Science.gov

Sample records for acid secondary structures

  1. Cystatin. Amino acid sequence and possible secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, C; Anastasi, A; Crow, H; McDonald, J K; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of cystatin, the protein from chicken egg-white that is a tight-binding inhibitor of many cysteine proteinases, is reported. Cystatin is composed of 116 amino acid residues, and the Mr is calculated to be 13 143. No striking similarity to any other known sequence has been detected. The results of computer analysis of the sequence and c.d. spectrometry indicate that the secondary structure includes relatively little alpha-helix (about 20%) and that the remainder is mainly beta-structure. PMID:6712597

  2. Generating non-overlapping displays of nucleic acid secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, B A; Maizel, J; Lipkin, L E; Currey, K; Whitney, C

    1984-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented which permits the display of nucleic acid secondary structure by computer. This algorithm circumvents the problem of overlapping portions of the molecule which is inherent in some other drawing programs. The results from this algorithm may also be used as input to the drawing algorithm previously reported in this journal [1] to untangle most of a drawing. The algorithm also represents the molecule in a form which makes visual comparisons for similarity quite easy since it guarantees that comparable features will reside in the same relative position in the drawings when the drawings are normalized. PMID:6694904

  3. Predicting Secondary Structural Folding Kinetics for Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peinan; Zhang, Wen-Bing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We report a new computational approach to the prediction of RNA secondary structure folding kinetics. In this approach, each elementary kinetic step is represented as the transformation between two secondary structures that differ by a helix. Based on the free energy landscape analysis, we identify three types of dominant pathways and the rate constants for the kinetic steps: 1), formation; 2), disruption of a helix stem; and 3), helix formation with concomitant partial melting of a competing (incompatible) helix. The third pathway, termed the tunneling pathway, is the low-barrier dominant pathway for the conversion between two incompatible helices. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that this new method is quite reliable in predicting the kinetics for RNA secondary structural folding and structural rearrangements. The approach presented here may provide a robust first step for further systematic development of a predictive theory for the folding kinetics for large RNAs. PMID:20409482

  4. NIAS-Server: Neighbors Influence of Amino acids and Secondary Structures in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Borguesan, Bruno; Inostroza-Ponta, Mario; Dorn, Márcio

    2017-03-01

    The exponential growth in the number of experimentally determined three-dimensional protein structures provide a new and relevant knowledge about the conformation of amino acids in proteins. Only a few of probability densities of amino acids are publicly available for use in structure validation and prediction methods. NIAS (Neighbors Influence of Amino acids and Secondary structures) is a web-based tool used to extract information about conformational preferences of amino acid residues and secondary structures in experimental-determined protein templates. This information is useful, for example, to characterize folds and local motifs in proteins, molecular folding, and can help the solution of complex problems such as protein structure prediction, protein design, among others. The NIAS-Server and supplementary data are available at http://sbcb.inf.ufrgs.br/nias .

  5. An interactive technique for the display of nucleic acid secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, B A; Lipkin, L E; Maizel, J

    1982-01-01

    The ability to visualize nucleic acid secondary structure has become quite important since the advent of computer prediction and biochemical techniques that depict such structures. Manually drawing the conformations can be quite time consuming and tedious. Thus, the ability to draw with the aid of a computer the secondary structure of nucleic acid molecules is quite advantageous. This paper describes an interactive algorithm that permits one to generate such drawings which may then be used for further analysis and/or publications. PMID:7177857

  6. Cotranscriptional folding kinetics of ribonucleic acid secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peinan; Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-12-01

    We develop a systematic helix-based computational method to predict RNA folding kinetics during transcription. In our method, the transcription is modeled as stepwise process, where each step is the transcription of a nucleotide. For each step, the kinetics algorithm predicts the population kinetics, transition pathways, folding intermediates, and the transcriptional folding products. The folding pathways, rate constants, and the conformational populations for cotranscription folding show contrastingly different features than the refolding kinetics for a fully transcribed chain. The competition between the transcription speed and rate constants for the transitions between the different nascent structures determines the RNA folding pathway and the end product of folding. For example, fast transcription favors the formation of branch-like structures than rod-like structures and chain elongation in the folding process may reduce the probability of the formation of misfolded structures. Furthermore, good theory-experiment agreements suggest that our method may provide a reliable tool for quantitative prediction for cotranscriptional RNA folding, including the kinetics for the population distribution for the whole conformational ensemble.

  7. Mass & secondary structure propensity of amino acids explain their mutability and evolutionary replacements.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Hugo J; Suárez, Carlos F; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2017-08-10

    Why is an amino acid replacement in a protein accepted during evolution? The answer given by bioinformatics relies on the frequency of change of each amino acid by another one and the propensity of each to remain unchanged. We propose that these replacement rules are recoverable from the secondary structural trends of amino acids. A distance measure between high-resolution Ramachandran distributions reveals that structurally similar residues coincide with those found in substitution matrices such as BLOSUM: Asn ↔ Asp, P™he ↔ Tyr, Lys ↔ Arg, Gln ↔ Glu, Ile ↔ Val, Met → Leu; with Ala, Cys, His, Gly, Ser, Pro, and Thr, as structurally idiosyncratic residues. We also found a high average correlation ([Formula: see text] = 0.85) between thirty amino acid mutability scales and the mutational inertia (I X ), which measures the energetic cost weighted by the number of observations at the most probable amino acid conformation. These results indicate that amino acid substitutions follow two optimally-efficient principles: (a) amino acids interchangeability privileges their secondary structural similarity, and (b) the amino acid mutability depends directly on its biosynthetic energy cost, and inversely with its frequency. These two principles are the underlying rules governing the observed amino acid substitutions.

  8. PreSSAPro: a software for the prediction of secondary structure by amino acid properties.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Facchiano, Angelo M

    2007-10-01

    PreSSAPro is a software, available to the scientific community as a free web service designed to provide predictions of secondary structures starting from the amino acid sequence of a given protein. Predictions are based on our recently published work on the amino acid propensities for secondary structures in either large but not homogeneous protein data sets, as well as in smaller but homogeneous data sets corresponding to protein structural classes, i.e. all-alpha, all-beta, or alpha-beta proteins. Predictions result improved by the use of propensities evaluated for the right protein class. PreSSAPro predicts the secondary structure according to the right protein class, if known, or gives a multiple prediction with reference to the different structural classes. The comparison of these predictions represents a novel tool to evaluate what sequence regions can assume different secondary structures depending on the structural class assignment, in the perspective of identifying proteins able to fold in different conformations. The service is available at the URL http://bioinformatica.isa.cnr.it/PRESSAPRO/.

  9. NASP: a parallel program for identifying evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid secondary structures from nucleotide sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Semegni, J Y; Wamalwa, M; Gaujoux, R; Harkins, G W; Gray, A; Martin, D P

    2011-09-01

    Many natural nucleic acid sequences have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures with diverse biological functions. A reliable computational tool for identifying such structures would be very useful in guiding experimental analyses of their biological functions. NASP (Nucleic Acid Structure Predictor) is a program that takes into account thermodynamic stability, Boltzmann base pair probabilities, alignment uncertainty, covarying sites and evolutionary conservation to identify biologically relevant secondary structures within multiple sequence alignments. Unique to NASP is the consideration of all this information together with a recursive permutation-based approach to progressively identify and list the most conserved probable secondary structures that are likely to have the greatest biological relevance. By focusing on identifying only evolutionarily conserved structures, NASP forgoes the prediction of complete nucleotide folds but outperforms various other secondary structure prediction methods in its ability to selectively identify actual base pairings. Downloable and web-based versions of NASP are freely available at http://web.cbio.uct.ac.za/~yves/nasp_portal.php yves@cbio.uct.ac.za Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  11. Shark myelin basic protein: amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and self-association.

    PubMed

    Milne, T J; Atkins, A R; Warren, J A; Auton, W P; Smith, R

    1990-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) from the Whaler shark (Carcharhinus obscurus) has been purified from acid extracts of a chloroform/methanol pellet from whole brains. The amino acid sequence of the majority of the protein has been determined and compared with the sequences of other MBPs. The shark protein has only 44% homology with the bovine protein, but, in common with other MBPs, it has basic residues distributed throughout the sequence and no extensive segments that are predicted to have an ordered secondary structure in solution. Shark MBP lacks the triproline sequence previously postulated to form a hairpin bend in the molecule. The region containing the putative consensus sequence for encephalitogenicity in the guinea pig contains several substitutions, thus accounting for the lack of activity of the shark protein. Studies of the secondary structure and self-association have shown that shark MBP possesses solution properties similar to those of the bovine protein, despite the extensive differences in primary structure.

  12. Protein packing: dependence on protein size, secondary structure and amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fleming, P J; Richards, F M

    2000-06-02

    We have used the occluded surface algorithm to estimate the packing of both buried and exposed amino acid residues in protein structures. This method works equally well for buried residues and solvent-exposed residues in contrast to the commonly used Voronoi method that works directly only on buried residues. The atomic packing of individual globular proteins may vary significantly from the average packing of a large data set of globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that these variations in protein packing are due to a complex combination of protein size, secondary structure composition and amino acid composition. Differences in protein packing are conserved in protein families of similar structure despite significant sequence differences. This conclusion indicates that quality assessments of packing in protein structures should include a consideration of various parameters including the packing of known homologous proteins. Also, modeling of protein structures based on homologous templates should take into account the packing of the template protein structure.

  13. Structure and Functional Characterization of a Bile Acid 7α Dehydratase BaiE in Secondary Bile Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D.; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L.; Ridlon, Jason M.; Wells, James E.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, we report crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound (3-oxo-Δ4,6- lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)) complex. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α+β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35 and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirmed that these residues are essential for catalysis and also confirmed the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady state kinetic studies revealed that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  14. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-01-01

    Poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Some recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. Our paper characterizes the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. Finally, when probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure.

  15. Special interaction of anionic phosphatidic acid promotes high secondary structure in tetrameric potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Raja, Mobeen

    2014-08-01

    Anionic phosphatidic acid (PA) has been shown to stabilize and bind stronger than phosphatidylglycerol via electrostatic and hydrogen bond interaction with the positively charged residues of potassium channel KcsA. However, the effects of these lipids on KcsA folding or secondary structure are not clear. In this study, the secondary structure analyses of KcsA potassium channel was carried out using circular dichroism spectroscopy. It was found that PA interaction leads to increases in α-helical and β-sheet content of KcsA protein. In PA, KcsA α-helical structure was further stabilized by classical membrane-active cosolvent trifluoroethanol followed by reduction in the β-sheet content indicating cooperative transformation from the β-sheet to an α-helical structure. The data further uncover the role of anionic PA in KcsA folding and provide mechanism by which strong hydrogen bonds/electrostatic interaction among PA headgroup and basic residues on lipid binding domains may induce high helical structure thereby altering the protein folding and increasing the stability of tetrameric assembly.

  16. Secondary structure of nucleic acids in the folded chromosome from E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Baase, W A; Johnson, W C

    1976-01-01

    The circular dichroism of membrane-free folded chromosomes from E. coli was measured and analyzed. The spectrum can be explained as a simple linear combination of the individual spectra of E. coli RNA, and E. Coli DNA in the B form. No contribution from A form or C form DNA was detected. There was evidently some real variation in the ratio of the two nucleic acids from preparation to preparation, but the average value was 24% RNA and 76% DNA. No significant light scattering was observed and the analyses indicated no contribution to the circular dichroism from scattering artifacts. Apparently, combining DNA, RNA, and protein into membrane-free folded chromosomes does not change the secondary structure of the DNA or RNA from that found for the free nucleic acid in the same solvent system. PMID:794834

  17. Relation between the secondary structure of carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and the fluorescence of the protein.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad R

    2003-05-01

    We studied in this work the relation that exists between the secondary structure of the glycans of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and the fluorescence of the Trp residues of the protein. We calculated for that the efficiency of quenching and the radiative and non-radiative constants. Our results indicate that the glycans display a spatial structure that is modified upon asialylation. The asialylated conformation is closer to the protein matrix than the sialylated form, inducing by that a decrease in the fluorescence parameters of the Trp residues. In fact, the mean quantum yield of Trp residues in sialylated and asialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein are 0.0645 and 0.0385, respectively. Analysis of the fluorescence emission of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein as the result of two contributions (surface and hydrophobic domains) indicates that quantum yields of both classes of Trp residues are lower when the protein is in the asialylated form. Also, the mean fluorescence lifetime of Trp residues decreases from 2.285 ns in the sialylated protein to 1.948 ns in the asialylated one. The radiative rate constant k(r) of the Trp residues in the sialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein is higher than that in the asialylated protein. Thus, the carbohydrate residues are closer to the Trp residues in the absence of sialic acid. The modification of the spatial conformation of the glycans upon asialylation is confirmed by the decrease of the fluorescence lifetimes of Calcofluor, a fluorophore that binds to the carbohydrate residues. Finally, thermal intensity quenching of Calcofluor bound to alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein shows that the carbohydrate residues have slower residual motions in the absence of sialic acid residues.

  18. Amino acid composition analysis of secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli with relation to functional classification, ligand specificity and structure.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, Massoud; Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    We have performed an amino acid composition (AAC) analysis of the complete sequences for 235 secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli, which have functions in the uptake and export of organic and inorganic metabolites, efflux of drugs and in controlling membrane potential. This revealed the trends in content for specific amino acid types and for combinations of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties. In certain proteins or groups of proteins, the so-called spikes of high content for a specific amino acid type or combination of amino acids were identified and confirmed statistically, which in some cases could be directly related to function and ligand specificity. This was prevalent in proteins with a function of multidrug or metal ion efflux. Any tool that can help in identifying bacterial multidrug efflux proteins is important for a better understanding of this mechanism of antibiotic resistance. Phylogenetic analysis based on sequence alignments and comparison of sequences at the N- and C-terminal ends confirmed transporter Family classification. Locations of specific amino acid types in some of the proteins that have crystal structures (EmrE, LacY, AcrB) were also considered to help link amino acid content with protein function. Though there are limitations, this work has demonstrated that a basic analysis of AAC is a useful tool to use in combination with other computational and experimental methods for classifying and investigating function and ligand specificity in a large group of transport or other membrane proteins, including those that are molecular targets for development of new drugs.

  19. Palingol: a declarative programming language to describe nucleic acids' secondary structures and to scan sequence database.

    PubMed Central

    Billoud, B; Kontic, M; Viari, A

    1996-01-01

    At the DNA/RNA level, biological signals are defined by a combination of spatial structures and sequence motifs. Until now, few attempts had been made in writing general purpose search programs that take into account both sequence and structure criteria. Indeed, the most successful structure scanning programs are usually dedicated to particular structures and are written using general purpose programming languages through a complex and time consuming process where the biological problem of defining the structure and the computer engineering problem of looking for it are intimately intertwined. In this paper, we describe a general representation of structures, suitable for database scanning, together with a programming language, Palingol, designed to manipulate it. Palingol has specific data types, corresponding to structural elements-basically helices-that can be arranged in any way to form a complex structure. As a consequence of the declarative approach used in Palingol, the user should only focus on 'what to search for' while the language engine takes care of 'how to look for it'. Therefore, it becomes simpler to write a scanning program and the structural constraints that define the required structure are more clearly identified. PMID:8628670

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of BaiA, An Enzyme Involved in Secondary Bile Acid Synthesis in Human Gut Microbe

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Jones, David H.; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Park, In-Hee; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Farr, Carol L.; Tien, Henry J.; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Lesley, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant influence of secondary bile acids on human health and disease, limited structural and biochemical information is available for the key gut microbial enzymes catalyzing its synthesis. Herein, we report apo- and co-factor bound crystal structures of BaiA2, a short chain dehydrogenase/reductase from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 that represent the first protein structure of this pathway. The structures elucidated the basis of co-factor specificity and mechanism of proton relay. A conformational restriction involving Glu42 located in the co-factor binding site seems crucial in determining co-factor specificity. Limited flexibility of Glu42 results in imminent steric and electrostatic hindrance with 2′-phosphate group of NADP(H). Consistent with crystal structures, steady-state kinetic characterization performed with both BaiA2 and BaiA1, a close homolog with 92% sequence identity, revealed specificity constant (kcat/KM) of NADP+ at least an order of magnitude lower than NAD+. Substitution of Glu42 with Ala improved specificity towards NADP+ by 10- fold compared to wild type. The co-factor bound structure uncovered a novel nicotinamide-hydroxyl ion (NAD+-OH−) adduct contraposing previously reported adducts. The OH− of the adduct in BaiA2 is distal to C4 atom of nicotinamide and proximal to 2′-hydroxyl group of the ribose moiety. Moreover, it is located at intermediary distances between terminal functional groups of active site residues Tyr157 (2.7 Å) and Lys161 (4.5 Å). Based on these observations we propose an involvement of NAD+-OH− adduct in proton relay instead of hydride transfer as noted for previous adducts. PMID:23836456

  1. Impact of size, secondary structure, and counterions on the binding of small ribonucleic acids to layered double hydroxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Blanca V; Pescador, Jorge; Pollok, Nicole; Beall, Gary W; Maeder, Corina; Lewis, L Kevin

    2015-12-30

    Use of ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference to regulate protein expression has become an important research topic and gene therapy tool, and therefore, finding suitable vehicles for delivery of small RNAs into cells is of crucial importance. Layered double metal hydroxides such as hydrotalcite (HT) have shown great promise as nonviral vectors for transport of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA), proteins, and drugs into cells, but the adsorption of RNAs to these materials has been little explored. In this study, the binding of small RNAs with different lengths and levels of secondary structure to HT nanoparticles has been analyzed and compared to results obtained with small DNAs in concurrent experiments. Initial experiments established the spectrophotometric properties of HT in aqueous solutions and determined that HT particles could be readily sedimented with near 100% efficiencies. Use of RNA+HT cosedimentation experiments as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated strong adsorption of RNA 25mers to HT, with twofold greater binding of single-stranded RNAs relative to double-stranded molecules. Strong affinities were also observed with ssRNA and dsRNA 54mers and with more complex transfer RNA molecules. Competition binding and RNA displacement experiments indicated that RNA-HT associations were strong and were only modestly affected by the presence of high concentrations of inorganic anions.

  2. The Role of the Local Conformation of a Cyclically Constrained β-AMINO Acid in the Secondary Structures of a Mixed α/β Diastereomer Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Karl N.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    Synthetic foldamers are non-natural polymers designed to fold into unique secondary structures that either mimic nature's preferred secondary structures, or expand their possibilities. Among the most studied synthetic foldamers are β-peptides, which lengthen the distance between amide groups from the single substituted carbon spacer in α-peptides by one (β) additional carbon. Cyclically constrained β-amino acids can impart rigidity to the secondary structure of oligomers by locking in a particular conformation. The β-residue cis-2-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid (cis-ACHC) is one such amino acid which has been shown to drive vastly different secondary structures as a function of the local conformation of the cyclohexane ring. We present data on two diastereomers of the mixed α/β tri-peptide Ac-Ala-β_{ACHC}-Ala-NHBn which differ from one another by the chirality along the ACHC residue (SRSS vs. SSRS). The first oligomer is known to crystallize to a 9/11 mixed helix while the second forms no intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the crystal state. This talk will describe the conformation-specific IR and UV spectroscopy of the above two diastereomers under jet cooled conditions in the gas phase. Assignments based on comparison with calculations show the presence of incipient 9/11 mixed helices and competing structures containing more tightly folded hydrogen-bonded networks. The calculated global minimum structures are observed in each case, and in each case these folded structures are reminiscent of a β-turn.

  3. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsching, K. J.; Yang, Y.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of 13C and 15N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D 13C–13C, 15N–13C, or 3D 15N–13C–13C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D 13C–13C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40–60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO–Cα–Cβ or N–Cα–Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination. PMID:23625364

  4. Alignment editing and identification of consensus secondary structures for nucleic acid sequences: interactive use of dot matrix representations.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J P; Janjić, N; Pribnow, D; Zichi, D A

    1995-01-01

    We present a computer-aided approach for identifying and aligning consensus secondary structure within a set of functionally related oligonucleotide sequences aligned by sequence. The method relies on visualization of secondary structure using a generalization of the dot matrix representation appropriate for consensus sequence data sets. An interactive computer program implementing such a visualization of consensus structure has been developed. The program allows for alignment editing, data and display filtering and various modes of base pair representation, including co-variation. The utility of this approach is demonstrated with four sample data sets derived from in vitro selection experiments and one data set comprising tRNA sequences. Images PMID:7501472

  5. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, Michael C; Nesbitt, Anna E; Hallock, Michael J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa; Tang, Ming; Harris, Jason B; Baudry, Jerome Y; Schuler, Mary A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  6. An algebraic representation of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Magarshak, Y; Benham, C J

    1992-12-01

    This paper develops mathematical methods for describing and analyzing RNA secondary structures. It was motivated by the need to develop rigorous yet efficient methods to treat transitions from one secondary structure to another, which we propose here may occur as motions of loops within RNAs having appropriate sequences. In this approach a molecular sequence is described as a vector of the appropriate length. The concept of symmetries between nucleic acid sequences is developed, and the 48 possible different types of symmetries are described. Each secondary structure possible for a particular nucleotide sequence determines a symmetric, signed permutation matrix. The collection of all possible secondary structures is comprised of all matrices of this type whose left multiplication with the sequence vector leaves that vector unchanged. A transition between two secondary structures is given by the product of the two corresponding structure matrices. This formalism provides an efficient method for describing nucleic acid sequences that allows questions relating to secondary structures and transitions to be addressed using the powerful methods of abstract algebra. In particular, it facilitates the determination of possible secondary structures, including those containing pseudoknots. Although this paper concentrates on RNA structure, this formalism also can be applied to DNA.

  7. Determinants of protein hyperthermostability: Purification and amino acid sequence of rubredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus and secondary structure of the zinc adduct by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, P.R.; Summers, M.F. ); Park, J.B.; Bryant, F.O.; Aono, Shigetoshi; Adams, M.W.W. ); Magnuson, J.K.; Eccleston, E.; Howard, J.B. )

    1991-11-12

    The purification, amino acid sequence, and two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR results are reported for the rubredoxin (Rd) from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus, an organism that grows optimally at 100C. The molecular mass (5397 Da), iron content UV-vis spectrophotometric properties, and amino acid sequence are found to be typical of this class of redox protein. However, P. furiosus Rd is remarkably thermostable, being unaffected after incubation for 24 h at 95C. One- and two-dimensional {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the oxidized (Fe(III)Rd) and reduced (Fe(II)Rd) forms of P. furiosus Rd exhibited substantial paramagnetic line broadening, and this precluded detailed 3D structural studies. The apoprotein was not readily amenable to NMR studies due to apparent protein oxidation involving the free cysteine sulfhydryls. Secondary structural elements were determined from qualitative analysis of 2D Overhauser effect spectra. These structural elements are similar to those observed by X-ray crystallography for native Rd from the mesophile C. pasteurianum. From analysis of the secondary structure, potentially stabilizing electrostatic interactions involving the charged groups of residues Ala(1), Glu(14), and Glu(52) are proposed. These interactions, which are not present in rubredoxins from mesophilic organisms, may prevent the {beta}-sheet from unzipping' at elevated temperatures.

  8. Secondary Structure Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  9. Secondary Structure Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  10. Secondary Structures in a Freeze-Dried Lignite Humic Acid Fraction Caused by Hydrogen-Bonding of Acidic Protons with Aromatic Rings.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Drosos, Marios; Leenheer, Jerry A; Mao, Jingdong

    2016-02-16

    A lignite humic acid (HA) was separated from inorganic and non-HA impurities (i.e., aluminosilicates, metals) and fractionated by a combination of dialysis and XAD-8 resin. Fractionation revealed a more homogeneous structure of lignite HA. New and more specific structural information on the main lignite HA fraction is obtained by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Quantitative (13)C multiple cross-polarization (multiCP) NMR indicated oxidized phenyl propane structures derived from lignin. MultiCP experiments, conducted on potassium HA salts titrated to pH 10 and pH 12, revealed shifts consistent with carboxylate and phenolate formation, but structural changes associated with enolate formation from aromatic beta keto acids were not detected. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (2D HETCOR) NMR indicated aryl-aliphatic ketones, aliphatic and aromatic carboxyl groups, phenol, and methoxy phenyl ethers. Acidic protons from carboxyl groups in both the lignite HA fraction and a synthetic HA-like polycondensate were found to be hydrogen-bonded with electron-rich aromatic rings. Our results coupled with published infrared spectra provide evidence for the preferential hydrogen bonding of acidic hydrogens with electron-rich aromatic rings rather than adjacent carbonyl groups. These hydrogen-bonding interactions likely result from stereochemical arrangements in primary structures and folding.

  11. The respective roles of polar/nonpolar binary patterns and amino acid composition in protein regular secondary structures explored exhaustively using hydrophobic cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Rebehmed, Joseph; Quintus, Flavien; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have highlighted the leading role of the sequence periodicity of polar and nonpolar amino acids (binary patterns) in the formation of regular secondary structures (RSS). However, these were based on the analysis of only a few simple cases, with no direct mean to correlate binary patterns with the limits of RSS. Here, HCA-derived hydrophobic clusters (HC) which are conditioned binary patterns whose positions fit well those of RSS, were considered. All the HC types, defined by unique binary patterns, which were commonly observed in three-dimensional (3D) structures of globular domains, were analyzed. The 180 HC types with preferences for either α-helices or β-strands distinctly contain basic binary units typical of these RSS. Therefore a general trend supporting the "binary pattern preference" assumption was observed. HC for which observed RSS are in disagreement with their expected behavior (discordant HC) were also examined. They were separated in HC types with moderate preferences for RSS, having "weak" binary patterns and versatile RSS and HC types with high preferences for RSS, having "strong" binary patterns and then displaying nonpolar amino acids at the protein surface. It was shown that in both cases, discordant HC could be distinguished from concordant ones by well-differentiated amino acid compositions. The obtained results could, thus, help to complement the currently available methods for the accurate prediction of secondary structures in proteins from the only information of a single amino acid sequence. This can be especially useful for characterizing orphan sequences and for assisting protein engineering and design. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Secondary structure formation in peptide amphiphile micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are capable of self-assembly into micelles for use in the targeted delivery of peptide therapeutics and diagnostics. PA micelles exhibit a structural resemblance to proteins by having folded bioactive peptides displayed on the exterior of a hydrophobic core. We have studied two factors that influence PA secondary structure in micellar assemblies: the length of the peptide headgroup and amino acids closest to the micelle core. Peptide length was systematically varied using a heptad repeat PA. For all PAs the addition of a C12 tail induced micellization and secondary structure. PAs with 9 amino acids formed beta-sheet interactions upon aggregation, whereas the 23 and 30 residue peptides were displayed in an apha-helical conformation. The 16 amino acid PA experienced a structural transition from helix to sheet, indicating that kinetics play a role in secondary structure formation. A p53 peptide was conjugated to a C16 tail via various linkers to study the effect of linker chemistry on PA headgroup conformation. With no linker the p53 headgroup was predominantly alpha helix and a four alanine linker drastically changed the structure of the peptide headgroup to beta-sheet, highlighting the importance of hydrogen boding potential near the micelle core.

  13. Effect of the secondary structure of carbohydrate residues of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) on the local dynamics of Trp residues.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad René

    2004-01-01

    We studied in this work the relation between the secondary structure of the carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein and the local motions of Trp residues of the protein. We measured for this purpose the fluorescence emission intensity and anisotropy of the Trp residues between -46 and +30 degrees of the sialylated and asialylated protein. Our results indicate that, in both forms, the global profile of the emission intensity with temperature shows that Trp residues display static and collisional interaction with the neighboring amino acids. However, the profile of the asialylated form is more structured than that observed for the sialylated protein. The Y-plot analysis of the emission-anisotropy results indicated that the frictional resistance to rotation of the surface Trp residue is less important in the sialylated protein than in the asialylated form. This result is in good agreement with the fact that, in the asialylated conformation, the carbohydrate residues are closer to the protein surface than in the sialylated form, thereby increasing the contact of the surface Trp residue with the neighboring amino acids. Also, the interaction between the carbohydrate residues and the surface Trp residue contributes to the modification of the frictional resistance to rotation of the fluorophore.

  14. Fatty acid as structure directing agent for controlled secondary growth of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles to achieve mesoscale assemblies: A facile approach for developing hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, K.; Kaushik, S. D.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Deb, P.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale hierarchical assemblies have emerged out as a new class of structures between fine dimension nanoparticles and bulk structures, having distinctly different physical properties from either side. Controlling the self-assembly process of primary nanoparticles and subsequent secondary growth mechanism is the key aspect for achieving such ordered structures. In this work, we introduce a new insight on achieving hierarchical assemblies of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles based on the temporal stability of the primary nanoparticles, where, the growth and stability of the primary particles are controlled by using oleic acid. It is found that the developed particles, at a critical concentration of oleic acid, prefer a secondary growth process, rather than promoting their individual growth. Domination of the attractive hydrophobic interaction over steric repulsion among the primary particles at this critical concentration of oleic acid is found to be the key factor for the initial aggregation of the primary particles, which eventually leads to the formation of spherical hierarchical assemblies via oriented attachment. It is also realized that the extremely well or poor stability conditions of the primary particles do not allow this secondary growth process. Estimated values of Co2+ distribution factor show that the cation distribution factor of CoFe2O4 system is not affected by the nature of dominant growth processes, when these are controlled. Interestingly, magnetic measurements reflect the stronger interparticle interaction in the hierarchical system and high magnetic moment values at low magnetic field.

  15. Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acid residues is more important for proteins encoded by GC-poor genes.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids has been studied by the way of analysis of pentapeptide fragments from twelve partial bacterial proteomes. PDB files describing structures of proteins from species with extremely high and low genomic GC-content, as well as with average G + C were included in the study. Amino acid residues in 78,009 pentapeptides from alpha helices, beta strands and coil regions were classified into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones. The common propensity scale for 32 possible combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues in pentapeptide has been created: specific pentapeptides for helix, sheet and coil were described. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming alpha helices is decreasing in alpha helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the increase of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming beta strands is increasing in coil regions and in helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the growth of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. Due to these circumstances the probability of coil-sheet and helix-sheet transitions should be increased in proteins encoded by GC-rich genes making them prone to form amyloid in certain conditions. Possible causes of the described fact that importance of alpha helix and coil stabilization by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids is growing with the decrease of genomic GC-content have been discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Secondary structure determines protein topology

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Patrick J.; Gong, Haipeng; Rose, George D.

    2006-01-01

    Using a test set of 13 small, compact proteins, we demonstrate that a remarkably simple protocol can capture native topology from secondary structure information alone, in the absence of long-range interactions. It has been a long-standing open question whether such information is sufficient to determine a protein's fold. Indeed, even the far simpler problem of reconstructing the three-dimensional structure of a protein from its exact backbone torsion angles has remained a difficult challenge owing to the small, but cumulative, deviations from ideality in backbone planarity, which, if ignored, cause large errors in structure. As a familiar example, a small change in an elbow angle causes a large displacement at the end of your arm; the longer the arm, the larger the displacement. Here, correct secondary structure assignments (α-helix, β-strand, β-turn, polyproline II, coil) were used to constrain polypeptide backbone chains devoid of side chains, and the most stable folded conformations were determined, using Monte Carlo simulation. Just three terms were used to assess stability: molecular compaction, steric exclusion, and hydrogen bonding. For nine of the 13 proteins, this protocol restricts the main chain to a surprisingly small number of energetically favorable topologies, with the native one prominent among them. PMID:16823044

  17. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  18. Interrelationships among biological activity, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and metal ion binding for a chemically synthesized 34-amino-acid peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    MacColl, R; Eisele, L E; Stack, R F; Hauer, C; Vakharia, D D; Benno, A; Kelly, W C; Mizejewski, G J

    2001-10-03

    A 34-amino-acid peptide has been chemically synthesized based on a sequence from human alpha-fetoprotein. The purified peptide is active in anti-growth assays when freshly prepared in pH 7.4 buffer at 0.20 g/l, but this peptide slowly becomes inactive. This functional change is proven by mass spectrometry to be triggered by the formation of an intrapeptide disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues on the peptide. Interpeptide cross-linking does not occur. The active and inactive forms of the peptide have almost identical secondary structures as shown by circular dichroism (CD). Zinc ions bind to the active peptide and completely prevents formation of the inactive form. Cobalt(II) ions also bind to the peptide, and the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the cobalt-peptide complex shows that: (1) a near-UV sulfur-to-metal-ion charge-transfer band had a molar extinction coefficient consistent with two thiolate bonds to Co(II); (2) the lowest-energy visible d-d transition maximum at 659 nm, also, demonstrated that the two cysteine residues are ligands for the metal ion; (3) the d-d molar extinction coefficient showed that the metal ion-ligand complex was in a distorted tetrahedral symmetry. The peptide has two cysteines, and it is speculated that the other two metal ion ligands might be the two histidines. The Zn(II)- and Co(II)-peptide complexes had similar peptide conformations as indicated by their ultraviolet CD spectra, which differed very slightly from that of the free peptide. Surprisingly, the cobalt ions acted in the reverse of the zinc ions in that, instead of stabilizing anti-growth form of the peptide, they catalyzed its loss. Metal ion control of peptide function is a saliently interesting concept. Calcium ions, in the conditions studied, apparently do not bind to the peptide. Trifluoroethanol and temperature (60 degrees C) affected the secondary structure of the peptide, and the peptide was found capable of assuming various conformations in solution

  19. Effects of hydration on the acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Chan-Huot, Monique; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-09-21

    Using high resolution solid state (15)N and (13)C NMR spectroscopy we have studied the effects of successive hydration on the (15)N labeled side chain amino groups of solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) in the presence of acids. Generally, hydration leads to the formation of local "ionic fluid" phases composed by flexible side chain ammonium groups, acid anions and small amounts of water. The associated local dynamics reduces the widths of the inhomogeneously broadened (15)N amino signals found for the dry states. The hydration of free base PLL--which consists of mixtures of alpha-helices and beta-pleated sheets--is monitored by a small low-field shift of the amino group signal arising from hydrogen bonding with water, reaching eventually the value of PLL in water at pH 13. No difference for the two conformations is observed. PLL x HF adopts a similar secondary structure with isolated NHF hydrogen bonds; hydration leads only to small low-field shifts which are nevertheless compatible with the formation of ammonium groups in aqueous solution. PLL doped with small amounts of HCl contains ammonium groups which are internally solvated by neighboring free amino groups. Both nitrogen environments are characterized by different chemical shifts. Hydration with less than one water molecule per amino group leads already to a chemical shift averaging arising from fast proton motions along NHN-hydrogen bonds and fast side chain and anion motions.By contrast, the hydration of fully doped PLL x HBr and PLL x HCl is more complex. These systems exist only in beta-pleated sheet conformations forming alkyl ammonium salt structures. Separate (15)N signal components are observed for (i) the dry states, for (ii) wet beta-pleated sheets and for (iii) wet alpha-helices which are successively formed upon hydration. Exchange between these environments is slow, but water motions lead to averaged amino group signals within each of the two wet environments. These results indicate that the different

  20. A novel approach to represent and compare RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Eugenio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Structural information is crucial in ribonucleic acid (RNA) analysis and functional annotation; nevertheless, how to include such structural data is still a debated problem. Dot-bracket notation is the most common and simple representation for RNA secondary structures but its simplicity leads also to ambiguity requiring further processing steps to dissolve. Here we present BEAR (Brand nEw Alphabet for RNA), a new context-aware structural encoding represented by a string of characters. Each character in BEAR encodes for a specific secondary structure element (loop, stem, bulge and internal loop) with specific length. Furthermore, exploiting this informative and yet simple encoding in multiple alignments of related RNAs, we captured how much structural variation is tolerated in RNA families and convert it into transition rates among secondary structure elements. This allowed us to compute a substitution matrix for secondary structure elements called MBR (Matrix of BEAR-encoded RNA secondary structures), of which we tested the ability in aligning RNA secondary structures. We propose BEAR and the MBR as powerful resources for the RNA secondary structure analysis, comparison and classification, motif finding and phylogeny. PMID:24753415

  1. A balanced secondary structure predictor.

    PubMed

    Nasrul Islam, Md; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Katebi, Ataur R; Tamjidul Hoque, Md

    2016-01-21

    Secondary structure (SS) refers to the local spatial organization of a polypeptide backbone atoms of a protein. Accurate prediction of SS can provide crucial features to form the next higher level of 3D structure of a protein accurately. SS has three different major components, helix (H), beta (E) and coil (C). Most of the SS predictors express imbalanced accuracies by claiming higher prediction performances in predicting H and C, and on the contrary having low accuracy in E predictions. E component being in low count, a predictor may show very good overall performance by over-predicting H and C and under predicting E, which can make such predictors biologically inapplicable. In this work we are motivated to develop a balanced SS predictor by incorporating 33 physicochemical properties into 15-tuble peptides via Chou׳s general PseAAC, which allowed obtaining higher accuracies in predicting all three SS components. Our approach uses three different support vector machines for binary classification of the major classes and then form optimized multiclass predictor using genetic algorithm (GA). The trained three binary SVMs are E versus non-E (i.e., E/¬E), C/¬C and H/¬H. This GA based optimized and combined three class predictor, called cSVM, is further combined with SPINE X to form the proposed final balanced predictor, called MetaSSPred. This novel paradigm assists us in optimizing the precision and recall. We prepared two independent test datasets (CB471 and N295) to compare the performance of our predictors with SPINE X. MetaSSPred significantly increases beta accuracy (QE) for both the datasets. QE score of MetaSSPred on CB471 and N295 were 71.7% and 74.4% respectively. These scores are 20.9% and 19.0% improvement over the QE scores given by SPINE X alone on CB471 and N295 datasets respectively. Standard deviations of the accuracies across three SS classes of MetaSSPred on CB471 and N295 datasets were 4.2% and 2.3% respectively. On the other hand, for SPINE X

  2. Simultaneous prediction of protein secondary structure and transmembrane spans.

    PubMed

    Leman, Julia Koehler; Mueller, Ralf; Karakas, Mert; Woetzel, Nils; Meiler, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Prediction of transmembrane spans and secondary structure from the protein sequence is generally the first step in the structural characterization of (membrane) proteins. Preference of a stretch of amino acids in a protein to form secondary structure and being placed in the membrane are correlated. Nevertheless, current methods predict either secondary structure or individual transmembrane states. We introduce a method that simultaneously predicts the secondary structure and transmembrane spans from the protein sequence. This approach not only eliminates the necessity to create a consensus prediction from possibly contradicting outputs of several predictors but bears the potential to predict conformational switches, i.e., sequence regions that have a high probability to change for example from a coil conformation in solution to an α-helical transmembrane state. An artificial neural network was trained on databases of 177 membrane proteins and 6048 soluble proteins. The output is a 3 × 3 dimensional probability matrix for each residue in the sequence that combines three secondary structure types (helix, strand, coil) and three environment types (membrane core, interface, solution). The prediction accuracies are 70.3% for nine possible states, 73.2% for three-state secondary structure prediction, and 94.8% for three-state transmembrane span prediction. These accuracies are comparable to state-of-the-art predictors of secondary structure (e.g., Psipred) or transmembrane placement (e.g., OCTOPUS). The method is available as web server and for download at www.meilerlab.org. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Flexible Structures and Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Considers the problems inherent in British secondary school organization, the resistance to change built into the organizational systems, and possible organizational concepts that could serve the same general purposes (curricular oversight and student services) while adapting more successfully to changing needs and conditions. (PGD)

  4. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  5. SHAPE-Directed RNA Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Low, Justin T.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    The diverse functional roles of RNA are determined by its underlying structure. Accurate and comprehensive knowledge of RNA structure would inform a broader understanding of RNA biology and facilitate exploiting RNA as a biotechnological tool and therapeutic target. Determining the pattern of base pairing, or secondary structure, of RNA is a first step in these endeavors. Advances in experimental, computational, and comparative analysis approaches for analyzing secondary structure have yielded accurate structures for many small RNAs, but only a few large (>500 nts) RNAs. In addition, most current methods for determining a secondary structure require considerable effort, analytical expertise, and technical ingenuity. In this review, we outline an efficient strategy for developing accurate secondary structure models for RNAs of arbitrary length. This approach melds structural information obtained using SHAPE chemistry with structure prediction using nearest-neighbor rules and the dynamic programming algorithm implemented in the RNAstructure program. Prediction accuracies reach ≥95% for RNAs on the kilobase scale. This approach facilitates both development of new models and refinement of existing RNA structure models, which we illustrate using the Gag-Pol frameshift element in an HIV-1 M-group genome. Most promisingly, integrated experimental and computational refinement brings closer the ultimate goal of efficiently and accurately establishing the secondary structure for any RNA sequence. PMID:20554050

  6. Improved Predictions of Secondary Structures for RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, John A.; Turner, Douglas H.; Zuker, Michael

    1989-10-01

    The accuracy of computer predictions of RNA secondary structure from sequence data and free energy parameters has been increased to roughly 70%. Performance is judged by comparison with structures known from phylogenetic analysis. The algorithm also generates suboptimal structures. On average, the best structure within 10% of the lowest free energy contains roughly 90% of phylogenetically known helixes. The algorithm does not include tertiary interactions or pseudoknots and employs a crude model for single-stranded regions. The only favorable interactions are base pairing and stacking of terminal unpaired nucleotides at the ends of helixes. The excellent performance is consistent with these interactions being the primary interactions determining RNA secondary structure.

  7. Odorant Sensory Input Modulates DNA Secondary Structure Formation and Heterogeneous Ribonucleoprotein Recruitment on the Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 1 Promoters in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Cai, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Nana; Fones, Lilah; Brown, Elizabeth; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cave, John W

    2017-05-03

    Adaptation of neural circuits to changes in sensory input can modify several cellular processes within neurons, including neurotransmitter biosynthesis levels. For a subset of olfactory bulb interneurons, activity-dependent changes in GABA are reflected by corresponding changes in Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (Gad1) expression levels. Mechanisms regulating Gad1 promoter activity are poorly understood, but here we show that a conserved G:C-rich region in the mouse Gad1 proximal promoter region both recruits heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) that facilitate transcription and forms single-stranded DNA secondary structures associated with transcriptional repression. This promoter architecture and function is shared with Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), which is also modulated by odorant-dependent activity in the olfactory bulb. This study shows that the balance between DNA secondary structure formation and hnRNP binding on the mouse Th and Gad1 promoters in the olfactory bulb is responsive to changes in odorant-dependent sensory input. These findings reveal that Th and Gad1 share a novel transcription regulatory mechanism that facilitates sensory input-dependent regulation of dopamine and GABA expression.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Adaptation of neural circuits to changes in sensory input can modify several cellular processes within neurons, including neurotransmitter biosynthesis levels. This study shows that transcription of genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes for GABA and dopamine biosynthesis (Gad1 and Th, respectively) in the mammalian olfactory bulb is regulated by G:C-rich regions that both recruit heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) to facilitate transcription and form single-stranded DNA secondary structures associated with repression. hnRNP binding and formation of DNA secondary structure on the Th and Gad1 promoters are mutually exclusive, and odorant sensory input levels regulate the balance between these regulatory features. These findings

  8. Structure of Acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are enzymes that have been studied extensively due to the fact that their dysregulation is associated with pathophysiological conditions. This characteristic has been exploited for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. As an example, prostatic acid phosphatase was the first marker for metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and the dysregulation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase is associated with abnormal bone resorption linked to osteoporosis. The pioneering crystallization studies on prostatic acid phosphatase and mammalian tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase conformed significant milestones towards the elucidation of the mechanisms followed by these enzymes (Schneider et al., EMBO J 12:2609-2615, 1993). Acid phosphatases are also found in nonmammalian species such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and plants, and most of them share structural similarities with mammalian acid phosphatase enzymes. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters following the general equation. Phosphate monoester + H2O -->/<-- alcohol + phosphate. The general classification "acid phosphatase" relies only on the optimum acidic pH for the enzymatic activity in assay conditions using non-physiological substrates. These enzymes accept a wide range of substrates in vitro, ranging from small organic molecules to phosphoproteins, constituting a heterogeneous group of enzymes from the structural point of view. These structural differences account for the divergence in cofactor dependences and behavior against substrates, inhibitors, and activators. In this group only the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase is a metallo-enzyme whereas the other members do not require metal-ion binding for their catalytic activity. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and erythrocytic acid phosphatase are not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate ion while the prostatic acid phosphatase is tartrate-sensitive. This is an important

  9. Improving RNA secondary structure prediction with structure mapping data.

    PubMed

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2015-01-01

    Methods to probe RNA secondary structure, such as small molecule modifying agents, secondary structure-specific nucleases, inline probing, and SHAPE chemistry, are widely used to study the structure of functional RNA. Computational secondary structure prediction programs can incorporate probing data to predict structure with high accuracy. In this chapter, an overview of current methods for probing RNA secondary structure is provided, including modern high-throughput methods. Methods for guiding secondary structure prediction algorithms using these data are explained, and best practices for using these data are provided. This chapter concludes by listing a number of open questions about how to best use probing data, and what these data can provide. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA Secondary Structure Analysis Using RNAstructure.

    PubMed

    Mathews, David H

    2014-06-17

    RNAstructure is a user-friendly program for the prediction and analysis of RNA secondary structure. It is available as a Web server, as a program with a graphical user interface, or as a set of command-line tools. The programs are available for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, or Linux. This unit provides protocols for RNA secondary structure prediction (using the Web server or the graphical user interface) and prediction of high-affinity oligonucleotide biding sites to a structured RNA target (using the graphical user interface). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. RNA Secondary Structure Analysis Using RNAstructure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.

    2014-01-01

    RNAstructure is a user-friendly program for the prediction and analysis of RNA secondary structure. It is available as a web server, as a program with a graphical user interface, or as a set of command line tools. The programs are available for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, or Linux. This unit provides protocols for RNA secondary structure prediction (using the web server or the graphical user interface) and prediction of high affinity oligonucleotide biding sites to a structured RNA target (using the graphical user interface). PMID:18428759

  12. Multithreaded parsing for predicting RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Al-Mulhem, Muhammed S

    2010-01-01

    Many computational approaches have been developed for modelling and analysing the RNA secondary structure. These approaches are based on diverse methods such as grammars, dynamic programming, matching and evolutionary algorithms. This paper proposes a new parsing algorithm for the prediction of RNA secondary structures. The proposed algorithm is based on the shift-reduce LR parsing algorithm for programming languages. It has two main contributions: it extends the LR parsing algorithm by using a Stochastic Context-Free Grammar (SCFG) instead of Context-Free Grammar (CFG) for parsing RNA secondary structures; it extends the LR parsing algorithm by using a multithreaded approach to handle the LR parsing conflicts resulting from the use of ambiguous grammars.

  13. Tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to muriatic acid ingestion.

    PubMed

    Pense, S C; Wood, W J; Stempel, T K; Zwemer, F L; Wachtel, T L

    1988-02-01

    Acid ingestion may result in a variety of early and late complications. A patient is presented with severe sequelae from muriatic acid ingestion, including a tracheoesophageal fistula which is a previously unreported complication of acid ingestion injury. Recommendations are made for diagnosis and prevention of this potentially lethal complication.

  14. PEGylated nanoparticles: protein corona and secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runa, Sabiha; Hill, Alexandra; Cochran, Victoria L.; Payne, Christine K.

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles have important biological and biomedical applications ranging from drug and gene delivery to biosensing. In the presence of extracellular proteins, a "corona" of proteins adsorbs on the surface of the nanoparticles, altering their interaction with cells, including immune cells. Nanoparticles are often functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to reduce this non-specific adsorption of proteins. To understand the change in protein corona that occurs following PEGylation, we first quantified the adsorption of blood serum proteins on bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles using gel electrophoresis. We find a threefold decrease in the amount of protein adsorbed on PEGylated gold nanoparticles compared to the bare gold nanoparticles, showing that PEG reduces, but does not prevent, corona formation. To determine if the secondary structure of corona proteins was altered upon adsorption onto the bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles, we use CD spectroscopy to characterize the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin following incubation with the nanoparticles. Our results show no significant change in protein secondary structure following incubation with bare or PEGylated nanoparticles. Further examination of the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin, α2-macroglobulin, and transferrin in the presence of free PEG showed similar results. These findings provide important insights for the use of PEGylated gold nanoparticles under physiological conditions.

  15. Folding and Finding RNA Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Moss, Walter N.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Optimal exploitation of the expanding database of sequences requires rapid finding and folding of RNAs. Methods are reviewed that automate folding and discovery of RNAs with algorithms that couple thermodynamics with chemical mapping, NMR, and/or sequence comparison. New functional noncoding RNAs in genome sequences can be found by combining sequence comparison with the assumption that functional noncoding RNAs will have more favorable folding free energies than other RNAs. When a new RNA is discovered, experiments and sequence comparison can restrict folding space so that secondary structure can be rapidly determined with the help of predicted free energies. In turn, secondary structure restricts folding in three dimensions, which allows modeling of three-dimensional structure. An example from a domain of a retrotransposon is described. Discovery of new RNAs and their structures will provide insights into evolution, biology, and design of therapeutics. Applications to studies of evolution are also reviewed. PMID:20685845

  16. PSS-SQL: protein secondary structure - structured query language.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Dominika; Malysiak-Mrozek, Bozena; Kozielski, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    Secondary structure representation of proteins provides important information regarding protein general construction and shape. This representation is often used in protein similarity searching. Since existing commercial database management systems do not offer integrated exploration methods for biological data e.g. at the level of the SQL language, the structural similarity searching is usually performed by external tools. In the paper, we present our newly developed PSS-SQL language, which allows searching a database in order to identify proteins having secondary structure similar to the structure specified by the user in a PSS-SQL query. Therefore, we provide a simple and declarative language for protein structure similarity searching.

  17. Synthetic mimetics of protein secondary structure domains

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nathan T.; Katt, William P.; Hamilton, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins modulate the majority of all biological functions and are primarily composed of highly organized secondary structural elements such as helices, turns and sheets. Many of these functions are affected by a small number of key protein–protein contacts, often involving one or more of these well-defined structural elements. Given the ubiquitous nature of these protein recognition domains, their mimicry by peptidic and non-peptidic scaffolds has become a major focus of contemporary research. This review examines several key advances in secondary structure mimicry over the past several years, particularly focusing upon scaffolds that show not only promising projection of functional groups, but also a proven effect in biological systems. PMID:20123744

  18. A new hybrid coding for protein secondary structure prediction based on primary structure similarity.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Shunpu; Zhang, Qifeng; Wu, Wuming

    2017-03-16

    The coding pattern of protein can greatly affect the prediction accuracy of protein secondary structure. In this paper, a novel hybrid coding method based on the physicochemical properties of amino acids and tendency factors is proposed for the prediction of protein secondary structure. The principal component analysis (PCA) is first applied to the physicochemical properties of amino acids to construct a 3-bit-code, and then the 3 tendency factors of amino acids are calculated to generate another 3-bit-code. Two 3-bit-codes are fused to form a novel hybrid 6-bit-code. Furthermore, we make a geometry-based similarity comparison of the protein primary structure between the reference set and the test set before the secondary structure prediction. We finally use the support vector machine (SVM) to predict those amino acids which are not detected by the primary structure similarity comparison. Experimental results show that our method achieves a satisfactory improvement in accuracy in the prediction of protein secondary structure.

  19. Cascaded multiple classifiers for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Ouali, M.; King, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a new classifier for protein secondary structure prediction that is formed by cascading together different types of classifiers using neural networks and linear discrimination. The new classifier achieves an accuracy of 76.7% (assessed by a rigorous full Jack-knife procedure) on a new nonredundant dataset of 496 nonhomologous sequences (obtained from G.J. Barton and J.A. Cuff). This database was especially designed to train and test protein secondary structure prediction methods, and it uses a more stringent definition of homologous sequence than in previous studies. We show that it is possible to design classifiers that can highly discriminate the three classes (H, E, C) with an accuracy of up to 78% for beta-strands, using only a local window and resampling techniques. This indicates that the importance of long-range interactions for the prediction of beta-strands has been probably previously overestimated. PMID:10892809

  20. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  1. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  2. Prediction of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, M.; Orland, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present a new algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. The method is based on a classification of RNA structures according to their topological genus. The algorithm utilizes a simplified parametrization of the free energies for pair stacking, loop penalties, etc. and in addition a free energy penalty proportional to the topological genus of the pairing graph. Our method can take into account all pseudoknot topologies and achieves high success rates compared to state-of-the-art methods. This shows that the genus is a promising concept to classify pseudoknots.

  3. Secondary structure switching in Cro protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Newlove, Tracey; Konieczka, Jay H; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2004-04-01

    We report the solution structure of the Cro protein from bacteriophage P22. Comparisons of its sequence and structure to those of lambda Cro strongly suggest an alpha-to-beta secondary structure switching event during Cro evolution. The folds of P22 Cro and lambda Cro share a three alpha helix fragment comprising the N-terminal half of the domain. However, P22 Cro's C terminus folds as two helices, while lambda Cro's folds as a beta hairpin. The all-alpha fold found for P22 Cro appears to be ancestral, since it also occurs in cI proteins, which are anciently duplicated paralogues of Cro. PSI-BLAST and transitive homology analyses strongly suggest that the sequences of P22 Cro and lambda Cro are globally homologous despite encoding different folds. The alpha+beta fold of lambda Cro therefore likely evolved from its all-alpha ancestor by homologous secondary structure switching, rather than by nonhomologous replacement of both sequence and structure.

  4. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned.

  5. Conserved RNA secondary structures promote alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Peter J; Hertel, Klemens J

    2008-08-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. Alternative splicing in higher eukaryotes results in the generation of multiple protein isoforms from gene transcripts. The extensive alternative splicing observed implies a flexibility of the spliceosome to identify exons within a given pre-mRNA. To reach this flexibility, splice-site selection in higher eukaryotes has evolved to depend on multiple parameters such as splice-site strength, splicing regulators, the exon/intron architecture, and the process of pre-mRNA synthesis itself. RNA secondary structures have also been proposed to influence alternative splicing as stable RNA secondary structures that mask splice sites are expected to interfere with splice-site recognition. Using structural and functional conservation, we identified RNA structure elements within the human genome that associate with alternative splice-site selection. Their frequent involvement with alternative splicing demonstrates that RNA structure formation is an important mechanism regulating gene expression and disease.

  6. Enumerating secondary structures and structural moieties for circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Jose A; Manrubia, Susanna

    2017-04-21

    A quantitative characterization of the relationship between molecular sequence and structure is essential to improve our understanding of how function emerges. This particular genotype-phenotype map has been often studied in the context of RNA sequences, with the folded configurations standing as a proxy for the phenotype. Here, we count the secondary structures of circular RNAs of length n and calculate the asymptotic distributions of different structural moieties, such as stems or hairpin loops, by means of symbolic combinatorics. Circular RNAs differ in essential ways from their linear counterparts. From the mathematical viewpoint, the enumeration of the corresponding secondary structures demands the use of combinatorial techniques additional to those used for linear RNAs. The asymptotic number of secondary structures for circular RNAs grows as a(n)n(-5/2), with a depending on particular constraints applied to the secondary structure. As it occurs with linear RNA, the abundance of any structural moiety is normally distributed in the limit n→∞, with a mean and a variance that increase linearly with n. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Comparative analysis of spatial organization of myoglobins. II. Secondary structure].

    PubMed

    Korobov, V N; Nazarenko, V I; Radomskiĭ, N F; Starodub, N F

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of probability of distribution curves of alpha-helical sites and bends of polypeptide chains of myoglobins in half-water mammals (beaver, nutria, muskrat, otter) carried out in comparison with those of myoglobins of the horse and Sperm whale (X-ray diffraction analysis has revealed their tertiary structure) has revealed a coincidence of the secondary structure sites end bends of the chain in the studied respiratory hemoproteins of muscles. Despite a considerable number of amino acid substitutions the profiles of alpha-helicity and B-bends of the compared proteins are practically identical. This indicates to the "resistance" of the probability curves to amino acid substitutions and to retention of the tertiary structure of myoglobins in evolutionary remote species of the animals.

  8. Expected degree for RNA secondary structure networks.

    PubMed

    Clote, Peter

    2015-01-15

    Consider the network of all secondary structures of a given RNA sequence, where nodes are connected when the corresponding structures have base pair distance one. The expected degree of the network is the average number of neighbors, where average may be computed with respect to the either the uniform or Boltzmann probability. Here, we describe the first algorithm, RNAexpNumNbors, that can compute the expected number of neighbors, or expected network degree, of an input sequence. For RNA sequences from the Rfam database, the expected degree is significantly less than the constrained minimum free energy structure, defined to have minimum free energy (MFE) over all structures consistent with the Rfam consensus structure. The expected degree of structural RNAs, such as purine riboswitches, paradoxically appears to be smaller than that of random RNA, yet the difference between the degree of the MFE structure and the expected degree is larger than that of random RNA. Expected degree does not seem to correlate with standard structural diversity measures of RNA, such as positional entropy and ensemble defect. The program RNAexpNumNbors is written in C, runs in cubic time and quadratic space, and is publicly available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAexpNumNbors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Secondary flow structures in large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, H.; Devauchelle, O.; Metivier, F.; Limare, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2012-04-01

    Measuring the velocity field in large rivers remains a challenge, even with recent measurement techniques such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). Indeed, due to the diverging angle between its ultrasonic beams, an ADCP cannot detect small-scale flow structures. However, when the measurements are limited to a single location for a sufficient period of time, averaging can reveal large, stationary flow structures. Here we present velocity measurements in a straight reach of the Seine river in Paris, France, where the cross-section is close to rectangular. The transverse modulation of the streamwise velocity indicates secondary flow cells, which seem to occupy the entire width of the river. This observation is reminiscent of the longitudinal vortices observed in laboratory experiments (e.g. Blanckaert et al., Advances in Water Resources, 2010, 33, 1062-1074). Although the physical origin of these secondary structures remains unclear, their measured velocity is sufficient to significantly impact the distribution of streamwise momentum. We propose a model for the transverse profile of the depth-averaged velocity based on a crude representation of the longitudinal vortices, with a single free parameter. Preliminary results are in good agreement with field measurements. This model also provides an estimate for the bank shear stress, which controls bank erosion.

  10. Supramolecular Multiblock Copolymers Featuring Complex Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Elacqua, Elizabeth; Manning, Kylie B; Lye, Diane S; Pomarico, Scott K; Morgia, Federica; Weck, Marcus

    2017-09-06

    This contribution introduces main-chain supramolecular ABC and ABB'A block copolymers sustained by orthogonal metal coordination and hydrogen bonding between telechelic polymers that feature distinct secondary structure motifs. Controlled polymerization techniques in combination with supramolecular assembly are used to engineer heterotelechelic π-sheets that undergo high-fidelity association with both helical and coil-forming synthetic polymers. Our design features multiple advances to achieve our targeted structures, in particular, those emulating sheet-like structural aspects using poly(p-phenylenevinylene)s (PPVs). To engineer heterotelechelic PPVs in a sheet-like design, we engineer an iterative one-pot cross metathesis-ring-opening metathesis polymerization (CM-ROMP) strategy that affords functionalized Grubbs-II initiators that subsequently polymerize a paracyclophanediene. Supramolecular assembly of two heterotelechelic PPVs is used to realize a parallel π-sheet, wherein further orthogonal assembly with helical motifs is possible. We also construct an antiparallel π-sheet, wherein terminal PPV blocks are adjacent to a flexible coil-like poly(norbornene) (PNB). The PNB is designed, through supramolecular chain collapse, to expose benzene and perfluorobenzene motifs that promote a hairpin turn via charge-transfer-aided folding. We demonstrate that targeted helix-(π-sheet)-helix and helix-(π-sheet)-coil assemblies occur without compromising intrinsic helicity, while both parallel and antiparallel β-sheet-like structures are realized. Our main-chain orthogonal assembly approach allows the engineering of multiblock copolymer scaffolds featuring diverse secondary structures via the directional assembly of telechelic building blocks. The targeted assemblies, a mix of sequence-defined helix-sheet-coil and helix-sheet-helix architectures, are Nature-inspired synthetic mimics that expose α/β and α+β protein classes via de novo design and cooperative assembly

  11. Distinct circular dichroism spectroscopic signatures of polyproline II and unordered secondary structures: applications in secondary structure analyses.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jose L S; Miles, Andrew J; Whitmore, Lee; Wallace, B A

    2014-12-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a valuable method for defining canonical secondary structure contents of proteins based on empirically-defined spectroscopic signatures derived from proteins with known three-dimensional structures. Many proteins identified as being "Intrinsically Disordered Proteins" have a significant amount of their structure that is neither sheet, helix, nor turn; this type of structure is often classified by CD as "other", "random coil", "unordered", or "disordered". However the "other" category can also include polyproline II (PPII)-type structures, whose spectral properties have not been well-distinguished from those of unordered structures. In this study, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to investigate the spectral properties of collagen and polyproline, which both contain PPII-type structures. Their native spectra were compared as representatives of PPII structures. In addition, their spectra before and after treatment with various conditions to produce unfolded or denatured structures were also compared, with the aim of defining the differences between CD spectra of PPII and disordered structures. We conclude that the spectral features of collagen are more appropriate than those of polyproline for use as the representative spectrum for PPII structures present in typical amino acid-containing proteins, and that the single most characteristic spectroscopic feature distinguishing a PPII structure from a disordered structure is the presence of a positive peak around 220nm in the former but not in the latter. These spectra are now available for inclusion in new reference data sets used for CD analyses of the secondary structures of soluble proteins.

  12. Distinct circular dichroism spectroscopic signatures of polyproline II and unordered secondary structures: Applications in secondary structure analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Jose L S; Miles, Andrew J; Whitmore, Lee; Wallace, B A

    2014-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a valuable method for defining canonical secondary structure contents of proteins based on empirically-defined spectroscopic signatures derived from proteins with known three-dimensional structures. Many proteins identified as being “Intrinsically Disordered Proteins” have a significant amount of their structure that is neither sheet, helix, nor turn; this type of structure is often classified by CD as “other”, “random coil”, “unordered”, or “disordered”. However the “other” category can also include polyproline II (PPII)-type structures, whose spectral properties have not been well-distinguished from those of unordered structures. In this study, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to investigate the spectral properties of collagen and polyproline, which both contain PPII-type structures. Their native spectra were compared as representatives of PPII structures. In addition, their spectra before and after treatment with various conditions to produce unfolded or denatured structures were also compared, with the aim of defining the differences between CD spectra of PPII and disordered structures. We conclude that the spectral features of collagen are more appropriate than those of polyproline for use as the representative spectrum for PPII structures present in typical amino acid-containing proteins, and that the single most characteristic spectroscopic feature distinguishing a PPII structure from a disordered structure is the presence of a positive peak around 220nm in the former but not in the latter. These spectra are now available for inclusion in new reference data sets used for CD analyses of the secondary structures of soluble proteins. PMID:25262612

  13. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used in which

  14. Autocatalytic Sets and RNA Secondary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordijk, Wim

    2017-04-01

    The dominant paradigm in origin of life research is that of an RNA world. However, despite experimental progress towards the spontaneous formation of RNA, the RNA world hypothesis still has its problems. Here, we introduce a novel computational model of chemical reaction networks based on RNA secondary structure and analyze the existence of autocatalytic sub-networks in random instances of this model, by combining two well-established computational tools. Our main results are that (i) autocatalytic sets are highly likely to exist, even for very small reaction networks and short RNA sequences, and (ii) sequence diversity seems to be a more important factor in the formation of autocatalytic sets than sequence length. These findings could shed new light on the probability of the spontaneous emergence of an RNA world as a network of mutually collaborative ribozymes.

  15. Autocatalytic Sets and RNA Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Hordijk, Wim

    2017-04-04

    The dominant paradigm in origin of life research is that of an RNA world. However, despite experimental progress towards the spontaneous formation of RNA, the RNA world hypothesis still has its problems. Here, we introduce a novel computational model of chemical reaction networks based on RNA secondary structure and analyze the existence of autocatalytic sub-networks in random instances of this model, by combining two well-established computational tools. Our main results are that (i) autocatalytic sets are highly likely to exist, even for very small reaction networks and short RNA sequences, and (ii) sequence diversity seems to be a more important factor in the formation of autocatalytic sets than sequence length. These findings could shed new light on the probability of the spontaneous emergence of an RNA world as a network of mutually collaborative ribozymes.

  16. Bacterial community structure in secondary wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, K.T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Practically all process problems encountered in activated sludge treatment, such as bulking, sludge rising, septic sludge, foaming, dispersed growth, deflocculation, and pinpoint floc, are caused by poor separation of sludge in the secondary sedimentation tank. This occurs when the microorganisms fail to produce floc which settle well and results in an increase in effluent suspended solids and biochemical oxygen demand. In the past, attempts at control and prevention of such failures have been almost entirely empirical. In order to better understand these flocculation problems, a study of the community structure of the bacteria as in activated sludge has been conducted. In addition to activated sludge, samples from a trickling filter and a rotating biological contactor (RBC) also were examined for comparison.

  17. RNAex: an RNA secondary structure prediction server enhanced by high-throughput structure-probing data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Qu, Rihao; Huang, Yiming; Shi, Binbin; Liu, Mengrong; Li, Yang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-07-08

    Several high-throughput technologies have been developed to probe RNA base pairs and loops at the transcriptome level in multiple species. However, to obtain the final RNA secondary structure, extensive effort and considerable expertise is required to statistically process the probing data and combine them with free energy models. Therefore, we developed an RNA secondary structure prediction server that is enhanced by experimental data (RNAex). RNAex is a web interface that enables non-specialists to easily access cutting-edge structure-probing data and predict RNA secondary structures enhanced by in vivo and in vitro data. RNAex annotates the RNA editing, RNA modification and SNP sites on the predicted structures. It provides four structure-folding methods, restrained MaxExpect, SeqFold, RNAstructure (Fold) and RNAfold that can be selected by the user. The performance of these four folding methods has been verified by previous publications on known structures. We re-mapped the raw sequencing data of the probing experiments to the whole genome for each species. RNAex thus enables users to predict secondary structures for both known and novel RNA transcripts in human, mouse, yeast and Arabidopsis The RNAex web server is available at http://RNAex.ncrnalab.org/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  19. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes.

  20. RNA STRAND: the RNA secondary structure and statistical analysis database.

    PubMed

    Andronescu, Mirela; Bereg, Vera; Hoos, Holger H; Condon, Anne

    2008-08-13

    The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. In this paper we describe RNA STRAND - the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at http://www.rnasoft.ca/strand.

  1. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    PubMed Central

    Andronescu, Mirela; Bereg, Vera; Hoos, Holger H; Condon, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at . PMID:18700982

  2. Improvement of protein secondary structure prediction using binary word encoding.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, T; Doi, J

    1997-01-01

    We propose a binary word encoding to improve the protein secondary structure prediction. A binary word encoding encodes a local amino acid sequence to a binary word, which consists of 0 or 1. We use an encoding function to map an amino acid to 0 or 1. Using the binary word encoding, we can statistically extract the multiresidue information, which depends on more than one residue. We combine the binary word encoding with the GOR method, its modified version, which shows better accuracy, and the neural network method. The binary word encoding improves the accuracy of GOR by 2.8%. We obtain similar improvement when we combine this with the modified GOR method and the neural network method. When we use multiple sequence alignment data, the binary word encoding similarly improves the accuracy. The accuracy of our best combined method is 68.2%. In this paper, we only show improvement of the GOR and neural network method, we cannot say that the encoding improves the other methods. But the improvement by the encoding suggests that the multiresidue interaction affects the formation of secondary structure. In addition, we find that the optimal encoding function obtained by the simulated annealing method relates to nonpolarity. This means that nonpolarity is important to the multiresidue interaction.

  3. The conservation and function of RNA secondary structure in plants

    PubMed Central

    Vandivier, Lee E.; Anderson, Stephen J.; Foley, Shawn W.; Gregory, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA transcripts fold into secondary structures via intricate patterns of base pairing. These secondary structures impart catalytic, ligand binding, and scaffolding functions to a wide array of RNAs, forming a critical node of biological regulation. Among their many functions, RNA structural elements modulate epigenetic marks, alter mRNA stability and translation, regulate alternative splicing, transduce signals, and scaffold large macromolecular complexes. Thus, the study of RNA secondary structure is critical to understanding the function and regulation of RNA transcripts. Here, we review the origins, form, and function of RNA secondary structure, focusing on plants. We then provide an overview of methods for probing secondary structure, from physical methods such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) to chemical and nuclease probing methods. Marriage with high-throughput sequencing has enabled these latter methods to scale across whole transcriptomes, yielding tremendous new insights into the form and function of RNA secondary structure. PMID:26865341

  4. Automated discovery of active motifs in multiple RNA secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.T.L.; Chang, Chia-Yo; Shapiro, B.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present a method for discovering approximately common motifs (also known as active motifs) in multiple RNA secondary structures. The secondary structures can be represented as ordered trees (i.e., the order among siblings matters). Motifs in these trees are connected subgraphs that can differ in both substitutions and deletions/insertions. The proposed method consists of two steps: (1) find candidate motifs in a small sample of the secondary structures; (2) search all of the secondary structures to determine how frequently these motifs occur (within the allowed approximation) in the secondary structures. To reduce the running time, we develop two optimization heuristics based on sampling and pattern matching techniques. Experimental results obtained by running these algorithms on both generated data and RNA secondary structures show the good performance of the algorithms. To demonstrate the utility of our algorithms, we discuss their applications to conducting the phylogenetic study of RNA sequences obtained from GenBank.

  5. Potential anticancer activity of lichen secondary metabolite physodic acid.

    PubMed

    Cardile, V; Graziano, A C E; Avola, R; Piovano, M; Russo, A

    2017-02-01

    Secondary metabolites present in lichens, which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic and terpenic compounds, are unique with respect to those of higher plants and show interesting biological and pharmacological activities. However, only a few of these compounds, have been assessed for their effectiveness against various in vitro cancer models. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of three lichen secondary metabolites (atranorin, gyrophoric acid and physodic acid) on A375 melanoma cancer cell line. The tested compounds arise from different lichen species collected in different areas of Continental and Antarctic Chile. The obtained results confirm the major efficiency of depsidones. In fact, depsides atranorin and gyrophoric acid, showed a lower activity inhibiting the melanoma cancer cells only at more high concentrations. Whereas the depsidone physodic acid, showed a dose-response relationship in the range of 6.25-50 μM concentrations in A375 cells, activating an apoptotic process, that probably involves the reduction of Hsp70 expression. Although the molecular mechanism, by which apoptosis is induced by physodic acid remains unclear, and of course further studies are needed, the results here reported confirm the promising biological properties of depsidone compounds, and may offer a further impulse to the development of analogues with more powerful efficiency against melanoma cells.

  6. Neural network definitions of highly predictable protein secondary structure classes

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A. |; Steeg, E.; Farber, R.

    1994-02-01

    We use two co-evolving neural networks to determine new classes of protein secondary structure which are significantly more predictable from local amino sequence than the conventional secondary structure classification. Accurate prediction of the conventional secondary structure classes: alpha helix, beta strand, and coil, from primary sequence has long been an important problem in computational molecular biology. Neural networks have been a popular method to attempt to predict these conventional secondary structure classes. Accuracy has been disappointingly low. The algorithm presented here uses neural networks to similtaneously examine both sequence and structure data, and to evolve new classes of secondary structure that can be predicted from sequence with significantly higher accuracy than the conventional classes. These new classes have both similarities to, and differences with the conventional alpha helix, beta strand and coil.

  7. A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Mechelke, Martin; Habeck, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Protein chemical shifts encode detailed structural information that is difficult and computationally costly to describe at a fundamental level. Statistical and machine learning approaches have been used to infer correlations between chemical shifts and secondary structure from experimental chemical shifts. These methods range from simple statistics such as the chemical shift index to complex methods using neural networks. Notwithstanding their higher accuracy, more complex approaches tend to obscure the relationship between secondary structure and chemical shift and often involve many parameters that need to be trained. We present hidden Markov models (HMMs) with Gaussian emission probabilities to model the dependence between protein chemical shifts and secondary structure. The continuous emission probabilities are modeled as conditional probabilities for a given amino acid and secondary structure type. Using these distributions as outputs of first- and second-order HMMs, we achieve a prediction accuracy of 82.3%, which is competitive with existing methods for predicting secondary structure from protein chemical shifts. Incorporation of sequence-based secondary structure prediction into our HMM improves the prediction accuracy to 84.0%. Our findings suggest that an HMM with correlated Gaussian distributions conditioned on the secondary structure provides an adequate generative model of chemical shifts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    PubMed

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  9. Quantitative Correlation Between the Protein Primary Sequences and Secondary Structures in Spider Dragline Silks

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Janelle E.; Creager, Melinda S.; Lewis, Randolph V.; Holland, Gregory P.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic spider silk holds great potential for use in various applications spanning medical uses to ultra lightweight armor, however producing synthetic fibers with mechanical properties comparable to natural spider silk has eluded the scientific community. Natural dragline spider silks are commonly made from proteins that contain highly repetitive amino acid motifs, adopting an array of secondary structures. Before further advances can be made in the production of synthetic fibers based on spider silk proteins, it is imperative to know the percentage of each amino acid in the protein that forms a specific secondary structure. Linking these percentages to the primary amino acid sequence of the protein will establish a structural foundation for synthetic silk. In this study, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques are used to quantify the percentage of Ala, Gly, and Ser that form both β-sheet and helical secondary structures. The fraction of these three amino acids and their secondary structure are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence for the proteins that comprise major and minor ampullate silk from the Nephila clavipes spider providing a blueprint for synthetic spider silks. PMID:20000730

  10. Detection of common motifs in RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Margalit, H; Shapiro, B A; Oppenheim, A B; Maizel, J V

    1989-01-01

    We describe a novel computerized system for comparison of RNA secondary structures and demonstrate its use for experimental studies. The system is able to screen a very large number of structures, to cluster similar structures and to detect specific structural motifs. In particular, the system is useful for detecting mutations with specific structural effects among all possible point mutations, and for predicting compensatory mutations that will restore the wild type structure. The algorithms are independent of the folding rules that are used to generate the secondary structures. PMID:2473442

  11. Amino acid composition analysis of human secondary transport proteins and implications for reliable membrane topology prediction.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2017-04-01

    Secondary transporters in humans are a large group of proteins that transport a wide range of ions, metals, organic and inorganic solutes involved in energy transduction, control of membrane potential and osmotic balance, metabolic processes and in the absorption or efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. They are also emerging as important targets for development of new drugs and as target sites for drug delivery to specific organs or tissues. We have performed amino acid composition (AAC) and phylogenetic analyses and membrane topology predictions for 336 human secondary transport proteins and used the results to confirm protein classification and to look for trends and correlations with structural domains and specific substrates and/or function. Some proteins showed statistically high contents of individual amino acids or of groups of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties. One recurring trend was a correlation between high contents of charged and/or polar residues with misleading results in predictions of membrane topology, which was especially prevalent in Mitochondrial Carrier family proteins. We demonstrate how charged or polar residues located in the middle of transmembrane helices can interfere with their identification by membrane topology tools resulting in missed helices in the prediction. Comparison of AAC in the human proteins with that in 235 secondary transport proteins from Escherichia coli revealed similar overall trends along with differences in average contents for some individual amino acids and groups of similar amino acids that are presumed to result from a greater number of functions and complexity in the higher organism.

  12. Statistical analysis of SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Ding, Feng; Weeks, Kevin M; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2013-01-29

    The ability to predict RNA secondary structure is fundamental for understanding and manipulating RNA function. The information obtained from selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) experiments greatly improves the accuracy of RNA secondary structure prediction. Recently, Das and colleagues [Kladwang, W., et al. (2011) Biochemistry 50, 8049-8056] proposed a "bootstrapping" approach for estimating the variance and helix-by-helix confidence levels of predicted secondary structures based on resampling (randomizing and summing) the measured SHAPE data. We show that the specific resampling approach described by Kladwang et al. introduces systematic errors and underestimates confidence in secondary structure prediction using SHAPE data. Instead, a leave-data-out jackknife approach better estimates the influence of a given experimental data set on SHAPE-directed secondary structure modeling. Even when 35% of the data were left out in the jackknife approach, the confidence levels of SHAPE-directed secondary structure prediction were significantly higher than those calculated by Das and colleagues using bootstrapping. Helix confidence levels were thus underestimated in the recent study, and the resampling approach implemented by Kladwang et al. is not an appropriate metric for evaluating SHAPE-directed secondary structure modeling.

  13. Suppressed hepatic bile acid signalling despite elevated production of primary and secondary bile acids in NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Na; Baker, Susan S; Chapa-Rodriguez, Adrian; Liu, Wensheng; Nugent, Colleen A; Tsompana, Maria; Mastrandrea, Lucy; Buck, Michael J; Baker, Robert D; Genco, Robert J; Zhu, Ruixin; Zhu, Lixin

    2017-08-03

    Bile acids are regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism, and modulate inflammation in the liver and other tissues. Primary bile acids such as cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) are produced in the liver, and converted into secondary bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid by gut microbiota. Here we investigated the possible roles of bile acids in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis and the impact of the gut microbiome on bile acid signalling in NAFLD. Serum bile acid levels and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), liver gene expression profiles and gut microbiome compositions were determined in patients with NAFLD, high-fat diet-fed rats and their controls. Serum concentrations of primary and secondary bile acids were increased in patients with NAFLD. In per cent, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) antagonistic DCA was increased, while the agonistic CDCA was decreased in NAFLD. Increased mRNA expression for cytochrome P450 7A1, Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and paraoxonase 1, no change in mRNA expression for small heterodimer partner and bile salt export pump, and reduced serum FGF19 were evidence of impaired FXR and fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4)-mediated signalling in NAFLD. Taurine and glycine metabolising bacteria were increased in the gut of patients with NAFLD, reflecting increased secondary bile acid production. Similar changes in liver gene expression and the gut microbiome were observed in high-fat diet-fed rats. The serum bile acid profile, the hepatic gene expression pattern and the gut microbiome composition consistently support an elevated bile acid production in NAFLD. The increased proportion of FXR antagonistic bile acid explains, at least in part, the suppression of hepatic FXR-mediated and FGFR4-mediated signalling. Our study suggests that future NAFLD intervention may target the components of FXR signalling, including the bile acid converting gut microbiome. © Article

  14. Protein secondary structural types are differentially coded on messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Tricodon regions on messenger RNAs corresponding to a set of proteins from Escherichia coli were scrutinized for their translation speed. The fractional frequency values of the individual codons as they occur in mRNAs of highly expressed genes from Escherichia coli were taken as an indicative measure of the translation speed. The tricodons were classified by the sum of the frequency values of the constituent codons. Examination of the conformation of the encoded amino acid residues in the corresponding protein tertiary structures revealed a correlation between codon usage in mRNA and topological features of the encoded proteins. Alpha helices on proteins tend to be preferentially coded by translationally fast mRNA regions while the slow segments often code for beta strands and coil regions. Fast regions correspondingly avoid coding for beta strands and coil regions while the slow regions similarly move away from encoding alpha helices. Structural and mechanistic aspects of the ribosome peptide channel support the relevance of sequence fragment translation and subsequent conformation. A discussion is presented relating the observation to the reported kinetic data on the formation and stabilization of protein secondary structural types during protein folding. The observed absence of such strong positive selection for codons in non-highly expressed genes is compatible with existing theories that mutation pressure may well dominate codon selection in non-highly expressed genes. PMID:8897597

  15. Local hydrophobicity stabilizes secondary structures in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kanehisa, M.I.; Tsong, T.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The probability of occurrence of helix and ..beta..-sheet residues in 47 globular proteins was determined as a function of local hydrophobicity, which was defined by the sum of the Nozaki-Tanford transfer free energies at two nearest-neighbors on both sides of the amino acid sequence. In general, hydrophilic amino acids favor neither helix nor ..beta..-sheet formations when neighbor residues are also hydrophilic but favor helix formation at higher local hydrophobicity. On the other hand, some hydrophobic amino acids such as Met, Leu, and Ile favor helix formation when neighbor residues are hydrophilic. None of the hydrophobic amino acids favor ..beta..-sheet formation with hydrophilic neighbors, but most of them strongly favor ..beta..-sheet formation at high local hydrophobicity. When the average of 20 amino acids is taken, both helix and ..beta..-sheet residue probabilities are higher at higher local hydrophobicity, although the increase is steeper for ..beta..-sheets. Therefore, ..beta..-sheet formation is more influenced by local hydrophobicity than helix formation. Generally, helices are nearer the surface and tend to have hydrophilic and hydrophobic faces at opposite sides. The tendency of alternating regions of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues in a helical sequence was revealed by calculating the correlation of the Nozaki-Tanford values. Such amphipathic helices may be important in protein-protein-lipid interactions and in forming hydrophilic channels in the membrane. The choice of 30 nonhomologous proteins as the data set did not alter the above results.

  16. Secondary structure of a dynamic type I'beta-hairpin peptide.

    PubMed

    Stotz, C E; Borchardt, R T; Middaugh, C R; Siahaan, T J; Vander Velde, D; Topp, E M

    2004-04-01

    A spontaneously folding beta-hairpin peptide (Lys-Lys-Tyr-Thr-Val-Ser-Ile-Asn-Gly-Lys-Lys-Ile-Thr-Val-Ser-Ile) and related cyclic (cyclo-Gly-Lys-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Gly-Lys-Ile-Ile-Asn) and linear (Ser-Ile-Asn-Gly-Lys) controls were studied to determine the effects of various factors on secondary structure. Secondary structure was evaluated using circular dichroism (CD) and 1D and 2D (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The effects of chemical modifications in the peptide and various solution conditions were investigated to determine their impact on peptide structure. The beta-hairpin peptide displayed a CD minimum at 216 nm and a TOCSY i + 1 - i + 2 and i + 2 -i + 3 interaction, confirming the expected structure. Using NMR alpha-proton (H(alpha)) chemical shifts, the extents of folding of the beta-hairpin and linear control were estimated to be 51 and 25% of the cyclic control (pH 4, 37 degrees C), which was taken to be maximally folded. Substitution of iso-aspartic acid for Asn reduced the secondary structure dramatically; substitution of aspartic acid for Asn also disrupted the structure. This result suggests that deamidation in unconstrained beta-turns may have adverse effects on secondary structure. N-terminal acetylation and extreme pH conditions also reduced structure, while the addition of methanol increased structure.

  17. BRASERO: A Resource for Benchmarking RNA Secondary Structure Comparison Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Allali, Julien; Saule, Cédric; Chauve, Cédric; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Denise, Alain; Drevet, Christine; Ferraro, Pascal; Gautheret, Daniel; Herrbach, Claire; Leclerc, Fabrice; de Monte, Antoine; Ouangraoua, Aida; Sagot, Marie-France; Termier, Michel; Thermes, Claude; Touzet, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    The pairwise comparison of RNA secondary structures is a fundamental problem, with direct application in mining databases for annotating putative noncoding RNA candidates in newly sequenced genomes. An increasing number of software tools are available for comparing RNA secondary structures, based on different models (such as ordered trees or forests, arc annotated sequences, and multilevel trees) and computational principles (edit distance, alignment). We describe here the website BRASERO that offers tools for evaluating such software tools on real and synthetic datasets. PMID:22675348

  18. BRASERO: A Resource for Benchmarking RNA Secondary Structure Comparison Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Allali, Julien; Saule, Cédric; Chauve, Cédric; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Denise, Alain; Drevet, Christine; Ferraro, Pascal; Gautheret, Daniel; Herrbach, Claire; Leclerc, Fabrice; de Monte, Antoine; Ouangraoua, Aida; Sagot, Marie-France; Termier, Michel; Thermes, Claude; Touzet, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    The pairwise comparison of RNA secondary structures is a fundamental problem, with direct application in mining databases for annotating putative noncoding RNA candidates in newly sequenced genomes. An increasing number of software tools are available for comparing RNA secondary structures, based on different models (such as ordered trees or forests, arc annotated sequences, and multilevel trees) and computational principles (edit distance, alignment). We describe here the website BRASERO that offers tools for evaluating such software tools on real and synthetic datasets.

  19. A new expertness index for assessment of secondary structure prediction engines.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, M; Moshiri, B; Nikbakht, H; Lucas, C

    2007-02-01

    Improvement of prediction accuracy of the protein secondary structure is essential for further developments of the whole field of protein research. In this paper, the expertness of protein secondary structure prediction engines has been studied in three levels and a new criterion has been introduced in the third level. This criterion could be considered as an extension of the previous ones based on amino acid index. Using this new criterion, the expertness of some high score secondary structure prediction engines has been reanalyzed and some hidden facts have been discovered. The results of this new assessment demonstrated that a noticeable harmony has been existed among each amino acid prediction behavior in all engines. This harmony has also been seen between single global propensity and prediction accuracy of amino acid types in each secondary structure class. Moreover, it is shown that Proline and Glycine amino acids have been predicted with less accuracy in alpha helices and beta strands. In addition, regardless of different approaches used in prediction engines, beta strands have been predicted with less accuracy.

  20. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in α-helix conformation and a decrease in β-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in α-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  1. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Simultaneous prediction of RNA secondary structure and helix coaxial stacking.

    PubMed

    Shareghi, Pooya; Wang, Yingfeng; Malmberg, Russell; Cai, Liming

    2012-06-11

    RNA secondary structure plays a scaffolding role for RNA tertiary conformation. Accurate secondary structure prediction can not only identify double-stranded helices and single stranded-loops but also help provide information for potential tertiary interaction motifs critical to the 3D conformation. The average accuracy in ab initio prediction remains 70%; performance improvement has only been limited to short RNA sequences. The prediction of tertiary interaction motifs is difficult without multiple, related sequences that are usually not available. This paper presents research that aims to improve the secondary structure prediction performance and to develop a capability to predict coaxial stacking between helices. Coaxial stacking positions two helices on the same axis, a tertiary motif present in almost all junctions that account for a high percentage of RNA tertiary structures. This research identified energetic rules for coaxial stacks and geometric constraints on stack combinations, which were applied to developing an efficient dynamic programming application for simultaneous prediction of secondary structure and coaxial stacking. Results on a number of non-coding RNA data sets, of short and moderately long lengths, show a performance improvement (specially on tRNAs) for secondary structure prediction when compared with existing methods. The program also demonstrates a capability for prediction of coaxial stacking. The significant leap of performance on tRNAs demonstrated in this work suggests that a breakthrough to a higher performance in RNA secondary structure prediction may lie in understanding contributions from tertiary motifs critical to the structure, as such information can be used to constrain geometrically as well as energetically the space of RNA secondary structure.

  3. Simultaneous prediction of RNA secondary structure and helix coaxial stacking

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA secondary structure plays a scaffolding role for RNA tertiary conformation. Accurate secondary structure prediction can not only identify double-stranded helices and single stranded-loops but also help provide information for potential tertiary interaction motifs critical to the 3D conformation. The average accuracy in ab initio prediction remains 70%; performance improvement has only been limited to short RNA sequences. The prediction of tertiary interaction motifs is difficult without multiple, related sequences that are usually not available. This paper presents research that aims to improve the secondary structure prediction performance and to develop a capability to predict coaxial stacking between helices. Coaxial stacking positions two helices on the same axis, a tertiary motif present in almost all junctions that account for a high percentage of RNA tertiary structures. Results This research identified energetic rules for coaxial stacks and geometric constraints on stack combinations, which were applied to developing an efficient dynamic programming application for simultaneous prediction of secondary structure and coaxial stacking. Results on a number of non-coding RNA data sets, of short and moderately long lengths, show a performance improvement (specially on tRNAs) for secondary structure prediction when compared with existing methods. The program also demonstrates a capability for prediction of coaxial stacking. Conclusions The significant leap of performance on tRNAs demonstrated in this work suggests that a breakthrough to a higher performance in RNA secondary structure prediction may lie in understanding contributions from tertiary motifs critical to the structure, as such information can be used to constrain geometrically as well as energetically the space of RNA secondary structure. PMID:22759616

  4. Diffractaic acid: Crystalline structure and physicochemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro Fonseca, Jéssica; de Oliveira, Yara Santiago; Bezerra, Beatriz P.; Ellena, Javier; Honda, Neli Kika; Silva, Camilla V. N. S.; da Silva Santos, Noemia Pereira; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diffractaic acid (DA) is a secondary metabolite of lichens that belongs to the chemical class of depsides, and some relevant pharmacological properties are associated with this natural product, such as antioxidant, antiulcerogenic and gastroprotective effects. Considering the relevant biological activities and taking into account that the activities are intrinsically related to the structure, the main goal of this study was to elucidate the structure of diffractaic acid by single crystal X-ray diffraction as well to characterize its physicochemical properties by powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. It was observed that DA belongs to the monoclinic crystal system, crystallizing in the space group P21/c with the following cell parameters: a = 18.535(7) Å, b = 4.0439(18) Å, c = 23.964(6) Å, β = 91.55(3)°. The crystal packing is characterized by difractaic acid dimers, which are reflected in the vibrational spectrum. These observations were supported by quantum mechanical calculations.

  5. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  6. Principles for predicting RNA secondary structure design difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt, MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry, and specific difficult-to-design motifs like zig-zags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assessing “designability” of single RNA structures as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26902426

  7. DNA Secondary Structure at Chromosomal Fragile Sites in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan G; Lehman, Christine E; Pierce, Levi C. T; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures that can interfere with normal cellular processes, and many of these structures have been associated with neurological diseases and cancer. Secondary structure-forming sequences are often found at chromosomal fragile sites, which are hotspots for sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal translocations, and deletions. Structures formed at fragile sites can lead to instability by disrupting normal cellular processes such as DNA replication and transcription. The instability caused by disruption of replication and transcription can lead to DNA breakage, resulting in gene rearrangements and deletions that cause disease. In this review, we discuss the role of DNA secondary structure at fragile sites in human disease. PMID:25937814

  8. Assembly of protein tertiary structures from secondary structures using optimized potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R; Cieplak, Marek; Maritan, Amos

    2003-08-01

    We present a simulated annealing-based method for the prediction of the tertiary structures of proteins given knowledge of the secondary structure associated with each amino acid in the sequence. The backbone is represented in a detailed fashion whereas the sidechains and pairwise interactions are modeled in a simplified way, following the LINUS model of Srinivasan and Rose. A perceptron-based technique is used to optimize the interaction potentials for a training set of three proteins. For these proteins, the procedure is able to reproduce the tertiary structures to below 3 A in root mean square deviation (rmsd) from the PDB targets. We present the results of tests on twelve other proteins. For half of these, the lowest energy decoy has a rmsd from the native state below 6 A and, in 9 out of 12 cases, we obtain decoys whose rmsd from the native states are also well below 5 A.

  9. Crystal structures of the apo form and a complex of human LMW-PTP with a phosphonic acid provide new evidence of a secondary site potentially related to the anchorage of natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Emanuella M B; Trivella, Daniela B B; Scorsato, Valéria; Dias, Mariana P; Bazzo, Natália L; Mandapati, Kishore R; de Oliveira, Fábio L; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen V; Pilli, Ronaldo A; Miranda, Paulo C M L; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2015-08-01

    Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTP, EC 3.1.3.48) are a family of single-domain enzymes with molecular weight up to 18 kDa, expressed in different tissues and considered attractive pharmacological targets for cancer chemotherapy. Despite this, few LMW-PTP inhibitors have been described to date, and the structural information on LMW-PTP druggable binding sites is scarce. In this study, a small series of phosphonic acids were designed based on a new crystallographic structure of LMW-PTP complexed with benzylsulfonic acid, determined at 2.1Å. In silico docking was used as a tool to interpret the structural and enzyme kinetics data, as well as to design new analogs. From the synthesized series, two compounds were found to act as competitive inhibitors, with inhibition constants of 0.124 and 0.047 mM. We also report the 2.4Å structure of another complex in which LMW-PTP is bound to benzylphosphonic acid, and a structure of apo LMW-PTP determined at 2.3Å resolution. Although no appreciable conformation changes were observed, in the latter structures, amino acid residues from an expression tag were found bound to a hydrophobic region at the protein surface. This regions is neighbored by positively charged residues, adjacent to the active site pocket, suggesting that this region might be not a mere artefact of crystal contacts but an indication of a possible anchoring region for the natural substrate-which is a phosphorylated protein.

  10. Structured Observation Component. Secondary Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Michael L.; Keen, Phyllis A.

    A format is presented for use of student teachers in structuring their classroom observation techniques. Fifteen classroom and school activities are listed with a comprehensive questionnaire accompanying each. These questionnaires guide the student on what behaviors to observe and suggest objective and subjective responses to these behaviors to be…

  11. Secondary structural analyses of ITS1 in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal RNA gene operon is interrupted by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS2. Although the secondary structure of ITS2 has been widely investigated, less is known about ITS1 and its structure. In this study, the secondary structure of ITS1 sequences for Paramecium and other ciliates was predicted. Each Paramecium ITS1 forms an open loop with three helices, A through C. Helix B was highly conserved among Paramecium, and similar helices were found in other ciliates. A phylogenetic analysis using the ITS1 sequences showed high-resolution, implying that ITS1 is a good tool for species-level analyses.

  12. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-03-11

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure-function relationship.

  13. A Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Finding the Optimal Placement of a Secondary Structure Topology in Cryo-EM Data.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abhishek; Ranjan, Desh; Zubair, Mohammad; He, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The determination of secondary structure topology is a critical step in deriving the atomic structures from the protein density maps obtained from electron cryomicroscopy technique. This step often relies on matching the secondary structure traces detected from the protein density map to the secondary structure sequence segments predicted from the amino acid sequence. Due to inaccuracies in both sources of information, a pool of possible secondary structure positions needs to be sampled. One way to approach the problem is to first derive a small number of possible topologies using existing matching algorithms, and then find the optimal placement for each possible topology. We present a dynamic programming method of Θ(Nq(2)h) to find the optimal placement for a secondary structure topology. We show that our algorithm requires significantly less computational time than the brute force method that is in the order of Θ(q(N) h).

  14. A new route to carbohydrate secondary and tertiary structure using Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical activity.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Nicola R; Almond, Andrew; Blanch, Ewan W

    2010-08-11

    The structural characterization of carbohydrate polymers is important for understanding their functions and behavior. However, mainstream structural biology tools are not applicable to many carbohydrate polymers, particularly at physiological concentrations. We report Raman and Raman optical activity spectra of hyaluronan polymer, the hyaluronan tetramer building block, and the two monosaccharide components glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine and identify marker bands corresponding to primary and secondary structure in glycosaminoglycans. Furthermore, we show that the hyaluronan polymer does not adopt tertiary structure under near-physiological conditions, confirming a proposed model of hyaluronan structural organization.

  15. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  16. Secondary structure formations of conotoxin genes: a possible role in mediating variability.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Kalyan Kumar

    2006-10-20

    Small venomous peptides called conotoxins produced by the predatory marine snail (genus Conus) present an interesting case for mutational studies. They have a high degree of amino acid variability among them yet they possess highly conserved structural elements that are defined by cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges along the length of the mature peptide. It has been observed that codons specifying these cysteines are also highly conserved. It is unknown how such codon conservation is maintained within the mature conotoxin gene since this entire region undergoes an accelerated rate of mutation. There is evidence suggesting that nucleic acids wield some influence in mechanisms that dictate the region and frequency where mutations occur in DNA. Nucleic acids exert this effect primarily through secondary structures that bring about local peaks and troughs in the energy relief of these transient formations. Secondary structure predictions of several conotoxin genes were analyzed to see if there was any correspondence between the highly variable regions of the conotoxin. Regions of the DNA encompassing the conserved Cys codons (and several other conserved amino acid codons) have been found to correspond to predicted secondary structures of higher stabilities. In stark contrast the regions of the conotoxin that have a higher degree of variation correlate to regions of lower stability. This striking co-relation allows for a simple model of inaccessibility of a mutator to these highly conserved regions of the conotoxin gene allowing them a relative degree of resistance towards change.

  17. Secondary structure adventures with Carl Woese.

    PubMed

    Noller, Harry F

    2014-01-01

    Not long after my arrival at UCSC as an assistant professor, I came across Carl Woese's paper "Molecular Mechanics of Translation: A Reciprocating Ratchet Mechanism." (1) In the days before the crystal structure of tRNA was known, Fuller and Hodgson (2) had proposed two alternative conformations for its anticodon loop; one was stacked on the 3' side (as later found in the crystal structure) and the other on the 5' side. In an ingenious and elegant model, Woese proposed that the conformation of the loop flips between Fuller and Hodgson's 5'- and 3'-stacked forms during protein synthesis, changing the local direction of the mRNA such that the identities of the tRNA binding sites alternated between binding aminoacyl-tRNA and peptidyl-tRNA. The model predicted that there are no A and P sites, only two binding sites whose identities changed following translation of each codon, and that there would be no translocation of tRNAs in the usual sense--only binding and release. I met Carl in person the following year when he presented a seminar on his ratchet model in Santa Cruz. He was chatting in my colleague Ralph Hinegardner's office in what Carl termed a "Little Jack Horner appointment" (the visitor sits and listens to his host describing "What a good boy am I"). He was of compact stature, and bore a striking resemblance to Oskar Werner in Truffaut's film "Jules and Jim." He projected the impression of a New-Age guru--a shiny black amulet suspended over the front of his black turtleneck sweater and a crown of prematurely white hair. Ralph asked me to explain to Carl what we were doing with ribosomes. I quickly summarized our early experiments that were pointing to a functional role for 16S rRNA. Carl regarded me silently, with a penetrating stare. He then turned to Ralph and said, in an ominous low voice, "I'm going to have some more tanks made as soon as I get back." Carl's beautiful model was, unfortunately, wrong--it was simpler and more elegant than the complex

  18. Secondary structure adventures with Carl Woese

    PubMed Central

    Noller, Harry F

    2014-01-01

    Not long after my arrival at UCSC as an assistant professor, I came across Carl Woese's paper “Molecular Mechanics of Translation: A Reciprocating Ratchet Mechanism.”1 In the days before the crystal structure of tRNA was known, Fuller and Hodgson2 had proposed two alternative conformations for its anticodon loop; one was stacked on the 3′ side (as later found in the crystal structure) and the other on the 5′ side. In an ingenious and elegant model, Woese proposed that the conformation of the loop flips between Fuller and Hodgson's 5′- and 3′-stacked forms during protein synthesis, changing the local direction of the mRNA such that the identities of the tRNA binding sites alternated between binding aminoacyl-tRNA and peptidyl-tRNA. The model predicted that there are no A and P sites, only two binding sites whose identities changed following translation of each codon, and that there would be no translocation of tRNAs in the usual sense—only binding and release. I met Carl in person the following year when he presented a seminar on his ratchet model in Santa Cruz. He was chatting in my colleague Ralph Hinegardner's office in what Carl termed a “Little Jack Horner appointment” (the visitor sits and listens to his host describing “What a good boy am I”). He was of compact stature, and bore a striking resemblance to Oskar Werner in Truffaut's film “Jules and Jim.” He projected the impression of a New-Age guru—a shiny black amulet suspended over the front of his black turtleneck sweater and a crown of prematurely white hair. Ralph asked me to explain to Carl what we were doing with ribosomes. I quickly summarized our early experiments that were pointing to a functional role for 16S rRNA. Carl regarded me silently, with a penetrating stare. He then turned to Ralph and said, in an ominous low voice, “I'm going to have some more tanks made as soon as I get back.” Carl's beautiful model was, unfortunately, wrong—it was simpler and more

  19. Peracetic acid for secondary effluent disinfection: a comprehensive performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Turolla, A; Mezzanotte, V; Nurizzo, C

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of previous research on secondary effluent disinfection by peracetic acid (PAA) integrated with new data about the effect of a preliminary flash-mixing step. The process was studied at bench and pilot scale to assess its performance for discharge in surface water and agricultural reuse (target microorganisms: Escherichia coli and faecal coliform bacteria). The purposes of the research were: (1) determining PAA decay and disinfection kinetics as a function of operating parameters, (2) evaluating PAA suitability as a disinfectant, (3) assessing long-term disinfection efficiency, (4) investigating disinfected effluent biological toxicity on some aquatic indicator organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum), (5) comparing PAA with conventional disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite, UV irradiation). PAA disinfection was capable of complying with Italian regulations on reuse (10 CFU/100 mL for E. coli) and was competitive with benchmarks. No regrowth phenomena were observed, as long as needed for agricultural reuse (29 h after disinfection), even at negligible concentrations of residual disinfectant. The toxic effect of PAA on the aquatic environment was due to the residual disinfectant in the water, rather than to chemical modification of the effluent.

  20. Can Computationally Designed Protein Sequences Improve Secondary Structure Prediction?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    with the structural classification of proteins ( SCOP ) database of known structural domains (Kuhlman and Baker, 2000; Rohl et al., 2004). Secondary...reported in the literature. Methods In this work, the Astral SCOP 1.75 (Murzin et al., 1995; Hubbard et al., 1999) structural domain database filtered...entry matching the query test sequence can be left out. A total of 6511 SCOP 1.75 domains were used after some domains were discarded due to large

  1. Mechanical tuning of elastomers via peptide secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanasekara, Nandula; Johnson, J. Casey; Korley, Lashanda T. J.

    2014-03-01

    Nature utilizes an array of design tools for engineering materials with multiple functions and tunable mechanical properties. The precise control of hierarchical structure, self-assembly, and secondary structure is essential to achieve the desired properties in bio-inspired materials design. We have developed a series of peptidic-poyurea hybrids to determine the effects of peptide secondary structure and hydrogen bonding arrangement on morphology, thermal and mechanical properties. These materials were fabricated by incorporating peptide segments containing either poly(β-benzyl-L-aspartate) or poly(ɛ-carbobenzyloxy-L-lysine) into non-chain extended polyureas to form either β-sheets or α-helix conformations based on peptide length. Infrared analysis proved the retention of peptide secondary structure when incorporated into peptidic-polyureas. The polymers containing β-sheet forming peptide blocks exhibited higher modulus and toughness due to intermolecular H-bonding. Additionally, higher peptide weight fractions lead to higher plateau moduli due to a transition of continuous domain morphology from a soft segment continuous to a fibrous and interconnected stiffer peptide domain. All the polymers exhibited microphase separated morphology with nanofibrous or ribbon-like structures. It is observed that fiber aspect ratio and percolation were influenced by the peptide secondary structure and the weight fraction.

  2. Prediction of protein secondary structure using probability based features and a hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Ghanty, Pradip; Pal, Nikhil R; Mudi, Rajani K

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose some co-occurrence probability-based features for prediction of protein secondary structure. The features are extracted using occurrence/nonoccurrence of secondary structures in the protein sequences. We explore two types of features: position-specific (based on position of amino acid on fragments of protein sequences) as well as position-independent (independent of amino acid position on fragments of protein sequences). We use a hybrid system, NEUROSVM, consisting of neural networks and support vector machines for classification of secondary structures. We propose two schemes NSVMps and NSVM for protein secondary structure prediction. The NSVMps uses position-specific probability-based features and NEUROSVM classifier whereas NSVM uses the same classifier with position-independent probability-based features. The proposed method falls in the single-sequence category of methods because it does not use any sequence profile information such as position specific scoring matrices (PSSM) derived from PSI-BLAST. Two widely used datasets RS126 and CB513 are used in the experiments. The results obtained using the proposed features and NEUROSVM classifier are better than most of the existing single-sequence prediction methods. Most importantly, the results using NSVMps that are obtained using lower dimensional features, are comparable to those by other existing methods. The NSVMps and NSVM are finally tested on target proteins of the critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). A larger dataset is used to compare the performance of the proposed methods with that of two recent single-sequence prediction methods. We also investigate the impact of presence of different amino acid residues (in protein sequences) that are responsible for the formation of different secondary structures.

  3. Mixed acid-base disorder secondary to topiramate use in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Golla, S.; Anandh, U.; Balasubramaniam, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a man with traumatic brain injury. He was started on to prophylactic topiramate which led to a mixed acid-base disorder. He had severe metabolic acidosis secondary to renal tubular acidification defect and respiratory alkalosis secondary to hyperventilation. Withdrawal of the offending drug led to the prompt resolution of the acid-base disturbance. PMID:27942179

  4. Secondary structure characterization of beta-lactamase inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Przybycien, T M; Dunn, J P; Valax, P; Georgiou, G

    1994-01-01

    The secondary structure of proteins in E. coli inclusion bodies was investigated via Raman spectroscopy. Inclusion bodies were purified from cells expressing different forms of RTEM beta-lactamase and grown at either 37 or 42 degrees C. All of the solid phase inclusion body samples examined gave amide I band spectra that were perturbed from that of the native, purified protein in both solution and powder forms; secondary structure estimates indicated significant decreases in alpha-helix and increases in beta-sheet contents in the inclusion body samples. The structure estimates for inclusion bodies isolated from 37 degrees C cultures were similar, regardless of aggregate localization in the E. coli cytoplasmic or periplasmic spaces or beta-lactamase precursor content. Inclusion bodies obtained from 42 degrees C cells exhibited a further reduction of alpha-helix and augmentation of beta-sheet contents relative to those from 37 degrees C cultures. These results are consistent with the paradigm for inclusion body formation via the self-association of intra-cellular folding intermediates having extensive secondary structure content. Further, the overall secondary structure content of inclusion bodies is not significantly affected by subcellular compartmentalization, but may be altered at increased temperatures.

  5. Primary and Secondary Sources of Gas-Phase Organic Acids from Diesel Exhaust.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Beth; Link, Michael F; Fulgham, S Ryan; Brophy, Patrick; Galang, Abril; Brune, William H; Jathar, Shantanu H; Farmer, Delphine K

    2017-09-19

    Organic acids have primary and secondary sources in the atmosphere, impact ecosystem health, and are useful metrics for identifying gaps in organic oxidation chemistry through model-measurement comparisons. We photooxidized (OH oxidation) primary emissions from diesel and biodiesel fuel types under two engine loads in an oxidative flow reactor. formic, butyric, and propanoic acids, but not methacrylic acid, have primary and secondary sources. Emission factors for these gas-phase acids varied from 0.3-8.4 mg kg(-1) fuel. Secondary chemistry enhanced these emissions by 1.1 (load) to 4.4 (idle) × after two OH-equivalent days. The relative enhancement in secondary organic acids in idle versus loaded conditions was due to increased precursor emissions, not faster reaction rates. Increased hydrocarbon emissions in idle conditions due to less complete combustion (associated with less oxidized gas-phase molecules) correlated to higher primary organic acid emissions. The lack of correlation between organic aerosol and organic acid concentrations downstream of the flow reactor indicates that the secondary products formed on different oxidation time scales and that despite being photochemical products, organic acids are poor tracers for secondary organic aerosol formation from diesel exhaust. Ignoring secondary chemistry from diesel exhaust would lead to underestimates of both organic aerosol and gas-phase organic acids.

  6. Thermodynamic and solution state NMR characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids to STARD5.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Cabana, Jérôme; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2013-11-01

    STARD5 is a member of the STARD4 sub-family of START domain containing proteins specialized in the non-vesicular transport of lipids and sterols. We recently reported that STARD5 binds primary bile acids. Herein, we report on the biophysical and structural characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids by STARD5 at physiological concentrations. We found that the absence of the 7α-OH group and its epimerization increase the affinity of secondary bile acids for STARD5. According to NMR titration and molecular modeling, the affinity depends mainly on the number and positions of the steroid ring hydroxyl groups and to a lesser extent on the presence or type of bile acid side-chain conjugation. Primary and secondary bile acids have different binding modes and display different positioning within the STARD5 binding pocket. The relative STARD5 affinity for the different bile acids studied is: DCA>LCA>CDCA>GDCA>TDCA>CA>UDCA. TCA and GCA do not bind significantly to STARD5. The impact of the ligand chemical structure on the thermodynamics of binding is discussed. The discovery of these new ligands suggests that STARD5 is involved in the cellular response elicited by bile acids and offers many entry points to decipher its physiological role.

  7. Ensemble-based prediction of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Hoos, Holger H

    2013-04-24

    Accurate structure prediction methods play an important role for the understanding of RNA function. Energy-based, pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction is one of the most widely used and versatile approaches, and improved methods for this task have received much attention over the past five years. Despite the impressive progress that as been achieved in this area, existing evaluations of the prediction accuracy achieved by various algorithms do not provide a comprehensive, statistically sound assessment. Furthermore, while there is increasing evidence that no prediction algorithm consistently outperforms all others, no work has been done to exploit the complementary strengths of multiple approaches. In this work, we present two contributions to the area of RNA secondary structure prediction. Firstly, we use state-of-the-art, resampling-based statistical methods together with a previously published and increasingly widely used dataset of high-quality RNA structures to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of existing RNA secondary structure prediction procedures. The results from this evaluation clarify the performance relationship between ten well-known existing energy-based pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction methods and clearly demonstrate the progress that has been achieved in recent years. Secondly, we introduce AveRNA, a generic and powerful method for combining a set of existing secondary structure prediction procedures into an ensemble-based method that achieves significantly higher prediction accuracies than obtained from any of its component procedures. Our new, ensemble-based method, AveRNA, improves the state of the art for energy-based, pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction by exploiting the complementary strengths of multiple existing prediction procedures, as demonstrated using a state-of-the-art statistical resampling approach. In addition, AveRNA allows an intuitive and effective control of the trade-off between

  8. Ensemble-based prediction of RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate structure prediction methods play an important role for the understanding of RNA function. Energy-based, pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction is one of the most widely used and versatile approaches, and improved methods for this task have received much attention over the past five years. Despite the impressive progress that as been achieved in this area, existing evaluations of the prediction accuracy achieved by various algorithms do not provide a comprehensive, statistically sound assessment. Furthermore, while there is increasing evidence that no prediction algorithm consistently outperforms all others, no work has been done to exploit the complementary strengths of multiple approaches. Results In this work, we present two contributions to the area of RNA secondary structure prediction. Firstly, we use state-of-the-art, resampling-based statistical methods together with a previously published and increasingly widely used dataset of high-quality RNA structures to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of existing RNA secondary structure prediction procedures. The results from this evaluation clarify the performance relationship between ten well-known existing energy-based pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction methods and clearly demonstrate the progress that has been achieved in recent years. Secondly, we introduce AveRNA, a generic and powerful method for combining a set of existing secondary structure prediction procedures into an ensemble-based method that achieves significantly higher prediction accuracies than obtained from any of its component procedures. Conclusions Our new, ensemble-based method, AveRNA, improves the state of the art for energy-based, pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction by exploiting the complementary strengths of multiple existing prediction procedures, as demonstrated using a state-of-the-art statistical resampling approach. In addition, AveRNA allows an intuitive and effective

  9. Comparison of Hensen's node and retinoic acid in secondary axis induction in the early chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Solursh, M

    1992-10-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) and Hensen's node, the organizer center in the chick embryo, have been shown to have polarizing activity when applied or grafted into the chick limb bud. Here we investigate and compare the effects of RA and grafted Hensen's node on the early chick embryo. Anion exchange beads soaked with RA at concentrations ranging from 5 to 100 ng/ml and implanted on the anterior side or on the left side of the host anteroposterior axis of a stage 4 chick embryo in ovo have the ability to induce secondary axis formation, while beads soaked with RA of the same concentration and implanted on the right side or on the posterior side of the host axis are unable to induce the secondary axis. All of the induced axes contain trunk-tail structures. Hensen's node from quail embryos implanted into the early chick blastoderm could also cause the formation of secondary axes in addition to self-differentiation of the graft into a secondary axis. Both RA and grafted Hensen's node caused the inhibition of forebrain development with an increase in hindbrain development and the host heart to loop in an abnormal direction. The results support the hypothesis that Hensen's node is a source of RA which is involved in early embryogenesis. Alternatively, RA might stimulate the formation of Hensen's nodal properties in adjacent tissue.

  10. Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Eleonora; Lutz, Benjamin; Ratz, Sebastian; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Rémi; Schug, Alexander; Weigt, Martin

    2015-12-02

    Despite the biological importance of non-coding RNA, their structural characterization remains challenging. Making use of the rapidly growing sequence databases, we analyze nucleotide coevolution across homologous sequences via Direct-Coupling Analysis to detect nucleotide-nucleotide contacts. For a representative set of riboswitches, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis in combination with a generalized Nussinov algorithm systematically improve the results of RNA secondary structure prediction beyond traditional covariance approaches based on mutual information. Even more importantly, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis are enriched in tertiary structure contacts. By integrating these predictions into molecular modeling tools, systematically improved tertiary structure predictions can be obtained, as compared to using secondary structure information alone. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Asymptotic number of hairpins of saturated RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Clote, Peter; Kranakis, Evangelos; Krizanc, Danny

    2013-12-01

    In the absence of chaperone molecules, RNA folding is believed to depend on the distribution of kinetic traps in the energy landscape of all secondary structures. Kinetic traps in the Nussinov energy model are precisely those secondary structures that are saturated, meaning that no base pair can be added without introducing either a pseudoknot or base triple. In this paper, we compute the asymptotic expected number of hairpins in saturated structures. For instance, if every hairpin is required to contain at least θ=3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can base-pair is p=3/8, then the asymptotic number of saturated structures is 1.34685[Symbol: see text]n (-3/2)[Symbol: see text]1.62178 (n) , and the asymptotic expected number of hairpins follows a normal distribution with mean [Formula: see text]. Similar results are given for values θ=1,3, and p=1,1/2,3/8; for instance, when θ=1 and p=1, the asymptotic expected number of hairpins in saturated secondary structures is 0.123194[Symbol: see text]n, a value greater than the asymptotic expected number 0.105573[Symbol: see text]n of hairpins over all secondary structures. Since RNA binding targets are often found in hairpin regions, it follows that saturated structures present potentially more binding targets than nonsaturated structures, on average. Next, we describe a novel algorithm to compute the hairpin profile of a given RNA sequence: given RNA sequence a 1,…,a n , for each integer k, we compute that secondary structure S k having minimum energy in the Nussinov energy model, taken over all secondary structures having k hairpins. We expect that an extension of our algorithm to the Turner energy model may provide more accurate structure prediction for particular RNAs, such as tRNAs and purine riboswitches, known to have a particular number of hairpins. Mathematica(™) computations, C and Python source code, and additional supplementary information are available at the website http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAhairpinProfile/ .

  12. Structure of Secondary Crystals in Ethylene-Based Ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Loo, Y.-L.; Huang, Y. E.; Lee, L.-B. W.; Register, R. A.

    2003-03-01

    A typical DSC thermogram of an ethylene-(meth)acrylic acid ionomer displays two melting endotherms: one near 100^oC reflecting the melting of primary ethylene crystals, and one at 40-60^oC which we have shown via simultaneous SAXS/WAXS/DSC to arise from the melting of interlamellar secondary crystals. Dynamic DSC (DDSC) confirms that the two peaks reflect a bimodal crystal thickness distribution, rather than a superposition of melting and recrystallization events. The melting temperature of these secondary crystals, estimated to be 2.5-3.5 nm thick, is sensitive to annealing history. DDSC also indicates that these secondary crystals melt irreversibly, as expected if each must be individually nucleated. The 2-D SAXS patterns of highly-oriented blown films of such ionomers show intense peaks, arising from the polyethylene lamellar crystallites, along the direction of principal orientation. Comparing the azimuthal variation in SAXS peak intensity at temperatures below and above the low-temperature endotherm reveals that the secondary crystallites are significantly oriented, but less so than the primary lamellae. Thus, the secondary interlamellar crystals also have a lamellar (anisotropic) habit, rather than resembling fringed micelles (isotropic).

  13. Secondary Structure Predictions for Long RNA Sequences Based on Inversion Excursions and MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Yehdego, Daniel T; Zhang, Boyu; Kodimala, Vikram K R; Johnson, Kyle L; Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2013-05-01

    Secondary structures of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Experimental observations and computing limitations suggest that we can approach the secondary structure prediction problem for long RNA sequences by segmenting them into shorter chunks, predicting the secondary structures of each chunk individually using existing prediction programs, and then assembling the results to give the structure of the original sequence. The selection of cutting points is a crucial component of the segmenting step. Noting that stem-loops and pseudoknots always contain an inversion, i.e., a stretch of nucleotides followed closely by its inverse complementary sequence, we developed two cutting methods for segmenting long RNA sequences based on inversion excursions: the centered and optimized method. Each step of searching for inversions, chunking, and predictions can be performed in parallel. In this paper we use a MapReduce framework, i.e., Hadoop, to extensively explore meaningful inversion stem lengths and gap sizes for the segmentation and identify correlations between chunking methods and prediction accuracy. We show that for a set of long RNA sequences in the RFAM database, whose secondary structures are known to contain pseudoknots, our approach predicts secondary structures more accurately than methods that do not segment the sequence, when the latter predictions are possible computationally. We also show that, as sequences exceed certain lengths, some programs cannot computationally predict pseudoknots while our chunking methods can. Overall, our predicted structures still retain the accuracy level of the original prediction programs when compared with known experimental secondary structure.

  14. Secondary Education, Social Structure and Development in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Economic and Social Council, New York, NY.

    This work is an attempt to analyze the development of education, particularly secondary education, in order to identify the special features of educational structure in Latin America. The educational systems are examined within the following contexts: Literacy Training; Educational Levels (which considers the question of access to formal…

  15. Secondary Structure Transition and Critical Stress for a Model of Spider Silk Assembly.

    PubMed

    Giesa, Tristan; Perry, Carole C; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-08

    Spiders spin their silk from an aqueous solution to a solid fiber in ambient conditions. However, to date, the assembly mechanism in the spider silk gland has not been satisfactorily explained. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to model Nephila clavipes MaSp1 dragline silk formation under shear flow and determine the secondary structure transitions leading to the experimentally observed fiber structures. While no experiments are performed on the silk fiber itself, insights from this polypeptide model can be transferred to the fiber scale. The novelty of this study lies in the calculation of the shear stress (300-700 MPa) required for fiber formation and identification of the amino acid residues involved in the transition. This is the first time that the shear stress has been quantified in connection with a secondary structure transition. By study of molecules containing varying numbers of contiguous MaSp1 repeats, we determine that the smallest molecule size giving rise to a "silk-like" structure contains six polyalanine repeats. Through a probability analysis of the secondary structure, we identify specific amino acids that transition from α-helix to β-sheet. In addition to portions of the polyalanine section, these amino acids include glycine, leucine, and glutamine. The stability of β-sheet structures appears to arise from a close proximity in space of helices in the initial spidroin state. Our results are in agreement with the forces exerted by spiders in the silking process and the experimentally determined global secondary structure of spidroin and pulled MaSp1 silk. Our study emphasizes the role of shear in the assembly process of silk and can guide the design of microfluidic devices that attempt to mimic the natural spinning process and predict molecular requirements for the next generation of silk-based functional materials.

  16. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-03-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. PCI-SS: MISO dynamic nonlinear protein secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Green, James R; Korenberg, Michael J; Aboul-Magd, Mohammed O

    2009-07-17

    Since the function of a protein is largely dictated by its three dimensional configuration, determining a protein's structure is of fundamental importance to biology. Here we report on a novel approach to determining the one dimensional secondary structure of proteins (distinguishing alpha-helices, beta-strands, and non-regular structures) from primary sequence data which makes use of Parallel Cascade Identification (PCI), a powerful technique from the field of nonlinear system identification. Using PSI-BLAST divergent evolutionary profiles as input data, dynamic nonlinear systems are built through a black-box approach to model the process of protein folding. Genetic algorithms (GAs) are applied in order to optimize the architectural parameters of the PCI models. The three-state prediction problem is broken down into a combination of three binary sub-problems and protein structure classifiers are built using 2 layers of PCI classifiers. Careful construction of the optimization, training, and test datasets ensures that no homology exists between any training and testing data. A detailed comparison between PCI and 9 contemporary methods is provided over a set of 125 new protein chains guaranteed to be dissimilar to all training data. Unlike other secondary structure prediction methods, here a web service is developed to provide both human- and machine-readable interfaces to PCI-based protein secondary structure prediction. This server, called PCI-SS, is available at http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/PCISS. In addition to a dynamic PHP-generated web interface for humans, a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) interface is added to permit invocation of the PCI-SS service remotely. This machine-readable interface facilitates incorporation of PCI-SS into multi-faceted systems biology analysis pipelines requiring protein secondary structure information, and greatly simplifies high-throughput analyses. XML is used to represent the input protein sequence data and also to encode

  18. The impact of RNA secondary structure on read start locations on the Illumina sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Price, Adam; Garhyan, Jaishree; Gibas, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is subject to sequence dependent bias, which must be accounted for if researchers are to make precise measurements and draw accurate conclusions from their data. A widely studied source of bias in sequencing is the GC content bias, in which levels of GC content in a genomic region effect the number of reads produced during sequencing. Although some research has been performed on methods to correct for GC bias, there has been little effort to understand the underlying mechanism. The availability of sequencing protocols that target the specific location of structure in nucleic acid molecules enables us to investigate the underlying molecular origin of observed GC bias in sequencing. By applying a parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS) protocol to bacterial genomes of varying GC content, we are able to observe the relationship between local RNA secondary structure and sequencing outcome, and to establish RNA secondary structure as the significant contributing factor to observed GC bias.

  19. The impact of RNA secondary structure on read start locations on the Illumina sequencing platform

    PubMed Central

    Price, Adam; Garhyan, Jaishree

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is subject to sequence dependent bias, which must be accounted for if researchers are to make precise measurements and draw accurate conclusions from their data. A widely studied source of bias in sequencing is the GC content bias, in which levels of GC content in a genomic region effect the number of reads produced during sequencing. Although some research has been performed on methods to correct for GC bias, there has been little effort to understand the underlying mechanism. The availability of sequencing protocols that target the specific location of structure in nucleic acid molecules enables us to investigate the underlying molecular origin of observed GC bias in sequencing. By applying a parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS) protocol to bacterial genomes of varying GC content, we are able to observe the relationship between local RNA secondary structure and sequencing outcome, and to establish RNA secondary structure as the significant contributing factor to observed GC bias. PMID:28245230

  20. Carboxylic acids in secondary aerosols from oxidation of cyclic monoterpenes by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Glasius, M.; Lahaniati, M.; Calogirou, A.; Di Bella, D.; Jensen, N.R.; Hjorth, J.; Kotzias, D.; Larsen, B.R.

    2000-03-15

    A series of smog chamber experiments have been conducted in which five cyclic monoterpenes were oxidized by ozone. The evolved secondary aerosol was analyzed by GC-MS and HPLC-MS for nonvolatile polar oxidation products with emphasis on the identification of carboxylic acids. Three classes of compounds were determined at concentration levels corresponding to low percentage molar yields: i.e., dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and hydroxyketocarboxylic acids. Carboxylic acids are highly polar and have lower vapor pressures than their corresponding aldehydes and may thus play an important role in secondary organic aerosol formation processes. The most abundant carboxylic acids were the following: cis-pinic acid AB1(cis-3-carboxy-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) from {alpha} and {beta}-pinene; cis-pinonic acid A3 (cis-3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) and cis-10-hydroxypinonic acid Ab6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxyacetylcyclobutyl-ethanoic acid) from {alpha}-pinene and {beta}-pinene; cis-3-caric acid C1 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-cyclopropyldiethanoic acid), cis-3-caronic acid C3 (2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid), and cis-10-hydroxy-3-caronic acid C6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3(hydroxy-2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid) from 3-carene; cis-sabinic acid S1 (cis-2-carboxy-1-isopropylcyclopropylethanoic acid) from sabinene; limonic acid L1 (3-isopropenylhexanedioic acid), limononic acid L3 (3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanoic acid), 7-hydroxy-limononic acid L6 (3-isopropenyl-7-hydroxy-6-oxoheptanoic acid), and 7-hydroxylimononic acid Lg{prime} (7-hydroxy-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoic acid) from limonene.

  1. The structural basis of secondary active transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R; Krämer, Reinhard; Ziegler, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Secondary active transporters couple the free energy of the electrochemical potential of one solute to the transmembrane movement of another. As a basic mechanistic explanation for their transport function the model of alternating access was put forward more than 40 years ago, and has been supported by numerous kinetic, biochemical and biophysical studies. According to this model, the transporter exposes its substrate binding site(s) to one side of the membrane or the other during transport catalysis, requiring a substantial conformational change of the carrier protein. In the light of recent structural data for a number of secondary transport proteins, we analyze the model of alternating access in more detail, and correlate it with specific structural and chemical properties of the transporters, such as their assignment to different functional states in the catalytic cycle of the respective transporter, the definition of substrate binding sites, the type of movement of the central part of the carrier harboring the substrate binding site, as well as the impact of symmetry on fold-specific conformational changes. Besides mediating the transmembrane movement of solutes, the mechanism of secondary carriers inherently involves a mechanistic coupling of substrate flux to the electrochemical potential of co-substrate ions or solutes. Mainly because of limitations in resolution of available transporter structures, this important aspect of secondary transport cannot yet be substantiated by structural data to the same extent as the conformational change aspect. We summarize the concepts of coupling in secondary transport and discuss them in the context of the available evidence for ion binding to specific sites and the impact of the ions on the conformational state of the carrier protein, which together lead to mechanistic models for coupling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of RNA secondary structure, including pseudoknotting, by computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, J P; van den Berg, M; van Batenburg, E; Pleij, C

    1990-01-01

    A computer program is presented which determines the secondary structure of linear RNA molecules by simulating a hypothetical process of folding. This process implies the concept of 'nucleation centres', regions in RNA which locally trigger the folding. During the simulation, the RNA is allowed to fold into pseudoknotted structures, unlike all other programs predicting RNA secondary structure. The simulation uses published, experimentally determined free energy values for nearest neighbour base pair stackings and loop regions, except for new extrapolated values for loops larger than seven nucleotides. The free energy value for a loop arising from pseudoknot formation is set to a single, estimated value of 4.2 kcal/mole. Especially in the case of long RNA sequences, our program appears superior to other secondary structure predicting programs described so far, as tests on tRNAs, the LSU intron of Tetrahymena thermophila and a number of plant viral RNAs show. In addition, pseudoknotted structures are often predicted successfully. The program is written in mainframe APL and is adapted to run on IBM compatible PCs, Atari ST and Macintosh personal computers. On an 8 MHz 8088 standard PC without coprocessor, using STSC APL, it folds a sequence of 700 nucleotides in one and a half hour. PMID:1693421

  3. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  4. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling, including pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Hajdin, Christine E.; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Huggins, Wayne; Leonard, Christopher W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    A pseudoknot forms in an RNA when nucleotides in a loop pair with a region outside the helices that close the loop. Pseudoknots occur relatively rarely in RNA but are highly overrepresented in functionally critical motifs in large catalytic RNAs, in riboswitches, and in regulatory elements of viruses. Pseudoknots are usually excluded from RNA structure prediction algorithms. When included, these pairings are difficult to model accurately, especially in large RNAs, because allowing this structure dramatically increases the number of possible incorrect folds and because it is difficult to search the fold space for an optimal structure. We have developed a concise secondary structure modeling approach that combines SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experimental chemical probing information and a simple, but robust, energy model for the entropic cost of single pseudoknot formation. Structures are predicted with iterative refinement, using a dynamic programming algorithm. This melded experimental and thermodynamic energy function predicted the secondary structures and the pseudoknots for a set of 21 challenging RNAs of known structure ranging in size from 34 to 530 nt. On average, 93% of known base pairs were predicted, and all pseudoknots in well-folded RNAs were identified. PMID:23503844

  5. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Markus E; Scheid, Anika; Weinberg, Frank

    2011-10-12

    Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform) random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure). Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold) ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2) for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n) while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2). Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with logarithmized probabilities. A number of

  6. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. Results In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform) random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure). Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold) ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2) for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n) while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2). Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with logarithmized probabilities

  7. Using circular dichroism spectra to estimate protein secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Norma J.

    2009-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is an excellent tool for rapid determination of the secondary structure and folding properties of proteins that have been obtained using recombinant techniques or purified from tissues. The most widely used applications of protein CD are to determine whether an expressed, purified protein is folded, or if a mutation affects its conformation or stability. In addition, it can be used to study protein interactions. This protocol details the basic steps of obtaining and interpreting CD data and methods for analyzing spectra to estimate the secondary structural composition of proteins. CD has the advantage that it is that measurements may be made on multiple samples containing 20 µg or less of proteins in physiological buffers in a few hours. However, it does not give the residue-specific information that can be obtained by X-ray crystallography or NMR. PMID:17406547

  8. Automatic RNA secondary structure determination stochastic context-free grammars

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, L.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a method for predicting the common secondary structure of large RNA multiple alignments using only the information in the alignment. It uses a series of progressively more sensitive searches of the data in an iterative manner to discover regions of base pairing; the first pass examines the entire multiple alignment. The searching uses two methods to find base pairings. Mutual information is used to measure covariation between pairs of columns in the multiple alignment and a minimum length encoding method is used to detect column pairs with high potential to base pair. Dynamic programming is used to recover the optimal tree made up of the best potential base pairs and to create a stochastic context-free grammar. The information in the tree guides the next iteration of searching. The method is similar to the traditional comparative sequence analysis technique. The method correctly identifies most of the common secondary structure in 16S and 23S rRNA.

  9. Electronic Transport via Homopeptides: The Role of Side Chains and Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Sepunaru, Lior; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Lovrinčić, Robert; Gavrilov, Yulian; Agrawal, Piyush; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2015-08-05

    Many novel applications in bioelectronics rely on the interaction between biomolecules and electronically conducting substrates. However, crucial knowledge about the relation between electronic transport via peptides and their amino-acid composition is still absent. Here, we report results of electronic transport measurements via several homopeptides as a function of their structural properties and temperature. We demonstrate that the conduction through the peptide depends on its length and secondary structure as well as on the nature of the constituent amino acid and charge of its residue. We support our experimental observations with high-level electronic structure calculations and suggest off-resonance tunneling as the dominant conduction mechanism via extended peptides. Our findings indicate that both peptide composition and structure can affect the efficiency of electronic transport across peptides.

  10. Coating concrete secondary containment structures exposed to agrichemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, M.F.; Nguyen, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Concrete has traditionally been the material of choice for building secondary containment structures because it is relatively inexpensive and has structural properties which make it ideal for supporting the loads of vehicles and large tanks. However, concrete`s chemical properties make it susceptible to corrosion by some common fertilizers. Though fairly impervious to water movement, concrete is easily penetrated by vapors and solvents. It is also prone to cracking. For these reasons, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes that concrete alone may not provide an effective barrier to pesticide movement and has proposed that concrete in pesticide secondary containment structures be sealed or coated to reduce its permeability. Some state secondary containment regulations require that concrete exposed to fertilizers and pesticides be sealed or protected with a coating. Lacking guidelines, some retailers have used penetrating sealants to satisfy the law, even though these products provide little protection from chemical attack nor do they prevent pesticide egress. Other retailers who have applied thick film coatings which were properly selected have had disastrous results because the application was poorly done. Consequently, much skepticism exists regarding the performance and benefit of protective coatings.

  11. A graphic approach to evaluate algorithms of secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C T; Zhang, R

    2000-04-01

    Algorithms of secondary structure prediction have undergone the developments of nearly 30 years. However, the problem of how to appropriately evaluate and compare algorithms has not yet completely solved. A graphic method to evaluate algorithms of secondary structure prediction has been proposed here. Traditionally, the performance of an algorithm is evaluated by a number, i.e., accuracy of various definitions. Instead of a number, we use a graph to completely evaluate an algorithm, in which the mapping points are distributed in a three-dimensional space. Each point represents the predictive result of the secondary structure of a protein. Because the distribution of mapping points in the 3D space generally contains more information than a number or a set of numbers, it is expected that algorithms may be evaluated and compared by the proposed graphic method more objectively. Based on the point distribution, six evaluation parameters are proposed, which describe the overall performance of the algorithm evaluated. Furthermore, the graphic method is simple and intuitive. As an example of application, two advanced algorithms, i.e., the PHD and NNpredict methods, are evaluated and compared. It is shown that there is still much room for further improvement for both algorithms. It is pointed out that the accuracy for predicting either the alpha-helix or beta-strand in proteins with higher alpha-helix or beta-strand content, respectively, should be greatly improved for both algorithms.

  12. Elucidating protein secondary structure with circular dichroism and a neural network.

    PubMed

    Hall, Vincent; Nash, Anthony; Hines, Evor; Rodger, Alison

    2013-12-15

    Circular dichroism spectroscopy is a quick method for determining the average secondary structures of proteins, probing their interactions with their environment, and aiding drug discovery. This article describes the development of a self-organising map structure-fitting methodology named secondary structure neural network (SSNN) to aid this process and reduce the level of expertise required. SSNN uses a database of spectra from proteins with known X-ray structures; prediction of structures for new proteins is then possible. It has been designed as 3 units: SSNN1 takes spectra for known proteins, clusters them into a map, and SSNN2 creates a matching structure map. SSNN3 places unknown spectra on the map and gives them structure vectors. SSNN3 output illustrates the process and results obtained. We detail the strengths and weaknesses of SSNN and compare it with widely accepted structure fitting programs. Current input format is Δε per amino acid residue from 240 to 190 nm in 1 nm steps for the known and unknown proteins and a vector summarizing the secondary structure elements of the known proteins. The format is readily modified to include input data with, for example, extended wavelength ranges or different assignment of secondary structures. SSNN can be used either pretrained with a reference set from the CDPro web site (direct application of SSNN3, with the provided output from SSNN1 and SSNN2) or all three modules can be used as required. SSNN3 is available trained (with the reference set of the 48-spectra set used in this work complemented by five additional spectra) at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/chemistry/research/arodger/arodgergroup/research_intro/instrumentation/ssnn/. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Identification of local variations within secondary structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-05-01

    Secondary-structure elements (SSEs) play an important role in the folding of proteins. Identification of SSEs in proteins is a common problem in structural biology. A new method, ASSP (Assignment of Secondary Structure in Proteins), using only the path traversed by the C(α) atoms has been developed. The algorithm is based on the premise that the protein structure can be divided into continuous or uniform stretches, which can be defined in terms of helical parameters, and depending on their values the stretches can be classified into different SSEs, namely α-helices, 310-helices, π-helices, extended β-strands and polyproline II (PPII) and other left-handed helices. The methodology was validated using an unbiased clustering of these parameters for a protein data set consisting of 1008 protein chains, which suggested that there are seven well defined clusters associated with different SSEs. Apart from α-helices and extended β-strands, 310-helices and π-helices were also found to occur in substantial numbers. ASSP was able to discriminate non-α-helical segments from flanking α-helices, which were often identified as part of α-helices by other algorithms. ASSP can also lead to the identification of novel SSEs. It is believed that ASSP could provide a better understanding of the finer nuances of protein secondary structure and could make an important contribution to the better understanding of comparatively less frequently occurring structural motifs. At the same time, it can contribute to the identification of novel SSEs. A standalone version of the program for the Linux as well as the Windows operating systems is freely downloadable and a web-server version is also available at http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/assp/index.php.

  14. Chiral discrimination of secondary alcohols and carboxylic acids by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pal, Indrani; Chaudhari, Sachin R; Suryaprakash, Nagaraja Rao

    2015-02-01

    The manuscript reports two novel ternary ion-pair complexes, which serve as chiral solvating agents, for enantiodiscrimination of secondary alcohols and carboxylic acids. The protocol for discrimination of secondary alcohols is designed by using one equivalent mixture each of enantiopure mandelic acid, 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and a chiral alcohol. For discrimination of carboxylic acids, the ternary complex is obtained by one equivalent mixture each of enantiopure chiral alcohol, DMAP and a carboxylic acid. The designed protocols also permit accurate measurement of enantiomeric composition.

  15. RNAMotif, an RNA secondary structure definition and search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Macke, Thomas J.; Ecker, David J.; Gutell, Robin R.; Gautheret, Daniel; Case, David A.; Sampath, Rangarajan

    2001-01-01

    RNA molecules fold into characteristic secondary and tertiary structures that account for their diverse functional activities. Many of these RNA structures are assembled from a collection of RNA structural motifs. These basic building blocks are used repeatedly, and in various combinations, to form different RNA types and define their unique structural and functional properties. Identification of recurring RNA structural motifs will therefore enhance our understanding of RNA structure and help associate elements of RNA structure with functional and regulatory elements. Our goal was to develop a computer program that can describe an RNA structural element of any complexity and then search any nucleotide sequence database, including the complete prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, for these structural elements. Here we describe in detail a new computational motif search algorithm, RNAMotif, and demonstrate its utility with some motif search examples. RNAMotif differs from other motif search tools in two important aspects: first, the structure definition language is more flexible and can specify any type of base–base interaction; second, RNAMotif provides a user controlled scoring section that can be used to add capabilities that patterns alone cannot provide. PMID:11713323

  16. RNAMotif, an RNA secondary structure definition and search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Macke, T J; Ecker, D J; Gutell, R R; Gautheret, D; Case, D A; Sampath, R

    2001-11-15

    RNA molecules fold into characteristic secondary and tertiary structures that account for their diverse functional activities. Many of these RNA structures are assembled from a collection of RNA structural motifs. These basic building blocks are used repeatedly, and in various combinations, to form different RNA types and define their unique structural and functional properties. Identification of recurring RNA structural motifs will therefore enhance our understanding of RNA structure and help associate elements of RNA structure with functional and regulatory elements. Our goal was to develop a computer program that can describe an RNA structural element of any complexity and then search any nucleotide sequence database, including the complete prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, for these structural elements. Here we describe in detail a new computational motif search algorithm, RNAMotif, and demonstrate its utility with some motif search examples. RNAMotif differs from other motif search tools in two important aspects: first, the structure definition language is more flexible and can specify any type of base-base interaction; second, RNAMotif provides a user controlled scoring section that can be used to add capabilities that patterns alone cannot provide.

  17. Statistical evaluation of improvement in RNA secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenjiang; Almudevar, Anthony; Mathews, David H.

    2012-01-01

    With discovery of diverse roles for RNA, its centrality in cellular functions has become increasingly apparent. A number of algorithms have been developed to predict RNA secondary structure. Their performance has been benchmarked by comparing structure predictions to reference secondary structures. Generally, algorithms are compared against each other and one is selected as best without statistical testing to determine whether the improvement is significant. In this work, it is demonstrated that the prediction accuracies of methods correlate with each other over sets of sequences. One possible reason for this correlation is that many algorithms use the same underlying principles. A set of benchmarks published previously for programs that predict a structure common to three or more sequences is statistically analyzed as an example to show that it can be rigorously evaluated using paired two-sample t-tests. Finally, a pipeline of statistical analyses is proposed to guide the choice of data set size and performance assessment for benchmarks of structure prediction. The pipeline is applied using 5S rRNA sequences as an example. PMID:22139940

  18. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Using High-throughput SHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Rausch, Jason W.; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the function of RNA involved in biological processes requires a thorough knowledge of RNA structure. Toward this end, the methodology dubbed "high-throughput selective 2' hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension", or SHAPE, allows prediction of RNA secondary structure with single nucleotide resolution. This approach utilizes chemical probing agents that preferentially acylate single stranded or flexible regions of RNA in aqueous solution. Sites of chemical modification are detected by reverse transcription of the modified RNA, and the products of this reaction are fractionated by automated capillary electrophoresis (CE). Since reverse transcriptase pauses at those RNA nucleotides modified by the SHAPE reagents, the resulting cDNA library indirectly maps those ribonucleotides that are single stranded in the context of the folded RNA. Using ShapeFinder software, the electropherograms produced by automated CE are processed and converted into nucleotide reactivity tables that are themselves converted into pseudo-energy constraints used in the RNAStructure (v5.3) prediction algorithm. The two-dimensional RNA structures obtained by combining SHAPE probing with in silico RNA secondary structure prediction have been found to be far more accurate than structures obtained using either method alone. PMID:23748604

  19. Computational RNA secondary structure design: empirical complexity and improved methods

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Hernández, Rosalía; Hoos, Holger H; Condon, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Background We investigate the empirical complexity of the RNA secondary structure design problem, that is, the scaling of the typical difficulty of the design task for various classes of RNA structures as the size of the target structure is increased. The purpose of this work is to understand better the factors that make RNA structures hard to design for existing, high-performance algorithms. Such understanding provides the basis for improving the performance of one of the best algorithms for this problem, RNA-SSD, and for characterising its limitations. Results To gain insights into the practical complexity of the problem, we present a scaling analysis on random and biologically motivated structures using an improved version of the RNA-SSD algorithm, and also the RNAinverse algorithm from the Vienna package. Since primary structure constraints are relevant for designing RNA structures, we also investigate the correlation between the number and the location of the primary structure constraints when designing structures and the performance of the RNA-SSD algorithm. The scaling analysis on random and biologically motivated structures supports the hypothesis that the running time of both algorithms scales polynomially with the size of the structure. We also found that the algorithms are in general faster when constraints are placed only on paired bases in the structure. Furthermore, we prove that, according to the standard thermodynamic model, for some structures that the RNA-SSD algorithm was unable to design, there exists no sequence whose minimum free energy structure is the target structure. Conclusion Our analysis helps to better understand the strengths and limitations of both the RNA-SSD and RNAinverse algorithms, and suggests ways in which the performance of these algorithms can be further improved. PMID:17266771

  20. Statistical mechanics of secondary structures formed by random RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, R; Hwa, T

    2002-03-01

    The formation of secondary structures by a random RNA sequence is studied as a model system for the sequence-structure problem omnipresent in biopolymers. Several toy energy models are introduced to allow detailed analytical and numerical studies. First, a two-replica calculation is performed. By mapping the two-replica problem to the denaturation of a single homogeneous RNA molecule in six-dimensional embedding space, we show that sequence disorder is perturbatively irrelevant, i.e., an RNA molecule with weak sequence disorder is in a molten phase where many secondary structures with comparable total energy coexist. A numerical study of various models at high temperature reproduces behaviors characteristic of the molten phase. On the other hand, a scaling argument based on the external statistics of rare regions can be constructed to show that the low-temperature phase is unstable to sequence disorder. We performed a detailed numerical study of the low-temperature phase using the droplet theory as a guide, and characterized the statistics of large-scale, low-energy excitations of the secondary structures from the ground state structure. We find the excitation energy to grow very slowly (i.e., logarithmically) with the length scale of the excitation, suggesting the existence of a marginal glass phase. The transition between the low-temperature glass phase and the high-temperature molten phase is also characterized numerically. It is revealed by a change in the coefficient of the logarithmic excitation energy, from being disorder dominated to being entropy dominated.

  1. Identify five kinds of simple super-secondary structures with quadratic discriminant algorithm based on the chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kou, Gaoshan; Feng, Yonge

    2015-09-07

    The biological function of protein is largely determined by its spatial structure. The research on the relationship between structure and function is the basis of protein structure prediction. However, the prediction of super secondary structure is an important step in the prediction of protein spatial structure. Many algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of protein super secondary structure. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on amino acid sequences. In this paper, we proposed a novel model for predicting five kinds of protein super secondary structures based on the chemical shifts (CSs). Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in five kinds of protein super secondary structures by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Secondly, we used chemical shifts of six nuclei as features, and combined with quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) to predict five kinds of protein super secondary structures. Finally, we achieved the averaged sensitivity, specificity and the overall accuracy of 81.8%, 95.19%, 82.91%, respectively in seven-fold cross-validation. Moreover, we have performed the prediction by combining the five different chemical shifts as features, the maximum overall accuracy up to 89.87% by using the C,Cα,Cβ,N,Hα of Hα chemical shifts, which are clearly superior to that of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) algorithm by using 20 amino acid compositions (AAC) as feature in the seven-fold cross-validation. These results demonstrated that chemical shifts (CSs) are indeed an outstanding parameter for the prediction of five kinds of super secondary structures. In addition, we compared the prediction of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) with that of support vector machine (SVM) by using the same six CSs as features. The result suggested that the quadratic discriminant analysis method by using chemical shifts as features is a good predictor for protein super

  2. Secondary electron emission from surfaces with small structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhanoev, A. R.; Spahn, F.; Yaroshenko, V.; Lühr, H.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-09-01

    It is found that for objects possessing small surface structures with differing radii of curvature the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield may be significantly higher than for objects with smooth surfaces of the same material. The effect is highly pronounced for surface structures of nanometer scale, often providing a more than 100 % increase of the SEE yield. The results also show that the SEE yield from surfaces with structure does not show a universal dependence on the energy of the primary, incident electrons as it is found for flat surfaces in experiments. We derive conditions for the applicability of the conventional formulation of SEE using the simplifying assumption of universal dependence. Our analysis provides a basis for studying low-energy electron emission from nanometer structured surfaces under a penetrating electron beam important in many technological applications.

  3. Structurexplor: a platform for the exploration of structural features of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Glouzon, Jean-Pierre Séhi; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Shengrui

    2017-10-01

    Discovering function-related structural features, such as the cloverleaf shape of transfer RNA secondary structures, is essential to understand RNA function. With this aim, we have developed a platform, named Structurexplor, to facilitate the exploration of structural features in populations of RNA secondary structures. It has been designed and developed to help biologists interactively search for, evaluate and select interesting structural features that can potentially explain RNA functions. Structurxplor is a web application available at http://structurexplor.dinf.usherbrooke.ca. The source code can be found at http://jpsglouzon.github.io/structurexplor/. shengrui.wang@usherbrooke.ca. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Super-secondary structure of oligopeptide aggregates in an organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, H.; Yuuki, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Taga, K.; Yoshida, T.; Okabayashi, H.; Furusaka, M.; Kawasaki, K.; Kawakatsu, T.; Hirai, M.

    1995-02-01

    For N-acetyl-L-glutamic acid hexamer α,γ-benzyl ester (A6Z), synthesized by a stepwise procedure, the shape and size of an aggregate formed in dioxane has been investigated in connection with the super-secondary structure of oligopeptides by the SANS method. The results are summarized as follows. An A6Z aggregate in dioxane has a cylinder-like shape having a radius of 13 Å and a height of 135 Å, and the aggregation number is 36. Probably, the cylinder aggregate has a stacking structure of the A6Z β-sheets.

  5. Data-directed RNA secondary structure prediction using probabilistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Ledda, Mirko; Vaziri, Sana; Aviran, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Structure dictates the function of many RNAs, but secondary RNA structure analysis is either labor intensive and costly or relies on computational predictions that are often inaccurate. These limitations are alleviated by integration of structure probing data into prediction algorithms. However, existing algorithms are optimized for a specific type of probing data. Recently, new chemistries combined with advances in sequencing have facilitated structure probing at unprecedented scale and sensitivity. These novel technologies and anticipated wealth of data highlight a need for algorithms that readily accommodate more complex and diverse input sources. We implemented and investigated a recently outlined probabilistic framework for RNA secondary structure prediction and extended it to accommodate further refinement of structural information. This framework utilizes direct likelihood-based calculations of pseudo-energy terms per considered structural context and can readily accommodate diverse data types and complex data dependencies. We use real data in conjunction with simulations to evaluate performances of several implementations and to show that proper integration of structural contexts can lead to improvements. Our tests also reveal discrepancies between real data and simulations, which we show can be alleviated by refined modeling. We then propose statistical preprocessing approaches to standardize data interpretation and integration into such a generic framework. We further systematically quantify the information content of data subsets, demonstrating that high reactivities are major drivers of SHAPE-directed predictions and that better understanding of less informative reactivities is key to further improvements. Finally, we provide evidence for the adaptive capability of our framework using mock probe simulations. © 2016 Deng et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Computational study of protein secondary structure elements: Ramachandran plots revisited.

    PubMed

    Carrascoza, Francisco; Zaric, Snezana; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2014-05-01

    Potential energy surface (PES) were built for nineteen amino acids using density functional theory (PW91 and DFT M062X/6-311**). Examining the energy as a function of the φ/ψ dihedral angles in the allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot, amino acid groups that share common patterns on their PES plots and global minima were identified. These patterns show partial correlation with their structural and pharmacophoric features. Differences between these computational results and the experimentally noted permitted conformations of each amino acid are rationalized on the basis of attractive intra- and inter-molecular non-covalent interactions. The present data are focused on the intrinsic properties of an amino acid - an element which to our knowledge is typically ignored, as larger models are always used for the sake of similarity to real biological polypeptides.

  7. The formation of organic sulfate esters in the limonene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) under acidic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Müller, Conny; Böge, Olaf; Gnauk, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the gas phase ozonolysis of limonene and the influence of particle acidity were investigated in a series of indoor aerosol chamber experiments. The particle acidity was adjusted in three stages using Na 2SO 4 (neutral), (NH 4) 2SO 4/H 2SO 4 (acidic) and H 2SO 4 (strongly acidic) seed particles. Detected low molecular weight carboxylic acids (Mw<300) were found to account only for a smaller fraction of produced SOA mass at all particle acidities. Although SOA components with molecular weights between 300 and 900 were detected regardless of the seed particle acidity, the intensities of these compounds were much higher for acidic seed particle experiments. Compounds with mass to charge ratios (m/z) 281, 465 and 481 were only detected in the presence of sulfuric acid. MSn and TOFMS analyses showed a strong fragment of m/z 97 and elemental compositions of C10H17O7S-, C20H33O10S- and C20H33O11S- suggesting organic sulfate structures, possibly formed by a heterogeneous acid catalyzed reaction of limonene oxidation products and sulfuric acid in the particle phase. The high intensities of organic sulfate esters suggest that these compounds contribute at least as much as first and second generation oxidation products to the SOA mass.

  8. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  9. Secondary Structure and Glycosylation of Mucus Glycoproteins by Raman Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The major structural components of protective mucus hydrogels on mucosal surfaces are the secreted polymeric gel-forming mucins. The very high molecular weight and extensive O-glycosylation of gel-forming mucins, which are key to their viscoelastic properties, create problems when studying mucins using conventional biochemical/structural techniques. Thus, key structural information, such as the secondary structure of the various mucin subdomains, and glycosylation patterns along individual molecules, remains to be elucidated. Here, we utilized Raman spectroscopy, Raman optical activity (ROA), circular dichroism (CD), and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) to study the structure of the secreted polymeric gel-forming mucin MUC5B. ROA indicated that the protein backbone of MUC5B is dominated by unordered conformation, which was found to originate from the heavily glycosylated central mucin domain by isolation of MUC5B O-glycan-rich regions. In sharp contrast, recombinant proteins of the N-terminal region of MUC5B (D1-D2-D′-D3 domains, NT5B), C-terminal region of MUC5B (D4-B-C-CK domains, CT5B) and the Cys-domain (within the central mucin domain of MUC5B) were found to be dominated by the β-sheet. Using these findings, we employed TERS, which combines the chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy to study the secondary structure along 90 nm of an individual MUC5B molecule. Interestingly, the molecule was found to contain a large amount of α-helix/unordered structures and many signatures of glycosylation, pointing to a highly O-glycosylated region on the mucin. PMID:27791356

  10. Determination of the Secondary Structure of the king Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra neurotoxin CM-11 is a small protein with 72 amino acid residues. After its complete assignments of (1)H-NMR resonance's were obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY, the secondary structure was analysed by studying the various NOEs extracted from the NOESY spectra and the distribution of chemical shifts. The secondary structure was finally determined by MCD as follows: a triple-strand antiparallel beta sheet with I20-W26, R37-A43 and V53-S59 as its beta strands, a short alpha helix formed by W30-G35 and four turns formed by P7-K1O, C14-G17, K50-V53 and D61-N64.

  11. Third type of secondary structure: noncooperative mobile conformation. Protein Data Bank analysis.

    PubMed

    Adzhubei, A A; Eisenmenger, F; Tumanyan, V G; Zinke, M; Brodzinski, S; Esipova, N G

    1987-08-14

    Analysis of 68 proteins from Protein Data Bank disclosed a new widely spread type of the secondary structure that is designated as mobile (M-) conformation. Helical parameters of M-conformation are close to the poly-L-proline II type helix. Its occurrence in globular proteins approximates that of the beta-sheet. The angles corresponding to the position of the M-conformation maximum in distribution of amino acid residues on a conformational map are phi: -65 degrees, psi: 140 degrees. Unique features and high occurrence in proteins make it possible to distinguish the M-conformation as an independent third type of the secondary structure in globular proteins, that should be included in the present classification.

  12. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Hroudova, Miluse; Vlcek, Cestmir; Koubek, Jiri; Holeckova, Marcela; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how selected natural compounds (naringin, caffeic acid, and limonene) induce shifts in both bacterial community structure and degradative activity in long-term polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil and how these changes correlate with changes in chlorobiphenyl degradation capacity. In order to address this issue, we have integrated analytical methods of determining PCB degradation with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tag-encoded amplicons and DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Our model system was set in laboratory microcosms with PCB-contaminated soil, which was enriched for 8 weeks with the suspensions of flavonoid naringin, terpene limonene, and phenolic caffeic acid. Our results show that application of selected plant secondary metabolites resulted in bacterial community structure far different from the control one (no natural compound amendment). The community in soil treated with caffeic acid is almost solely represented by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia (together over 99 %). Treatment with naringin resulted in an enrichment of Firmicutes to the exclusion of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. SIP was applied in order to identify populations actively participating in 4-chlorobiphenyl catabolism. We observed that naringin and limonene in soil foster mainly populations of Hydrogenophaga spp., caffeic acid Burkholderia spp. and Pseudoxanthomonas spp. None of these populations were detected among 4-chlorobiphenyl utilizers in non-amended soil. Similarly, the degradation of individual PCB congeners was influenced by the addition of different plant compounds. Residual content of PCBs was lowest after treating the soil with naringin. Addition of caffeic acid resulted in comparable decrease of total PCBs with non-amended soil; however, higher substituted congeners were more degraded after caffeic acid treatment compared to all other treatments. Finally, it appears that plant secondary metabolites

  13. On the page number of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots.

    PubMed

    Clote, Peter; Dobrev, Stefan; Dotu, Ivan; Kranakis, Evangelos; Krizanc, Danny; Urrutia, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    Let S denote the set of (possibly noncanonical) base pairs {i, j } of an RNA tertiary structure; i.e. {i, j} ∈ S if there is a hydrogen bond between the ith and jth nucleotide. The page number of S, denoted π(S), is the minimum number k such that Scan be decomposed into a disjoint union of k secondary structures. Here, we show that computing the page number is NP-complete; we describe an exact computation of page number, using constraint programming, and determine the page number of a collection of RNA tertiary structures, for which the topological genus is known. We describe an approximation algorithm from which it follows that ω(S) ≤ π(S) ≤ ω(S) ・log n,where the clique number of S, ω(S), denotes the maximum number of base pairs that pairwise cross each other.

  14. Fourier Analysis of Conservation Patterns in Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Jakobsson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Residue conservation is a common observation in alignments of protein families, underscoring positions important in protein structure and function. Though many methods measure the level of conservation of particular residue positions, currently we do not have a way to study spatial oscillations occurring in protein conservation patterns. It is known that hydrophobicity shows spatial oscillations in proteins, which is characterized by computing the hydrophobic moment of the protein domains. Here, we advance the study of moments of conservation of protein families to know whether there might exist spatial asymmetry in the conservation patterns of regular secondary structures. Analogous to the hydrophobic moment, the conservation moment is defined as the modulus of the Fourier transform of the conservation function of an alignment of related protein, where the conservation function is the vector of conservation values at each column of the alignment. The profile of the conservation moment is useful in ascertaining any periodicity of conservation, which might correlate with the period of the secondary structure. To demonstrate the concept, conservation in the family of potassium ion channel proteins was analyzed using moments. It was shown that the pore helix of the potassium channel showed oscillations in the moment of conservation matching the period of the α-helix. This implied that one side of the pore helix was evolutionarily conserved in contrast to its opposite side. In addition, the method of conservation moments correctly identified the disposition of the voltage sensor of voltage-gated potassium channels to form a 310 helix in the membrane.

  15. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  16. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; ...

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin wasmore » determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. As a result, we hypothesize that these

  17. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  18. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Lu, Lei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Min; Li, Xianchi; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing dramatically especially in developing countries like India. CVD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There has been a growing awareness of the role of nutrients in the prevention of CVD. One specific recommendation in the battle against CVD is the increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, which are polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies have reported inverse associations of CVD with dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids supplementation might exert protective effects on CVD. They exert their cardioprotective effect through multiple mechanisms. Omega-3 fatty acid therapy has shown promise as a useful tool in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. This review briefly summarizes the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of CVD.

  20. Evaluating minimalist mimics by exploring key orientations on secondary structures (EKOS).

    PubMed

    Xin, Dongyue; Ko, Eunhwa; Perez, Lisa M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Burgess, Kevin

    2013-11-28

    Peptide mimics that display amino acid side-chains on semi-rigid scaffolds (not peptide polyamides) can be referred to as minimalist mimics. Accessible conformations of these scaffolds may overlay with secondary structures giving, for example, "minimalist helical mimics". It is difficult for researchers who want to apply minimalist mimics to decide which one to use because there is no widely accepted protocol for calibrating how closely these compounds mimic secondary structures. Moreover, it is also difficult for potential practitioners to evaluate which ideal minimalist helical mimics are preferred for a particular set of side-chains. For instance, what mimic presents i, i + 4, i + 7 side-chains in orientations that best resemble an ideal α-helix, and is a different mimic required for a i, i + 3, i + 7 helical combination? This article describes a protocol for fitting each member of an array of accessible scaffold conformations on secondary structures. The protocol involves: (i) use quenched molecular dynamics (QMD) to generate an ensemble consisting of hundreds of accessible, low energy conformers of the mimics; (ii) representation of each of these as a set of Cα and Cβ coordinates corresponding to three amino acid side-chains displayed by the scaffolds; (iii) similar representation of each combination of three side-chains in each ideal secondary structure as a set of Cα and Cβ coordinates corresponding to three amino acid side-chains displayed by the scaffolds; and, (iv) overlay Cα and Cβ coordinates of all the conformers on all the sets of side-chain "triads" in the ideal secondary structures and express the goodness of fit in terms of root mean squared deviation (RMSD, Å) for each overlay. We refer to this process as Exploring Key Orientations on Secondary structures (EKOS). Application of this procedure reveals the relative bias of a scaffold to overlay on different secondary structures, the "side-chain correspondences" (e.g. i, i + 4, i + 7 or i, i

  1. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannová, Lada Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  2. Detection of alkylmethylphosphonic acids on leaf surfaces by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1995-01-01

    Detection of environmental degradation products of nerve agents directly from the surface of plant leaves using static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is demonstrated. Pinacolylmethylphosphonic acid (PMPA), isopropylmethylphosphonic acid (IMPA), and ethylmethylphosphonic acid (EMPA) were spiked from aqueous solutions onto philodendron leaves prior to analysis by static SIMS. Fragment ions were observed in the anion SIMS spectra from all three compounds at m/z 63, 77, 79, and 95, which are attributed to PO[sub 2][sup [minus

  3. Prot-2S: a new python web tool for protein secondary structure studies.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Magalhães, Alexandre L

    2009-01-01

    Prot-2S is a bioinformatics web application devised to analyse the protein chain secondary structures (2S) (http:/ /www.requimte.pt:8080/Prot-2S/). The tool is built on the RCSB Protein Data Bank PDB and DSSP application/files and includes calculation/graphical display of amino acid propensities in 2S motifs based on any user amino acid classification/code (for any particular protein chain list). The interface can calculate the 2S composition, display the 2S subsequences and search for DSSP non-standard residues and for pairs/triplets/quadruplets (amino acid patterns in 2S motifs). This work presents some Prot-2S applications showing its usefulness in protein research and as an e-learning tool as well.

  4. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under this...

  9. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  10. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  11. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  12. Peptoid nanosheets exhibit a new secondary-structure motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.; Haxton, Thomas K.; Proulx, Caroline; Robertson, Ellen J.; Battigelli, Alessia; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    A promising route to the synthesis of protein-mimetic materials that are capable of complex functions, such as molecular recognition and catalysis, is provided by sequence-defined peptoid polymers--structural relatives of biologically occurring polypeptides. Peptoids, which are relatively non-toxic and resistant to degradation, can fold into defined structures through a combination of sequence-dependent interactions. However, the range of possible structures that are accessible to peptoids and other biological mimetics is unknown, and our ability to design protein-like architectures from these polymer classes is limited. Here we use molecular-dynamics simulations, together with scattering and microscopy data, to determine the atomic-resolution structure of the recently discovered peptoid nanosheet, an ordered supramolecular assembly that extends macroscopically in only two dimensions. Our simulations show that nanosheets are structurally and dynamically heterogeneous, can be formed only from peptoids of certain lengths, and are potentially porous to water and ions. Moreover, their formation is enabled by the peptoids' adoption of a secondary structure that is not seen in the natural world. This structure, a zigzag pattern that we call a Σ(`sigma')-strand, results from the ability of adjacent backbone monomers to adopt opposed rotational states, thereby allowing the backbone to remain linear and untwisted. Linear backbones tiled in a brick-like way form an extended two-dimensional nanostructure, the Σ-sheet. The binary rotational-state motif of the Σ-strand is not seen in regular protein structures, which are usually built from one type of rotational state. We also show that the concept of building regular structures from multiple rotational states can be generalized beyond the peptoid nanosheet system.

  13. CENTROIDFOLD: a web server for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kengo; Hamada, Michiaki; Asai, Kiyoshi; Mituyama, Toutai

    2009-07-01

    The CENTROIDFOLD web server (http://www.ncrna.org/centroidfold/) is a web application for RNA secondary structure prediction powered by one of the most accurate prediction engine. The server accepts two kinds of sequence data: a single RNA sequence and a multiple alignment of RNA sequences. It responses with a prediction result shown as a popular base-pair notation and a graph representation. PDF version of the graph representation is also available. For a multiple alignment sequence, the server predicts a common secondary structure. Usage of the server is quite simple. You can paste a single RNA sequence (FASTA or plain sequence text) or a multiple alignment (CLUSTAL-W format) into the textarea then click on the 'execute CentroidFold' button. The server quickly responses with a prediction result. The major advantage of this server is that it employs our original CentroidFold software as its prediction engine which scores the best accuracy in our benchmark results. Our web server is freely available with no login requirement.

  14. Coding of odor stimulus features among secondary olfactory structures

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Christina Z.; Adjei, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems must represent stimuli in manners dependent upon a wealth of factors, including stimulus intensity and duration. One way the brain might handle these complex functions is to assign the tasks throughout distributed nodes, each contributing to information processing. We sought to explore this important aspect of sensory network function in the mammalian olfactory system, wherein the intensity and duration of odor exposure are critical contributors to odor perception. This is a quintessential model for exploring processing schemes given the distribution of odor information by olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells into several anatomically distinct secondary processing stages, including the piriform cortex (PCX) and olfactory tubercle (OT), whose unique contributions to odor coding are unresolved. We explored the coding of PCX and OT neuron responses to odor intensity and duration. We found that both structures similarly partake in representing descending intensities of odors by reduced recruitment and modulation of neurons. Additionally, while neurons in the OT adapt to odor exposure, they display reduced capacity to adapt to either repeated presentations of odor or a single prolonged odor presentation compared with neurons in the PCX. These results provide insights into manners whereby secondary olfactory structures may, at least in some cases, uniquely represent stimulus features. PMID:26041832

  15. Formation and stability of secondary structures in globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascle, J.; Garel, T.; Orland, H.

    1993-02-01

    We study two models for the formation and packing of helices and sheets in globular (compact) proteins. These models, based on weighted Hamiltonian paths on a regular lattice both exhibit a first order transition between a compact high temperature phase, with no extended secondary structures, and a quasi-frozen compact phase, with secondary structures invading the whole lattice. The quasi-frozen phase with very weak temperature dependence, is identified as the native phase of proteins, whereas the high-temperature phase may be relevant to the so-called molten globule state of proteins. Nous étudions deux modèles pour la formation et l'empilement d'hélices ou de feuillets dans la phase globulaire (compacte) des protéines. ces modèles, fondés sur des chemins hamiltoniens pondérés sur réseau, possèdent une transition de phase du premier ordre, entre (i) une phase haute température compacte, avec structures secondaires non étendues, et (ii) une phase compacte quasi-gelée, où les structures secondaires envahissent tout le réseau. La phase quasi-gelée, qui a une dépendance en température très faible, est identifiée à la phase native des protéines; la phase haute température est peut-être reliée à la phase native “globule fondu” (molten globule) des protéines.

  16. A semi-supervised learning approach for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Yonemoto, Haruka; Asai, Kiyoshi; Hamada, Michiaki

    2015-08-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction is a key technology in RNA bioinformatics. Most algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction use probabilistic models, in which the model parameters are trained with reliable RNA secondary structures. Because of the difficulty of determining RNA secondary structures by experimental procedures, such as NMR or X-ray crystal structural analyses, there are still many RNA sequences that could be useful for training whose secondary structures have not been experimentally determined. In this paper, we introduce a novel semi-supervised learning approach for training parameters in a probabilistic model of RNA secondary structures in which we employ not only RNA sequences with annotated secondary structures but also ones with unknown secondary structures. Our model is based on a hybrid of generative (stochastic context-free grammars) and discriminative models (conditional random fields) that has been successfully applied to natural language processing. Computational experiments indicate that the accuracy of secondary structure prediction is improved by incorporating RNA sequences with unknown secondary structures into training. To our knowledge, this is the first study of a semi-supervised learning approach for RNA secondary structure prediction. This technique will be useful when the number of reliable structures is limited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Effective Computational Method Incorporating Multiple Secondary Structure Predictions in Topology Determination for Cryo-EM Images.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abhishek; Ranjan, Desh; Zubair, Mohammad; Zeil, Stephanie; Al Nasr, Kamal; He, Jing

    2016-03-17

    A key idea in de novo modeling of a medium-resolution density image obtained from cryo-electron microscopy is to calculate the optimal mapping between the secondary structure traces observed in the density image and those predicted on the protein sequence. When secondary structures are not determined precisely, either from the image or from the amino acid sequence of the protein, this results in additional computational overhead. We present an efficient method that addresses the secondary structure placement problem dealing with multiple secondary structure predictions and calculates the optimal mapping. The method was tested using 12 simulated images from α-proteins and two Cryo-EM images of α-β proteins. We observed that the rank of the true topologies is consistently improved by using multiple secondary structure predictions instead of the single prediction method. The results show that the algorithm is robust and works well even when errors/misses in the predicted secondary structures are present in the image or the sequence. The results also show that the algorithm is efficient and is able to handle proteins with as many as 33 helices.

  18. RNAex: an RNA secondary structure prediction server enhanced by high-throughput structure-probing data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Qu, Rihao; Huang, Yiming; Shi, Binbin; Liu, Mengrong; Li, Yang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-01-01

    Several high-throughput technologies have been developed to probe RNA base pairs and loops at the transcriptome level in multiple species. However, to obtain the final RNA secondary structure, extensive effort and considerable expertise is required to statistically process the probing data and combine them with free energy models. Therefore, we developed an RNA secondary structure prediction server that is enhanced by experimental data (RNAex). RNAex is a web interface that enables non-specialists to easily access cutting-edge structure-probing data and predict RNA secondary structures enhanced by in vivo and in vitro data. RNAex annotates the RNA editing, RNA modification and SNP sites on the predicted structures. It provides four structure-folding methods, restrained MaxExpect, SeqFold, RNAstructure (Fold) and RNAfold that can be selected by the user. The performance of these four folding methods has been verified by previous publications on known structures. We re-mapped the raw sequencing data of the probing experiments to the whole genome for each species. RNAex thus enables users to predict secondary structures for both known and novel RNA transcripts in human, mouse, yeast and Arabidopsis. The RNAex web server is available at http://RNAex.ncrnalab.org/. PMID:27137891

  19. DNA secondary structures: stability and function of G-quadruplex structures.

    PubMed

    Bochman, Matthew L; Paeschke, Katrin; Zakian, Virginia A

    2012-11-01

    In addition to the canonical double helix, DNA can fold into various other inter- and intramolecular secondary structures. Although many such structures were long thought to be in vitro artefacts, bioinformatics demonstrates that DNA sequences capable of forming these structures are conserved throughout evolution, suggesting the existence of non-B-form DNA in vivo. In addition, genes whose products promote formation or resolution of these structures are found in diverse organisms, and a growing body of work suggests that the resolution of DNA secondary structures is critical for genome integrity. This Review focuses on emerging evidence relating to the characteristics of G-quadruplex structures and the possible influence of such structures on genomic stability and cellular processes, such as transcription.

  20. Optimized Jasmonic Acid Production by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Reveals Formation of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Felipe; Haroth, Sven; Feussner, Kirstin; Meldau, Dorothea; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ischebeck, Till; Brodhun, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is a plant hormone that can be produced by the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae via submerged fermentation. From a biotechnological perspective jasmonic acid is a valuable feedstock as its derivatives serve as important ingredients in different cosmetic products and in the future it may be used for pharmaceutical applications. The objective of this work was to improve the production of jasmonic acid by L. theobromae strain 2334. We observed that jasmonic acid formation is dependent on the culture volume. Moreover, cultures grown in medium containing potassium nitrate as nitrogen source produced higher amounts of jasmonic acid than analogous cultures supplemented with ammonium nitrate. When cultivated under optimal conditions for jasmonic acid production, L. theobromae secreted several secondary metabolites known from plants into the medium. Among those we found 3-oxo-2-(pent-2-enyl)-cyclopentane-1-butanoic acid (OPC-4) and hydroxy-jasmonic acid derivatives, respectively, suggesting that fungal jasmonate metabolism may involve similar reaction steps as that of plants. To characterize fungal growth and jasmonic acid-formation, we established a mathematical model describing both processes. This model may form the basis of industrial upscaling attempts. Importantly, it showed that jasmonic acid-formation is not associated to fungal growth. Therefore, this finding suggests that jasmonic acid, despite its enormous amount being produced upon fungal development, serves merely as secondary metabolite. PMID:27907207

  1. Optimized Jasmonic Acid Production by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Reveals Formation of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Eng, Felipe; Haroth, Sven; Feussner, Kirstin; Meldau, Dorothea; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ischebeck, Till; Brodhun, Florian; Feussner, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is a plant hormone that can be produced by the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae via submerged fermentation. From a biotechnological perspective jasmonic acid is a valuable feedstock as its derivatives serve as important ingredients in different cosmetic products and in the future it may be used for pharmaceutical applications. The objective of this work was to improve the production of jasmonic acid by L. theobromae strain 2334. We observed that jasmonic acid formation is dependent on the culture volume. Moreover, cultures grown in medium containing potassium nitrate as nitrogen source produced higher amounts of jasmonic acid than analogous cultures supplemented with ammonium nitrate. When cultivated under optimal conditions for jasmonic acid production, L. theobromae secreted several secondary metabolites known from plants into the medium. Among those we found 3-oxo-2-(pent-2-enyl)-cyclopentane-1-butanoic acid (OPC-4) and hydroxy-jasmonic acid derivatives, respectively, suggesting that fungal jasmonate metabolism may involve similar reaction steps as that of plants. To characterize fungal growth and jasmonic acid-formation, we established a mathematical model describing both processes. This model may form the basis of industrial upscaling attempts. Importantly, it showed that jasmonic acid-formation is not associated to fungal growth. Therefore, this finding suggests that jasmonic acid, despite its enormous amount being produced upon fungal development, serves merely as secondary metabolite.

  2. Secondary structural entropy in RNA switch (Riboswitch) identification.

    PubMed

    Manzourolajdad, Amirhossein; Arnold, Jonathan

    2015-04-28

    RNA regulatory elements play a significant role in gene regulation. Riboswitches, a widespread group of regulatory RNAs, are vital components of many bacterial genomes. These regulatory elements generally function by forming a ligand-induced alternative fold that controls access to ribosome binding sites or other regulatory sites in RNA. Riboswitch-mediated mechanisms are ubiquitous across bacterial genomes. A typical class of riboswitch has its own unique structural and biological complexity, making de novo riboswitch identification a formidable task. Traditionally, riboswitches have been identified through comparative genomics based on sequence and structural homology. The limitations of structural-homology-based approaches, coupled with the assumption that there is a great diversity of undiscovered riboswitches, suggests the need for alternative methods for riboswitch identification, possibly based on features intrinsic to their structure. As of yet, no such reliable method has been proposed. We used structural entropy of riboswitch sequences as a measure of their secondary structural dynamics. Entropy values of a diverse set of riboswitches were compared to that of their mutants, their dinucleotide shuffles, and their reverse complement sequences under different stochastic context-free grammar folding models. Significance of our results was evaluated by comparison to other approaches, such as the base-pairing entropy and energy landscapes dynamics. Classifiers based on structural entropy optimized via sequence and structural features were devised as riboswitch identifiers and tested on Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Synechococcus elongatus as an exploration of structural entropy based approaches. The unusually long untranslated region of the cotH in Bacillus subtilis, as well as upstream regions of certain genes, such as the sucC genes were associated with significant structural entropy values in genome-wide examinations. Various tests show that there

  3. Consumption of some polyphenols reduces fecal deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, the secondary bile acids of risk factors of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunkyung; Haraguchi, Tomoaki; Iwanaga, Sumie; Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yukako; Mineo, Shigeru; Moriyama, Akiho; Inoue, Junji; Kato, Norihisa

    2009-09-23

    This study was performed to examine the effect of dietary polyphenols on fecal secondary bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, the risk factors of colon cancer, in rats fed a high-fat diet. In experiment 1, rats were fed a 30% beef tallow diet containing 0.5% polyphenols for 3 weeks. Dietary curcumin and caffeic acid significantly reduced the fecal concentration of deoxycholic acid. Dietary caffeic acid, catechin, rutin, and ellagic acid significantly reduced fecal lithocholic acid. Fecal hyodeoxycholic acid, a metabolite of lithocholic acid, was markedly lowered by dietary curcumin, caffeic acid, catechin, and rutin. In experiment 2, rats were fed a 30 or 5% beef tallow diet with or without the addition of 0.5% curcumin. In the rats without receiving curcumin, the fecal level of deoxycholic acid was significantly higher in the high-fat diet group than in the low-fat diet group. Fecal deoxycholic acid was significantly reduced by dietary curcumin in the high-fat diets but not in the low-fat diets. The results suggest novel effects of some polyphenols favorable for colon health by reducing secondary bile acids in animals fed a high-fat diet.

  4. SVM-PB-Pred: SVM based protein block prediction method using sequence profiles and secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Parthasarathy, S

    2014-01-01

    We developed a support vector machine based web server called SVM-PB-Pred, to predict the Protein Block for any given amino acid sequence. The input features of SVM-PB-Pred include i) sequence profiles (PSSM) and ii) actual secondary structures (SS) from DSSP method or predicted secondary structures from NPS@ and GOR4 methods. There were three combined input features PSSM+SS(DSSP), PSSM+SS(NPS@) and PSSM+SS(GOR4) used to test and train the SVM models. Similarly, four datasets RS90, DB433, LI1264 and SP1577 were used to develop the SVM models. These four SVM models developed were tested using three different benchmarking tests namely; (i) self consistency, (ii) seven fold cross validation test and (iii) independent case test. The maximum possible prediction accuracy of ~70% was observed in self consistency test for the SVM models of both LI1264 and SP1577 datasets, where PSSM+SS(DSSP) input features was used to test. The prediction accuracies were reduced to ~53% for PSSM+SS(NPS@) and ~43% for PSSM+SS(GOR4) in independent case test, for the SVM models of above two same datasets. Using our method, it is possible to predict the protein block letters for any query protein sequence with ~53% accuracy, when the SP1577 dataset and predicted secondary structure from NPS@ server were used. The SVM-PB-Pred server can be freely accessed through http://bioinfo.bdu.ac.in/~svmpbpred.

  5. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of our knowledge, no implementation combines both CPU and extra accelerators, such as GPUs, to accelerate the Zuker algorithm applications. Results In this paper, a CPU-GPU hybrid computing system that accelerates Zuker algorithm applications for RNA secondary structure prediction is proposed. The computing tasks are allocated between CPU and GPU for parallel cooperate execution. Performance differences between the CPU and the GPU in the task-allocation scheme are considered to obtain workload balance. To improve the hybrid system performance, the Zuker algorithm is optimally implemented with special methods for CPU and GPU architecture. Conclusions Speedup of 15.93× over optimized multi-core SIMD CPU implementation and performance advantage of 16% over optimized GPU implementation are shown in the experimental results. More than 14% of the sequences are executed on CPU in the hybrid system. The system combining CPU and GPU to accelerate the Zuker algorithm is proven to be promising and can be applied to other bioinformatics applications. PMID:22369626

  6. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications.

    PubMed

    Lei, Guoqing; Dou, Yong; Wan, Wen; Xia, Fei; Li, Rongchun; Ma, Meng; Zou, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of our knowledge, no implementation combines both CPU and extra accelerators, such as GPUs, to accelerate the Zuker algorithm applications. In this paper, a CPU-GPU hybrid computing system that accelerates Zuker algorithm applications for RNA secondary structure prediction is proposed. The computing tasks are allocated between CPU and GPU for parallel cooperate execution. Performance differences between the CPU and the GPU in the task-allocation scheme are considered to obtain workload balance. To improve the hybrid system performance, the Zuker algorithm is optimally implemented with special methods for CPU and GPU architecture. Speedup of 15.93× over optimized multi-core SIMD CPU implementation and performance advantage of 16% over optimized GPU implementation are shown in the experimental results. More than 14% of the sequences are executed on CPU in the hybrid system. The system combining CPU and GPU to accelerate the Zuker algorithm is proven to be promising and can be applied to other bioinformatics applications.

  7. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility.

  8. Secondary Structure of Huntingtin Amino-Terminal Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mee Whi; Chelliah, Yogarany; Kim, Sang Woo; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2010-09-21

    Huntington's disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder resulting from polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion (>36Q) within the first exon of Huntingtin (Htt) protein. We applied X-ray crystallography to determine the secondary structure of the first exon (EX1) of Htt17Q. The structure of Htt17Q-EX1 consists of an amino-terminal {alpha} helix, poly17Q region, and polyproline helix formed by the proline-rich region. The poly17Q region adopts multiple conformations in the structure, including {alpha} helix, random coil, and extended loop. The conformation of the poly17Q region is influenced by the conformation of neighboring protein regions, demonstrating the importance of the native protein context. We propose that the conformational flexibility of the polyQ region observed in our structure is a common characteristic of many amyloidogenic proteins. We further propose that the pathogenic polyQ expansion in the Htt protein increases the length of the random coil, which promotes aggregation and facilitates abnormal interactions with other proteins in cells.

  9. FTIR protein secondary structure analysis of human ascending aortic tissues.

    PubMed

    Bonnier, Franck; Rubin, Sylvain; Debelle, Laurent; Ventéo, Lydie; Pluot, Michel; Baehrel, Bernard; Manfait, Michel; Sockalingum, Ganesh D

    2008-08-01

    The advent of moderate dilatations in ascending aortas is often accompanied by structural modifications of the main components of the aortic tissue, elastin and collagen. In this study, we have undertaken an approach based on FTIR microscopy coupled to a curve-fitting procedure to analyze secondary structure modifications in these proteins in human normal and pathological aortic tissues. We found that the outcome of the aortic pathology is strongly influenced by these proteins, which are abundant in the media of the aortic wall, and that the advent of an aortic dilatation is generally accompanied by a decrease of parallel beta-sheet structures. Elastin, essentially composed of beta-sheet structures, seems to be directly related to these changes and therefore indicative of the elastic alteration of the aortic wall. Conventional microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to compare FTIR microscopy results with the organization of the elastic fibers present in the tissues. This in-vitro study on 6 patients (three normal and three pathologic), suggests that such a spectroscopic marker, specific to aneurismal tissue characterization, could be important information for surgeons who face the dilemma of moderate aortic tissue dilatation of the ascending aortas.

  10. Terpenylic and Related Lactone-Containing Acids: Novel Monoterpene Secondary Organic Aerosol Tracers with Dimer-Forming Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Szmigielski, R.; Farhat, Y.; Surratt, J. D.; Blockhuys, F.; van Alsenoy, C.; Böge, O.; Sierau, B.; Gómez-González, Y.; Vermeylen, R.; van der Veken, P.; Shahgholi, M.; Chan, A. W.; Herrmann, H.; Seinfeld, J.; Maenhaut, W.

    2009-12-01

    Blue haze is a natural phenomenon that is observed in forested regions worldwide and is due to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. While evidence exists for organic molecular clusters in the size range of < 2 nm, the chemical structures of the nucleating particles have remained unresolved. In the present study, novel SOA products from the monoterpene α-pinene with unique dimer-forming properties have been identified as lactone-containing terpenoic acids, i.e., terpenylic (molecular weight (MW) 172), terebic (MW 158) and 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid (MW 188), and diaterpenylic acid acetate (MW 232). The structural characterizations were based on synthesis of reference compounds and detailed interpretation of negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectral [(-)ESI-MS] data, including accurate mass and MSn ion trap measurements. Terpenylic acid and diaterpenylic acid acetate are early oxidation products formed upon both photooxidation and ozonolysis, and are abundant SOA tracers in ambient fine aerosol from coniferous forest sites (e.g., K-puszta, Hungary). Terebic and 2-hydroxyterpenylic acid can be explained by further oxidation of terpenylic acid, and are also prominent tracers in ambient fine aerosol. Quantum chemical calculations support that non-covalent dimer formation involving double hydrogen bonding interactions between carboxyl groups of the monomers is energetically favorable. Lactone-containing terpenoic acids also form through photooxidation from monoterpenes other than α-pinene, i.e., terebic acid from Δ3-carene, and terpenylic, homoterpenylic (MW 186), and terebic acid from β-pinene. A distinct feature of terpenylic acid and related lactone-containing acids is that they can be selectively detected in positive ion (+)ESI-MS, unlike isobaric dicarboxylic terpenoic acids such as norpinic (MW 172) and pinic acid (MW 186). Interestingly, terpenylic, terebic and homoterpenylic acid were already reported in the early German

  11. Pattern recognition of the secondary structure of proteins (alpha-helix and beta-structure).

    PubMed

    Tohá, J C; Soto, M A; Chinga, H

    1990-09-21

    In this paper, an algorithm for the pattern recognition of secondary structure of proteins is proposed. The procedure simultaneously evaluates the contribution of all the residues of a given peptide to its conformation. By means of the algorithm it is possible to select from a universe of well known proteins the most representative alpha-helix and beta-structure peptides, and to use these peptides, as screening matrices to define the unknown structure of any peptide.

  12. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site in June-July of 2010 during CalNex and a site in an oil and gas producing region in January-February of 2013 during UBWOS 2013 will be discussed. Although the VOC compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 ppb in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 8%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Inclusion of recent findings on additional precursors and formation pathways of formic acid in the box model increases modeled formic acid concentrations for UBWOS 2013 and CalNex by a factor of 6.4 and 4.5, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 21 and 47% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be -7 and 0-6% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that air-snow exchange processes and morning fog events may also contribute to ambient formic acid concentrations during UBWOS 2013 (∼20% in total). In total, 50-57% in UBWOS 2013 and 48-53% in CalNex of secondary formation of formic acid remains unexplained. More work on formic acid formation pathways is needed to reduce the uncertainties in the sources and budget of formic

  13. Conformational Features of Topologically Classified RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Jimmy Ka Ho; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    Background Current RNA secondary structure prediction approaches predict prevalent pseudoknots such as the H-pseudoknot and kissing hairpin. The number of possible structures increases drastically when more complex pseudoknots are considered, thus leading to computational limitations. On the other hand, the enormous population of possible structures means not all of them appear in real RNA molecules. Therefore, it is of interest to understand how many of them really exist and the reasons for their preferred existence over the others, as any new findings revealed by this study might enhance the capability of future structure prediction algorithms for more accurate prediction of complex pseudoknots. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel algorithm was devised to estimate the exact number of structural possibilities for a pseudoknot constructed with a specified number of base pair stems. Then, topological classification was applied to classify RNA pseudoknotted structures from data in the RNA STRAND database. By showing the vast possibilities and the real population, it is clear that most of these plausible complex pseudoknots are not observed. Moreover, from these classified motifs that exist in nature, some features were identified for further investigation. It was found that some features are related to helical stacking. Other features are still left open to discover underlying tertiary interactions. Conclusions Results from topological classification suggest that complex pseudoknots are usually some well-known motifs that are themselves complex or the interaction results of some special motifs. Heuristics can be proposed to predict the essential parts of these complex motifs, even if the required thermodynamic parameters are currently unknown. PMID:22792195

  14. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Alison A.; Young, Vincent B.

    2016-01-01

    microbiota, allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine. PMID:27239562

  15. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    , allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine.

  16. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  17. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, J Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G; Sánchez, Ignacio E

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage "Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis".

  18. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, J. Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Sánchez, Ignacio E.

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage “Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis”. PMID:26674530

  19. Consequential secondary structure alterations and aggregation during prolonged casein glycation.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Supriya; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) of casein is a process used not just to ameliorate the quality of dairy products but also to increase the shelf life of canned foods, including baby milk supplements. Incubation of κ-casein with reducing sugars for 15 days at physiological temperature showed the formation of a molten globule state at day 9 and 12 during fructation and glucation respectively. This state exhibits substantial secondary structure and maximum ANS binding. Later on, glycation resulted in the formation of aggregates at day 12 in presence of fructose and day 15 in presence of glucose. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and FTIR. These aggregates showed altered tryptophan environment, decrease ANS binding relative to molten globule state and increase in Thioflavin T fluorescence. Aggregates were also accompanied by the accumulation of AGEs, indicative of structural damage to the protein and formation of potentially harmful species at the physiological level. Fructose was more reactive than glucose and thus caused early and significant changes in the protein. From our studies, we conclude that controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction in the food industry is essential to counter its negative effects and expand its safety spectrum.

  20. A simple motif for protein recognition in DNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Landt, Stephen G; Ramirez, Alejandro; Daugherty, Matthew D; Frankel, Alan D

    2005-09-02

    DNA in a single-stranded form (ssDNA) exists transiently within the cell and comprises the telomeres of linear chromosomes and the genomes of some DNA viruses. As with RNA, in the single-stranded state, some DNA sequences are able to fold into complex secondary and tertiary structures that may be recognized by proteins and participate in gene regulation. To better understand how such DNA elements might fold and interact with proteins, and to compare recognition features to those of a structured RNA, we used in vitro selection to identify ssDNAs that bind an RNA-binding peptide from the HIV Rev protein with high affinity and specificity. The large majority of selected binders contain a non-Watson-Crick G.T base-pair and an adjacent C:G base-pair and both are essential for binding. This GT motif can be presented in different DNA contexts, including a nearly perfect duplex and a branched three-helix structure, and appears to be recognized in large part by arginine residues separated by one turn of an alpha-helix. Interestingly, a very similar GT motif is necessary also for protein binding and function of a well-characterized model ssDNA regulatory element from the proenkephalin promoter.

  1. Reproductive response of generalist and specialist aphid morphs with the same genotype to plant secondary compounds and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Colin R; Powell, Glen; Holmes, Neil D; Hardie, Jim

    2003-12-01

    Many studies have paid particular attention to the role of either secondary plant compounds or amino acids as determinants of host-plant range in phytophagous insects. Here we examine the relative importance of both of these classes of compound in host acceptance by generalist and specialist morphs of the black bean aphid, Aphis fabae, that are morphologically similar and genetically identical. Eleven secondary plant compounds and six amino acids with known biological activity in aphids are presented to insects within an artificial membrane system as single compounds, mixtures of same-class compounds and combined mixtures of the two classes of compound. It is found that 1) when specific single secondary compounds and amino acids are presented to generalist and specialist morphs of A. fabae, differential responses are exclusively consistent with plant-use strategy for amino acids but not for secondary compounds, 2) neither secondary compound nor amino acid mixtures give reproductive responses entirely consistent with plant range, but the response to secondary compounds is broadly consistent with plant range whereas the response to amino acids is not, 3) when secondary compounds and amino acid mixtures are combined, the response to secondary compounds generally dominates that to amino acids. Some scenarios of plant-range determination by secondary plant compounds and amino acids, suggested by results, are discussed.

  2. Secondary structure of protamine in sperm nuclei: an infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protamines are small basic proteins that condense the DNA in mature spermatozoa. Typical protamines are of simple composition and very arginine-rich, usually in the range of 60-80%. Arginine residues are distributed in a number of stretches separated by neutral amino acids. We have used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to gain access for the first time to the secondary structure of protamines in sperm nuclei. This technique is particularly well suited to the study of DNA-bound protamine in whole nuclei since it is not affected by turbidity. Results We show that DNA -bound salmon (salmine) and squid protamines contain α-helix, β-turns and a proportion of other structures not stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. No β-sheet was observed. In salmine, the α-helix amounted to ~20%, while in squid protamine it reached ~40%. In contrast, the structure not stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonding was more abundant in salmine (~40%) than in squid protamine (~20%). Both protamines contained ~40% β-turns. The different helical potential of salmine and squid protamine was confirmed by structure predictions and CD in the presence of trifluoroethanol. Conclusion DNA-bound protamine in sperm nuclei contains large amounts of defined secondary structure stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Both salmine and squid protamine contain similar amounts of β-turns, but differ in the proportions of α-helix and non-hydrogen bonded conformations. In spite of the large differences in the proportions of secondary structure motifs between salmon and squid protamines, they appear to be equally efficient in promoting tight hexagonal packing of the DNA molecules in sperm nuclei. PMID:21435240

  3. Effect of secondary structure on the self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules: A multiscale simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Jagannath; Yethiraj, Arun

    2012-02-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules is of interest from a fundamental and practical standpoint. There has been recent interest in a class of molecules made from β-amino acids (which contain an additional backbone carbon atom when compared with natural amino acids). Block copolymers of β-peptides, where one block is hydrophobic and the other is hydrophilic, self-assemble into micelles. In this work, we use computer simulations to provide insight into the effect of secondary structure on the self-assembly of these molecules. Atomistic simulations for the free energy of association of a pair of molecules show that a homochiral hydrophobic block promotes self assembly compared to a heterochiral hydrophobic block, consistent with experiment. Simulations of a coarse-grained model show that these molecules spontaneously form spherical micelles.

  4. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC).

  5. Characterizing the secondary protein structure of black widow dragline silk using solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Butler, Emily; Kim, Jihyun; Henning, Robert W; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-10-14

    This study provides a detailed secondary structural characterization of major ampullate dragline silk from Latrodectus hesperus (black widow) spiders. X-ray diffraction results show that the structure of black widow major ampullate silk fibers is comprised of stacked β-sheet nanocrystallites oriented parallel to the fiber axis and an amorphous region with oriented (anisotropic) and isotropic components. The combination of two-dimensional (2D) (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments provide chemical shifts that are used to determine detailed information about the amino acid motif secondary structure in black widow spider dragline silk. Individual amino acids are incorporated into different repetitive motifs that make up the majority of this protein-based biopolymer. From the solid-state NMR measurements, we assign distinct secondary conformations to each repetitive amino acid motif and, hence, to the amino acids that make up the motifs. Specifically, alanine is incorporated in β-sheet (poly(Alan) and poly(Gly-Ala)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Xaa), and α-helix (poly(Gln-Gln-Ala-Tyr)) components. Glycine is determined to be in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala)) and 3(1)-helical (poly(Gly-Gly-X(aa))) regions, while serine is present in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala-Ser)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Ser)), and β-turn (poly(Gly-Pro-Ser)) structures. These various motif-specific secondary structural elements are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence of major ampullate spidroin 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2) and are shown to form a self-consistent model for black widow dragline silk.

  6. Formic acid measurements from space: Retrieval strategy, evaluation, and initial constraints on primary and secondary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, D. B.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Wells, K. C.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Luo, M.; Paulot, F.

    2012-12-01

    Formic acid is a major contributor to acidity in the global atmosphere, and recent work suggests that its sources are significantly underestimated. New space-borne measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), onboard EOS Aura, offer valuable global data for investigating this issue, and for quantifying primary and secondary formic acid sources to the atmosphere. In this presentation, we describe the TES formic acid retrieval strategy along with a series of sensitivity studies to test its reliability. We present initial global results showing the seasonal and spatial distribution of formic acid in the lower troposphere, and apply a 3D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to i) evaluate the TES retrievals against a collection of airborne and ground-based observations, and ii) assess what constraints the satellite data can provide on the budget of atmospheric formic acid.

  7. Relating secondary structure to the mechanical properties of polypeptide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Sharon Anne

    Biomimetic hydrogels are being developed for use in medicine as drug delivery devices and tissue engineering matrices, and the mechanical properties of the materials play an important role in their performance. For example, in tissue engineering, gene expression and cell adhesion have been closely linked to the mechanical properties of the surrounding hydrogel matrix. In poly-L-lysine hydrogels, a five-fold increase in storage modulus, a 50% increase in equilibrium modulus, and a 62% decrease in swelling degree are shown to occur as the hydrogel network chains transition from an alpha-helix to a beta-sheet conformation. The manipulation of the network's mechanical behavior through changes in the secondary structure of the polymer chains offers an additional design variable in the development of biosynthetic materials. Analogous to poly-L-lysine, elastin-mimetic proteins based on the consensus repeat sequence of elastin (VPGVG) undergo a temperature-dependent secondary structure transition from a random coil to a beta-spiral. In this research, chemically-crosslinked poly[(VPGVG)4(VPGKG)] hydrogels are shown to possess temperature- and pH-dependent swelling. Following scaling law predictions (G ˜ φ2n), the hydrogels have been shown to behave as ideal elastic networks when the crosslink density is varied at synthesis (theory: n = 9/4, experimental: n = 2.0 +/- 0.1), and behave as flexible networks above and below their structural transition temperature of 35°C (theory: n = 1/3, experimental: n = 0.45 +/- 0.06). Evaluation of published data on elastin-mimetic hydrogels shows that the hydrogels behave as ideal elastic networks for all crosslinking techniques, crosslink spacings, and crosslink functionalities reported. As a contrast to chemically-crosslinked hydrogels, a novel elastin-mimetic triblock (EMT) copolymer was evaluated because of its potential use in cell encapsulation without potentially harmful side reactions. Unlike other thermally gelling copolymers

  8. Teachers' Perceptions of the Teaching of Acids and Bases in Swedish Upper Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drechsler, Michal; Van Driel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report in this paper on a study of chemistry teachers' perceptions of their teaching in upper secondary schools in Sweden, regarding models of acids and bases, especially the Bronsted and the Arrhenius model. A questionnaire consisting of a Likert-type scale was developed, which focused on teachers' knowledge of different models, knowledge of…

  9. The Chemistry of Polymers, Proteins, and Nucleic Acids: A Short Course on Macromolecules for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulav, Ilan; Samuel, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a unit on macromolecules that has been used in the 12th grade of many Israeli secondary schools. Topic areas in the unit include synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, and nucleic acids. A unit outline is provided in an appendix. (JN)

  10. Teachers' Perceptions of the Teaching of Acids and Bases in Swedish Upper Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drechsler, Michal; Van Driel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report in this paper on a study of chemistry teachers' perceptions of their teaching in upper secondary schools in Sweden, regarding models of acids and bases, especially the Bronsted and the Arrhenius model. A questionnaire consisting of a Likert-type scale was developed, which focused on teachers' knowledge of different models, knowledge of…

  11. The Chemistry of Polymers, Proteins, and Nucleic Acids: A Short Course on Macromolecules for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulav, Ilan; Samuel, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a unit on macromolecules that has been used in the 12th grade of many Israeli secondary schools. Topic areas in the unit include synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, and nucleic acids. A unit outline is provided in an appendix. (JN)

  12. Evolutionary Algorithm for RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Based on Simulated SHAPE Data.

    PubMed

    Montaseri, Soheila; Ganjtabesh, Mohammad; Zare-Mirakabad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs perform a wide range of functions inside the living cells that are related to their structures. Several algorithms have been proposed to predict RNA secondary structure based on minimum free energy. Low prediction accuracy of these algorithms indicates that free energy alone is not sufficient to predict the functional secondary structure. Recently, the obtained information from the SHAPE experiment greatly improves the accuracy of RNA secondary structure prediction by adding this information to the thermodynamic free energy as pseudo-free energy. In this paper, a new method is proposed to predict RNA secondary structure based on both free energy and SHAPE pseudo-free energy. For each RNA sequence, a population of secondary structures is constructed and their SHAPE data are simulated. Then, an evolutionary algorithm is used to improve each structure based on both free and pseudo-free energies. Finally, a structure with minimum summation of free and pseudo-free energies is considered as the predicted RNA secondary structure. Computationally simulating the SHAPE data for a given RNA sequence requires its secondary structure. Here, we overcome this limitation by employing a population of secondary structures. This helps us to simulate the SHAPE data for any RNA sequence and consequently improves the accuracy of RNA secondary structure prediction as it is confirmed by our experiments. The source code and web server of our proposed method are freely available at http://mostafa.ut.ac.ir/ESD-Fold/.

  13. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observed when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.

  14. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; ...

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observedmore » when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.« less

  15. Secondary structure prediction of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase from a porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Zenteno-Cuevas, R; Hernández, J; Espinosa, B; Reyes, J; Zenteno, E

    1998-01-01

    The Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) from 'La Piedad, Michoacan' porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) interacts specifically with NeuAc alpha 2,3 lactose residues on the target cell. In this work we report the secondary structure of this protein, determined with five different theoretical algorithms. Results indicate that the HN protein is organized in: an intracellular region (from amino acid 1 to 25); in a beta-strand transmembrane region (residue 26 to 47), typically hydrophobic, rigid and solvent inaccessible; and extracellular region (48 to 576), which possesses hemagglutinating and neuraminidase activity. The secondary structure in this region is organized in a beta-loop-beta alternated with few alpha-helices. Regions with structural and functional implications were determined by pattern search and multiple alignment of the HN from LPM with 12 rubulaviruses and paramyxoviruses HN sequences. The low diversity observed among the HN sequences evaluated indicates that in general the structural organization of the protein, and in particular its sugar binding domain, is closely related among both genera, thus suggesting that the sugar binding domain is well preserved through evolution.

  16. Effects of morpholine and boric acid implementation on secondary chemistry and corrosion product transport

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, D.P.; Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.; Clouse, M.E.

    1992-07-01

    This project expanded the database on the effects of morpholine use as a pH control additive in the secondary water system of pressurized water reactors. Tests carried out at Alabama Power`s Joseph M. Farley Units 1 and 2, Northern States Power`s Prairie Island Unit 2, and Commonwealth Edison`s Byron Unit 1 demonstrated that the use of morpholine reduced corrosion product transport in PWR secondary systems by up to a factor of 2. Further reductions were achieved by eliminating copper alloy tubing and increasing secondary cycles pH. Steam generator boric acid treatment in plants with all ferrous secondary cycles operated with morpholine was shown to have a minimal effect on iron transport.

  17. Effects of morpholine and boric acid implementation on secondary chemistry and corrosion product transport

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, D.P.; Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.; Clouse, M.E. )

    1992-07-01

    This project expanded the database on the effects of morpholine use as a pH control additive in the secondary water system of pressurized water reactors. Tests carried out at Alabama Power's Joseph M. Farley Units 1 and 2, Northern States Power's Prairie Island Unit 2, and Commonwealth Edison's Byron Unit 1 demonstrated that the use of morpholine reduced corrosion product transport in PWR secondary systems by up to a factor of 2. Further reductions were achieved by eliminating copper alloy tubing and increasing secondary cycles pH. Steam generator boric acid treatment in plants with all ferrous secondary cycles operated with morpholine was shown to have a minimal effect on iron transport.

  18. Secondary use of structured patient data: interim results of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vuokko, Riikka; Mäkelä-Bengs, Päivi; Hyppönen, Hannele; Doupi, Persephone

    2015-01-01

    In addition to patient care, EHR data are increasingly in demand for secondary purposes, e.g. administration, research and enterprise resource planning. We conducted a systematic literature review and subsequent analysis of 85 articles focusing on the secondary use of structured patient records. We grounded the analysis on how patient records have been structured, how these structures have been evaluated and what are the main results achieved from the secondary use viewpoint. We conclude that secondary use requires complete and interoperable patient records, which in turn depend on better alignment of primary and secondary users' needs and benefits.

  19. [Interaction relationship between secondary metabolites in Glycyrrhiza uralensis at condition of short-term exogenous glycyrrhizic acid simulation].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Liu, Chun-sheng; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Li, Yan-peng

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the interaction relationship between secondary metabolites in Glycyrrhiza uralensis, and find out which secondary metabolite is significantly related to the content of glycyrrhizic acid, artificial applying ammonium glycyrrhetate solution was used to establish a high glycyrrhizic acid environment. The change of the 4 secondary metabolites was analyzed within 72 h after glycyrrhizic acid stimulation, while correlation statistical soft was applied to analyze the correlation of glycyrrhizic acid and other compositions. It turned out that it is feasible to establish high glycyrrhizic acid environment by glycyrrhizic acid root soaking in the concentration of 1.0 mmol x L(-1). There was significant positive correlation between glycyrrhizic acid and liquorice glycosides in short-term glycyrrhizic acid stimulation environment. It is concluded that glycyrrhizic acid accumulation internal of G. uralensis could be effected by artificial exogenous glycyrrhizic acid stimulation in certain case, and its accumulation was significantly related to the content of liquorice glycosides.

  20. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  1. Effect of boric acid treatment on the secondary cycle at ANO-2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, D.P.; McNea, D.A.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1985-11-01

    Because of the rapid progression of denting at the steam generator upper support plates at Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 2 (ANO-2), Arkansas Power and Light (AP and L) implemented boric acid treatment during the third fuel cycle. Minimal effects of boric acid on secondary cycle ionic transport were observed; however, indications of accelerated corrosion of copper alloys in portions of the cycle were noted. Since the primary-to-secondary hydrogen diffusion rate data did not conform to the relation expected based on laboratory studies with Alloy 600, hydrogen transport data could not be employed to conclusively demonstrate the effect of boric acid on steam generator corrosion. Assuming that the basic form of the diffusion relation remained the same during operation with and without boric acid, a net increase in corrosion-generated hydrogen transport appeared to result from the adoption of boric acid treatment. This increase may be attributable to an increase in secondary cycle copper alloy corrosion rates, although additional measurements would be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  2. [Management, prevention and control of megaloblastic anemia, secondary to folic acid deficiency].

    PubMed

    de Paz, R; Hernández-Navarro, F

    2006-01-01

    Folic acid deficiency is the second most common cause of anemia in our environment, after anemia secondary to iron deficiency. Folates are essential components of human and animal diet. Folic acid is mainly in poliglutamate form, and it is hydrolyzed in the proximal jejunum. It is important to identify adequately the exact vitamin deficiency that causes megaloblastic anemia, because vitamin B12 administration in folate deficiency may correct partially megaloblastic alterations, but administration of folic acid in cobalamin deficient patients improves haematological parameters but deteriorates the neurological syndrome. Main causes of anemia secondary to folate deficiency are inadequate dietetic administration, increased requirements, impaired absorption and pharmacologic interactions. Folates are altered by light, high temperature and by water affinity, which facilitates its elimination by washing or cooking.

  3. Infrared spectroscopic study of photoreceptor membrane and purple membrane. Protein secondary structure and hydrogen deuterium exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, N.W.; Bruchman, T.J.; Hazzard, J.H.

    1986-03-15

    Infrared spectroscopy in the interval from 1800 to 1300 cm-1 has been used to investigate the secondary structure and the hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of bacteriorhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin in their respective native membranes. The amide I' and amide II' regions from spectra of membrane suspensions in D2O were decomposed into constituent bands by use of a curve-fitting procedure. The amide I' bands could be fit with a minimum of three theoretical components having peak positions at 1664, 1638, and 1625 cm-1 for bacteriorhodopsin and 1657, 1639, and 1625 cm-1 for rhodopsin. For both of these membrane proteins, the amide I' spectrum suggests that alpha-helix is the predominant form of peptide chain secondary structure, but that a substantial amount of beta-sheet conformation is present as well. The shape of the amide I' band was pH-sensitive for photoreceptor membranes, but not for purple membrane, indicating that membrane-bound rhodopsin undergoes a conformation change at acidic pH. Peptide hydrogen exchange of bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin was monitored by observing the change in the ratio of integrated absorbance (Aamide II'/Aamide I') during the interval from 1.5 to 25 h after membranes were introduced into buffered D2O. The fraction of peptide groups in a very slowly exchanging secondary structure was estimated to be 0.71 for bacteriorhodopsin at pD 7. The corresponding fraction in vertebrate rhodopsin was estimated to be less than or equal to 0.60. These findings are discussed in relationship to previous studies of hydrogen exchange behavior and to structural models for both proteins.

  4. CLIPing Staufen to secondary RNA structures: size and location matter!

    PubMed

    Fernández Moya, Sandra M; Kiebler, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    hiCLIP (RNA hybrid and individual-nucleotide resolution ultraviolet cross-linking and immunoprecipitation), is a novel technique developed by Sugimoto et al. (2015). Here, the use of different adaptors permits a controlled ligation of the two strands of a RNA duplex allowing the identification of each arm in the duplex upon sequencing. The authors chose a notoriously difficult to study double-stranded RNA-binding protein (dsRBP) termed Staufen1, a mammalian homolog of Drosophila Staufen involved in mRNA localization and translational control. Using hiCLIP, they discovered a dominance of intramolecular RNA duplexes compared to the total RNA duplexes identified. Importantly, the authors discovered two different types of intramolecular duplexes in the cell: highly translated mRNAs with long-range duplexes in their 3'-UTRs and poorly translated mRNAs with duplexes in their coding region. In conclusion, the authors establish hiCLIP as an important novel technique for the identification of RNA secondary structures that serve as in vivo binding sites for dsRBPs. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Can computationally designed protein sequences improve secondary structure prediction?

    PubMed

    Bondugula, Rajkumar; Wallqvist, Anders; Lee, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Computational sequence design methods are used to engineer proteins with desired properties such as increased thermal stability and novel function. In addition, these algorithms can be used to identify an envelope of sequences that may be compatible with a particular protein fold topology. In this regard, we hypothesized that sequence-property prediction, specifically secondary structure, could be significantly enhanced by using a large database of computationally designed sequences. We performed a large-scale test of this hypothesis with 6511 diverse protein domains and 50 designed sequences per domain. After analysis of the inherent accuracy of the designed sequences database, we realized that it was necessary to put constraints on what fraction of the native sequence should be allowed to change. With mutational constraints, accuracy was improved vs. no constraints, but the diversity of designed sequences, and hence effective size of the database, was moderately reduced. Overall, the best three-state prediction accuracy (Q(3)) that we achieved was nearly a percentage point improved over using a natural sequence database alone, well below the theoretical possibility for improvement of 8-10 percentage points. Furthermore, our nascent method was used to augment the state-of-the-art PSIPRED program by a percentage point.

  6. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Local Adaptive Techniques in Training Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aik, Lim Eng; Zainuddin, Zarita; Joseph, Annie

    2008-01-01

    One of the most significant problems in computer molecular biology today is how to predict a protein's three-dimensional structure from its one-dimensional amino acid sequence or generally call the protein folding problem and difficult to determine the corresponding protein functions. Thus, this paper involves protein secondary structure prediction using neural network in order to solve the protein folding problem. The neural network used for protein secondary structure prediction is multilayer perceptron (MLP) of the feed-forward variety. The training set are taken from the protein data bank which are 120 proteins while 60 testing set is the proteins which were chosen randomly from the protein data bank. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is used to get the protein similar sequence and Position Specific Scoring matrix (PSSM) is used for network input. The training process of the neural network involves local adaptive techniques. Local adaptive techniques used in this paper comprises Learning rate by sign changes, SuperSAB, Quickprop and RPROP. From the simulation, the performance for learning rate by Rprop and Quickprop are superior to all other algorithms with respect to the convergence time. However, the best result was obtained using Rprop algorithm.

  7. Predicted secondary structure and membrane topology of the scrapie prion protein.

    PubMed

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J; McKinley, M P; Prusiner, S B

    1987-01-01

    The integral membrane sialoglycoprotein PrPSc is the only identifiable component of the scrapie prion. Scrapie in animals and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans are transmissible, degenerative neurological diseases caused by prions. Standard predictive strategies have been used to analyze the secondary structure of the prion protein in conjunction with Fourier analysis of the primary sequence hydrophobicities to detect potential amphipathic regions. Several hydrophobic segments, a proline- and glycine-rich repeat region and putative glycosylation sites are incorporated into a model for the integral membrane topology of PrP. The complete amino acid sequences of the hamster, human and mouse prion proteins are compared and the effects of residue substitutions upon the predicted conformation of the polypeptide chain are discussed. While PrP has a unique primary structure, its predicted secondary structure shares some interesting features with the serum amyloid A proteins. These proteins undergo a post-translational modification to yield amyloid A, molecules that share with PrP the ability to polymerize into birefringent filaments. Our analyses may explain some experimental observations on PrP, and suggest further studies on the properties of the scrapie and cellular PrP isoforms.

  8. Active Transport of Iron in Bacillus megaterium: Role of Secondary Hydroxamic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Davis, W. B.; Byers, B. R.

    1971-01-01

    Kinetics of radioactive iron transport were examined in three strains of Bacillus megaterium. In strain ATCC 19213, which secretes the ferric-chelating secondary hydroxamic acid schizokinen, 59Fe3+ uptake from 59FeCl3 or the ferric hydroxamate Desferal-59Fe3+ was rapid and reached saturation within 3 min. In strain SK11, which does not secrete schizokinen, transport from 59FeCl3 was markedly reduced; the two ferric hydroxamates Desferal-59Fe3+ or schizokinen-59Fe3+ increased both total 59Fe3+ uptake and the 59Fe3+ appearing in a cellular trichloroacetic acid-insoluble fraction, although 10 min was required to reach saturation. Certain characteristics of transport from both ferric hydroxamates and FeCl3 suggest that iron uptake was an active process. The growth-inhibitory effect of aluminum on strain SK11 was probably due to the formation of nonutilizable iron-aluminum complexes which blocked uptake from 59FeCl3. Desferal or schizokinen prevented this blockage. A strain (ARD-1) resistant to the ferric hydroxamate antibiotic A22765 was isolated from strain SK11. Strain ARD-1 failed to grow with Desferal-Fe3+ as an iron source, and it was unable to incorporate 59Fe3+ from this source. Growth and iron uptake in strain ARD-1 were similar to strain SK11 with schizokinen-Fe3+ or the iron salt as sources. It is suggested that the ferric hydroxamates, or the iron they chelate, may be transported by a special system which might be selective for certain ferric hydroxamates. Strain ARD-1 may be unable to recognize both the antibiotic A22765 and the structurally similar chelate Desferal-Fe3+, while retaining its capacity to utilize schizokinen-Fe3+. PMID:5000305

  9. Importance of secondary structure in the signal sequence for protein secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Emr, S D; Silhavy, T J

    1983-01-01

    Mutant Escherichia coli strains in which export of the LamB protein (coded for by the lamB gene) to the outer membrane of the cell is prevented have been described previously. One of these mutant strains contains a small (12-base pair) deletion mutation within the region of the lamB gene that codes for the NH2-terminal signal sequence. In this mutant strain, export but not synthesis of the LamB protein is blocked. We have isolated pseudorevertants that restore export of functional LamB protein to the outer membrane. DNA sequence analysis showed that two of the revertants contain a point mutation in addition to the original deletion. These point mutations lead to amino acid substitutions within the signal sequence. Our results indicate that these secondary mutations efficiently suppress the export defect caused by the deletion mutation. Analysis of the secondary structure of the wild-type, mutant, and pseudorevertant LamB signal sequences suggests that the secondary mutations restore export by allowing the formation of a stable alpha-helical conformation in the central, hydrophobic region of the signal sequence. Images PMID:6224220

  10. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Carbonyls and Alcohols With Sulfuric Acid: Implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Levitt, N.; Zhang, R.

    2006-12-01

    Recent environmental chamber studies have suggested that acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions of organic carbonyls lead to multifold increases in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass and acid-catalyzed reactions between alcohols and aldehydes in the condensed phase lead to the formation of hemiacetals and acetals, also enhancing secondary organic aerosol growth. The kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous chemistry of carbonyls and alcohols with sulfuric acid, however, remain largely uncertain. In this talk, we present measurements of heterogeneous uptake of several carbonyls and alcohols on liquid H2SO4 in a wide range of acid concentrations and temperatures. The results indicate that uptake of larger carbonyls is explained by aldol condensation. For small dicarbonyls, heterogeneous reactions are shown to decrease with acidity and involve negligible formation of sulfate esters. Hydration and polymerization likely explain the measured uptake of such small dicarbonyls on H2SO4 and the measurements do not support an acid- catalyzed uptake. Atmospheric implications from our findings will be discussed.

  11. New structural motif for carboxylic acid perhydrolases.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Purpero, Vince M; Fujii, Ryota; Jing, Qing; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2013-02-25

    Some serine hydrolases also catalyze a promiscuous reaction--reversible perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to make peroxycarboxylic acids. Five X-ray crystal structures of these carboxylic acid perhydrolases show a proline in the oxyanion loop. Here, we test whether this proline is essential for high perhydrolysis activity using Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase (PFE). The L29P variant of this esterase catalyzes perhydrolysis 43-fold faster (k(cat) comparison) than the wild type. Surprisingly, saturation mutagenesis at the 29 position of PFE identified six other amino acid substitutions that increase perhydrolysis of acetic acid at least fourfold over the wild type. The best variant, L29I PFE, catalyzed perhydrolysis 83-times faster (k(cat) comparison) than wild-type PFE and twice as fast as L29P PFE. Despite the different amino acid in the oxyanion loop, L29I PFE shows a similar selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over water as L29P PFE (β(0)=170 vs. 160 M(-1)), and a similar fast formation of acetyl-enzyme (140 vs. 62 U mg(-1)). X-ray crystal structures of L29I PFE with and without bound acetate show an unusual mixture of two different oxyanion loop conformations. The type II β-turn conformation resembles the wild-type structure and is unlikely to increase perhydrolysis, but the type I β-turn conformation creates a binding site for a second acetate. Modeling suggests that a previously proposed mechanism for L29P PFE can be extended to include L29I PFE, so that an acetate accepts a hydrogen bond to promote faster formation of the acetyl-enzyme.

  12. New structural motif for carboxylic acid perhydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Purpero, Vince M.; Fujii, Ryota; Jing, Qing; Kazlauskas, Romas J.

    2013-01-01

    Some serine hydrolases also catalyze a promiscuous reaction – reversible perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to make peroxycarboxylic acids. Five x-ray crystal structures of these carboxylic acid perhydrolases show a proline in the oxyanion loop. Here, we test whether this proline is essential for high perhydrolysis activity using Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase (PFE). The L29P variant of this esterase catalyzes perhydrolysis 43-fold faster (kcat comparison) than wild type. Surprisingly, saturation mutagenesis at the 29 position of PFE identified six other amino acid substitutions that increase perhydrolysis of acetic acid at least fourfold over wild type. The best variant, L29I PFE, catalyzed perhydrolysis 83 times faster (kcat comparison) than wild-type PFE and twice as fast as L29P PFE. Despite the different amino acid in the oxyanion loop, L29I PFE shows a similar selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over water as L29P PFE (β0 = 170 M−1 vs. 160 M−1), and a similar fast formation of acetyl-enzyme (140 U/mg vs. 62 U/mg). X-ray crystal structures of L29I PFE with and without bound acetate show an unusual mixture of two different oxyanion loop conformations. The type II β-turn conformation resembles the wild-type structure and is unlikely to increase perhydrolysis, but the type I β-turn conformation creates a binding site for a second acetate. Modeling suggests that a previously proposed mechanism for L29P PFE can be extended to include L29I PFE where an acetate accepts a hydrogen bond to promote faster formation of the acetyl enzyme. PMID:23325572

  13. Structurally Coloured Secondary Particles Composed of Black and White Colloidal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Takeoka, Yukikazu; Yoshioka, Shinya; Teshima, Midori; Takano, Atsushi; Harun-Ur-Rashid, Mohammad; Seki, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the colourful secondary particles formed by controlling the aggregation states of colloidal silica particles and the enhancement of the structural colouration of the secondary particles caused by adding black particles. We obtained glossy, partially structurally coloured secondary particles in the absence of NaCl, but matte, whitish secondary particles were obtained in the presence of NaCl. When a small amount of carbon black was incorporated into both types of secondary particles, the incoherent multiple scattering of light from the amorphous region was considerably reduced. However, the peak intensities in the reflection spectra, caused by Bragg reflection and by coherent single wavelength scattering, were only slightly decreased. Consequently, a brighter structural colour of these secondary particles was observed with the naked eye. Furthermore, when magnetite was added as a black particle, the coloured secondary particles could be moved and collected by applying an external magnetic field. PMID:23917891

  14. Profiles and majority voting-based ensemble method for protein secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Bouziane, Hafida; Messabih, Belhadri; Chouarfia, Abdallah

    2011-01-01

    Machine learning techniques have been widely applied to solve the problem of predicting protein secondary structure from the amino acid sequence. They have gained substantial success in this research area. Many methods have been used including k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NNs), Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), which have attracted attention recently. Today, the main goal remains to improve the prediction quality of the secondary structure elements. The prediction accuracy has been continuously improved over the years, especially by using hybrid or ensemble methods and incorporating evolutionary information in the form of profiles extracted from alignments of multiple homologous sequences. In this paper, we investigate how best to combine k-NNs, ANNs and Multi-class SVMs (M-SVMs) to improve secondary structure prediction of globular proteins. An ensemble method which combines the outputs of two feed-forward ANNs, k-NN and three M-SVM classifiers has been applied. Ensemble members are combined using two variants of majority voting rule. An heuristic based filter has also been applied to refine the prediction. To investigate how much improvement the general ensemble method can give rather than the individual classifiers that make up the ensemble, we have experimented with the proposed system on the two widely used benchmark datasets RS126 and CB513 using cross-validation tests by including PSI-BLAST position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) profiles as inputs. The experimental results reveal that the proposed system yields significant performance gains when compared with the best individual classifier.

  15. Structure prediction and functional characterization of secondary metabolite proteins of Ocimum

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudeep; Maheshwari, Nidhi; Chauhan, Rashi; Sen, Naresh Kumar; Sharma, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Various species of Ocimum have acquired special attention due to their medicinal properties. Different parts of the plant (root, stem, flower, leaves) are used in the treatment of a wide range of disorders from centuries. Experimental structures (X-ray and NMR) of proteins from different Ocimum species, are not yet available in the Protein Databank (PDB). These proteins play a key role in various metabolic pathways in Ocimum. 3D structures of the proteins are essential to determine most of their functions. Homology modeling approach was employed in order to derive structures for these proteins. A program meant for comparative modeling- Modeller 9v7 was utilized for the purpose. The modeled proteins were further validated by Prochek and Verify-3d and Errat servers. Amino acid composition and polarity of these proteins was determined by CLC-Protein Workbench tool. Expasy's Prot-param server and Cys_rec tool were used for physico-chemical and functional characterization of these proteins. Studies of secondary structure of these proteins were carried out by computational program, Profunc. Swiss-pdb viewer was used to visualize and analyze these homology derived structures. The structures are finally submitted in Protein Model Database, PMDB so that they become accessible to other users for further studies. PMID:21769194

  16. PSP_MCSVM: brainstorming consensus prediction of protein secondary structures using two-stage multiclass support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Secondary structure prediction is a crucial task for understanding the variety of protein structures and performed biological functions. Prediction of secondary structures for new proteins using their amino acid sequences is of fundamental importance in bioinformatics. We propose a novel technique to predict protein secondary structures based on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) and physico-chemical properties of amino acids. It is a two stage approach involving multiclass support vector machines (SVMs) as classifiers for three different structural conformations, viz., helix, sheet and coil. In the first stage, PSSMs obtained from PSI-BLAST and five specially selected physicochemical properties of amino acids are fed into SVMs as features for sequence-to-structure prediction. Confidence values for forming helix, sheet and coil that are obtained from the first stage SVM are then used in the second stage SVM for performing structure-to-structure prediction. The two-stage cascaded classifiers (PSP_MCSVM) are trained with proteins from RS126 dataset. The classifiers are finally tested on target proteins of critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). PSP_MCSVM with brainstorming consensus procedure performs better than the prediction servers like Predator, DSC, SIMPA96, for randomly selected proteins from CASP9 targets. The overall performance is found to be comparable with the current state-of-the art. PSP_MCSVM source code, train-test datasets and supplementary files are available freely in public domain at: http://sysbio.icm.edu.pl/secstruct and http://code.google.com/p/cmater-bioinfo/

  17. JNSViewer—A JavaScript-based Nucleotide Sequence Viewer for DNA/RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Min; Graham, Mitchell; Yadav, Nehul

    2017-01-01

    Many tools are available for visualizing RNA or DNA secondary structures, but there is scarce implementation in JavaScript that provides seamless integration with the increasingly popular web computational platforms. We have developed JNSViewer, a highly interactive web service, which is bundled with several popular tools for DNA/RNA secondary structure prediction and can provide precise and interactive correspondence among nucleotides, dot-bracket data, secondary structure graphs, and genic annotations. In JNSViewer, users can perform RNA secondary structure predictions with different programs and settings, add customized genic annotations in GFF format to structure graphs, search for specific linear motifs, and extract relevant structure graphs of sub-sequences. JNSViewer also allows users to choose a transcript or specific segment of Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequences and predict the corresponding secondary structure. Popular genome browsers (i.e., JBrowse and BrowserGenome) were integrated into JNSViewer to provide powerful visualizations of chromosomal locations, genic annotations, and secondary structures. In addition, we used StructureFold with default settings to predict some RNA structures for Arabidopsis by incorporating in vivo high-throughput RNA structure profiling data and stored the results in our web server, which might be a useful resource for RNA secondary structure studies in plants. JNSViewer is available at http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/jnsviewer/index.html. PMID:28582416

  18. Predicting continuous local structure and the effect of its substitution for secondary structure in fragment-free protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Yang, Yuedong; Zhang, Shesheng; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2009-11-11

    Local structures predicted from protein sequences are used extensively in every aspect of modeling and prediction of protein structure and function. For more than 50 years, they have been predicted at a low-resolution coarse-grained level (e.g., three-state secondary structure). Here, we combine a two-state classifier with real-value predictor to predict local structure in continuous representation by backbone torsion angles. The accuracy of the angles predicted by this approach is close to that derived from NMR chemical shifts. Their substitution for predicted secondary structure as restraints for ab initio structure prediction doubles the success rate. This result demonstrates the potential of predicted local structure for fragment-free tertiary-structure prediction. It further implies potentially significant benefits from using predicted real-valued torsion angles as a replacement for or supplement to the secondary-structure prediction tools used almost exclusively in many computational methods ranging from sequence alignment to function prediction.

  19. Improved prediction of RNA secondary structure by integrating the free energy model with restraints derived from experimental probing data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Shi, Binbin; Ding, Xinqiang; Liu, Tong; Hu, Xihao; Yip, Kevin Y; Yang, Zheng Rong; Mathews, David H; Lu, Zhi John

    2015-09-03

    Recently, several experimental techniques have emerged for probing RNA structures based on high-throughput sequencing. However, most secondary structure prediction tools that incorporate probing data are designed and optimized for particular types of experiments. For example, RNAstructure-Fold is optimized for SHAPE data, while SeqFold is optimized for PARS data. Here, we report a new RNA secondary structure prediction method, restrained MaxExpect (RME), which can incorporate multiple types of experimental probing data and is based on a free energy model and an MEA (maximizing expected accuracy) algorithm. We first demonstrated that RME substantially improved secondary structure prediction with perfect restraints (base pair information of known structures). Next, we collected structure-probing data from diverse experiments (e.g. SHAPE, PARS and DMS-seq) and transformed them into a unified set of pairing probabilities with a posterior probabilistic model. By using the probability scores as restraints in RME, we compared its secondary structure prediction performance with two other well-known tools, RNAstructure-Fold (based on a free energy minimization algorithm) and SeqFold (based on a sampling algorithm). For SHAPE data, RME and RNAstructure-Fold performed better than SeqFold, because they markedly altered the energy model with the experimental restraints. For high-throughput data (e.g. PARS and DMS-seq) with lower probing efficiency, the secondary structure prediction performances of the tested tools were comparable, with performance improvements for only a portion of the tested RNAs. However, when the effects of tertiary structure and protein interactions were removed, RME showed the highest prediction accuracy in the DMS-accessible regions by incorporating in vivo DMS-seq data. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Toxicity of the lichen secondary metabolite (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Dailey, R N; Montgomery, D L; Ingram, J T; Siemion, R; Vasquez, M; Raisbeck, M F

    2008-01-01

    Toxicity following ingestion of the vagrant, foliose lichen Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa was identified as the putative etiology in the death of an estimated 400-500 elk on the Red Rim-Daley Wildlife Habitat Management Area in Wyoming during the winter of 2004. A single, unsubstantiated report in 1939 attributed toxicity of X. chlorochroa in cattle and sheep to usnic acid, a common lichen secondary metabolite. To test the hypothesis that usnic acid is the proximate cause of death in animals poisoned by lichen, domestic sheep were dosed PO with (+)-usnic acid. Clinical signs in symptomatic ewes included lethargy, anorexia, and signs indicative of abdominal discomfort. Serum creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase activities were considerably elevated in symptomatic sheep. Similarly, only symptomatic ewes exhibited appreciable postmortem lesions consisting of severe degenerative appendicular skeletal myopathy. The median toxic dose (ED(50)) of (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep was estimated to be between 485 and 647 mg/kg/day for 7 days.

  1. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  2. The refining of secondary lead for use in advanced lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Mirza, Abbas H.

    Secondary lead, i.e. material produced by the recycling of lead-acid batteries has become the primary source of lead in much of the world. This has been important to the secondary lead industry as other uses have dwindled, e.g. lead based pigments, chemicals, fuel additives, solders and CRT glasses [1]. Presently, battery manufacturing accounts for greater than 80% of lead consumption while recycled lead accounts for approximately the same market share of lead supply. These two facts strongly demonstrate the battery manufacturing and recycled lead are intimately coupled in everyday life. In this paper we will explore how recycled lead has become the material of choice for battery construction through the development of a recovery and refining process that exceeds the industries requirements. Particular focus will be on addressing the results presented by Prengaman [2] on the effects of contaminant or tramp elements on gassing in lead-acid batteries.

  3. Secondary Impacts on Structures on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric; Walker, James D.; Grosch, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    The Altair Lunar Lander is being designed for the planned return to the Moon by 2020. Since it is hoped that lander components will be re-used by later missions, studies are underway to examine the exposure threat to the lander sitting on the Lunar surface for extended periods. These threats involve both direct strikes of meteoroids on the vehicle as well as strikes from Lunar regolith and rock thrown by nearby meteorite strikes. Currently, the lander design is comprised of up to 10 different types of pressure vessels. These vessels included the manned habitation module, fuel, cryogenic fuel and gas storage containers, and instrument bays. These pressure vessels have various wall designs, including various aluminum alloys, honeycomb, and carbon-fiber composite materials. For some of the vessels, shielding is being considered. This program involved the test and analysis of six pressure vessel designs, one of which included a Whipple bumper shield. In addition to the pressure vessel walls, all the pressure vessels are wrapped in multi-layer insulation (MLI). Two variants were tested without the MLI to better understand the role of the MLI in the impact performance. The tests of performed were to examine the secondary impacts on these structures as they rested on the Lunar surface. If a hypervelocity meteor were to strike the surface nearby, it would throw regolith and rock debris into the structure at a much lower velocity. Also, when the manned module departs for the return to Earth, its rocket engines throw up debris that can impact the remaining lander components and cause damage. Glass spheres were used as a stimulant for the regolith material. Impact tests were performed with a gas gun to find the V50 of various sized spheres striking the pressure vessels. The impacts were then modeled and a fast-running approximate model for the V50 data was developed. This model was for performing risk analysis to assist in the vessel design and in the identification of ideal

  4. Secondary Impacts on Structures on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric; Walker, James D.; Grosch, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    The Altair Lunar Lander is being designed for the planned return to the Moon by 2020. Since it is hoped that lander components will be re-used by later missions, studies are underway to examine the exposure threat to the lander sitting on the Lunar surface for extended periods. These threats involve both direct strikes of meteoroids on the vehicle as well as strikes from Lunar regolith and rock thrown by nearby meteorite strikes. Currently, the lander design is comprised of up to 10 different types of pressure vessels. These vessels included the manned habitation module, fuel, cryogenic fuel and gas storage containers, and instrument bays. These pressure vessels have various wall designs, including various aluminum alloys, honeycomb, and carbon-fiber composite materials. For some of the vessels, shielding is being considered. This program involved the test and analysis of six pressure vessel designs, one of which included a Whipple bumper shield. In addition to the pressure vessel walls, all the pressure vessels are wrapped in multi-layer insulation (MLI). Two variants were tested without the MLI to better understand the role of the MLI in the impact performance. The tests of performed were to examine the secondary impacts on these structures as they rested on the Lunar surface. If a hypervelocity meteor were to strike the surface nearby, it would throw regolith and rock debris into the structure at a much lower velocity. Also, when the manned module departs for the return to Earth, its rocket engines throw up debris that can impact the remaining lander components and cause damage. Glass spheres were used as a stimulant for the regolith material. Impact tests were performed with a gas gun to find the V50 of various sized spheres striking the pressure vessels. The impacts were then modeled and a fast-running approximate model for the V50 data was developed. This model was for performing risk analysis to assist in the vessel design and in the identification of ideal

  5. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  6. Gibberellic acid increases secondary metabolite production in Echinacea purpurea hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Bilal H; Stiles, Amanda R; Saxena, Praveen K; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-12-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA(3)) is reported to have diverse effects on hairy root cultures of many plant species; therefore, the effects of GA(3) on the growth, secondary metabolite production (caffeic acid derivatives and lignin), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, and free radical scavenging activity of light-grown Echinacea purpurea L. hairy roots were investigated. Eight concentrations of GA(3), ranging from 0.005 to 1.0 μM, were added to shake flask cultures. The moderate GA(3) concentration, 0.025 μM, resulted in the highest concentrations of cichoric acid, caftaric acid, and chlorogenic acid, as well as increased PAL activity, cell viability, and free radical scavenging activity, while higher and lower GA(3) concentrations resulted in reduced levels compared to the control (lacking GA(3)). The moderate GA(3) concentration also affected root morphogenesis; supplementation with 0.025 μM GA(3) resulted in the development of thick, dense, purple-colored roots, while roots exposed to the higher and lower concentrations of GA(3) were thin and off-white. This study demonstrates that supplementation with GA(3) may be an excellent strategy to optimize the production of secondary metabolites from E. purpurea hairy root cultures; however, the GA(3) concentration is a critical factor.

  7. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets.

  8. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  9. A hollow sphere secondary structure of LiFePO4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong-Hee; Kim, Jin-Young; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2010-09-28

    We report on the evolution of a hollow sphere secondary structure of spherical nanoparticles by a solubilization-reprecipitation mechanism based on the difference of solubility products (K(sp)) of two different precipitates. Carbon-coated nanoparticles of olivine structure LiFePO(4) served as the primary nano-blocks to build the secondary nano-architecture.

  10. Early identification of secondary brain damage in subarachnoid hemorrhage: a role for glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Keir, Geoffrey; Kerr, Mary; Kay, Andrew; Kitchen, Neil; Smith, Martin; Thompson, Edward J

    2006-07-01

    Secondary ischaemic deficit adversely affects outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Astrocytes are vulnerable to ischemia, releasing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) when challenged. In this study, we followed nine patients with SAH who underwent extra-ventricular drainage for the management of secondary hydrocephalus. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected daily for up to 14 days. CSF GFAP was quantified using a standard ELISA. In the patients, we found that the CSF GFAP values were pathologically elevated in 83/89 (93%) of the CSF samples. The levels were highest on day 1 (median = 47.64 ng/mL) and decreased to 11.19 ng/mL on day 3, leveling out at approximately 1 ng/mL after 10 days. In non-survivors, a secondary rise of GFAP levels became significant during the high-risk period for vasospasm, with median levels of 21.76 ng/mL compared to 2.62 ng/mL in the survivors (p = 0.037) on day 6. This study suggests that CSF GFAP levels are of prognostic value in SAH. Additionally, the difference in the slope of GFAP levels between survivors (rapid wash-out) and non-survivors (secondary peaks) may allow difierentiation between primary brain injury from secondary brain damage due to delayed cerebral ischaemia.

  11. Increased Secondary/Primary Bile Acid Ratio in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Cristiane C K; Ueland, Thor; Broch, Kaspar; Vincent, Royce P; Cross, Gemma F; Dahl, Christen P; Aukrust, Pål; Gullestad, Lars; Hov, Johannes R; Trøseid, Marius

    2017-09-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are now recognized as signaling molecules and emerging evidence suggests that BAs affect cardiovascular function. The gut microbiota has recently been linked to the severity of heart failure (HF), and microbial metabolism has a major impact on BA homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the pattern of BAs, and particularly microbiota-transformed (secondary) BAs, in patients with chronic HF. This was a prospective, observational, single-center study including 142 patients with chronic HF and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. We measured plasma levels of primary, secondary, and total BAs, and explored their associations with clinical characteristics and survival. Plasma levels of primary BAs were lower (P < .01) and the ratios of secondary to primary BAs higher (P < .001) in patients with HF compared with control subjects. Approximately 40% of patients in the upper tertile of the ratio of secondary to primary BAs died during 5.6 years of follow-up (unadjusted Cox regression: hazard ratio 1.93, 95% confidence interval 1.01-3.68, compared with the lower tertiles). However, this association was attenuated and no longer significant in multivariate analyses. Levels of primary BAs were reduced and specific secondary BAs increased in patients with chronic HF. This pattern was associated with reduced overall survival in univariate analysis, but not in multivariate analyses. Future studies should assess the regulation and potential role of BA metabolism in HF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Secondary-structure analysis of denatured proteins by vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koichi; Sakurada, Yoshie; Yonehara, Ryuta; Kataoka, Mikio; Gekko, Kunihiko

    2007-06-01

    To elucidate the structure of denatured proteins, we measured the vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectra from 260 to 172 nm of three proteins (metmyoglobin, staphylococcal nuclease, and thioredoxin) in the native and the acid-, cold-, and heat-denatured states, using a synchrotron-radiation VUVCD spectrophotometer. The circular dichroism spectra of proteins fully unfolded by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) were also measured down to 197 nm for comparison. These denatured proteins exhibited characteristic VUVCD spectra that reflected a considerable amount of residual secondary structures. The contents of alpha-helices, beta-strands, turns, poly-L-proline type II (PPII), and unordered structures were estimated for each denatured state of the three proteins using the SELCON3 program with Protein Data Bank data and the VUVCD spectra of 31 reference proteins reported in our previous study. Based on these contents, the characteristics of the four types of denaturation were discussed for each protein. In all types of denaturation, a decrease in alpha-helices was accompanied by increases in beta-strands, PPII, and unordered structures. About 20% beta-strands were present even in the proteins fully unfolded by GdnHCl in which beta-sheets should be broken. From these results, we propose that denatured proteins constitute an ensemble of residual alpha-helices and beta-sheets, partly unfolded (or distorted) alpha-helices and beta-strands, PPII, and unordered structures.

  13. DSSR-enhanced visualization of nucleic acid structures in Jmol.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Robert M; Lu, Xiang-Jun

    2017-05-03

    Sophisticated and interactive visualizations are essential for making sense of the intricate 3D structures of macromolecules. For proteins, secondary structural components are routinely featured in molecular graphics visualizations. However, the field of RNA structural bioinformatics is still lagging behind; for example, current molecular graphics tools lack built-in support even for base pairs, double helices, or hairpin loops. DSSR (Dissecting the Spatial Structure of RNA) is an integrated and automated command-line tool for the analysis and annotation of RNA tertiary structures. It calculates a comprehensive and unique set of features for characterizing RNA, as well as DNA structures. Jmol is a widely used, open-source Java viewer for 3D structures, with a powerful scripting language. JSmol, its reincarnation based on native JavaScript, has a predominant position in the post Java-applet era for web-based visualization of molecular structures. The DSSR-Jmol integration presented here makes salient features of DSSR readily accessible, either via the Java-based Jmol application itself, or its HTML5-based equivalent, JSmol. The DSSR web service accepts 3D coordinate files (in mmCIF or PDB format) initiated from a Jmol or JSmol session and returns DSSR-derived structural features in JSON format. This seamless combination of DSSR and Jmol/JSmol brings the molecular graphics of 3D RNA structures to a similar level as that for proteins, and enables a much deeper analysis of structural characteristics. It fills a gap in RNA structural bioinformatics, and is freely accessible (via the Jmol application or the JSmol-based website http://jmol.x3dna.org). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Hafsa, Noor E.; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I′, II′ and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  15. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  16. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent.

  17. Visualizing the global secondary structure of a viral RNA genome with cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Garmann, Rees F.; Gopal, Ajaykumar; Athavale, Shreyas S.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    The lifecycle, and therefore the virulence, of single-stranded (ss)-RNA viruses is regulated not only by their particular protein gene products, but also by the secondary and tertiary structure of their genomes. The secondary structure of the entire genomic RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was recently determined by selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). The SHAPE analysis suggested a single highly extended secondary structure with much less branching than occurs in the ensemble of structures predicted by purely thermodynamic algorithms. Here we examine the solution-equilibrated STMV genome by direct visualization with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), using an RNA of similar length transcribed from the yeast genome as a control. The cryo-EM data reveal an ensemble of branching patterns that are collectively consistent with the SHAPE-derived secondary structure model. Thus, our results both elucidate the statistical nature of the secondary structure of large ss-RNAs and give visual support for modern RNA structure determination methods. Additionally, this work introduces cryo-EM as a means to distinguish between competing secondary structure models if the models differ significantly in terms of the number and/or length of branches. Furthermore, with the latest advances in cryo-EM technology, we suggest the possibility of developing methods that incorporate restraints from cryo-EM into the next generation of algorithms for the determination of RNA secondary and tertiary structures. PMID:25752599

  18. An amino acid code for β-sheet packing structure.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun; Tsai, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    To understand the relationship between protein sequence and structure, this work extends the knob-socket model in an investigation of β-sheet packing. Over a comprehensive set of β-sheet folds, the contacts between residues were used to identify packing cliques: sets of residues that all contact each other. These packing cliques were then classified based on size and contact order. From this analysis, the two types of four-residue packing cliques necessary to describe β-sheet packing were characterized. Both occur between two adjacent hydrogen bonded β-strands. First, defining the secondary structure packing within β-sheets, the combined socket or XY:HG pocket consists of four residues i, i+2 on one strand and j, j+2 on the other. Second, characterizing the tertiary packing between β-sheets, the knob-socket XY:H+B consists of a three-residue XY:H socket (i, i+2 on one strand and j on the other) packed against a knob B residue (residue k distant in sequence). Depending on the packing depth of the knob B residue, two types of knob-sockets are found: side-chain and main-chain sockets. The amino acid composition of the pockets and knob-sockets reveal the sequence specificity of β-sheet packing. For β-sheet formation, the XY:HG pocket clearly shows sequence specificity of amino acids. For tertiary packing, the XY:H+B side-chain and main-chain sockets exhibit distinct amino acid preferences at each position. These relationships define an amino acid code for β-sheet structure and provide an intuitive topological mapping of β-sheet packing.

  19. Comparable effects of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce and hydrochloric acid on secondary peristalsis in humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether acute esophageal instillation of capsaicin and hydrochloric acid had different effects on distension-induced secondary peristalsis. Secondary peristalsis was induced by slow and rapid air injections into the mid-esophagus after the evaluation of baseline motility in 16 healthy subjects. The effects on secondary peristalsis were determined by esophageal instillation with capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce (pure capsaicin, 0.84 mg) and hydrochloric acid (0.1 N). The administration of capsaicin induced a significant increase in the visual analogue scale score for heartburn as compared with hydrochloric acid (P = 0.002). The threshold volume for generating secondary peristalsis during slow and rapid air distensions did not differ between capsaicin and hydrochloric acid infusions. Hydrochloric acid significantly increased the frequency of secondary peristalsis in response to rapid air distension compared with capsaicin infusion (P = 0.03). Pressure wave amplitude during slow air distension was greater with the infusion of hydrochloric acid than capsaicin infusion (P = 0.001). The pressure wave duration during rapid air distension was longer after capsaicin infusion than hydrochloric acid infusion (P = 0.01). The pressure wave amplitude during rapid air distension was similar between capsaicin and hydrochloric acid infusions. Despite subtle differences in physiological characteristics of secondary peristalsis, acute esophageal instillation of capsaicin and hydrochloric acid produced comparable effects on distension-induced secondary peristalsis. Our data suggest the coexistence of both acid- and capsaicin-sensitive afferents in human esophagus which produce similar physiological alterations in secondary peristalsis. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Secondary porosity revisited: The chemistry of feldspar dissolution by carboxylic acids and anions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoessell, R.K. ); Pittman, E.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Carboxylic acids in subsurface waters have been proposed as agents for dissolving feldspars and complexing aluminum to create secondary porosity in sandstones. Previously published experimental work indicated high aluminum mobility in the presence of carboxylic acid solutions. In order to further evaluate aluminum mobility, alkali feldspar dissolution experiments were run at 100C and 300 bars in the presence of mono- and dicarboxylic acids and their anions. Experimental results imply that under reservoir conditions, aluminum-organic anion complexes are insignificant for acetate and propionate and possibly significant for oxalate and malonate. Propionate appeared to inhibit alkali feldspar dissolution and, hence, may retard aluminum mobility. Dissolution of feldspar in the presence of oxalic and acetic acid can be explained by enhanced dissolution kinetics and greater aluminum mobility under low-pH conditions. The general absence of such low-pH fluids in subsurface reservoirs makes this an unlikely mechanism for creating secondary porosity. Also, the thermal instability of oxalate and malonate limits their aluminum-complexing potential in reservoirs at temperatures above 100C.

  1. Safety & Efficacy of Cyclic Zoledronic Acid Therapy on Pediatric Secondary Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E.; Shaikhain, Talal A.; Ashour, Abdullah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Osteoporosis is a systemic disease characterized by decreased bone density and increased tendency to develop fractures. Osteoporosis in children and adolescents is a rare disease usually secondary to Medical conditions or medications given to children. The condition affects normal bone growth and development and carries with it multiple morbidities (physical and psychological) if not corrected promptly. This study aims to share our experience with Zoledronic Acid Therapy in Pediatric patients with secondary osteoporosis. Method: A retrospective study which included 46 patients aged 3 to 18 years. All patients received specific doses of Zoledronic acid and were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Clinical and laboratory data were collected for each patient from their files. Adverse events were also recorded. Results: The use of Zoledronic Acid in children and adolescents appears to be statically significant reduce fracture rate (p=0.005), bone turnover markers (Osteocalcin p= 0.003, CTX p= 0.008) and pain frequency in symptomatic individuals (p=0.000). Careful selection of cases is required to provide maximum benefits compared to risks associated with therapy. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that Zoledronic acid has positive effects on clinical outcome and bone marker level as well as quality of life for Pediatric patients with Osteoporosis and their families, with no long-term side effects. PMID:27045392

  2. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic studies on avidin secondary structure and complexation with biotin and biotin-lipid assemblies.

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, M J; Heimburg, T; Marsh, D

    1996-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared studies have been carried out to investigate the secondary structure and thermal stability of hen egg white avidin and its complexes with biotin and with a biotinylated lipid derivative, N-biotinyl dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DMBPE) in aqueous dispersion. Analysis of the amide I stretching band of avidin yielded a secondary structural content composed of approximately 66% beta-sheet and extended structures, with the remainder being attributed to disordered structure and beta-turns. Binding of biotin or specific association with the biotinylated lipid DMBPE did not result in any appreciable changes in the secondary structure content of the protein, but a change in hydrogen bond stability of the beta-sheet or extended chain regions was indicated. The latter effect was enhanced by surface interactions in the case of the biotin-lipid assemblies, as was demonstrated by electrostatic binding to a nonspecific negatively charged lipid. Difference spectra of the bound biotin implicated a direct involvement of the ureido moiety in the ligand interaction that was consistent with hydrogen bonding to amino acid residues in the avidin protein. It was found that complexation with avidin leads to a decrease in bond length of the biotin ureido carbonyl group that is consistent with a reduction of sp3 character of the C-O bond when it is hydrogen bonded to the protein. Studies of the temperature dependence of the spectra revealed that for avidin alone the secondary structure was unaltered up to approximately 75 degrees C, above which the protein undergoes a highly cooperative transition to an unfolded state with concomitant loss of ordered secondary structure. The complexes of avidin with both biotin and membrane-bound DMBPE lipid assemblies display a large increase in thermal stability compared with the native protein. PMID:8842222

  3. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic studies on avidin secondary structure and complexation with biotin and biotin-lipid assemblies.

    PubMed

    Swamy, M J; Heimburg, T; Marsh, D

    1996-08-01

    Fourier-transform infrared studies have been carried out to investigate the secondary structure and thermal stability of hen egg white avidin and its complexes with biotin and with a biotinylated lipid derivative, N-biotinyl dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DMBPE) in aqueous dispersion. Analysis of the amide I stretching band of avidin yielded a secondary structural content composed of approximately 66% beta-sheet and extended structures, with the remainder being attributed to disordered structure and beta-turns. Binding of biotin or specific association with the biotinylated lipid DMBPE did not result in any appreciable changes in the secondary structure content of the protein, but a change in hydrogen bond stability of the beta-sheet or extended chain regions was indicated. The latter effect was enhanced by surface interactions in the case of the biotin-lipid assemblies, as was demonstrated by electrostatic binding to a nonspecific negatively charged lipid. Difference spectra of the bound biotin implicated a direct involvement of the ureido moiety in the ligand interaction that was consistent with hydrogen bonding to amino acid residues in the avidin protein. It was found that complexation with avidin leads to a decrease in bond length of the biotin ureido carbonyl group that is consistent with a reduction of sp3 character of the C-O bond when it is hydrogen bonded to the protein. Studies of the temperature dependence of the spectra revealed that for avidin alone the secondary structure was unaltered up to approximately 75 degrees C, above which the protein undergoes a highly cooperative transition to an unfolded state with concomitant loss of ordered secondary structure. The complexes of avidin with both biotin and membrane-bound DMBPE lipid assemblies display a large increase in thermal stability compared with the native protein.

  4. Phosphorus removal by acid mine drainage sludge from secondary effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xinchao; Viadero, Roger C; Bhojappa, Shilpa

    2008-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge, a waste product from coal mine water treatment, was used in this study as an adsorbent to develop a cost-effective treatment approach to phosphorus removal from municipal secondary effluents. Batch tests were carried out to study the effects of pH, temperature, concentration, and contact time for phosphorus removal from wastewater. Batch tests were followed by continuous flow tests using a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Adsorption of orthophosphate onto AMD sludge particles followed the Freundlich isotherm model with an adsorption capacity ranging from 9.89 to 31.97 mg/g when the final effluent concentration increased from 0.21 to 13.61 mg P/L. P adsorption was found to be a rather rapid process and neutral or acidic pH enhanced phosphorus removal. Based on a thermodynamic assessment, P adsorption by AMD sludge was found to be endothermic; consequently, an increase in temperature could also favor phosphorus adsorption. Results from batch tests showed that leaching of metals common to AMD sludges was not likely to be a major issue of concern over the typical pH range (6-8) of secondary wastewater effluents. CSTR tests with three types of water (synthetic wastewater, river water, and municipal secondary effluent) illustrated that P adsorption by AMD sludge was relatively independent of the presence of other ionic species. In treating municipal secondary effluent, a phosphorus removal efficiency in excess of 98% was obtained. Results of this study indicated that it was very promising to utilize AMD sludge for phosphorus removal from secondary effluents and may be relevant to future efforts focused on the control of eutrophication in surface waters.

  5. Influence of codon usage bias on FGLamide-allatostatin mRNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; Bendena, William G; Chang, Belinda S W; Tobe, Stephen S

    2011-03-01

    The FGLamide allatostatins (ASTs) are invertebrate neuropeptides which inhibit juvenile hormone biosynthesis in Dictyoptera and related orders. They also show myomodulatory activity. FGLamide AST nucleotide frequencies and codon bias were investigated with respect to possible effects on mRNA secondary structure. 367 putative FGLamide ASTs and their potential endoproteolytic cleavage sites were identified from 40 species of crustaceans, chelicerates and insects. Among these, 55% comprised only 11 amino acids. An FGLamide AST consensus was identified to be (X)(1→16)Y(S/A/N/G)FGLGKR, with a strong bias for the codons UUU encoding for Phe and AAA for Lys, which can form strong Watson-Crick pairing in all peptides analyzed. The physical distance between these codons favor a loop structure from Ser/Ala-Phe to Lys-Arg. Other loop and hairpin loops were also inferred from the codon frequencies in the N-terminal motif, and the first amino acids from the C-terminal motif, or the dibasic potential endoproteolytic cleavage site. Our results indicate that nucleotide frequencies and codon usage bias in FGLamide ASTs tend to favor mRNA folds in the codon sequence in the C-terminal active peptide core and at the dibasic potential endoproteolytic cleavage site. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Controllable Assembly, Structures, and Properties of Lanthanide-Transition Metal-Amino Acid Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Sheng-Chang; Hu, Sheng-Min; Sheng, Tian-Lu; Chen, Ling; Wu, Xin-Tao

    Amino acids are the basic building blocks in the chemistry of life. This chapter describes the controllable assembly, structures and properties of lathanide(III)-transition metal-amino acid clusters developed recently by our group. The effects on the assembly of several factors of influence, such as presence of a secondary ligand, lanthanides, crystallization conditions, the ratio of metal ions to amino acids, and transition metal ions have been expounded. The dynamic balance of metalloligands and the substitution of weak coordination bonds account for the occurrence of diverse structures in this series of compounds.

  7. A survey of machine learning methods for secondary and supersecondary protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hui Kian; Zhang, Lei; Ramamohanarao, Kotagiri; Martin, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we provide a survey of protein secondary and supersecondary structure prediction using methods from machine learning. Our focus is on machine learning methods applicable to β-hairpin and β-sheet prediction, but we also discuss methods for more general supersecondary structure prediction. We provide background on the secondary and supersecondary structures that we discuss, the features used to describe them, and the basic theory behind the machine learning methods used. We survey the machine learning methods available for secondary and supersecondary structure prediction and compare them where possible.

  8. Resonance assignments and secondary structure of apolipoprotein E C-terminal domain in DHPC micelles.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Jen; Chyan, Chia-Lin; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chi-Fon; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lin, Ta-Hsien

    2015-04-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been known to play a key role in the transport of plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism. It is an apolipoprotein of 299 amino acids with a molecular mass, ~34 kDa. ApoE has three major isoforms, apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4 which differ only at residue 112 or 158. ApoE consists of two independently folded domains (N-terminal and C-terminal domain) separated by a hinge region. The N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain of apoE are responsible for the binding to receptor and to lipid, respectively. Since the high resolution structures of apoE in lipids are still unavailable to date, we therefore aim to resolve the structures in lipids by NMR. Here, we reported the resonance assignments and secondary structure distribution of the C-terminal domain of wild-type human apoE (residue 195-299) in the micelles formed by dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine. Our results may provide a novel structural model of apoE in micelles and may shed new light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoE related biological processes.

  9. A simple and fast approach to prediction of protein secondary structure from multiply aligned sequences with accuracy above 70%.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, P. K.; Heringa, J.; Argos, P.

    1995-01-01

    To improve secondary structure predictions in protein sequences, the information residing in multiple sequence alignments of substituted but structurally related proteins is exploited. A database comprised of 70 protein families and a total of 2,500 sequences, some of which were aligned by tertiary structural superpositions, was used to calculate residue exchange weight matrices within alpha-helical, beta-strand, and coil substructures, respectively. Secondary structure predictions were made based on the observed residue substitutions in local regions of the multiple alignments and the largest possible associated exchange weights in each of the three matrix types. Comparison of the observed and predicted secondary structure on a per-residue basis yielded a mean accuracy of 72.2%. Individual alpha-helix, beta-strand, and coil states were respectively predicted at 66.7, and 75.8% correctness, representing a well-balanced three-state prediction. The accuracy level, verified by cross-validation through jack-knife tests on all protein families, dropped, on average, to only 70.9%, indicating the rigor of the prediction procedure. On the basis of robustness, conceptual clarity, accuracy, and executable efficiency, the method has considerable advantage, especially with its sole reliance on amino acid substitutions within structurally related proteins. PMID:8580842

  10. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations. PMID:26527137

  11. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-11-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon-donor hydrogen bonds, OH-π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  12. Acid-catalyzed Reactions in Model Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA): Insights using Desorption-electrospray Ionization (DESI) Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddler, M. N.; Cooks, R. G.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are presently little understood in terms of their sources, formation, and effect on climate forcing, despite their significant impacts on climate change and respiratory health. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which were thought to arise entirely from simple gas-particle partitioning, have recently been found to contain oligomeric species which result from the condensed-phase reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The non-methane VOC with the greatest emission flux, isoprene, is known to produce aerosols through chemistry involving its oxidation products. We selected one of its major oxidation product, methacrolein, to assess its role in oligomeric SOA formation in response to the acidic conditions found in cloud water. Since it has been found that acidified aerosol produces oligomeric species with greater molecular weight and yield, acid-catalyzed oligomerization is likely a significant process in the formation of SOA. Aqueous solutions of methacrolein were acidified with sulfuric acid, and studied using linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LIT-MS) with a home-built desorption-electrospray ionization (DESI) source. An extremely heterogeneous mixture of products was produced in this system, resulting from hydrolysis, acid- catalyzed oxidation, reduction, and organosulfate formation. Evidence for disproportionation and heterocycle formation are proposed as reaction mechanisms hitherto unrecognized in the production of SOA. The proposed structure and formation mechanism for several species, based upon their MS/MS spectra, will also be presented.

  13. Dimers of formic acid: Structures, stability, and double proton transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfán, Paola; Echeverri, Andrea; Diaz, Estefanía; Tapia, Juan David; Gómez, Sara; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2017-07-01

    A stochastic search of the potential energy surface for the formic acid dimers results in 21 well-defined minima. A number of structures are reported here for the first time, others have already been experimentally detected or computationally predicted. Four types of different hydrogen bonds (HBs) are at play stabilizing the clusters: primary C=O⋯ H—O and H—O⋯ H—O and secondary C=O⋯ H—C and H—O⋯ H—C HBs corresponding to well-characterized bonding paths are identified. A novel C=O⋯ C stabilizing interaction is also reported. The double proton transfer reaction is calculated to occur in a synchronous fashion, with an energy barrier smaller than the energy needed to break up the dimers.

  14. Dimers of formic acid: Structures, stability, and double proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Paola; Echeverri, Andrea; Diaz, Estefanía; Tapia, Juan David; Gómez, Sara; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2017-07-28

    A stochastic search of the potential energy surface for the formic acid dimers results in 21 well-defined minima. A number of structures are reported here for the first time, others have already been experimentally detected or computationally predicted. Four types of different hydrogen bonds (HBs) are at play stabilizing the clusters: primary C=O⋯ H-O and H-O⋯ H-O and secondary C=O⋯ H-C and H-O⋯ H-C HBs corresponding to well-characterized bonding paths are identified. A novel C=O⋯ C stabilizing interaction is also reported. The double proton transfer reaction is calculated to occur in a synchronous fashion, with an energy barrier smaller than the energy needed to break up the dimers.

  15. The Globular State of the Single-Stranded RNA: Effect of the Secondary Structure Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Zareh A.; Karapetian, Armen T.

    2015-01-01

    The mutual influence of the slow rearrangements of secondary structure and fast collapse of the long single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in approximation of coarse-grained model is studied with analytic calculations. It is assumed that the characteristic time of the secondary structure rearrangement is much longer than that for the formation of the tertiary structure. A nonequilibrium phase transition of the 2nd order has been observed. PMID:26345143

  16. Direct observation of the secondary structure of unfolded pseudomonas-cytochrome c 551 by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. F.; Manivannan, A.; Yanagi, H.; Ashida, M.; Fujishima, A.; Inokuchi, H.

    The denaturation of pseudomonas-cytochrome c 551 at the air-water interface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The STM images indicate that the native secondary and tertiary structures of this protein has been virtually lost at such interface. The polypeptide chains of the unfolded protein are nearly fully extended, and highly aggregated in a localized region, forming a crystalline or a twisted rope-like structure. Our observation demonstrates the capability of STM in studying the unfolding of proteins, and also suggests the possibility of using STM to directly sequence the amino acid residues of a protein.

  17. Direct observation of the secondary structure of unfolded pseudomonas-cytochrome c 551 by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. F.; Manivannan, A.; Yanagi, H.; Ashida, M.; Fujishima, A.; Inokuchi, H.

    1993-03-01

    The denaturation of pseudomonas-cytochrome c 551 at the air-water interface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The STM images indicate that the native secondary and tertiary structures of this protein has been virtually lost at such interface. The polypeptide chains of the unfolded protein are nearly fully extended, and highly aggregated in a localized region, forming a crystalline or a twisted rope-like structure. Our observation demonstrates the capability of STM in studying the unfolding of proteins, and also suggests the possibility of using STM to directly sequence the amino acid residues of a protein.

  18. Photochemical processing of diesel fuel emissions as a large secondary source of isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, M. F.; Friedman, B.; Fulgham, R.; Brophy, P.; Galang, A.; Jathar, S. H.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Farmer, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a well-known air pollutant that affects human health. Biomass burning, smoking, and combustion engines are known HNCO sources, but recent studies suggest that secondary production in the atmosphere may also occur. We directly observed photochemical production of HNCO from the oxidative aging of diesel exhaust during the Diesel Exhaust Fuel and Control experiments at Colorado State University using acetate ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Emission ratios of HNCO were enhanced, after 1.5 days of simulated atmospheric aging, from 50 to 230 mg HNCO/kg fuel at idle engine operating conditions. Engines operated at higher loads resulted in less primary and secondary HNCO formation, with emission ratios increasing from 20 to 40 mg HNCO/kg fuel under 50% load engine operating conditions. These results suggest that photochemical sources of HNCO could be more significant than primary sources in urban areas.

  19. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  20. New insights into RNA secondary structure in the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongfeng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism in generating proteomic diversity, and RNA secondary structure is an important element in splicing regulation. The use of high-throughput sequencing and other approaches has increased the number of known pre-mRNA secondary structures by several orders of magnitude, and we now have new insights into the role of RNA secondary structure in alternative splicing and the mechanisms involved (e.g., physical competition, long-range RNA pairing, the structural splicing code, and co-transcriptional splicing). Furthermore, an RNA pairing-based mechanism ensures the selection of only one of several available exons (e.g., Dscam splicing). Here we review several recent discoveries related to the role of RNA secondary structure in alternative splicing and the underlying mechanisms.

  1. Comparative analysis of mt LSU rRNA secondary structures of Odonates: structural variability and phylogenetic signal.

    PubMed

    Misof, B; Fleck, G

    2003-12-01

    Secondary structures of the most conserved part of the mt 16S rRNA gene, domains IV and V, have been recently analysed in a comparative study. However, full secondary structures of the mt LSU rRNA molecule are published for only a few insect species. The present study presents full secondary structures of domains I, II, IV and V of Odonates and one representative of mayflies, Ephemera sp. The reconstructions are based on a comparative approach and minimal consensus structures derived from sequence alignments. The inferred structures exhibit remarkable similarities to the published Drosophila melanogaster model, which increases confidence in these structures. Structural variance within Odonates is homoplastic, and neighbour-joining trees based on tree edit distances do not correspond to any of the phylogenetically expected patterns. However, despite homoplastic quantitative structural variation, many similarities between Odonates and Ephemera sp. suggest promising character sets for higher order insect systematics that merit further investigations.

  2. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Determination of Secondary School Students' Cognitive Structure, and Misconception in Ecological Concepts through Word Association Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yücel, Elif Özata; Özkan, Mulis

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we determined cognitive structures and misconceptions about basic ecological concepts by using "word association" tests on secondary school students, age between 12-14 years. Eighty-nine students participated in this study. Before WAT was generated, basic ecological concepts that take place in the secondary science…

  4. Determination of Secondary School Students' Cognitive Structure, and Misconception in Ecological Concepts through Word Association Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yücel, Elif Özata; Özkan, Mulis

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we determined cognitive structures and misconceptions about basic ecological concepts by using "word association" tests on secondary school students, age between 12-14 years. Eighty-nine students participated in this study. Before WAT was generated, basic ecological concepts that take place in the secondary science…

  5. Testing Mediation Using Multiple Regression and Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in Secondary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Spencer D.

    2011-01-01

    Mediation analysis in child and adolescent development research is possible using large secondary data sets. This article provides an overview of two statistical methods commonly used to test mediated effects in secondary analysis: multiple regression and structural equation modeling (SEM). Two empirical studies are presented to illustrate the…

  6. The Structure of Secondary School Teacher Job Satisfaction and Its Relationship with Attrition and Work Enthusiasm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiqi, Chen

    2007-01-01

    This study used the results of a questionnaire survey of 230 secondary school teachers to analyze the factors constituting job satisfaction and its effects on teacher attrition and work enthusiasm. The results show that (a) the structure of secondary school teacher job satisfaction is made up of ten components and is consistent with the model put…

  7. Predicting Protein Secondary Structure Using Consensus Data Mining (CDM) Based on Empirical Statistics and Evolutionary Information.

    PubMed

    Kandoi, Gaurav; Leelananda, Sumudu P; Jernigan, Robert L; Sen, Taner Z

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the secondary structure of a protein from its sequence still remains a challenging problem. The prediction accuracies remain around 80 %, and for very diverse methods. Using evolutionary information and machine learning algorithms in particular has had the most impact. In this chapter, we will first define secondary structures, then we will review the Consensus Data Mining (CDM) technique based on the robust GOR algorithm and Fragment Database Mining (FDM) approach. GOR V is an empirical method utilizing a sliding window approach to model the secondary structural elements of a protein by making use of generalized evolutionary information. FDM uses data mining from experimental structure fragments, and is able to successfully predict the secondary structure of a protein by combining experimentally determined structural fragments based on sequence similarities of the fragments. The CDM method combines predictions from GOR V and FDM in a hierarchical manner to produce consensus predictions for secondary structure. In other words, if sequence fragment are not available, then it uses GOR V to make the secondary structure prediction. The online server of CDM is available at http://gor.bb.iastate.edu/cdm/ .

  8. Topological Constraints: Using RNA Secondary Structure to Model 3D Conformation, Folding Pathways, and Dynamic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bailor, Maximillian; Mustoe, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Accompanying recent advances in determining RNA secondary structure is the growing appreciation for the importance of relatively simple topological constraints, encoded at the secondary structure level, in defining the overall architecture, folding pathways, and dynamic adaptability of RNA. A new view is emerging in which tertiary interactions do not define RNA 3D structure, but rather, help select specific conformers from an already narrow, topologically pre-defined conformational distribution. Studies are providing fundamental insights into the nature of these topological constraints, how they are encoded by the RNA secondary structure, and how they interplay with other interactions, breathing new meaning to RNA secondary structure. New approaches have been developed that take advantage of topological constraints in determining RNA backbone conformation based on secondary structure, and a limited set of other, easily accessible constraints. Topological constraints are also providing a much-needed framework for rationalizing and describing RNA dynamics and structural adaptation. Finally, studies suggest that topological constraints may play important roles steering RNA folding pathways. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of topological constraints encoded by the RNA secondary structure. PMID:21497083

  9. Peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection of primary, secondary and tertiary treated municipal wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, J; Heinonen-Tanski, H

    2005-11-01

    The efficiency of peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection against enteric bacteria and viruses in municipal wastewaters was studied in pilot-scale. Disinfection pilot-plant was fed with the primary or secondary effluent of Kuopio municipal wastewater treatment plant or tertiary effluent from the pilot-scale dissolved air flotation (DAF) unit. Disinfectant doses ranged from 2 to 7 mg/l PAA in the secondary and tertiary effluents, and from 5 to 15 mg/l PAA in the primary effluents. Disinfection contact times were 4-27 min. Disinfection of secondary and tertiary effluents with 2-7 mg/l PAA and 27 min contact time achieved around 3 log reductions of total coliforms (TC) and enterococci (EC). PAA disinfection also significantly improved the hygienic quality of the primary effluents: 10-15 mg/l PAA achieved 3-4 log reductions of TC and EC, 5 mg/l PAA resulting in below 2 log reductions. F-RNA coliphages were more resistant against the PAA disinfection and around 1 log reductions of these enteric viruses were typically achieved in the disinfection treatments of the primary, secondary and tertiary effluents. Most of the microbial reductions occurred during the first 4-18 min of contact time, depending on the PAA dose and microorganism. The PAA disinfection efficiency remained relatively constant in the secondary and tertiary effluents, despite of small changes of wastewater quality (COD, SS, turbidity, 253.7 nm transmittance) or temperature. The disinfection efficiency clearly decreased in the primary effluents with substantially higher microbial, organic matter and suspended solids concentrations. The results demonstrated that PAA could be a good alternative disinfection method for elimination of enteric microbes from different wastewaters.

  10. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  11. The GOR Method of Protein Secondary Structure Prediction and Its Application as a Protein Aggregation Prediction Tool.

    PubMed

    Kouza, Maksim; Faraggi, Eshel; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The GOR method of protein secondary structure prediction is described. The original method was published by Garnier, Osguthorpe, and Robson in 1978 and was one of the first successful methods to predict protein secondary structure from amino acid sequence. The method is based on information theory, and an assumption that information function of a protein chain can be approximated by a sum of information from single residues and pairs of residues. The analysis of frequencies of occurrence of secondary structure for singlets and doublets of residues in a protein database enables prediction of secondary structure for new amino acid sequences. Because of these simple physical assumptions the GOR method has a conceptual advantage over other later developed methods such as PHD, PSIPRED, and others that are based on Machine Learning methods (like Neural Networks), give slightly better predictions, but have a "black box" nature. The GOR method has been continuously improved and modified for 30 years with the last GOR V version published in 2002, and the GOR V server developed in 2005. We discuss here the original GOR method and the GOR V program and the web server. Additionally we discuss new highly interesting and important applications of the GOR method to chameleon sequences in protein folding simulations, and for prediction of protein aggregation propensities. Our preliminary studies show that the GOR method is a promising and efficient alternative to other protein aggregation predicting tools. This shows that the GOR method despite being almost 40 years old is still important and has significant potential in application to new scientific problems.

  12. Terpenylic acid and related compounds: precursors for dimers in secondary organic aerosol from the ozonolysis of α and β-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmeen, F.; Vermeylen, R.; Szmigielski, R.; Iinuma, Y.; Böge, O.; Herrmann, H.; Maenhaut, W.; Claeys, M.

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, we have characterized the structure of a higher-molecular weight (MW) 358 α- and β-pinene dimeric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) product that received ample attention in previous molecular characterization studies. Based on mass spectrometric evidence for deprotonated molecules formed by electrospray ionization in the negative ion mode, we propose that diaterpenylic acid is a key monomeric unit for dimers of the ester type. It is shown that cis-pinic acid is esterified with the hydroxyl-containing diaterpenylic acid which can be explained through acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the recently elucidated lactone-containing terpenylic acid and/or diaterpenylic acid acetate, both first-generation oxidation products. To a minor extent, higher-MW 358 and 344 diester products are formed containing other terpenoic acids as monomeric units, i.e., diaterpenylic acid instead of cis-pinic acid, and diaterebic acid instead of diaterpenylic acid. It is shown that the MW 358 diester and related MW 344 compounds, which can be regarded as processed SOA products, also occur in ambient fine (PM2.5) rural aerosol collected at night during the warm period of the 2006 summer field campaign conducted at K-puszta, Hungary, a rural site with coniferous vegetation. This indicates that, under ambient conditions, the higher-MW diesters are formed in the particle phase over a longer time-scale than that required for gas-to-particle partitioning of their monomeric precursors.

  13. S curve, a graphic representation of protein secondary structure sequence and its applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C T; Zhang, R

    2000-06-01

    A secondary structure sequence is a symbolic string composed of three kinds of letters, indicating the helix, strand, and coil (including turns), respectively. A graphic representation for this abstract symbolic sequence is proposed here, called the S curve. The S curve is the unique representation for a given secondary structure sequence in the sense that the sequence and the S curve can be uniquely determined from the other. Therefore, the S curve contains all the information that the secondary structure sequence contains. Different geometrical properties of the S curve are studied in details, which reflect the basic characteristics of the secondary structure sequences. The S curves are used to display, analyze, and compare the secondary structure sequences. Detailed application examples are presented. One advantage of the S curve methodology is that the main patterns of a given secondary structure sequence can be grasped quickly in a perceivable form. This is particularly useful in the cases in which longer sequences are involved and structures of proteins are unknown. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Minimum message length inference of secondary structure from protein coordinate data

    PubMed Central

    Konagurthu, Arun S.; Lesk, Arthur M.; Allison, Lloyd

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Secondary structure underpins the folding pattern and architecture of most proteins. Accurate assignment of the secondary structure elements is therefore an important problem. Although many approximate solutions of the secondary structure assignment problem exist, the statement of the problem has resisted a consistent and mathematically rigorous definition. A variety of comparative studies have highlighted major disagreements in the way the available methods define and assign secondary structure to coordinate data. Results: We report a new method to infer secondary structure based on the Bayesian method of minimum message length inference. It treats assignments of secondary structure as hypotheses that explain the given coordinate data. The method seeks to maximize the joint probability of a hypothesis and the data. There is a natural null hypothesis and any assignment that cannot better it is unacceptable. We developed a program SST based on this approach and compared it with popular programs, such as DSSP and STRIDE among others. Our evaluation suggests that SST gives reliable assignments even on low-resolution structures. Availability: http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~karun/sst Contact: arun.konagurthu@monash.edu (or lloyd.allison@monash.edu) PMID:22689785

  15. A Non-parametric Bayesian Approach for Predicting RNA Secondary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kengo; Hamada, Michiaki; Mituyama, Toutai; Asai, Kiyoshi; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    Since many functional RNAs form stable secondary structures which are related to their functions, RNA secondary structure prediction is a crucial problem in bioinformatics. We propose a novel model for generating RNA secondary structures based on a non-parametric Bayesian approach, called hierarchical Dirichlet processes for stochastic context-free grammars (HDP-SCFGs). Here non-parametric means that some meta-parameters, such as the number of non-terminal symbols and production rules, do not have to be fixed. Instead their distributions are inferred in order to be adapted (in the Bayesian sense) to the training sequences provided. The results of our RNA secondary structure predictions show that HDP-SCFGs are more accurate than the MFE-based and other generative models.

  16. The role of the secondary structure of helical poly(phenylacetylene)s in the formation of nanoparticles from polymer-metal complexes (HPMCs).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Rafael; Arias, Sandra; Quiñoá, Emilio; Riguera, Ricardo; Freire, Félix

    2017-09-01

    The great importance of the secondary structure (compressed/stretched) of helical poly(phenylacetylene)s (PPAs) in the formation of nanostructures (nanospheres and nanotoroids) by complexation with metal ions of diverse valences is demonstrated. PPAs bearing the same chelating units [anilide of (R)-methoxyphenylacetic acid] but displaying different helical scaffolds show great differences in their nanostructuration due to the different secondary structures of their helices despite the analogous ways in which their mono- and divalent metal ions form complexes. This key 3-D structural feature has not been taken into account previously when studying the nanostructuration of helical polymer-metal complexes (HPMCs).

  17. Quantification of amino acid neurochemistry secondary to NMDA or betaxolol application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Alterations in retinal amino acid neurochemistry are an indicator of metabolic function. Glutamate is the primary excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter within the retina, and excessive levels of glutamate can potentially cause excitotoxicity, in particular, through the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor. Anomalies in NMDA receptor function have been implicated as causing many neurodegenerative disorders, and overactivation leads to neuronal death secondary to metabolic insult. Several pharmaceutical agents have been proposed as potential neuroprotective agents against excitotoxicity (e.g. betaxolol), yet any effects such drugs have on retinal neurochemistry have not been determined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the changes in retinal amino acid neurochemistry secondary to the application of NMDA with and without betaxolol. Functional NMDA channel activation was confirmed in both amacrine and ganglion cells by quantifying the entry into these neurones of a channel permeable probe (agmatine: 1-amino-4-guanidobutane [AGB]). By probing serial thin sections with immunoglobulins targeting AGB, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine, it was possible to simultaneously study the neurochemical characteristic as well as the NMDA-evoked AGB responses of different neurochemical populations of inner retinal neurones. The authors have previously shown no accumulation of glutamate or GABA within Muller cells following NMDA application. Herein they report altered GABA and glycine immunoreactivity, but not glutamate immunoreactivity within neurones of the amacrine and ganglion cell layers following NMDA application. Finally, the addition of betaxolol did not significantly alter the normal neurochemistry of the retina. The retina possesses intrinsic mechanisms that allow it to maintain metabolic integrity during short periods of high NMDA application.

  18. Plant and Soil Emissions of Amines and Amino Acids: A Source of Secondary Aerosol Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. L.; Doskey, P. V.; Pypker, T. G.

    2011-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the most abundant alkaline gas in the atmosphere and forms secondary aerosol by neutralizing sulfuric and nitric acids that are released during combustion of fossil fuels. Ammonia is primarily emitted by cropping and livestock operations. However, C2 and C3 amines (pKb 3.3-3.4), which are stronger bases than NH3 (pKb 4.7) have been observed in nuclei mode aerosol that is the precursor to secondary aerosol. Mixtures of amines and amino acids have been identified in diverse environments in aerosol, fog water, cloud water, the soluble fraction of precipitation, and in dew. Glycine (pKb 4.2), serine (pKb 4.8) and alanine (pKb 3.7 and 4.1 for the D and L forms, respectively) are typically the most abundant species. The only reported values of gas-phase glycine, serine and alanine were in marine air and ranged from 6-14 pptv. The origin of atmospheric amines and amino acids has not been fully identified, although sources are likely similar to NH3. Nitrate assimilation in plants forms glycine, serine, and L-alanine, while D-alanine is present in bacterial cell walls. Glycine is converted to serine during C3 plant photorespiration, producing CO2 and NH3. Bacteria metabolize glycine and alanine to methylamine and ethylamine via decarboxylation. Likely sources of amino acids are plants and bacteria, thus concentrations near continental sources are likely greater than those measured in marine air. The overall goal of the research is to examine seasonal variations and relationships between the exchange of CO2, NH3, amines, and amino acids with a corn/soybean rotation in the Midwest Corn Belt. The study presents gaseous profiles of organic amine compounds from various species of vegetation using a mist chamber trapping technique and analysis of the derivatized species by high pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Amino acid and amine profiles were obtained for red oak (Quercus rubra), sugar maple (Acer saccharinum), white pine (Pinus

  19. A secondary copulatory structure in a female insect: a clasp for a nuptial meal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Darryl T.

    2002-03-01

    Secondary copulatory structures are well-known in male dragonflies and spiders. Here I report a secondary copulatory organ in female ground weta, Hemiandrus pallitarsis (Ensifera, Orthoptera - crickets and allies). The organ, located on the underside of the abdomen, appears to secure the male's genitalia during the transfer of a spermatophylax nuptial meal to this location, an area quite separate from the female's primary copulatory structures, where the sperm ampulla is attached.

  20. Enhancing polysaccharide-mediated delivery of nucleic acids through functionalization with secondary and tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Bilal; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Roy, Krishnendu

    2008-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide that has generated significant interest as a non-viral gene delivery vehicle due to its cationic and biocompatible characteristics. However, transfection efficiency of chitosan is significantly lower compared to other cationic gene delivery agents, e.g. polyethyleneimine (PEI), dendrimers or cationic lipids. This is primarily attributed to its minimal solubility and low buffering capacity at physiological pH leading to poor endosomal escape of the gene carrier and inefficient cytoplasmic decoupling of the complexed nucleic acid. Here we have developed an imidazole acetic acid (IAA)-modified chitosan to introduce secondary and tertiary amines to the polymer in order to improve its endosomal buffering and solubility. The modified polymer was characterized by ninhydrin and (1)H NMR assays for degree of modification, while buffering and solubility were analyzed by acid titration. Nanocomplex formation, studied at various polymer-nucleic acid ratios, showed an increase in particle zeta potential for chitosan-IAA, as well as an increase in the effective diameter. Up to 100-fold increase in transfection efficiency of pDNA was seen for chitosan-IAA as compared to native chitosan, nearly matching that of PEI. In addition, transfection of siRNA by the modified polymers showed efficient gene knockdown equivalent to commercially available siPORT Amines. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of the imidazole-grafted chitosan as a biocompatible and effective delivery vehicle for both pDNA and siRNA.

  1. Unfolding and pH studies on manganese peroxidase: role of heme and calcium on secondary structure stability.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bartalesi, Ilaria; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Tien, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The present study characterizes the unfolding and folding processes of recombinant manganese peroxidase. This enzyme contains five disulfide bonds, two calcium ions, and one heme prosthetic group. Circular dichroism in the far UV was used to monitor global changes of the protein secondary structure, whereas UV-visible spectroscopy of the Soret band provided information about local changes in the heme cavity. The effects of reducing agents, oxidizing agents, and denaturants on this process were investigated. In addition to affecting the secondary structure content, these factors also affect the binding of the heme and the calcium ions, both of which have a significant effect on the folding process. Our results also show that denaturants induce irreversible changes, which are most likely due to the inability of the denatured protein to rebind either calcium or the heme. Breaking of disulfide bonds by 30 mM dithiothreitol causes complete unfolding of recombinant manganese peroxidase. The unfolding process was also studied at low and high pH, where the protein reaches the final unfolded state through two different intermediate states. The data also indicate that only the acidic folding-unfolding process is reversible. Our results indicate a complex synergistic relationship between the secondary structure content, the tertiary structure arrangement, and the binding of the heme and the calcium ions and disulfide bridge formation. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and 1,3-Butadiene: influence of aerosol acidity and Relative humidity on secondary organic aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acidic seed aerosols on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)have been examined in a number of previous studies, several of which have observed strong linear correlations between the aerosol acidity (measured as nmol H+ per m3 air s...

  3. Recovery of organic extractant from secondary emulsions formed in the extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Korchnak, J.D.; Fett, R.H.G.

    1984-01-03

    Uranium in wet-process phosphoric acid is extracted with an organic extractant. The pregnant extractant is then centrifuged to separate contaminants from the extractant. Secondary emulsions obtained by separating the contaminants following centrifugation are mixed with water or an acid leaching solution. After mixing, the mixture is centrifuged to separate and recover extractant which is recycled for stripping.

  4. Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and 1,3-Butadiene: influence of aerosol acidity and Relative humidity on secondary organic aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acidic seed aerosols on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)have been examined in a number of previous studies, several of which have observed strong linear correlations between the aerosol acidity (measured as nmol H+ per m3 air s...

  5. Click with a boronic acid handle: a neighboring group-assisted click reaction that allows ready secondary functionalization.

    PubMed

    Draganov, Alexander B; Wang, Ke; Holmes, Jalisa; Damera, Krishna; Wang, Danzhu; Dai, Chaofeng; Wang, Binghe

    2015-10-21

    The feasibility of a neighboring boronic acid-facilitated facile condensation of an aldehyde is described. This reaction is bio-orthogonal, complete at room temperature within minutes, and suitable for bioconjugation chemistry. The boronic acid group serves the dual purpose of catalyzing the condensation reaction and being a handle for secondary functionalization.

  6. Computational analysis of conserved RNA secondary structure in transcriptomes and genomes

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Sean R.

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptomics experiments and computational predictions both enable systematic discovery of new functional RNAs, but many putative noncoding transcripts arise instead from artifacts and biological noise, and current computational prediction methods have high false positive rates. I discuss prospects for improving computational methods for analyzing and identifying functional RNAs, with a focus on detecting signatures of conserved RNA secondary structure. An interesting new front is the application of chemical and enzymatic RNA structure probing experiments on a transcriptome-wide scale. I review several proposed approaches for incorporating structure probing data into computational RNA secondary structure prediction. Using probabilistic inference formalisms, I show how all these approaches can be unified in a well-principled framework. Using that framework, RNA probing data can easily be integrated into a wide range of different analyses that depend on RNA secondary structure inference, including homology search and genome-wide detection of new structural RNAs. PMID:24895857

  7. Structural similarity between β(3)-peptides synthesized from β(3)-homo-amino acids and aspartic acid monomers.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sahar; Sprules, Tara; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2014-07-01

    Formation of stable secondary structures by oligomers that mimic natural peptides is a key asset for enhanced biological response. Here we show that oligomeric β(3)-hexapeptides synthesized from L-aspartic acid monomers (β(3)-peptides 1, 5a, and 6) or homologated β(3)-amino acids (β(3)-peptide 2), fold into similar stable 14-helical secondary structures in solution, except that the former form right-handed 14-helix and the later form left-handed 14-helix. β(3)-Peptides from L-Asp monomers contain an additional amide bond in the side chains that provides opportunities for more hydrogen bonding. However, based on the NMR solution structures, we found that β(3)-peptide from L-Asp monomers (1) and from homologated amino acids (2) form similar structures with no additional side-chain interactions. These results suggest that the β(3)-peptides derived from L-Asp are promising peptide-mimetics that can be readily synthesized using L-Asp monomers as well as the right-handed 14-helical conformation of these β(3)-peptides (such as 1 and 6) may prove beneficial in the design of mimics for right-handed α-helix of α-peptides. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Analysis of the relation between the sequence and secondary and three-dimensional structures of immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, I M; Kister, A E

    1995-01-01

    Methods of structural and statistical analysis of the relation between the sequence and secondary and three-dimensional structures are developed. About 5000 secondary structures of immunoglobulin molecules from the Kabat data base were predicted. Two statistical analyses of amino acids reveal 47 universal positions in strands and loops. Eight universally conservative positions out of the 47 are singled out because they contain the same amino acid in > 90% of all chains. The remaining 39 positions, which we term universally alternative positions, were divided into five groups: hydrophobic, charged and polar, aromatic, hydrophilic, and Gly-Ala, corresponding to the residues that occupied them in almost all chains. The analysis of residue-residue contacts shows that the 47 universal positions can be distinguished by the number and types of contacts. The calculations of contact maps in the 29 antibody structures revealed that residues in 24 of these 47 positions have contacts only with residues of antiparallel beta-strands in the same beta-sheet and residues in the remaining 23 positions always have far-away contacts with residues from other beta-sheets as well. In addition, residues in 6 of the 47 universal positions are also involved in interactions with residues of the other variable or constant domains. PMID:7479903

  9. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  10. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  11. RNA Secondary Structures Having a Compatible Sequence of Certain Nucleotide Ratios.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Christopher L; Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2016-11-01

    Given a random RNA secondary structure, S, we study RNA sequences having fixed ratios of nucleotides that are compatible with S. We perform this analysis for RNA secondary structures subject to various base-pairing rules and minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions. Our main result reads as follows: in the simplex of nucleotide ratios, there exists a convex region, in which, in the limit of long sequences, a random structure asymptotically almost surely (a.a.s.) has compatible sequence with these ratios and outside of which a.a.s. a random structure has no such compatible sequence. We localize this region for RNA secondary structures subject to various base-pairing rules and minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions. In particular, for GC-sequences (GC denoting the nucleotides guanine and cytosine, respectively) having a ratio of G nucleotides smaller than 1/3, a random RNA secondary structure without any minimum arc- and stack-length restrictions has a.a.s. no such compatible sequence. For sequences having a ratio of G nucleotides larger than 1/3, a random RNA secondary structure has a.a.s. such compatible sequences. We discuss our results in the context of various families of RNA structures.

  12. Including RNA secondary structures improves accuracy and robustness in reconstruction of phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In several studies, secondary structures of ribosomal genes have been used to improve the quality of phylogenetic reconstructions. An extensive evaluation of the benefits of secondary structure, however, is lacking. Results This is the first study to counter this deficiency. We inspected the accuracy and robustness of phylogenetics with individual secondary structures by simulation experiments for artificial tree topologies with up to 18 taxa and for divergency levels in the range of typical phylogenetic studies. We chose the internal transcribed spacer 2 of the ribosomal cistron as an exemplary marker region. Simulation integrated the coevolution process of sequences with secondary structures. Additionally, the phylogenetic power of marker size duplication was investigated and compared with sequence and sequence-structure reconstruction methods. The results clearly show that accuracy and robustness of Neighbor Joining trees are largely improved by structural information in contrast to sequence only data, whereas a doubled marker size only accounts for robustness. Conclusions Individual secondary structures of ribosomal RNA sequences provide a valuable gain of information content that is useful for phylogenetics. Thus, the usage of ITS2 sequence together with secondary structure for taxonomic inferences is recommended. Other reconstruction methods as maximum likelihood, bayesian inference or maximum parsimony may equally profit from secondary structure inclusion. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, Andrea Tanzer (nominated by Frank Eisenhaber) and Eugene V. Koonin. Open peer review Reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, Andrea Tanzer (nominated by Frank Eisenhaber) and Eugene V. Koonin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:20078867

  13. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens), mice (Mus musculus), fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures. PMID:21281513

  14. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Kuo, C C Jay; Chen, Liang

    2011-01-31

    Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens), mice (Mus musculus), fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans) to further investigate this phenomenon. We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  15. Synthesis and structural characterization of sialic acid-glutamic acid hybrid foldamers as conformational surrogates of alpha-2,8-linked polysialic acid.

    PubMed

    Saludes, Jonel P; Ames, James B; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2009-04-22

    Surface expression of alpha-(2,8)-linked polymers of sialic acid in adult tissues has been correlated with metastasis of several human cancers. One approach to chemotherapeutic intervention against the spread of these cancers involves the development of immunogenic molecules that elicit an antibody response against alpha-(2,8)-linked polysialic acids. Naturally occurring polysialic acids are not viable candidates because they are present during embryonic development and are recognized as self by the immune system. These natural polymers also have poor pharmacokinetic properties because they are readily degraded by neuraminidase enzymes. We have been interested in developing structural surrogates of polysialic acids in an effort to overcome these limitations. Reported herein are microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide syntheses and structural characterization studies of a series of alpha/delta hybrid peptides derived from Fmoc-Neu2en and Fmoc-Glu(OtBu)-OH. Conformational experiments including circular dichroism, NH/ND exchange, and ROESY in aqueous solution were performed to study the secondary structures of these hybrid foldamers. ROESY data were analyzed with the assistance of XPLOR-NIH that was modified to include parameter and topology files to accommodate unnatural amino acids and the delta amide linkages. The results indicate that stable secondary structure is dependent upon both the amino acid sequence and the configuration of Glu. The most stable foldamer was composed of a total of 6 residues beginning with L-Glu at the carboxy terminus and alternating Neu2en and L-Glu residues. In water, this foldamer adopts a right-handed helical conformation with 3.7 residues per turn, 7.4 A pitch, 5.8 A diameter, and a length of 18.5 A, which is stabilized by both classical C=O...H-N backbone interactions and by pyranose ring O and L-Glu HN H-bonding. These structural features orient the L-Glu carboxylates along the helical backbone with a periodicity that matches the

  16. Can Computationally Designed Protein Sequences Improve Secondary Structure Prediction?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    SSP. We use the RosettaDesign program to generate sequences that are com- patible with the structural classification of proteins ( SCOP ) database of...1997) using a significantly larger database of known structures than previously reported in the literature. Methods In this work, the Astral SCOP 1.75...6511 SCOP 1.75 domains were used after some domains were discarded due to large missing segments (Nres . 10), non-contiguities in the domain sequence

  17. Irradiation effects on secondary structure of protein induced by keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, F. Z.; Lin, Y. B.; Zhang, D. M.; Tian, M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Protein secondary structure changes by low-energy ion irradiation are reported for the first time. The selected system is 30 keV N + irradiation on bovine serum albumin (BSA). After irradiation at increasing fluences from 1.0×10 15 to 2.5×10 16 ion/cm 2, Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis was conducted. It was found that the secondary structures of BSA molecules were very sensitive to ion irradiation. Secondary conformations showed different trends of change during irradiation. With the increase of ion fluence from 0 to 2.5×10 16 ion/cm 2, the fraction of α-helix and β-turns decreased from 17 to 12%, and from 40 to 31%, respectively, while that of random coil and β-sheet structure increased from 18 to 27%, and from 25 to 30%, respectively. Possible explanations for the secondary conformational changes of protein are proposed.

  18. Ligand-induced conformational transitions and secondary-structure composition of chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    McGurk, Karen S.; Spivey, H. Olin

    1979-01-01

    Apparent conformational transitions induced in chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase by substrates, KHCO3 and MgATP, and the allosteric effector, acetyl-CoA, were studied by using the fluorescent probe, 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid and c.d. Fluorescence measurements were made with both conventional and stopped-flow spectrophotometers. Additions of acetyl-CoA and/or ATP to the enzyme-probe solutions quenched fluorescence of the probe by the following cumulative amounts regardless of the sequence of additions: acetyl-CoA, 10–13%; ATP, 21–24%; acetyl-CoA plus ATP, about 35%. Additions of KHCO3 had no effect on the fluorescence. The rates of quenching by acetyl-CoA and MgATP (in the presence of acetyl-CoA) were too rapid to measure by stopped-flow kinetic methods, but kinetics of the MgATP effect (in the absence of acetyl-CoA) indicate three unimolecular transitions after the association step. The negligible effect of the probe on enzyme catalytic activity, a preservation of the near-u.v. c.d. effect of MgATP and acetyl-CoA in the presence of the probe and no observable unimolecular transitions after binding of the probe to the enzyme indicate that the probe had no deleterious effect on the enzyme. In contrast with results with 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid, fluorescence of the ε-derivative of acetyl-CoA or ATP [fluorescent analogues; Secrist, Barrio, Leonard & Weber (1972) Biochemistry 11, 3499–3506] was not changed when either one was added to the enzyme. Secondary-structure composition of chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase estimated from the far-u.v. c.d. spectrum of the enzyme is 27% helix, 7% β-pleated sheet and 66% other structural types. PMID:435260

  19. Synthesis and characterization of secondary nitrosamines from secondary amines using sodium nitrite and p-toluenesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Miró Sabaté, Carles; Delalu, Henri

    2015-03-01

    We synthesized nitrosamines (R2N-NO) with R = iPr (1), nPr (2), nBu (3), and hydroxyethyl (4) from the amine using sodium nitrite/p-toluenesulfonic acid in CH2Cl2. The rate of formation of 1-4 increases in the direction iPrstructures of 1-4 (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)) and computed the NMR spectroscopic chemical shifts and infrared frequencies. Furthermore, we carried out a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of the nitrosamine moiety. Lastly, the compounds described in this work are valuable starting materials for the synthesis of 2-tetrazenes with potential interest to replace highly toxic hydrazines in rocket propulsion.

  20. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  1. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs.

  2. Secondary Structure Adopted by the Gly-Gly-X Repetitive Regions of Dragline Spider Silk

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Geoffrey M.; van der Vaart, Arjan; Guo, Chengchen; Jones, Justin; Onofrei, David; Cherry, Brian R.; Lewis, Randolph V.; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Holland, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are presented to help elucidate the molecular secondary structure of poly(Gly-Gly-X), which is one of the most common structural repetitive motifs found in orb-weaving dragline spider silk proteins. The combination of NMR and computational experiments provides insight into the molecular secondary structure of poly(Gly-Gly-X) segments and provides further support that these regions are disordered and primarily non-β-sheet. Furthermore, the combination of NMR and MD simulations illustrate the possibility for several secondary structural elements in the poly(Gly-Gly-X) regions of dragline silks, including β-turns, 310-helicies, and coil structures with a negligible population of α-helix observed. PMID:27918448

  3. RNA secondary structures in the proximal 3'UTR of Indonesian Dengue 1 virus strains.

    PubMed

    Koraka, Penelope; Williams, Marisol M; Djamiatun, Kis; Setiati, Tatty E; van Batenburg, F H D; Stittelaar, Koert J; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E E

    2009-06-01

    The characteristics of DENV-1 viruses, isolated during the 2001-2002 outbreak in Indonesia were studied. The secondary structure of the 3'UTR of different DENV-1 strains derived from Indonesian patients was compared with the 3'UTR of previously described DENV-1 sequences. The complete 3'UTR of DENV-1 was sequenced from 13 patients suffering from the severe form of dengue virus infection (dengue hemorrhagic fever). Prediction of RNA secondary structure of the 3'UTR revealed some previously unidentified conserved structures in the proximal region of the 3'UTR, the role of which in viral replication is still unknown. In addition our data suggest that some structural elements previously described in the distal part of the 3'UTR are partly dependent on the proximal part of the UTR. Our data support the existence of previously unidentified conserved secondary structures in the proximal part of the 3'UTR and their roles need to be further investigated.

  4. A Comparative Taxonomy of Parallel Algorithms for RNA Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khatib, Ra’ed M.; Abdullah, Rosni; Rashid, Nur’Aini Abdul

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecules have been discovered playing crucial roles in numerous biological and medical procedures and processes. RNA structures determination have become a major problem in the biology context. Recently, computer scientists have empowered the biologists with RNA secondary structures that ease an understanding of the RNA functions and roles. Detecting RNA secondary structure is an NP-hard problem, especially in pseudoknotted RNA structures. The detection process is also time-consuming; as a result, an alternative approach such as using parallel architectures is a desirable option. The main goal in this paper is to do an intensive investigation of parallel methods used in the literature to solve the demanding issues, related to the RNA secondary structure prediction methods. Then, we introduce a new taxonomy for the parallel RNA folding methods. Based on this proposed taxonomy, a systematic and scientific comparison is performed among these existing methods. PMID:20458364

  5. Structure prediction of the EcoRV DNA methyltransferase based on mutant profiling, secondary structure analysis, comparison with known structures of methyltransferases and isolation of catalytically inactive single mutants.

    PubMed

    Jeltsch, A; Sobotta, T; Pingoud, A

    1996-05-01

    The EcoRV DNA methyltransferase (M.EcoRV) is an alpha-adenine methyltransferase. We have used two different programs to predict the secondary structure of M.EcoRV. The resulting consensus prediction was tested by a mutant profiling analysis. 29 neutral mutations of M.EcoRV were generated by five cycles of random mutagenesis and selection for active variants to increase the reliability of the prediction and to get a secondary structure prediction for some ambiguously predicted regions. The predicted consensus secondary structure elements could be aligned to the common topology of the structures of the catalytic domains of M.HhaI and M.TaqI. In a complementary approach we have isolated nine catalytically inactive single mutants. Five of these mutants contain an amino acid exchange within the catalytic domain of M.EcoRV (Val2-Ala, Lys81Arg, Cys192Arg, Asp193Gly, Trp231Arg). The Trp231Arg mutant binds DNA similarly to wild-type M.EcoRV, but is catalytically inactive. Hence this mutant behaves like a bona fide active site mutant. According to the structure prediction, Trp231 is located in a loop at the putative active site of M.EcoRV. The other inactive mutants were insoluble. They contain amino acid exchanges within the conserved amino acid motifs X, III or IV in M.EcoRV confirming the importance of these regions.

  6. Influence of bovine serum albumin on the secondary structure of interferon alpha 2b as determined by far UV circular dichroism spectropolarimetry.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Michael J W; Nemr, Kayla; Hefford, Mary A

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic biologics are formulated with excipients, including the protein excipient human serum albumin (HSA), to increase stability and prevent protein aggregation and adsorption onto glass vials. One biologic formulated with albumin is interferon alpha-2b (IFN alpha-2b). As is the case with other therapeutic biologics, the increased structural complexity of IFN alpha-2b compared to a small molecule drug requires that both the correct chemical structure (amino acid sequence) and also the correct secondary and tertiary structures (3 dimensional fold) be verified to assure safety and efficacy. Although numerous techniques are available to assess a biologic's primary, secondary and tertiary structures, difficulties arise when assessing higher order structure in the presence of protein excipients. In these studies far UV circular dichroism spectropolarimetry (far UV-CD) was used to determine the secondary structure of IFN alpha-2b in the presence of a protein excipient (bovine serum albumin, BSA). We demonstrated that the secondary structure of IFN alpha-2b remains mostly unchanged at a variety of BSA to IFN alpha-2b protein ratios. A significant difference in alpha helix and beta sheet content was noted when the BSA to IFN alpha-2b ratio was 5:1 (w/w), suggesting a potential conformational change in IFN alpha-2b secondary structure when BSA is in molar excess. (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tempe consumption modulates fecal secondary bile acids, mucins, immunoglobulin A, enzyme activities, and cecal microflora and organic acids in rats.

    PubMed

    Utama, Zaki; Okazaki, Yukako; Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Kato, Norihisa

    2013-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dietary tempe, a fermented soy product, on the colonic environment of rats fed high-fat (HF, 30 % fat; experiment 1) or low-fat (LF, 6 % fat; experiment 2) diets. Growing male rats were fed the experimental diets with or without 25 % tempe for 21 days. Tempe consumption slightly but significantly increased the growth of rats fed both the HF and LF diets (P < 0.05). With both the HF and LF diets, dietary tempe markedly reduced a harmful fecal secondary bile acid, lithocholic acid (a risk factor of colon cancer) (P < 0.05), and markedly elevated fecal mucins (indices of intestinal barrier function) and immunoglobulin A (IgA, an index of intestinal immune function) (P < 0.05). With the HF diet, dietary tempe increased cecal acetate, butyrate, propionate, and succinate concentrations (P < 0.05). Analysis of the profile of cecal microflora revealed lower Bacteroides and higher Clostridium cluster XIVa levels in the tempe group of rats fed the HF diet (P < 0.05). Compared with the control group, the fecal activity of β-glucosidase was markedly higher in the tempe group (P < 0.05), while that of urease was lower (P < 0.05) with both the HF and LF diets. The present results suggest that tempe consumption modulates the colonic environment in rats.

  8. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36.

    PubMed

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127-279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127-279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions.

  9. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36

    PubMed Central

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A.; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127–279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127–279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions. PMID:24348024

  10. Plant secondary metabolites and gut health: the case for phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Russell, Wendy; Duthie, Garry

    2011-08-01

    Plant-based diets contain a plethora of secondary metabolites that may impact on health and disease prevention. Much attention has been focused on the potential bioactivity and nutritional relevance of several classes of phytochemicals such as flavonoids, carotenoids, phyto-oestrogens and glucosinolates. Less attention has been paid to simple phenolic acids that are widely found in fruit, vegetables, herbs, spices and beverages. Daily intakes may exceed 100 mg. In addition, bacteria in the gut can perform reactions that transform more complex plant phenolics such as anthocyanins, procyanidins, flavanones, flavonols, tannins and isoflavones into simple phenolic metabolites. The colon is thus a rich source of potentially active phenolic acids that may impact both locally and systemically on gut health. Both the small and large intestine (colon) contain absorption sites for phenolic acids but low post-prandial concentrations in plasma indicate minimal absorption early in the gastrointestinal tract and/or rapid hepatic metabolism and excretion. Therefore, any bioactivity that contributes to gut health may predominantly occur in the colon. Several phenolic acids affect the expression and activity of enzymes involved in the production of inflammatory mediators of pathways thought to be important in the development of gut disorders including colon cancer. However, at present, we remain largely ignorant as to which of these compounds are beneficial to gut health. Until we can elucidate which pro-inflammatory and potentially carcinogenetic changes in gene expression can be moderated by simple phenolic acids, it is not possible to recommend specific plant-based foods rich in particular phenolics to optimise gut health.

  11. Reaction of primary and secondary amines to form carbamic acid glucuronides.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, William H

    2006-12-01

    Glucuronidation is an important mechanism used by mammalian systems to clear and eliminate both endogenous and foreign chemicals. Many functional groups are susceptible to conjugation with glucuronic acid, including hydroxyls, phenols, carboxyls, activated carbons, thiols, amines, and selenium. Primary and secondary amines can also react with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) via a reversible reaction to form a carbamic acid. The carbamic acid is also a substrate for glucuronidation and results in a stable carbamate glucuronide metabolite. The detection and characterization of these products has been facilitated greatly by the advent of soft ionization mass spectrometry techniques and high field NMR instrumentation. The formation of carbamate glucuronide metabolites has been described for numerous pharmaceuticals and they have been identified in all of the species commonly used in drug metabolism studies (rat, dog, mouse, rabbit, guinea pig, and human). There has been no obvious species specificity for their formation and no preference for 1 degrees or 2 degrees amines. Many biological reactions have also been described in the literature that involve the reaction of CO(2) with amino groups of biomolecules. For example, CO(2) generated from cellular respiration is expired in part through the reversible formation of a carbamate between CO(2) and the alpha-amino groups of the alpha- and beta-chains of hemoglobin. Also, carbamic acid products of several amines, such as beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), ethylenediamine, and L-cysteine have been implicated in toxicity. Studies suggested that a significant portion of amino-compounds in biological samples (that naturally contain CO(2)/bicarbonate) can be present as a carbamic acid.

  12. Use of monoatomic and polyatomic projectiles for the characterisation of polylactic acid by static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boschmans, Bart; Van Royen, Pieter; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2005-01-01

    The application of polyatomic primary ions is a strongly developing branch of static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS), since these projectiles allow a significant increase in the secondary ion yields to be achieved. However, the different limitations and possibilities of certain polyatomic primary ions for use on specific functional classes of samples are still not completely known. This paper compares the use of monoatomic and polyatomic primary ions in S-SIMS for thin layers of polylactic acid (PLA), obtained by spin-coating solutions on silicon wafers. Bombardment with Ga+, Xe+ and SF5+ primary ions allowed the contribution of the projectile mass and number of atoms in the gain in ion yield and molecular specificity (relative importance of high m/z and low m/z signals) to be assessed. Samples obtained by spin-coating solutions with increasing concentration showed that optimal layer thickness depended on the primary ion used. In comparison with the use of Ga+ projectiles, the yield of structural ions increased by a factor of about 1.5 to 2 and by about 7 to 12 when Xe+ and SF5+ primary ion bombardment were applied, respectively. A detailed fragmentation pattern was elaborated to interpret ion signal intensity changes for different projectiles in terms of energy deposition and collective processes in the subsurface, and the internal energy of radical and even-electron precursor ions.

  13. Rewiring a secondary metabolite pathway towards itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Abeer H; Li, An; Brickwedde, Anja; Wilms, Lars; Caspers, Martien; Overkamp, Karin; Punt, Peter J

    2016-07-28

    The industrially relevant filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely used in industry for its secretion capabilities of enzymes and organic acids. Biotechnologically produced organic acids promise to be an attractive alternative for the chemical industry to replace petrochemicals. Itaconic acid (IA) has been identified as one of the top twelve building block chemicals which have high potential to be produced by biotechnological means. The IA biosynthesis cluster (cadA, mttA and mfsA) has been elucidated in its natural producer Aspergillus terreus and transferred to A. niger to enable IA production. Here we report the rewiring of a secondary metabolite pathway towards further improved IA production through the overexpression of a putative cytosolic citrate synthase citB in a A. niger strain carrying the IA biosynthesis cluster. We have previously shown that expression of cadA from A. terreus results in itaconic acid production in A. niger AB1.13, albeit at low levels. This low-level production is boosted fivefold by the overexpression of mttA and mfsA in itaconic acid producing AB1.13 CAD background strains. Controlled batch cultivations with AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strains showed increased production of itaconic acid compared with AB1.13 CAD strain. Moreover, preliminary RNA-Seq analysis of an itaconic acid producing AB1.13 CAD strain has led to the identification of the putative cytosolic citrate synthase citB which was induced in an IA producing strain. We have overexpressed citB in a AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strain and by doing so hypothesize to have targeted itaconic acid production to the cytosolic compartment. By overexpressing citB in AB1.13 CAD + MFS + MTT strains in controlled batch cultivations we have achieved highly increased titers of up to 26.2 g/L IA with a productivity of 0.35 g/L/h while no CA was produced. Expression of the IA biosynthesis cluster in Aspergillus niger AB1.13 strain enables IA production. Moreover, in the AB1.13 CAD

  14. Porous carbonaceous electrode structure and method for secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1977-03-08

    Positive and negative electrodes are provided as rigid, porous carbonaceous matrices with particulate active material fixedly embedded. Active material such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali metal or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and a solid volatile to form a paste mixture. Various electrically conductive powders or current collector structures can be blended or embedded into the paste mixture which can be molded to the desired electrode shape. The molded paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity as the resin begins to cure into a rigid solid structure.

  15. RNA structure framework: automated transcriptome-wide reconstruction of RNA secondary structures from high-throughput structure probing data.

    PubMed

    Incarnato, Danny; Neri, Francesco; Anselmi, Francesca; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2016-02-01

    The rapidly increasing number of discovered non-coding RNAs makes the understanding of their structure a key feature toward a deeper comprehension of gene expression regulation. Various enzymatic- and chemically- based approaches have been recently developed to allow whole-genome studies of RNA secondary structures. Several methods have been recently presented that allow high-throughput RNA structure probing (CIRS-seq, Structure-seq, SHAPE-seq, PARS, etc.) and unbiased structural inference of residues within RNAs in their native conformation. We here present an analysis toolkit, named RNA Structure Framework (RSF), which allows fast and fully-automated analysis of high-throughput structure probing data, from data pre-processing to whole-transcriptome RNA structure inference. RSF is written in Perl and is freely available under the GPLv3 license from http://rsf.hugef-research.org. salvatore.oliviero@hugef-torino.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Argumentation in Secondary School Students' Structured and Unstructured Chat Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Timo; Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Joint construction of new knowledge demands that persons can express their statements in a convincing way and explore other people's arguments constructively. For this reason, more knowledge on different means to support collaborative argumentation is needed. This study clarifies whether structured interaction supports students' critical and…

  17. Argumentation in Secondary School Students' Structured and Unstructured Chat Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Timo; Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Joint construction of new knowledge demands that persons can express their statements in a convincing way and explore other people's arguments constructively. For this reason, more knowledge on different means to support collaborative argumentation is needed. This study clarifies whether structured interaction supports students' critical and…

  18. Detection of Fatty Acids from Intact Microorganisms by Molecular Beam Static Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jani Cheri; Lehman, Richard Michael; Bauer, William Francis; O'Connell, Sean Patrick; Colwell, Frederick Scott; Shaw, Andrew D.

    2003-06-01

    We report the use of a surface analysis approach, static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) equipped with a molecular (ReO4-) ion primary beam, to analyze the surface of intact microbial cells. SIMS spectra of 28 microorganisms were compared to fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatographic analysis of transesterfied fatty acids extracted from the same organisms. The results indicate that surface bombardment using the molecular primary beam cleaved the ester linkage characteristic of bacteria at the glycerophosphate backbone of the phospholipid components of the cell membrane. This cleavage enables direct detection of the fatty acid conjugate base of intact microorganisms by static SIMS. The limit of detection for this approach is approximately 107 bacterial cells/cm2. Multivariate statistical methods were applied in a graded approach to the SIMS microbial data. The results showed that the full data set could initially be statistically grouped based upon major differences in biochemical composition of the cell wall. The gram-positive bacteria were further statistically analyzed, followed by final analysis of a specific bacterial genus that was successfully grouped by species. Additionally, the use of SIMS to detect microbes on mineral surfaces is demonstrated by an analysis of Shewanella oneidensis on crushed hematite. The results of this study provide evidence for the potential of static SIMS to rapidly detect bacterial species based on ion fragments originating from cell membrane lipids directly from sample surfaces.

  19. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere.

  20. Parallel computation of genome-scale RNA secondary structure to detect structural constraints on human genome.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Risa; Kiryu, Hisanori

    2016-05-06

    RNA secondary structure around splice sites is known to assist normal splicing by promoting spliceosome recognition. However, analyzing the structural properties of entire intronic regions or pre-mRNA sequences has been difficult hitherto, owing to serious experimental and computational limitations, such as low read coverage and numerical problems. Our novel software, "ParasoR", is designed to run on a computer cluster and enables the exact computation of various structural features of long RNA sequences under the constraint of maximal base-pairing distance. ParasoR divides dynamic programming (DP) matrices into smaller pieces, such that each piece can be computed by a separate computer node without losing the connectivity information between the pieces. ParasoR directly computes the ratios of DP variables to avoid the reduction of numerical precision caused by the cancellation of a large number of Boltzmann factors. The structural preferences of mRNAs computed by ParasoR shows a high concordance with those determined by high-throughput sequencing analyses. Using ParasoR, we investigated the global structural preferences of transcribed regions in the human genome. A genome-wide folding simulation indicated that transcribed regions are significantly more structural than intergenic regions after removing repeat sequences and k-mer frequency bias. In particular, we observed a highly significant preference for base pairing over entire intronic regions as compared to their antisense sequences, as well as to intergenic regions. A comparison between pre-mRNAs and mRNAs showed that coding regions become more accessible after splicing, indicating constraints for translational efficiency. Such changes are correlated with gene expression levels, as well as GC content, and are enriched among genes associated with cytoskeleton and kinase functions. We have shown that ParasoR is very useful for analyzing the structural properties of long RNA sequences such as mRNAs, pre

  1. A comprehensive database of high-throughput sequencing-based RNA secondary structure probing data (Structure Surfer).

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Nathan D; Silverman, Ian M; Childress, Daniel M; Kazan, Hilal; Wang, Li-San; Gregory, Brian D

    2016-05-17

    RNA molecules fold into complex three-dimensional shapes, guided by the pattern of hydrogen bonding between nucleotides. This pattern of base pairing, known as RNA secondary structure, is critical to their cellular function. Recently several diverse methods have been developed to assay RNA secondary structure on a transcriptome-wide scale using high-throughput sequencing. Each approach has its own strengths and caveats, however there is no widely available tool for visualizing and comparing the results from these varied methods. To address this, we have developed Structure Surfer, a database and visualization tool for inspecting RNA secondary structure in six transcriptome-wide data sets from human and mouse ( http://tesla.pcbi.upenn.edu/strucuturesurfer/ ). The data sets were generated using four different high-throughput sequencing based methods. Each one was analyzed with a scoring pipeline specific to its experimental design. Users of Structure Surfer have the ability to query individual loci as well as detect trends across multiple sites. Here, we describe the included data sets and their differences. We illustrate the database's function by examining known structural elements and we explore example use cases in which combined data is used to detect structural trends. In total, Structure Surfer provides an easy-to-use database and visualization interface for allowing users to interrogate the currently available transcriptome-wide RNA secondary structure information for mammals.

  2. Free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures and computational RNA design.

    PubMed

    Churkin, Alexander; Weinbrand, Lina; Barash, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Determining the RNA secondary structure from sequence data by computational predictions is a long-standing problem. Its solution has been approached in two distinctive ways. If a multiple sequence alignment of a collection of homologous sequences is available, the comparative method uses phylogeny to determine conserved base pairs that are more likely to form as a result of billions of years of evolution than by chance. In the case of single sequences, recursive algorithms that compute free energy structures by using empirically derived energy parameters have been developed. This latter approach of RNA folding prediction by energy minimization is widely used to predict RNA secondary structure from sequence. For a significant number of RNA molecules, the secondary structure of the RNA molecule is indicative of its function and its computational prediction by minimizing its free energy is important for its functional analysis. A general method for free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures is dynamic programming, although other optimization methods have been developed as well along with empirically derived energy parameters. In this chapter, we introduce and illustrate by examples the approach of free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures.

  3. Analysis of an optimal hidden Markov model for secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Juliette; Gibrat, Jean-François; Rodolphe, François

    2006-01-01

    Background Secondary structure prediction is a useful first step toward 3D structure prediction. A number of successful secondary structure prediction methods use neural networks, but unfortunately, neural networks are not intuitively interpretable. On the contrary, hidden Markov models are graphical interpretable models. Moreover, they have been successfully used in many bioinformatic applications. Because they offer a strong statistical background and allow model interpretation, we propose a method based on hidden Markov models. Results Our HMM is designed without prior knowledge. It is chosen within a collection of models of increasing size, using statistical and accuracy criteria. The resulting model has 36 hidden states: 15 that model α-helices, 12 that model coil and 9 that model β-strands. Connections between hidden states and state emission probabilities reflect the organization of protein structures into secondary structure segments. We start by analyzing the model features and see how it offers a new vision of local structures. We then use it for secondary structure prediction. Our model appears to be very efficient on single sequences, with a Q3 score of 68.8%, more than one point above PSIPRED prediction on single sequences. A straightforward extension of the method allows the use of multiple sequence alignments, rising the Q3 score to 75.5%. Conclusion The hidden Markov model presented here achieves valuable prediction results using only a limited number of parameters. It provides an interpretable framework for protein secondary structure architecture. Furthermore, it can be used as a tool for generating protein sequences with a given secondary structure content. PMID:17166267

  4. PARTS: probabilistic alignment for RNA joinT secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, Arif Ozgun; Sharma, Gaurav; Mathews, David H

    2008-04-01

    A novel method is presented for joint prediction of alignment and common secondary structures of two RNA sequences. The joint consideration of common secondary structures and alignment is accomplished by structural alignment over a search space defined by the newly introduced motif called matched helical regions. The matched helical region formulation generalizes previously employed constraints for structural alignment and thereby better accommodates the structural variability within RNA families. A probabilistic model based on pseudo free energies obtained from precomputed base pairing and alignment probabilities is utilized for scoring structural alignments. Maximum a posteriori (MAP) common secondary structures, sequence alignment and joint posterior probabilities of base pairing are obtained from the model via a dynamic programming algorithm called PARTS. The advantage of the more general structural alignment of PARTS is seen in secondary structure predictions for the RNase P family. For this family, the PARTS MAP predictions of secondary structures and alignment perform significantly better than prior methods that utilize a more restrictive structural alignment model. For the tRNA and 5S rRNA families, the richer structural alignment model of PARTS does not offer a benefit and the method therefore performs comparably with existing alternatives. For all RNA families studied, the posterior probability estimates obtained from PARTS offer an improvement over posterior probability estimates from a single sequence prediction. When considering the base pairings predicted over a threshold value of confidence, the combination of sensitivity and positive predictive value is superior for PARTS than for the single sequence prediction. PARTS source code is available for download under the GNU public license at http://rna.urmc.rochester.edu.

  5. PARTS: Probabilistic Alignment for RNA joinT Secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Harmanci, Arif Ozgun; Sharma, Gaurav; Mathews, David H.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method is presented for joint prediction of alignment and common secondary structures of two RNA sequences. The joint consideration of common secondary structures and alignment is accomplished by structural alignment over a search space defined by the newly introduced motif called matched helical regions. The matched helical region formulation generalizes previously employed constraints for structural alignment and thereby better accommodates the structural variability within RNA families. A probabilistic model based on pseudo free energies obtained from precomputed base pairing and alignment probabilities is utilized for scoring structural alignments. Maximum a posteriori (MAP) common secondary structures, sequence alignment and joint posterior probabilities of base pairing are obtained from the model via a dynamic programming algorithm called PARTS. The advantage of the more general structural alignment of PARTS is seen in secondary structure predictions for the RNase P family. For this family, the PARTS MAP predictions of secondary structures and alignment perform significantly better than prior methods that utilize a more restrictive structural alignment model. For the tRNA and 5S rRNA families, the richer structural alignment model of PARTS does not offer a benefit and the method therefore performs comparably with existing alternatives. For all RNA families studied, the posterior probability estimates obtained from PARTS offer an improvement over posterior probability estimates from a single sequence prediction. When considering the base pairings predicted over a threshold value of confidence, the combination of sensitivity and positive predictive value is superior for PARTS than for the single sequence prediction. PARTS source code is available for download under the GNU public license at http://rna.urmc.rochester.edu. PMID:18304945

  6. Students' understanding of primary and secondary protein structure: drawing secondary protein structure reveals student understanding better than simple recognition of structures.

    PubMed

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H

    2013-01-01

    The interdisciplinary nature of biochemistry courses requires students to use both chemistry and biology knowledge to understand biochemical concepts. Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations in addition to a fragmented understanding of fundamental biochemistry concepts. This project focuses on students' understanding of primary and secondary protein structure and drawings (representations) of hydrogen-bonding in alpha helices and beta sheets. Analysis demonstrated that students can recognize and identify primary protein structure concepts when given a polypeptide. However, when asked to draw alpha helices and beta sheets and explain the role of hydrogen bonding their drawings students exhibited a fragmented understanding that lacked coherence. Faculty are encouraged to have students draw molecular level representations to make their mental models more explicit, complete, and coherent. This is in contrast to recognition and identification tasks, which do not adequately probe mental models and molecular level understanding. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Studies on solution NMR structure of brazzein : Secondary structure and molecular scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gao, G; Dai, J; Ding, M; Hellekant, G; Wang, J; Wang, D

    1999-08-01

    Brazzein is a sweet-tasting protein isolated from the fruit of West African plantPentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon. It is the smallest and the most water-soluble sweet protein discovered so far and is highly thermostable. The proton NMR study of brazzein at 600 MHz (pH 3.5, 300 K) is presented. The complete sequence specific assignments of the individual backbone and sidechain proton resonances were achieved using through-bond and through-space connectivities obtained from standard two-dimensional NMR techniques. The secondary structure of brazzein contains one alpha-helix (residues 21-29), one short 3(10)-helix (residues 14-17), two strands of antiparallel beta-sheet (residues 34-39, 44-50) and probably a third strand (residues 5-7) near the N-terminus. A comparative analysis found that brazzein shares a so-called 'cysteine-stabilized alpha-beta' (CSalphabeta) motif with scorpion neurotoxins, insect defensins and plant gamma - thionins. The significance of this multi-function motif, the possible active sites and the structural basis of themostability were discussed.

  8. Parameter-Free Hydrogen-Bond Definition to Classify Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Hasti; Higham, Jonathan; Henchman, Richard H

    2016-08-25

    DSSP is the most commonly used method to assign protein secondary structure. It is based on a hydrogen-bond definition with an energy cutoff. To assess whether hydrogen bonds defined in a parameter-free way may give more generality while preserving accuracy, we examine a series of hydrogen-bond definitions to assign secondary structure for a series of proteins. Assignment by the strongest-acceptor bifurcated definition with provision for unassigned donor hydrogens, termed the SABLE method, is found to match DSSP with 95% agreement. The small disagreement mainly occurs for helices, turns, and bends. While there is no absolute way to assign protein secondary structure, avoiding molecule-specific cutoff parameters should be advantageous in generalizing structure-assignment methods to any hydrogen-bonded system.

  9. Charge‐Induced Unzipping of Isolated Proteins to a Defined Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    González Flórez, Ana Isabel; Mucha, Eike; Ahn, Doo‐Sik; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Pagel, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study on the secondary structure of isolated proteins as a function of charge state. In infrared spectra of the proteins ubiquitin and cytochrome c, amide I (C=O stretch) and amide II (N–H bend) bands can be found at positions that are typical for condensed‐phase proteins. For high charge states a new band appears, substantially red‐shifted from the amide II band observed at lower charge states. The observations are interpreted in terms of Coulomb‐driven transitions in secondary structures from mostly helical to extended C5‐type hydrogen‐bonded structures. Support for this interpretation comes from simple energy considerations as well as from quantum chemical calculations on model peptides. This transition in secondary structure is most likely universal for isolated proteins that occur in mass spectrometric experiments. PMID:26847383

  10. Impact of microbial derived secondary bile acids on colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Winston, Jenessa A; Theriot, Casey M

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram positive, spore-forming bacillus that is the leading cause of nosocomial gastroenteritis. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality, consequently posing an urgent threat to public health. Recurrence of CDI after successful treatment with antibiotics is high, thus necessitating discovery of novel therapeutics against this pathogen. Susceptibility to CDI is associated with alterations in the gut microbiota composition and bile acid metabolome, specifically a loss of microbial derived secondary bile acids. This review aims to summarize in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies done by our group and others that demonstrate how secondary bile acids affect the different stages of the C. difficile life cycle. Understanding the dynamic interplay of C. difficile and microbial derived secondary bile acids within the gastrointestinal tract will shed light on how bile acids play a role in colonization resistance against C. difficile. Rational manipulation of secondary bile acids may prove beneficial as a treatment for patients with CDI. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Cloud partitioning of isocyanic acid (HNCO) and evidence of secondary source of HNCO in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Mcdonald, A. M.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.; Modini, R. L.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Noone, K. J.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Hawkins, L. N.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Liggio, J.

    2014-10-01

    Although isocyanic acid (HNCO) may cause a variety of health issues via protein carbamylation and has been proposed as a key compound in smoke-related health issues, our understanding of the atmospheric sources and fate of this toxic compound is currently incomplete. To address these issues, a field study was conducted at Mount Soledad, La Jolla, CA, to investigate partitioning of HNCO to clouds and fogs using an Acetate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer coupled to a ground-based counterflow virtual impactor. The first field evidence of cloud partitioning of HNCO is presented, demonstrating that HNCO is dissolved in cloudwater more efficiently than expected based on the effective Henry's law solubility. The measurements also indicate evidence for a secondary, photochemical source of HNCO in ambient air at this site.

  12. Control of stability and structure of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimta, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    The stabilities, structures, and functions of nucleic acids are responsive to surrounding conditions. Living cells contain biomolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides, and other soluble and insoluble low-molecular weight components, that occupy a significant fraction of the cellular volume (up to 40%), resulting in a highly crowded intracellular environment. We have proven that conditions that mimic features of this intra-cellular environment alter the physical properties affect the stability, structure, and function of nucleic acids. The ability to control structure of nucleic acids by mimicking intra-cellular conditions will be useful in nanotechnology applications of nucleic acids. This paper describes methods that can be used to analyze quantitatively the intra-cellular environment effects caused by cosolutes on nucleic acid structures and to regulate properties of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

  13. Homology among acid proteases: comparison of crystal structures at 3A resolution of acid proteases from Rhizopus chinensis and Endothia parasitica.

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, E; Swan, I D; Liu, M; Davies, D R; Jenkins, J A; Tickle, I J; Blundell, T L

    1977-01-01

    The molecular structures of two fungal acid proteases at 3 A resolution have been compared, and found to have similar secondary and tertiary folding. These enzymes are bilobal and have a pronounced cleft between the two lobes. This cleft has been identified as the active site region from inhibitor binding studies. The results of the comparison are discussed in terms of homology among the acid proteases in general. Images PMID:322132

  14. Secondary structure formation and LCST behavior of short elastin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nuhn, Harald; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2008-10-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of chain length and chemical composition on the secondary structure and LCST behavior of a library of short, elastin-like peptides based on the GVGVP motif. CD experiments revealed that most of the investigated peptides showed the typical elastin conformational behavior with a decrease in random coil and an increase in beta-turn character with increasing temperature. For several peptides, LCST behavior was observed in aqueous NaCl solutions containing 10 mg/mL peptide. By extrapolation of the LCSTs measured at different NaCl concentrations to zero-salt concentration, apparent LCSTs were determined. The apparent LCST was found to decrease with increasing peptide chain length, which correlated well with the trend in the predicted partition coefficients. The apparent LCST of the peptides could be manipulated by successive replacement of the valine residues by more hydrophobic isoleucine, leucine, or phenylalanine residues. Within a particular series of variants, the apparent LCST was found to decrease with an increasing number of valine replacements, which also correlated well with the predicted evolution of the partition coefficient. Although the relative importance of the overall peptide hydrophobicity and the conformational preferences of the constituent amino acids on the LCST behavior still remains an open question, the results described in this contribution clearly demonstrate that short, elastin-like peptides are potentially attractive building blocks for a range of materials applications in biomedicine and engineering.

  15. Circular-dichroic properties and secondary structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa soluble cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tordi, M G; Silvestrini, M C; Colosimo, A; Provencher, S; Brunori, M

    1984-03-15

    The c.d. spectra of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c oxidase in the oxidized state and the reduced state are reported in the visible- and u.v. absorption regions. In the visible region the comparison between the spectra of reduced cytochrome c oxidase and ferrocytochrome c-551 allows the identification of the c.d. bands mainly due to the d1 haem chromophore in cytochrome c oxidase. In the near-u.v. region the assignment of some of the observed peaks to the haem groups and to the aromatic amino acid residues is proposed. A careful analysis of the data in the far-u.v. region leads to the determination of the relative amounts of alpha-helix and beta-sheet in the enzyme, giving for the first time a picture of its secondary structure. A significant difference in this respect between the reduced and the oxidized species is observed and discussed in the light of similar conclusions reported by other workers.

  16. RNA secondary structure prediction by using discrete mathematics: an interdisciplinary research experience for undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses discrete mathematical techniques and identifies specified base pairs as parameters. The goal of the REU was to introduce upper-level undergraduate students to the principles and challenges of interdisciplinary research in molecular biology and discrete mathematics. At the beginning of the project, students from the biology and mathematics departments of a mid-sized university received instruction on the role of secondary structure in the function of eukaryotic RNAs and RNA viruses, RNA related to combinatorics, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information resources. The student research projects focused on RNA secondary structure prediction on a regulatory region of the yellow fever virus RNA genome and on an untranslated region of an mRNA of a gene associated with the neurological disorder epilepsy. At the end of the project, the REU students gave poster and oral presentations, and they submitted written final project reports to the program director. The outcome of the REU was that the students gained transferable knowledge and skills in bioinformatics and an awareness of the applications of discrete mathematics to biological research problems.

  17. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses discrete mathematical techniques and identifies specified base pairs as parameters. The goal of the REU was to introduce upper-level undergraduate students to the principles and challenges of interdisciplinary research in molecular biology and discrete mathematics. At the beginning of the project, students from the biology and mathematics departments of a mid-sized university received instruction on the role of secondary structure in the function of eukaryotic RNAs and RNA viruses, RNA related to combinatorics, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information resources. The student research projects focused on RNA secondary structure prediction on a regulatory region of the yellow fever virus RNA genome and on an untranslated region of an mRNA of a gene associated with the neurological disorder epilepsy. At the end of the project, the REU students gave poster and oral presentations, and they submitted written final project reports to the program director. The outcome of the REU was that the students gained transferable knowledge and skills in bioinformatics and an awareness of the applications of discrete mathematics to biological research problems. PMID:20810968

  18. Interconnection of Salt-induced Hydrophobic Compaction and Secondary Structure Formation Depends on Solution Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea. PMID:22303014

  19. The Electronic Structure and Secondary Pyroelectric Properties of Lithium Tetraborate

    PubMed Central

    Adamiv, Volodymyr.T.; Burak, Yaroslav.V.; Wooten, David. J.; McClory, John; Petrosky, James; Ketsman, Ihor; Xiao, Jie; Losovyj, Yaroslav B.; Dowben, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    We review the pyroelectric properties and electronic structure of Li2B4O7(110) and Li2B4O7(100) surfaces. There is evidence for a pyroelectric current along the [110] direction of stoichiometric Li2B4O7 so that the pyroelectric coefficient is nonzero but roughly 103 smaller than along the [001] direction of spontaneous polarization. Abrupt decreases in the pyroelectric coefficient along the [110] direction can be correlated with anomalies in the elastic stiffness C33D contributing to the concept that the pyroelectric coefficient is not simply a vector but has qualities of a tensor, as expected. The time dependent surface photovoltaic charging suggests that surface charging is dependent on crystal orientation and doping, as well as temperature. PMID:28883341

  20. Modeling RNA Secondary Structure with Sequence Comparison and Experimental Mapping Data.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhen; Sharma, Gaurav; Mathews, David H

    2017-07-25

    Secondary structure prediction is an important problem in RNA bioinformatics because knowledge of structure is critical to understanding the functions of RNA sequences. Significant improvements in prediction accuracy have recently been demonstrated though the incorporation of experimentally obtained structural information, for instance using selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) mapping. However, such mapping data is currently available only for a limited number of RNA sequences. In this article, we present a method for extending the benefit of experimental mapping data in secondary structure prediction to homologous sequences. Specifically, we propose a method for integrating experimental mapping data into a comparative sequence analysis algorithm for secondary structure prediction of multiple homologs, whereby the mapping data benefits not only the prediction for the specific sequence that was mapped but also other homologs. The proposed method is realized by modifying the TurboFold II algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structures to utilize basepairing probabilities guided by SHAPE experimental data when such data are available. The SHAPE-mapping-guided basepairing probabilities are obtained using the RSample method. Results demonstrate that the SHAPE mapping data for a sequence improves structure prediction accuracy of other homologous sequences beyond the accuracy obtained by sequence comparison alone (TurboFold II). The updated version of TurboFold II is freely available as part of the RNAstructure software package. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. IPknot: fast and accurate prediction of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots using integer programming.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kengo; Kato, Yuki; Hamada, Michiaki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2011-07-01

    Pseudoknots found in secondary structures of a number of functional RNAs play various roles in biological processes. Recent methods for predicting RNA secondary structures cover certain classes of pseudoknotted structures, but only a few of them achieve satisfying predictions in terms of both speed and accuracy. We propose IPknot, a novel computational method for predicting RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots based on maximizing expected accuracy of a predicted structure. IPknot decomposes a pseudoknotted structure into a set of pseudoknot-free substructures and approximates a base-pairing probability distribution that considers pseudoknots, leading to the capability of modeling a wide class of pseudoknots and running quite fast. In addition, we propose a heuristic algorithm for refining base-paring probabilities to improve the prediction accuracy of IPknot. The problem of maximizing expected accuracy is solved by using integer programming with threshold cut. We also extend IPknot so that it can predict the consensus secondary structure with pseudoknots when a multiple sequence alignment is given. IPknot is validated through extensive experiments on various datasets, showing that IPknot achieves better prediction accuracy and faster running time as compared with several competitive prediction methods. The program of IPknot is available at http://www.ncrna.org/software/ipknot/. IPknot is also available as a web server at http://rna.naist.jp/ipknot/. satoken@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; ykato@is.naist.jp Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. A reference database for circular dichroism spectroscopy covering fold and secondary structure space.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Miles, Andrew J; Wien, Frank; Wallace, B A

    2006-08-15

    Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a long-established technique for studying protein secondary structures in solution. Empirical analyses of CD data rely on the availability of reference datasets comprised of far-UV CD spectra of proteins whose crystal structures have been determined. This article reports on the creation of a new reference dataset which effectively covers both secondary structure and fold space, and uses the higher information content available in synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectra to more accurately predict secondary structure than has been possible with existing reference datasets. It also examines the effects of wavelength range, structural redundancy and different means of categorizing secondary structures on the accuracy of the analyses. In addition, it describes a novel use of hierarchical cluster analyses to identify protein relatedness based on spectral properties alone. The databases are shown to be applicable in both conventional CD and SRCD spectroscopic analyses of proteins. Hence, by combining new bioinformatics and biophysical methods, a database has been produced that should have wide applicability as a tool for structural molecular biology.

  3. A Reference Database for Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy Covering Fold and Secondary Structure Space

    SciTech Connect

    Lees,J.; Miles, A.; Wien, F.; Wallace, B.

    2006-01-01

    Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a long-established technique for studying protein secondary structures in solution. Empirical analyses of CD data rely on the availability of reference datasets comprised of far-UV CD spectra of proteins whose crystal structures have been determined. This article reports on the creation of a new reference dataset which effectively covers both secondary structure and fold space, and uses the higher information content available in synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectra to more accurately predict secondary structure than has been possible with existing reference datasets. It also examines the effects of wavelength range, structural redundancy and different means of categorizing secondary structures on the accuracy of the analyses. In addition, it describes a novel use of hierarchical cluster analyses to identify protein relatedness based on spectral properties alone. The databases are shown to be applicable in both conventional CD and SRCD spectroscopic analyses of proteins. Hence, by combining new bioinformatics and biophysical methods, a database has been produced that should have wide applicability as a tool for structural molecular biology.

  4. Monitoring Single-Stranded DNA Secondary Structure Formation by Determining the Topological State of DNA Catenanes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xingguo; Kuhn, Heiko; Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has essential biological functions during DNA replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. The structure of ssDNA must be better understood to elucidate its functions. However, the available data are too limited to give a clear picture of ssDNA due to the extremely capricious structural features of ssDNA. In this study, by forming DNA catenanes and determining their topology (the linking number, Lk) through the electrophoretic analysis, we demonstrate that the studies of catenanes formed from two ssDNA molecules can yield valuable new information about the ssDNA secondary structure. We construct catenanes out of two short (60/70 nt) ssDNA molecules by enzymatic cyclization of linear oligodeoxynucleotides. The secondary structure formed between the two DNA circles determines the topology (the Lk value) of the constructed DNA catenane. Thus, formation of the secondary structure is experimentally monitored by observing the changes of linking number with sequences and conditions. We found that the secondary structure of ssDNA is much easier to form than expected: the two strands in an internal loop in the folded ssDNA structure prefer to braid around each other rather than stay separately forming a loop, and a duplex containing only mismatched basepairs can form under physiological conditions. PMID:16461397

  5. Structural class prediction of protein using novel feature extraction method from chaos game representation of predicted secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichao; Kong, Liang; Han, Xiaodong; Lv, Jinfeng

    2016-07-07

    Protein structural class prediction plays an important role in protein structure and function analysis, drug design and many other biological applications. Extracting good representation from protein sequence is fundamental for this prediction task. In recent years, although several secondary structure based feature extraction strategies have been specially proposed for low-similarity protein sequences, the prediction accuracy still remains limited. To explore the potential of secondary structure information, this study proposed a novel feature extraction method from the chaos game representation of predicted secondary structure to mainly capture sequence order information and secondary structure segments distribution information in a given protein sequence. Several kinds of prediction accuracies obtained by the jackknife test are reported on three widely used low-similarity benchmark datasets (25PDB, 1189 and 640). Compared with the state-of-the-art prediction methods, the proposed method achieves the highest overall accuracies on all the three datasets. The experimental results confirm that the proposed feature extraction method is effective for accurate prediction of protein structural class. Moreover, it is anticipated that the proposed method could be extended to other graphical representations of protein sequence and be helpful in future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human liver glutathione S-transferase psi. Chemical characterization and secondary-structure comparison with other mammalian glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S V; Kurosky, A; Awasthi, Y C

    1987-01-01

    The isolation and chemical characterization of the anionic human liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) psi (pI 5.5) are described and compared with other GST isoenzymes reported for rat and human. Amino acid compositional analysis, substrate specificity and isoelectric focusing indicated that GST psi is a unique isoenzyme form of GST. Strikingly, however, amino acid sequence analysis of the N-terminal region indicated that GST psi was identical with GST mu in the first 23 amino acid residues reported. It is likely that these two enzyme forms are at least partially structurally related. In order to investigate further the genetic relationship of GST psi to other reported GST isoenzymes, secondary-structure analysis was performed. Despite substantial differences in the N-terminal-region amino acid sequences of some of the GST isoenzymes, the secondary structure of all the isoenzymes is highly conserved at their N-termini. The general uniformity of the secondary structure of this enzyme class at their N-termini strongly indicated that the observed diversity of these isoenzymes probably occurred as a result of a mechanism of gene duplication followed by divergence rather than a mechanism of convergent evolution. PMID:3606582

  7. Two-dimensional self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides; adsorption-induced secondary structural transition on hydrophilic substrate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Abiko, Souhei; Himeiwa, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Takatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of sequential amphiphilic peptides on solid substrates triggered the spontaneous construction of nanoscaled architecture. An amphiphilic peptide designed with a cationic amino acid as a hydrophilic residue turned an anionic mica substrate into a water-repellent surface, simply by adsorbing it on the substrate surface. In contrast, an amphiphilic peptide designed with an anionic amino-acid residue formed a precisely controlled fiber array comprising a β-sheet fiber monolayer at the anionic substrate/water interface. This phenomenon was based on the secondary structural transition from random-coil to β-sheet, which occurred specifically when amphiphilic peptide adsorbed on the substrate surface. Such surface-specific nonorder/order transition was implemented by exploiting the strength of adsorption between the peptide and the substrate. A strategic design exploiting weak bonding such as hydrophobic interactions is essential for constructing precisely controlled nano-architectures in two dimensions.

  8. Monitoring secondary structural changes in salted and smoked salmon muscle myofiber proteins by FT-IR microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carton, Izaskun; Böcker, Ulrike; Ofstad, Ragni; Sørheim, Oddvin; Kohler, Achim

    2009-05-13

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy and light microscopy were used to study changes in the myofibrillar proteins and microstructure in salmon muscle due to dry salting and smoking. Light microscopy showed that the myofibers of the smoked samples were more shrunken and their shape more irregular and edged than for the nonsmoked samples. FT-IR microspectroscopy showed that salting time mostly contributed in the amide I region, revealing that secondary structural changes of proteins were primarily affected by salting. The main variation in the amide II region was caused by smoking. As it is known that smoke components can react with amino acid side chains and that the contribution of the side chain in the amide II region is larger than that in amide I, it is concluded that the observed differences are due to interactions between carbonyl compounds of smoke and amino acid side chains.

  9. Algorithmic computation of knot polynomials of secondary structure elements of proteins.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2006-10-01

    The classification of protein structures is an important and still outstanding problem. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, we utilize a relation between the Tutte and homfly polynomial to show that the Alexander-Conway polynomial can be algorithmically computed for a given planar graph. Second, as special cases of planar graphs, we use polymer graphs of protein structures. More precisely, we use three building blocks of the three-dimensional protein structure--alpha-helix, antiparallel beta-sheet, and parallel beta-sheet--and calculate, for their corresponding polymer graphs, the Tutte polynomials analytically by providing recurrence equations for all three secondary structure elements. Third, we present numerical results comparing the results from our analytical calculations with the numerical results of our algorithm-not only to test consistency, but also to demonstrate that all assigned polynomials are unique labels of the secondary structure elements. This paves the way for an automatic classification of protein structures.

  10. A Method for WD40 Repeat Detection and Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Jiang, Fan; Zhuo, Zhu; Wu, Xian-Hui; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2013-01-01

    WD40-repeat proteins (WD40s), as one of the largest protein families in eukaryotes, play vital roles in assembling protein-protein/DNA/RNA complexes. WD40s fold into similar β-propeller structures despite diversified sequences. A program WDSP (WD40 repeat protein Structure Predictor) has been developed to accurately identify WD40 repeats and predict their secondary structures. The method is designed specifically for WD40 proteins by incorporating both local residue information and non-local family-specific structural features. It overcomes the problem of highly diversified protein sequences and variable loops. In addition, WDSP achieves a better prediction in identifying multiple WD40-domain proteins by taking the global combination of repeats into consideration. In secondary structure prediction, the average Q3 accuracy of WDSP in jack-knife test reaches 93.7%. A disease related protein LRRK2 was used as a representive example to demonstrate the structure prediction. PMID:23776530

  11. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  12. Contributions of Acid-Catalysed Processes to Secondary Organic Aerosol Mass - A Modelling pproach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Feingold, G.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    A significant fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass is formed by chemical and/or physical processes. However, the amount of organic material found in ambient organic aerosols cannot be explained with current models. Recently, several laboratory studies have been published which suggest that also acid-catalyzed processes that occur either in particles or at their surfaces (heterogeneous) might contribute significantly to mass formation. However, to date there is no general conclusion about the efficiency of such processes due to the great diversity of species and experimental conditions. We present a compilation of literature data (thermodynamic and kinetic) of these processes. The aerosol yields of (i) additional species which are thought previously not contribute to SOA formation (e.g. isoprene, aliphatic aldehydes) and (ii) species which form apparently higher SOA masses on acidic seed aerosols are reported and compared to input data of previous SOA models. Available kinetic data clearly exclude aldol condensation as a significant process for SOA formation on a time scale of typical aerosol life times. Using aerosol size distributions and gas phase concentrations measured during NEAQS2002 as model input data, we show that (even under assumption of equilibrium conditions) these additional processes only contribute a minor fraction to the organic aerosol mass.

  13. Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase transcription by hnRNP K and DNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Kasturi; Wang, Meng; Cai, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Nana; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene (Th) transcription is critical for specifying and maintaining the dopaminergic neuronal phenotype. Here we define a molecular regulatory mechanism for Th transcription conserved in tetrapod vertebrates. We show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a transactivator of Th transcription. It binds to previously unreported and evolutionarily conserved G:C-rich regions in the Th proximal promoter. hnRNP K directly binds C-rich single DNA strands within these conserved regions and also associates with double-stranded sequences when proteins, such as CREB, are bound to an adjacent cis-regulatory element. The single DNA strands within the conserved G:C-rich regions adopt either G-quadruplex or i-motif secondary structures. We also show that small molecule-mediated stabilization of these secondary structures represses Th promoter activity. These data suggest that these secondary structures are targets for pharmacological modulation of the dopaminergic phenotype. PMID:25493445

  14. The FT-IR spectrometric analysis of the changes of polyphenol oxidase II secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunhua; Dai, Ya; Liu, Qingliang; Xie, Yongshu; Xu, Xiaolong

    2003-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase II is a novel protein purified from tobacco, which acts as a key role in plant defense system. From the analysis of FT-IR spectrums, Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) spectrums and second-derivative spectrums of PPO II at different pH and peroxide PPO II adduct, the secondary structure fractions are analyzed. PPO II at low pH (pH=3.0) and peroxide PPO II adduct almost keep the same secondary structure of native PPO II. The percentages of β-turn and random coil increase rapidly and the percentages of α-helix and anti-parallel β-sheet decrease rapidly at high pH (pH=10.0) comparing with that of native PPO II. All these conclusions are proved by the secondary structure calculations of circular dichroism spectrums in different states.

  15. RNA secondary structure prediction from sequence alignments using a network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers

    PubMed Central

    BINDEWALD, ECKART; SHAPIRO, BRUCE A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a machine learning method (a hierarchical network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers) that uses an RNA sequence alignment in order to predict a consensus RNA secondary structure. The input to the network is the mutual information, the fraction of complementary nucleotides, and a novel consensus RNAfold secondary structure prediction of a pair of alignment columns and its nearest neighbors. Given this input, the network computes a prediction as to whether a particular pair of alignment columns corresponds to a base pair. By using a comprehensive test set of 49 RFAM alignments, the program KNetFold achieves an average Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.81. This is a significant improvement compared with the secondary structure prediction methods PFOLD and RNAalifold. By using the example of archaeal RNase P, we show that the program can also predict pseudoknot interactions. PMID:16495232

  16. RNA secondary structure prediction from sequence alignments using a network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers.

    PubMed

    Bindewald, Eckart; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2006-03-01

    We present a machine learning method (a hierarchical network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers) that uses an RNA sequence alignment in order to predict a consensus RNA secondary structure. The input to the network is the mutual information, the fraction of complementary nucleotides, and a novel consensus RNAfold secondary structure prediction of a pair of alignment columns and its nearest neighbors. Given this input, the network computes a prediction as to whether a particular pair of alignment columns corresponds to a base pair. By using a comprehensive test set of 49 RFAM alignments, the program KNetFold achieves an average Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.81. This is a significant improvement compared with the secondary structure prediction methods PFOLD and RNAalifold. By using the example of archaeal RNase P, we show that the program can also predict pseudoknot interactions.

  17. Bayesian segmental models with multiple sequence alignment profiles for protein secondary structure and contact map prediction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wei; Ghahramani, Zoubin; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei; Wild, David L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a segmental semi-Markov model (SSMM) for protein secondary structure prediction which incorporates multiple sequence alignment profiles with the purpose of improving the predictive performance. The segmental model is a generalization of the hidden Markov model where a hidden state generates segments of various length and secondary structure type. A novel parameterized model is proposed for the likelihood function that explicitly represents multiple sequence alignment profiles to capture the segmental conformation. Numerical results on benchmark data sets show that incorporating the profiles results in substantial improvements and the generalization performance is promising. By incorporating the information from long range interactions in beta-sheets, this model is also capable of carrying out inference on contact maps. This is an important advantage of probabilistic generative models over the traditional discriminative approach to protein secondary structure prediction. The Web server of our algorithm and supplementary materials are available at http://public.kgi.edu/-wild/bsm.html.

  18. RNA secondary structure prediction based on SHAPE data in helix regions.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mohadeseh; Zare-Mirakabad, Fatemeh; Montaseri, Soheila

    2015-09-07

    RNA molecules play important and fundamental roles in biological processes. Frequently, the functional form of single-stranded RNA molecules requires a specific tertiary structure. Classically, RNA structure determination has mostly been accomplished by X-Ray crystallography or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance approaches. These experimental methods are time consuming and expensive. In the past two decades, some computational methods and algorithms have been developed for RNA secondary structure prediction. In these algorithms, minimum free energy is known as the best criterion. However, the results of algorithms show that minimum free energy is not a sufficient criterion to predict RNA secondary structure. These algorithms need some additional knowledge about the structure, which has to be added in the methods. Recently, the information obtained from some experimental data, called SHAPE, can greatly improve the consistency between the native and predicted RNA secondary structure. In this paper, we investigate the influence of SHAPE data on four types of RNA substructures, helices, loops, base pairs from the start and end of helices and two base pairs from the start and end of helices. The results show that SHAPE data in helix regions can improve the prediction. We represent a new method to apply SHAPE data in helix regions for finding RNA secondary structure. Finally, we compare the results of the method on a set of RNAs to predict minimum free energy structure based on considering all SHAPE data and only SHAPE data in helix regions as pseudo free energy and without SHAPE data (without any pseudo free energy). The results show that RNA secondary structure prediction based on considering only SHAPE data in helix regions is more successful than not considering SHAPE data and it provides competitive results in comparison with considering all SHAPE data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  20. Accurate secondary structure prediction and fold recognition for circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Micsonai, András; Wien, Frank; Kernya, Linda; Lee, Young-Ho; Goto, Yuji; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Kardos, József

    2015-06-16

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a widely used technique for the study of protein structure. Numerous algorithms have been developed for the estimation of the secondary structure composition from the CD spectra. These methods often fail to provide acceptable results on α/β-mixed or β-structure-rich proteins. The problem arises from the spectral diversity of β-structures, which has hitherto been considered as an intrinsic limitation of the technique. The predictions are less reliable for proteins of unusual β-structures such as membrane proteins, protein aggregates, and amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that the parallel/antiparallel orientation and the twisting of the β-sheets account for the observed spectral diversity. We have developed a method called β-structure selection (BeStSel) for the secondary structure estimation that takes into account the twist of β-structures. This method can reliably distinguish parallel and antiparallel β-sheets and accurately estimates the secondary structure for a broad range of proteins. Moreover, the secondary structure components applied by the method are characteristic to the protein fold, and thus the fold can be predicted to the level of topology in the CATH classification from a single CD spectrum. By constructing a web server, we offer a general tool for a quick and reliable structure analysis using conventional CD or synchrotron radiation CD (SRCD) spectroscopy for the protein science research community. The method is especially useful when X-ray or NMR techniques fail. Using BeStSel on data collected by SRCD spectroscopy, we investigated the structure of amyloid fibrils of various disease-related proteins and peptides.

  1. Influence of secondary structure on in-source decay of protein in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Osaka, Issey; Sakakura, Motoshi

    2012-01-01

    The susceptibility of the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone to specific cleavage by in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) was studied from the standpoint of the secondary structure of three proteins. A naphthalene derivative, 5-amino-1-naphtol (5,1-ANL), was used as the matrix. The resulting c'-ions, which originate from the cleavage at N-Cα bonds in flexible secondary structures such as turn and bend, and are free from intra-molecular hydrogen-bonded α-helix structure, gave relatively intense peaks. Furthermore, ISD spectra of the proteins showed that the N-Cα bonds of specific amino acid residues, namely Gly-Xxx, Xxx-Asp, and Xxx-Asn, were more susceptible to MALDI-ISD than other amino acid residues. This is in agreement with the observation that Gly, Asp and Asn residues usually located in turns, rather than α-helix. The results obtained indicate that protein molecules embedded into the matrix crystal in the MALDI experiments maintain their secondary structures as determined by X-ray crystallography, and that MALDI-ISD has the capability for providing information concerning the secondary structure of protein.

  2. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: Structure elucidation and metabolic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-10-20

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. Lastly, in this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field.

  3. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field.

  4. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  5. A set of nearest neighbor parameters for predicting the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi John; Turner, Douglas H.; Mathews, David H.

    2006-01-01

    A complete set of nearest neighbor parameters to predict the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation was derived. These parameters can be used with available free energy nearest neighbor parameters to extend the secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences to temperatures other than 37°C. The parameters were tested by predicting the secondary structures of sequences with known secondary structure that are from organisms with known optimal growth temperatures. Compared with the previous set of enthalpy nearest neighbor parameters, the sensitivity of base pair prediction improved from 65.2 to 68.9% at optimal growth temperatures ranging from 10 to 60°C. Base pair probabilities were predicted with a partition function and the positive predictive value of structure prediction is 90.4% when considering the base pairs in the lowest free energy structure with pairing probability of 0.99 or above. Moreover, a strong correlation is found between the predicted melting temperatures of RNA sequences and the optimal growth temperatures of the host organism. This indicates that organisms that live at higher temperatures have evolved RNA sequences with higher melting temperatures. PMID:16982646

  6. A set of nearest neighbor parameters for predicting the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi John; Turner, Douglas H; Mathews, David H

    2006-01-01

    A complete set of nearest neighbor parameters to predict the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation was derived. These parameters can be used with available free energy nearest neighbor parameters to extend the secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences to temperatures other than 37 degrees C. The parameters were tested by predicting the secondary structures of sequences with known secondary structure that are from organisms with known optimal growth temperatures. Compared with the previous set of enthalpy nearest neighbor parameters, the sensitivity of base pair prediction improved from 65.2 to 68.9% at optimal growth temperatures ranging from 10 to 60 degrees C. Base pair probabilities were predicted with a partition function and the positive predictive value of structure prediction is 90.4% when considering the base pairs in the lowest free energy structure with pairing probability of 0.99 or above. Moreover, a strong correlation is found between the predicted melting temperatures of RNA sequences and the optimal growth temperatures of the host organism. This indicates that organisms that live at higher temperatures have evolved RNA sequences with higher melting temperatures.

  7. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information.

    PubMed

    Bose, Tungadri; Dutta, Anirban; Mh, Mohammed; Gandhi, Hemang; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, 'FASTR', for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. 'FASTR' - the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant 'fastr' string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the 'FASTR' methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  8. Web-Beagle: a web server for the alignment of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Pietrosanto, Marco; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    Web-Beagle (http://beagle.bio.uniroma2.it) is a web server for the pairwise global or local alignment of RNA secondary structures. The server exploits a new encoding for RNA secondary structure and a substitution matrix of RNA structural elements to perform RNA structural alignments. The web server allows the user to compute up to 10 000 alignments in a single run, taking as input sets of RNA sequences and structures or primary sequences alone. In the latter case, the server computes the secondary structure prediction for the RNAs on-the-fly using RNAfold (free energy minimization). The user can also compare a set of input RNAs to one of five pre-compiled RNA datasets including lncRNAs and 3' UTRs. All types of comparison produce in output the pairwise alignments along with structural similarity and statistical significance measures for each resulting alignment. A graphical color-coded representation of the alignments allows the user to easily identify structural similarities between RNAs. Web-Beagle can be used for finding structurally related regions in two or more RNAs, for the identification of homologous regions or for functional annotation. Benchmark tests show that Web-Beagle has lower computational complexity, running time and better performances than other available methods.

  9. Web-Beagle: a web server for the alignment of RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Eugenio; Pietrosanto, Marco; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Web-Beagle (http://beagle.bio.uniroma2.it) is a web server for the pairwise global or local alignment of RNA secondary structures. The server exploits a new encoding for RNA secondary structure and a substitution matrix of RNA structural elements to perform RNA structural alignments. The web server allows the user to compute up to 10 000 alignments in a single run, taking as input sets of RNA sequences and structures or primary sequences alone. In the latter case, the server computes the secondary structure prediction for the RNAs on-the-fly using RNAfold (free energy minimization). The user can also compare a set of input RNAs to one of five pre-compiled RNA datasets including lncRNAs and 3′ UTRs. All types of comparison produce in output the pairwise alignments along with structural similarity and statistical significance measures for each resulting alignment. A graphical color-coded representation of the alignments allows the user to easily identify structural similarities between RNAs. Web-Beagle can be used for finding structurally related regions in two or more RNAs, for the identification of homologous regions or for functional annotation. Benchmark tests show that Web-Beagle has lower computational complexity, running time and better performances than other available methods. PMID:25977293

  10. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  11. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  12. Probing the secondary structure of expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2006-07-04

    Expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA is, unlike many other expansion segments, present in all eukaryotes. The available data suggest that ES6 is located on the surface of the small ribosomal subunit. Here we have analyzed the secondary structure of the complete ES6 sequence in intact ribosomes from three eukaryotes, wheat, yeast, and mouse, representing different eukaryotic kingdoms. The availability of the ES6 sequence for modification and cleavage by structure sensitive chemicals and enzymatic reagents was analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The experimental results were used to restrict the number of possible secondary structure models of ES6 generated by the folding software MFOLD. The modification data obtained from the three experimental organisms were very similar despite the sequence variation. Consequently, similar secondary structure models were obtained for the ES6 sequence in wheat, yeast, and mouse ribosomes. A comparison of sequence data from more than 6000 eukaryotes showed that similar structural elements could also be formed in other organisms. The comparative analysis also showed that the extent of compensatory base changes in the suggested helices was low. The in situ structure analysis was complemented by a secondary structure analysis of wheat ES6 transcribed and folded in vitro. The obtained modification data indicate that the secondary structure of the in vitro transcribed sequence differs from that observed in the intact ribosome. These results suggest that chaperones, ribosomal proteins, and/or tertiary rRNA interactions could be involved in the in vivo folding of ES6.

  13. Graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in primary and secondary roots of Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Pasieniuk, J

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine what structural changes are associated with the onset of graviresponsiveness by plant roots, we have monitored the quantitative ultrastructures of columella (i.e., graviperceptive) cells in primary and secondary roots of Ricinus communis. The relative volumes of cellular components in lateral (i.e., minimally graviresponsive) roots were not significantly different from those of primary roots. The relative volumes of cellular components in secondary roots growing laterally were not significantly different from those of graviresponsive secondary roots. Therefore, the onset of graviresponsiveness by secondary roots of R. communis is not correlated with changes in organellar concentrations in columella cells. These results are discussed relative to a model for the differential graviresponsiveness of plant roots.

  14. Orientation determination of protein helical secondary structures using linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Le Clair, Stéphanie V; Ye, Shuji; Chen, Zhan

    2009-09-10

    In this paper, we systematically presented the orientation determination of protein helical secondary structures using vibrational spectroscopic methods, particularly, nonlinear sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, along with linear vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering. SFG amide I signals can be collected using different polarization combinations of the input laser beams and output signal beam to measure the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility components of the helical amide I modes, which are related to their molecular hyperpolarizability elements through the orientation distribution of these helices. The molecular hyperpolarizability elements of amide I modes of a helix can be calculated based on the infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of the helix; these quantities are determined by using the bond additivity model to sum over the individual infrared transition dipole moments and Raman polarizability tensors, respectively, of the peptide units (or the amino acid residues). The computed overall infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of a helix can be validated by experimental data using polarized infrared and polarized Raman spectroscopy on samples with well-aligned helical structures. From the deduced SFG hyperpolarizability elements and measured SFG second-order nonlinear susceptibility components, orientation information regarding helical structures can be determined. Even though such orientation information can also be measured using polarized infrared or polarized Raman amide I signals, SFG has a much lower detection limit, which can be used to study the orientation of a helix when its surface coverage is much lower than a monolayer. In addition, the combination of different vibrational spectroscopic techniques, for example, SFG and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, provides more

  15. Accurate secondary structure prediction and fold recognition for circular dichroism spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Micsonai, András; Wien, Frank; Kernya, Linda; Lee, Young-Ho; Goto, Yuji; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Kardos, József

    2015-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a widely used technique for the study of protein structure. Numerous algorithms have been developed for the estimation of the secondary structure composition from the CD spectra. These methods often fail to provide acceptable results on α/β-mixed or β-structure–rich proteins. The problem arises from the spectral diversity of β-structures, which has hitherto been considered as an intrinsic limitation of the technique. The predictions are less reliable for proteins of unusual β-structures such as membrane proteins, protein aggregates, and amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that the parallel/antiparallel orientation and the twisting of the β-sheets account for the observed spectral diversity. We have developed a method called β-structure selection (BeStSel) for the secondary structure estimation that takes into account the twist of β-structures. This method can reliably distinguish parallel and antiparallel β-sheets and accurately estimates the secondary structure for a broad range of proteins. Moreover, the secondary structure components applied by the method are characteristic to the protein fold, and thus the fold can be predicted to the level of topology in the CATH classification from a single CD spectrum. By constructing a web server, we offer a general tool for a quick and reliable structure analysis using conventional CD or synchrotron radiation CD (SRCD) spectroscopy for the protein science research community. The method is especially useful when X-ray or NMR techniques fail. Using BeStSel on data collected by SRCD spectroscopy, we investigated the structure of amyloid fibrils of various disease-related proteins and peptides. PMID:26038575

  16. "Parallel factor analysis of multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra for protein secondary structure determination".

    PubMed

    Oshokoya, Olayinka O; JiJi, Renee D

    2015-09-10

    Protein secondary structural analysis is important for understanding the relationship between protein structure and function, or more importantly how changes in structure relate to loss of function. The structurally sensitive protein vibrational modes (amide I, II, III and S) in deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectra resulting from the backbone C-O and N-H vibrations make DUVRR a potentially powerful tool for studying secondary structure changes. Experimental studies reveal that the position and intensity of the four amide modes in DUVRR spectra of proteins are largely correlated with the varying fractions of α-helix, β-sheet and disordered structural content of proteins. Employing multivariate calibration methods and DUVRR spectra of globular proteins with varying structural compositions, the secondary structure of a protein with unknown structure can be predicted. A disadvantage of multivariate calibration methods is the requirement of known concentration or spectral profiles. Second-order curve resolution methods, such as parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), do not have such a requirement due to the "second-order advantage." An exceptional feature of DUVRR spectroscopy is that DUVRR spectra are linearly dependent on both excitation wavelength and secondary structure composition. Thus, higher order data can be created by combining protein DUVRR spectra of several proteins collected at multiple excitation wavelengths to give multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman data (ME-UVRR). PARAFAC has been used to analyze ME-UVRR data of nine proteins to resolve the pure spectral, excitation and compositional profiles. A three factor model with non-negativity constraints produced three unique factors that were correlated with the relative abundance of helical, β-sheet and poly-proline II dihedral angles. This is the first empirical evidence that the typically resolved "disordered" spectrum represents the better defined poly-proline II type structure.

  17. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Yang, Yu; Chen, Chun; Bu, Jiajun; Zhang, Yin; Ye, Xiuzi

    2008-01-01

    Background With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. Results RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1) present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2) design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers) compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. Conclusion A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool for academic users

  18. Sequence-specific 1H-NMR assignment and secondary structure of black mamba dendrotoxin I, a highly selective blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Foray, M F; Lancelin, J M; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1993-02-01

    The secondary structure of dendrotoxin I, an important constituent of the venom of the African black mamba snake Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis, was determined in aqueous solution by two-dimensional methods. Complete sequence-specific 1H-NMR assignment was obtained with the exception of the backbone amide proton of Gly39 and Cys40. Dendrotoxin I is based on a central antiparallel beta-sheet and two small helices located at the N- and the C-terminal extremities. These secondary-structural units occur at exactly the same places in the amino acid sequence as those of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), with which dendrotoxin I shares 33% sequence similarity. According to the disulfide-bridge positions and the long-range NOE observed these secondary-structural elements fold in a similar manner to BPTI. This similarity allows an hypothesis according to which dendrotoxin I could derive from an ancestral Künitz-type proteinase inhibitor. This ancestor would have been heavily mutated at amino acid positions not critical for gross structure. The spatial locations of the solvent-exposed amino acids concerned could therefore serve as a guideline for interpretation of the structure/activity relationship of dendrotoxin I for the blockage of voltage-sensitive potassium channels of which dendrotoxin I is a strong inhibitor. The possible connections with other polypeptide toxins that block related ion currents is discussed.

  19. Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    De Leonardis, Eleonora; Lutz, Benjamin; Ratz, Sebastian; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Rémi; Schug, Alexander; Weigt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the biological importance of non-coding RNA, their structural characterization remains challenging. Making use of the rapidly growing sequence databases, we analyze nucleotide coevolution across homologous sequences via Direct-Coupling Analysis to detect nucleotide-nucleotide contacts. For a representative set of riboswitches, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis in combination with a generalized Nussinov algorithm systematically improve the results of RNA secondary structure prediction beyond traditional covariance approaches based on mutual information. Even more importantly, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis are enriched in tertiary structure contacts. By integrating these predictions into molecular modeling tools, systematically improved tertiary structure predictions can be obtained, as compared to using secondary structure information alone. PMID:26420827

  20. FTIR study of secondary structure of bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimova, K. V.; Shulenina, O. V.; Paston, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    Proteins structure is the critical factor for their functioning. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides a possibility to obtain information about secondary structure of proteins in different states and also in a whole biological samples. Infrared spectra of egg white from the untreated and hard-boiled hen's egg, and also of chicken ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin in lyophilic form and in aqueous solution were studied. Lyophilization of investigated globular proteins is accompanied by the decrease of a-helix structures and the increase in amount of intermolecular β-sheets. Analysis of infrared spectrum of egg white allowed to make an estimation of OVA secondary structure and to observe α-to-β structural transformation as a result of the heat denaturation.

  1. Identification of secondary structure elements in intermediate-resolution density maps.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew L; Ju, Tao; Chiu, Wah

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of structural studies of large macromolecular complexes, both in X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, have resulted in intermediate-resolution (5-10 A) density maps. Despite being limited in resolution, significant structural and functional information may be extractable from these maps. To aid in the analysis and annotation of these complexes, we have developed SSEhunter, a tool for the quantitative detection of alpha helices and beta sheets. Based on density skeletonization, local geometry calculations, and a template-based search, SSEhunter has been tested and validated on a variety of simulated and authentic subnanometer-resolution density maps. The result is a robust, user-friendly approach that allows users to quickly visualize, assess, and annotate intermediate-resolution density maps. Beyond secondary structure element identification, the skeletonization algorithm in SSEhunter provides secondary structure topology, which is potentially useful in leading to structural models of individual molecular components directly from the density.

  2. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  3. Localization of fatty acids with selective chain length by imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Nygren, Håkan; Malmberg, Per; Hagenhoff, Birgit

    2007-07-01

    Localization of fatty acids in biological tissues was made by using TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry). Two cell-types with a specific fatty acid distribution are shown. In rat cerebellum, different distribution patterns of stearic acid (C18:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), and oleic acid (C18:1) were found. Stearic acid signals were observed accumulated in Purkinje cells with high intensities inside the cell, but not in the nucleus region. The signals colocalized with high intensity signals of the phosphocholine head group, indicating origin from phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin. In mouse intestine, high palmitic acid signals were found in the secretory crypt cells together with high levels of phosphorylinositol colocalized in the crypt region. Palmitic acid was also seen in the intestinal lumen that contains high amounts of mucine, which is known to be produced in the crypt cells. Linoleic acid signals (C18:2) were low in the crypt region and high in the villus region. Oleic acid signals were seen in the villi and stearic acid signals were ubiquitous with no specific localization in the intestine. We conclude that the results obtained by using imaging TOF-SIMS are consistent with known brain and intestine biochemistry and that the localization of fatty acids is specific in differentiated cells.

  4. Description and recognition of regular and distorted secondary structures in proteins using the automated protein structure analysis method.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Sushilee; Izotov, Dmitry; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2009-08-01

    The Automated Protein Structure Analysis (APSA) method, which describes the protein backbone as a smooth line in three-dimensional space and characterizes it by curvature kappa and torsion tau as a function of arc length s, was applied on 77 proteins to determine all secondary structural units via specific kappa(s) and tau(s) patterns. A total of 533 alpha-helices and 644 beta-strands were recognized by APSA, whereas DSSP gives 536 and 651 units, respectively. Kinks and distortions were quantified and the boundaries (entry and exit) of secondary structures were classified. Similarity between proteins can be easily quantified using APSA, as was demonstrated for the roll architecture of proteins ubiquitin and spinach ferridoxin. A twenty-by-twenty comparison of all alpha domains showed that the curvature-torsion patterns generated by APSA provide an accurate and meaningful similarity measurement for secondary, super secondary, and tertiary protein structure. APSA is shown to accurately reflect the conformation of the backbone effectively reducing three-dimensional structure information to two-dimensional representations that are easy to interpret and understand. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. [Establishment of industry promotion technology system in Chinese medicine secondary exploitation based on "component structure theory"].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xu-Dong; Feng, Liang; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Gu, Jun-Fei; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the secondary exploitation of Chinese medicine is to improve the quality of Chinese medicine products, enhance core competitiveness, for better use in clinical practice, and more effectively solve the patient suffering. Herbs, extraction, separation, refreshing, preparation and quality control are all involved in the industry promotion of Chinese medicine secondary exploitation of industrial production. The Chinese medicine quality improvement and industry promotion could be realized with the whole process of process optimization, quality control, overall processes improvement. Based on the "component structure theory", "multi-dimensional structure & process dynamic quality control system" and systematic and holistic character of Chinese medicine, impacts of whole process were discussed. Technology systems of Chinese medicine industry promotion was built to provide theoretical basis for improving the quality and efficacy of the secondary development of traditional Chinese medicine products.

  6. Anthropogenic and natural sources of acidity and metals and their influence on the structure of stream food webs.

    PubMed

    Hogsden, Kristy L; Harding, Jon S

    2012-03-01

    We compared food web structure in 20 streams with either anthropogenic or natural sources of acidity and metals or circumneutral water chemistry in New Zealand. Community and diet analysis indicated that mining streams receiving anthropogenic inputs of acidic and metal-rich drainage had much simpler food webs (fewer species, shorter food chains, less links) than those in naturally acidic, naturally high metal, and circumneutral streams. Food webs of naturally high metal streams were structurally similar to those in mining streams, lacking fish predators and having few species. Whereas, webs in naturally acidic streams differed very little from those in circumneutral streams due to strong similarities in community composition and diets of secondary and top consumers. The combined negative effects of acidity and metals on stream food webs are clear. However, elevated metal concentrations, regardless of source, appear to play a more important role than acidity in driving food web structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance assignments and secondary structure determination of the Co1E1 rop (rom) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, W. European Molecular Biology Lab., Heidelberg ); Klaus, W. ); Cesareni, G. ); Sander, C. ); Roesch, P. )

    1990-08-14

    The complete resonance assignment of the Co1E1 rop (rom) protein at pH 2.3 was obtained by two-dimensional (2D) proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H NMR) at 500 and 600 MHz using through-bond and through-space connectivities. Sequential assignments and elements of regular secondary structure were deduced by analysis of nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments and {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants. One 7.2-kDa monomer of the homodimer consists of two antiparallel helices connected by a hairpin loop at residue 31. The C-terminal peptide consisting of amino acids 59-63 shows no stable conformation. The dimer forms a four-helix bundle with opposite polarization of neighboring elements in agreement with the x-ray structure.

  8. Single-fluorophore monitoring of DNA hybridization for investigating the effect of secondary structure on the nucleation step.

    PubMed

    Jo, Joon-Jung; Kim, Min-Ji; Son, Jung-Tae; Kim, Jandi; Shin, Jong-Shik

    2009-07-17

    Nucleic acid hybridization is one of the essential biological processes involved in storage and transmission of genetic information. Here we quantitatively determined the effect of secondary structure on the hybridization activation energy using structurally defined oligonucleotides. It turned out that activation energy is linearly proportional to the length of a single-stranded region flanking a nucleation site, generating a 0.18 kcal/mol energy barrier per nucleotide. Based on this result, we propose that the presence of single-stranded segments available for non-productive base pairing with a nucleation counterpart extends the searching process for nucleation sites to find a perfect match. This result may provide insights into rational selection of a target mRNA site for siRNA and antisense gene silencing.

  9. Virus and cytotoxic T lymphocytes: crucial role of viral peptide secondary structure in major histocompatibility complex class I interactions.

    PubMed

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1993-05-01

    Viral antigens are presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by H-2-restricted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoproteins. Binding of the endogenously processed viral peptides (epitopes) to their specific MHC molecules is an early intracellular event in the recognition process and is necessary for subsequent killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs. It is now well established that interaction between a viral antigenic peptide and MHC is dependent on the primary structure (length and amino acid sequence) of that antigen. Here we show, using the H-2Db-restricted epitope GP277-286 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as a model, that the secondary structure (conformation) of the viral sequence also plays a crucial role in the binding of a viral antigen to MHC glycoprotein and in its subsequent presentation to virus-specific CTLs.

  10. Virus and cytotoxic T lymphocytes: crucial role of viral peptide secondary structure in major histocompatibility complex class I interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Gairin, J E; Oldstone, M B

    1993-01-01

    Viral antigens are presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by H-2-restricted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoproteins. Binding of the endogenously processed viral peptides (epitopes) to their specific MHC molecules is an early intracellular event in the recognition process and is necessary for subsequent killing of virus-infected cells by virus-specific CTLs. It is now well established that interaction between a viral antigenic peptide and MHC is dependent on the primary structure (length and amino acid sequence) of that antigen. Here we show, using the H-2Db-restricted epitope GP277-286 of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as a model, that the secondary structure (conformation) of the viral sequence also plays a crucial role in the binding of a viral antigen to MHC glycoprotein and in its subsequent presentation to virus-specific CTLs. PMID:7682632

  11. Structure and mechanism of a Na+-independent amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Paul L; Goehring, April; Shankaranarayanan, Aruna; Gouaux, Eric

    2009-08-21

    Amino acid, polyamine, and organocation (APC) transporters are secondary transporters that play essential roles in nutrient uptake, neurotransmitter recycling, ionic homeostasis, and regulation of cell volume. Here, we present the crystal structure of apo-ApcT, a proton-coupled broad-specificity amino acid transporter, at 2.35 angstrom resolution. The structure contains 12 transmembrane helices, with the first 10 consisting of an inverted structural repeat of 5 transmembrane helices like the leucine transporter LeuT. The ApcT structure reveals an inward-facing, apo state and an amine moiety of lysine-158 located in a position equivalent to the sodium ion site Na2 of LeuT. We propose that lysine-158 is central to proton-coupled transport and that the amine group serves the same functional role as the Na2 ion in LeuT, thus demonstrating common principles among proton- and sodium-coupled transporters.

  12. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  13. Terpenylic acid and related compounds: precursors for dimers in secondary organic aerosol from the ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmeen, F.; Vermeylen, R.; Szmigielski, R.; Iinuma, Y.; Böge, O.; Herrmann, H.; Maenhaut, W.; Claeys, M.

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, we have characterized the structure of a higher-molecular weight (MW) 358 α- and β-pinene dimeric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) product that received ample attention in previous molecular characterization studies and has been elusive. Based on mass spectrometric evidence for deprotonated molecules formed by electrospray ionization in the negative ion mode and chemical considerations, it is suggested that diaterpenylic acid is a key monomeric intermediate for dimers of the ester type. It is proposed that cis-pinic acid is esterified with the hydroxyl-containing diaterpenylic acid, which can be explained through acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the recently elucidated lactone-containing terpenylic acid and/or diaterpenylic acid acetate, both first-generation oxidation products. To a minor extent, higher-MW 358 and 344 diester products are formed containing other terpenoic acids as monomeric units, i.e., diaterpenylic acid instead of cis-pinic acid, and diaterebic acid instead of diaterpenylic acid. It is shown that the MW 358 diester and related MW 344 compounds, which can be regarded as processed SOA products, also occur in ambient fine (PM2.5) rural aerosol collected at night during the warm period of the 2006 summer field campaign conducted at K-puszta, Hungary, a rural site with coniferous vegetation. This indicates that, under ambient conditions, the higher-MW diesters are formed in the particle phase over a longer time-scale than that required for gas-to-particle partitioning of their monomeric precursors in laboratory α-/β-pinene ozonolysis experiments.

  14. Prediction of protein secondary structure from circular dichroism using theoretically derived spectra.

    PubMed

    Louis-Jeune, Caroline; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol

    2012-02-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is a spectroscopic technique commonly used to investigate the structure of proteins. Major secondary structure types, alpha-helices and beta-strands, produce distinctive CD spectra. Thus, by comparing the CD spectrum of a protein of interest to a reference set consisting of CD spectra of proteins of known structure, predictive methods can estimate the secondary structure of the protein. Currently available methods, including K2D2, use such experimental CD reference sets, which are very small in size when compared to the number of tertiary structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Conversely, given a PDB structure, it is possible to predict a theoretical CD spectrum from it. The methodological framework for this calculation was established long ago but only recently a convenient implementation called DichroCalc has been developed. In this study, we set to determine whether theoretically derived spectra could be used as reference set for accurate CD based predictions of secondary structure. We used DichroCalc to calculate the theoretical CD spectra of a nonredundant set of structures representing most proteins in the PDB, and applied a straightforward approach for predicting protein secondary structure content using these theoretical CD spectra as reference set. We show that this method improves the predictions, particularly for the wavelength interval between 200 and 240 nm and for beta-strand content. We have implemented this method, called K2D3, in a publicly accessible web server at http://www. ogic.ca/projects/k2d3. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Flow structure in submarine meandering channels, a continuous discussion on secondary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, J. D.; Parker, G.; Sequeiros, O.; Spinewine, B.; Garcia, M. H.; Pirmez, C.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the flow structure in deep-sea turbidity currents is important for the formation of submarine meandering channels. Similarly to the case of subaerial channels, several types of secondary flows include turbulence-, curvature- and bed morphodynamic-driven flow structures that modulate sediment transport and channel bed morphodynamics. This study focuses on [1] a review of long-time research effort (Abad et al., 2011) that tackles the description of the secondary flow associated with a subaqueous bottom current (saline) in a high-curvature meandering channel and [2] ongoing numerical simulations of similar settings as the experiments to describe the entire flow structure. In the case of subaerial channels, the classical Rozovskiian paradigm is often invoked which indicates that the near-bottom secondary flow in a bend is directed inward. It has recently been suggested based on experimental and theoretical considerations, however, that this pattern is reversed (near-bottom secondary flow is directed outward) in the case of submarine meandering channels. Experimental results presented here, on the other hand, indicate near-bottom secondary flows that have the same direction as observed in a river (normal secondary flow). The implication is an apparent contradiction between experimental results. This study combines theory, experiments, reconstructions of field flows and ongoing simulations to resolve this apparent contradiction based on the flow densimetric Froude number. Three ranges of densimetric Froude number are found, such that a) in an upper regime, secondary flow is reversed, b) in a middle regime, it is normal and c) in a lower regime, it is reversed. These results are applied to field scale channel-forming turbidity currents in the Amazon submarine canyon-fan system (Amazon Channel) and the Monterey canyon and a saline underflow in the Black Sea flowing from the Bosphorus. Our analysis indicates that secondary flow should be normal

  16. Exact calculation of loop formation probability identifies folding motifs in RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2016-12-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction is widely used to analyze RNA sequences. In an RNA partition function calculation, free energy nearest neighbor parameters are used in a dynamic programming algorithm to estimate statistical properties of the secondary structure ensemble. Previously, partition functions have largely been used to estimate the probability that a given pair of nucleotides form a base pair, the conditional stacking probability, the accessibility to binding of a continuous stretch of nucleotides, or a representative sample of RNA structures. Here it is demonstrated that an RNA partition function can also be used to calculate the exact probability of formation of hairpin loops, internal loops, bulge loops, or multibranch loops at a given position. This calculation can also be used to estimate the probability of formation of specific helices. Benchmarking on a set of RNA sequences with known secondary structures indicated that loops that were calculated to be more probable were more likely to be present in the known structure than less probable loops. Furthermore, highly probable loops are more likely to be in the known structure than the set of loops predicted in the lowest free energy structures. © 2016 Sloma and Mathews; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. RNA secondary structure modeling at consistent high accuracy using differential SHAPE.

    PubMed

    Rice, Greggory M; Leonard, Christopher W; Weeks, Kevin M

    2014-06-01

    RNA secondary structure modeling is a challenging problem, and recent successes have raised the standards for accuracy, consistency, and tractability. Large increases in accuracy have been achieved by including data on reactivity toward chemical probes: Incorporation of 1M7 SHAPE reactivity data into an mfold-class algorithm results in median accuracies for base pair prediction that exceed 90%. However, a few RNA structures are modeled with significantly lower accuracy. Here, we show that incorporating differential reactivities from the NMIA and 1M6 reagents--which detect noncanonical and tertiary interactions--into prediction algorithms results in highly accurate secondary structure models for RNAs that were previously shown to be difficult to model. For these RNAs, 93% of accepted canonical base pairs were recovered in SHAPE-directed models. Discrepancies between accepted and modeled structures were small and appear to reflect genuine structural differences. Three-reagent SHAPE-directed modeling scales concisely to structurally complex RNAs to resolve the in-solution secondary structure analysis problem for many classes of RNA.

  18. Evolution of aptamers with a new specificity and new secondary structures from an ATP aptamer

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, ZHEN; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2003-01-01

    Small changes in target specificity can sometimes be achieved, without changing aptamer structure, through mutation of a few bases. Larger changes in target geometry or chemistry may require more radical changes in an aptamer. In the latter case, it is unknown whether structural and functional solutions can still be found in the region of sequence space close to the original aptamer. To investigate these questions, we designed an in vitro selection experiment aimed at evolving specificity of an ATP aptamer. The ATP aptamer makes contacts with both the nucleobase and the sugar. We used an affinity matrix in which GTP was immobilized through the sugar, thus requiring extensive changes in or loss of sugar contact, as well as changes in recognition of the nucleobase. After just five rounds of selection, the pool was dominated by new aptamers falling into three major classes, each with secondary structures distinct from that of the ATP aptamer. The average sequence identity between the original aptamer and new aptamers is 76%. Most of the mutations appear to play roles either in disrupting the original secondary structure or in forming the new secondary structure or the new recognition loops. Our results show that there are novel structures that recognize a significantly different ligand in the region of sequence space close to the ATP aptamer. These examples of the emergence of novel functions and structures from an RNA molecule with a defined specificity and fold provide a new perspective on the evolutionary flexibility and adaptability of RNA. PMID:14624002

  19. RNA secondary structure modeling at consistent high accuracy using differential SHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Greggory M.; Leonard, Christopher W.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structure modeling is a challenging problem, and recent successes have raised the standards for accuracy, consistency, and tractability. Large increases in accuracy have been achieved by including data on reactivity toward chemical probes: Incorporation of 1M7 SHAPE reactivity data into an mfold-class algorithm results in median accuracies for base pair prediction that exceed 90%. However, a few RNA structures are modeled with significantly lower accuracy. Here, we show that incorporating differential reactivities from the NMIA and 1M6 reagents—which detect noncanonical and tertiary interactions—into prediction algorithms results in highly accurate secondary structure models for RNAs that were previously shown to be difficult to model. For these RNAs, 93% of accepted canonical base pairs were recovered in SHAPE-directed models. Discrepancies between accepted and modeled structures were small and appear to reflect genuine structural differences. Three-reagent SHAPE-directed modeling scales concisely to structurally complex RNAs to resolve the in-solution secondary structure analysis problem for many classes of RNA. PMID:24742934

  20. The influence of ignoring secondary structure on divergence time estimates from ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Dohrmann, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Genes coding for ribosomal RNA molecules (rDNA) are among the most popular markers in molecular phylogenetics and evolution. However, coevolution of sites that code for pairing regions (stems) in the RNA secondary structure can make it challenging to obtain accurate results from such loci. While the influence of ignoring secondary structure on multiple sequence alignment and tree topology has been investigated in numerous studies, its effect on molecular divergence time estimates is still poorly known. Here, I investigate this issue in Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (BMCMC) and penalized likelihood (PL) frameworks, using empirical datasets from dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera) and glass sponges (Porifera: Hexactinellida). My results indicate that highly biased inferences under substitution models that ignore secondary structure only occur if maximum-likelihood estimates of branch lengths are used as input to PL dating, whereas in a BMCMC framework and in PL dating based on Bayesian consensus branch lengths, the effect is far less severe. I conclude that accounting for coevolution of paired sites in molecular dating studies is not as important as previously suggested, as long as the estimates are based on Bayesian consensus branch lengths instead of ML point estimates. This finding is especially relevant for studies where computational limitations do not allow the use of secondary-structure specific substitution models, or where accurate consensus structures cannot be predicted. I also found that the magnitude and direction (over- vs. underestimating node ages) of bias in age estimates when secondary structure is ignored was not distributed randomly across the nodes of the phylogenies, a phenomenon that requires further investigation.

  1. Aliphatic structure of humic acids; a clue to their origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Maciel, G.E.; Dennis, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (both 1H and 13C) of humic acids from diverse depositional environments indicate the presence of aromatic chemical structures, most likely derived from lignin of vascular plants, and complex, paraffinic structures, most likely derived from algal or microbial sources. The latter components account for a major fraction of humic acid structures in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, suggesting that algae or microbes play a large role in humification of organic remains from both systems. ?? 1981.

  2. Extracting Infrared Spectra of Protein Secondary Structures Using a Library of Protein Spectra and the Ramachandran Plot.

    PubMed

    Coe, James V; Nystrom, Steven V; Chen, Zhaomin; Li, Ran; Verreault, Dominique; Hitchcock, Charles L; Martin, Edward W; Allen, Heather C

    2015-10-15

    Infrared (IR) spectra from 1200 to 1800 cm(-1) of the pure α-helix and β-sheet secondary structures have been extracted using a covariant least-squares procedure which relates a library of 40 infrared (IR) solution protein spectra from the work of Dong, Carpenter, and Caughey and amino acid fractions of the proteins based on assignments by STRIDE (secondary structure identification) of Eisenhaber and Argos. The excitonic splitting of the β-sheet structures is determined for this library of solution proteins. The method is extended to find a set of spectral basis functions that analyze IR spectra of protein samples for α-helix and β-sheet content. A rigorous error analysis including covariance, the correlations between the input library spectra, was used to justify the results and avoid less meaningful results. The utility of the results on α-helix and β-sheet regions is demonstrated by detecting protein changes due to cancer in imaging Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectra of liver tissue slices. This work ends with a method to extract IR spectra of less prominent torsional angle distributions.

  3. Understanding of Relation Structures of Graphical Models by Lower Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Buuren, Onne; Heck, André; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2016-01-01

    A learning path has been developed on system dynamical graphical modelling, integrated into the Dutch lower secondary physics curriculum. As part of the developmental research for this learning path, students' understanding of the relation structures shown in the diagrams of graphical system dynamics based models has been investigated. One of our…

  4. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA.

  5. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  6. The Turn of the Screw: An Exercise in Protein Secondary Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikaart, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An exercise using simple paper strips to illustrate protein helical and sheet secondary structures is presented. Drawing on the rich historical context of the use of physical models in protein biochemistry by early practitioners, in particular Linus Pauling, the purpose of this activity is to cultivate in students a hands-on, intuitive sense of…

  7. Classroom Structure and Teacher Efficacy in Serving Students with Disabilities: Differences in Elementary and Secondary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Margaret E.; Flores, Margaret M.; Crites, Steven A.; Patterson, DaShaunda; Ramsey, Michelle L.; Houchins, David E.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differential classroom structure and efficacy reported by general and special educators at the elementary and secondary level. General and special educators (n = 774, return rate of 37%) from a large school district in the southeast US participated in the study. The participants completed a modified…

  8. Secondary School Students' Understanding of Mathematical Induction: Structural Characteristics and the Process of Proof Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palla, Marina; Potari, Despina; Spyrou, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the meaning students attribute to the structure of mathematical induction (MI) and the process of proof construction using mathematical induction in the context of a geometric recursion problem. Two hundred and thirteen 17-year-old students of an upper secondary school in Greece participated in the study. Students'…

  9. Secondary School Students' Understanding of Mathematical Induction: Structural Characteristics and the Process of Proof Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palla, Marina; Potari, Despina; Spyrou, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the meaning students attribute to the structure of mathematical induction (MI) and the process of proof construction using mathematical induction in the context of a geometric recursion problem. Two hundred and thirteen 17-year-old students of an upper secondary school in Greece participated in the study. Students'…

  10. Topology and Secondary Structure of the N-terminal Domain of Diacylglycerol Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Soennichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2002-09-28

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) functions as a homotrimer of 13 kDa subunits, each of which has three transmembrane segments. This enzyme is conditionally essential to some bacteria and serves as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, stability, folding, and misfolding. In this work, the detailed topology and secondary structure of DAGKs N-terminus up through the loop

  11. Chinese American Post-Secondary Achievement and Attainment: A Cultural and Structural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Richard R.; Lin, Zeng

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors compare Chinese American post-secondary educational attainment with that of White Americans and, in identifying those factors that most strongly account for success, argue that commonalities exist among social structural factors, while distinct differences are evident among cultural capital factors. The article rejects…

  12. Chinese American Post-Secondary Achievement and Attainment: A Cultural and Structural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Richard R.; Lin, Zeng

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors compare Chinese American post-secondary educational attainment with that of White Americans and, in identifying those factors that most strongly account for success, argue that commonalities exist among social structural factors, while distinct differences are evident among cultural capital factors. The article rejects…

  13. Understanding of Relation Structures of Graphical Models by Lower Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Buuren, Onne; Heck, André; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2016-01-01

    A learning path has been developed on system dynamical graphical modelling, integrated into the Dutch lower secondary physics curriculum. As part of the developmental research for this learning path, students' understanding of the relation structures shown in the diagrams of graphical system dynamics based models has been investigated. One of our…

  14. The Turn of the Screw: An Exercise in Protein Secondary Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikaart, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An exercise using simple paper strips to illustrate protein helical and sheet secondary structures is presented. Drawing on the rich historical context of the use of physical models in protein biochemistry by early practitioners, in particular Linus Pauling, the purpose of this activity is to cultivate in students a hands-on, intuitive sense of…

  15. Dynalign II: common secondary structure prediction for RNA homologs with domain insertions

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yinghan; Sharma, Gaurav; Mathews, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous non-coding RNAs frequently exhibit domain insertions, where a branch of secondary structure is inserted in a sequence with respect to its homologs. Dynamic programming algorithms for common secondary structure prediction of multiple RNA homologs, however, do not account for these domain insertions. This paper introduces a novel dynamic programming algorithm methodology that explicitly accounts for the possibility of inserted domains when predicting common RNA secondary structures. The algorithm is implemented as Dynalign II, an update to the Dynalign software package for predicting the common secondary structure of two RNA homologs. This update is accomplished with negligible increase in computational cost. Benchmarks on ncRNA families with domain insertions validate the method. Over base pairs occurring in inserted domains, Dynalign II improves accuracy over Dynalign, attaining 80.8% sensitivity (compared with 14.4% for Dynalign) and 91.4% positive predictive value (PPV) for tRNA; 66.5% sensitivity (compared with 38.9% for Dynalign) and 57.0% PPV for RNase P RNA; and 50.1% sensitivity (compared with 24.3% for Dynalign) and 58.5% PPV for SRP RNA. Compared with Dynalign, Dynalign II also exhibits statistically significant improvements in overall sensitivity and PPV. Dynalign II is available as a component of RNAstructure, which can be downloaded from http://rna.urmc.rochester.edu/RNAstructure.html. PMID:25416799

  16. PHD--an automatic mail server for protein secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rost, B; Sander, C; Schneider, R

    1994-02-01

    By the middle of 1993, > 30,000 protein sequences has been listed. For 1000 of these, the three-dimensional (tertiary) structure has been experimentally solved. Another 7000 can be modelled by homology. For the remaining 21,000 sequences, secondary structure prediction provides a rough estimate of structural features. Predictions in three states range between 35% (random) and 88% (homology modelling) overall accuracy. Using information about evolutionary conservation as contained in multiple sequence alignments, the secondary structure of 4700 protein sequences was predicted by the automatic e-mail server PHD. For proteins with at least one known homologue, the method has an expected overall three-state accuracy of 71.4% for proteins with at least one known homologue (evaluated on 126 unique protein chains).

  17. Secondary structures of rRNAs from all three domains of life.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Anton S; Bernier, Chad R; Gulen, Burak; Waterbury, Chris C; Hershkovits, Eli; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Harvey, Stephen C; Hud, Nicholas V; Fox, George E; Wartell, Roger M; Williams, Loren Dean

    2014-01-01

    Accurate secondary structures are important for understanding ribosomes, which are extremely large and highly complex. Using 3D structures of ribosomes as input, we have revised and corrected traditional secondary (2°) structures of rRNAs. We identify helices by specific geometric and molecular interaction criteria, not by co-variation. The structural approach allows us to incorporate non-canonical base pairs on parity with Watson-Crick base pairs. The resulting rRNA 2° structures are up-to-date and consistent with three-dimensional structures, and are information-rich. These 2° structures are relatively simple to understand and are amenable to reproduction and modification by end-users. The 2° structures made available here broadly sample the phylogenetic tree and are mapped with a variety of data related to molecular interactions and geometry, phylogeny and evolution. We have generated 2° structures for both large subunit (LSU) 23S/28S and small subunit (SSU) 16S/18S rRNAs of Escherichia coli, Thermus thermophilus, Haloarcula marismortui (LSU rRNA only), Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens. We provide high-resolution editable versions of the 2° structures in several file formats. For the SSU rRNA, the 2° structures use an intuitive representation of the central pseudoknot where base triples are presented as pairs of base pairs. Both LSU and SSU secondary maps are available (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RibosomeGallery). Mapping of data onto 2° structures was performed on the RiboVision server (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RiboVision).

  18. Computational simulations of protein folding to engineer amino acid sequences to encourage desired supersecondary structure formation.

    PubMed

    Gerstman, Bernard S; Chapagain, Prem P

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of protein folding are complicated because of the various types of amino acid interactions that create secondary, supersecondary, and tertiary interactions. Computational modeling can be used to simulate the biophysical and biochemical interactions that determine protein folding. Effective folding to a desired protein configuration requires a compromise between speed, stability, and specificity. If the primary sequence of amino acids emphasizes one of these characteristics, the others might suffer and the folding process may not be optimized. We provide an example of a model peptide whose primary sequence produces a highly stable supersecondary two-helix bundle structure, but at the expense of lower speed and specificity of the folding process. We show how computational simulations can be used to discover the configuration of the kinetic trap that causes the degradation in the speed and specificity of folding. We also show how amino acid sequences can be engineered by specific substitutions to optimize the folding to the desired supersecondary structure.

  19. Deciphering the rules by which dynamics of mRNA secondary structure affect translation efficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuanhui; Liu, HuiLing; Liu, Yanlin; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-04-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) secondary structure decreases the elongation rate, as ribosomes must unwind every structure they encounter during translation. Therefore, the strength of mRNA secondary structure is assumed to be reduced in highly translated mRNAs. However, previous studies in vitro reported a positive correlation between mRNA folding strength and protein abundance. The counterintuitive finding suggests that mRNA secondary structure affects translation efficiency in an undetermined manner. Here, we analyzed the folding behavior of mRNA during translation and its effect on translation efficiency. We simulated translation process based on a novel computational model, taking into account the interactions among ribosomes, codon usage and mRNA secondary structures. We showed that mRNA secondary structure shortens ribosomal distance through the dynamics of folding strength. Notably, when adjacent ribosomes are close, mRNA secondary structures between them disappear, and codon usage determines the elongation rate. More importantly, our results showed that the combined effect of mRNA secondary structure and codon usage in highly translated mRNAs causes a short ribosomal distance in structural regions, which in turn eliminates the structures during translation, leading to a high elongation rate. Together, these findings reveal how the dynamics of mRNA secondary structure coupling with codon usage affect translation efficiency.

  20. Mycosporines and mycosporine-like amino acids: UV protectants or multipurpose secondary metabolites?

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2007-04-01

    Mycosporines and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are low-molecular-weight water-soluble molecules absorbing UV radiation in the wavelength range 310-365 nm. They are accumulated by a wide range of microorganisms, prokaryotic (cyanobacteria) as well as eukaryotic (microalgae, yeasts, and fungi), and a variety of marine macroalgae, corals, and other marine life forms. The role that MAAs play as sunscreen compounds to protect against damage by harmful levels of UV radiation is well established. However, evidence is accumulating that MAAs may have additional functions: they may serve as antioxidant molecules scavenging toxic oxygen radicals, they can be accumulated as compatible solutes following salt stress, their formation is induced by desiccation or by thermal stress in certain organisms, they have been suggested to function as an accessory light-harvesting pigment in photosynthesis or as an intracellular nitrogen reservoir, and they are involved in fungal reproduction. Here, the evidence for these additional roles of MAAs as 'multipurpose' secondary metabolites is reviewed, with special emphasis on their functions in the microbial world.

  1. Chemical probing of adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.M.; Lockard, R.E.

    1988-01-26

    The location of unpaired adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA was determined by chemical probing. Naked /sup 18/S rRNA was first prepared by digestion of purified 40S subunits with matrix-bound proteinase K in sodium dodecyl sulfate, thereby omitting the use of nucleic acid denaturants. Adenines within naked /sup 18/S rRNA were chemically probed by using either diethyl pyrocarbonate or dimethyl sulfate, which specifically react with unpaired nucleotides. Adenine modification sites were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis either upon aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact and fragmented rRNA or by primer extension using sequence-specific DNA oligomers with reverse transcriptase. The data indicate good agreement between the general pattern of adenine reactivity and the location of unpaired regions in /sup 18/S rRNA determined by comparative sequence analysis. The overall reactivity of adenine residues toward single-strand-specific chemical probes was, also, similar for both rabbit and Escherichia coli small rRNA. The number of strongly reactive adenines appearing within phylogenetically determined helical segments, however, was greater in rabbit /sup 18/S rRNA than for E. coli /sup 16/S rRNA. Some of these adenines were found clustered in specific helices. Such differences suggest a greater irregularity of many of the helical elements within mammalian /sup 18/S rRNA, as compared with prokaryotic /sup 16/S rRNA. These helical irregularities could be important for protein association and also may represent biologically relevant flexible regions of the molecule.

  2. From Sequences to Shapes and Back: A Case Study in RNA Secondary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Peter; Fontana, Walter; Stadler, Peter F.; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    1994-03-01

    RNA folding is viewed here as a map assigning secondary structures to sequences. At fixed chain length the number of sequences far exceeds the number of structures. Frequencies of structures are highly non-uniform and follow a generalized form of Zipf's law: we find relatively few common and many rare ones. By using an algorithm for inverse folding, we show that sequences sharing the same structure are distributed randomly over sequence space. All common structures can be accessed from an arbitrary sequence by a number of mutations much smaller than the chain length. The sequence space is percolated by extensive neutral networks connecting nearest neighbours folding into identical structures. Implications for evolutionary adaptation and for applied molecular evolution are evident: finding a particular structure by mutation and selection is much simpler than expected and, even if catalytic activity should turn out to be sparse in the space of RNA structures, it can hardly be missed by evolutionary processes.

  3. Mutually exclusive RNA secondary structures regulate translation initiation of DinQ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Knut I; Weel-Sneve, Ragnhild; Booth, James A; Bjørås, Magnar

    2016-11-01

    Protein translation can be affected by changes in the secondary structure of mRNA. The dinQ gene in Escherichia coli encodes a primary transcript (+1) that is inert to translation. Ribonucleolytic removal of the 44 first nucleotides converts the +1 transcript into a translationally active form, but the mechanism behind this structural change is unknown. Here we present experimental evidence for a mechanism where alternative RNA secondary structures in the two dinQ mRNA variants affect translation initiation by mediating opening or closing of the ribosome binding sequence. This structural switch is determined by alternative interactions of four sequence elements within the dinQ mRNA and also by the agrB antisense RNA. Additionally, the structural conformation of +1 dinQ suggests a locking mechanism comprised of an RNA stem that both stabilizes and prevents translation initiation from the full-length dinQ transcript. BLAST search and multiple sequence alignments define a new family of dinQ-like genes widespread in Enterobacteriaceae with close RNA sequence similarities in their 5' untranslated regions. Thus, it appears that a whole new family of genes is regulated by the same mechanism of alternative secondary RNA structures. © 2016 Kristiansen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Evaluation of several lightweight stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Robin D; Eddy, Sean R

    2004-01-01

    Background RNA secondary structure prediction methods based on probabilistic modeling can be developed using stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs). Such methods can readily combine different sources of information that can be expressed probabilistically, such as an evolutionary model of comparative RNA sequence analysis and a biophysical model of structure plausibility. However, the number of free parameters in an integrated model for consensus RNA structure prediction can become untenable if the underlying SCFG design is too complex. Thus a key question is, what small, simple SCFG designs perform best for RNA secondary structure prediction? Results Nine different small SCFGs were implemented to explore the tradeoffs between model complexity and prediction accuracy. Each model was tested for single sequence structure prediction accuracy on a benchmark set of RNA secondary structures. Conclusions Four SCFG designs had prediction accuracies near the performance of current energy minimization programs. One of these designs, introduced by Knudsen and Hein in their PFOLD algorithm, has only 21 free parameters and is significantly simpler than the others. PMID:15180907

  5. Secondary structure of RNA from bacteriophages f2 Qbeta, and PP7.

    PubMed Central

    Edlind, T D; Bassel, A R

    1977-01-01

    Electron microscopy of RNA-protein monolayers prepared under partial denaturing conditions has been used to compare the secondary structure of coliphage f2 and Qbeta and Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PP7 RNAs. The secondary structure map of f2 RNA contains a central open loop and four symmetrically placed hairpins, which is similar to the pattern reported by Jacobson (A. B. Jacobson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 73:307-311, 1976) for the closely related phage MS2. With the same denaturing conditions, Qbeta RNA, which is 20% larger than f2 or PP7 RNA, has a central open loop and a smaller terminal loop. PP7 RNA has two large, closed secondary structures, one of which is nearly central. The base composition of PP7 RNA was determined and is similar to that of the group I coliphage RNAs. Thus, the greater amount of large base-paired structure is not related to an increased guanine-plus-cytosine content of PP7 RNA. With increased denaturing conditions, the central, closed structure of PP7 RNA is converted into an open loop. The central structures of all three phages include about 700 nucleotides. The rele