gabriela; Corvini, Philippe F X; Lenz, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Speciation plays a crucial role in elemental mobility. However, trace level selenium (Se) speciation analyses in aqueous samples from acidic environments are hampered due to adsorption of the analytes (i.e. selenate, selenite) on precipitates. Such solid phases can form during pH adaptation up till now necessary for chromatographic separation. Thermodynamic calculations in this study predicted that a pH<4 is needed to prevent precipitation of Al and Fe phases. Therefore, a speciation method with a low pH eluent that matches the natural sample pH of acid rain-soil interaction samples from Etna volcano was developed. With a mobile phase containing 20mM ammonium citrate at pH 3, selenate and selenite could be separated in different acidic media (spiked water, rain, soil leachates) in <10 min with a LOQ of 0.2 μg L(-1) using (78)Se for detection. Applying this speciation analysis to study acid rain-soil interaction using synthetic rain based on H(2)SO(4) and soil samples collected at the flanks of Etna volcano demonstrated the dominance of selenate over selenite in leachates from samples collected close to the volcanic craters. This suggests that competitive behavior with sulfate present in acid rain might be a key factor in Se mobilization. The developed speciation method can significantly contribute to understand Se cycling in acidic, Al/Fe rich environments.

  4. Review of sample preparation strategies for MS-based metabolomic studies in industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Causon, Tim J; Hann, Stephan

    2016-09-28

    Fermentation and cell culture biotechnology in the form of so-called "cell factories" now play an increasingly significant role in production of both large (e.g. proteins, biopharmaceuticals) and small organic molecules for a wide variety of applications. However, associated metabolic engineering optimisation processes relying on genetic modification of organisms used in cell factories, or alteration of production conditions remain a challenging undertaking for improving the final yield and quality of cell factory products. In addition to genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic workflows, analytical metabolomics continues to play a critical role in studying detailed aspects of critical pathways (e.g. via targeted quantification of metabolites), identification of biosynthetic intermediates, and also for phenotype differentiation and the elucidation of previously unknown pathways (e.g. via non-targeted strategies). However, the diversity of primary and secondary metabolites and the broad concentration ranges encompassed during typical biotechnological processes means that simultaneous extraction and robust analytical determination of all parts of interest of the metabolome is effectively impossible. As the integration of metabolome data with transcriptome and proteome data is an essential goal of both targeted and non-targeted methods addressing production optimisation goals, additional sample preparation steps beyond necessary sampling, quenching and extraction protocols including clean-up, analyte enrichment, and derivatisation are important considerations for some classes of metabolites, especially those present in low concentrations or exhibiting poor stability. This contribution critically assesses the potential of current sample preparation strategies applied in metabolomic studies of industrially-relevant cell factory organisms using mass spectrometry-based platforms primarily coupled to liquid-phase sample introduction (i.e. flow injection, liquid

  5. Preserving the distribution of inorganic arsenic species in groundwater and acid mine drainage samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Wildeman, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of inorganic arsenic species must be preserved in the field to eliminate changes caused by metal oxyhydroxide precipitation, photochemical oxidation, and redox reactions. Arsenic species sorb to iron and manganese oxyhydroxide precipitates, and arsenite can be oxidized to arsenate by photolytically produced free radicals in many sample matrices. Several preservatives were evaluated to minimize metal oxyhydroxide precipitation, such as inorganic acids and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). EDTA was found to work best for all sample matrices tested. Storing samples in opaque polyethylene bottles eliminated the effects of photochemical reactions. The preservation technique was tested on 71 groundwater and six acid mine drainage samples. Concentrations in groundwater samples reached 720 ??g-As/L for arsenite and 1080 ??g-As/L for arsenate, and acid mine drainage samples reached 13 000 ??g-As/L for arsenite and 3700 ??g-As/L for arsenate. The arsenic species distribution in the samples ranged from 0 to 90% arsenite. The stability of the preservation technique was established by comparing laboratory arsenic speciation results for samples preserved in the field to results for subsamples speciated onsite. Statistical analyses indicated that the difference between arsenite and arsenate concentrations for samples preserved with EDTA in opaque bottles and field speciation results were analytically insignificant. The percentage change in arsenite:arsenate ratios for a preserved acid mine drainage sample and groundwater sample during a 3-month period was -5 and +3%, respectively.

  6. Effects of sampling, preparation and defecation on metal concentrations in selected invertebrates at urban sites.

    PubMed

    Zödl, Bettina; Wittmann, Karl J

    2003-08-01

    In order to obtain basic information for designing standardized test preparation methods, the heavy metals Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb were measured in gastropods (Xerolenta obvia), oligochaetes (Lumbricus terrestris), isopods (Armadillidium vulgare, Trachelipus rathkei) and carabids (Harpalus rubripes, Calathus fuscipes) using different sampling methods and different modes of sample treatment. In some of the experiments, higher Zn, Cd and Pb, and lower Cu-contents were observed in isopods and carabids trapped with formalin-pitfalls compared to manually collected specimens (which were allowed to defecate). Defecation had marked effects on the levels of all four metals investigated in oligochaetes, and on Cd and Pb in gastropods and isopods. Cellulose was fed as an accelerator of gut passage and showed a significant effect on the Pb concentration in the soft body of gastropods. Deionate-washed isopods (A. vulgare) showed higher Cd concentrations than ultrasonic-cleaned individuals. No marked differences were observed between heat-dried and freeze-dried isopods. Carabids showed strong sex-specific differences in metal concentrations. Based on these and previous results, invertebrates should be: collected in vivo, allowed to defecate, be freeze-fixed and (at least in arthropods) ultrasonic-cleaned, determined to species level and in certain groups (carabids) also to sex, and then be sized or sorted by size (age) before further preparation and analysis. If any of these treatments is impractical, comparable sampling and preparation methods are recommended as a minimum requirement in order to avoid bias in the results and/or interpretation. PMID:12820990

  7. Perfluoroalkyl Acid Concentrations in Blood Samples Subjected to Transportation and Processing Delay

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Cathrine Carlsen; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Bossi, Rossana; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Fuglsang, Jens; Olsen, Jørn; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    Background In studies of perfluoroalkyl acids, the validity and comparability of measured concentrations may be affected by differences in the handling of biospecimens. We aimed to investigate whether measured plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl acids differed between blood samples subjected to delay and transportation prior to processing and samples with immediate processing and freezing. Methods Pregnant women recruited at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, (n = 88) provided paired blood samples. For each pair of samples, one was immediately processed and plasma was frozen, and the other was delayed and transported as whole blood before processing and freezing of plasma (similar to the Danish National Birth Cohort). We measured 12 perfluoroalkyl acids and present results for compounds with more than 50% of samples above the lower limit of quantification. Results For samples taken in the winter, relative differences between the paired samples ranged between -77 and +38% for individual perfluoroalkyl acids. In most cases concentrations were lower in the delayed and transported samples, e.g. the relative difference was -29% (95% confidence interval -30; -27) for perfluorooctane sulfonate. For perfluorooctanoate there was no difference between the two setups [corresponding estimate 1% (0, 3)]. Differences were negligible in the summer for all compounds. Conclusions Transport of blood samples and processing delay, similar to conditions applied in some large, population-based studies, may affect measured perfluoroalkyl acid concentrations, mainly when outdoor temperatures are low. Attention to processing conditions is needed in studies of perfluoroalkyl acid exposure in humans. PMID:26356420

  8. Workshop on Mars 2001: Integrated Science in Preparation for Sample Return and Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John (Editor); Weitz, Cathy (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Workshop on Mars 2001: Integrated Science in Preparation for Sample Return and Human Exploration was held on October 2-4, 1999, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas. The workshop was sponsored by the Lunar and Planetary Institute, the Mars Program Office of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The three-day meeting was attended by 133 scientists whose purpose was to share results from recent missions, to share plans for the 2001 mission, and to come to an agreement on a landing site for this mission.

  9. Marine sediment sample preparation for analysis for low concentrations of fine detrital gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, H. Edward; Hubert, Arthur; Phillips, R. Lawrence

    1967-01-01

    Analyses by atomic absorption for detrital gold in more than 2,000 beach, offshore, marine-terrace, and alluvial sands from southern Oregon have shown that the values determined from raw or unconcentrated sediment containing small amounts of gold are neither reproducible nor representative of the initial sample. This difficulty results from a 'particle sparsity effect', whereby the analysis for gold in a given sample depends more upon the occurrence of random flakes of gold in the analyzed portion than upon the actual gold content of the sample. The particle sparsity effect can largely be eliminated by preparing a gold concentrate prior to analysis. A combination of sieve, gravimetric, and magnetic separation produces a satisfactory concentrate that yields accurate and reproducible analyses. In concentrates of nearly every marine and beach sand studied, the gold occurs in the nonmagnetic fraction smaller than 0.124 mm and with a specific gravity greater than 3.3. The grain size of gold in stream sediments is somewhat more variable. Analysis of concentrates provides a means of greatly increasing the sensitivity of the analytical technique in relation to the initial sample. Gold rarely exceeds 1 part per million in even the richest black sand analyzed; to establish the distribution of gold (and platinum) in marine sediments and its relationship to source and environmental factors, one commonly needs to know their content to the part per billion range. Analysis of a concentrate and recalculation to the value in the initial sample permits this degree of sensitivity.

  10. Background and Artifacts Generated by the by the Sample Preparation Experiment on SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmahdi, Imene; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Coscia, David; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Teinturier, Samuel; Morisson, Marietta; Stambouli, Moncef; Dequaire, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is one of the instruments of the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Three analytical devices composed the SAM experiment: the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), the Gas Chromatography (GC) and the Mass Spectrometer (MS). To adapt the nature of a sample to the analytical devices used, a sample preparation and gas processing system implemented with (a) a pyrolysis system, (b) wet chemistry: MTBSTFA and TMAH (c) the hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax® TA and Carbosieve G) and the injection trap (Tenax® GR composed of Tenax® TA and 30% of graphite) are employed to concentrate volatiles released from the sample prior to GC-MS analysis. Our study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation detected in the SAM background by looking for: (a) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® and perchlorates present on Mars, (b) also between some soil sample and perchlorates and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. Here we report on the detection of chlorohydrocarbon compounds and their potential origin.

  11. On-line microdialysis sample cleanup for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of nucleic acid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Wu, Q.; Harms, A.C.; Smith, R.D.

    1996-09-15

    A major limitation of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for oligonucleotide analysis arises due to sodium adduction, a problem that increases with molecular weight. Sodium adduction can preclude useful measurements when limited sample sizes prevent off-line cleanup. A novel and generally useful on-line microdialysis technique is described for the rapid (nearly 1-5 min) DNA sample cleanup for ESI-MS. Mass spectra of oligonucleotides of different size and sequence showing no significant sodium adduct peaks were obtained using the on-line microdialysis system with sodium chloride concentrations as high as 250 mM. Signal-to-noise ratios were also greatly enhanced compared to direct infusion of the original samples. By using ammonium acetate as the dialysis buffer, it was also found that the noncovalent association of double-stranded oligonucleotides could be preserved during the microdialysis process, allowing analysis by ESI-MS. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Appropriate sampling for intracellular amino acid analysis in five phylogenetically different yeasts.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Christoph J; Wittmann, Christoph

    2008-11-01

    Methanol quenching and fast filtration, the two most common sampling protocols in microbial metabolome analysis, were validated for intracellular amino acid analysis in phylogenetically different yeast strains comprising Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. With only few exceptions for selected amino acids, all yeasts exhibited negligible metabolite leakage during quenching with 60% cold buffered methanol. Slightly higher leakage was observed with increasing methanol content in the quenching solution. Fast filtration resulted in identical levels for intracellular amino acids in all strains tested. The results clearly demonstrate the validity of both approaches for leakage-free sampling of amino acids in yeast.

  13. Sample preparation for the determination of steroids (corticoids and anabolics) in feed using LC.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Valencia, Roberto; Ceballos-Magaña, Silvia G; Gonzalo-Lumbreras, Raquel; Santos-Montes, Ana; Izquierdo-Hornillos, Roberto C

    2008-07-01

    An improved sample preparation procedure for the determination of 17 steroids (corticoids (CC) and androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS)), used potentially as growth promoters, in feed samples has been developed. This procedure is based on two reported LC-UV methods. The improved procedure includes a leaching process using ACN, saponification, and SPE using polymeric cartridges. The proposed method was validated according to the EU criteria established for quantitative screening methods in PFS. The extraction efficiencies, decision limits (CCalpha) and detection capabilities (CCbeta), for these compounds were in the ranges of 82-100%, 19-40, and 24-53 microg/kg, respectively. The repeatability and the within-laboratory reproducibility at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 CCbeta levels were smaller than 10%. Accuracy was in the 97-101% range. The robustness was evaluated using the Youden robustness test. This method was applied to the analysis of steroids in different kinds of FS with satisfactory results.

  14. Capacitive deionization on-chip as a method for microfluidic sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Susan H; Kim, Bumjoo; Eijkel, Jan C T; Han, Jongyoon; van den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2015-03-21

    Desalination as a sample preparation step is essential for noise reduction and reproducibility of mass spectrometry measurements. A specific example is the analysis of proteins for medical research and clinical applications. Salts and buffers that are present in samples need to be removed before analysis to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Capacitive deionization is an electrostatic desalination (CDI) technique which uses two porous electrodes facing each other to remove ions from a solution. Upon the application of a potential of 0.5 V ions migrate to the electrodes and are stored in the electrical double layer. In this article we demonstrate CDI on a chip, and desalinate a solution by the removal of 23% of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, while the concentration of a larger molecule (FITC-dextran) remains unchanged. For the first time impedance spectroscopy is introduced to monitor the salt concentration in situ in real-time in between the two desalination electrodes.

  15. Sample preparation and separation techniques for bioanalysis of morphine and related substances.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2009-03-01

    In present time the use or misuse of morphine and its derivatives are monitored by assaying the presence of the drug and its metabolites in biofluids. In the present review, focus is placed on the sample preparation and on the separation techniques used in the current best practices of bioanalysis of morphine and its major metabolites. However, as methods for testing the misuse of heroin, a morphine derivative, often involve bioanalytical methods that cover a number of other illicit drug substances, such methods are also included in the review. Furthermore, the review also includes bioanalysis in a broader perspective as analysis of plant materials, cell cultures and environmental samples. The review is not intended to cover all publications that include bioanalysis of morphine but is more to be considered a view into the current best practices of bioanalysis of morphine, its metabolites and other related substances.

  16. Purifying Nucleic Acids from Samples of Extremely Low Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Duc, Myron; Osman, Shariff; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2008-01-01

    A new method is able to circumvent the bias to which one commercial DNA extraction method falls prey with regard to the lysing of certain types of microbial cells, resulting in a truncated spectrum of microbial diversity. By prefacing the protocol with glass-bead-beating agitation (mechanically lysing a much more encompassing array of cell types and spores), the resulting microbial diversity detection is greatly enhanced. In preliminary studies, a commercially available automated DNA extraction method is effective at delivering total DNA yield, but only the non-hardy members of the bacterial bisque were represented in clone libraries, suggesting that this method was ineffective at lysing the hardier cell types. To circumvent such a bias in cells, yet another extraction method was devised. In this technique, samples are first subjected to a stringent bead-beating step, and then are processed via standard protocols. Prior to being loaded into extraction vials, samples are placed in micro-centrifuge bead tubes containing 50 micro-L of commercially produced lysis solution. After inverting several times, tubes are agitated at maximum speed for two minutes. Following agitation, tubes are centrifuged at 10,000 x g for one minute. At this time, the aqueous volumes are removed from the bead tubes and are loaded into extraction vials to be further processed via extraction regime. The new method couples two independent methodologies in such as way as to yield the highest concentration of PCR-amplifiable DNA with consistent and reproducible results and with the most accurate and encompassing report of species richness.

  17. Study of an Acid-Free Technique for the Preparation of Glycyrrhetinic Acid from Ammonium Glycyrrhizinate in Subcritical Water.

    PubMed

    Lekar, Anna V; Borisenko, Sergey N; Vetrova, Elena V; Filonova, Olga V; Maksimenko, Elena V; Borisenko, Nikolai I; Minkin, Vladimir I

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study an application of a previously developed expedient acid-free technique for the preparation of glycyrrhetinic acid from ammonium glycyrrhizinate that requires no use of acids and toxic organic solvents. Subcritical water that serves as a reactant and a solvent was used in order to obtain glycyrrhetinic acid in good yields starting from ammonium glycyrrhizinate. It has been shown that variation of only one parameter of the process (temperature) allows alteration to thecomposition of the hydrolysis products. A new method was used for the synthesis of glycyrrhetinic acid (glycyrrhizic acid aglycone) and its monoglycoside. HPLC combined with mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the quantitative and qualitative compositions of the obtained products. The method developed for the production of glycyrrhetinic acid in subcritical water is environmentally friendly and faster than conventional hydrolysis methods that use acids and-expensive and toxic organic solvents. The proposed technique has a potential for the future development of inexpensive and environmentally friendly technologies for production of new pharmaceutical plant-based substances. PMID:26749800

  18. Comparison of Sample Preparation Methods Used for the Next-Generation Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrea D; Christianson, Sara; Knox, Natalie C; Mabon, Philip; Wolfe, Joyce; Van Domselaar, Gary; Graham, Morag R; Sharma, Meenu K

    2016-01-01

    The advent and widespread application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to the study of microbial genomes has led to a substantial increase in the number of studies in which whole genome sequencing (WGS) is applied to the analysis of microbial genomic epidemiology. However, microorganisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) present unique problems for sequencing and downstream analysis based on their unique physiology and the composition of their genomes. In this study, we compare the quality of sequence data generated using the Nextera and TruSeq isolate preparation kits for library construction prior to Illumina sequencing-by-synthesis. Our results confirm that MTB NGS data quality is highly dependent on the purity of the DNA sample submitted for sequencing and its guanine-cytosine content (or GC-content). Our data additionally demonstrate that the choice of library preparation method plays an important role in mitigating downstream sequencing quality issues. Importantly for MTB, the Illumina TruSeq library preparation kit produces more uniform data quality than the Nextera XT method, regardless of the quality of the input DNA. Furthermore, specific genomic sequence motifs are commonly missed by the Nextera XT method, as are regions of especially high GC-content relative to the rest of the MTB genome. As coverage bias is highly undesirable, this study illustrates the importance of appropriate protocol selection when performing NGS studies in order to ensure that sound inferences can be made regarding mycobacterial genomes. PMID:26849565

  19. Recent developments on field gas extraction and sample preparation methods for radiokrypton dating of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokochi, Reika

    2016-09-01

    Current and foreseen population growths will lead to an increased demand in freshwater, large quantities of which is stored as groundwater. The ventilation age is crucial to the assessment of groundwater resources, complementing the hydrological model approach based on hydrogeological parameters. Ultra-trace radioactive isotopes of Kr (81 Kr and 85 Kr) possess the ideal physical and chemical properties for groundwater dating. The recent advent of atom trap trace analyses (ATTA) has enabled determination of ultra-trace noble gas radioisotope abundances using 5-10 μ L of pure Kr. Anticipated developments will enable ATTA to analyze radiokrypton isotope abundances at high sample throughput, which necessitates simple and efficient sample preparation techniques that are adaptable to various sample chemistries. Recent developments of field gas extraction devices and simple and rapid Kr separation method at the University of Chicago are presented herein. Two field gas extraction devices optimized for different sampling conditions were recently designed and constructed, aiming at operational simplicity and portability. A newly developed Kr purification system enriches Kr by flowing a sample gas through a moderately cooled (138 K) activated charcoal column, followed by a gentle fractionating desorption. This simple process uses a single adsorbent and separates 99% of the bulk atmospheric gases from Kr without significant loss. The subsequent two stages of gas chromatographic separation and a hot Ti sponge getter further purify the Kr-enriched gas. Abundant CH4 necessitates multiple passages through one of the gas chromatographic separation columns. The presented Kr separation system has a demonstrated capability of extracting Kr with > 90% yield and 99% purity within 75 min from 1.2 to 26.8 L STP of atmospheric air with various concentrations of CH4. The apparatuses have successfully been deployed for sampling in the field and purification of groundwater samples.

  20. Studies on the oxidation of hexamethylbenzene 2: Preparation of dimethylpyromellitic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiba, K.; Tomura, S.

    1986-01-01

    Hexamethylbenzene (HMB) was difficult to be oxidized with an alkaline potassium permanganate solution, since HMB was insoluble in an aqueous alkaline solution. But, when HMB was warmed with 50% nitric acid for a short time, and then treated with aqueous potassium permanganate, the reaction occurred readily and dimethylpyromellitic acid was obtained. When HMB was warmed with 50% nitric acid for 1 to 2 minutes, a yellow material was produced, which was soluble in hot aqueous potassium hydroxide, though free from carboxylic acids. It contained a little amount of bis-(nitromethyl)prehnitene and several unknown compounds. Further, the heat stability of polyimide prepared by the reaction of tetramethyldimethylpyromellitate with 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenylmethane turned out to be nearly equal to that of polyimide prepared from tetramethylpyromellitate.

  1. Pitfalls in the sample preparation and analysis of N-acylethanolamines[S

    PubMed Central

    Skonberg, Christian; Artmann, Andreas; Cornett, Claus; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Hansen, Harald S.

    2010-01-01

    N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a group of lipid mediators synthesized in response to a number of physiological and pathological stimuli. Because of the low tissue concentrations of NAEs, analyses often include liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction and subsequent quantitation by LC/MS or GC/MS. Reported levels of NAEs vary considerably, however, and often no explanation is given for these discrepancies. Brought on by difficulties encountered during method development, the effects of using four different brands of silica-containing solid phase extraction (SPE) columns and five different brands of chloroform for sample preparation were investigated. Considerable variation in the retention and recoveries of seven NAEs and 2-arachidonoylglycerol existed between the SPE columns. Furthermore, it was found that some chloroforms contained quantifiable amounts of N-palmitoylethanolamine and N-stearoylethanolamine. Finally, it was found that use of one of the chloroforms resulted in a loss of N-oleoylethanolamine from solution due to addition of chlorine to the ω-9 bond. The identity of this reaction product was confirmed by LC-MS/MS and NMR. It is recommended that these aspects of sample preparation and analysis should be thoroughly validated during method development and the relevant information on specific brands used be reported in future communications in order to better estimate the validity of reported quantitative data. PMID:20447930

  2. Image artifacts in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy: why optimization of sample preparation protocols matters

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Donna R.; Bell, Toby D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) techniques allow for sub-diffraction imaging with spatial resolutions better than 10 nm reported. Much has been discussed relating to different variations of SMLM and all-inclusive microscopes can now be purchased, removing the need for in-house software or hardware development. However, little discussion has occurred examining the reliability and quality of the images being produced, as well as the potential for overlooked preparative artifacts. As a result of the up to an order-of-magnitude improvement in spatial resolution, substantially more detail is observed, including changes in distribution and ultrastructure caused by the many steps required to fix, permeabilize, and stain a sample. Here we systematically investigate many of these steps including different fixatives, fixative concentration, permeabilization concentration and timing, antibody concentration, and buffering. We present three well-optimized fixation protocols for staining microtubules, mitochondria and actin in a mammalian cell line and then discuss various artifacts in relation to images obtained from samples prepared using the protocols. The potential for such errors to go undetected in SMLM images and the complications in defining a ‘good’ image using previous parameters applied to confocal microscopy are also discussed. PMID:25603780

  3. High-efficiency sample preparation approach to determine acrylamide levels in high-fat foods.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodan; Li, Jinwei; Cao, Peirang; Liu, Yuanfa

    2016-08-01

    An improved sample preparation method was developed to enhance acrylamide recovery in high-fat foods. Prior to concentration, distilled deionized water was added to protect acrylamide from degradation, resulting in a higher acrylamide recovery rate from fried potato chips. A Chrome-Matrix C18 column (2.6 μm, 2.1 × 100 mm) was used for the first time to analyze acrylamide levels using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, displaying good separation of acrylamide from interference. A solid-phase extraction procedure was avoided, and an average recovery of >89.00% was achieved from different food matrices for three different acrylamide spiking levels. Good reproducibility was observed, with an intraday relative standard deviation of 0.04-2.38%, and an interday relative standard deviation of 2.34-3.26%. Thus, combining the improved sample preparation method for acrylamide analysis with the separation on a Chrome-Matrix C18 column (2.6 μm, 2.1 × 100 mm) using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is highly useful for analyzing acrylamide levels in complex food matrices.

  4. Preparation of an immunoaffinity column and its application in sample cleanup for methandrostenolone residues detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Xun; Wang, Enlan; Dong, Ying

    2011-07-15

    Methandrostenolone (MA) is a steroid used as veterinary medicine on stockbreeding to promote animal growth. The use of MA has been strictly regulated because of its harmful effect on consumers. This paper describes the production of polyclonal antibody (pAb) against MA, the preparation of immunoaffinity column (IAC) and its potential application to the selective extraction of MA residues from animal tissue and feed samples. The produced pAb exhibited good sensitivity to MA with an IC(50) value of 5.6 ng/mL. The cross-reactivity values of the antibody with MA structurally related compounds of testosterone propionate (TP) and trenbolone (TR) were lower than 0.6%. By coupling the produced antibody with CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, an IAC was prepared. 2% methanol and 80% methanol were selected as loading and eluting solution by optimization. The maximum capacity of the column for MA was approximately 334 ng/mL gel. The average recovery of 20, 40 and 60 ng/mL MA standard solutions from IACs was 97.9% with the relative standard deviation (RSD) among columns of 6.7%. After 3 times of repeated usage, the column capacity and recovery rate still remained 82.0% and 92.6% respectively. The IACs were then challenged with MA-fortified animal tissue and feed samples, recoveries of MA were found to be in the range of 83.5-99.7%. PMID:21703946

  5. Matrix compatible solid phase microextraction coating, a greener approach to sample preparation in vegetable matrices.

    PubMed

    Naccarato, Attilio; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes the novel PDMS/DVB/PDMS fiber as a greener strategy for analysis by direct immersion solid phase microextraction (SPME) in vegetables. SPME is an established sample preparation approach that has not yet been adequately explored for food analysis in direct immersion mode due to the limitations of the available commercial coatings. The robustness and endurance of this new coating were investigated by direct immersion extractions in raw blended vegetables without any further sample preparation steps. The PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating exhibited superior features related to the capability of the external PDMS layer to protect the commercial coating, and showed improvements in terms of extraction capability and in the cleanability of the coating surface. In addition to having contributed to the recognition of the superior features of this new fiber concept before commercialization, the outcomes of this work serve to confirm advancements in the matrix compatibility of the PDMS-modified fiber, and open new prospects for the development of greener high-throughput analytical methods in food analysis using solid phase microextraction in the near future.

  6. Semiautomated Sample Preparation for Protein Stability and Formulation Screening via Buffer Exchange.

    PubMed

    Ying, William; Levons, Jaquan K; Carney, Andrea; Gandhi, Rajesh; Vydra, Vicky; Rubin, A Erik

    2016-06-01

    A novel semiautomated buffer exchange process workflow was developed to enable efficient early protein formulation screening. An antibody fragment protein, BMSdab, was used to demonstrate the workflow. The process afforded 60% to 80% cycle time and scientist time savings and significant material efficiencies. These efficiencies ultimately facilitated execution of this stability work earlier in the drug development process, allowing this tool to inform the developability of potential candidates for development from a formulation perspective. To overcome the key technical challenges, the protein solution was buffer-exchanged by centrifuge filtration into formulations for stability screening in a 96-well plate with an ultrafiltration membrane, leveraging automated liquid handling and acoustic volume measurements to allow several cycles of exchanges. The formulations were transferred into a vacuum manifold and sterile filtered into a rack holding 96 glass vials. The vials were sealed with a capmat of individual caps and placed in stability stations. Stability of the samples prepared by this process and by the standard process was demonstrated to be comparable. This process enabled screening a number of formulations of a protein at an early pharmaceutical development stage with a short sample preparation time.

  7. Image artifacts in single molecule localization microscopy: why optimization of sample preparation protocols matters.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Donna R; Bell, Toby D M

    2015-01-21

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) techniques allow for sub-diffraction imaging with spatial resolutions better than 10 nm reported. Much has been discussed relating to different variations of SMLM and all-inclusive microscopes can now be purchased, removing the need for in-house software or hardware development. However, little discussion has occurred examining the reliability and quality of the images being produced, as well as the potential for overlooked preparative artifacts. As a result of the up to an order-of-magnitude improvement in spatial resolution, substantially more detail is observed, including changes in distribution and ultrastructure caused by the many steps required to fix, permeabilize, and stain a sample. Here we systematically investigate many of these steps including different fixatives, fixative concentration, permeabilization concentration and timing, antibody concentration, and buffering. We present three well-optimized fixation protocols for staining microtubules, mitochondria and actin in a mammalian cell line and then discuss various artifacts in relation to images obtained from samples prepared using the protocols. The potential for such errors to go undetected in SMLM images and the complications in defining a 'good' image using previous parameters applied to confocal microscopy are also discussed.

  8. High-efficiency sample preparation approach to determine acrylamide levels in high-fat foods.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodan; Li, Jinwei; Cao, Peirang; Liu, Yuanfa

    2016-08-01

    An improved sample preparation method was developed to enhance acrylamide recovery in high-fat foods. Prior to concentration, distilled deionized water was added to protect acrylamide from degradation, resulting in a higher acrylamide recovery rate from fried potato chips. A Chrome-Matrix C18 column (2.6 μm, 2.1 × 100 mm) was used for the first time to analyze acrylamide levels using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, displaying good separation of acrylamide from interference. A solid-phase extraction procedure was avoided, and an average recovery of >89.00% was achieved from different food matrices for three different acrylamide spiking levels. Good reproducibility was observed, with an intraday relative standard deviation of 0.04-2.38%, and an interday relative standard deviation of 2.34-3.26%. Thus, combining the improved sample preparation method for acrylamide analysis with the separation on a Chrome-Matrix C18 column (2.6 μm, 2.1 × 100 mm) using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry is highly useful for analyzing acrylamide levels in complex food matrices. PMID:27279364

  9. Simultaneous determination of acetylsalicylic and salicylic acids by first derivative spectrometry in pharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogić, Dunja

    1993-03-01

    A multicomponent first derivative UV spectrometric procedure for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and salicylic acid in the solution containing 1 % (w/v) of citric acid in some pharmaceutical preparations is presented. The method is based on the use of the first derivative minimum spectrometric measurements at 286 nm for aspirin and at 318 nm for salicylic acid. Four kinds of cmmercial Aspirin tablets were assayed without a long pretreatment of the pharmaceuticals from the tablet additives. Beer's law is obeyed from 13.62-68.1 μg ml -1 of aspirin and from 2.723-13.616 μg ml -1 of salicylic acid. Detection limits at the 0.05 level of significance were calculated to be 1.24 and 0.25 μg ml -1 with relative standard deviations of 1.09 % and 1.2 % of aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  11. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA. PMID:21619278

  12. Efficient preparation of (R)-2-chloromandelic acid via a recycle process of resolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Wu, Chang; Wu, Xue-Ying; Li, Shao-Lei; Sun, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Ze-Biao

    2015-03-01

    Efficient preparation of (R)-2-chloromandelic acid based on a recycle process of resolution is described. In the process, the desired was obtained by coordination-mediated resolution with D-O,O'-di-(p-toluoyl)-tartaric acid in the presence of Ca(2+) . Meanwhile, the undesired could be racemized in the presence of sodium hydroxide and the product was suitable for further resolution. A carbanion mechanism for the racemization of is proposed.

  13. The search for and identification of amino acids, nucleobases and nucleosides in samples returned from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, Charles W.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Stalling, David L.; Zumwalt, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the returned Mars samples for biologically important organic compounds, with emphasis on amino acid, the puring and pyrimidine bases, and nucleosides is proposed. These studies would be conducted on subsurface samples obtained by drilling past the surface oxidizing layer with emphasis on samples containing the larges quantities of organic carbon as determined by the rover gas chromatographic mass spectrometer (GCMS). Extraction of these molecules from the returned samples will be performed using the hydrothermal extraction technique described by Cheng and Ponnamperuma. More rigorous extraction methods will be developed and evaluated. For analysis of the extract for free amino acids or amino acids present in a bound or peptidic form, aliquots will be analyzed by capillary GCMS both before and after hydrolysis with 6N hydrochloric acid. Establishment of the presence of amino acids would then lead to the next logical step which would be the use of chiral stationary gas chromatography phases to determine the enatiomeic composition of the amino acids present, and thus potentially establish their biotic or abiotic origin. Confirmational analyses for amino acids would include ion-exchange and reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis. For analyses of the returned Mars samples for nucleobases and nucleosides, affinity and reversed-phase liquid chromatography would be utilized. This technology coupled with scanning UV detection for identification, presents a powerful tool for nucleobase and nucleoside analysis. Mass spectrometric analysis of these compounds would confirm their presence in samples returned form Mars.

  14. Preparative divergent flow IEF without carrier ampholytes for separation of complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Stastna, Miroslava; Slais, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Efficient separation method is a crucial part of the process in which components of highly complex biological sample are identified and characterized. Based on the principles of recently newly established electrophoretic method called divergent flow IEF (DF IEF), we have tested the DF IEF instrument which is able to operate without the use of background carrier ampholytes. We have verified that during separation and focusing of sample consisting of high numbers of proteins (yeast lysate and wheat flour extract), the pH gradient of preparative DF IEF can be created by autofocusing of the sample components themselves without any addition of carrier ampholytes. In DF IEF, the proteins are separated, desalted and concentrated in one step. The fractions of yeast lysate sample, collected at the DF IEF output and subjected to gel IEF, contained the zones of proteins gradually covering the pI values from 3.7 to 8.5. In our experimental arrangement, the highest number of proteins has been found in fractions with pI values around 5.3 as detected by polyacrylamide gel IEF with CBB staining. During DF IEF, the selected protein bands have been concentrated up to 16.8-fold.

  15. Preparation of Magnetic Hollow Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Detection of Triazines in Food Samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aixiang; Lu, Hongzhi; Xu, Shoufang

    2016-06-22

    Novel magnetic hollow molecularly imprinted polymers (M-H-MIPs) were proposed for highly selective recognition and fast enrichment of triazines in food samples. M-H-MIPs were prepared on the basis of multi-step swelling polymerization, followed by in situ growth of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of hollow molecularly imprinted polymers (H-MIPs). Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of H-MIPs. M-H-MIPs could be separated simply using an external magnet. The binding adsorption results indicated that M-H-MIPs displayed high binding capacity and fast mass transfer property and class selective property for triazines. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models fitted the best adsorption models for M-H-MIPs. M-H-MIPs were used to analyze atrazine, simazine, propazine, and terbuthylazine in corn, wheat, and soybean samples. Satisfactory recoveries were in the range of 80.62-101.69%, and relative standard deviation was lower than 5.2%. Limits of detection from 0.16 to 0.39 μg L(-1) were obtained. When the method was applied to test positive samples that were contaminated with triazines, the results agree well with those obtained from an accredited method. Thus, the M-H-MIP-based dispersive solid-phase extraction method proved to be a convenient and practical platform for detection of triazines in food samples. PMID:27257079

  16. Influence of transition metals on the surface acidic properties of titania prepared by sol-gel route

    SciTech Connect

    Shali, N.B.; Sugunan, S. . E-mail: ssg@cusat.ac.in

    2007-09-04

    A series of titania catalysts containing chromium, molybdenum as well as tungsten has been prepared by colloidal sol-gel route using metatitanic acid as the precursor. Structural characterization of the prepared catalysts was done with Energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, BET surface area and pore volume measurements. The influence of different transition metals like chromium, molybdenum and tungsten on the surface acidic properties of titania is investigated in detail. Two independent methods have been used to study the surface acidity of these catalyst systems: temperature programmed desorption of ammonia which is a measure of total acidity and thermodesorption studies using 2,6-dimethyl pyridine which is a measure of Bronsted acidity. Cumene cracking reaction is carried out over the prepared systems for further characterizing the acidity of the prepared catalysts. Remarkable enhancement in the surface acidity is observed after transition metal incorporation. The catalytic activity of the prepared catalysts was tested towards the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane.

  17. Array capillary in-tube solid-phase microextraction: a rapid preparation technique for water samples.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaohui; Wu, Dapeng; Peng, Hong; Ding, Kun; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2012-06-29

    A rapid sample preparation technique, namely array capillary in-tube solid-phase microextraction (ACIT-SPME) for direct extraction of organic pollutants from water samples, was developed and evaluated. The ACIT-SPME cartridge consisted of a bundle of glass capillary tubes of 0.5 mm I.D. × 30mm contained inside a quartz liner of 4 mm I.D. The high ratio of cross-section area of channel-to-wall allowed water sample flow through the cartridge just under gravity. Both the internal/external surfaces of the array capillary tubing were coated with extraction phase of 2-5 μm in thickness, which provided large extraction surface area up to 30 cm² for a cartridge containing 19 glass capillaries. The large surface area and thin extraction phase improved greatly both the mass transfer process of extraction and the thermo desorption process, leading to fast extraction and fast desorption. The extracted analytes were thermally desorbed in a homemade thermal desorption unit (TDU), which was coupled to a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector for analysis. By using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the extraction phase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the model analytes, the performance of the ACIT-SPME cartridge was systematically investigated. The extraction time was 2 min for 350 mL of water sample, and detection limits were between 0.8 and 1.7 ng/L with deviation of 2.8-9.7% RSD. Relative recoveries of analytes for real water samples were between 65.0% and 116%. The extraction time can even be further shortened to 10s for 250 mL sample by applying vacuum at the outlet of the cartridge, with detection limits of 2.2-5.3 ng/L and deviation of 4.0-12% RSD.

  18. Acid and redox properties of mixed oxides prepared by calcination of chromate-containing layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Arco, M. del; Carriazo, D.; Martin, C.; Perez-Grueso, A.M.; Rives, V. . E-mail: vrives@usal.es

    2005-11-15

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with Mg and Al in the layers and carbonate, nitrate or chloride in the interlayer, or with Zn and Al in the layers and chloride in the interlayer, have been prepared by coprecipitation, and have been used as precursors to prepare chromate-containing LDHs. All these systems, as well as those obtained upon their calcination up to 800 deg. C, have been characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and vis-UV spectroscopies, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), nitrogen adsorption at -196 deg. C for surface texture and porosity assessment, and FT-IR monitoring of pyridine adsorption for surface acidity determination. The results obtained show that the crystallinity of the chromate-containing LDH depends on the precursor used. The layered structure of the Mg, Al systems is stabilised up to 400 deg. C upon incorporation of chromate; however, the Zn,Al-chromate samples collapse between 200 and 300 deg. C, with simultaneous formation of ZnO. Calcination of the samples above 400 deg. C gives rise to a reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), as concluded from vis-UV spectroscopic studies. The TPR profiles show that chromate in ZnAl hydrotalcite is more easily reduced than that incorporated in the magnesium ones. Moderately strong surface Lewis acid sites exist in all samples calcined below 500 deg. C.

  19. The Pharmacokinetic Profile of a New Gastroresistant Capsule Preparation of Eicosapentaenoic Acid as the Free Fatty Acid

    PubMed Central

    Scaioli, Eleonora; Cardamone, Carla; Liverani, Elisa; Munarini, Alessandra; Hull, Mark A.; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may be beneficial for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this study we analyzed the pharmacokinetic profile of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), as the free fatty acid (FFA), in an enteric-coated preparation, in 10 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 10 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 15 healthy volunteers (HV). Subjects received 2 g daily of EPA-FFA for 8 weeks. Plasma phospholipid and red blood cell (RBC) membrane fatty acid content were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. There was a rapid incorporation of EPA into plasma phospholipids by 2 weeks and a slower, but highly consistent, incorporation into RBC membranes (4% total fatty acid content; coefficient of variation 10–16%). There was a concomitant reduction in relative n-6 PUFA content. Elongation and desaturation of EPA into docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) via docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were apparent and DHA content also increased in membranes. EPA-FFA is well tolerated and no difference in the pharmacokinetic profile of n-3 PUFA incorporation was detected between IBD patients and HV. Our data support the concept that EPA can be considered the “universal donor” with respect to key n-3 PUFAs and that this enteric-coated formulation allows long term treatment with a high level of compliance. PMID:26339608

  20. Detection, Evaluation and Minimization of Nonenzymatic Deamidation in Proteomic Sample Preparation*

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Piliang; Ren, Yan; Alpert, Andrew J.; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Identification of deamidated sites in proteins is commonly used for assignment of N-glycosylation sites. It is also important for assessing the role of deamidation in vivo. However, nonenzymatic deamidation occurs easily in peptides under conditions commonly used in treatment with trypsin and PNGase F. The impact on proteomic sample preparation has not yet been evaluated systematically. In addition, the 13C peaks of amidated peptides can be misassigned as monoisotopic peaks of the corresponding deamidated ones in database searches. The 19.34 mDa mass difference between them is proposed as a means for eliminating the resulting false positive identifications in large-scale proteomic analysis. We evaluated five groups of proteomic data, obtained mainly through an electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC)-reverse phase (RP) chromatography sequence, and ascertained that nonenzymatic asparagine deamidation occurred to some extent on 4–9% of the peptides, resulting in the false positive identification of many N-glycosylation sites. A comprehensive investigation indicated that the chief causative factors were the mildly alkaline pH and prolonged incubations at 37 °C during proteomic sample preparation. An improved protocol is proposed featuring tryptic digestion at pH 6 and deglycosylation at pH 5, resulting in a significant decrease in nonenzymatic deamidation while conserving adequate digestion efficiency. The number of identified deamidation sites was improved significantly by increasing the sample loading amount in liquid chromatography-tandem MS. This permitted the identification of a significant number of glutamine deamidation sites, which featured sequence motifs largely different from those for asparagine deamidation: -Q-V-, -Q-L- and -Q-G- and, to a lesser extent, -Q-A- and -Q-E-. PMID:21784994

  1. Application and comparison of high-speed countercurrent chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography in preparative enantioseparation of α-substitution mandelic acids

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shengqiang; Zhang, Hu; Shen, Mangmang; Ito, Yoichiro; Yan, Jizhong

    2014-01-01

    Preparative enantioseparations of α-cyclopentylmandelic acid and α-methylmandelic acid by high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were compared using hydroxypropy-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as the chiral mobile phase additives. In preparative HPLC the enantioseparation was achieved on the ODS C18 reverse phase column with the mobile phase composed of a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.10 mol L−1 phosphate buffer at pH 2.68 containing 20 mmol L−1 HP-β-CD for α-cyclopentylmandelic acid and 20 mmol L−1 SBE-β-CD for α-methylmandelic acid. The maximum sample size for α-cyclopentylmandelic acid and α-methylmandelic acid was only about 10 mg and 5 mg, respectively. In preparative HSCCC the enantioseparations of these two racemates were performed with the two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-methyl tert.-butyl ether-0.1 molL−1 phosphate buffer solution at pH 2.67 containing 0.1 mol L−1 HP-β-CD for α-cyclopentylmandelic acid (8.5:1.5:10, v/v/v) and 0.1 mol L−1 SBE-β-CD for α-methylmandelic acid (3:7:10, v/v/v). Under the optimum separation conditions, total 250 mg of racemic α-cyclopentylmandelic acid could be completely enantioseparated by HSCCC with HP-β-CD as a chiral mobile phase additive in a single run, yielding 105-110 mg of enantiomers with 95-98% purity and 85-90% recovery. But, no complete enantioseparation of α-methylmandelic acid was achieved by preparative HSCCC with either of the chiral selectors due to their limited enantioselectivity. In this paper preparative enantioseparation by HSCCC and HPLC was compared from various aspects. PMID:25983356

  2. Acid-Soluble Internal Capsules for Closed-Face Cassette Elemental Sampling and Analysis of Workplace Air

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Martin; Ashley, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particles that are collected using closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs), which are used widely in the sampling of workplace aerosols, can deposit in places other than on the filter and thereby may not be included in the ensuing analysis. A technique for ensuring that internal non-filter deposits are included in the analysis is to collect airborne particles within an acid-soluble internal capsule that, following sampling, can be dissolved along with the filter for subsequent elemental analysis. An interlaboratory study (ILS) was carried out to evaluate the use of cellulosic CFC capsule inserts for their suitability in the determination of trace elements in airborne samples. The ILS was performed in accordance with an applicable ASTM International standard practice, ASTM E691, which describes statistical procedures for investigating interlaboratory precision. Performance evaluation materials consisted of prototype cellulose acetate capsules attached to mixed-cellulose ester filters. Batches of capsules were dosed with Pb-containing materials (standard aqueous solutions, and certified reference material soil and paint). Also, aerosol samples containing nine target analyte elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, and Ni) were generated using a multiport sampler; various concentrations and sampling times were employed to yield samples fortified at desired loading levels. Triplicates of spiked capsules at three different loadings were conveyed to each volunteer laboratory; loading levels were unknown to the participants. The laboratories were asked to prepare the samples by acid dissolution and to analyze aliquots of extracted samples by atomic spectrometry in accordance with applicable ASTM International Standards. Participants were asked to report their results in units of μg of each target element per sample. For the elements investigated, interlaboratory precision and recovery estimates from the participating laboratories demonstrated the utility of the

  3. Effect of the solvent and the sample preparation on the determination of triterpene compounds in two-phase olive-mill-waste samples.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hernández, Antonia; Martinez, Antonio; Rivas, Francisco; García-Mesa, Jose A; Parra, Andres

    2015-05-01

    A simple and rapid extraction method has been employed to determine several value-added compounds, mainly triterpenes, in two-phase olive-mill-waste samples. The compounds were extracted with methanol or ethyl acetate, and the initial fresh samples were treated for classic techniques such as drying, drying and oil extraction, and drying and sifting of the olive stones. For the identification and quantitation of the compounds, an ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was employed. The best results of the triterpenic compound content were achieved by extraction with methanol from the fresh sample for the oleanolic and ursolic acids, and erythrodiol and uvaol; and from the dried-extracted sample for the maslinic acid. Conversely, the best results for the linoleic acid content were reached by extraction with ethyl acetate from the dried-sifted sample. These are remarkable processes that make the solid wastes from the olive-oil industry reach a high added value. PMID:25773914

  4. Preparation and characterization of (10)B boric acid with high purity for nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijiang; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid is often added into coolant as neutron capture agent for pressurized water reactor, whose amount is influenced by its abundance and purity. Therefore, the preparation of enriched (10)B boric acid with high purity is beneficial to nuclear industry. (10)B is also used in developing tumor-specific boronated drugs in boron neutron capture therapy. The boronated drug can be administered to patient intravenously, intratumorally, or deposited at tumor site in surgical excision. Thus, enriched (10)B boric acid is of practical significance in the field of medicine. Self-made boron trifluoride-methanol-complex solution was selected as one of the experimental reagents, and the preparation of (10)B acid was realized by one-step reaction for the complexes with water and calcium chloride. The determination of electrical conductivity in reaction process proves that the optimum reaction time was 16-20 h. Furthermore, the effect of reaction time, ratio of calcium chloride to complex as well as the amount of water on the purity and yield of boric acid was investigated. Finally, the optimum reaction time was 20 h, the optimal solid-liquid ratio (molar ratio) was 3:1, and the amount of water was 1 L of deionized water for each mol of the complex. H2O2 was added in the reaction process to remove Fe(2+). After recrystallization, IR spectra of (10)B boric acid was measured and compared with standard to verify the product of boric acid. The feasibility of the preparation method was determined by the detection of XRD of boric acid. To observe the morphology by polarizing microscope, crystal structure was obtained. The purity of the final product is 99.95 %, and the yield is 96.47 %. The ion concentration of boric acid accords with the national standard of high purity, which was determined by ICP. PMID:27516940

  5. Preparation and characterization of (10)B boric acid with high purity for nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijiang; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid is often added into coolant as neutron capture agent for pressurized water reactor, whose amount is influenced by its abundance and purity. Therefore, the preparation of enriched (10)B boric acid with high purity is beneficial to nuclear industry. (10)B is also used in developing tumor-specific boronated drugs in boron neutron capture therapy. The boronated drug can be administered to patient intravenously, intratumorally, or deposited at tumor site in surgical excision. Thus, enriched (10)B boric acid is of practical significance in the field of medicine. Self-made boron trifluoride-methanol-complex solution was selected as one of the experimental reagents, and the preparation of (10)B acid was realized by one-step reaction for the complexes with water and calcium chloride. The determination of electrical conductivity in reaction process proves that the optimum reaction time was 16-20 h. Furthermore, the effect of reaction time, ratio of calcium chloride to complex as well as the amount of water on the purity and yield of boric acid was investigated. Finally, the optimum reaction time was 20 h, the optimal solid-liquid ratio (molar ratio) was 3:1, and the amount of water was 1 L of deionized water for each mol of the complex. H2O2 was added in the reaction process to remove Fe(2+). After recrystallization, IR spectra of (10)B boric acid was measured and compared with standard to verify the product of boric acid. The feasibility of the preparation method was determined by the detection of XRD of boric acid. To observe the morphology by polarizing microscope, crystal structure was obtained. The purity of the final product is 99.95 %, and the yield is 96.47 %. The ion concentration of boric acid accords with the national standard of high purity, which was determined by ICP.

  6. Methods for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2015-12-29

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  7. Apparatus for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2016-04-19

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  8. A 96-well screen filter plate for high-throughput biological sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sean X; Cousineau, Martin; Juzwin, Stephen J; Ritchie, David M

    2006-01-01

    A novel 96-well screen filter plate (patent pending) has been invented to eliminate a time-consuming and labor-intensive step in preparation of in vivo study samples--to remove blood or plasma clots. These clots plug the pipet tips during a manual or automated sample-transfer step causing inaccurate pipetting or total pipetting failure. Traditionally, these blood and plasma clots are removed by picking them out manually one by one from each sample tube before any sample transfer can be made. This has significantly slowed the sample preparation process and has become a bottleneck for automated high-throughput sample preparation using robotic liquid handlers. Our novel screen filter plate was developed to solve this problem. The 96-well screen filter plate consists of 96 stainless steel wire-mesh screen tubes connected to the 96 openings of a top plate so that the screen filter plate can be readily inserted into a 96-well sample storage plate. Upon insertion, the blood and plasma clots are excluded from entering the screen tube while clear sample solutions flow freely into it. In this way, sample transfer can be easily completed by either manual or automated pipetting methods. In this report, three structurally diverse compounds were selected to evaluate and validate the use of the screen filter plate. The plasma samples of these compounds were transferred and processed in the presence and absence of the screen filter plate and then analyzed by LC-MS/MS methods. Our results showed a good agreement between the samples prepared with and without the screen filter plate, demonstrating the utility and efficiency of this novel device for preparation of blood and plasma samples. The device is simple, easy to use, and reusable. It can be employed for sample preparation of other biological fluids that contain floating particulates or aggregates. PMID:16383347

  9. Preparation of magnetic polylactic acid microspheres and investigation of its releasing property for loading curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengxia; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Bin

    2011-11-01

    In order to obtain a targeting drug carrier system, magnetic polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres loading curcumin were synthesized by the classical oil-in-water emulsion solvent-evaporation method. In the Fourier transform infrared spectra of microspheres, the present functional groups of PLA were all kept invariably. The morphology and size distribution of magnetic microspheres were observed with scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, respectively. The results showed that the microspheres were regularly spherical and the surface was smooth with a diameter of 0.55-0.75 μm. Magnetic Fe 3O 4 was loaded in PLA microspheres and the content of magnetic particles was 12 wt% through thermogravimetric analysis. The magnetic property of prepared microspheres was measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The results showed that the magnetic microspheres exhibited typical superparamagnetic behavior and the saturated magnetization was 14.38 emu/g. Through analysis of differential scanning calorimetry, the curcumin was in an amorphous state in the magnetic microspheres. The drug loading, encapsulation efficiency and releasing properties of curcumin in vitro were also investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectrum analysis. The results showed that the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were 8.0% and 24.2%, respectively. And curcumin was obviously slowly released because the cumulative release percentage of magnetic microspheres in the phosphate buffer (pH=7.4) solution was only 49.01% in 72 h, and the basic release of curcumin finished in 120 h.

  10. Preparation and characterization of nanoliposomes entrapping medium-chain fatty acids and vitamin C by lyophilization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuibing; Liu, Chengmei; Liu, Wei; Yu, Haixia; Zheng, Huijuan; Zhou, Wei; Hu, Yaqin

    2013-01-01

    The complex nanoliposomes encapsulating both a hydrophilic drug vitamin C (vit C) and hydrophobic drug medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) was prepared by combining double emulsion method with dynamic high pressure microfluidization. The complex nanoliposomes was further freeze-dried under -86 °C for 48 h with sucrose at the sucrose/lipids ratio of 2:1(w/w) in order to enhance its stability. The freeze-dried complex nanoliposomes under the suitable conditions exhibited high entrapment efficiency of MCFAs (44.26 ± 3.34)%, relatively high entrapment efficiency of vit C (62.25 ± 3.43)%, low average size diameter (110.4 ± 7.28) nm and good storage stability at 4 °C for 60 days with slight changes in mean particle diameter and drug entrapment efficiencies. The results of transmission electron microscopy of freeze-dried complex nanoliposomes also showed that the freeze-dried samples with sucrose were stable without great increase in their particle sizes and without destroying their spherical shape. The results indicated that sucrose presented well protection effects in MCFAs-vit C complex nanoliposomes, suggesting the possibility of further usage in commercial liposomes. PMID:24084723

  11. Off-line sample preparation by electrophoretic concentration using a micropipette and hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Alain; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2014-11-21

    An off-line electrophoretic sample concentration technique for charged analytes in aqueous samples is presented. As a demonstration, nine anions including inorganic ions, a dye and benzenesulfonate derivatives were enriched from a 10 mL sample solution into 20 μL electrolyte inside a glass micropipette. A hydrogel was placed at one end of the micropipette while the other end was immersed in the sample. The electric field caused the movement and concentration of anions into the high conductivity electrolyte. The technique was applied to purified, drinking and river water and was optimised by changing applied voltage and voltage application time. The LODs after analysis by capillary electrophoresis was 1-19 ng/mL, 4-133 ng/mL and 18-80 ng/mL for purified, drinking and river water, respectively. The linear range was 0.002-0.048 to 0.1-2.4 μg/mL (R(2) of 0.993-0.999), 0.02-0.24 to 1.0-24 μg/mL (R(2) of 0.995-0.999) and 0.02-0.24 to 1.0-24 μg/mL (R(2) of 0.998-1.000), correspondingly. The intraday and interday repeatability (%RSD, n=6) was ≤7.4% and 14.0%, respectively. The concentration factor was from one to two orders of magnitude. The technique was directly compatible with a liquid phase analytical technique, thus eliminated the additional steps (e.g., evaporation, elution and/or reconstitution) which are typically performed in sample preparation (e.g., liquid and solid phase extraction). PMID:25441086

  12. Fuel properties of heptadecene isomers prepared via tandem isomerization-decarboxylation of oleic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heptadecene isomers were prepared via tandem isomerization-decarboxylation of oleic acid using catalytic triruthenium dodecacarbonyl [Ru3(CO)12]. Chromatographic and spectroscopic characterization of the isolated heptadecene mixture indicated that it consisted of 96% internal trans isomers and 4% ar...

  13. Preparation and properties of N alpha-Bpoc-amino acid pentafluorophenyl esters.

    PubMed

    Carey, R I; Bordas, L W; Slaughter, R A; Meadows, B C; Wadsworth, J L; Huang, H; Smith, J J; Furusjö, E

    1997-06-01

    The preparation and properties are reported of several N alpha-Bpoc -amino acid pentafluorophenyl esters, including those bearing tert-butyl-, allyl- and trityl-based protecting groups. These derivatives have been used in the solid-phase peptide synthesis of several short peptides. PMID:9266485

  14. A Highly Flexible, Automated System Providing Reliable Sample Preparation in Element- and Structure-Specific Measurements.

    PubMed

    Vorberg, Ellen; Fleischer, Heidi; Junginger, Steffen; Liu, Hui; Stoll, Norbert; Thurow, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Life science areas require specific sample pretreatment to increase the concentration of the analytes and/or to convert the analytes into an appropriate form for the detection and separation systems. Various workstations are commercially available, allowing for automated biological sample pretreatment. Nevertheless, due to the required temperature, pressure, and volume conditions in typical element and structure-specific measurements, automated platforms are not suitable for analytical processes. Thus, the purpose of the presented investigation was the design, realization, and evaluation of an automated system ensuring high-precision sample preparation for a variety of analytical measurements. The developed system has to enable system adaption and high performance flexibility. Furthermore, the system has to be capable of dealing with the wide range of required vessels simultaneously, allowing for less cost and time-consuming process steps. However, the system's functionality has been confirmed in various validation sequences. Using element-specific measurements, the automated system was up to 25% more precise compared to the manual procedure and as precise as the manual procedure using structure-specific measurements.

  15. Modular approach to customise sample preparation procedures for viral metagenomics: a reproducible protocol for virome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Lefrère, Hanne; De Bruyn, Pieter; Beller, Leen; Deboutte, Ward; Yinda, Claude Kwe; Lavigne, Rob; Maes, Piet; Ranst, Marc Van; Heylen, Elisabeth; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation for better understanding the role of the human gut virome in health and disease is the lack of validated methods that allow high throughput virome analysis. To overcome this, we evaluated the quantitative effect of homogenisation, centrifugation, filtration, chloroform treatment and random amplification on a mock-virome (containing nine highly diverse viruses) and a bacterial mock-community (containing four faecal bacterial species) using quantitative PCR and next-generation sequencing. This resulted in an optimised protocol that was able to recover all viruses present in the mock-virome and strongly alters the ratio of viral versus bacterial and 16S rRNA genetic material in favour of viruses (from 43.2% to 96.7% viral reads and from 47.6% to 0.19% bacterial reads). Furthermore, our study indicated that most of the currently used virome protocols, using small filter pores and/or stringent centrifugation conditions may have largely overlooked large viruses present in viromes. We propose NetoVIR (Novel enrichment technique of VIRomes), which allows for a fast, reproducible and high throughput sample preparation for viral metagenomics studies, introducing minimal bias. This procedure is optimised mainly for faecal samples, but with appropriate concentration steps can also be used for other sample types with lower initial viral loads. PMID:26559140

  16. Fully Automated Sample Preparation for Ultrafast N-Glycosylation Analysis of Antibody Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Marton; Lew, Clarence; Roby, Keith; Guttman, Andras

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing demand in the biopharmaceutical industry for high-throughput, large-scale N-glycosylation profiling of therapeutic antibodies in all phases of product development, but especially during clone selection when hundreds of samples should be analyzed in a short period of time to assure their glycosylation-based biological activity. Our group has recently developed a magnetic bead-based protocol for N-glycosylation analysis of glycoproteins to alleviate the hard-to-automate centrifugation and vacuum-centrifugation steps of the currently used protocols. Glycan release, fluorophore labeling, and cleanup were all optimized, resulting in a <4 h magnetic bead-based process with excellent yield and good repeatability. This article demonstrates the next level of this work by automating all steps of the optimized magnetic bead-based protocol from endoglycosidase digestion, through fluorophore labeling and cleanup with high-throughput sample processing in 96-well plate format, using an automated laboratory workstation. Capillary electrophoresis analysis of the fluorophore-labeled glycans was also optimized for rapid (<3 min) separation to accommodate the high-throughput processing of the automated sample preparation workflow. Ultrafast N-glycosylation analyses of several commercially relevant antibody therapeutics are also shown and compared to their biosimilar counterparts, addressing the biological significance of the differences.

  17. Sample preparation, data collection and preliminary data analysis in biomolecular solution X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Grishaev, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the classic methods of structural biology - X-ray crystallography and NMR, solution X-ray scattering (SAXS) is starting to play an important role in experiential structural investigation of biological macromolecules. Ease of SAXS data collection and sophistication of its data analysis tools increasingly used as black boxes can be seen as both a blessing and a curse. On one hand, a sample set aside for solution scattering will always yield experimental data, including cases when macromolecule cannot be crystallized or when it is too large for application of solution NMR. On the other hand, any sample, whether pure or contaminated, whether mono- or polydisperse, will yield scattering data and it is up to the user to ensure the absence of artifacts in them and to choose a proper structural modeling strategy. We will discuss experimental aspects of X-ray solution scattering including sample preparation, data collection, as well as the steps in data processing and preliminary analysis that need to be carried out to ensure the absence of artifacts. Our goal is to summarize everything than can possibly go wrong with SAXS data measurement so that the user can have confidence in the data before they enter structural modeling. PMID:23151743

  18. Development of automated preparation system for isotopocule analysis of N2O in various air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Sakae; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), an increasingly abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, is the most important stratospheric ozone-depleting gas of this century. Natural abundance ratios of isotopocules of N2O, NNO molecules substituted with stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen, are a promising index of various sources or production pathways of N2O and of its sink or decomposition pathways. Several automated methods have been reported to improve the analytical precision for the isotopocule ratio of atmospheric N2O and to reduce the labor necessary for complicated sample preparation procedures related to mass spectrometric analysis. However, no method accommodates flask samples with limited volume or pressure. Here we present an automated preconcentration system which offers flexibility with respect to the available gas volume, pressure, and N2O concentration. The shortest processing time for a single analysis of typical atmospheric sample is 40 min. Precision values of isotopocule ratio analysis are < 0.1 ‰ for δ15Nbulk (average abundances of 14N15N16O and 15N14N16O relative to 14N14N16O), < 0.2 ‰ for δ18O (relative abundance of 14N14N18O), and < 0.5 ‰ for site preference (SP; difference between relative abundance of 14N15N16O and 15N14N16O). This precision is comparable to that of other automated systems, but better than that of our previously reported manual measurement system.

  19. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP) to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; Williams, Eram D; Loeb, Jennifer M; Guckenberger, David J; Lavanway, Alex J; Puchalski, Alice A; Kityo, Cissy M; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Graziano, Franklin M; Beebe, David J

    2015-01-01

    Viral load (VL) measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD), accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1) and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP).71 patient samples with VLs ranging from <40 to >3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL) and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97). Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  20. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP) to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Williams, Eram D.; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Guckenberger, David J.; Lavanway, Alex J.; Puchalski, Alice A.; Kityo, Cissy M.; Mugyenyi, Peter N.; Graziano, Franklin M.; Beebe, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Viral load (VL) measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD), accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1) and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP).71 patient samples with VLs ranging from <40 to >3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL) and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97). Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries. PMID:26630135

  1. Modular approach to customise sample preparation procedures for viral metagenomics: a reproducible protocol for virome analysis.

    PubMed

    Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Lefrère, Hanne; De Bruyn, Pieter; Beller, Leen; Deboutte, Ward; Yinda, Claude Kwe; Lavigne, Rob; Maes, Piet; Van Ranst, Marc; Heylen, Elisabeth; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-11-12

    A major limitation for better understanding the role of the human gut virome in health and disease is the lack of validated methods that allow high throughput virome analysis. To overcome this, we evaluated the quantitative effect of homogenisation, centrifugation, filtration, chloroform treatment and random amplification on a mock-virome (containing nine highly diverse viruses) and a bacterial mock-community (containing four faecal bacterial species) using quantitative PCR and next-generation sequencing. This resulted in an optimised protocol that was able to recover all viruses present in the mock-virome and strongly alters the ratio of viral versus bacterial and 16S rRNA genetic material in favour of viruses (from 43.2% to 96.7% viral reads and from 47.6% to 0.19% bacterial reads). Furthermore, our study indicated that most of the currently used virome protocols, using small filter pores and/or stringent centrifugation conditions may have largely overlooked large viruses present in viromes. We propose NetoVIR (Novel enrichment technique of VIRomes), which allows for a fast, reproducible and high throughput sample preparation for viral metagenomics studies, introducing minimal bias. This procedure is optimised mainly for faecal samples, but with appropriate concentration steps can also be used for other sample types with lower initial viral loads.

  2. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR COLLECTION OF FOOD PREPARATION SURFACE WIPE SAMPLES FOR PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-2.17)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the method for collection of the food preparation surface wipe samples for the measurement of persistent organic pollutants (POP). This method uses a wipe to collect POP residues from a surface where a study participant prepares food the most often (i.e., kitch...

  3. Preparation and evaluation of advanced catalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.; Baris, J.; Hockmuth, J.; Pagliaro, P.

    1984-01-01

    The platinum electrocatalysts were characterized for their crystallite sizes and the degree of dispersion on the carbon supports. One application of these electrocatalysts was for anodic oxidation of hydrogen in hot phosphoric acid fuel cells, coupled with the influence of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the fuel gas stream. In a similar way, these platinum on carbon electrocatalysts were evaluated for oxygen reduction in hot phosphoric acid. Binary noble metal alloys were prepared for anodic oxidation of hydrogen and noble metal-refractory metal mixtures were prepared for oxygen reduction. An exemplar alloy of platinum and palladium (50/50 atom %) was discovered for anodic oxidation of hydrogen in the presence of carbon monoxide, and patent disclosures were submitted. For the cathode, platinum-vanadium alloys were prepared showing improved performance over pure platinum. Preliminary experiments on electrocatalyst utilization in electrode structures showed low utilization of the noble metal when the electrocatalyst loading exceeded one weight percent on the carbon.

  4. Esterification of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride by citric acid in a solid dose pharmaceutical preparation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Alok; Zhao, Zhicheng; Sørensen, Dan; Zhou, Jay; Zhang, Fa

    2016-09-10

    Esterification of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSE) by citric acid was observed in a solid dose pharmaceutical preparation at room temperature and accelerated stability condition (40°C/75% relative humidity). The esterification of PSE with citric acid was confirmed by a solid-state binary reaction in the presence of minor level of water at elevated temperature to generate three isomeric esters. The structures of the pseudoephedrine citric acid esters were elucidated using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Occurrence of esterification in solid state, instead of amidation which is generally more favorable than esterification, is likely due to remaining HCl salt form of solid pseudoephedrine hydrochloride to protect its amino group from amidation with citric acid. In contrast, the esterification was not observed from solution reaction between PSE and citric acid.

  5. Esterification of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride by citric acid in a solid dose pharmaceutical preparation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Alok; Zhao, Zhicheng; Sørensen, Dan; Zhou, Jay; Zhang, Fa

    2016-09-10

    Esterification of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSE) by citric acid was observed in a solid dose pharmaceutical preparation at room temperature and accelerated stability condition (40°C/75% relative humidity). The esterification of PSE with citric acid was confirmed by a solid-state binary reaction in the presence of minor level of water at elevated temperature to generate three isomeric esters. The structures of the pseudoephedrine citric acid esters were elucidated using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Occurrence of esterification in solid state, instead of amidation which is generally more favorable than esterification, is likely due to remaining HCl salt form of solid pseudoephedrine hydrochloride to protect its amino group from amidation with citric acid. In contrast, the esterification was not observed from solution reaction between PSE and citric acid. PMID:27474946

  6. Simple and rapid preparation of infected plant tissue extracts for PCR amplification of virus, viroid, and MLO nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Levy, L; Lee, I M; Hadidi, A

    1994-10-01

    A rapid, simple method for preparing plant tissues infected with viruses, viroids, or MLOs using a commercial product known as Gene Releaser is described. The Gene Releaser polymeric matrix method produced plant extracts suitable for PCR amplification without the use of organic solvents, ethanol precipitation, or additional nucleic acid purification techniques. Modification of maceration methods and/or extraction buffers resulted in the PCR amplification of potato spindle tuber, apple scar skin, and dapple apple viroids, as well as, genomic segments of plum pox potyvirus, grapevine virus B, grapevine leafroll-associated virus III, and elm yellows MLO. These pathogens were amplified from tissue of woody and herbaceous hosts such as peach, apricot, apple, grapevine, elm, periwinkle and potato. The application of this product for use with intractable tissue avoids lengthy and laborious extraction procedures. In our hands, about 20 samples could be prepared for PCR or RT-PCR in 1-2 h versus 1-3 days. PMID:7868647

  7. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  8. Effects of sample preparation on the optical properties of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Fay A.

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of biological tissue should be determined in vivo whenever possible. However, for those instances when in vivo studies are impractical, too expensive or inappropriate, and when blood flow is not an issue, the ability to perform in vitro studies then becomes invaluable. Optical absorption spectroscopy shows that it may be possible to obtain meaningful information about the optical properties of human breast tissue from in vitro samples if strict preparation and measuring protocols are used. That a strict protocol for storing and handling tissue is critical can be seen from our observations of changes in the optical absorption spectra that occur in response to formalin fixation, the passage of time, application of stains and dyes, and storage in growth medium of the excised tissue. In vivo optical absorption spectroscopy measurements have been made on human breast cancer xenografts and compared with in vitro measurements on breast biopsies prepared according to precise collection and treatment protocols. There is a 'window of opportunity' before time dependent changes in the UV optical absorption spectra of the excised tissue specimens occur. This time window of opportunity widens at longer wavelengths with the least changes occurring in the optical spectra in the NIR.

  9. Ultrastructure of Plant Leaf Cuticles in relation to Sample Preparation as Observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Paula; Fernández, Victoria; García, María Luisa; Fernández, Agustín; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The leaf cuticular ultrastructure of some plant species has been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in only few studies. Attending to the different cuticle layers and inner structure, plant cuticles have been grouped into six general morphological types. With the aim of critically examining the effect of cuticle isolation and preparation for TEM analysis on cuticular ultrastructure, adaxial leaf cuticles of blue-gum eucalypt, grey poplar, and European pear were assessed, following a membrane science approach. The embedding and staining protocols affected the ultrastructure of the cuticles analysed. The solubility parameter, surface tension, and contact angles with water of pure Spurr's and LR-White resins were within a similar range. Differences were however estimated for resin : solvent mixtures, since Spurr's resin is combined with acetone and LR-White resin is mixed with ethanol. Given the composite hydrophilic and lipophilic nature of plant cuticles, the particular TEM tissue embedding and staining procedures employed may affect sample ultrastructure and the interpretation of the results in physicochemical and biological terms. It is concluded that tissue preparation procedures may be optimised to facilitate the observation of the micro- and nanostructure of cuticular layers and components with different degrees of polarity and hydrophobicity. PMID:24895682

  10. Concept and status of the new sample preparation and analyzing facility at Bochum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubsky, S.; Borucki, L.; Berheide, M.; Baier, S.; Becker, H.-W.; Gorris, F.; Grunwald, C.; Gutt, T.; Krüger, G.; Mehrhoff, M.; Piel, N.; Schulte, W. H.; Rolfs, C.

    1996-06-01

    The technical conditions of the activities at the Dynamitron Tandem Accelerator Laboratory at Bochum in the field of ion beam modification and analysis of thin films will be improved. A new 500 kV accelerator with high energy resolution of the ion beams as well as a UHV system consisting of several chambers are presently being built up. The beam lines of the new accelerator and of the 4 MV Tandem are interconnected, providing a wide range of ion species and energies at the target sites. The UHV system not only allows the use of ion beam techniques but also provides standard electron spectroscopic techniques for surface analyses. For sample preparation techniques such as standard furnace evaporation, electron gun evaporation and rapid thermal processing are available.

  11. Polymer-coated fibrous extraction medium for sample preparation coupled to microcolumn liquid-phase separations.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Motohiro; Saito, Yoshihiro; Hayashida, Makiko; Takeichi, Tsutomu; Wada, Hiroo; Jinno, Kiyokatsu

    2003-01-15

    Polymer-coated fibrous material has been introduced as the extraction medium for a miniaturized sample preparation method being coupled with microcolumn liquid chromatography. The preconcentration and the subsequent liquid chromatographic separation of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) drugs, amitriptyline, imipramine, nortriptyline and desipramine, was carried out with the hyphenated system. Several basic experimental parameters, such as extraction and separation conditions, were investigated along with the applicability of the method for the analysis of biological fluids. The results clearly showed that the on-line coupled system could be a powerful tool for the analysis of complex mixtures in biological matrix without a large solvent consumption and specially designed instruments. The lowest limit of quantification was quite acceptable for the analysis of TCAs in clinical and forensic situations.

  12. Polymer-coated fibrous extraction medium for sample preparation coupled to microcolumn liquid-phase separations.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Motohiro; Saito, Yoshihiro; Hayashida, Makiko; Takeichi, Tsutomu; Wada, Hiroo; Jinno, Kiyokatsu

    2003-01-15

    Polymer-coated fibrous material has been introduced as the extraction medium for a miniaturized sample preparation method being coupled with microcolumn liquid chromatography. The preconcentration and the subsequent liquid chromatographic separation of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) drugs, amitriptyline, imipramine, nortriptyline and desipramine, was carried out with the hyphenated system. Several basic experimental parameters, such as extraction and separation conditions, were investigated along with the applicability of the method for the analysis of biological fluids. The results clearly showed that the on-line coupled system could be a powerful tool for the analysis of complex mixtures in biological matrix without a large solvent consumption and specially designed instruments. The lowest limit of quantification was quite acceptable for the analysis of TCAs in clinical and forensic situations. PMID:12485721

  13. Sample processing and cDNA preparation for microbial metatranscriptomics in complex soil communities.

    PubMed

    Carvalhais, Lilia C; Schenk, Peer M

    2013-01-01

    Soil presents one of the most complex environments for microbial communities as it provides many microhabitats that allow coexistence of thousands of species with important ecosystem functions. These include biomass and nutrient cycling, mineralization, and detoxification. Culture-independent DNA-based methods, such as metagenomics, have revealed operational taxonomic units that suggest a high diversity of microbial species and associated functions in soil. An emerging but technically challenging area to profile the functions of microorganisms and their activities is mRNA-based metatranscriptomics. Here, we describe issues and important considerations of soil sample processing and cDNA preparation for metatranscriptomics from bacteria and archaea and provide a set of methods that can be used in the required experimental steps.

  14. On-chip sample preparation by controlled release of antibodies for simple CD4 counting.

    PubMed

    Beck, Markus; Brockhuis, Silvia; van der Velde, Niels; Breukers, Christian; Greve, Jan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple system for CD4 and CD8 counting for point-of-care HIV staging in low-resource settings. Automatic sample preparation is achieved through a dried reagent coating inside a thin (26 μm) counting chamber, allowing the delayed release of fluorochrome conjugated monoclonal antibodies after the filling of the chamber with whole blood by capillary flow. A custom-built image cytometer is used to capture fluorescence images representing more than 1 μl of blood. The thin layer of blood in combination with the large image area allows the use of whole blood from a finger prick without the need for dilution, lysis or cell enrichment. Automatic cell counting of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes correlates well with results obtained by flow cytometry.

  15. NGSI FY15 Final Report. Innovative Sample Preparation for in-Field Uranium Isotopic Determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Thomas M.; Meyers, Lisa

    2015-11-10

    Our FY14 Final Report included an introduction to the project, background, literature search of uranium dissolution methods, assessment of commercial off the shelf (COTS) automated sample preparation systems, as well as data and results for dissolution of bulk quantities of uranium oxides, and dissolution of uranium oxides from swipe filter materials using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). Also, discussed were reaction studies of solid ABF with uranium oxide that provided a basis for determining the ABF/uranium oxide dissolution mechanism. This report details the final experiments for optimizing dissolution of U3O8 and UO2 using ABF and steps leading to development of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for dissolution of uranium oxides on swipe filters.

  16. Raman scattering study of the lattice dynamic of URu2Si2 and sample's preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhot, Jonathan; Méasson, Marie-Aude; Gallais, Yann; Cazayous, Maximilien; Sacuto, Alain; Lapertot, Gérard; Aoki, Dai

    2013-05-01

    We report Raman scattering measurements on URu2Si2 single crystals as a function of temperature down to 2 K. We probe all the Raman active symmetries. Only when the sample is prepared with a surface perpendicular to a-axis, we observe an extrinsic hardening and broadening of the A1 g and B1 g phonons after polishing, which disappears after annealing. Moreover, a parasitic phase with Si-excess compared to URu2Si2 composition appears on the a-axis surface when annealing is at 1075 °C. No parasitic phase is induced when annealing is done at 950 °C. The temperature dependance of the A1 g , and two E g phonons shows a hardening with decreasing temperature. The B1 g phonon mode's behavior is more unusual, its energy stays stable down to ˜ 30 K before softens at lower temperature. An electron-phonon coupling is certainly at play here.

  17. Agarose- and alginate-based biopolymers for sample preparation: Excellent green extraction tools for this century.

    PubMed

    Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Loh, Saw Hong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Nazihah; Pourmand, Neda; Salisu, Ahmed; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran

    2016-03-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in the use of miniaturized sample preparation techniques before the chromatographic monitoring of the analytes in unknown complex compositions. The use of biopolymer-based sorbents in solid-phase microextraction techniques has achieved a good reputation. A great variety of polysaccharides can be extracted from marine plants or microorganisms. Seaweeds are the major sources of polysaccharides such as alginate, agar, agarose, as well as carrageenans. Agarose and alginate (green biopolymers) have been manipulated for different microextraction approaches. The present review is focused on the classification of biopolymer and their applications in multidisciplinary research. Besides, efforts have been made to discuss the state-of-the-art of the new microextraction techniques that utilize commercial biopolymer interfaces such as agarose in liquid-phase microextraction and solid-phase microextraction.

  18. Evaluation of an ultrasonic acid digestion procedure for total heavy metals determination in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Jamali, Mohammad K; Arain, Mohammad B; Afridi, Hassan I; Jalbani, Nusrat; Sarfraz, Raja A; Ansari, Rehana

    2009-01-30

    In this study, a sample preparation method based on ultrasonic assisted acid digestion (UAD) has been evaluated for total heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb) determination in different environmental (soil, sediment and sewage sludge), and biological (fish muscles, vegetables and grains) samples, using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The investigated parameters influencing UAD such as presonication time, sonication time, temperature of ultrasonic bath, and different acid mixtures were fully optimized, whereas power was maintained constant at 100% of nominal power of ultrasonic bath. Six different sets of above parameters were applied on six certified reference materials (CRMs) having different matrices. The accuracy of the method was also tested by comparing the results with those obtained from conventional hot plate assisted acid digestion method on same CRMs. Analytical results for HMs by both methods showed no significant difference at 95% confidence limit (p<0.05). Recoveries of HMs ranging from 96.2% to 102% and 96.3% to 98.6% were obtained from biological and environmental samples, respectively. The average relative standard deviation of UAD method varied between 3.5% and 8.2%, depending on the analyte.

  19. Carbon Isotopic Measurements of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here, we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and e-aminocaproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CAMS/IRMS).

  20. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  1. Second generation laser-heated microfurnace for the preparation of microgram-sized graphite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Smith, A. M.; Long, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present construction details and test results for two second-generation laser-heated microfurnaces (LHF-II) used to prepare graphite samples for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ANSTO. Based on systematic studies aimed at optimising the performance of our prototype laser-heated microfurnace (LHF-I) (Smith et al., 2007 [1]; Smith et al., 2010 [2,3]; Yang et al., 2014 [4]), we have designed the LHF-II to have the following features: (i) it has a small reactor volume of 0.25 mL allowing us to completely graphitise carbon dioxide samples containing as little as 2 μg of C, (ii) it can operate over a large pressure range (0-3 bar) and so has the capacity to graphitise CO2 samples containing up to 100 μg of C; (iii) it is compact, with three valves integrated into the microfurnace body, (iv) it is compatible with our new miniaturised conventional graphitisation furnaces (MCF), also designed for small samples, and shares a common vacuum system. Early tests have shown that the extraneous carbon added during graphitisation in each LHF-II is of the order of 0.05 μg, assuming 100 pMC activity, similar to that of the prototype unit. We use a 'budget' fibre packaged array for the diode laser with custom built focusing optics. The use of a new infrared (IR) thermometer with a short focal length has allowed us to decrease the height of the light-proof safety enclosure. These innovations have produced a cheaper and more compact device. As with the LHF-I, feedback control of the catalyst temperature and logging of the reaction parameters is managed by a LabVIEW interface.

  2. Preparation and characterization of humic acid-carbon hybrid materials as adsorbents for organic micro-pollutants.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Emad K; Abdel Ghafar, Hany H; Moursy, Ahmed S; Langford, Cooper H; Bedair, Ahmed H; Achari, Gopal

    2015-08-01

    The present work involves the preparation of novel adsorbent materials by the insolubilization and hybridization of humic acid (HA) with carbon. The prepared materials were characterized by N2 adsorption, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, solid-state (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry on wetted samples. The water solubility of these materials and the lack of effect of oxidants were also confirmed. With this background, the adsorption capacities toward phenol, 2,4,6-tricholrophenol, and atrazine were evaluated, using these as model compounds for organic micropollutants of concern in water. Experimental results show that the prepared materials are mesoporous and have a higher surface area than humic acid and even than the porous carbon in the case of carbon coating. They retain the basic features of the starting materials with lowered functional group content. Moreover, there are interesting new features. NMR relaxometry shows that equilibration of water uptake is very fast, making use in water simple. They have higher adsorption capacities than the pure materials, and they can be applied under a wide range of environmental conditions. PMID:25874433

  3. Preparation and characterization of humic acid-carbon hybrid materials as adsorbents for organic micro-pollutants.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Emad K; Abdel Ghafar, Hany H; Moursy, Ahmed S; Langford, Cooper H; Bedair, Ahmed H; Achari, Gopal

    2015-08-01

    The present work involves the preparation of novel adsorbent materials by the insolubilization and hybridization of humic acid (HA) with carbon. The prepared materials were characterized by N2 adsorption, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, solid-state (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry on wetted samples. The water solubility of these materials and the lack of effect of oxidants were also confirmed. With this background, the adsorption capacities toward phenol, 2,4,6-tricholrophenol, and atrazine were evaluated, using these as model compounds for organic micropollutants of concern in water. Experimental results show that the prepared materials are mesoporous and have a higher surface area than humic acid and even than the porous carbon in the case of carbon coating. They retain the basic features of the starting materials with lowered functional group content. Moreover, there are interesting new features. NMR relaxometry shows that equilibration of water uptake is very fast, making use in water simple. They have higher adsorption capacities than the pure materials, and they can be applied under a wide range of environmental conditions.

  4. Electrochemical Preparation of a Molecularly Imprinted Polypyrrole-modified Pencil Graphite Electrode for Determination of Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Levent; Şahin, Mutlu; Şahin, Yücel

    2008-01-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) polypyrrole (PPy)-based film was fabricated for the determination of ascorbic acid. The film was prepared by incorporation of a template molecule (ascorbic acid) during the electropolymerization of pyrrole onto a pencil graphite electrode (PGE) in aqueous solution using a cyclic voltammetry method. The performance of the imprinted and non-imprinted (NIP) films was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The effect of pH, monomer and template concentrations, electropolymerization cycles and interferents on the performance of the MIP electrode was investigated and optimized. The molecularly imprinted film exhibited a high selectivity and sensitivity toward ascorbic acid. The DPV peak current showed a linear dependence on the ascorbic acid concentration and a linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 0.25 to 7.0 mM of ascorbic acid with a correlation coefficient of 0.9946. The detection limit (3σ) was determined as 7.4×10−5 M (S/N=3). The molecularly-imprinted polypyrrole-modified pencil graphite electrode showed a stable and reproducible response, without any influence of interferents commonly existing in pharmaceutical samples. The proposed method is simple and quick. The PPy electrodes have a low response time, good mechanical stability and are disposable simple to construct.

  5. Study of UltraHigh Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatography to measure free fatty acids with out fatty acid ester preparation.

    PubMed

    Ashraf-Khorassani, M; Isaac, G; Rainville, P; Fountain, K; Taylor, L T

    2015-08-01

    Most lipids are best characterized by their fatty acids which may differ in (a) chain length, (b) degree of unsaturation, (c) configuration and position of the double bonds, and (d) the presence of other functionalities. Thus, a fast, simple, and quantitative analytical technique to determine naturally occurring free fatty acids (FFA) in different samples is very important. Just as for saponified acylglycerols, the determination of FFA's has generally been carried out by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC). The use of an open tubular capillary column coupled with a flame ionization or mass spectrometric detector provides for both high resolution and quantification of FFA's but only after conversion of all free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or pentafluorobenzyl esters. Unfortunately, volatilization of labile ester derivatives of mono- and poly-unsaturated FFA's can cause both thermal degradation and isomerization of the fatty acid during HRGC. The employment of a second generation instrument (here referred to as UltraHigh Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatograph, UHPSFC) with high precision for modified flow and repeated back pressure adjustment in conjunction with sub-2μm various bonded silica particles (coupled with evaporative light scattering, ELSD, and mass spectrometric, MS, detection) for separation and detection of the following mixtures is described: (a) 31 free fatty acids, (b) isomeric FFA's, and (c) lipophilic materials in two real world fish oil samples. Limits of detection for FFA's via UHPSFC/MS and UHPSFC/ELSD versus detection of FAME's via HRGC/MS are quantitatively compared.

  6. Optical biosensor system with integrated microfluidic sample preparation and TIRF based detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, Eduard; Scheicher, Sylvia R.; Suppan, Michael; Pichler, Heinz; Rumpler, Markus; Satzinger, Valentin; Palfinger, Christian; Reil, Frank; Hajnsek, Martin; Köstler, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    There is a steadily growing demand for miniaturized bioanalytical devices allowing for on-site or point-of-care detection of biomolecules or pathogens in applications like diagnostics, food testing, or environmental monitoring. These, so called labs-on-a-chip or micro-total analysis systems (μ-TAS) should ideally enable convenient sample-in - result-out type operation. Therefore, the entire process from sample preparation, metering, reagent incubation, etc. to detection should be performed on a single disposable device (on-chip). In the early days such devices were mainly fabricated using glass or silicon substrates and adapting established fabrication technologies from the electronics and semiconductor industry. More recently, the development focuses on the use of thermoplastic polymers as they allow for low-cost high volume fabrication of disposables. One of the most promising materials for the development of plastic based lab-on-achip systems are cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers (COP/COC) due to their excellent optical properties (high transparency and low autofluorescence) and ease of processing. We present a bioanalytical system for whole blood samples comprising a disposable plastic chip based on TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) optical detection. The chips were fabricated by compression moulding of COP and microfluidic channels were structured by hot embossing. These microfluidic structures integrate several sample pretreatment steps. These are the separation of erythrocytes, metering of sample volume using passive valves, and reagent incubation for competitive bioassays. The surface of the following optical detection zone is functionalized with specific capture probes in an array format. The plastic chips comprise dedicated structures for simple and effective coupling of excitation light from low-cost laser diodes. This enables TIRF excitation of fluorescently labeled probes selectively bound to detection spots at the microchannel surface

  7. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-11-08

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt% or 2 wt%) were used at 55°C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results.

  8. State of the art of environmentally friendly sample preparation approaches for determination of PBDEs and metabolites in environmental and biological samples: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Berton, Paula; Lana, Nerina B; Ríos, Juan M; García-Reyes, Juan F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2016-01-28

    Green chemistry principles for developing methodologies have gained attention in analytical chemistry in recent decades. A growing number of analytical techniques have been proposed for determination of organic persistent pollutants in environmental and biological samples. In this light, the current review aims to present state-of-the-art sample preparation approaches based on green analytical principles proposed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metabolites (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) in environmental and biological samples. Approaches to lower the solvent consumption and accelerate the extraction, such as pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are discussed in this review. Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and strategies proposed to reduce organic solvent consumption. Additionally, extraction techniques based on alternative solvents (surfactants, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids) are also commented in this work, even though these are scarcely used for determination of PBDEs. In addition to liquid-based extraction techniques, solid-based analytical techniques are also addressed. The development of greener, faster and simpler sample preparation approaches has increased in recent years (2003-2013). Among green extraction techniques, those based on the liquid phase predominate over those based on the solid phase (71% vs. 29%, respectively). For solid samples, solvent assisted extraction techniques are preferred for leaching of PBDEs, and liquid phase microextraction techniques are mostly used for liquid samples. Likewise, green characteristics of the instrumental analysis used after the extraction and clean-up steps are briefly discussed.

  9. Proteomic tools for environmental microbiology--a roadmap from sample preparation to protein identification and quantification.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Trautwein, Kathleen; Rabus, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    The steadily increasing amount of (meta-)genomic sequence information of diverse organisms and habitats has a strong impact on research in microbial physiology and ecology. In-depth functional understanding of metabolic processes and overall physiological adaptation to environmental changes, however, requires application of proteomics, as the context specific proteome constitutes the true functional output of a cell. Considering the enormous structural and functional diversity of proteins, only rational combinations of various analytical approaches allow a holistic view on the overall state of the cell. Within the past decade, proteomic methods became increasingly accessible to microbiologists mainly due to the robustness of analytical methods (e.g. 2DE), and affordability of mass spectrometers and their relative ease of use. This review provides an overview on the complex portfolio of state-of-the-art proteomics and highlights the basic principles of key methods, ranging from sample preparation of laboratory or environmental samples, via protein/peptide separation (gel-based or gel-free) and different types of mass spectrometric protein/peptide analyses, to protein identification and abundance determination. PMID:23894077

  10. Preparation of chitosan grafted graphite composite for sensitive detection of dopamine in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Gnanaprakasam, P; Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2016-10-20

    The accurate detection of dopamine (DA) levels in biological samples such as human serum and urine are essential indicators in medical diagnostics. In this work, we describe the preparation of chitosan (CS) biopolymer grafted graphite (GR) composite for the sensitive and lower potential detection of DA in its sub micromolar levels. The composite modified electrode has been used for the detection of DA in biological samples such as human serum and urine. The GR-CS composite modified electrode shows an enhanced oxidation peak current response and low oxidation potential for the detection of DA than that of electrodes modified with bare, GR and CS discretely. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated GR-CS composite modified electrode shows the DPV response of DA in the linear response ranging from 0.03 to 20.06μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the sensor were estimated as 0.0045μM and 6.06μA μM(-1)cm(-2), respectively.

  11. Sample Preparation for Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Circadian Time Series in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Krahmer, Johanna; Hindle, Matthew M.; Martin, Sarah F.; Le Bihan, Thierry; Millar, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biological approaches to study the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock have mainly focused on transcriptomics while little is known about the proteome, and even less about posttranslational modifications. Evidence has emerged that posttranslational protein modifications, in particular phosphorylation, play an important role for the clock and its output. Phosphoproteomics is the method of choice for a large-scale approach to gain more knowledge about rhythmic protein phosphorylation. Recent plant phosphoproteomics publications have identified several thousand phosphopeptides. However, the methods used in these studies are very labor-intensive and therefore not suitable to apply to a well-replicated circadian time series. To address this issue, we present and compare different strategies for sample preparation for phosphoproteomics that are compatible with large numbers of samples. Methods are compared regarding number of identifications, variability of quantitation, and functional categorization. We focus on the type of detergent used for protein extraction as well as methods for its removal. We also test a simple two-fraction separation of the protein extract. PMID:25662467

  12. Site-Specific Cryo-focused Ion Beam Sample Preparation Guided by 3D Correlative Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jan; Mahamid, Julia; Lucic, Vladan; de Marco, Alex; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Laugks, Tim; Mayer, Tobias; Hyman, Anthony A; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2016-02-23

    The development of cryo-focused ion beam (cryo-FIB) for the thinning of frozen-hydrated biological specimens enabled cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) analysis in unperturbed cells and tissues. However, the volume represented within a typical FIB lamella constitutes a small fraction of the biological specimen. Retaining low-abundance and dynamic subcellular structures or macromolecular assemblies within such limited volumes requires precise targeting of the FIB milling process. In this study, we present the development of a cryo-stage allowing for spinning-disk confocal light microscopy at cryogenic temperatures and describe the incorporation of the new hardware into existing workflows for cellular sample preparation by cryo-FIB. Introduction of fiducial markers and subsequent computation of three-dimensional coordinate transformations provide correlation between light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy/FIB. The correlative approach is employed to guide the FIB milling process of vitrified cellular samples and to capture specific structures, namely fluorescently labeled lipid droplets, in lamellas that are 300 nm thick. The correlation procedure is then applied to localize the fluorescently labeled structures in the transmission electron microscopy image of the lamella. This approach can be employed to navigate the acquisition of cryo-ET data within FIB-lamellas at specific locations, unambiguously identified by fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Preparation of higher-actinide burnup and cross section samples. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Thomas, D.K.; Dailey, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was instigated about four years ago for the purpose of studying burnup of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the burnup and cross section samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the burnup study were /sup 241/Am and /sup 244/Cm in the forms of Am/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Am/sub 6/ Cm(RE)/sub 7/O/sub 21/, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanide sesquioxides. It is the purpose of this paper to describe technology development and its application in the preparation of the fuel specimens and the cross section specimens that are being used in this cooperative program.

  14. Preparation of chitosan grafted graphite composite for sensitive detection of dopamine in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Gnanaprakasam, P; Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2016-10-20

    The accurate detection of dopamine (DA) levels in biological samples such as human serum and urine are essential indicators in medical diagnostics. In this work, we describe the preparation of chitosan (CS) biopolymer grafted graphite (GR) composite for the sensitive and lower potential detection of DA in its sub micromolar levels. The composite modified electrode has been used for the detection of DA in biological samples such as human serum and urine. The GR-CS composite modified electrode shows an enhanced oxidation peak current response and low oxidation potential for the detection of DA than that of electrodes modified with bare, GR and CS discretely. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated GR-CS composite modified electrode shows the DPV response of DA in the linear response ranging from 0.03 to 20.06μM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the sensor were estimated as 0.0045μM and 6.06μA μM(-1)cm(-2), respectively. PMID:27474582

  15. Photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol on photocatalyst prepared by acid leaching of titanium oxide/hydroxyapatite composite

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.; Rachi, T.; Yokouchi, M.; Kamimoto, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Okada, K.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Photocatalyst powder was prepared by acid leaching of TiO{sub 2}/apatite composite. ► The photocatalytic activity was evaluated from in situ FT-IR study using ethanol. ► Apatite in the composite had positive effect for the photo-oxidation of ethanol. ► The enhanced oxidation rate was explained by the difference in deactivation rate. - Abstract: Highly active photocatalysts were synthesized by leaching of heat-treated titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})/hydroxyapatite (HAp) powder with hydrochloric acid at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 mol/l, and their photocatalytic activities were evaluated from in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) study of photo-oxidation of gaseous ethanol. By changing the acid concentration, the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composite had different atomic ratios of Ca/Ti (0.0–2.8) and P/Ti (0.3–2.1). It was found that phosphate group remained on the surface of TiO{sub 2} particle even in the sample treated with concentrated acid (0.75 mol/l). These acid-treated samples showed higher rates for ethanol photo-oxidation than the commercial TiO{sub 2} powder, Degussa P25. The highest rate was obtained in the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composite treated with the dilute (0.25 mol/l) acid in spite of its low content of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst. This enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to the result that the deactivation with repeated injections of ethanol gas was suppressed in the TiO{sub 2}/HAp composites compared with the TiO{sub 2} powders.

  16. Multiple stable isotope characterization as a forensic tool to distinguish acid scavenger samples

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Carman, April J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    Acid scavengers are frequently used as stabilizer compounds in a variety of applications. When used to stabilize volatile compounds such as nerve agents, the lower volatility and higher stability of acid scavengers make them more persistent in a post-event forensic setting. We are employing compound-specific stable isotope analysis of the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen components of three acid scavenging compounds (N,N-diethylaniline, tributylamine, and triethylamine) as a tool for distinguishing between different samples of the stabilizers. Combined analysis of three stable isotopes in these samples improves the technique’s resolving potential, enhancing sample matching capabilities. The compound specific methods developed here can be applied to instances where these compounds are not pure, such as when mixed with an agent or when found as a residue at an event site. Effective sample matching can be crucial for linking compounds at multiple event sites or linking a supply inventory to an event.

  17. Amino acid analysis in micrograms of meteorite sample by nanoliquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael P; Martin, Mildred G; Burton, Aaron S; Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids and their enantiomers in a 360 microgram sample of Murchison meteorite were unambiguously identified and quantified using chemical derivatization and nanoliquid chromatography coupled to nanoelectrospray ionization high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques. The distribution and abundance of amino acids were similar to past studies of Murchison meteorite but the samples used here were three orders of magnitude lower. The analytical method was also highly sensitive, and some amino acid reference standards were successfully detected at a level of ∼200 attomoles (on column). These results may open up the possibility for investigating other less studied, sample-limited extraterrestrial samples (e.g., micrometeorites, interplanetary dust particles, and cometary particles) for biologically-relevant organic molecules. PMID:24529954

  18. Amino acid analysis in micrograms of meteorite sample by nanoliquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael P; Martin, Mildred G; Burton, Aaron S; Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids and their enantiomers in a 360 microgram sample of Murchison meteorite were unambiguously identified and quantified using chemical derivatization and nanoliquid chromatography coupled to nanoelectrospray ionization high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques. The distribution and abundance of amino acids were similar to past studies of Murchison meteorite but the samples used here were three orders of magnitude lower. The analytical method was also highly sensitive, and some amino acid reference standards were successfully detected at a level of ∼200 attomoles (on column). These results may open up the possibility for investigating other less studied, sample-limited extraterrestrial samples (e.g., micrometeorites, interplanetary dust particles, and cometary particles) for biologically-relevant organic molecules.

  19. Effect of sample preparation on contaminant leaching from copper smelting slag.

    PubMed

    Vítková, Martina; Ettler, Vojtěch; Mihaljevič, Martin; Sebek, Ondřej

    2011-12-15

    Currently standardised leaching tests require grain size reduction, which for large fragments of slags could overestimate the leaching results. To assess the effect of the fine-grained fraction generated by sample crushing, a set of leaching experiments was performed on copper smelting slag from the Zambian Copperbelt: (i) EN 12457-2 batch tests (standardised grain size <4 mm; modified procedure with grain size of 4-0.5 mm simulating exposure of larger fragments on the dumps) and (ii) CEN/TS 14997 pH-static tests (standardised grain size <1 mm simulating the possible wind dispersion scenario near the slag crushing facilities or disposal of fine-grained granulated slag; additional grain sizes <5 mm, 5-0.5 mm and 5-0.5 mm after ultrasonic cleaning). A higher proportion of the fine-grained fraction generally led to greater leaching of Cu, Co and Zn. The metal levels in the leachates under circum-neutral conditions were all below the EU limits for non-hazardous waste. However, at pH 4, the presence of fine dust particles dramatically increased the concentrations of metals in the slag leachates. The greater leachability of Cu and Co from slag particles under acidic conditions suggests a risk of their mobilisation in acidic soils in the Copperbelt area.

  20. Microfluidic Preparation of Polymer-Nucleic Acid Nanocomplexes Improves Nonviral Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigsby, Christopher L.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Lin, Chao; Engbersen, Johan F. J.; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-11-01

    As the designs of polymer systems used to deliver nucleic acids continue to evolve, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the basic bulk manufacturing techniques of the past will be insufficient to produce polymer-nucleic acid nanocomplexes that possess the uniformity, stability, and potency required for their successful clinical translation and widespread commercialization. Traditional bulk-prepared products are often physicochemically heterogeneous and may vary significantly from one batch to the next. Here we show that preparation of bioreducible nanocomplexes with an emulsion-based droplet microfluidic system produces significantly improved nanoparticles that are up to fifty percent smaller, more uniform, and are less prone to aggregation. The intracellular integrity of nanocomplexes prepared with this microfluidic method is significantly prolonged, as detected using a high-throughput flow cytometric quantum dot Förster resonance energy transfer nanosensor system. These physical attributes conspire to consistently enhance the delivery of both plasmid DNA and messenger RNA payloads in stem cells, primary cells, and human cell lines. Innovation in processing is necessary to move the field toward the broader clinical implementation of safe and effective nonviral nucleic acid therapeutics, and preparation with droplet microfluidics represents a step forward in addressing the critical barrier of robust and reproducible nanocomplex production.

  1. Applicability Comparison of Methods for Acid Generation Assessment of Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Yim, Giljae; Cheong, Youngwook

    2014-05-01

    Minerals including various forms of sulfur could generate AMD (Acid Mine Drainage) or ARD (Acid Rock Drainage), which can have serious effects on the ecosystem and even on human when exposed to air and/or water. To minimize the hazards by acid drainage, it is necessary to assess in advance the acid generation possibility of rocks and estimate the amount of acid generation. Because of its relatively simple and effective experiment procedure, the method of combining the results of ABA (Acid Base Accounting) and NAG (Net Acid Generation) tests have been commonly used in determining acid drainage conditions. The simplicity and effectiveness of the above method however, are derived from massive assumptions of simplified chemical reactions and this often leads to results of classifying the samples as UC (Uncertain) which would then require additional experimental or field data to reclassify them properly. This paper therefore, attempts to find the reasons that cause samples to be classified as UC and suggest new series of experiments where samples can be reclassified appropriately. Study precedents on evaluating potential acid generation and neutralization capacity were reviewed and as a result three individual experiments were selected in the light of applicability and compatibility of minimizing unnecessary influence among other experiments. The proposed experiments include sulfur speciation, ABCC (Acid Buffering Characteristic Curve), and Modified NAG which are all improved versions of existing experiments of Total S, ANC (Acid Neutralizing Capacity), and NAG respectively. To assure the applicability of the experiments, 36 samples from 19 sites with diverse geologies, field properties, and weathering conditions were collected. The samples were then subject to existing experiments and as a result, 14 samples which either were classified as UC or could be used as a comparison group had been selected. Afterwards, the selected samples were used to conduct the suggested

  2. Preparation of sphingolipid fatty acid methyl esters for determination by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    MacGee, J; Williams, M G

    1981-01-30

    Sphingolipid fatty acids are first converted to a mixture of free acids and their n-butyl esters by heating the specimen at 85 degree C in aqueous butanolic hydrogen chloride; the butyl esters are then saponified with methanolic potassium hydroxide. After acidification and extraction into hexane, the fatty acids are extracted into a very small volume of aqueous trimethyl(m-trifluorotolyl)ammonium hydroxide (TMTFTH), injection of an aliquot of the TMTFTH extract into the gas chromatograph yields the fatty acid methyl esters by pyrolytic methylation of the quaternary ammonium salts of the fatty acids. The preparation of a specimen ready for the gas--liquid chromatographic (GLC) analysis with quantitative recovery of the sphingolipid fatty acids can be accomplished in less than 2 h. By comparison, none of a number of well-accepted techniques for the release of sphingomyelin fatty acids by hydrolysis or methanolysis released the fatty acids quantitatively in less than 3 h, and all required additional manipulations before GLC analysis. PMID:7217267

  3. Porous poly(D,L-lactic acid) foams with tunable structure and mechanical anisotropy prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Floren, Michael; Spilimbergo, Sara; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2011-11-01

    The design and tunability of tissue scaffolds, such as pore size and geometry, is crucial to the success of an engineered tissue replacement. Moreover, the mechanical nature of a tissue scaffold should display properties similar to the tissue of interest; therefore, tunability of the foam mechanical properties is desirable. Polymeric foams prepared using supercritical carbon dioxide as a blowing agent has emerged in recent years as a promising technique to prepare porous scaffolds. While a number of groups have reported on the tailoring of scaffold morphologies by using gas foaming techniques, few have considered the effects of such processing conditions on the physical and mechanical anisotropy achieved. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the tunability of the structure and mechanical anisotropy of foams prepared using a variety of different gas foaming conditions. Porous poly(D,L lactic acid) foams were prepared by the systematic adjustment of processing conditions, namely pressure, temperature and venting time, resulting in an extensive range of scaffold morphologies. Characterization of sample anisotropy was achieved by mechanical evaluation of foam specimens both longitudinal and transverse to the foaming direction. The obtained mechanical properties demonstrated a strong dependence of the processing conditions on mechanical anisotropy and performance. Furthermore, results indicate that factors other than pore geometry may be necessary to define the mechanical behavior of the foam specimens. The favorable compressive moduli, coupled with large degrees of anisotropy, suggests these foams may have suitable application as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Enhanced Enzymatic Preparation of Biodiesel Using Ricinoleic Acid as Acyl Donor: Optimization Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Sun, Shangde

    2016-09-01

    Castor oil methyl ester is a kind of biodiesel from castor oil. However, in those previous methods for biodiesel preparation using castor oil as feedstock, glycerol was the main by-product, which had a strong blocking effect on the immobilized enzyme activity and affected the mass transfer of reaction system. For avoiding the negative effect of glycerol on the enzymatic esterification, biodiesel was prepared using ricinoleic acid (RA) as acyl donor. Enzyme screening was also studied, and the effects of reaction temperature, molar ratio of ricinoleic acid and methanol, enzyme load, and reaction time, on the preparation of castor methyl ester were also evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the interaction effect of reaction variables (reaction temperature (30-70°C), enzyme load (2-7%; relative to the weight of total substrates), molar ratio of methanol to ricinoleic acid (2:1-10:1), and reaction time (0.5-2.5 h)) on the acid value (AV) and the degree of esterification (DE). Validation of the RSM model was verified by the good agreement between the experimental and the predicted values of AV and DE. The optimum preparation conditions were as follows: reaction temperature, 48.2°C; enzyme load, 5.8%; molar ratio of methanol to ricinoleic acid, 5.56:1; reaction time, 2.36 h. Under these conditions, the AV and DE of the esterification reaction are 10.36±1.05 mgKOH/g and 94.03±0.60%, respectively. The relationship between initial reaction rate and temperature was also established, and the activation energy (Ea) of the enzymatic esterification is 33.87 KJ/mol. PMID:27477073

  5. Toward a Fieldable Atomic Mass Spectrometer for Safeguards Applications: Sample Preparation and Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Jones, Sarah MH; Manard, Benjamin T.

    2014-10-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for the development of new methods to detect misuse at nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing and enrichment plants. At enrichment plants, for example, the IAEA’s contemporary safeguards approaches are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include collection of UF6 samples from in-process material and selected cylinders for subsequent analyses. These analyses include destructive analysis (DA) in a laboratory (typically by mass spectrometry [MS]) for isotopic characterization, and environmental sampling (ES) for subsequent laboratory elemental and isotopic analysis (also both typically by MS). One area of new method development includes moving this kind of isotope ratio analytical capability for DA and ES activities into the field. Some of the reasons for these developments include timeliness of results, avoidance of hazardous material shipments, and guidance for additional sample collecting. However, this capability does not already exist for several reasons, such as that most lab-based chemical and instrumental methods rely on laboratory infrastructure (highly trained staff, power, space, hazardous material handling, etc.) and require significant amounts of consumables (power, compressed gases, etc.). In addition, there are no currently available, fieldable instruments for atomic or isotope ratio analysis. To address these issues, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and collaborator, Clemson University, are studying key areas that limit the fieldability of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for atomic ions: sample preparation and ionization, and reducing the physical size of a fieldable mass spectrometer. PNNL is seeking simple and robust techniques that could be effectively used by inspectors who may have no expertise in analytical MS. In this report, we present and describe the preliminary findings for three candidate

  6. Mobile on-site sample collection, preparation, and analysis in Iraq. Final report, January-April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Swahn, I.D.; Brzezinski, J.H.

    1996-11-01

    The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center has developed mobile on-site sample collection, preparation, and analysis equipment to collect environmental samples in highly contaminated areas. This equipment is being used by the United Nations Special Commission at the Baghdad Monitoring and Verification Center (BMVC), which provides long-term monitoring of dual-purpose chemical sites in Iraq, especially those with potential for chemical warfare (CW) production. A mobile laboratory was set-up in the BMVC to prepare and analyze samples collected throughout Iraq. Automatic air samplers were installed at various sites to collect vapor samples on absorption tubes that were analyzed using a gas chromatographic (GC) flame photometric detector (FPD). Mobile sample collection kits were used to collect solid, liquid, air, and wipe samples during challenge inspections. These samples were prepared using a sample preparation kit, which concentrates CW agent, breakdown products, and their precursors in complex matrices down to sub part per million levels for chemical analysis by a GC mass selective detector (MSD). This report describes the problems and solutions encountered with setting up a self-sufficient mobile analytical laboratory. Details of the various components associated with the laboratory and the collection kits are included.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of alumina-supported nickel catalysts precursors. Part I. Catalysts prepared from acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasieczna-Patkowska, S.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2007-04-01

    Nickel alumina-supported catalysts were prepared from acidic solutions of nickel nitrate by the CIM and DIM methods (classical and double impregnation, respectively). The catalysts exhibited different nickel species due to the existence of various metal-support interaction strengths. As a consequence, the reducibility and other surface properties changed as a function of the preparation method. The aim of this work was to study the interaction between the metal precursor and the alumina surface by means of FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) and FT-IR/PAS (FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy).

  8. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING AIR SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.13)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method for extracting and preparing indoor and outdoor air samples for analysis of polar persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the preparation of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  9. Fractional Factorial Design of MALDI-TOF-MS Sample Preparations for the Optimized Detection of Phospholipids and Acylglycerols.

    PubMed

    AlMasoud, Najla; Correa, Elon; Trivedi, Drupad K; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-06-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has successfully been used for the analysis of high molecular weight compounds, such as proteins and nucleic acids. By contrast, analysis of low molecular weight compounds with this technique has been less successful due to interference from matrix peaks which have a similar mass to the target analyte(s). Recently, a variety of modified matrices and matrix additives have been used to overcome these limitations. An increased interest in lipid analysis arose from the feasibility of correlating these components with many diseases, e.g. atherosclerosis and metabolic dysfunctions. Lipids have a wide range of chemical properties making their analysis difficult with traditional methods. MALDI-TOF-MS shows excellent potential for sensitive and rapid analysis of lipids, and therefore this study focuses on computational-analytical optimization of the analysis of five lipids (4 phospholipids and 1 acylglycerol) in complex mixtures using MALDI-TOF-MS with fractional factorial design (FFD) and Pareto optimality. Five different experimental factors were investigated using FFD which reduced the number of experiments performed by identifying 720 key experiments from a total of 8064 possible analyses. Factors investigated included the following: matrices, matrix preparations, matrix additives, additive concentrations, and deposition methods. This led to a significant reduction in time and cost of sample analysis with near optimal conditions. We discovered that the key factors used to produce high quality spectra were the matrix and use of appropriate matrix additives. PMID:27228355

  10. Incorporation of Mevalonic Acid into Ribosylzeatin in Tobacco Callus Ribonucleic Acid Preparations 1

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Norimoto; Armstrong, Donald J.; Skoog, Folke

    1975-01-01

    The incorporation of 14C-2-mevalonic acid into transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA (high molecular weight RNA) in rapidly growing, cytokinin-dependent tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Wisconsin No. 38) callus cultures has been investigated. Approximately 40% of the label incorporated into transfer RNA was present in a ribonucleoside with chromatographic properties identical to those of cis-ribosylzeatin. The remainder of the label in the transfer RNA appears to be nonspecific incorporation resulting from degradation and metabolism of 14C-2-mevalonic acid by the tobacco callus tissue. Although the total radioactivity incorporated into ribosomal RNA was roughly the same as in transfer RNA, the specific radioactivity of the transfer RNA was about four times higher than that of the ribosomal RNA, and the ribosomal RNA labeling could be distinguished from the cytokinin labeling observed in transfer RNA. The distributions of the 14C-2-mevalonic acid label and cytokinin activity in tobacco callus transfer RNA fractionated by benzoylated diethylaminoethylcellulose chromatography indicate that at least two cytokinin-containing transfer RNA species are present in this tissue. PMID:16659180

  11. Preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers using theanine as dummy template and its application as SPE sorbent for the determination of eighteen amino acids in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengling; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Lijun; Tan, Lanlan; Feng, Guanglin; Liu, Shaomin; Dai, Ya; Wang, Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel dummy template molecularly imprinted polymer (DMIP) based on a vinyl-SiO2 microspheres surface for the simultaneous selective recognition and enrichment of 18 amino acids was prepared via a surface molecular imprinting technique using theanine as a dummy template. Compared to the imprinted polymers prepared using traditional polymerization techniques, the obtained DMIPs exhibited a regular spherical shape and were relatively monodisperse. The maximal sorption capacity (Qmax) of the resulting DMIPs for the 18 amino acids was up to 1444.3 mg g(-1). A kinetic binding study showed that the sorption capacity reached 85.40% of Qmax in 25 min and sorption equilibrium at 30 min. The imprint factors of the sorbents ranged from 2.86 to 6.9 for the 18 amino acids, which indicated that the DMIP sorbents have high selectivity. An HPLC-UV method for the simultaneous determination of 18 amino acids in tobacco and tobacco smoke was developed using the DMIPs as sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE) in the sample pretreatment procedure. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the materials had enrichment factors of up to 200 for the amino acids, and the recoveries of the 18 amino acids in tobacco smoke were in the range from 79% to 104% with relative standard deviations of less than 7.4%. It indicated that the obtained DMIP sorbents could specifically recognize the amino acids from complicated samples.

  12. Surface-Mediated Nucleic Acid Delivery by Lipoplexes Prepared in Microwell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun; Terp, Megan Cavanaugh; Kwak, Kwang Joo; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P.; Lee, L. James

    2014-01-01

    Many delivery methods have been developed to improve the therapeutic efficacy and facilitate the clinical translation of nucleic acid-based therapeutics. A facile surface-mediated nucleic acid delivery by lipoplexes is prepared in a microwell array, which combines the advantages of lipoplexes as an efficient carrier system, surface-mediated delivery, and the control of surface topography. Uniform disc-like lipoplexes containing nucleic acids are formed in the microwell array with a diameter of ~ 818 nm and thickness of ~ 195 nm. The microwell array-mediated delivery of lipoplexes containing FAM-oligodeoxynucleotides is ~ 18.6 and ~ 10.6 times more efficient than the conventional transfection method in an adherent cell line (A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells) and a suspension cell line (KG-1a acute myelogenous leukemia cells), respectively. MicroRNA-29b is then used as a model nucleic acid to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of lipoplexes delivered by the microwell array. Compared to conventional transfection methods, the effective therapeutic dosage of microRNA-29b is reduced from the microgram level to the nanogram level by lipoplexes prepared in the microwell array. The microwell array is also a very flexible platform. Both nucleic acid therapeutics and imaging reagents are incorporated in lipoplexes and successfully delivered to A549 cells, demonstrating its potential applications in theranostic medicine. PMID:23471869

  13. Boronic Acid functionalized core-shell polymer nanoparticles prepared by distillation precipitation polymerization for glycopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyan; Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-07-16

    The boronic acid-functionalized core-shell polymer nanoparticles, poly(N,N-methylenebisacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)@4-vinylphenylboronic acid (poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA), were successfully synthesized for enriching glycosylated peptides. Such nanoparticles were composed of a hydrophilic polymer core prepared by distillation precipitation polymerization (DPP) and a boronic acid-functionalized shell designed for capturing glycopeptides. Owing to the relatively large amount of residual vinyl groups introduced by DPP on the core surface, the VPBA monomer was coated with high efficiency, working as the shell. Moreover, the overall polymerization route, especially the use of DPP, made the synthesis of nanoparticles facile and time-saving. With the poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA nanoparticles, 18 glycopeptides from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) digest were captured and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis, relative to eight glycopeptides enriched by using commercially available meta-aminophenylboronic acid agarose under the same conditions. When the concentration of the HRP digest was decreased to as low as 5 nmol, glycopeptides could still be selectively isolated by the prepared nanoparticles. Our results demonstrated that the synthetic poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA nanoparticles might be a promising selective enrichment material for glycoproteome analysis. PMID:22707097

  14. Preparation of κ-carra-oligosaccharides with microwave assisted acid hydrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangsheng; Zhao, Xia; Lv, Youjing; Li, Miaomiao; Yu, Guangli

    2015-04-01

    A rapid method of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was established to prepare κ-carra-oligosaccharides. The optimal hydrolysis condition was determined by an orthogonal test. The degree of polymerization (DP) of oligosaccharides was detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considering the results of HPTLC and PAGE, the optimum condition of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was determined. The concentration of κ-carrageenan was 5 mg mL-1; the reaction solution was adjusted to pH 3 with diluted hydrochloric acid; the solution was hydrolyzed under microwave irradiation at 100 for 15 °C min. Oligosaccharides were separated by a Superdex 30 column (2.6 cm × 90 cm) using AKTA Purifier UPC100 and detected with an online refractive index detector. Each fraction was characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The data showed that odd-numbered κ-carra-oligosaccharides with DP ranging from 3 to 21 could be obtained with this method, and the structures of the oligosaccharides were consistent with those obtained by traditional mild acid hydrolysis. The new method was more convenient, efficient and environment-friendly than traditional mild acid hydrolysis. Our results provided a useful reference for the preparation of oligosaccharides from other polysaccharides.

  15. Preparation of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers from natural rubber vulcanizates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonsawat, Worapong; Poompradub, Sirilux; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a series of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers were prepared by aqueous phase oxidation of natural rubber vulcanizates in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and formic acid (HCOOH). The starting vulcanizates were neatly prepared via an efficient vulcanization (EV) system by varying mass ratio of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), as an accelerator, to sulfur. The oxidation conditions were controlled at the molar ratio of H2O2: HCOOH = 1:1, the concentration of H2O2 = 15 wt.%, the temperature = 50 °C, and the reaction time = 3 h. The rubber materials before and after the oxidation were characterized for their physicochemical properties by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, bomb calorimetry, acid-base titration and swelling measurements. The results indicated the presence of sulfonic acid group in the oxidized rubbers, generated by the oxidative cleaves of sulfide crosslinks in the rubber vulcanizates. The oxidation decreased the sulfur content of the rubber in which the level of sulfur loss was determined by the CBS/sulfur ratio. Moreover, the acidity of the oxidized products was correlated with the amount of sulfur remaining.

  16. Surface-mediated nucleic acid delivery by lipoplexes prepared in microwell arrays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Terp, Megan Cavanaugh; Kwak, Kwang Joo; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P; Lee, L James

    2013-07-01

    Many delivery methods have been developed to improve the therapeutic efficacy and facilitate the clinical translation of nucleic acid-based therapeutics. A facile surface-mediated nucleic acid delivery by lipoplexes is prepared in a microwell array, which combines the advantages of lipoplexes as an efficient carrier system, surface-mediated delivery, and the control of surface topography. Uniform disc-like lipoplexes containing nucleic acids are formed in the microwell array with a diameter of ∼818 nm and thickness of ∼195 nm. The microwell array-mediated delivery of lipoplexes containing FAM-oligodeoxynucleotides is ∼18.6 and ∼10.6 times more efficient than the conventional transfection method in an adherent cell line (A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells) and a suspension cell line (KG-1a acute myelogenous leukemia cells), respectively. MicroRNA-29b is then used as a model nucleic acid to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of lipoplexes delivered by the microwell array. Compared to conventional transfection methods, the effective therapeutic dosage of microRNA-29b is reduced from the microgram level to the nanogram level by lipoplexes prepared in the microwell array. The microwell array is also a very flexible platform. Both nucleic acid therapeutics and imaging reagents are incorporated in lipoplexes and successfully delivered to A549 cells, demonstrating its potential applications in theranostic medicine.

  17. High-Throughput Serum 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Testing with Automated Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Serum from bar-coded tubes, and then internal standard, are pipetted to 96-well plates with an 8-channel automated liquid handler (ALH). The first precipitation reagent (methanol:ZnSO4) is added and mixed with the 8-channel ALH. A second protein precipitating agent, 1 % formic acid in acetonitrile, is added and mixed with a 96-channel ALH. After a 4-min delay for larger precipitates to settle to the bottom of the plate, the upper 36 % of the precipitate/supernatant mix is transferred with the 96-channel ALH to a Sigma Hybrid SPE(®) plate and vacuumed through for removal of phospholipids and precipitated proteins. The filtrate is collected in a second 96-well plate (collection plate) which is foil-sealed, placed in the autosampler (ALS), and injected into a multiplexed LC-MS/MS system running AB Sciex Cliquid(®) and MPX(®) software. Two Shimadzu LC stacks, with multiplex timing controlled by MPX(®) software, inject alternately to one AB Sciex API-5000 MS/MS using positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and a 1.87 min water/acetonitrile LC gradient with a 2.1 × 20 mm, 2.7 μm, C18 fused core particle column (Sigma Ascentis Express). LC-MS/MS through put is ~44 samples/h/LC-MS/MS system with dual-LC channel multiplexing. Plate maps are transferred electronically from the ALH and reformatted into LC-MS/MS sample table format using the Data Innovations LLC (DI) Instrument Manager middleware application. Before collection plates are loaded into the ALS, the plate bar code is manually scanned to download the sample table from the DI middleware to the LC-MS/MS. After acquisition-LC-MS/MS data is analyzed with AB Sciex Multiquant(®) software using customized queries, and then results are transferred electronically via a DI interface to the LIS. 2500 samples/day can be extracted by two analysts using four ALHs in 4-6 h. LC-MS/MS analysis of those samples on three dual-channel LC multiplexed LC-MS/MS systems requires 19-21 h and data analysis can be

  18. Solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction: A sample preparation method for trace detection of diazinon in urine and environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Aladaghlo, Zolfaghar; Fakhari, Alireza; Behbahani, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    In this research, a sample preparation method termed solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction (SA-DSPE) was applied. The used sample preparation method was based on the dispersion of the sorbent into the aqueous sample to maximize the interaction surface. In this approach, the dispersion of the sorbent at a very low milligram level was received by inserting a solution of the sorbent and disperser solvent into the aqueous sample. The cloudy solution created from the dispersion of the sorbent in the bulk aqueous sample. After pre-concentration of the diazinon, the cloudy solution was centrifuged and diazinon in the sediment phase dissolved in ethanol and determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Under the optimized conditions (pH of solution=7.0, Sorbent: benzophenone, 2%, Disperser solvent: ethanol, 500μL, Centrifuge: centrifuged at 4000rpm for 3min), the method detection limit for diazinon was 0.2, 0.3, 0.3 and 0.3μgL(-1) for distilled water, lake water, waste water and urine sample, respectively. Furthermore, the pre-concentration factor was 363.8, 356.1, 360.7 and 353.38 in distilled water, waste water, lake water and urine sample, respectively. SA-DSPE was successfully used for trace monitoring of diazinon in urine, lake and waste water samples. PMID:27495366

  19. Polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid for bowel preparation in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Keum, Bora; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Kim, Myung Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The safety of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid has not been fully investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. High-dose ascorbic acid could induce hyperoxaluria, thereby causing tubule-interstitial nephritis and renal failure. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid in patients with chronic kidney disease. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data on colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (n = 61) and 4 L polyethylene glycol (n = 80). The safety of the 2 groups was compared by assessing the differences in laboratory findings before and after bowel cleansing. The laboratory findings were not significantly different before and after the administration of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 4 L polyethylene glycol. In both groups, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was not influenced by the administration of the bowel-cleansing agent. Patients’ reports on tolerance and acceptability were better in the 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid group than in the 4 L polyethylene glycol group. The 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid solution is a safe choice for bowel preparation before colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:27603372

  20. [Preparation and antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone-bile acids salts].

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Ruan, Han-Li; Pi, Hui-Fang; Chen, Chang; Wu, Ji-Zhou

    2007-03-01

    To search for potential drugs with potent antitussive, expectorant, antiasthmatic activities and low toxicity, a series of verticinone-bile acids salts were prepared based on the clearly elucidated antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of verticinone in bulbs of Fritillaria and different bile acids in Snake Bile. The antitussive, expectorant and antiasthmatic activities of these verticinone-bile acid salts were then screened with different animal models. Ver-CA (verticinone-cholic acid salt) and Ver-CDCA (verticinone-chenodeoxycholic acid salt) showed much more potent activities than other compounds. The bioactivities of Ver-CA and Ver-CDCA are worthy to be intensively studied, and it is also deserved to pay much attention to their much more potent antitussive effects than codeine phosphate. In order to elucidate whether they have synergistic effect and attenuated toxicity, their activities will be continuously compared with single verticinone, cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid at the same doses on different animal models. The application of "combination principles" in traditional Chinese medicinal formulations may be a novel way in triditional Chinese medicine research and discovery.