Science.gov

Sample records for acid secondary structures

  1. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  2. Computation of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Kitamura, Y; Yoshikura, H

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a computer analysis of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids. For a given single stranded nucleic acid, we generated "structure map" which included all the annealing structures in the sequence. The map was transformed into "energy map" by rough approximation; here, the energy level of every pairing structure consisting of more than 2 successive nucleic acid pairs was calculated. By using the "energy map", the probability of occurrence of each annealed structure was computed, i.e., the structure was computed statistically. The basis of computation was the 8-queen problem in the chess game. The validity of our computer programme was checked by computing tRNA structure which has been well established. Successful application of this programme to small nuclear RNAs of various origins is demonstrated. PMID:6198622

  3. New charge-bearing amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Stacy J; Almeida, Aaron M; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-11-26

    Proteinogenic amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure are hydrophobic (e.g., Ile or Val) or only moderately polar (e.g., Thr). The design of peptides intended to display β-sheet secondary structure in water typically requires one set of residues to ensure conformational stability and an orthogonal set, with charged side chains, to ensure aqueous solubility and discourage self-association. Here we describe new amino acids that manifest substantial β-sheet propensity, by virtue of β-branching, and also bear an ionizable group in the side chain. PMID:25393077

  4. Pattern recognition in nucleic acid sequences. II. An efficient method for finding locally stable secondary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I; Goad, W B

    1982-01-01

    We present a method for calculating all possible single hairpin loop secondary structures in a nucleic acid sequence by the order of N2 operations where N is the total number of bases. Each structure may contain any number of bulges and internal loops. Most natural sequences are found to be indistinguishable from random sequences in the potential of forming secondary structures, which is defined by the frequency of possible secondary structures calculated by the method. There is a strong correlation between the higher G+C content and the higher structure forming potential. Interestingly, the removal of intervening sequences in mRNAs is almost always accompanied by an increase in the G+C content, which may suggest an involvement of structural stabilization in the mRNA maturation. PMID:6174936

  5. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  6. Reactivity of molybdovanadophosphoric acids: Influence of the presence of vanadium in the primary and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casarini, D.; Centi, G.; Lena, V.; Tvaruzkova, Z. ); Jiru, P. )

    1993-10-01

    The catalytic behavior in butadiene and n-butane oxidation of molybdovanadophosphoric acids with vanadium localized inside the primary (oxoanion) and/or the secondary structure is reported. The samples are characterized by infrared, [sup 31]P-NMR, [sup 51]V-NMR, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopies in order to obtain information on the nature and localization of vanadium in the samples before reaction and the possible changes occurring during the course of the catalytic reaction. In particular, it is shown that vanadium localized initially in the secondary structure can exchange with the molybdenum atoms of the oxoanion during the catalytic reaction. Introduction of vanadium in the molybdophosphoric acid structure enhances the selective formation of maleic anhydride from the butadiene when vanadium is present both inside the oxoanion or localized in the secondary structure (before the catalytic tests), but the maximum in catalytic performance is found for different amounts of vanadium, depending on where the vanadium is localized initially. However, when present in the secondary structure, vanadium also has a negative influence on the activity of the heteropoly acid. On the contrary, in n-butane oxidation, the presence of vanadium enhances the rate of alkane activation due to the different rate-determining step. The presence of V ions also affects the maximum selectivity and yield to maleic anhydride from butane. V ions in the secondary structure are more selective at low conversion, while V ions inside the oxoanion are more selective at higher conversions and thus allow better maximum yields to maleic anhydride. 40 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Computer-aided nucleic acid secondary structure modeling incorporating enzymatic digestion data.

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, G J; Gehrke, L; Roth, D A; Auron, P E

    1984-01-01

    We present a computer-aided method for determining nucleic acid secondary structure. The method utilizes a program which has the capability to filter matrix diagonal data on the basis of diagonal length, stabilization energy, and chemical and enzymatic data. The program also allows the user to assign selected regions of the structure as uniquely single-stranded or paired, and to filter out "trade-off" structures on the basis of such pairing. In order to demonstrate the utility of the program we present a preliminary secondary structure for the 3' end of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 (AMV-4 RNA). This structure is based on an analysis which includes the use of in vitro partial enzymatic digestion of the RNA. Images PMID:6320093

  8. TMPyP4, a Stabilizer of Nucleic Acid Secondary Structure, Is a Novel Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nana; Mazzola, Michael; Cai, Elizabeth; Wang, Meng; Cave, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrin compound, TMPyP4 (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphine), is widely used as a photosensitizer and a modulator of nucleic acid secondary structure stability. Our group recently showed in cultured cells and forebrain slice cultures that this compound can also down regulate expression of Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, by stabilizing DNA secondary structures in the Th proximal promoter. The current study sought to establish whether treatment with TMPyP4 could modify mouse Th expression levels in vivo. Intraperitoneal administration of low TMPyP4 doses (10mg/kg), similar to those used for photosensitization, did not significantly reduce Th transcript levels in several catecholaminergic regions. Administration of a high dose (40 mg/kg), similar to those used for tumor xenograph reduction, unexpectedly induced flaccid paralysis in an age and sex-dependent manner. In vitro analyses revealed that TMPyP4, but not putative metabolites, inhibited Acetylcholinesterase activity and pre-treatment of TMPyP4 with Hemeoxygenase-2 (HO-2) rescued Acetylcholinesterase function. Age-dependent differences in HO-2 expression levels may account for some of the variable in vivo effects of high TMPyP4 doses. Together, these studies indicate that only low doses of TMPyP4, such as those typically used for photosensitization, are well tolerated in vivo. Thus, despite its widespread use in vitro, TMPyP4 is not ideal for modifying neuronal gene expression in vivo by manipulating nucleic acid secondary structure stability, which highlights the need to identify more clinically suitable compounds that can modulate nucleic acid secondary structure and gene expression. PMID:26402367

  9. TMPyP4, a Stabilizer of Nucleic Acid Secondary Structure, Is a Novel Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nana; Mazzola, Michael; Cai, Elizabeth; Wang, Meng; Cave, John W

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrin compound, TMPyP4 (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphine), is widely used as a photosensitizer and a modulator of nucleic acid secondary structure stability. Our group recently showed in cultured cells and forebrain slice cultures that this compound can also down regulate expression of Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, by stabilizing DNA secondary structures in the Th proximal promoter. The current study sought to establish whether treatment with TMPyP4 could modify mouse Th expression levels in vivo. Intraperitoneal administration of low TMPyP4 doses (10mg/kg), similar to those used for photosensitization, did not significantly reduce Th transcript levels in several catecholaminergic regions. Administration of a high dose (40 mg/kg), similar to those used for tumor xenograph reduction, unexpectedly induced flaccid paralysis in an age and sex-dependent manner. In vitro analyses revealed that TMPyP4, but not putative metabolites, inhibited Acetylcholinesterase activity and pre-treatment of TMPyP4 with Hemeoxygenase-2 (HO-2) rescued Acetylcholinesterase function. Age-dependent differences in HO-2 expression levels may account for some of the variable in vivo effects of high TMPyP4 doses. Together, these studies indicate that only low doses of TMPyP4, such as those typically used for photosensitization, are well tolerated in vivo. Thus, despite its widespread use in vitro, TMPyP4 is not ideal for modifying neuronal gene expression in vivo by manipulating nucleic acid secondary structure stability, which highlights the need to identify more clinically suitable compounds that can modulate nucleic acid secondary structure and gene expression. PMID:26402367

  10. Structure and functional characterization of a bile acid 7α dehydratase BaiE in secondary bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L; Ridlon, Jason M; Wells, James E; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Hylemon, Phillip B; Lesley, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound [3-oxo-Δ(4,6) -lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)] complex are reported. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α + β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35, and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirm that these residues are essential for catalysis and also the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic studies reveal that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  11. Efficient detection of secondary structure folded nucleic acids related to Alzheimer's disease based on junction probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Qi, Xiu-Juan; Du, Yan-Yan; Fu, Hua-E; Chen, Guo-Nan; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Single stranded DNA often forms stable secondary structures under physiological conditions. These DNA secondary structures play important physiological roles. However, the analysis of such secondary structure folded DNA is often complicated because of its high thermodynamic stability and slow hybridization kinetics. In this article, we demonstrate that Y-shaped junction probes could be used for rapid and highly efficient detection of secondary structure folded DNA. Our approach contained a molecular beacon (MB) probe and an assistant probe. In the absence of target, the MB probe failed to hybridize with the assistant probe. Whereas, the MB probe and the assistant probe could cooperatively unwind the secondary structure folded DNA target to form a ternary Y-shaped junction structure. In this condition, the MB probe was also opened, resulting in separating the fluorophores from the quenching moiety and emitting the fluorescence signal. This approach allowed for the highly sensitive detection of secondary structure folded DNA target, such as a tau specific DNA fragment related to Alzheimer's disease in this case. Additionally, this approach showed strong SNPs identifying capability. Furthermore, it was noteworthy that this newly proposed approach was capable of detecting secondary structure folded DNA target in cell lysate samples.

  12. Structural and Functional Characterization of BaiA, An Enzyme Involved in Secondary Bile Acid Synthesis in Human Gut Microbe

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Jones, David H.; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Park, In-Hee; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Farr, Carol L.; Tien, Henry J.; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Lesley, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant influence of secondary bile acids on human health and disease, limited structural and biochemical information is available for the key gut microbial enzymes catalyzing its synthesis. Herein, we report apo- and co-factor bound crystal structures of BaiA2, a short chain dehydrogenase/reductase from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 that represent the first protein structure of this pathway. The structures elucidated the basis of co-factor specificity and mechanism of proton relay. A conformational restriction involving Glu42 located in the co-factor binding site seems crucial in determining co-factor specificity. Limited flexibility of Glu42 results in imminent steric and electrostatic hindrance with 2′-phosphate group of NADP(H). Consistent with crystal structures, steady-state kinetic characterization performed with both BaiA2 and BaiA1, a close homolog with 92% sequence identity, revealed specificity constant (kcat/KM) of NADP+ at least an order of magnitude lower than NAD+. Substitution of Glu42 with Ala improved specificity towards NADP+ by 10- fold compared to wild type. The co-factor bound structure uncovered a novel nicotinamide-hydroxyl ion (NAD+-OH−) adduct contraposing previously reported adducts. The OH− of the adduct in BaiA2 is distal to C4 atom of nicotinamide and proximal to 2′-hydroxyl group of the ribose moiety. Moreover, it is located at intermediary distances between terminal functional groups of active site residues Tyr157 (2.7 Å) and Lys161 (4.5 Å). Based on these observations we propose an involvement of NAD+-OH− adduct in proton relay instead of hydride transfer as noted for previous adducts. PMID:23836456

  13. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, K J; Yang, Y; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Hong, Mei

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D (13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, or 3D (15)N-(13)C-(13)C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40-60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO-Cα-Cβ or N-Cα-Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  14. VITAL NMR: using chemical shift derived secondary structure information for a limited set of amino acids to assess homology model accuracy.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Nesbitt, Anna E; Hallock, Michael J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G; Tang, Ming; Harris, Jason; Baudry, Jerome; Schuler, Mary A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2012-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  15. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, Michael C; Nesbitt, Anna E; Hallock, Michael J; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa; Tang, Ming; Harris, Jason B; Baudry, Jerome Y; Schuler, Mary A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  16. An algebraic representation of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Magarshak, Y; Benham, C J

    1992-12-01

    This paper develops mathematical methods for describing and analyzing RNA secondary structures. It was motivated by the need to develop rigorous yet efficient methods to treat transitions from one secondary structure to another, which we propose here may occur as motions of loops within RNAs having appropriate sequences. In this approach a molecular sequence is described as a vector of the appropriate length. The concept of symmetries between nucleic acid sequences is developed, and the 48 possible different types of symmetries are described. Each secondary structure possible for a particular nucleotide sequence determines a symmetric, signed permutation matrix. The collection of all possible secondary structures is comprised of all matrices of this type whose left multiplication with the sequence vector leaves that vector unchanged. A transition between two secondary structures is given by the product of the two corresponding structure matrices. This formalism provides an efficient method for describing nucleic acid sequences that allows questions relating to secondary structures and transitions to be addressed using the powerful methods of abstract algebra. In particular, it facilitates the determination of possible secondary structures, including those containing pseudoknots. Although this paper concentrates on RNA structure, this formalism also can be applied to DNA. PMID:1283516

  17. Redox-responsive organometallic foldamers from ferrocene amino acid: solid-phase synthesis, secondary structure and mixed-valence properties.

    PubMed

    Siebler, Daniel; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2011-04-14

    Oligoferrocenes Fmoc-Fca(n)-OMe (n=3-5) are assembled in a stepwise precise manner from Fmoc-protected ferrocene amino acid Fmoc-Fca-OH (H-Fca-OH = 1-amino-1'-ferrocene carboxylic acid; Fmoc = 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl) via amide bonds on solid supports by sequential Fmoc deprotection, acid activation and coupling steps. The resulting well-defined oligomers form ordered zigzag structures in THF solution with characteristic hydrogen bonding patterns. Electrochemical experiments reveal sequential oxidations of the individual ferrocene units in these peptides giving mixed-valent cations. Optical intervalence electron transfer is detected by intervalence transitions in the near-IR.

  18. Conserved Secondary Structures in Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Abigail Manson; Galagan, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that the number and variety of functional RNAs (ncRNAs as well as cis-acting RNA elements within mRNAs ) is much higher than previously thought; thus, the ability to computationally predict and analyze RNAs has taken on new importance. We have computationally studied the secondary structures in an alignment of six Aspergillus genomes. Little is known about the RNAs present in this set of fungi, and this diverse set of genomes has an optimal level of sequence conservation for observing the correlated evolution of base-pairs seen in RNAs. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the results of a whole-genome search for evolutionarily conserved secondary structures, as well as the results of clustering these predicted secondary structures by structural similarity. We find a total of 7450 predicted secondary structures, including a new predicted ∼60 bp long hairpin motif found primarily inside introns. We find no evidence for microRNAs. Different types of genomic regions are over-represented in different classes of predicted secondary structures. Exons contain the longest motifs (primarily long, branched hairpins), 5′ UTRs primarily contain groupings of short hairpins located near the start codon, and 3′ UTRs contain very little secondary structure compared to other regions. There is a large concentration of short hairpins just inside the boundaries of exons. The density of predicted intronic RNAs increases with the length of introns, and the density of predicted secondary structures within mRNA coding regions increases with the number of introns in a gene. Conclusions/Sigificance There are many conserved, high-confidence RNAs of unknown function in these Aspergillus genomes, as well as interesting spatial distributions of predicted secondary structures. This study increases our knowledge of secondary structure in these aspergillus organisms. PMID:18665251

  19. Secondary Structure Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  20. Secondary Structures in a Freeze-Dried Lignite Humic Acid Fraction Caused by Hydrogen-Bonding of Acidic Protons with Aromatic Rings.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Drosos, Marios; Leenheer, Jerry A; Mao, Jingdong

    2016-02-16

    A lignite humic acid (HA) was separated from inorganic and non-HA impurities (i.e., aluminosilicates, metals) and fractionated by a combination of dialysis and XAD-8 resin. Fractionation revealed a more homogeneous structure of lignite HA. New and more specific structural information on the main lignite HA fraction is obtained by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Quantitative (13)C multiple cross-polarization (multiCP) NMR indicated oxidized phenyl propane structures derived from lignin. MultiCP experiments, conducted on potassium HA salts titrated to pH 10 and pH 12, revealed shifts consistent with carboxylate and phenolate formation, but structural changes associated with enolate formation from aromatic beta keto acids were not detected. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (2D HETCOR) NMR indicated aryl-aliphatic ketones, aliphatic and aromatic carboxyl groups, phenol, and methoxy phenyl ethers. Acidic protons from carboxyl groups in both the lignite HA fraction and a synthetic HA-like polycondensate were found to be hydrogen-bonded with electron-rich aromatic rings. Our results coupled with published infrared spectra provide evidence for the preferential hydrogen bonding of acidic hydrogens with electron-rich aromatic rings rather than adjacent carbonyl groups. These hydrogen-bonding interactions likely result from stereochemical arrangements in primary structures and folding. PMID:26836017

  1. Secondary Structures in a Freeze-Dried Lignite Humic Acid Fraction Caused by Hydrogen-Bonding of Acidic Protons with Aromatic Rings.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Drosos, Marios; Leenheer, Jerry A; Mao, Jingdong

    2016-02-16

    A lignite humic acid (HA) was separated from inorganic and non-HA impurities (i.e., aluminosilicates, metals) and fractionated by a combination of dialysis and XAD-8 resin. Fractionation revealed a more homogeneous structure of lignite HA. New and more specific structural information on the main lignite HA fraction is obtained by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Quantitative (13)C multiple cross-polarization (multiCP) NMR indicated oxidized phenyl propane structures derived from lignin. MultiCP experiments, conducted on potassium HA salts titrated to pH 10 and pH 12, revealed shifts consistent with carboxylate and phenolate formation, but structural changes associated with enolate formation from aromatic beta keto acids were not detected. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (2D HETCOR) NMR indicated aryl-aliphatic ketones, aliphatic and aromatic carboxyl groups, phenol, and methoxy phenyl ethers. Acidic protons from carboxyl groups in both the lignite HA fraction and a synthetic HA-like polycondensate were found to be hydrogen-bonded with electron-rich aromatic rings. Our results coupled with published infrared spectra provide evidence for the preferential hydrogen bonding of acidic hydrogens with electron-rich aromatic rings rather than adjacent carbonyl groups. These hydrogen-bonding interactions likely result from stereochemical arrangements in primary structures and folding.

  2. Secondary structure formation in peptide amphiphile micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are capable of self-assembly into micelles for use in the targeted delivery of peptide therapeutics and diagnostics. PA micelles exhibit a structural resemblance to proteins by having folded bioactive peptides displayed on the exterior of a hydrophobic core. We have studied two factors that influence PA secondary structure in micellar assemblies: the length of the peptide headgroup and amino acids closest to the micelle core. Peptide length was systematically varied using a heptad repeat PA. For all PAs the addition of a C12 tail induced micellization and secondary structure. PAs with 9 amino acids formed beta-sheet interactions upon aggregation, whereas the 23 and 30 residue peptides were displayed in an apha-helical conformation. The 16 amino acid PA experienced a structural transition from helix to sheet, indicating that kinetics play a role in secondary structure formation. A p53 peptide was conjugated to a C16 tail via various linkers to study the effect of linker chemistry on PA headgroup conformation. With no linker the p53 headgroup was predominantly alpha helix and a four alanine linker drastically changed the structure of the peptide headgroup to beta-sheet, highlighting the importance of hydrogen boding potential near the micelle core.

  3. Fatty acid as structure directing agent for controlled secondary growth of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles to achieve mesoscale assemblies: A facile approach for developing hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, K.; Kaushik, S. D.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Deb, P.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale hierarchical assemblies have emerged out as a new class of structures between fine dimension nanoparticles and bulk structures, having distinctly different physical properties from either side. Controlling the self-assembly process of primary nanoparticles and subsequent secondary growth mechanism is the key aspect for achieving such ordered structures. In this work, we introduce a new insight on achieving hierarchical assemblies of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles based on the temporal stability of the primary nanoparticles, where, the growth and stability of the primary particles are controlled by using oleic acid. It is found that the developed particles, at a critical concentration of oleic acid, prefer a secondary growth process, rather than promoting their individual growth. Domination of the attractive hydrophobic interaction over steric repulsion among the primary particles at this critical concentration of oleic acid is found to be the key factor for the initial aggregation of the primary particles, which eventually leads to the formation of spherical hierarchical assemblies via oriented attachment. It is also realized that the extremely well or poor stability conditions of the primary particles do not allow this secondary growth process. Estimated values of Co2+ distribution factor show that the cation distribution factor of CoFe2O4 system is not affected by the nature of dominant growth processes, when these are controlled. Interestingly, magnetic measurements reflect the stronger interparticle interaction in the hierarchical system and high magnetic moment values at low magnetic field.

  4. Acid-base interactions and secondary structures of poly-L-lysine probed by 15N and 13C solid state NMR and Ab initio model calculations.

    PubMed

    Dos, Alexandra; Schimming, Volkmar; Tosoni, Sergio; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-12-11

    The interactions of the 15N-labeled amino groups of dry solid poly-L-lysine (PLL) with various halogen and oxygen acids HX and the relation to the secondary structure have been studied using solid-state 15N and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization and MAS = magic angle spinning). For comparison, 15N NMR spectra of an aqueous solution of PLL were measured as a function of pH. In order to understand the effects of protonation and hydration on the 15N chemical shifts of the amino groups, DFT and chemical shielding calculations were performed on isolated methylamine-acid complexes and on periodic halide clusters of the type (CH3NH3(+)X(-))n. The combined experimental and computational results reveal low-field shifts of the amino nitrogens upon interaction with the oxygen acids HX = HF, H2SO4, CH3COOH, (CH3)2POOH, H3PO4, HNO3, and internal carbamic acid formed by reaction of the amino groups with gaseous CO2. Evidence is obtained that only hydrogen-bonded species of the type (Lys-NH2***H-X)n are formed in the absence of water. 15N chemical shifts are maximum when H is located in the hydrogen bond center and then decrease again upon full protonation, as found for aqueous solution at low pH. By contrast, halogen acids interact in a different way. They form internal salts of the type (Lys-NH3(+)X(-))n via the interaction of many acid-base pairs. This salt formation is possible only in the beta-sheet conformation. By contrast, the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes can occur both in beta-sheet domains as well as in alpha-helical domains. The 15N chemical shifts of the protonated ammonium groups increase when the size of the interacting halogen anions is increased from chloride to iodide and when the number of the interacting anions is increased. Thus, the observed high-field 15N shift of ammonium groups upon hydration is the consequence of replacing interacting halogen atoms by oxygen atoms.

  5. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    PubMed

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/.

  6. Automatic display of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Muller, G; Gaspin, C; Etienne, A; Westhof, E

    1993-10-01

    A set of programs written in C language with the GL library and under UNIX has been developed for generating compact, pleasant and non-overlapping displays of secondary structures of ribonucleic acids. The first program, rnasearch, implements a new search procedure that dynamically rearranges overlapping portions of the two-dimensional drawing while preserving clear and readable displays of the two-dimensional structure. The algorithm is fast (the execution time for the command rnasearch is 38.6 s for the 16S rRNA of Escherichia coli with 1542 bases), accepts outputs from two-dimensional prediction programs and therefore allows for rapid comparison between the various two-dimensional folds generated. A second program, rnadisplay, allows the graphical display of the computed two-dimensional structures on a graphics workstation. Otherwise, it is possible to obtain a paper output of the two-dimensional structure by using the program print2D which builds a Postscript file. Moreover the two-dimensional drawing can be labelled for representing data coming from chemical modifications and/or enzymatic cleavages. Application to a few secondary structures such as RNaseP, 5S rRNA and 16S rRNA are given.

  7. Interrelationships among biological activity, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and metal ion binding for a chemically synthesized 34-amino-acid peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    MacColl, R; Eisele, L E; Stack, R F; Hauer, C; Vakharia, D D; Benno, A; Kelly, W C; Mizejewski, G J

    2001-10-01

    A 34-amino-acid peptide has been chemically synthesized based on a sequence from human alpha-fetoprotein. The purified peptide is active in anti-growth assays when freshly prepared in pH 7.4 buffer at 0.20 g/l, but this peptide slowly becomes inactive. This functional change is proven by mass spectrometry to be triggered by the formation of an intrapeptide disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues on the peptide. Interpeptide cross-linking does not occur. The active and inactive forms of the peptide have almost identical secondary structures as shown by circular dichroism (CD). Zinc ions bind to the active peptide and completely prevents formation of the inactive form. Cobalt(II) ions also bind to the peptide, and the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the cobalt-peptide complex shows that: (1) a near-UV sulfur-to-metal-ion charge-transfer band had a molar extinction coefficient consistent with two thiolate bonds to Co(II); (2) the lowest-energy visible d-d transition maximum at 659 nm, also, demonstrated that the two cysteine residues are ligands for the metal ion; (3) the d-d molar extinction coefficient showed that the metal ion-ligand complex was in a distorted tetrahedral symmetry. The peptide has two cysteines, and it is speculated that the other two metal ion ligands might be the two histidines. The Zn(II)- and Co(II)-peptide complexes had similar peptide conformations as indicated by their ultraviolet CD spectra, which differed very slightly from that of the free peptide. Surprisingly, the cobalt ions acted in the reverse of the zinc ions in that, instead of stabilizing anti-growth form of the peptide, they catalyzed its loss. Metal ion control of peptide function is a saliently interesting concept. Calcium ions, in the conditions studied, apparently do not bind to the peptide. Trifluoroethanol and temperature (60 degrees C) affected the secondary structure of the peptide, and the peptide was found capable of assuming various conformations in solution

  8. Improving RNA secondary structure prediction with structure mapping data.

    PubMed

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2015-01-01

    Methods to probe RNA secondary structure, such as small molecule modifying agents, secondary structure-specific nucleases, inline probing, and SHAPE chemistry, are widely used to study the structure of functional RNA. Computational secondary structure prediction programs can incorporate probing data to predict structure with high accuracy. In this chapter, an overview of current methods for probing RNA secondary structure is provided, including modern high-throughput methods. Methods for guiding secondary structure prediction algorithms using these data are explained, and best practices for using these data are provided. This chapter concludes by listing a number of open questions about how to best use probing data, and what these data can provide.

  9. Dynamics in Sequence Space for RNA Secondary Structure Design.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Marco C; Bienert, Stefan; Torda, Andrew E

    2012-10-01

    We have implemented a method for the design of RNA sequences that should fold to arbitrary secondary structures. A popular energy model allows one to take the derivative with respect to composition, which can then be interpreted as a force and used for Newtonian dynamics in sequence space. Combined with a negative design term, one can rapidly sample sequences which are compatible with a desired secondary structure via simulated annealing. Results for 360 structures were compared with those from another nucleic acid design program using measures such as the probability of the target structure and an ensemble-weighted distance to the target structure.

  10. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  11. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles). PMID:23263300

  12. Current perspectives on RNA secondary structure probing.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Julia; Prestwood, Liam; Lever, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The range of roles played by structured RNAs in biological systems is vast. At the same time as we are learning more about the importance of RNA structure, recent advances in reagents, methods and technology mean that RNA secondary structural probing has become faster and more accurate. As a result, the capabilities of laboratories that already perform this type of structural analysis have increased greatly, and it has also become more widely accessible. The present review summarizes established and recently developed techniques. The information we can derive from secondary structural analysis is assessed, together with the areas in which we are likely to see exciting developments in the near future. PMID:25110033

  13. RNA Secondary Structure Determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Turner, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic programming methods for predicting RNA secondary structure often use thermodynamics and experimental restraints and/or constraints to limit folding space. Chemical mapping results typically restrain certain nucleotides not to be in AU or GC pairs. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra can reveal the order of AU, GC, and GU pairs in double helixes. This chapter describes a program, NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure and chemical shifts (NAPSS-CS), that constrains possible secondary structures on the basis of the NMR determined order and 5'-3' direction of AU, GC, and GU pairs in helixes. NAPSS-CS minimally requires input of the order of base pairs as determined from nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) of imino protons. The program deduces the 5'-3' direction of the base pairs if certain chemical shifts are also input. Secondary structures predicted by the program provide assignments of input chemical shifts to particular nucleotides in the sequence, thus facilitating an important step for determination of the three dimensional structure by NMR. The method is particularly useful for revealing pseudoknots and an example is provided. The method may also allow determination of secondary structures when a sequence folds into two structures that exchange slowly. PMID:27665599

  14. RNA Secondary Structure Analysis Using RNAstructure.

    PubMed

    Mathews, David H

    2014-06-17

    RNAstructure is a user-friendly program for the prediction and analysis of RNA secondary structure. It is available as a Web server, as a program with a graphical user interface, or as a set of command-line tools. The programs are available for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, or Linux. This unit provides protocols for RNA secondary structure prediction (using the Web server or the graphical user interface) and prediction of high-affinity oligonucleotide biding sites to a structured RNA target (using the graphical user interface).

  15. General combinatorics of RNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bo; Wang, Tian-ming

    2004-09-01

    The total number of RNA secondary structures of a given length with minimal hairpin loop length m(m>0) and with minimal stack length l(l>0) is computed, under the assumption that all base pairs can occur. Asymptotics are derived from the determination of recurrence relations of decomposition properties.

  16. Folding and Finding RNA Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Moss, Walter N.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Optimal exploitation of the expanding database of sequences requires rapid finding and folding of RNAs. Methods are reviewed that automate folding and discovery of RNAs with algorithms that couple thermodynamics with chemical mapping, NMR, and/or sequence comparison. New functional noncoding RNAs in genome sequences can be found by combining sequence comparison with the assumption that functional noncoding RNAs will have more favorable folding free energies than other RNAs. When a new RNA is discovered, experiments and sequence comparison can restrict folding space so that secondary structure can be rapidly determined with the help of predicted free energies. In turn, secondary structure restricts folding in three dimensions, which allows modeling of three-dimensional structure. An example from a domain of a retrotransposon is described. Discovery of new RNAs and their structures will provide insights into evolution, biology, and design of therapeutics. Applications to studies of evolution are also reviewed. PMID:20685845

  17. Copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylthiolation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xinxin; Liu, Tianfei; Lu, Long; Shen, Qilong

    2014-09-19

    A Cu-catalyzed trifluoromethylthiolation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids with an electrophilic trifluoromethylthiolating reagent is described. Tolerance for a variety of functional groups was observed. PMID:25198142

  18. PSS-SQL: protein secondary structure - structured query language.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Dominika; Malysiak-Mrozek, Bozena; Kozielski, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    Secondary structure representation of proteins provides important information regarding protein general construction and shape. This representation is often used in protein similarity searching. Since existing commercial database management systems do not offer integrated exploration methods for biological data e.g. at the level of the SQL language, the structural similarity searching is usually performed by external tools. In the paper, we present our newly developed PSS-SQL language, which allows searching a database in order to identify proteins having secondary structure similar to the structure specified by the user in a PSS-SQL query. Therefore, we provide a simple and declarative language for protein structure similarity searching.

  19. Structural perspectives on secondary active transporters

    PubMed Central

    Boudker, Olga; Verdon, Grégory

    2010-01-01

    Secondary active transporters catalyze concentrative transport of substrates across lipid membranes by harnessing the energy of electrochemical ion gradients. These transporters bind their ligands on one side of the membrane, and undergo a global conformational change to release them on the other side of the membrane. Over the last few years, crystal structures have captured several bacterial secondary transporters in different states along their transport cycle, providing insight into possible molecular mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize recent findings focusing on the emerging structural and mechanistic similarities between evolutionary diverse transporters. We will also discuss the structural basis of substrate binding, ion coupling and inhibition viewed from the perspective of these similarities. PMID:20655602

  20. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  1. Copper-promoted trifluoromethylation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Xiao, Bin; Xie, Chuan-Qi; Luo, Dong-Fen; Liu, Lei; Fu, Yao

    2012-12-01

    New couple: The Cu-promoted trifluoromethylation of primary and secondary alkylboronic acids with TMSCF(3) extends the scope of transition-metal-catalyzed trifluoromethylation reactions to sp(3)-hybridized carbon centers. It also represents one of the first examples for Cu-catalyzed C-C cross-coupling reactions of alkylboronic acid derivatives. PMID:23143929

  2. Prediction of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, M.; Orland, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present a new algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. The method is based on a classification of RNA structures according to their topological genus. The algorithm utilizes a simplified parametrization of the free energies for pair stacking, loop penalties, etc. and in addition a free energy penalty proportional to the topological genus of the pairing graph. Our method can take into account all pseudoknot topologies and achieves high success rates compared to state-of-the-art methods. This shows that the genus is a promising concept to classify pseudoknots.

  3. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  4. Secondary flow structures in large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, H.; Devauchelle, O.; Metivier, F.; Limare, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2012-04-01

    Measuring the velocity field in large rivers remains a challenge, even with recent measurement techniques such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). Indeed, due to the diverging angle between its ultrasonic beams, an ADCP cannot detect small-scale flow structures. However, when the measurements are limited to a single location for a sufficient period of time, averaging can reveal large, stationary flow structures. Here we present velocity measurements in a straight reach of the Seine river in Paris, France, where the cross-section is close to rectangular. The transverse modulation of the streamwise velocity indicates secondary flow cells, which seem to occupy the entire width of the river. This observation is reminiscent of the longitudinal vortices observed in laboratory experiments (e.g. Blanckaert et al., Advances in Water Resources, 2010, 33, 1062-1074). Although the physical origin of these secondary structures remains unclear, their measured velocity is sufficient to significantly impact the distribution of streamwise momentum. We propose a model for the transverse profile of the depth-averaged velocity based on a crude representation of the longitudinal vortices, with a single free parameter. Preliminary results are in good agreement with field measurements. This model also provides an estimate for the bank shear stress, which controls bank erosion.

  5. Prediction of packing of secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Nagano, K; Ponnuswamy, P K

    1984-01-01

    An improved method of picking up candidates for predicting the packing arrangement of beta-strands and alpha-helices of the alpha/beta type domains is described here. The method of judging whether the region of the protein would fold into the alpha/beta type or not is also described. The folding constraints of globular proteins are analysed and presented in this article for application to the prediction of packing of secondary structure. The analysis of the residue-fluctuations is also applicable for the purpose.

  6. ExSer: A standalone tool to mine protein data bank (PDB) for secondary structural elements

    PubMed Central

    Vignesh, Dhandapani; Daniel, Paul; Raja, Natarajan; Balasubramanian, Ponnusamy; Arul, Loganathan

    2010-01-01

    Detailed structural analysis of protein necessitates investigation at primary, secondary and tertiary levels, respectively. Insight into protein secondary structures pave way for understanding the type of secondary structural elements involved (α-helices, β-strands etc.), the amino acid sequence that encode the secondary structural elements, number of residues, length and, percentage composition of the respective elements in the protein. Here we present a standalone tool entitled “ExSer” which facilitate an automated extraction of the amino acid sequence that encode for the secondary structural regions of a protein from the protein data bank (PDB) file. Availability ExSer is freely downloadable from http://code.google.com/p/tool-exser/ PMID:20975886

  7. Experiment-Assisted Secondary Structure Prediction with RNAstructure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mathews, David H

    2016-01-01

    Experimental probing data can be used to improve the accuracy of RNA secondary structure prediction. The software package RNAstructure can take advantage of enzymatic cleavage data, FMN cleavage data, traditional chemical modification reactivity data, and SHAPE reactivity data for secondary structure modeling. This chapter provides protocols for using experimental probing data with RNAstructure to restrain or constrain RNA secondary structure prediction. PMID:27665598

  8. Circular dichroism and DNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Baase, W A; Johnson, W C

    1979-02-01

    The change in average rotation of the DNA helix has been determined for the transfer from 0.05 M NaCl to 3.0 M CsCl, 6.2 M LiCl and 5.4 M NH4Cl. This work, combined with data at lower salt from other laboratories, allows us to relate the intensity of the CD of DNA at 275 nm directly to the change in the number of base pairs per turn. The change in secondary structure for the transfer of DNA from 0.05 M NaCl (where it is presumably in the B-form) to high salt (where the characteristic CD has been interpreted as corresponding to C-form geometry) is found to be -0.22 (+/- 0.02) base pairs per turn. In the case of mononucleosomes, where the CD indicates the "C-form", the change in secondary structure (including temperature effects) would add -0.31 (+/- 0.03) turns about the histone core to the -1.25 turns estimated from work on SV40 chromatin. Accurate winding angles and molar extinction coefficients were determined for ethidium.

  9. Maximum expected accuracy structural neighbors of an RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since RNA molecules regulate genes and control alternative splicing by allostery, it is important to develop algorithms to predict RNA conformational switches. Some tools, such as paRNAss, RNAshapes and RNAbor, can be used to predict potential conformational switches; nevertheless, no existent tool can detect general (i.e., not family specific) entire riboswitches (both aptamer and expression platform) with accuracy. Thus, the development of additional algorithms to detect conformational switches seems important, especially since the difference in free energy between the two metastable secondary structures may be as large as 15-20 kcal/mol. It has recently emerged that RNA secondary structure can be more accurately predicted by computing the maximum expected accuracy (MEA) structure, rather than the minimum free energy (MFE) structure. Results Given an arbitrary RNA secondary structure S0 for an RNA nucleotide sequence a = a1,..., an, we say that another secondary structure S of a is a k-neighbor of S0, if the base pair distance between S0 and S is k. In this paper, we prove that the Boltzmann probability of all k-neighbors of the minimum free energy structure S0 can be approximated with accuracy ε and confidence 1 - p, simultaneously for all 0 ≤ k < K, by a relative frequency count over N sampled structures, provided that N>N(ε,p,K)=Φ-1p2K24ε2, where Φ(z) is the cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the standard normal distribution. We go on to describe the algorithm RNAborMEA, which for an arbitrary initial structure S0 and for all values 0 ≤ k < K, computes the secondary structure MEA(k), having maximum expected accuracy over all k-neighbors of S0. Computation time is O(n3 · K2), and memory requirements are O(n2 · K). We analyze a sample TPP riboswitch, and apply our algorithm to the class of purine riboswitches. Conclusions The approximation of RNAbor by sampling, with rigorous bound on accuracy, together with the computation of

  10. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used in which

  11. Distinct circular dichroism spectroscopic signatures of polyproline II and unordered secondary structures: Applications in secondary structure analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Jose L S; Miles, Andrew J; Whitmore, Lee; Wallace, B A

    2014-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a valuable method for defining canonical secondary structure contents of proteins based on empirically-defined spectroscopic signatures derived from proteins with known three-dimensional structures. Many proteins identified as being “Intrinsically Disordered Proteins” have a significant amount of their structure that is neither sheet, helix, nor turn; this type of structure is often classified by CD as “other”, “random coil”, “unordered”, or “disordered”. However the “other” category can also include polyproline II (PPII)-type structures, whose spectral properties have not been well-distinguished from those of unordered structures. In this study, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to investigate the spectral properties of collagen and polyproline, which both contain PPII-type structures. Their native spectra were compared as representatives of PPII structures. In addition, their spectra before and after treatment with various conditions to produce unfolded or denatured structures were also compared, with the aim of defining the differences between CD spectra of PPII and disordered structures. We conclude that the spectral features of collagen are more appropriate than those of polyproline for use as the representative spectrum for PPII structures present in typical amino acid-containing proteins, and that the single most characteristic spectroscopic feature distinguishing a PPII structure from a disordered structure is the presence of a positive peak around 220nm in the former but not in the latter. These spectra are now available for inclusion in new reference data sets used for CD analyses of the secondary structures of soluble proteins. PMID:25262612

  12. Hydrogen bonding in peptide secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Zoltán; Kovács, Attila

    Hydrogen bonding interactions in various peptide secondary structures (β-sheet, 27-ribbon, 310-helix, α-helix, π-helix, β-turn II, and γ-turn) have been investigated in small oligopeptides by quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. Besides the primary O...HN interactions, the optimized structures revealed the importance of N...HN hydrogen bonding in several structures. The effect of substitution on the energy and structural properties was investigated comparing the properties of glycine, alanine, valine, and serine. The aliphatic substituents generally weaken the hydrogen bonds, the strongest effects being observed in crowded valine conformers. Additional hydrogen bonding interactions introduced by the OH group of serine can both strengthen (by polarizing the amide moiety through N...H interaction) and weaken (constraining the CO oxygen by O...HO interaction) the backbone hydrogen bonds. The effect of water as a polarizable medium on the energy properties was assessed by the COSMO model.

  13. New approach to real-time nucleic acids detection: folding polymerase chain reaction amplicons into a secondary structure to improve cleavage of Forster resonance energy transfer probes in 5'-nuclease assays.

    PubMed

    Kutyavin, Igor V

    2010-03-01

    The article describes a new technology for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of nucleic acids. Similar to Taqman, this new method, named Snake, utilizes the 5'-nuclease activity of Thermus aquaticus (Taq) DNA polymerase that cleaves dual-labeled Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes and generates a fluorescent signal during PCR. However, the mechanism of the probe cleavage in Snake is different. In this assay, PCR amplicons fold into stem-loop secondary structures. Hybridization of FRET probes to one of these structures leads to the formation of optimal substrates for the 5'-nuclease activity of Taq. The stem-loop structures in the Snake amplicons are introduced by the unique design of one of the PCR primers, which carries a special 5'-flap sequence. It was found that at a certain length of these 5'-flap sequences the folded Snake amplicons have very little, if any, effect on PCR yield but benefit many aspects of the detection process, particularly the signal productivity. Unlike Taqman, the Snake system favors the use of short FRET probes with improved fluorescence background. The head-to-head comparison study of Snake and Taqman revealed that these two technologies have more differences than similarities with respect to their responses to changes in PCR protocol, e.g. the variations in primer concentration, annealing time, PCR asymmetry. The optimal PCR protocol for Snake has been identified. The technology's real-time performance was compared to a number of conventional assays including Taqman, 3'-MGB-Taqman, Molecular Beacon and Scorpion primers. The test trial showed that Snake supersedes the conventional assays in the signal productivity and detection of sequence variations as small as single nucleotide polymorphisms. Due to the assay's cost-effectiveness and simplicity of design, the technology is anticipated to quickly replace all known conventional methods currently used for real-time nucleic acid detection.

  14. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  15. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidationmore » of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used

  16. Automated discovery of active motifs in multiple RNA secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.T.L.; Chang, Chia-Yo; Shapiro, B.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present a method for discovering approximately common motifs (also known as active motifs) in multiple RNA secondary structures. The secondary structures can be represented as ordered trees (i.e., the order among siblings matters). Motifs in these trees are connected subgraphs that can differ in both substitutions and deletions/insertions. The proposed method consists of two steps: (1) find candidate motifs in a small sample of the secondary structures; (2) search all of the secondary structures to determine how frequently these motifs occur (within the allowed approximation) in the secondary structures. To reduce the running time, we develop two optimization heuristics based on sampling and pattern matching techniques. Experimental results obtained by running these algorithms on both generated data and RNA secondary structures show the good performance of the algorithms. To demonstrate the utility of our algorithms, we discuss their applications to conducting the phylogenetic study of RNA sequences obtained from GenBank.

  17. Synthesis of kojic acid derivatives as secondary binding site probes of D-amino acid oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Raje, Mithun; Hin, Niyada; Duvall, Bridget; Ferraris, Dana V.; Berry, James F.; Thomas, Ajit G.; Alt, Jesse; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.; Tsukamoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A series of kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl-4H-pyran-4-one) derivatives were synthesized and tested for their ability to inhibit D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO). Various substituents were incorporated into kojic acid at its 2-hydroxymethyl group. These analogs serve as useful molecular probes to explore the secondary binding site, which can be exploited in designing more potent DAAO inhibitors. PMID:23683589

  18. Neural network definitions of highly predictable protein secondary structure classes

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A. |; Steeg, E.; Farber, R.

    1994-02-01

    We use two co-evolving neural networks to determine new classes of protein secondary structure which are significantly more predictable from local amino sequence than the conventional secondary structure classification. Accurate prediction of the conventional secondary structure classes: alpha helix, beta strand, and coil, from primary sequence has long been an important problem in computational molecular biology. Neural networks have been a popular method to attempt to predict these conventional secondary structure classes. Accuracy has been disappointingly low. The algorithm presented here uses neural networks to similtaneously examine both sequence and structure data, and to evolve new classes of secondary structure that can be predicted from sequence with significantly higher accuracy than the conventional classes. These new classes have both similarities to, and differences with the conventional alpha helix, beta strand and coil.

  19. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    PubMed

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string. PMID:21523935

  20. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    PubMed

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  1. A dynamic programming algorithm for finding alternative RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Williams, A L; Tinoco, I

    1986-01-10

    Dynamic programming algorithms that predict RNA secondary structure by minimizing the free energy have had one important limitation. They were able to predict only one optimal structure. Given the uncertainties of the thermodynamic data and the effects of proteins and other environmental factors on structure, the optimal structure predicted by these methods may not have biological significance. We present a dynamic programming algorithm that can determine optimal and suboptimal secondary structures for an RNA. The power and utility of the method is demonstrated in the folding of the intervening sequence of the rRNA of Tetrahymena. By first identifying the major secondary structures corresponding to the lowest free energy minima, a secondary structure of possible biological significance is derived.

  2. Quantitative Correlation between the protein primary sequences and secondary structures in spider dragline silks.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Janelle E; Creager, Melinda S; Lewis, Randolph V; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2010-01-11

    Synthetic spider silk holds great potential for use in various applications spanning medical uses to ultra lightweight armor; however, producing synthetic fibers with mechanical properties comparable to natural spider silk has eluded the scientific community. Natural dragline spider silks are commonly made from proteins that contain highly repetitive amino acid motifs, adopting an array of secondary structures. Before further advances can be made in the production of synthetic fibers based on spider silk proteins, it is imperative to know the percentage of each amino acid in the protein that forms a specific secondary structure. Linking these percentages to the primary amino acid sequence of the protein will establish a structural foundation for synthetic silk. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used to quantify the percentage of Ala, Gly, and Ser that form both beta-sheet and helical secondary structures. The fraction of these three amino acids and their secondary structure are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence for the proteins that comprise major and minor ampullate silk from the Nephila clavipes spider providing a blueprint for synthetic spider silks. PMID:20000730

  3. Protein secondary structural types are differentially coded on messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Tricodon regions on messenger RNAs corresponding to a set of proteins from Escherichia coli were scrutinized for their translation speed. The fractional frequency values of the individual codons as they occur in mRNAs of highly expressed genes from Escherichia coli were taken as an indicative measure of the translation speed. The tricodons were classified by the sum of the frequency values of the constituent codons. Examination of the conformation of the encoded amino acid residues in the corresponding protein tertiary structures revealed a correlation between codon usage in mRNA and topological features of the encoded proteins. Alpha helices on proteins tend to be preferentially coded by translationally fast mRNA regions while the slow segments often code for beta strands and coil regions. Fast regions correspondingly avoid coding for beta strands and coil regions while the slow regions similarly move away from encoding alpha helices. Structural and mechanistic aspects of the ribosome peptide channel support the relevance of sequence fragment translation and subsequent conformation. A discussion is presented relating the observation to the reported kinetic data on the formation and stabilization of protein secondary structural types during protein folding. The observed absence of such strong positive selection for codons in non-highly expressed genes is compatible with existing theories that mutation pressure may well dominate codon selection in non-highly expressed genes. PMID:8897597

  4. Unified approach to partition functions of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    RNA secondary structure formation is a field of considerable biological interest as well as a model system for understanding generic properties of heteropolymer folding. This system is particularly attractive because the partition function and thus all thermodynamic properties of RNA secondary structure ensembles can be calculated numerically in polynomial time for arbitrary sequences and homopolymer models admit analytical solutions. Such solutions for many different aspects of the combinatorics of RNA secondary structure formation share the property that the final solution depends on differences of statistical weights rather than on the weights alone. Here, we present a unified approach to a large class of problems in the field of RNA secondary structure formation. We prove a generic theorem for the calculation of RNA folding partition functions. Then, we show that this approach can be applied to the study of the molten-native transition, denaturation of RNA molecules, as well as to studies of the glass phase of random RNA sequences.

  5. Unified approach to partition functions of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    RNA secondary structure formation is a field of considerable biological interest as well as a model system for understanding generic properties of heteropolymer folding. This system is particularly attractive because the partition function and thus all thermodynamic properties of RNA secondary structure ensembles can be calculated numerically in polynomial time for arbitrary sequences and homopolymer models admit analytical solutions. Such solutions for many different aspects of the combinatorics of RNA secondary structure formation share the property that the final solution depends on differences of statistical weights rather than on the weights alone. Here, we present a unified approach to a large class of problems in the field of RNA secondary structure formation. We prove a generic theorem for the calculation of RNA folding partition functions. Then, we show that this approach can be applied to the study of the molten-native transition, denaturation of RNA molecules, as well as to studies of the glass phase of random RNA sequences. PMID:24177391

  6. Checking nucleic acid crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Das, U; Chen, S; Fuxreiter, M; Vaguine, A A; Richelle, J; Berman, H M; Wodak, S J

    2001-06-01

    The program SFCHECK [Vaguine et al. (1999), Acta Cryst. D55, 191-205] is used to survey the quality of the structure-factor data and the agreement of those data with the atomic coordinates in 105 nucleic acid crystal structures for which structure-factor amplitudes have been deposited in the Nucleic Acid Database [NDB; Berman et al. (1992), Biophys. J. 63, 751-759]. Nucleic acid structures present a particular challenge for structure-quality evaluations. The majority of these structures, and DNA molecules in particular, have been solved by molecular replacement of the double-helical motif, whose high degree of symmetry can lead to problems in positioning the molecule in the unit cell. In this paper, the overall quality of each structure was evaluated using parameters such as the R factor, the correlation coefficient and various atomic error estimates. In addition, each structure is characterized by the average values of several local quality indicators, which include the atomic displacement, the density correlation, the B factor and the density index. The latter parameter measures the relative electron-density level at the atomic position. In order to assess the quality of the model in specific regions, the same local quality indicators are also surveyed for individual groups of atoms in each structure. Several of the global quality indicators are found to vary linearly with resolution and less than a dozen structures are found to exhibit values significantly different from the mean for these indicators, showing that the quality of the nucleic acid structures tends to be rather uniform. Analysis of the mutual dependence of the values of different local quality indicators, computed for individual residues and atom groups, reveals that these indicators essentially complement each other and are not redundant with the B factor. Using several of these indicators, it was found that the atomic coordinates of the nucleic acid bases tend to be better defined than those of

  7. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    PubMed

    Müller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Höner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far.

  8. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    PubMed

    Müller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Höner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far. PMID

  9. Structural features of lignohumic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, František; Šestauberová, Martina; Hrabal, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The composition and structure of humic acids isolated from lignohumate, which is produced by hydrolytic-oxidative conversion of technical lignosulfonates, were characterized by chemical and spectral methods (UV/VIS, FTIR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy). As comparative samples, humic acids (HA) were isolated also from lignite and organic horizon of mountain spruce forest soil. When compared with other HA studied, the lignohumate humic acids (LHHA) contained relatively few carboxyl groups, whose role is partly fulfilled by sulfonic acid groups. Distinctive 13C NMR signal of methoxyl group carbons, typical for lignin and related humic substances, was found at the shift of 55.9 ppm. Other alkoxy carbons were present in limited quantity, like the aliphatic carbons. Due to the low content of these carbon types, the LHHA has high aromaticity of 60.6%. Comparison with the natural HA has shown that lignohumate obtained by thermal processing of technical lignosulfonate can be regarded as an industrially produced analog of natural humic substances. Based on the chemical and spectral data evaluation, structural features of lignohumate humic acids were clarified and their hypothetical chemical structure proposed, which described typical "average" properties of the isolated fraction.

  10. Assessing the impact of secondary structure and solvent accessibility on protein evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, N; Thorne, J L; Jones, D T

    1998-01-01

    Empirically derived models of amino acid replacement are employed to study the association between various physical features of proteins and evolution. The strengths of these associations are statistically evaluated by applying the models of protein evolution to 11 diverse sets of protein sequences. Parametric bootstrap tests indicate that the solvent accessibility status of a site has a particularly strong association with the process of amino acid replacement that it experiences. Significant association between secondary structure environment and the amino acid replacement process is also observed. Careful description of the length distribution of secondary structure elements and of the organization of secondary structure and solvent accessibility along a protein did not always significantly improve the fit of the evolutionary models to the data sets that were analyzed. As indicated by the strength of the association of both solvent accessibility and secondary structure with amino acid replacement, the process of protein evolution-both above and below the species level-will not be well understood until the physical constraints that affect protein evolution are identified and characterized. PMID:9584116

  11. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  12. Community structure description in amino acid interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gaci, Omar

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we represent proteins by amino acid interaction networks. This is a graph whose vertices are the protein's amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. We begin by identifying the main topological properties of these interaction networks using graph theory measures. We observe that the amino acids interact specifically, according to their structural role, and depending on whether they participate or not in the secondary structure. Thus, certain amino acids tend to group together to form local clouds. Then, we study the formation of node aggregations through community structure detections. We observe that the composition of organizations confirms a specific aggregation between loops around a core composed of secondary.

  13. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in α-helix conformation and a decrease in β-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in α-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  14. Computing the Partition Function for Kinetically Trapped RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, William A.; Clote, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An RNA secondary structure is locally optimal if there is no lower energy structure that can be obtained by the addition or removal of a single base pair, where energy is defined according to the widely accepted Turner nearest neighbor model. Locally optimal structures form kinetic traps, since any evolution away from a locally optimal structure must involve energetically unfavorable folding steps. Here, we present a novel, efficient algorithm to compute the partition function over all locally optimal secondary structures of a given RNA sequence. Our software, RNAlocopt runs in time and space. Additionally, RNAlocopt samples a user-specified number of structures from the Boltzmann subensemble of all locally optimal structures. We apply RNAlocopt to show that (1) the number of locally optimal structures is far fewer than the total number of structures – indeed, the number of locally optimal structures approximately equal to the square root of the number of all structures, (2) the structural diversity of this subensemble may be either similar to or quite different from the structural diversity of the entire Boltzmann ensemble, a situation that depends on the type of input RNA, (3) the (modified) maximum expected accuracy structure, computed by taking into account base pairing frequencies of locally optimal structures, is a more accurate prediction of the native structure than other current thermodynamics-based methods. The software RNAlocopt constitutes a technical breakthrough in our study of the folding landscape for RNA secondary structures. For the first time, locally optimal structures (kinetic traps in the Turner energy model) can be rapidly generated for long RNA sequences, previously impossible with methods that involved exhaustive enumeration. Use of locally optimal structure leads to state-of-the-art secondary structure prediction, as benchmarked against methods involving the computation of minimum free energy and of maximum expected accuracy. Web server

  15. Secondary Structure Prediction of Single Sequences Using RNAstructure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mathews, David H

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure is often predicted using folding thermodynamics. RNAstructure is a software package that includes structure prediction by free energy minimization, prediction of base pairing probabilities, prediction of structures composed of highly probably base pairs, and prediction of structures with pseudoknots. A user-friendly graphical user interface is provided, and this interface works on Windows, Apple OS X, and Linux. This chapter provides protocols for using RNAstructure for structure prediction. PMID:27665590

  16. Computing the partition function for kinetically trapped RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, William A; Clote, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An RNA secondary structure is locally optimal if there is no lower energy structure that can be obtained by the addition or removal of a single base pair, where energy is defined according to the widely accepted Turner nearest neighbor model. Locally optimal structures form kinetic traps, since any evolution away from a locally optimal structure must involve energetically unfavorable folding steps. Here, we present a novel, efficient algorithm to compute the partition function over all locally optimal secondary structures of a given RNA sequence. Our software, RNAlocopt runs in O(n3) time and O(n2) space. Additionally, RNAlocopt samples a user-specified number of structures from the Boltzmann subensemble of all locally optimal structures. We apply RNAlocopt to show that (1) the number of locally optimal structures is far fewer than the total number of structures--indeed, the number of locally optimal structures approximately equal to the square root of the number of all structures, (2) the structural diversity of this subensemble may be either similar to or quite different from the structural diversity of the entire Boltzmann ensemble, a situation that depends on the type of input RNA, (3) the (modified) maximum expected accuracy structure, computed by taking into account base pairing frequencies of locally optimal structures, is a more accurate prediction of the native structure than other current thermodynamics-based methods. The software RNAlocopt constitutes a technical breakthrough in our study of the folding landscape for RNA secondary structures. For the first time, locally optimal structures (kinetic traps in the Turner energy model) can be rapidly generated for long RNA sequences, previously impossible with methods that involved exhaustive enumeration. Use of locally optimal structure leads to state-of-the-art secondary structure prediction, as benchmarked against methods involving the computation of minimum free energy and of maximum expected accuracy

  17. Novel and efficient RNA secondary structure prediction using hierarchical folding.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Hosna; Condon, Anne; Zhao, Shelly

    2008-03-01

    Algorithms for prediction of RNA secondary structure-the set of base pairs that form when an RNA molecule folds-are valuable to biologists who aim to understand RNA structure and function. Improving the accuracy and efficiency of prediction methods is an ongoing challenge, particularly for pseudoknotted secondary structures, in which base pairs overlap. This challenge is biologically important, since pseudoknotted structures play essential roles in functions of many RNA molecules, such as splicing and ribosomal frameshifting. State-of-the-art methods, which are based on free energy minimization, have high run-time complexity (typically Theta(n(5)) or worse), and can handle (minimize over) only limited types of pseudoknotted structures. We propose a new approach for prediction of pseudoknotted structures, motivated by the hypothesis that RNA structures fold hierarchically, with pseudoknot-free (non-overlapping) base pairs forming first, and pseudoknots forming later so as to minimize energy relative to the folded pseudoknot-free structure. Our HFold algorithm uses two-phase energy minimization to predict hierarchically formed secondary structures in O(n(3)) time, matching the complexity of the best algorithms for pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction via energy minimization. Our algorithm can handle a wide range of biological structures, including kissing hairpins and nested kissing hairpins, which have previously required Theta(n(6)) time.

  18. Predicting RNA secondary structures from sequence and probing data.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ronny; Wolfinger, Michael T; Tanzer, Andrea; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2016-07-01

    RNA secondary structures have proven essential for understanding the regulatory functions performed by RNA such as microRNAs, bacterial small RNAs, or riboswitches. This success is in part due to the availability of efficient computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Recent advances focus on dealing with the inherent uncertainty of prediction by considering the ensemble of possible structures rather than the single most stable one. Moreover, the advent of high-throughput structural probing has spurred the development of computational methods that incorporate such experimental data as auxiliary information.

  19. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26902426

  20. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  1. DNA Secondary Structure at Chromosomal Fragile Sites in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan G; Lehman, Christine E; Pierce, Levi C. T; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures that can interfere with normal cellular processes, and many of these structures have been associated with neurological diseases and cancer. Secondary structure-forming sequences are often found at chromosomal fragile sites, which are hotspots for sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal translocations, and deletions. Structures formed at fragile sites can lead to instability by disrupting normal cellular processes such as DNA replication and transcription. The instability caused by disruption of replication and transcription can lead to DNA breakage, resulting in gene rearrangements and deletions that cause disease. In this review, we discuss the role of DNA secondary structure at fragile sites in human disease. PMID:25937814

  2. Use of secondary structural information and C alpha-C alpha distance restraints to model protein structures with MODELLER.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Boojala V B; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-08-01

    Protein secondary structure predictions and amino acid long range contact map predictions from primary sequence of proteins have been explored to aid in modelling protein tertiary structures. In order to evaluate the usefulness of secondary structure and 3D-residue contact prediction methods to model protein structures we have used the known Q3 (alpha-helix,beta-strands and irregular turns/loops) secondary structure information, along with residue-residue contact information as restraints for MODELLER. We present here results of our modelling studies on 30 best resolved single domain protein structures of varied lengths. The results shows that it is very difficult to obtain useful models even with 100% accurate secondary structure predictions and accurate residue contact predictions for up to 30% of residues in a sequence. The best models that we obtained for proteins of lengths 37, 70, 118, 136 and 193 amino acid residues are of RMSDs 4.17, 5.27, 9.12, 7.89 and 9.69,respectively. The results show that one can obtain better models for the proteins which have high percent of alpha-helix content. This analysis further shows that MODELLER restrain optimization program can be useful only if we have truly homologous structure(s) as a template where it derives numerous restraints, almost identical to the templates used. This analysis also clearly indicates that even if we satisfy several true residue-residue contact distances, up to 30%of their sequence length with fully known secondary structural information, we end up predicting model structures much distant from their corresponding native structures.

  3. Crystal structures of the apo form and a complex of human LMW-PTP with a phosphonic acid provide new evidence of a secondary site potentially related to the anchorage of natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Emanuella M B; Trivella, Daniela B B; Scorsato, Valéria; Dias, Mariana P; Bazzo, Natália L; Mandapati, Kishore R; de Oliveira, Fábio L; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen V; Pilli, Ronaldo A; Miranda, Paulo C M L; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2015-08-01

    Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTP, EC 3.1.3.48) are a family of single-domain enzymes with molecular weight up to 18 kDa, expressed in different tissues and considered attractive pharmacological targets for cancer chemotherapy. Despite this, few LMW-PTP inhibitors have been described to date, and the structural information on LMW-PTP druggable binding sites is scarce. In this study, a small series of phosphonic acids were designed based on a new crystallographic structure of LMW-PTP complexed with benzylsulfonic acid, determined at 2.1Å. In silico docking was used as a tool to interpret the structural and enzyme kinetics data, as well as to design new analogs. From the synthesized series, two compounds were found to act as competitive inhibitors, with inhibition constants of 0.124 and 0.047 mM. We also report the 2.4Å structure of another complex in which LMW-PTP is bound to benzylphosphonic acid, and a structure of apo LMW-PTP determined at 2.3Å resolution. Although no appreciable conformation changes were observed, in the latter structures, amino acid residues from an expression tag were found bound to a hydrophobic region at the protein surface. This regions is neighbored by positively charged residues, adjacent to the active site pocket, suggesting that this region might be not a mere artefact of crystal contacts but an indication of a possible anchoring region for the natural substrate-which is a phosphorylated protein. PMID:26117648

  4. Prediction of Secondary Structures Conserved in Multiple RNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mathews, David H

    2016-01-01

    RNA structure is conserved by evolution to a greater extent than sequence. Predicting the conserved structure for multiple homologous sequences can be much more accurate than predicting the structure for a single sequence. RNAstructure is a software package that includes the programs Dynalign, Multilign, TurboFold, and PARTS for predicting conserved RNA secondary structure. This chapter provides protocols for using these programs. PMID:27665591

  5. Diffractaic acid: Crystalline structure and physicochemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro Fonseca, Jéssica; de Oliveira, Yara Santiago; Bezerra, Beatriz P.; Ellena, Javier; Honda, Neli Kika; Silva, Camilla V. N. S.; da Silva Santos, Noemia Pereira; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diffractaic acid (DA) is a secondary metabolite of lichens that belongs to the chemical class of depsides, and some relevant pharmacological properties are associated with this natural product, such as antioxidant, antiulcerogenic and gastroprotective effects. Considering the relevant biological activities and taking into account that the activities are intrinsically related to the structure, the main goal of this study was to elucidate the structure of diffractaic acid by single crystal X-ray diffraction as well to characterize its physicochemical properties by powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. It was observed that DA belongs to the monoclinic crystal system, crystallizing in the space group P21/c with the following cell parameters: a = 18.535(7) Å, b = 4.0439(18) Å, c = 23.964(6) Å, β = 91.55(3)°. The crystal packing is characterized by difractaic acid dimers, which are reflected in the vibrational spectrum. These observations were supported by quantum mechanical calculations.

  6. Secondary structural analyses of ITS1 in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal RNA gene operon is interrupted by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS2. Although the secondary structure of ITS2 has been widely investigated, less is known about ITS1 and its structure. In this study, the secondary structure of ITS1 sequences for Paramecium and other ciliates was predicted. Each Paramecium ITS1 forms an open loop with three helices, A through C. Helix B was highly conserved among Paramecium, and similar helices were found in other ciliates. A phylogenetic analysis using the ITS1 sequences showed high-resolution, implying that ITS1 is a good tool for species-level analyses.

  7. Expected distance between terminal nucleotides of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Clote, Peter; Ponty, Yann; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    In "The ends of a large RNA molecule are necessarily close", Yoffe et al. (Nucleic Acids Res 39(1):292-299, 2011) used the programs RNAfold [resp. RNAsubopt] from Vienna RNA Package to calculate the distance between 5' and 3' ends of the minimum free energy secondary structure [resp. thermal equilibrium structures] of viral and random RNA sequences. Here, the 5'-3' distance is defined to be the length of the shortest path from 5' node to 3' node in the undirected graph, whose edge set consists of edges {i, i + 1} corresponding to covalent backbone bonds and of edges {i, j} corresponding to canonical base pairs. From repeated simulations and using a heuristic theoretical argument, Yoffe et al. conclude that the 5'-3' distance is less than a fixed constant, independent of RNA sequence length. In this paper, we provide a rigorous, mathematical framework to study the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence. We present recurrence relations that precisely define the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence, both for the Turner nearest neighbor energy model, as well as for a simple homopolymer model first defined by Stein and Waterman. We implement dynamic programming algorithms to compute (rather than approximate by repeated application of Vienna RNA Package) the expected distance between 5' and 3' ends of a given RNA sequence, with respect to the Turner energy model. Using methods of analytical combinatorics, that depend on complex analysis, we prove that the asymptotic expected 5'-3' distance of length n homopolymers is approximately equal to the constant 5.47211, while the asymptotic distance is 6.771096 if hairpins have a minimum of 3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can form a base pair is 1/4. Finally, we analyze the 5'-3' distance for secondary structures from the STRAND database, and conclude that the 5'-3' distance is correlated with RNA sequence length.

  8. Expected distance between terminal nucleotides of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Clote, Peter; Ponty, Yann; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    In "The ends of a large RNA molecule are necessarily close", Yoffe et al. (Nucleic Acids Res 39(1):292-299, 2011) used the programs RNAfold [resp. RNAsubopt] from Vienna RNA Package to calculate the distance between 5' and 3' ends of the minimum free energy secondary structure [resp. thermal equilibrium structures] of viral and random RNA sequences. Here, the 5'-3' distance is defined to be the length of the shortest path from 5' node to 3' node in the undirected graph, whose edge set consists of edges {i, i + 1} corresponding to covalent backbone bonds and of edges {i, j} corresponding to canonical base pairs. From repeated simulations and using a heuristic theoretical argument, Yoffe et al. conclude that the 5'-3' distance is less than a fixed constant, independent of RNA sequence length. In this paper, we provide a rigorous, mathematical framework to study the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence. We present recurrence relations that precisely define the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence, both for the Turner nearest neighbor energy model, as well as for a simple homopolymer model first defined by Stein and Waterman. We implement dynamic programming algorithms to compute (rather than approximate by repeated application of Vienna RNA Package) the expected distance between 5' and 3' ends of a given RNA sequence, with respect to the Turner energy model. Using methods of analytical combinatorics, that depend on complex analysis, we prove that the asymptotic expected 5'-3' distance of length n homopolymers is approximately equal to the constant 5.47211, while the asymptotic distance is 6.771096 if hairpins have a minimum of 3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can form a base pair is 1/4. Finally, we analyze the 5'-3' distance for secondary structures from the STRAND database, and conclude that the 5'-3' distance is correlated with RNA sequence length. PMID:21984358

  9. A Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Finding the Optimal Placement of a Secondary Structure Topology in Cryo-EM Data.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abhishek; Ranjan, Desh; Zubair, Mohammad; He, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The determination of secondary structure topology is a critical step in deriving the atomic structures from the protein density maps obtained from electron cryomicroscopy technique. This step often relies on matching the secondary structure traces detected from the protein density map to the secondary structure sequence segments predicted from the amino acid sequence. Due to inaccuracies in both sources of information, a pool of possible secondary structure positions needs to be sampled. One way to approach the problem is to first derive a small number of possible topologies using existing matching algorithms, and then find the optimal placement for each possible topology. We present a dynamic programming method of Θ(Nq(2)h) to find the optimal placement for a secondary structure topology. We show that our algorithm requires significantly less computational time than the brute force method that is in the order of Θ(q(N) h).

  10. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  11. NMR Methods for Characterization of RNA Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of RNA secondary structure is often sufficient to identify relationships between the structure of RNA and processing pathways, and the design of therapeutics. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can identify types of nucleotide base pairs and the sequence, thus limiting possible secondary structures. Because NMR experiments, like chemical mapping, are performed in solution, not in single crystals, experiments can be initiated as soon as the biomolecule is expressed and purified. This chapter summarizes NMR methods that permit rapid identification of RNA secondary structure, information that can be used as supplements to chemical mapping, and/or as preliminary steps required for 3D structure determination. The primary aim is to provide guidelines to enable a researcher with minimal knowledge of NMR to quickly extract secondary structure information from basic datasets. Instrumental and sample considerations that can maximize data quality are discussed along with some details for optimal data acquisition and processing parameters. Approaches for identifying base pair types in both unlabeled and isotopically labeled RNA are covered. Common problems, such as missing signals and overlaps, and approaches to address them are considered. Programs under development for merging NMR data with structure prediction algorithms are briefly discussed. PMID:27665604

  12. Peracetic acid for secondary effluent disinfection: a comprehensive performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Turolla, A; Mezzanotte, V; Nurizzo, C

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of previous research on secondary effluent disinfection by peracetic acid (PAA) integrated with new data about the effect of a preliminary flash-mixing step. The process was studied at bench and pilot scale to assess its performance for discharge in surface water and agricultural reuse (target microorganisms: Escherichia coli and faecal coliform bacteria). The purposes of the research were: (1) determining PAA decay and disinfection kinetics as a function of operating parameters, (2) evaluating PAA suitability as a disinfectant, (3) assessing long-term disinfection efficiency, (4) investigating disinfected effluent biological toxicity on some aquatic indicator organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum), (5) comparing PAA with conventional disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite, UV irradiation). PAA disinfection was capable of complying with Italian regulations on reuse (10 CFU/100 mL for E. coli) and was competitive with benchmarks. No regrowth phenomena were observed, as long as needed for agricultural reuse (29 h after disinfection), even at negligible concentrations of residual disinfectant. The toxic effect of PAA on the aquatic environment was due to the residual disinfectant in the water, rather than to chemical modification of the effluent. PMID:24355852

  13. Identification of Secondary Structure Elements in Intermediate Resolution Density Maps

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew L.; Ju, Tao; Chiu, Wah

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of structural studies of large macromolecular complexes, both in X-ray crystallography and electron cryomicroscopy, have resulted in intermediate resolution (5–10 Å) structures. Despite being limited in resolution, significant structural and functional information may be extractable from these maps. To aid in the analysis and annotation of these complexes, we have developed SSEhunter, a tool for the quantitative detection of α-helices and β-sheets. Based on density skeletonization, local geometry calculations and a template-based search, SSEhunter has been tested and validated on a variety of simulated and authentic subnanometer resolution density maps. The result is a robust, user-friendly approach that allows users to quickly visualize, assess and annotate intermediate resolution density maps. Beyond secondary structure element identification, the skeletonization algorithm in SSEhunter provides secondary structure topology, potentially useful in leading to structural models of individual molecular components directly from the density. PMID:17223528

  14. Secondary structure adventures with Carl Woese

    PubMed Central

    Noller, Harry F

    2014-01-01

    Not long after my arrival at UCSC as an assistant professor, I came across Carl Woese's paper “Molecular Mechanics of Translation: A Reciprocating Ratchet Mechanism.”1 In the days before the crystal structure of tRNA was known, Fuller and Hodgson2 had proposed two alternative conformations for its anticodon loop; one was stacked on the 3′ side (as later found in the crystal structure) and the other on the 5′ side. In an ingenious and elegant model, Woese proposed that the conformation of the loop flips between Fuller and Hodgson's 5′- and 3′-stacked forms during protein synthesis, changing the local direction of the mRNA such that the identities of the tRNA binding sites alternated between binding aminoacyl-tRNA and peptidyl-tRNA. The model predicted that there are no A and P sites, only two binding sites whose identities changed following translation of each codon, and that there would be no translocation of tRNAs in the usual sense—only binding and release. I met Carl in person the following year when he presented a seminar on his ratchet model in Santa Cruz. He was chatting in my colleague Ralph Hinegardner's office in what Carl termed a “Little Jack Horner appointment” (the visitor sits and listens to his host describing “What a good boy am I”). He was of compact stature, and bore a striking resemblance to Oskar Werner in Truffaut's film “Jules and Jim.” He projected the impression of a New-Age guru—a shiny black amulet suspended over the front of his black turtleneck sweater and a crown of prematurely white hair. Ralph asked me to explain to Carl what we were doing with ribosomes. I quickly summarized our early experiments that were pointing to a functional role for 16S rRNA. Carl regarded me silently, with a penetrating stare. He then turned to Ralph and said, in an ominous low voice, “I'm going to have some more tanks made as soon as I get back.” Carl's beautiful model was, unfortunately, wrong—it was simpler and more

  15. JPred4: a protein secondary structure prediction server.

    PubMed

    Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Cole, Christian; Procter, James; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2015-07-01

    JPred4 (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jpred4) is the latest version of the popular JPred protein secondary structure prediction server which provides predictions by the JNet algorithm, one of the most accurate methods for secondary structure prediction. In addition to protein secondary structure, JPred also makes predictions of solvent accessibility and coiled-coil regions. The JPred service runs up to 94 000 jobs per month and has carried out over 1.5 million predictions in total for users in 179 countries. The JPred4 web server has been re-implemented in the Bootstrap framework and JavaScript to improve its design, usability and accessibility from mobile devices. JPred4 features higher accuracy, with a blind three-state (α-helix, β-strand and coil) secondary structure prediction accuracy of 82.0% while solvent accessibility prediction accuracy has been raised to 90% for residues <5% accessible. Reporting of results is enhanced both on the website and through the optional email summaries and batch submission results. Predictions are now presented in SVG format with options to view full multiple sequence alignments with and without gaps and insertions. Finally, the help-pages have been updated and tool-tips added as well as step-by-step tutorials. PMID:25883141

  16. JPred4: a protein secondary structure prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Cole, Christian; Procter, James; Barton, Geoffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    JPred4 (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jpred4) is the latest version of the popular JPred protein secondary structure prediction server which provides predictions by the JNet algorithm, one of the most accurate methods for secondary structure prediction. In addition to protein secondary structure, JPred also makes predictions of solvent accessibility and coiled-coil regions. The JPred service runs up to 94 000 jobs per month and has carried out over 1.5 million predictions in total for users in 179 countries. The JPred4 web server has been re-implemented in the Bootstrap framework and JavaScript to improve its design, usability and accessibility from mobile devices. JPred4 features higher accuracy, with a blind three-state (α-helix, β-strand and coil) secondary structure prediction accuracy of 82.0% while solvent accessibility prediction accuracy has been raised to 90% for residues <5% accessible. Reporting of results is enhanced both on the website and through the optional email summaries and batch submission results. Predictions are now presented in SVG format with options to view full multiple sequence alignments with and without gaps and insertions. Finally, the help-pages have been updated and tool-tips added as well as step-by-step tutorials. PMID:25883141

  17. RNA Movies 2: sequential animation of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Krüger, Jan; Evers, Dirk J

    2007-07-01

    RNA Movies is a simple, yet powerful visualization tool in likeness to a media player application, which enables to browse sequential paths through RNA secondary structure landscapes. It can be used to visualize structural rearrangement processes of RNA, such as folding pathways and conformational switches, or to browse lists of alternative structure candidates. Besides extending the feature set, retaining and improving usability and availability in the web is the main aim of this new version. RNA Movies now supports the DCSE and RNAStructML input formats besides its own RNM format. Pseudoknots and 'entangled helices' can be superimposed on the RNA secondary structure layout. Publication quality output is provided through the Scalable Vector Graphics output format understood by most current drawing programs. The software has been completely re-implemented in Java to enable pure client-side operation as applet and web-start application available at the Bielefeld Bioinformatics Server http://bibiserv.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/rnamovies. PMID:17567618

  18. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-03-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  19. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  20. Carboxylic acids in secondary aerosols from oxidation of cyclic monoterpenes by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Glasius, M.; Lahaniati, M.; Calogirou, A.; Di Bella, D.; Jensen, N.R.; Hjorth, J.; Kotzias, D.; Larsen, B.R.

    2000-03-15

    A series of smog chamber experiments have been conducted in which five cyclic monoterpenes were oxidized by ozone. The evolved secondary aerosol was analyzed by GC-MS and HPLC-MS for nonvolatile polar oxidation products with emphasis on the identification of carboxylic acids. Three classes of compounds were determined at concentration levels corresponding to low percentage molar yields: i.e., dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, and hydroxyketocarboxylic acids. Carboxylic acids are highly polar and have lower vapor pressures than their corresponding aldehydes and may thus play an important role in secondary organic aerosol formation processes. The most abundant carboxylic acids were the following: cis-pinic acid AB1(cis-3-carboxy-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) from {alpha} and {beta}-pinene; cis-pinonic acid A3 (cis-3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutylethanoic acid) and cis-10-hydroxypinonic acid Ab6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxyacetylcyclobutyl-ethanoic acid) from {alpha}-pinene and {beta}-pinene; cis-3-caric acid C1 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-cyclopropyldiethanoic acid), cis-3-caronic acid C3 (2,2-dimethyl-3-(2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid), and cis-10-hydroxy-3-caronic acid C6 (cis-2,2-dimethyl-3(hydroxy-2-oxopropyl)cyclopropanylethanoic acid) from 3-carene; cis-sabinic acid S1 (cis-2-carboxy-1-isopropylcyclopropylethanoic acid) from sabinene; limonic acid L1 (3-isopropenylhexanedioic acid), limononic acid L3 (3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanoic acid), 7-hydroxy-limononic acid L6 (3-isopropenyl-7-hydroxy-6-oxoheptanoic acid), and 7-hydroxylimononic acid Lg{prime} (7-hydroxy-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoic acid) from limonene.

  1. Data-directed RNA secondary structure prediction using probabilistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Ledda, Mirko; Vaziri, Sana; Aviran, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Structure dictates the function of many RNAs, but secondary RNA structure analysis is either labor intensive and costly or relies on computational predictions that are often inaccurate. These limitations are alleviated by integration of structure probing data into prediction algorithms. However, existing algorithms are optimized for a specific type of probing data. Recently, new chemistries combined with advances in sequencing have facilitated structure probing at unprecedented scale and sensitivity. These novel technologies and anticipated wealth of data highlight a need for algorithms that readily accommodate more complex and diverse input sources. We implemented and investigated a recently outlined probabilistic framework for RNA secondary structure prediction and extended it to accommodate further refinement of structural information. This framework utilizes direct likelihood-based calculations of pseudo-energy terms per considered structural context and can readily accommodate diverse data types and complex data dependencies. We use real data in conjunction with simulations to evaluate performances of several implementations and to show that proper integration of structural contexts can lead to improvements. Our tests also reveal discrepancies between real data and simulations, which we show can be alleviated by refined modeling. We then propose statistical preprocessing approaches to standardize data interpretation and integration into such a generic framework. We further systematically quantify the information content of data subsets, demonstrating that high reactivities are major drivers of SHAPE-directed predictions and that better understanding of less informative reactivities is key to further improvements. Finally, we provide evidence for the adaptive capability of our framework using mock probe simulations.

  2. Integrating chemical footprinting data into RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zarringhalam, Kourosh; Meyer, Michelle M; Dotu, Ivan; Chuang, Jeffrey H; Clote, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and enzymatic footprinting experiments, such as shape (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension), yield important information about RNA secondary structure. Indeed, since the [Formula: see text]-hydroxyl is reactive at flexible (loop) regions, but unreactive at base-paired regions, shape yields quantitative data about which RNA nucleotides are base-paired. Recently, low error rates in secondary structure prediction have been reported for three RNAs of moderate size, by including base stacking pseudo-energy terms derived from shape data into the computation of minimum free energy secondary structure. Here, we describe a novel method, RNAsc (RNA soft constraints), which includes pseudo-energy terms for each nucleotide position, rather than only for base stacking positions. We prove that RNAsc is self-consistent, in the sense that the nucleotide-specific probabilities of being unpaired in the low energy Boltzmann ensemble always become more closely correlated with the input shape data after application of RNAsc. From this mathematical perspective, the secondary structure predicted by RNAsc should be 'correct', in as much as the shape data is 'correct'. We benchmark RNAsc against the previously mentioned method for eight RNAs, for which both shape data and native structures are known, to find the same accuracy in 7 out of 8 cases, and an improvement of 25% in one case. Furthermore, we present what appears to be the first direct comparison of shape data and in-line probing data, by comparing yeast asp-tRNA shape data from the literature with data from in-line probing experiments we have recently performed. With respect to several criteria, we find that shape data appear to be more robust than in-line probing data, at least in the case of asp-tRNA.

  3. Structure of acid-stable carmine.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yoko; Sato, Kyoko; Aoki, Hiromitsu; Ichi, Takahito; Koda, Takatoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-02-01

    Acid-stable carmine has recently been distributed in the U.S. market because of its good acid stability, but it is not permitted in Japan. We analyzed and determined the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine, in order to establish an analytical method for it. Carminic acid was transformed into a different type of pigment, named acid-stable carmine, through amination when heated in ammonia solution. The features of the structure were clarified using a model compound, purpurin, in which the orientation of hydroxyl groups on the A ring of the anthraquinone skeleton is the same as that of carminic acid. By spectroscopic means and the synthesis of acid-stable carmine and purpurin derivatives, the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine was established as 4-aminocarminic acid, a novel compound. PMID:11998314

  4. COOLAIR Antisense RNAs Form Evolutionarily Conserved Elaborate Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Emily J; Hennelly, Scott P; Novikova, Irina V; Irwin, Judith A; Dean, Caroline; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2016-09-20

    There is considerable debate about the functionality of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Lack of sequence conservation has been used to argue against functional relevance. We investigated antisense lncRNAs, called COOLAIR, at the A. thaliana FLC locus and experimentally determined their secondary structure. The major COOLAIR variants are highly structured, organized by exon. The distally polyadenylated transcript has a complex multi-domain structure, altered by a single non-coding SNP defining a functionally distinct A. thaliana FLC haplotype. The A. thaliana COOLAIR secondary structure was used to predict COOLAIR exons in evolutionarily divergent Brassicaceae species. These predictions were validated through chemical probing and cloning. Despite the relatively low nucleotide sequence identity, the structures, including multi-helix junctions, show remarkable evolutionary conservation. In a number of places, the structure is conserved through covariation of a non-contiguous DNA sequence. This structural conservation supports a functional role for COOLAIR transcripts rather than, or in addition to, antisense transcription. PMID:27653675

  5. Using Circular Dichroism Spectra to Estimate Protein Secondary Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, N.

    2006-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is an excellent tool for rapid determination of the secondary structure and folding properties of proteins that have been obtained using recombinant techniques or purified from tissues. The most widely used applications of protein CD are to determine whether an expressed, purified protein is folded, or if a mutation affects its conformation or stability. In addition, it can be used to study protein interactions. This protocol details the basic steps of obtaining and interpreting CD data and methods for analyzing spectra to estimate the secondary structural composition of proteins. CD has the advantage that it is that measurements may be made on multiple samples containing 20 {mu}g or less of proteins in physiological buffers in a few hours. However, it does not give the residue-specific information that can be obtained by X-ray crystallography or NMR.

  6. Using circular dichroism spectra to estimate protein secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Norma J.

    2009-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is an excellent tool for rapid determination of the secondary structure and folding properties of proteins that have been obtained using recombinant techniques or purified from tissues. The most widely used applications of protein CD are to determine whether an expressed, purified protein is folded, or if a mutation affects its conformation or stability. In addition, it can be used to study protein interactions. This protocol details the basic steps of obtaining and interpreting CD data and methods for analyzing spectra to estimate the secondary structural composition of proteins. CD has the advantage that it is that measurements may be made on multiple samples containing 20 µg or less of proteins in physiological buffers in a few hours. However, it does not give the residue-specific information that can be obtained by X-ray crystallography or NMR. PMID:17406547

  7. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  8. Chiral discrimination of secondary alcohols and carboxylic acids by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pal, Indrani; Chaudhari, Sachin R; Suryaprakash, Nagaraja Rao

    2015-02-01

    The manuscript reports two novel ternary ion-pair complexes, which serve as chiral solvating agents, for enantiodiscrimination of secondary alcohols and carboxylic acids. The protocol for discrimination of secondary alcohols is designed by using one equivalent mixture each of enantiopure mandelic acid, 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and a chiral alcohol. For discrimination of carboxylic acids, the ternary complex is obtained by one equivalent mixture each of enantiopure chiral alcohol, DMAP and a carboxylic acid. The designed protocols also permit accurate measurement of enantiomeric composition.

  9. Intron positions in actin genes seem unrelated to the secondary structure of the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K; Kabsch, W

    1994-01-01

    A catalogue of intron positions along the coding sequence was assembled from the large number of actin genes known for different eukaryotes. 36 positions in the amino acid sequence were compared with the known three-dimensional structure of actin. At least 20 but not more than 23 intron positions are at the start or end of a secondary structural element (beta-strand, alpha-helix or 3/10 helix) while eight positions interrupt such an element. Statistical analysis shows that due to the large number of end positions the boundaries of secondary structural elements are not correlated with the intron positions. In addition, the observed intron pattern seems compatible with the null hypothesis, i.e. intron positions are randomly distributed along the actin sequence. Images PMID:8137812

  10. Coating concrete secondary containment structures exposed to agrichemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, M.F.; Nguyen, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Concrete has traditionally been the material of choice for building secondary containment structures because it is relatively inexpensive and has structural properties which make it ideal for supporting the loads of vehicles and large tanks. However, concrete`s chemical properties make it susceptible to corrosion by some common fertilizers. Though fairly impervious to water movement, concrete is easily penetrated by vapors and solvents. It is also prone to cracking. For these reasons, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes that concrete alone may not provide an effective barrier to pesticide movement and has proposed that concrete in pesticide secondary containment structures be sealed or coated to reduce its permeability. Some state secondary containment regulations require that concrete exposed to fertilizers and pesticides be sealed or protected with a coating. Lacking guidelines, some retailers have used penetrating sealants to satisfy the law, even though these products provide little protection from chemical attack nor do they prevent pesticide egress. Other retailers who have applied thick film coatings which were properly selected have had disastrous results because the application was poorly done. Consequently, much skepticism exists regarding the performance and benefit of protective coatings.

  11. Identification of local variations within secondary structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-05-01

    Secondary-structure elements (SSEs) play an important role in the folding of proteins. Identification of SSEs in proteins is a common problem in structural biology. A new method, ASSP (Assignment of Secondary Structure in Proteins), using only the path traversed by the C(α) atoms has been developed. The algorithm is based on the premise that the protein structure can be divided into continuous or uniform stretches, which can be defined in terms of helical parameters, and depending on their values the stretches can be classified into different SSEs, namely α-helices, 310-helices, π-helices, extended β-strands and polyproline II (PPII) and other left-handed helices. The methodology was validated using an unbiased clustering of these parameters for a protein data set consisting of 1008 protein chains, which suggested that there are seven well defined clusters associated with different SSEs. Apart from α-helices and extended β-strands, 310-helices and π-helices were also found to occur in substantial numbers. ASSP was able to discriminate non-α-helical segments from flanking α-helices, which were often identified as part of α-helices by other algorithms. ASSP can also lead to the identification of novel SSEs. It is believed that ASSP could provide a better understanding of the finer nuances of protein secondary structure and could make an important contribution to the better understanding of comparatively less frequently occurring structural motifs. At the same time, it can contribute to the identification of novel SSEs. A standalone version of the program for the Linux as well as the Windows operating systems is freely downloadable and a web-server version is also available at http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/assp/index.php.

  12. Identification of local variations within secondary structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-05-01

    Secondary-structure elements (SSEs) play an important role in the folding of proteins. Identification of SSEs in proteins is a common problem in structural biology. A new method, ASSP (Assignment of Secondary Structure in Proteins), using only the path traversed by the C(α) atoms has been developed. The algorithm is based on the premise that the protein structure can be divided into continuous or uniform stretches, which can be defined in terms of helical parameters, and depending on their values the stretches can be classified into different SSEs, namely α-helices, 310-helices, π-helices, extended β-strands and polyproline II (PPII) and other left-handed helices. The methodology was validated using an unbiased clustering of these parameters for a protein data set consisting of 1008 protein chains, which suggested that there are seven well defined clusters associated with different SSEs. Apart from α-helices and extended β-strands, 310-helices and π-helices were also found to occur in substantial numbers. ASSP was able to discriminate non-α-helical segments from flanking α-helices, which were often identified as part of α-helices by other algorithms. ASSP can also lead to the identification of novel SSEs. It is believed that ASSP could provide a better understanding of the finer nuances of protein secondary structure and could make an important contribution to the better understanding of comparatively less frequently occurring structural motifs. At the same time, it can contribute to the identification of novel SSEs. A standalone version of the program for the Linux as well as the Windows operating systems is freely downloadable and a web-server version is also available at http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/assp/index.php. PMID:25945573

  13. How well are protein structures annotated in secondary databases?

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Michalsky, Elke; Leser, Ulf

    2005-09-01

    We investigated to what extent Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries are annotated with second-party information based on existing cross-references between PDB and 15 other databases. We report 2 interesting findings. First, there is a clear "annotation gap" for structures less than 7 years old for secondary databases that are manually curated. Second, the examined databases overlap with each other quite well, dividing the PDB into 2 well-annotated thirds and one poorly annotated third. Both observations should be taken into account in any study depending on the selection of protein structures by their annotation.

  14. Protein backbone torsion angle-based structure comparison and secondary structure database web server.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunghoon; Bae, Se-Eun; Ahn, Insung; Son, Hyeon S

    2013-09-01

    Structural information has been a major concern for biological and pharmaceutical studies for its intimate relationship to the function of a protein. Three-dimensional representation of the positions of protein atoms is utilized among many structural information repositories that have been published. The reliability of the torsional system, which represents the native processes of structural change in the structural analysis, was partially proven with previous structural alignment studies. Here, a web server providing structural information and analysis based on the backbone torsional representation of a protein structure is newly introduced. The web server offers functions of secondary structure database search, secondary structure calculation, and pair-wise protein structure comparison, based on a backbone torsion angle representation system. Application of the implementation in pair-wise structural alignment showed highly accurate results. The information derived from this web server might be further utilized in the field of ab initio protein structure modeling or protein homology-related analyses.

  15. Identify five kinds of simple super-secondary structures with quadratic discriminant algorithm based on the chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kou, Gaoshan; Feng, Yonge

    2015-09-01

    The biological function of protein is largely determined by its spatial structure. The research on the relationship between structure and function is the basis of protein structure prediction. However, the prediction of super secondary structure is an important step in the prediction of protein spatial structure. Many algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of protein super secondary structure. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on amino acid sequences. In this paper, we proposed a novel model for predicting five kinds of protein super secondary structures based on the chemical shifts (CSs). Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in five kinds of protein super secondary structures by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Secondly, we used chemical shifts of six nuclei as features, and combined with quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) to predict five kinds of protein super secondary structures. Finally, we achieved the averaged sensitivity, specificity and the overall accuracy of 81.8%, 95.19%, 82.91%, respectively in seven-fold cross-validation. Moreover, we have performed the prediction by combining the five different chemical shifts as features, the maximum overall accuracy up to 89.87% by using the C,Cα,Cβ,N,Hα of Hα chemical shifts, which are clearly superior to that of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) algorithm by using 20 amino acid compositions (AAC) as feature in the seven-fold cross-validation. These results demonstrated that chemical shifts (CSs) are indeed an outstanding parameter for the prediction of five kinds of super secondary structures. In addition, we compared the prediction of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) with that of support vector machine (SVM) by using the same six CSs as features. The result suggested that the quadratic discriminant analysis method by using chemical shifts as features is a good predictor for protein super

  16. HOTAIR forms an intricate and modular secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Somarowthu, Srinivas; Legiewicz, Michal; Chillón, Isabel; Marcia, Marco; Liu, Fei; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as key players in fundamental cellular processes and diseases, but their functions are poorly understood. HOTAIR is a 2,148-nucleotide-long lncRNA molecule involved in physiological epidermal development and in pathogenic cancer progression, where it has been demonstrated to repress tumor and metastasis suppressor genes. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of HOTAIR, we purified it in a stable and homogenous form in vitro and we determined its functional secondary structure through chemical probing and phylogenetic analysis. The HOTAIR structure reveals a degree of structural organization comparable to well-folded RNAs, like the group II intron, rRNA or lncRNA steroid receptor activator. It is composed of four independently-folding modules, two of which correspond to predicted protein-binding domains. Secondary structure elements that surround protein-binding motifs are evolutionarily conserved. Our work serves as a guide for “navigating” through the lncRNA HOTAIR and ultimately for understanding its function. PMID:25866246

  17. Rigidity, Secondary Structure, and the Universality of the Boson Peak in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Nickels, Jonathan D.; Ehlers, Georg; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary neutron- and light-scattering results on nine proteins and amino acids reveal the role of rigidity and secondary structure in determining the time- and lengthscales of low-frequency collective vibrational dynamics in proteins. These dynamics manifest in a spectral feature, known as the boson peak (BP), which is common to all disordered materials. We demonstrate that BP position scales systematically with structural motifs, reflecting local rigidity: disordered proteins appear softer than α-helical proteins; which are softer than β-sheet proteins. Our analysis also reveals a universal spectral shape of the BP in proteins and amino acid mixtures; superimposable on the shape observed in typical glasses. Uniformity in the underlying physical mechanism, independent of the specific chemical composition, connects the BP vibrations to nanometer-scale heterogeneities, providing an experimental benchmark for coarse-grained simulations, structure/rigidity relationships, and engineering of proteins for novel applications. PMID:24940784

  18. Determination of the Secondary Structure of the king Cobra Neurotoxin CM-11.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu-Xi; Liu, Wei-Dong; Liu, Ai-Zhuo; Pei, Feng-Kui

    1997-01-01

    The king cobra neurotoxin CM-11 is a small protein with 72 amino acid residues. After its complete assignments of (1)H-NMR resonance's were obtained using various 2D-NMR technologies, including DQF-COSY, clean-TOCSY and NOESY, the secondary structure was analysed by studying the various NOEs extracted from the NOESY spectra and the distribution of chemical shifts. The secondary structure was finally determined by MCD as follows: a triple-strand antiparallel beta sheet with I20-W26, R37-A43 and V53-S59 as its beta strands, a short alpha helix formed by W30-G35 and four turns formed by P7-K1O, C14-G17, K50-V53 and D61-N64.

  19. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floare, C. G.; Bogdan, M.; Horovitz, O.; Mocanu, A.; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Lu, Lei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Min; Li, Xianchi; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing dramatically especially in developing countries like India. CVD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There has been a growing awareness of the role of nutrients in the prevention of CVD. One specific recommendation in the battle against CVD is the increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, which are polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies have reported inverse associations of CVD with dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids supplementation might exert protective effects on CVD. They exert their cardioprotective effect through multiple mechanisms. Omega-3 fatty acid therapy has shown promise as a useful tool in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. This review briefly summarizes the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in primary and secondary prevention of CVD.

  1. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  6. Protein secondary structure prediction using logic-based machine learning.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, S; King, R D; Sternberg, M J

    1992-10-01

    Many attempts have been made to solve the problem of predicting protein secondary structure from the primary sequence but the best performance results are still disappointing. In this paper, the use of a machine learning algorithm which allows relational descriptions is shown to lead to improved performance. The Inductive Logic Programming computer program, Golem, was applied to learning secondary structure prediction rules for alpha/alpha domain type proteins. The input to the program consisted of 12 non-homologous proteins (1612 residues) of known structure, together with a background knowledge describing the chemical and physical properties of the residues. Golem learned a small set of rules that predict which residues are part of the alpha-helices--based on their positional relationships and chemical and physical properties. The rules were tested on four independent non-homologous proteins (416 residues) giving an accuracy of 81% (+/- 2%). This is an improvement, on identical data, over the previously reported result of 73% by King and Sternberg (1990, J. Mol. Biol., 216, 441-457) using the machine learning program PROMIS, and of 72% using the standard Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson method. The best previously reported result in the literature for the alpha/alpha domain type is 76%, achieved using a neural net approach. Machine learning also has the advantage over neural network and statistical methods in producing more understandable results. PMID:1480619

  7. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  8. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  9. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  10. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin wasmore » determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states

  11. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  12. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  13. Prot-2S: a new python web tool for protein secondary structure studies.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Magalhães, Alexandre L

    2009-01-01

    Prot-2S is a bioinformatics web application devised to analyse the protein chain secondary structures (2S) (http:/ /www.requimte.pt:8080/Prot-2S/). The tool is built on the RCSB Protein Data Bank PDB and DSSP application/files and includes calculation/graphical display of amino acid propensities in 2S motifs based on any user amino acid classification/code (for any particular protein chain list). The interface can calculate the 2S composition, display the 2S subsequences and search for DSSP non-standard residues and for pairs/triplets/quadruplets (amino acid patterns in 2S motifs). This work presents some Prot-2S applications showing its usefulness in protein research and as an e-learning tool as well. PMID:19640828

  14. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  15. Bioactive secondary metabolites from acid mine waste extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B

    2014-07-01

    The extremophilic microbes of the Berkeley Pit Lake are a valuable source of new and interesting secondary metabolites. It is of particular interest that these acidophilic microbes produce small molecule inhibitors of pathways associated with low pH and high Eh. These same small molecules also inhibit molecular pathways induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation in mammalian cells. Low pH is a hallmark of inflammation and high Eh is one of ROS, so the suitability of this collection as a source of bioactive metabolites is actually quite biorational. Compound isolation was guided by inhibition of caspase-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-3, and active compounds were sent to the National Cancer Institute-Developmental Therapeutics Program and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer center for evaluation as either antiproliferative or cytotoxic agents.

  16. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-10-01

    In this article we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model that is only dependent on the diagram representation and is not sequence-specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures, and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point at which the distribution of irreducibles experiences this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and, subsequently, put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe structures leads to a constant time and space reduction, and that the sparsification of the folding of structures with modified parameters leads to a linear time and space reduction. We, furthermore, identify the limit distribution at the phase transition as a Rayleigh distribution.

  17. Coding of odor stimulus features among secondary olfactory structures.

    PubMed

    Xia, Christina Z; Adjei, Stacey; Wesson, Daniel W

    2015-07-01

    Sensory systems must represent stimuli in manners dependent upon a wealth of factors, including stimulus intensity and duration. One way the brain might handle these complex functions is to assign the tasks throughout distributed nodes, each contributing to information processing. We sought to explore this important aspect of sensory network function in the mammalian olfactory system, wherein the intensity and duration of odor exposure are critical contributors to odor perception. This is a quintessential model for exploring processing schemes given the distribution of odor information by olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells into several anatomically distinct secondary processing stages, including the piriform cortex (PCX) and olfactory tubercle (OT), whose unique contributions to odor coding are unresolved. We explored the coding of PCX and OT neuron responses to odor intensity and duration. We found that both structures similarly partake in representing descending intensities of odors by reduced recruitment and modulation of neurons. Additionally, while neurons in the OT adapt to odor exposure, they display reduced capacity to adapt to either repeated presentations of odor or a single prolonged odor presentation compared with neurons in the PCX. These results provide insights into manners whereby secondary olfactory structures may, at least in some cases, uniquely represent stimulus features. PMID:26041832

  18. Coding of odor stimulus features among secondary olfactory structures

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Christina Z.; Adjei, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems must represent stimuli in manners dependent upon a wealth of factors, including stimulus intensity and duration. One way the brain might handle these complex functions is to assign the tasks throughout distributed nodes, each contributing to information processing. We sought to explore this important aspect of sensory network function in the mammalian olfactory system, wherein the intensity and duration of odor exposure are critical contributors to odor perception. This is a quintessential model for exploring processing schemes given the distribution of odor information by olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells into several anatomically distinct secondary processing stages, including the piriform cortex (PCX) and olfactory tubercle (OT), whose unique contributions to odor coding are unresolved. We explored the coding of PCX and OT neuron responses to odor intensity and duration. We found that both structures similarly partake in representing descending intensities of odors by reduced recruitment and modulation of neurons. Additionally, while neurons in the OT adapt to odor exposure, they display reduced capacity to adapt to either repeated presentations of odor or a single prolonged odor presentation compared with neurons in the PCX. These results provide insights into manners whereby secondary olfactory structures may, at least in some cases, uniquely represent stimulus features. PMID:26041832

  19. Peptoid nanosheets exhibit a new secondary-structure motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.; Haxton, Thomas K.; Proulx, Caroline; Robertson, Ellen J.; Battigelli, Alessia; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    A promising route to the synthesis of protein-mimetic materials that are capable of complex functions, such as molecular recognition and catalysis, is provided by sequence-defined peptoid polymers--structural relatives of biologically occurring polypeptides. Peptoids, which are relatively non-toxic and resistant to degradation, can fold into defined structures through a combination of sequence-dependent interactions. However, the range of possible structures that are accessible to peptoids and other biological mimetics is unknown, and our ability to design protein-like architectures from these polymer classes is limited. Here we use molecular-dynamics simulations, together with scattering and microscopy data, to determine the atomic-resolution structure of the recently discovered peptoid nanosheet, an ordered supramolecular assembly that extends macroscopically in only two dimensions. Our simulations show that nanosheets are structurally and dynamically heterogeneous, can be formed only from peptoids of certain lengths, and are potentially porous to water and ions. Moreover, their formation is enabled by the peptoids' adoption of a secondary structure that is not seen in the natural world. This structure, a zigzag pattern that we call a Σ(`sigma')-strand, results from the ability of adjacent backbone monomers to adopt opposed rotational states, thereby allowing the backbone to remain linear and untwisted. Linear backbones tiled in a brick-like way form an extended two-dimensional nanostructure, the Σ-sheet. The binary rotational-state motif of the Σ-strand is not seen in regular protein structures, which are usually built from one type of rotational state. We also show that the concept of building regular structures from multiple rotational states can be generalized beyond the peptoid nanosheet system.

  20. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannová, Lada Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  1. An optimized probucol microencapsulated formulation integrating a secondary bile acid (deoxycholic acid) as a permeation enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Watts, Gerald F; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The authors have previously designed, developed, and characterized a novel microencapsulated formulation as a platform for the targeted delivery of therapeutics in an animal model of type 2 diabetes, using the drug probucol (PB). The aim of this study was to optimize PB microcapsules by incorporating the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), which has good permeation-enhancing properties, and to examine its effect on microcapsules’ morphology, rheology, structural and surface characteristics, and excipients’ chemical and thermal compatibilities. Microencapsulation was carried out using a BÜCHI-based microencapsulating system established in the authors’ laboratory. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA), two microencapsulated formulations were prepared: PB-SA (control) and PB-DCA-SA (test) at a constant ratio (1:30 and 1:3:30, respectively). Complete characterization of the microcapsules was carried out. The incorporation of DCA resulted in better structural and surface characteristics, uniform morphology, and stable chemical and thermal profiles, while size and rheological parameters remained similar to control. In addition, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good excipients’ compatibilities, which were supported by data from differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. Hence, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules have good rheological and compatibility characteristics and may be suitable for the oral delivery of PB in type 2 diabetes. PMID:25302020

  2. An optimized probucol microencapsulated formulation integrating a secondary bile acid (deoxycholic acid) as a permeation enhancer.

    PubMed

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Watts, Gerald F; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The authors have previously designed, developed, and characterized a novel microencapsulated formulation as a platform for the targeted delivery of therapeutics in an animal model of type 2 diabetes, using the drug probucol (PB). The aim of this study was to optimize PB microcapsules by incorporating the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), which has good permeation-enhancing properties, and to examine its effect on microcapsules' morphology, rheology, structural and surface characteristics, and excipients' chemical and thermal compatibilities. Microencapsulation was carried out using a BÜCHI-based microencapsulating system established in the authors' laboratory. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA), two microencapsulated formulations were prepared: PB-SA (control) and PB-DCA-SA (test) at a constant ratio (1:30 and 1:3:30, respectively). Complete characterization of the microcapsules was carried out. The incorporation of DCA resulted in better structural and surface characteristics, uniform morphology, and stable chemical and thermal profiles, while size and rheological parameters remained similar to control. In addition, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good excipients' compatibilities, which were supported by data from differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. Hence, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules have good rheological and compatibility characteristics and may be suitable for the oral delivery of PB in type 2 diabetes. PMID:25302020

  3. RNAex: an RNA secondary structure prediction server enhanced by high-throughput structure-probing data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Qu, Rihao; Huang, Yiming; Shi, Binbin; Liu, Mengrong; Li, Yang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-07-01

    Several high-throughput technologies have been developed to probe RNA base pairs and loops at the transcriptome level in multiple species. However, to obtain the final RNA secondary structure, extensive effort and considerable expertise is required to statistically process the probing data and combine them with free energy models. Therefore, we developed an RNA secondary structure prediction server that is enhanced by experimental data (RNAex). RNAex is a web interface that enables non-specialists to easily access cutting-edge structure-probing data and predict RNA secondary structures enhanced by in vivo and in vitro data. RNAex annotates the RNA editing, RNA modification and SNP sites on the predicted structures. It provides four structure-folding methods, restrained MaxExpect, SeqFold, RNAstructure (Fold) and RNAfold that can be selected by the user. The performance of these four folding methods has been verified by previous publications on known structures. We re-mapped the raw sequencing data of the probing experiments to the whole genome for each species. RNAex thus enables users to predict secondary structures for both known and novel RNA transcripts in human, mouse, yeast and Arabidopsis The RNAex web server is available at http://RNAex.ncrnalab.org/.

  4. RNAex: an RNA secondary structure prediction server enhanced by high-throughput structure-probing data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Qu, Rihao; Huang, Yiming; Shi, Binbin; Liu, Mengrong; Li, Yang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-01-01

    Several high-throughput technologies have been developed to probe RNA base pairs and loops at the transcriptome level in multiple species. However, to obtain the final RNA secondary structure, extensive effort and considerable expertise is required to statistically process the probing data and combine them with free energy models. Therefore, we developed an RNA secondary structure prediction server that is enhanced by experimental data (RNAex). RNAex is a web interface that enables non-specialists to easily access cutting-edge structure-probing data and predict RNA secondary structures enhanced by in vivo and in vitro data. RNAex annotates the RNA editing, RNA modification and SNP sites on the predicted structures. It provides four structure-folding methods, restrained MaxExpect, SeqFold, RNAstructure (Fold) and RNAfold that can be selected by the user. The performance of these four folding methods has been verified by previous publications on known structures. We re-mapped the raw sequencing data of the probing experiments to the whole genome for each species. RNAex thus enables users to predict secondary structures for both known and novel RNA transcripts in human, mouse, yeast and Arabidopsis. The RNAex web server is available at http://RNAex.ncrnalab.org/. PMID:27137891

  5. Computer-aided prediction of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Auron, P E; Rindone, W P; Vary, C P; Celentano, J J; Vournakis, J N

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey of computer algorithms that have been developed to generate predictions of the secondary structures of RNA molecules is presented. Two particular methods are described in some detail. The first utilizes a thermodynamic energy minimization algorithm that takes into account the likelihood that short-range folding tends to be favored over long-range interactions. The second utilizes an interactive computer graphic modelling algorithm that enables the user to consider thermodynamic criteria as well as structural data obtained by nuclease susceptibility, chemical reactivity and phylogenetic studies. Examples of structures for prokaryotic 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs, several eukaryotic 5S ribosomal RNAs and rabbit beta-globin messenger RNA are presented as case studies in order to describe the two techniques. Anm argument is made for integrating the two approaches presented in this paper, enabling the user to generate proposed structures using thermodynamic criteria, allowing interactive refinement of these structures through the application of experimentally derived data. PMID:6174937

  6. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of our knowledge, no implementation combines both CPU and extra accelerators, such as GPUs, to accelerate the Zuker algorithm applications. Results In this paper, a CPU-GPU hybrid computing system that accelerates Zuker algorithm applications for RNA secondary structure prediction is proposed. The computing tasks are allocated between CPU and GPU for parallel cooperate execution. Performance differences between the CPU and the GPU in the task-allocation scheme are considered to obtain workload balance. To improve the hybrid system performance, the Zuker algorithm is optimally implemented with special methods for CPU and GPU architecture. Conclusions Speedup of 15.93× over optimized multi-core SIMD CPU implementation and performance advantage of 16% over optimized GPU implementation are shown in the experimental results. More than 14% of the sequences are executed on CPU in the hybrid system. The system combining CPU and GPU to accelerate the Zuker algorithm is proven to be promising and can be applied to other bioinformatics applications. PMID:22369626

  7. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    , allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine. PMID:27239562

  8. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    , allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine.

  9. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Alison A.; Young, Vincent B.

    2016-01-01

    microbiota, allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine. PMID:27239562

  10. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility. PMID:26752681

  11. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility.

  12. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  13. An RNA secondary structure prediction method based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haoyue; Yang, Lianping; Zhang, Xiangde

    2015-09-01

    The function of an RNA-molecule is mainly determined by its tertiary structures. And its secondary structure is an important determinant of its tertiary structure. The comparative methods usually give better results than the single-sequence methods. Based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures, the paper presents a novel method for predicting conserved secondary structure of a group of related RNAs. In the method, the information from the known RNA structures is used as training data in a SVM (Support Vector Machine) classifier. Our method has been tested on the benchmark dataset given by Puton et al. The results show that the average sensitivity of our method is higher than that of other comparative methods such as CentroidAlifold, MXScrana, RNAalifold, and TurboFold. PMID:26100179

  14. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  15. Phenolic acids in neem (Azadirachta indica): a major pre-existing secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, U P; Maurya, S; Singh, D P

    2005-01-01

    High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) analyses of various parts (fresh and dry bark of stem, mature and tender leaves, flower and different parts of fruit, i.e., raw and ripe fruit epicarp, mesocarp and seed) of neem (Azadirachta indica), which occupies an important place in socio-cultural-religious life in Indian communities, indicate that neem is rich in pre-existing secondary metabolites (phenolic acids). Dry bark showed only tannic acid but in fresh bark three phenolic acids were observed, i.e., gallic, tannic, and ferulic acids. In tender leaves only gallic and ferulic acids were detected, but the levels of these phenolic acids in mature leaves were about three times and fifty times greater, respectively. Flowers had only two phenolic acids in which gallic acid was maximum followed by chlorogenic acid. The level of phenolic acid was maximum in seeds followed by epicarp and pulp. In raw and ripe fruit seeds four phenolic acids were detected. Raw fruit seeds were rich in phenolic acids than ripe fruit seeds. Fruit epicarp was relatively richer than seed, seed pulp and flowers of the plants. Neem flowers were also rich in gallic and chlorogenic acids. PMID:16093234

  16. Parity-Violation Energy of Biomolecules - IV: Protein Secondary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faglioni, Francesco; Cuesta, Inmaculada García

    2011-06-01

    The parity-violation energy difference between enantiomeric forms of the same amino acid sequence, from the amyloid β-peptide involved in Alzheimer's desease, in both α-helix and β-sheet configurations, is investigated with ab-initio techniques. To this end, we develop an extension of the N2 computational scheme that selectively includes neighboring amino acids to preserve the relevant H-bonds. In agreement with previous speculations, it is found that the helical α structure is associated with larger parity-violation energy differences than the corresponding β form. Implications for the evolution of biological homochirality are discussed as well as the relative importance of various effects in determining the parity-violation energy.

  17. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, J. Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Sánchez, Ignacio E.

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage “Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis”. PMID:26674530

  18. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, J Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G; Sánchez, Ignacio E

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage "Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis".

  19. Consequential secondary structure alterations and aggregation during prolonged casein glycation.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Supriya; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) of casein is a process used not just to ameliorate the quality of dairy products but also to increase the shelf life of canned foods, including baby milk supplements. Incubation of κ-casein with reducing sugars for 15 days at physiological temperature showed the formation of a molten globule state at day 9 and 12 during fructation and glucation respectively. This state exhibits substantial secondary structure and maximum ANS binding. Later on, glycation resulted in the formation of aggregates at day 12 in presence of fructose and day 15 in presence of glucose. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and FTIR. These aggregates showed altered tryptophan environment, decrease ANS binding relative to molten globule state and increase in Thioflavin T fluorescence. Aggregates were also accompanied by the accumulation of AGEs, indicative of structural damage to the protein and formation of potentially harmful species at the physiological level. Fructose was more reactive than glucose and thus caused early and significant changes in the protein. From our studies, we conclude that controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction in the food industry is essential to counter its negative effects and expand its safety spectrum. PMID:23408088

  20. Secondary structure of protamine in sperm nuclei: an infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protamines are small basic proteins that condense the DNA in mature spermatozoa. Typical protamines are of simple composition and very arginine-rich, usually in the range of 60-80%. Arginine residues are distributed in a number of stretches separated by neutral amino acids. We have used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to gain access for the first time to the secondary structure of protamines in sperm nuclei. This technique is particularly well suited to the study of DNA-bound protamine in whole nuclei since it is not affected by turbidity. Results We show that DNA -bound salmon (salmine) and squid protamines contain α-helix, β-turns and a proportion of other structures not stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. No β-sheet was observed. In salmine, the α-helix amounted to ~20%, while in squid protamine it reached ~40%. In contrast, the structure not stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonding was more abundant in salmine (~40%) than in squid protamine (~20%). Both protamines contained ~40% β-turns. The different helical potential of salmine and squid protamine was confirmed by structure predictions and CD in the presence of trifluoroethanol. Conclusion DNA-bound protamine in sperm nuclei contains large amounts of defined secondary structure stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Both salmine and squid protamine contain similar amounts of β-turns, but differ in the proportions of α-helix and non-hydrogen bonded conformations. In spite of the large differences in the proportions of secondary structure motifs between salmon and squid protamines, they appear to be equally efficient in promoting tight hexagonal packing of the DNA molecules in sperm nuclei. PMID:21435240

  1. Toward a better understanding of structural divergences in proteins using different secondary structure assignment methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, L. F. O.

    2014-04-01

    Structural disagreements on the location and quantity of secondary structure segments comprise a current challenging problem leading to several limitations for theoretical and applied research. This paper presents 116 structural evaluations by steric and hydrophobic interactions in secondary structures within a specific template group; determines simple prediction rules that calculate 88 occurrence frequencies of large and hydrophobic residues into target intra- and inter-subgroups with structure disagreements; and utilizes 42 comparisons between the methods PROMOTIF, DSSP and STRIDE. In the stereochemical predictions inside the subgroups there are predominantly excellent and/or good success amounts with their expected values, and the disclosure of a triple molecular mechanism by residue volumetric and hydrophobic ingredients. The method comparisons show high compatibility scores between them, therefore validating their seemingly incompatible assignments. Thus, the nonconsensual ascriptions are better understood and appreciated. Furthermore, such results suggest a broad utility of our assignment method for other benchmark datasets and known methods.

  2. Vibrational structure of the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid studied by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Noack, Kristina; Bartelmess, Juergen; Walter, Christian; Dörnenburg, Heike; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    The spectroscopic discrimination of the two structurally similar polyunsaturated C 20 fatty acids (PUFAs) 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid) is shown. For this purpose their vibrational structures are studied by means of attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The fingerprint regions of the recorded spectra are found to be almost identical, while the C-H stretching mode regions around 3000 cm -1 show such significant differences as results of electronic and molecular structure alterations based on the different degree of saturation that both fatty acids can be clearly distinguished from each other.

  3. Accounting for solvent accessibility and secondary structure in protein phylogenetics is clearly beneficial.

    PubMed

    Le, Si Quang; Gascuel, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    Amino acid substitution models are essential to most methods to infer phylogenies from protein data. These models represent the ways in which proteins evolve and substitutions accumulate along the course of time. It is widely accepted that the substitution processes vary depending on the structural configuration of the protein residues. However, this information is very rarely used in phylogenetic studies, though the 3-dimensional structure of dozens of thousands of proteins has been elucidated. Here, we reinvestigate the question in order to fill this gap. We use an improved estimation methodology and a very large database comprising 1471 nonredundant globular protein alignments with structural annotations to estimate new amino acid substitution models accounting for the secondary structure and solvent accessibility of the residues. These models incorporate a confidence coefficient that is estimated from the data and reflects the reliability and usefulness of structural annotations in the analyzed sequences. Our results with 300 independent test alignments show an impressive likelihood gain compared with standard models such as JTT or WAG. Moreover, the use of these models induces significant topological changes in the inferred trees, which should be of primary interest to phylogeneticists. Our data, models, and software are available for download from http://atgc.lirmm.fr/phyml-structure/.

  4. Teachers' Perceptions of the Teaching of Acids and Bases in Swedish Upper Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drechsler, Michal; Van Driel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report in this paper on a study of chemistry teachers' perceptions of their teaching in upper secondary schools in Sweden, regarding models of acids and bases, especially the Bronsted and the Arrhenius model. A questionnaire consisting of a Likert-type scale was developed, which focused on teachers' knowledge of different models, knowledge of…

  5. The Chemistry of Polymers, Proteins, and Nucleic Acids: A Short Course on Macromolecules for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulav, Ilan; Samuel, David

    1985-01-01

    Describes a unit on macromolecules that has been used in the 12th grade of many Israeli secondary schools. Topic areas in the unit include synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, and nucleic acids. A unit outline is provided in an appendix. (JN)

  6. Structural evolution of gold nanorods during controlled secondary growth.

    PubMed

    Keul, Heidrun A; Möller, Martin; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2007-09-25

    Single-crystalline gold nanorods synthesized by the Ag(I)-mediated seeded-growth method (see: El-Sayed, M. A.; Nikoobakht, B. Chem. Mater. 2003, 15, 1957) were used as seeds for the preferential overgrowth of gold on particular crystallographic facets by systematic variation of the conditions during overgrowth. The results support previous reports about the relevance of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Ag(I) in stabilizing anisotropic particle shapes and demonstrate that the regulation of the amount of ascorbic acid facilitates the preferential overgrowth of {111} crystal facets to form Xi-type particle shapes. Interestingly, secondary overgrowth is found to inevitably result in a loss of particle shape anisotropy. A mechanism based on surface reconstruction is proposed to rationalize the "shape-reversal" that is generally observed in the nanorod growth process, that is, the initial increase and subsequent decrease of particle anisotropy with increasing reaction time. High-resolution electron microscopy analysis of gold nanorods reveals clear evidence for (1 x 2) missing row surface reconstruction of high energetic {110} facets that form during the initial phase during particle growth. PMID:17713936

  7. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC). PMID:27045556

  8. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC).

  9. Microwave structure for the propiolic acid-formic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Kukolich, Stephen G; Mitchell, Erik G; Carey, Spencer J; Sun, Ming; Sargus, Bryan A

    2013-10-01

    New microwave spectra were measured to obtain rotational constants and centrifugal distortion constants for the DCCCOOH···HOOCH and HCCCOOD···DOOCH isotopologues. Rotational transitions were measured in the frequency range of 4.9-15.4 GHz, providing accurate rotational constants, which, combined with previous rotational constants, allowed an improved structural fit for the propiolic acid-formic acid complex. The new structural fit yields reasonably accurate orientations for both the propiolic and formic acid monomers in the complex and more accurate structural parameters describing the hydrogen bonding. The structure is planar, with a positive inertial defect of Δ = 1.33 amu Å(2). The experimental structure exhibits a greater asymmetry for the two hydrogen bond lengths than was obtained from the ab initio mp2 calculations. The best-fit hydrogen bond lengths have an r(O1-H1···O4) of 1.64 Å and an r(O3-H2···O2) of 1.87 Å. The average of the two hydrogen bond lengths is r(av)(exp) = 1.76 Å, in good agreement with r(av)(theory) = 1.72 Å. The center of mass separation of the monomers is R(CM) = 3.864 Å. Other structural parameters from the least-squares fit using the experimental rotational constants are compared with theoretical values. The spectra were obtained using two different pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometers.

  10. Secondary use of structured patient data: interim results of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vuokko, Riikka; Mäkelä-Bengs, Päivi; Hyppönen, Hannele; Doupi, Persephone

    2015-01-01

    In addition to patient care, EHR data are increasingly in demand for secondary purposes, e.g. administration, research and enterprise resource planning. We conducted a systematic literature review and subsequent analysis of 85 articles focusing on the secondary use of structured patient records. We grounded the analysis on how patient records have been structured, how these structures have been evaluated and what are the main results achieved from the secondary use viewpoint. We conclude that secondary use requires complete and interoperable patient records, which in turn depend on better alignment of primary and secondary users' needs and benefits. PMID:25991152

  11. Structure of 13Be probed via secondary-beam reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randisi, G.; Leprince, A.; Al Falou, H.; Orr, N. A.; Marqués, F. M.; Achouri, N. L.; Angélique, J.-C.; Ashwood, N.; Bastin, B.; Bloxham, T.; Brown, B. A.; Catford, W. N.; Curtis, N.; Delaunay, F.; Freer, M.; de Góes Brennand, E.; Haigh, P.; Hanappe, F.; Harlin, C.; Laurent, B.; Lecouey, J.-L.; Ninane, A.; Patterson, N.; Price, D.; Stuttgé, L.; Thomas, J. S.

    2014-03-01

    The low-lying level structure of the unbound neutron-rich nucleus 13Be has been investigated via breakup on a carbon target of secondary beams of 14,15B at 35 MeV/nucleon. The coincident detection of the beam velocity 12Be fragments and neutrons permitted the invariant mass of the 12Be+n and 12Be+n+n systems to be reconstructed. In the case of the breakup of 15B, a very narrow structure at threshold was observed in the 12Be+n channel. Analysis of the 12Be+n+n events demonstrated that this resulted from the sequential decay of the unbound 14Be(2+) state rather than a strongly interacting s-wave virtual state in 13Be, as had been surmised in stable beam fragmentation studies. Single-proton removal from 14B was found to populate a broad low-lying structure some 0.7 MeV above the neutron-decay threshold, in addition to a less prominent feature at around 2.4 MeV. Based on the selectivity of the reaction and a comparison with (0-3)ℏω shell-model calculations, the low-lying structure is concluded to arise from closely spaced Jπ=1/2+ and 5/2+ resonances (Er=0.40±0.03 and 0.85-0.11+0.15 MeV), while the broad higher-lying feature is a second 5/2+ level (Er=2.35±0.14 MeV). Taken in conjunction with earlier studies, the results suggest that the lowest 1/2+ and 1/2- levels lie relatively close together below 1 MeV.

  12. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observedmore » when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.« less

  13. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observed when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.

  14. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Local Adaptive Techniques in Training Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aik, Lim Eng; Zainuddin, Zarita; Joseph, Annie

    2008-01-01

    One of the most significant problems in computer molecular biology today is how to predict a protein's three-dimensional structure from its one-dimensional amino acid sequence or generally call the protein folding problem and difficult to determine the corresponding protein functions. Thus, this paper involves protein secondary structure prediction using neural network in order to solve the protein folding problem. The neural network used for protein secondary structure prediction is multilayer perceptron (MLP) of the feed-forward variety. The training set are taken from the protein data bank which are 120 proteins while 60 testing set is the proteins which were chosen randomly from the protein data bank. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is used to get the protein similar sequence and Position Specific Scoring matrix (PSSM) is used for network input. The training process of the neural network involves local adaptive techniques. Local adaptive techniques used in this paper comprises Learning rate by sign changes, SuperSAB, Quickprop and RPROP. From the simulation, the performance for learning rate by Rprop and Quickprop are superior to all other algorithms with respect to the convergence time. However, the best result was obtained using Rprop algorithm.

  15. Molecular topography and secondary structure comparisons of botulinum neurotoxin types A, B and E.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R; DasGupta, B R

    1989-03-16

    Botulinum neurotoxin (NT) serotypes A, B and E differ in microstructure and biological activities. The three NTs were examined for secondary structure parameters (alpha-helix, beta-sheet, beta-turn and random coil content) on the basis of circular dichroism; degree of exposed Tyr residues (second derivative spectroscopy) and state of the Trp residues (fluorescence and fluorescence quantum yield). The proteins are high in beta-pleated sheet content (41-44%) and low in alpha-helical content (21-28%). About 30-36% of the amino acids are in random coils. The beta-sheet contents in the NTs are similar irrespective of their structural forms (i.e. single or dichain forms) or level of toxicity. About 84%, 58% and 61% of Tyr residues of types A, B, and E NT, respectively, were exposed to the solvent (pH 7.2 phosphate buffer). Although the fluorescence emission maximum of Trp residues of type B NT was most blue shifted (331 nm compared to 334 for types A and E NT, and 346 nm for free tryptophan) the fluorescence quantum yields of types A and B were similar and higher than type E. In general the NTs have similar secondary (low alpha-helix and high beta-sheets) and tertiary (exposed tyrosine residues and tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield) structures. Within this generalized picture there are significant differences which might be related to the differences in their biological activities.

  16. Efficient enantioselective separation and determination of trace impurities in secondary amino acids (i.e., imino acids).

    PubMed

    Zukowski, J; Pawlowska, M; Armstrong, D W

    1992-10-01

    An R-(-)-1-(1-naphthyl)ethyl carbamoylated-beta-cyclodextrin bonded phase in conjunction with a nonaqueous polar mobile phase was used for the highly selective enantioseparation of a number of secondary amino acids after their pre-column derivatization with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC). Under the conditions employed, the FMOC reagent served to "lock" the imino acid into their existing conformation thereby preventing the possibility of racemization. Furthermore, it served to increase the sensitivity to the point that trace level enantiomeric impurities were easily detected. Compared with separations that use traditional reversed-phase solvents, this method showed several advantages: higher selectivity towards the imino acid enantiomers investigated, shorter analysis times, faster equilibration of the column, more stable baseline and more sensitive fluorescence detection. The detection limits for FMOC derivatives of proline, trans-4-hydroxyproline, cis-4-hydroxyproline, pyroglutamic acid, 3,4-dehydroproline, thiaproline, penicillamine acetone adduct and pipecolic acid are in the low femtomole range. The method was used for evaluation of enantioselectivity of a number of "optically pure" commercial imino acid standards. Enantiomeric impurities as low as 0.0001% (1 ppm) can be determined in some cases. High precision determination of trace levels of D-imino acids in the presence of large amounts of corresponding (opposite) L enantiomer at 1, 0.1, 0.01% and below are demonstrated. PMID:1452629

  17. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  18. Energy-based RNA consensus secondary structure prediction in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Washietl, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically important RNA structures are conserved in evolution leading to characteristic mutational patterns. RNAalifold is a widely used program to predict consensus secondary structures in multiple alignments by combining evolutionary information with traditional energy-based RNA folding algorithms. Here we describe the theory and applications of the RNAalifold algorithm. Consensus secondary structure prediction not only leads to significantly more accurate structure models, but it also allows to study structural conservation of functional RNAs. PMID:24639158

  19. Energy-based RNA consensus secondary structure prediction in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Washietl, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically important RNA structures are conserved in evolution leading to characteristic mutational patterns. RNAalifold is a widely used program to predict consensus secondary structures in multiple alignments by combining evolutionary information with traditional energy-based RNA folding algorithms. Here we describe the theory and applications of the RNAalifold algorithm. Consensus secondary structure prediction not only leads to significantly more accurate structure models, but it also allows to study structural conservation of functional RNAs.

  20. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  1. Toxicity of the lichen secondary metabolite (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Dailey, R N; Montgomery, D L; Ingram, J T; Siemion, R; Vasquez, M; Raisbeck, M F

    2008-01-01

    Toxicity following ingestion of the vagrant, foliose lichen Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa was identified as the putative etiology in the death of an estimated 400-500 elk on the Red Rim-Daley Wildlife Habitat Management Area in Wyoming during the winter of 2004. A single, unsubstantiated report in 1939 attributed toxicity of X. chlorochroa in cattle and sheep to usnic acid, a common lichen secondary metabolite. To test the hypothesis that usnic acid is the proximate cause of death in animals poisoned by lichen, domestic sheep were dosed PO with (+)-usnic acid. Clinical signs in symptomatic ewes included lethargy, anorexia, and signs indicative of abdominal discomfort. Serum creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase activities were considerably elevated in symptomatic sheep. Similarly, only symptomatic ewes exhibited appreciable postmortem lesions consisting of severe degenerative appendicular skeletal myopathy. The median toxic dose (ED(50)) of (+)-usnic acid in domestic sheep was estimated to be between 485 and 647 mg/kg/day for 7 days.

  2. Rtools: a web server for various secondary structural analyses on single RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Michiaki; Ono, Yukiteru; Kiryu, Hisanori; Sato, Kengo; Kato, Yuki; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Mori, Ryota; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    The secondary structures, as well as the nucleotide sequences, are the important features of RNA molecules to characterize their functions. According to the thermodynamic model, however, the probability of any secondary structure is very small. As a consequence, any tool to predict the secondary structures of RNAs has limited accuracy. On the other hand, there are a few tools to compensate the imperfect predictions by calculating and visualizing the secondary structural information from RNA sequences. It is desirable to obtain the rich information from those tools through a friendly interface. We implemented a web server of the tools to predict secondary structures and to calculate various structural features based on the energy models of secondary structures. By just giving an RNA sequence to the web server, the user can get the different types of solutions of the secondary structures, the marginal probabilities such as base-paring probabilities, loop probabilities and accessibilities of the local bases, the energy changes by arbitrary base mutations as well as the measures for validations of the predicted secondary structures. The web server is available at http://rtools.cbrc.jp, which integrates software tools, CentroidFold, CentroidHomfold, IPKnot, CapR, Raccess, Rchange and RintD. PMID:27131356

  3. Rtools: a web server for various secondary structural analyses on single RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Michiaki; Ono, Yukiteru; Kiryu, Hisanori; Sato, Kengo; Kato, Yuki; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Mori, Ryota; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The secondary structures, as well as the nucleotide sequences, are the important features of RNA molecules to characterize their functions. According to the thermodynamic model, however, the probability of any secondary structure is very small. As a consequence, any tool to predict the secondary structures of RNAs has limited accuracy. On the other hand, there are a few tools to compensate the imperfect predictions by calculating and visualizing the secondary structural information from RNA sequences. It is desirable to obtain the rich information from those tools through a friendly interface. We implemented a web server of the tools to predict secondary structures and to calculate various structural features based on the energy models of secondary structures. By just giving an RNA sequence to the web server, the user can get the different types of solutions of the secondary structures, the marginal probabilities such as base-paring probabilities, loop probabilities and accessibilities of the local bases, the energy changes by arbitrary base mutations as well as the measures for validations of the predicted secondary structures. The web server is available at http://rtools.cbrc.jp, which integrates software tools, CentroidFold, CentroidHomfold, IPKnot, CapR, Raccess, Rchange and RintD. PMID:27131356

  4. Comparative analysis of secondary structure of insect mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA using maximum weighted matching.

    PubMed

    Page, R D

    2000-10-15

    Comparative analysis is the preferred method of inferring RNA secondary structure, but its use requires considerable expertise and manual effort. As the importance of secondary structure for accurate sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis becomes increasingly realised, the need for secondary structure models for diverse taxonomic groups becomes more pressing. The number of available structures bears little relation to the relative diversity or importance of the different taxonomic groups. Insects, for example, comprise the largest group of animals and yet are very poorly represented in secondary structure databases. This paper explores the utility of maximum weighted matching (MWM) to help automate the process of comparative analysis by inferring secondary structure for insect mitochondrial small subunit (12S) rRNA sequences. By combining information on correlated changes in substitutions and helix dot plots, MWM can rapidly generate plausible models of secondary structure. These models can be further refined using standard comparative techniques. This paper presents a secondary structure model for insect 12S rRNA based on an alignment of 225 insect sequences and an alignment for 16 exemplar insect sequences. This alignment is used as a template for a web server that automatically generates secondary structures for insect sequences.

  5. PSP_MCSVM: brainstorming consensus prediction of protein secondary structures using two-stage multiclass support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Secondary structure prediction is a crucial task for understanding the variety of protein structures and performed biological functions. Prediction of secondary structures for new proteins using their amino acid sequences is of fundamental importance in bioinformatics. We propose a novel technique to predict protein secondary structures based on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) and physico-chemical properties of amino acids. It is a two stage approach involving multiclass support vector machines (SVMs) as classifiers for three different structural conformations, viz., helix, sheet and coil. In the first stage, PSSMs obtained from PSI-BLAST and five specially selected physicochemical properties of amino acids are fed into SVMs as features for sequence-to-structure prediction. Confidence values for forming helix, sheet and coil that are obtained from the first stage SVM are then used in the second stage SVM for performing structure-to-structure prediction. The two-stage cascaded classifiers (PSP_MCSVM) are trained with proteins from RS126 dataset. The classifiers are finally tested on target proteins of critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). PSP_MCSVM with brainstorming consensus procedure performs better than the prediction servers like Predator, DSC, SIMPA96, for randomly selected proteins from CASP9 targets. The overall performance is found to be comparable with the current state-of-the art. PSP_MCSVM source code, train-test datasets and supplementary files are available freely in public domain at: http://sysbio.icm.edu.pl/secstruct and http://code.google.com/p/cmater-bioinfo/

  6. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  7. Sucrose prevents protein fibrillation through compaction of the tertiary structure but hardly affects the secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Nídia; Franquelim, Henri G; Lopes, Carlos; Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Christiansen, Gunna; Otzen, Daniel E; Melo, Eduardo P

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibers, implicated in a wide range of diseases, are formed when proteins misfold and stick together in long rope-like structures. As a natural mechanism, osmolytes can be used to modulate protein aggregation pathways with no interference with other cellular functions. The osmolyte sucrose delays fibrillation of the ribosomal protein S6 leading to softer and less shaped-defined fibrils. The molecular mechanism used by sucrose to delay S6 fibrillation was studied based on the two-state unfolding kinetics of the secondary and tertiary structures. It was concluded that the delay in S6 fibrillation results from stabilization and compaction of the slightly expanded tertiary native structure formed under fibrillation conditions. Interestingly, this compaction extends to almost all S6 tertiary structure but hardly affects its secondary structure. The part of the S6 tertiary structure that suffered more compaction by sucrose is known to be the first part to unfold, indicating that the native S6 has entered the unfolding pathway under fibrillation conditions.

  8. Secondary Impacts on Structures on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric; Walker, James D.; Grosch, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    The Altair Lunar Lander is being designed for the planned return to the Moon by 2020. Since it is hoped that lander components will be re-used by later missions, studies are underway to examine the exposure threat to the lander sitting on the Lunar surface for extended periods. These threats involve both direct strikes of meteoroids on the vehicle as well as strikes from Lunar regolith and rock thrown by nearby meteorite strikes. Currently, the lander design is comprised of up to 10 different types of pressure vessels. These vessels included the manned habitation module, fuel, cryogenic fuel and gas storage containers, and instrument bays. These pressure vessels have various wall designs, including various aluminum alloys, honeycomb, and carbon-fiber composite materials. For some of the vessels, shielding is being considered. This program involved the test and analysis of six pressure vessel designs, one of which included a Whipple bumper shield. In addition to the pressure vessel walls, all the pressure vessels are wrapped in multi-layer insulation (MLI). Two variants were tested without the MLI to better understand the role of the MLI in the impact performance. The tests of performed were to examine the secondary impacts on these structures as they rested on the Lunar surface. If a hypervelocity meteor were to strike the surface nearby, it would throw regolith and rock debris into the structure at a much lower velocity. Also, when the manned module departs for the return to Earth, its rocket engines throw up debris that can impact the remaining lander components and cause damage. Glass spheres were used as a stimulant for the regolith material. Impact tests were performed with a gas gun to find the V50 of various sized spheres striking the pressure vessels. The impacts were then modeled and a fast-running approximate model for the V50 data was developed. This model was for performing risk analysis to assist in the vessel design and in the identification of ideal

  9. Self-Renewing Secondary Schools: The Relationship between Structural and Cultural Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannay, Lynne M.; Ross, John A.

    This paper explores the deep-reform efforts of 9 secondary schools over a 3-year period. The reforms occurred in an Ontario, Canada, school district that empowered their secondary schools to develop site-specific organizational structures that deviated from the traditional subject, departmental structure. The sample for the study included all…

  10. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  11. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0.

  12. RNA-protein interactions and secondary structures of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus for in vitro assembly.

    PubMed

    Verduin, B J; Prescott, B; Thomas, G J

    1984-09-11

    Laser Raman spectroscopy of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) in native (pH 5.0) and partially swollen (pH 7.5) states reveals the presence of small percentages of protonated adenine (less than 15%) and cytosine (less than 7%) bases in the encapsidated RNA molecule of the native virion. The protonated bases are titrated with pH-induced swelling of the virus. Titration of putative COOH groups of aspartic and glutamic side chains of the virion subunit cannot be detected over the same pH range, which suggests that carboxyl anions (CO-2) and protonated bases are both available at pH 5 to stabilize the ribonucleoprotein particles by electrostatic interactions. The highly (95%) ordered secondary structure of encapsidated RNA may undergo a small additional increase (less than 3%) in ordered structure with release from the virion, suggesting at most a marginal structure-distorting influence from protein contacts in the native particle. The Raman spectra of the virion are also compared by difference spectroscopy with spectra of capsids (empty shells devoid of RNA), subunit dimers, and protein-free RNA. The results indicate that the subunit structure is altered by the release of RNA from the virion, as well as by the swelling of the virion. Amino acid residues and protein secondary structures that are affected in these in vitro assembly and disassembly processes are identified from their characteristic Raman lines. Two classes of cysteinyl SH groups, solvent exposed and solvent protected, are revealed for the capsid and virion subunit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets.

  14. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets. PMID:20413617

  15. Safety & Efficacy of Cyclic Zoledronic Acid Therapy on Pediatric Secondary Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Agha, Abdulmoein E.; Shaikhain, Talal A.; Ashour, Abdullah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Osteoporosis is a systemic disease characterized by decreased bone density and increased tendency to develop fractures. Osteoporosis in children and adolescents is a rare disease usually secondary to Medical conditions or medications given to children. The condition affects normal bone growth and development and carries with it multiple morbidities (physical and psychological) if not corrected promptly. This study aims to share our experience with Zoledronic Acid Therapy in Pediatric patients with secondary osteoporosis. Method: A retrospective study which included 46 patients aged 3 to 18 years. All patients received specific doses of Zoledronic acid and were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Clinical and laboratory data were collected for each patient from their files. Adverse events were also recorded. Results: The use of Zoledronic Acid in children and adolescents appears to be statically significant reduce fracture rate (p=0.005), bone turnover markers (Osteocalcin p= 0.003, CTX p= 0.008) and pain frequency in symptomatic individuals (p=0.000). Careful selection of cases is required to provide maximum benefits compared to risks associated with therapy. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that Zoledronic acid has positive effects on clinical outcome and bone marker level as well as quality of life for Pediatric patients with Osteoporosis and their families, with no long-term side effects.

  16. Hydroxydicarboxylic acids: markers for secondary organic aerosol from the photooxidation of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Magda; Szmigielski, Rafal; Kourtchev, Ivan; van der Veken, Pieter; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Maenhaut, Willy; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Lewandowski, Michael; Offenberg, John H; Edney, Edward O

    2007-03-01

    Detailed organic analysis of fine (PM2.5) rural aerosol collected during summer at K-puszta, Hungary from a mixed deciduous/coniferous forest site shows the presence of polar oxygenated compounds that are also formed in laboratory irradiated alpha-pinene/NOx/air mixtures. In the present work, two major photooxidation products of alpha-pinene were characterized as the hydroxydicarboxylic acids, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, and 2-hydroxy-4-isopropyladipic acid, based on chemical, chromatographic, and mass spectral data. Different types of volatile derivatives, including trimethylsilyl ester/ether, methyl ester trimethylsilyl ether, and ethyl ester trimethylsilyl ether derivatives were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and their electron ionization (El) spectra were interpreted in detail. The proposed structures of the hydroxydicarboxylic acids were confirmed or supported with reference compounds. 2-Hydroxy-4-isopropyladipic acid formally corresponds to a further reaction product of pinic acid involving addition of a molecule of water and opening of the dimethylcyclobutane ring; this proposal is supported by a laboratory irradiation experiment with alpha-pinene/NOJ0 air. In addition, we report the presence of a structurally related minor alpha-pinene photooxidation product, which was tentatively identified as the C7 homolog of 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, 3-hydroxy-4,4-dimethylglutaric acid. The detection of 2-hydroxy-4-isopropyladipic acid in ambient aerosol provides an explanation for the relatively low atmospheric concentrations of pinic acid found during daytime in forest environments.

  17. Visualizing the global secondary structure of a viral RNA genome with cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garmann, Rees F; Gopal, Ajaykumar; Athavale, Shreyas S; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M; Harvey, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    The lifecycle, and therefore the virulence, of single-stranded (ss)-RNA viruses is regulated not only by their particular protein gene products, but also by the secondary and tertiary structure of their genomes. The secondary structure of the entire genomic RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was recently determined by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). The SHAPE analysis suggested a single highly extended secondary structure with much less branching than occurs in the ensemble of structures predicted by purely thermodynamic algorithms. Here we examine the solution-equilibrated STMV genome by direct visualization with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), using an RNA of similar length transcribed from the yeast genome as a control. The cryo-EM data reveal an ensemble of branching patterns that are collectively consistent with the SHAPE-derived secondary structure model. Thus, our results both elucidate the statistical nature of the secondary structure of large ss-RNAs and give visual support for modern RNA structure determination methods. Additionally, this work introduces cryo-EM as a means to distinguish between competing secondary structure models if the models differ significantly in terms of the number and/or length of branches. Furthermore, with the latest advances in cryo-EM technology, we suggest the possibility of developing methods that incorporate restraints from cryo-EM into the next generation of algorithms for the determination of RNA secondary and tertiary structures.

  18. Pfold: RNA secondary structure prediction using stochastic context-free grammars.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Bjarne; Hein, Jotun

    2003-07-01

    RNA secondary structures are important in many biological processes and efficient structure prediction can give vital directions for experimental investigations. Many available programs for RNA secondary structure prediction only use a single sequence at a time. This may be sufficient in some applications, but often it is possible to obtain related RNA sequences with conserved secondary structure. These should be included in structural analyses to give improved results. This work presents a practical way of predicting RNA secondary structure that is especially useful when related sequences can be obtained. The method improves a previous algorithm based on an explicit evolutionary model and a probabilistic model of structures. Predictions can be done on a web server at http://www.daimi.au.dk/~compbio/pfold.

  19. Analysis and prediction of RNA-binding residues using sequence, evolutionary conservation, and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ke; Ruan, Jishou; Shen, Shiyi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-11-01

    Identification and prediction of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) provides valuable insights into the mechanisms of protein-RNA interactions. We analyzed the contributions of a wide range of factors including amino acid sequence, evolutionary conservation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, to the prediction/characterization of RBRs. Five feature sets were designed and feature selection was performed to find and investigate relevant features. We demonstrate that (1) interactions with positively charged amino acids Arg and Lys are preferred by the egatively charged nucleotides; (2) Gly provides flexibility for the RNA binding sites; (3) Glu with negatively charged side chain and several hydrophobic residues such as Leu, Val, Ala and Phe are disfavored in the RNA-binding sites; (4) coil residues, especially in long segments, are more flexible (than other secondary structures) and more likely to interact with RNA; (5) helical residues are more rigid and consequently they are less likely to bind RNA; and (6) residues partially exposed to the solvent are more likely to form RNA-binding sites. We introduce a novel sequence-based predictor of RBRs, RBRpred, which utilizes the selected features. RBRpred is comprehensively tested on three datasets with varied atom distance cutoffs by performing both five-fold cross validation and jackknife tests and achieves Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.51, 0.48 and 0.42, respectively. The quality is comparable to or better than that for state-of-the-art predictors that apply the distancebased cutoff definition. We show that the most important factor for RBRs prediction is evolutionary conservation, followed by the amino acid sequence, predicted secondary structure and predicted solvent accessibility. We also investigate the impact of using native vs. predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The predictions are sufficient for the RBR prediction and the knowledge of the actual solvent accessibility

  20. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  1. Deciphering the shape and deformation of secondary structures through local conformation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein deformation has been extensively analysed through global methods based on RMSD, torsion angles and Principal Components Analysis calculations. Here we use a local approach, able to distinguish among the different backbone conformations within loops, α-helices and β-strands, to address the question of secondary structures' shape variation within proteins and deformation at interface upon complexation. Results Using a structural alphabet, we translated the 3 D structures of large sets of protein-protein complexes into sequences of structural letters. The shape of the secondary structures can be assessed by the structural letters that modeled them in the structural sequences. The distribution analysis of the structural letters in the three protein compartments (surface, core and interface) reveals that secondary structures tend to adopt preferential conformations that differ among the compartments. The local description of secondary structures highlights that curved conformations are preferred on the surface while straight ones are preferred in the core. Interfaces display a mixture of local conformations either preferred in core or surface. The analysis of the structural letters transition occurring between protein-bound and unbound conformations shows that the deformation of secondary structure is tightly linked to the compartment preference of the local conformations. Conclusion The conformation of secondary structures can be further analysed and detailed thanks to a structural alphabet which allows a better description of protein surface, core and interface in terms of secondary structures' shape and deformation. Induced-fit modification tendencies described here should be valuable information to identify and characterize regions under strong structural constraints for functional reasons. PMID:21284872

  2. Photochemical processing of diesel fuel emissions as a large secondary source of isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, M. F.; Friedman, B.; Fulgham, R.; Brophy, P.; Galang, A.; Jathar, S. H.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Farmer, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a well-known air pollutant that affects human health. Biomass burning, smoking, and combustion engines are known HNCO sources, but recent studies suggest that secondary production in the atmosphere may also occur. We directly observed photochemical production of HNCO from the oxidative aging of diesel exhaust during the Diesel Exhaust Fuel and Control experiments at Colorado State University using acetate ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Emission ratios of HNCO were enhanced, after 1.5 days of simulated atmospheric aging, from 50 to 230 mg HNCO/kg fuel at idle engine operating conditions. Engines operated at higher loads resulted in less primary and secondary HNCO formation, with emission ratios increasing from 20 to 40 mg HNCO/kg fuel under 50% load engine operating conditions. These results suggest that photochemical sources of HNCO could be more significant than primary sources in urban areas.

  3. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  4. Quantifying the energetic interplay of RNA tertiary and secondary structure interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, S K; Zheng, M; Wu, M; Tinoco, I; Cech, T R

    1999-01-01

    To understand the RNA-folding problem, we must know the extent to which RNA structure formation is hierarchical (tertiary folding of preformed secondary structure). Recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to show that Mg2+-dependent tertiary interactions force secondary structure rearrangement in the 56-nt tP5abc RNA, a truncated subdomain of the Tetrahymena group I intron. Here we combine mutagenesis with folding computations, nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, and chemical-modification experiments to probe further the energetic interplay of tertiary and secondary interactions in tP5abc. Point mutations predicted to destabilize the secondary structure of folded tP5abc greatly disrupt its Mg2+-dependent folding, as monitored by nondenaturing gels. Imino proton assignments and sequential NOE walks of the two-dimensional NMR spectrum of one of the tP5abc mutants confirm the predicted secondary structure, which does not change in the presence of Mg2+. In contrast to these data on tP5abc, the same point mutations in the context of the P4-P6 domain (of which P5abc is a subdomain) shift the Mg2+ dependence of P4-P6 folding only moderately, and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) modification experiments demonstrate that Mg2+ does cause secondary structure rearrangement of the P4-P6 mutants' P5abc subdomains. Our data provide experimental support for two simple conclusions: (1) Even single point mutations at bases involved only in secondary structure can be enough to tip the balance between RNA tertiary and secondary interactions. (2) Domain context must be considered in evaluating the relative importance of tertiary and secondary contributions. This tertiary/secondary interplay is likely relevant to the folding of many large RNA and to bimolecular snRNA-snRNA and snRNA-intron RNA interactions. PMID:10606276

  5. Secondary structure models for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region 1 from symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, Daniel J; Lord, Jenna B

    2010-07-01

    Ribosomal genes and their spacers have been extensively utilized to examine the biodiversity and phylogenetics of protists. Among these, the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) are known to form secondary structures that are critically important for proper processing of the pre-rRNA into mature ribosomes. Although the secondary structure of ITS2 has been widely investigated, considerably less is known about ITS1 and its secondary structure. Here, secondary structures of the ITS1 were modeled for 46 ITS "types" from Symbiodinium, a diverse dinoflagellate genus that forms symbioses with many protists and metazoans, using comparative phylogenetic and minimum free energy approaches. The predicted ITS1 secondary structures for each Symbiodinium "type" were highly stable (DeltaG=-46.40 to -85.30 kcal mol(-1) at 37 degrees C) and consisted of an open loop with five helices separated by single-stranded regions. Several structural characteristics were conserved within monophyletic sub-groups, providing additional support for the predicted structures and the relationships within this genus. Finally, the structures were applied to identify potential pseudogenes from five Symbiodinium ITS1 datasets. Consequently, ITS1 secondary structures are useful in understanding the biology and phylogenetics, as well as recognizing and excluding questionable sequences from datasets, of protists such as Symbiodinium.

  6. Determination of Secondary School Students' Cognitive Structure, and Misconception in Ecological Concepts through Word Association Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yücel, Elif Özata; Özkan, Mulis

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we determined cognitive structures and misconceptions about basic ecological concepts by using "word association" tests on secondary school students, age between 12-14 years. Eighty-nine students participated in this study. Before WAT was generated, basic ecological concepts that take place in the secondary science…

  7. Non-B DNA Secondary Structures and Their Resolution by RecQ Helicases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudha

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the canonical B-form structure first described by Watson and Crick, DNA can adopt a number of alternative structures. These non-B-form DNA secondary structures form spontaneously on tracts of repeat sequences that are abundant in genomes. In addition, structured forms of DNA with intrastrand pairing may arise on single-stranded DNA produced transiently during various cellular processes. Such secondary structures have a range of biological functions but also induce genetic instability. Increasing evidence suggests that genomic instabilities induced by non-B DNA secondary structures result in predisposition to diseases. Secondary DNA structures also represent a new class of molecular targets for DNA-interactive compounds that might be useful for targeting telomeres and transcriptional control. The equilibrium between the duplex DNA and formation of multistranded non-B-form structures is partly dependent upon the helicases that unwind (resolve) these alternate DNA structures. With special focus on tetraplex, triplex, and cruciform, this paper summarizes the incidence of non-B DNA structures and their association with genomic instability and emphasizes the roles of RecQ-like DNA helicases in genome maintenance by resolution of DNA secondary structures. In future, RecQ helicases are anticipated to be additional molecular targets for cancer chemotherapeutics. PMID:21977309

  8. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of a similar magnitude, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity-dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  9. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters, and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied with experimental methods. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of similar magnitudes, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  10. A case study of urban particle acidity and its influence on secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Jimenez, Jose L; Worsnop, Douglas R; Canagaratna, Manjula

    2007-05-01

    Size-resolved indicators of aerosol acidity, including H+ ion concentrations (H+Aer) and the ratio of stoichiometric neutralization are evaluated in submicrometer aerosols using highly time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) data from Pittsburgh. The pH and ionic strength within the aqueous particle phase are also estimated using the Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM). Different mechanisms that contribute to the presence of acidic particles in Pittsburgh are discussed. The largest H+Aer loadings and lowest levels of stoichiometric neutralization were detected when PM1 loadings were high and dominated by SO4(2-). The average size distribution of H+Aer loading shows an accumulation mode at Dva approximately 600 nm and an enhanced smaller mode that centers at Dva approximately 200 nm and tails into smaller sizes. The acidity in the accumulation mode particles suggests that there is generally not enough gas-phase NH3 available on a regional scale to completely neutralize sulfate in Pittsburgh. The lack of stoichiometric neutralization in the 200 nm mode particles is likely caused by the relatively slow mixing of gas-phase NH3 into SO2-rich plumes containing younger particles. We examined the influence of particle acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation by comparing the mass concentrations and size distributions of oxygenated organic aerosol (00A--surrogate for SOA in Pittsburgh) during periods when particles are, on average, acidic to those when particles are bulk neutralized. The average mass concentration of ODA during the acidic periods (3.1 +/- 1.7 microg m(-3)) is higher than that during the neutralized periods (2.5 +/- 1.3 microg m(-3)). Possible reasons for this enhancement include increased condensation of SOA species, acid-catalyzed SOA formation, and/or differences in air mass transport and history. However, even if the entire enhancement (approximately 0.6 microg m(-3)) can be attributed to acid catalysis, the upperbound increase of SOA mass

  11. Students' understanding of primary and secondary protein structure: drawing secondary protein structure reveals student understanding better than simple recognition of structures.

    PubMed

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H

    2013-01-01

    The interdisciplinary nature of biochemistry courses requires students to use both chemistry and biology knowledge to understand biochemical concepts. Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations in addition to a fragmented understanding of fundamental biochemistry concepts. This project focuses on students' understanding of primary and secondary protein structure and drawings (representations) of hydrogen-bonding in alpha helices and beta sheets. Analysis demonstrated that students can recognize and identify primary protein structure concepts when given a polypeptide. However, when asked to draw alpha helices and beta sheets and explain the role of hydrogen bonding their drawings students exhibited a fragmented understanding that lacked coherence. Faculty are encouraged to have students draw molecular level representations to make their mental models more explicit, complete, and coherent. This is in contrast to recognition and identification tasks, which do not adequately probe mental models and molecular level understanding.

  12. GADIS: Algorithm for designing sequences to achieve target secondary structure profiles of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Tyler S; Crabtree, Michael D; Shammas, Sarah L; Posey, Ammon E; Clarke, Jane; Pappu, Rohit V

    2016-09-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) participate in coupled folding and binding reactions and form alpha helical structures in their bound complexes. Alanine, glycine, or proline scanning mutagenesis approaches are often used to dissect the contributions of intrinsic helicities to coupled folding and binding. These experiments can yield confounding results because the mutagenesis strategy changes the amino acid compositions of IDPs. Therefore, an important next step in mutagenesis-based approaches to mechanistic studies of coupled folding and binding is the design of sequences that satisfy three major constraints. These are (i) achieving a target intrinsic alpha helicity profile; (ii) fixing the positions of residues corresponding to the binding interface; and (iii) maintaining the native amino acid composition. Here, we report the development of a G: enetic A: lgorithm for D: esign of I: ntrinsic secondary S: tructure (GADIS) for designing sequences that satisfy the specified constraints. We describe the algorithm and present results to demonstrate the applicability of GADIS by designing sequence variants of the intrinsically disordered PUMA system that undergoes coupled folding and binding to Mcl-1. Our sequence designs span a range of intrinsic helicity profiles. The predicted variations in sequence-encoded mean helicities are tested against experimental measurements. PMID:27503953

  13. Shape matters: size-exclusion HPLC for the study of nucleic acid structural polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Largy, Eric; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of reports have been focused on the structure and biological role of non-canonical nucleic acid secondary structures. Many of these studies involve the use of oligonucleotides that can often adopt a variety of structures depending on the experimental conditions, and hence change the outcome of an assay. The knowledge of the structure(s) formed by oligonucleotides is thus critical to correctly interpret the results, and gain insight into the biological role of these particular sequences. Herein we demonstrate that size-exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) is a simple yet surprisingly powerful tool to quickly and effortlessly assess the secondary structure(s) formed by oligonucleotides. For the first time, an extensive calibration and validation of the use of SE-HPLC to confidently detect the presence of different species displaying various structure and/or molecularity, involving >110 oligonucleotides forming a variety of secondary structures (antiparallel, parallel, A-tract bent and mismatched duplexes, triplexes, G-quadruplexes and i-motifs, RNA stem loops), is performed. Moreover, we introduce simple metrics that allow the use of SE-HPLC without the need for a tedious calibration work. We show that the remarkable versatility of the method allows to quickly establish the influence of a number of experimental parameters on nucleic acid structuration and to operate on a wide range of oligonucleotide concentrations. Case studies are provided to clearly illustrate the all-terrain capabilities of SE-HPLC for oligonucleotide secondary structure analysis. Finally, this manuscript features a number of important observations contributing to a better understanding of nucleic acid structural polymorphism. PMID:25143531

  14. Plant and Soil Emissions of Amines and Amino Acids: A Source of Secondary Aerosol Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. L.; Doskey, P. V.; Pypker, T. G.

    2011-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the most abundant alkaline gas in the atmosphere and forms secondary aerosol by neutralizing sulfuric and nitric acids that are released during combustion of fossil fuels. Ammonia is primarily emitted by cropping and livestock operations. However, C2 and C3 amines (pKb 3.3-3.4), which are stronger bases than NH3 (pKb 4.7) have been observed in nuclei mode aerosol that is the precursor to secondary aerosol. Mixtures of amines and amino acids have been identified in diverse environments in aerosol, fog water, cloud water, the soluble fraction of precipitation, and in dew. Glycine (pKb 4.2), serine (pKb 4.8) and alanine (pKb 3.7 and 4.1 for the D and L forms, respectively) are typically the most abundant species. The only reported values of gas-phase glycine, serine and alanine were in marine air and ranged from 6-14 pptv. The origin of atmospheric amines and amino acids has not been fully identified, although sources are likely similar to NH3. Nitrate assimilation in plants forms glycine, serine, and L-alanine, while D-alanine is present in bacterial cell walls. Glycine is converted to serine during C3 plant photorespiration, producing CO2 and NH3. Bacteria metabolize glycine and alanine to methylamine and ethylamine via decarboxylation. Likely sources of amino acids are plants and bacteria, thus concentrations near continental sources are likely greater than those measured in marine air. The overall goal of the research is to examine seasonal variations and relationships between the exchange of CO2, NH3, amines, and amino acids with a corn/soybean rotation in the Midwest Corn Belt. The study presents gaseous profiles of organic amine compounds from various species of vegetation using a mist chamber trapping technique and analysis of the derivatized species by high pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Amino acid and amine profiles were obtained for red oak (Quercus rubra), sugar maple (Acer saccharinum), white pine (Pinus

  15. Putative secondary structures of unusually long strepsipteran SSU rRNAs and its phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Choe, C P; Hwang, U W; Kim, W

    1999-04-30

    We constructed the putative secondary structures of the small subunit rRNAs (SSU rRNA) from three strepsipteran insects. The primary sequences of the strepsipteran SSU rRNAs are unusually long due to unique and long insertions. In spite of these insertions, the basic shapes of their secondary structures are well maintained as shown in those of other eukaryotes, because these insertions appear mainly in the variable regions. The secondary structures for the V1, V3, V5, V8, and V9 regions are well conserved, even though the primary structures of V1, V5, and V8 regions are quite variable. However, the predicted secondary structures for the V2, V4, and V7 regions are quite different from those of other insects. In the V4 and V7 regions, helices specific to the Strepsiptera exist. These helices have not been reported in other organisms so far. Similarly, four eukaryotic specific helices (E8-1, E10-2, E23-4 and E45-1) not reported in insects exist in the V2, V4, and V8 regions. These helices are formed by the inserted sequences. The secondary structures of the expanded segments of the strepsipteran SSU rRNA were applied to infer the phylogenetic position of Strepsiptera, one of the most enigmatic problems in insect phylogeny. Only the secondary structure of the V7 region showed the weak Strepsiptera/Diptera sister-group relationship. PMID:10340475

  16. Nuclear rRNA transcript processing versus internal transcribed spacer secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Annette W

    2015-03-01

    rRNA is one of the few universal features of life, making it uniquely suited to assess phylogenetic relationships. The processing of the initial polycistronic rRNA transcript is also a conserved process, involving numerous cleavage events and the generation of secondary structures. The secondary structure of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear rRNA transcripts are well known for a wide variety of eukaryotes and have been used to aid in the alignment of these sequences for phylogenetic comparisons. By contrast, study of the processing of the initial rRNA transcripts has been largely limited to yeast, mice, rats, and humans. Here I examine the known cleavage sites in the two ITS regions and their positions relative to the secondary structure. A better understanding of the conservation of secondary structures and cleavage sites within the ITS regions will improve evolutionary inferences based on these sequences.

  17. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  18. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems. PMID:27465850

  19. Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and 1,3-Butadiene: influence of aerosol acidity and Relative humidity on secondary organic aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of acidic seed aerosols on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA)have been examined in a number of previous studies, several of which have observed strong linear correlations between the aerosol acidity (measured as nmol H+ per m3 air s...

  20. Recovery of organic extractant from secondary emulsions formed in the extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Korchnak, J.D.; Fett, R.H.G.

    1984-01-03

    Uranium in wet-process phosphoric acid is extracted with an organic extractant. The pregnant extractant is then centrifuged to separate contaminants from the extractant. Secondary emulsions obtained by separating the contaminants following centrifugation are mixed with water or an acid leaching solution. After mixing, the mixture is centrifuged to separate and recover extractant which is recycled for stripping.

  1. Enhancing polysaccharide-mediated delivery of nucleic acids through functionalization with secondary and tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Bilal; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Roy, Krishnendu

    2008-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide that has generated significant interest as a non-viral gene delivery vehicle due to its cationic and biocompatible characteristics. However, transfection efficiency of chitosan is significantly lower compared to other cationic gene delivery agents, e.g. polyethyleneimine (PEI), dendrimers or cationic lipids. This is primarily attributed to its minimal solubility and low buffering capacity at physiological pH leading to poor endosomal escape of the gene carrier and inefficient cytoplasmic decoupling of the complexed nucleic acid. Here we have developed an imidazole acetic acid (IAA)-modified chitosan to introduce secondary and tertiary amines to the polymer in order to improve its endosomal buffering and solubility. The modified polymer was characterized by ninhydrin and (1)H NMR assays for degree of modification, while buffering and solubility were analyzed by acid titration. Nanocomplex formation, studied at various polymer-nucleic acid ratios, showed an increase in particle zeta potential for chitosan-IAA, as well as an increase in the effective diameter. Up to 100-fold increase in transfection efficiency of pDNA was seen for chitosan-IAA as compared to native chitosan, nearly matching that of PEI. In addition, transfection of siRNA by the modified polymers showed efficient gene knockdown equivalent to commercially available siPORT Amines. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of the imidazole-grafted chitosan as a biocompatible and effective delivery vehicle for both pDNA and siRNA.

  2. Heterogeneous chemistry of glyoxal on acidic solutions. An oligomerization pathway for secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Mario E; Lin, Yun; Guo, Song; Zhang, Renyi

    2015-05-14

    The heterogeneous chemistry of glyoxal on sulfuric acid surfaces has been investigated at various acid concentrations and temperatures, utilizing a low-pressure fast flow laminar reactor coupled to an ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS). The uptake coefficient (γ) of glyoxal ranges from (1.2 ± 0.06) × 10(-2) to (2.5 ± 0.01) × 10(-3) for 60-93 wt % H2SO4 at 253-273 K. The effective Henry's Law constant (H*) ranges from (98.9 ± 4.9) × 10(5) to (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10(5) M atm(-1) for 60-93 wt % at 263-273 K. Both the uptake coefficient and Henry's Law constant increase with decreasing acid concentration and temperature. Our results reveal a reaction mechanism of hydration followed by oligomerization for glyoxal on acidic media, indicating an efficient aqueous reaction of glyoxal on hygroscopic particles leading to secondary organic aerosol formation.

  3. Conservation of mRNA secondary structures may filter out mutations in Escherichia coli evolution.

    PubMed

    Chursov, Andrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Recent reports indicate that mutations in viral genomes tend to preserve RNA secondary structure, and those mutations that disrupt secondary structural elements may reduce gene expression levels, thereby serving as a functional knockout. In this article, we explore the conservation of secondary structures of mRNA coding regions, a previously unknown factor in bacterial evolution, by comparing the structural consequences of mutations in essential and nonessential Escherichia coli genes accumulated over 40 000 generations in the course of the 'long-term evolution experiment'. We monitored the extent to which mutations influence minimum free energy (MFE) values, assuming that a substantial change in MFE is indicative of structural perturbation. Our principal finding is that purifying selection tends to eliminate those mutations in essential genes that lead to greater changes of MFE values and, therefore, may be more disruptive for the corresponding mRNA secondary structures. This effect implies that synonymous mutations disrupting mRNA secondary structures may directly affect the fitness of the organism. These results demonstrate that the need to maintain intact mRNA structures imposes additional evolutionary constraints on bacterial genomes, which go beyond preservation of structure and function of the encoded proteins.

  4. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  5. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  6. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann-Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann-Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  7. Knowledge base and neural network approach for protein secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Maulika S; Mazumdar, Himanshu S

    2014-11-21

    Protein structure prediction is of great relevance given the abundant genomic and proteomic data generated by the genome sequencing projects. Protein secondary structure prediction is addressed as a sub task in determining the protein tertiary structure and function. In this paper, a novel algorithm, KB-PROSSP-NN, which is a combination of knowledge base and modeling of the exceptions in the knowledge base using neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction (PSSP), is proposed. The knowledge base is derived from a proteomic sequence-structure database and consists of the statistics of association between the 5-residue words and corresponding secondary structure. The predicted results obtained using knowledge base are refined with a Backpropogation neural network algorithm. Neural net models the exceptions of the knowledge base. The Q3 accuracy of 90% and 82% is achieved on the RS126 and CB396 test sets respectively which suggest improvement over existing state of art methods.

  8. RNACluster: An integrated tool for RNA secondary structure comparison and clustering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Olman, V; Liu, Huiqing; Ye, Xiuzi; Qiu, Shilun; Xu, Ying

    2008-07-15

    RNA structure comparison is a fundamental problem in structural biology, structural chemistry, and bioinformatics. It can be used for analysis of RNA energy landscapes, conformational switches, and facilitating RNA structure prediction. The purpose of our integrated tool RNACluster is twofold: to provide a platform for computing and comparison of different distances between RNA secondary structures, and to perform cluster identification to derive useful information of RNA structure ensembles, using a minimum spanning tree (MST) based clustering algorithm. RNACluster employs a cluster identification approach based on a MST representation of the RNA ensemble data and currently supports six distance measures between RNA secondary structures. RNACluster provides a user-friendly graphical interface to allow a user to compare different structural distances, analyze the structure ensembles, and visualize predicted structural clusters. PMID:18271070

  9. RNACluster: An integrated tool for RNA secondary structure comparison and clustering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Olman, V; Liu, Huiqing; Ye, Xiuzi; Qiu, Shilun; Xu, Ying

    2008-07-15

    RNA structure comparison is a fundamental problem in structural biology, structural chemistry, and bioinformatics. It can be used for analysis of RNA energy landscapes, conformational switches, and facilitating RNA structure prediction. The purpose of our integrated tool RNACluster is twofold: to provide a platform for computing and comparison of different distances between RNA secondary structures, and to perform cluster identification to derive useful information of RNA structure ensembles, using a minimum spanning tree (MST) based clustering algorithm. RNACluster employs a cluster identification approach based on a MST representation of the RNA ensemble data and currently supports six distance measures between RNA secondary structures. RNACluster provides a user-friendly graphical interface to allow a user to compare different structural distances, analyze the structure ensembles, and visualize predicted structural clusters.

  10. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  11. Assessing secondary structure of a dyed wool fibre by means of FTIR and FTR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pielesz, A.; Freeman, H. S.; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, A.; Wysocki, M.; Włochowicz, A.

    2003-06-01

    The paper describes changes in the structure of a wool fibre dyed with model azo dyes. These were direct dyes, non-genotoxic derivatives of carcinogenic benzidine, synthesized specially for the purpose of the experiment. The non-mutagenic benzidine derivatives were: 2,2'-dimethyl-5,5'-dipropoxybenzidine and 5,5'-dipropoxybenzidine. Using FTIR, changes in secondary structure of fibres were assessed in three measuring ranges: 3600-3000, 1700-1400 and 1000-1300 cm -1. The dyes were found to distinctively affect wave-number shifts of amide A, amide I bands and in the fingerprint area around 1050 cm -1. It seems that these three areas are related to the sites in which dyes bind with wool fibre keratin. In FTR spectra, the focus was on assessing the changes of peptide bond configuration in the area of amide I, disulfide area of cystine and the area of the interaction between dyes and wool fibre keratin, i.e. 1250-1600 cm -1. For analysis, three kinds of materials were selected: (1) raw wool fibres, (2) fibres subjected to deuteration and treated with formic acid, (3) wool fabric. Each of them was dyed with the model azo dyes. The results obtained by both spectroscopies allow for identifying the functional groups responsible for the binding of dyes with keratin fibre.

  12. Strategies for Selection from Protein Libraries Composed of de Novo Designed Secondary Structure Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Tomoaki; Plückthun, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    As more and more protein structures are determined, it has become clear that there is only a limited number of protein folds in nature. To explore whether the protein folds found in nature are the only solutions to the protein folding problem, or that a lack of evolutionary pressure causes the paucity of different protein folds found, we set out to construct protein libraries without any restriction on topology. We generated different libraries (all α-helix, all β-strand and α-helix plus β-strand) with an average length of 100 amino acid residues, composed of designed secondary structure modules (α-helix, β-strand and β-turn) in various proportions, based primarily on the patterning of polar and non-polar residues. From the analysis of proteins chosen randomly from the libraries, we found that a substantial portion of pure α-helical proteins show properties similar to native proteins. Using these libraries as a starting point, we aim to establish a selection system which allows us to enrich proteins with favorable folding properties (non-aggregating, compactly folded) from the libraries. We have developed such a method based on ribosome display. This selection is based on two concepts: (1) misfolded proteins are more sensitive to proteolysis, (2) misfolded and/or aggregated proteins are more hydrophobic. We show that by applying each of these selection criteria proteins that are compactly folded and soluble can be enriched over insoluble and random coil proteins.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of secondary nitrosamines from secondary amines using sodium nitrite and p-toluenesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Miró Sabaté, Carles; Delalu, Henri

    2015-03-01

    We synthesized nitrosamines (R2N-NO) with R = iPr (1), nPr (2), nBu (3), and hydroxyethyl (4) from the amine using sodium nitrite/p-toluenesulfonic acid in CH2Cl2. The rate of formation of 1-4 increases in the direction iPrstructures of 1-4 (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)) and computed the NMR spectroscopic chemical shifts and infrared frequencies. Furthermore, we carried out a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of the nitrosamine moiety. Lastly, the compounds described in this work are valuable starting materials for the synthesis of 2-tetrazenes with potential interest to replace highly toxic hydrazines in rocket propulsion.

  14. The role of a metastable RNA secondary structure in hepatitis delta virus genotype III RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Casey, John L.

    2006-01-01

    RNA editing plays a critical role in the life cycle of hepatitis delta virus (HDV). The host editing enzyme ADAR1 recognizes specific RNA secondary structure features around the amber/W site in the HDV antigenome and deaminates the amber/W adenosine. A previous report suggested that a branched secondary structure is necessary for editing in HDV genotype III. This branched structure, which is distinct from the characteristic unbranched rod structure required for HDV replication, was only partially characterized, and knowledge concerning its formation and stability was limited. Here, we examine the secondary structures, conformational dynamics, and amber/W site editing of HDV genotype III RNA using a miniaturized HDV genotype III RNA in vitro. Computational analysis of this RNA using the MPGAfold algorithm indicated that the RNA has a tendency to form both metastable and stable unbranched secondary structures. Moreover, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that this RNA forms both branched and unbranched rod structures when transcribed in vitro. As predicted, the branched structure is a metastable structure that converts readily to the unbranched rod structure. Only branched RNA was edited at the amber/W site by ADAR1 in vitro. The structural heterogeneity of HDV genotype III RNA is significant because not only are both conformations of the RNA functionally important for viral replication, but the ratio of the two forms could modulate editing by determining the amount of substrate RNA available for modification. PMID:16790843

  15. Structural organization of the multifunctional animal fatty-acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, A; Rangan, V S; Randhawa, Z I; Amy, C M; Smith, S

    1991-06-15

    The amino acid sequence of the multifunctional fatty-acid synthase has been examined to investigate the exact location of the seven functional domains. Good agreement in predicting the location of interdomain boundaries was obtained using three independent methods. First, the sites of limited proteolytic attack that give rise to relatively stable, large polypeptide fragments were identified; cryptic sites for protease attack at the subunit interface were unmasked by first dissociating the dimer into its component subunits. Second, polypeptide regions exhibiting higher-than-average rates of non-conservative mutation were identified. Third, the sizes of putative functional domains were compared with those of related monofunctional proteins that exhibit similar primary or secondary structure. Residues 1-406 were assigned to the oxoacyl synthase, residues 430-802 to the malonyl/acetyl transferase, residues 1630-1850 to the enoyl reductase, residues 1870-2100 to the oxyreductase, residues 2114-2190 to the acyl-carrier protein and residues 2200-2505 to the thioesterase. The 47-kDa transferase and 8-kDa acyl-carrier-protein domains, which are situated at opposite ends of the multifunctional subunit, were nevertheless isolated from tryptic digests as a non-covalently associated complex. Furthermore, a centrally located domain encompassing residues 1160-1545 was isolated as a nicked dimer. These findings, indicating that interactions between the head-to-tail juxtaposed subunits occur in both the polar and equatorial regions, are consistent with previously derived electron-micrograph images that show subunit contacts in these areas. The data permit refinement of the model for the fatty-acid synthase dimer and suggest that the malonyl/acetyl transferase and oxoacyl synthase of one subunit cooperate with the reductases, acyl carrier protein and thioesterase of the companion subunit in the formation of a center for fatty-acid synthesis.

  16. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere. PMID:26460477

  17. Probing the glycosidic linkage: secondary structures in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, John P.; Cristina Stanca-Kaposta, E.; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Liu, B.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Gamblin, David P.; Kroemer, Romano T.

    2008-10-01

    The functional importance of carbohydrates in biological processes, particularly those involving specific molecular recognition, is immense. Characterizing the three-dimensional (3D) structures of carbohydrates and glycoproteins, and their interactions with other molecules, not least the ubiquitous solvent, water, is a key starting point for understanding these processes. The combination of laser-based electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of mass-selected carbohydrate molecules and their hydrated complexes, conducted under molecular beam conditions, with ab initio computation is providing a uniquely powerful means of characterizing 3D carbohydrate conformations; the structures of their hydrated complexes, the hydrogen-bonded networks they support (or which support them); and the factors that determine their conformational and structural preferences.

  18. Porous carbonaceous electrode structure and method for secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1977-03-08

    Positive and negative electrodes are provided as rigid, porous carbonaceous matrices with particulate active material fixedly embedded. Active material such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali metal or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and a solid volatile to form a paste mixture. Various electrically conductive powders or current collector structures can be blended or embedded into the paste mixture which can be molded to the desired electrode shape. The molded paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity as the resin begins to cure into a rigid solid structure.

  19. Free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures and computational RNA design.

    PubMed

    Churkin, Alexander; Weinbrand, Lina; Barash, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Determining the RNA secondary structure from sequence data by computational predictions is a long-standing problem. Its solution has been approached in two distinctive ways. If a multiple sequence alignment of a collection of homologous sequences is available, the comparative method uses phylogeny to determine conserved base pairs that are more likely to form as a result of billions of years of evolution than by chance. In the case of single sequences, recursive algorithms that compute free energy structures by using empirically derived energy parameters have been developed. This latter approach of RNA folding prediction by energy minimization is widely used to predict RNA secondary structure from sequence. For a significant number of RNA molecules, the secondary structure of the RNA molecule is indicative of its function and its computational prediction by minimizing its free energy is important for its functional analysis. A general method for free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures is dynamic programming, although other optimization methods have been developed as well along with empirically derived energy parameters. In this chapter, we introduce and illustrate by examples the approach of free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures.

  20. GTfold: Enabling parallel RNA secondary structure prediction on multi-core desktops

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate and efficient RNA secondary structure prediction remains an important open problem in computational molecular biology. Historically, advances in computing technology have enabled faster and more accurate RNA secondary structure predictions. Previous parallelized prediction programs achieved significant improvements in runtime, but their implementations were not portable from niche high-performance computers or easily accessible to most RNA researchers. With the increasing prevalence of multi-core desktop machines, a new parallel prediction program is needed to take full advantage of today’s computing technology. Findings We present here the first implementation of RNA secondary structure prediction by thermodynamic optimization for modern multi-core computers. We show that GTfold predicts secondary structure in less time than UNAfold and RNAfold, without sacrificing accuracy, on machines with four or more cores. Conclusions GTfold supports advances in RNA structural biology by reducing the timescales for secondary structure prediction. The difference will be particularly valuable to researchers working with lengthy RNA sequences, such as RNA viral genomes. PMID:22747589

  1. Evaluation of the Information Content in Infrared Spectra for Protein Secondary Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Goormaghtigh, Erik; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Raussens, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is a method of choice for the experimental determination of protein secondary structure. Numerous approaches have been developed during the past 15 years. A critical parameter that has not been taken into account systematically is the selection of the wavenumbers used for building the mathematical models used for structure prediction. The high quality of the current Fourier-transform infrared spectrometers makes the absorbance at every single wavenumber a valid and almost noiseless type of information. We address here the question of the amount of independent information present in the infrared spectra of proteins for the prediction of the different secondary structure contents. It appears that, at most, the absorbance at three distinct frequencies of the spectra contain all the nonredundant information that can be related to one secondary structure content. The ascending stepwise method proposed here identifies the relevance of each wavenumber of the infrared spectrum for the prediction of a given secondary structure and yields a particularly simple method for computing the secondary structure content. Using the 50-protein database built beforehand to contain as little fold redundancy as possible, the standard error of prediction in cross-validation is 5.5% for the α-helix, 6.6% for the β-sheet, and 3.4% for the β-turn. PMID:16428280

  2. Argumentation in Secondary School Students' Structured and Unstructured Chat Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Timo; Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Joint construction of new knowledge demands that persons can express their statements in a convincing way and explore other people's arguments constructively. For this reason, more knowledge on different means to support collaborative argumentation is needed. This study clarifies whether structured interaction supports students' critical and…

  3. Cloud partitioning of isocyanic acid (HNCO) and evidence of secondary source of HNCO in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Wentzell, J. J. B.; Mcdonald, A. M.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.; Modini, R. L.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Noone, K. J.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Hawkins, L. N.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Liggio, J.

    2014-10-01

    Although isocyanic acid (HNCO) may cause a variety of health issues via protein carbamylation and has been proposed as a key compound in smoke-related health issues, our understanding of the atmospheric sources and fate of this toxic compound is currently incomplete. To address these issues, a field study was conducted at Mount Soledad, La Jolla, CA, to investigate partitioning of HNCO to clouds and fogs using an Acetate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer coupled to a ground-based counterflow virtual impactor. The first field evidence of cloud partitioning of HNCO is presented, demonstrating that HNCO is dissolved in cloudwater more efficiently than expected based on the effective Henry's law solubility. The measurements also indicate evidence for a secondary, photochemical source of HNCO in ambient air at this site.

  4. Parameter-Free Hydrogen-Bond Definition to Classify Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Hasti; Higham, Jonathan; Henchman, Richard H

    2016-08-25

    DSSP is the most commonly used method to assign protein secondary structure. It is based on a hydrogen-bond definition with an energy cutoff. To assess whether hydrogen bonds defined in a parameter-free way may give more generality while preserving accuracy, we examine a series of hydrogen-bond definitions to assign secondary structure for a series of proteins. Assignment by the strongest-acceptor bifurcated definition with provision for unassigned donor hydrogens, termed the SABLE method, is found to match DSSP with 95% agreement. The small disagreement mainly occurs for helices, turns, and bends. While there is no absolute way to assign protein secondary structure, avoiding molecule-specific cutoff parameters should be advantageous in generalizing structure-assignment methods to any hydrogen-bonded system. PMID:27067825

  5. Charge‐Induced Unzipping of Isolated Proteins to a Defined Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    González Flórez, Ana Isabel; Mucha, Eike; Ahn, Doo‐Sik; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Pagel, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study on the secondary structure of isolated proteins as a function of charge state. In infrared spectra of the proteins ubiquitin and cytochrome c, amide I (C=O stretch) and amide II (N–H bend) bands can be found at positions that are typical for condensed‐phase proteins. For high charge states a new band appears, substantially red‐shifted from the amide II band observed at lower charge states. The observations are interpreted in terms of Coulomb‐driven transitions in secondary structures from mostly helical to extended C5‐type hydrogen‐bonded structures. Support for this interpretation comes from simple energy considerations as well as from quantum chemical calculations on model peptides. This transition in secondary structure is most likely universal for isolated proteins that occur in mass spectrometric experiments. PMID:26847383

  6. Residue-residue contacts: application to analysis of secondary structure interactions.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Vladimir; Edelman, Marvin; Sobolev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Protein structures and their complexes are formed and stabilized by interactions, both inside and outside of the protein. Analysis of such interactions helps in understanding different levels of structures (secondary, super-secondary, and oligomeric states). It can also assist molecular biologists in understanding structural consequences of modifying proteins and/or ligands. In this chapter, our definition of atom-atom and residue-residue contacts is described and applied to analysis of protein-protein interactions in dimeric β-sandwich proteins.

  7. Macromolecular ab initio phasing enforcing secondary and tertiary structure

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Claudia; Sammito, Massimo; Usón, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio phasing of macromolecular structures, from the native intensities alone with no experimental phase information or previous particular structural knowledge, has been the object of a long quest, limited by two main barriers: structure size and resolution of the data. Current approaches to extend the scope of ab initio phasing include use of the Patterson function, density modification and data extrapolation. The authors’ approach relies on the combination of locating model fragments such as polyalanine α-helices with the program PHASER and density modification with the program SHELXE. Given the difficulties in discriminating correct small substructures, many putative groups of fragments have to be tested in parallel; thus calculations are performed in a grid or supercomputer. The method has been named after the Italian painter Arcimboldo, who used to compose portraits out of fruit and vegetables. With ARCIMBOLDO, most collections of fragments remain a ‘still-life’, but some are correct enough for density modification and main-chain tracing to reveal the protein’s true portrait. Beyond α-helices, other fragments can be exploited in an analogous way: libraries of helices with modelled side chains, β-strands, predictable fragments such as DNA-binding folds or fragments selected from distant homologues up to libraries of small local folds that are used to enforce nonspecific tertiary structure; thus restoring the ab initio nature of the method. Using these methods, a number of unknown macromolecules with a few thousand atoms and resolutions around 2 Å have been solved. In the 2014 release, use of the program has been simplified. The software mediates the use of massive computing to automate the grid access required in difficult cases but may also run on a single multicore workstation (http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/ARCIMBOLDO_LITE) to solve straightforward cases. PMID:25610631

  8. Macromolecular ab initio phasing enforcing secondary and tertiary structure.

    PubMed

    Millán, Claudia; Sammito, Massimo; Usón, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio phasing of macromolecular structures, from the native intensities alone with no experimental phase information or previous particular structural knowledge, has been the object of a long quest, limited by two main barriers: structure size and resolution of the data. Current approaches to extend the scope of ab initio phasing include use of the Patterson function, density modification and data extrapolation. The authors' approach relies on the combination of locating model fragments such as polyalanine α-helices with the program PHASER and density modification with the program SHELXE. Given the difficulties in discriminating correct small substructures, many putative groups of fragments have to be tested in parallel; thus calculations are performed in a grid or supercomputer. The method has been named after the Italian painter Arcimboldo, who used to compose portraits out of fruit and vegetables. With ARCIMBOLDO, most collections of fragments remain a 'still-life', but some are correct enough for density modification and main-chain tracing to reveal the protein's true portrait. Beyond α-helices, other fragments can be exploited in an analogous way: libraries of helices with modelled side chains, β-strands, predictable fragments such as DNA-binding folds or fragments selected from distant homologues up to libraries of small local folds that are used to enforce nonspecific tertiary structure; thus restoring the ab initio nature of the method. Using these methods, a number of unknown macromolecules with a few thousand atoms and resolutions around 2 Å have been solved. In the 2014 release, use of the program has been simplified. The software mediates the use of massive computing to automate the grid access required in difficult cases but may also run on a single multicore workstation (http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/ARCIMBOLDO_LITE) to solve straightforward cases.

  9. Macromolecular ab initio phasing enforcing secondary and tertiary structure.

    PubMed

    Millán, Claudia; Sammito, Massimo; Usón, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio phasing of macromolecular structures, from the native intensities alone with no experimental phase information or previous particular structural knowledge, has been the object of a long quest, limited by two main barriers: structure size and resolution of the data. Current approaches to extend the scope of ab initio phasing include use of the Patterson function, density modification and data extrapolation. The authors' approach relies on the combination of locating model fragments such as polyalanine α-helices with the program PHASER and density modification with the program SHELXE. Given the difficulties in discriminating correct small substructures, many putative groups of fragments have to be tested in parallel; thus calculations are performed in a grid or supercomputer. The method has been named after the Italian painter Arcimboldo, who used to compose portraits out of fruit and vegetables. With ARCIMBOLDO, most collections of fragments remain a 'still-life', but some are correct enough for density modification and main-chain tracing to reveal the protein's true portrait. Beyond α-helices, other fragments can be exploited in an analogous way: libraries of helices with modelled side chains, β-strands, predictable fragments such as DNA-binding folds or fragments selected from distant homologues up to libraries of small local folds that are used to enforce nonspecific tertiary structure; thus restoring the ab initio nature of the method. Using these methods, a number of unknown macromolecules with a few thousand atoms and resolutions around 2 Å have been solved. In the 2014 release, use of the program has been simplified. The software mediates the use of massive computing to automate the grid access required in difficult cases but may also run on a single multicore workstation (http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/ARCIMBOLDO_LITE) to solve straightforward cases. PMID:25610631

  10. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  11. Interconnection of Salt-induced Hydrophobic Compaction and Secondary Structure Formation Depends on Solution Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea. PMID:22303014

  12. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses discrete mathematical techniques and identifies specified base pairs as parameters. The goal of the REU was to introduce upper-level undergraduate students to the principles and challenges of interdisciplinary research in molecular biology and discrete mathematics. At the beginning of the project, students from the biology and mathematics departments of a mid-sized university received instruction on the role of secondary structure in the function of eukaryotic RNAs and RNA viruses, RNA related to combinatorics, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information resources. The student research projects focused on RNA secondary structure prediction on a regulatory region of the yellow fever virus RNA genome and on an untranslated region of an mRNA of a gene associated with the neurological disorder epilepsy. At the end of the project, the REU students gave poster and oral presentations, and they submitted written final project reports to the program director. The outcome of the REU was that the students gained transferable knowledge and skills in bioinformatics and an awareness of the applications of discrete mathematics to biological research problems. PMID:20810968

  13. RNA secondary structure prediction by using discrete mathematics: an interdisciplinary research experience for undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses discrete mathematical techniques and identifies specified base pairs as parameters. The goal of the REU was to introduce upper-level undergraduate students to the principles and challenges of interdisciplinary research in molecular biology and discrete mathematics. At the beginning of the project, students from the biology and mathematics departments of a mid-sized university received instruction on the role of secondary structure in the function of eukaryotic RNAs and RNA viruses, RNA related to combinatorics, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information resources. The student research projects focused on RNA secondary structure prediction on a regulatory region of the yellow fever virus RNA genome and on an untranslated region of an mRNA of a gene associated with the neurological disorder epilepsy. At the end of the project, the REU students gave poster and oral presentations, and they submitted written final project reports to the program director. The outcome of the REU was that the students gained transferable knowledge and skills in bioinformatics and an awareness of the applications of discrete mathematics to biological research problems.

  14. Tracing specific synonymous codon-secondary structure correlations through evolution.

    PubMed

    Oresic, Matej; Dehn, Michael; Korenblum, Daniel; Shalloway, David

    2003-04-01

    We previously showed that GAU codons are preferred (relative to synonymous GAC codons) for encoding aspartates specifically at the N-termini of alpha-helices in human, but not in E. coli, proteins. To test if this difference reflected a general difference between eucaryotes and procaryotes, we now extended the analysis to include the proteins and coding sequences of mammals, vertebrates, S. cerevisiae, and plants. We found that the GAU-alpha-helix correlation is also strong in non-human mammalian and vertebrate proteins but is much weaker or insignificant in S. cerevisiae and plants. The vertebrate correlations are of sufficient strength to enhance alpha-helix N-terminus prediction. Additional results, including the observation that the correlation is significantly enhanced when proteins that are known to be correctly expressed in recombinant procaryotic systems are excluded, suggest that the correlation is induced at the level of protein translation and folding and not at the nucleic acid level. To the best of our knowledge, it is not explicable by the canonical picture of protein expression and folding, suggesting the existence of a novel evolutionary selection mechanism. One possible explanation is that some alpha-helix N-terminal GAU codons may facilitate correct co-translational folding in vertebrates.

  15. Structuring Free-text Microbiology Culture Reports For Secondary Use

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Wen-wai; Evans, Heather L.; Yetisgen, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology lab culture reports are a frequently used diagnostic tool for clinical providers. However, their incorporation into clinical surveillance applications and evidence-based medicine can be severely hindered by the free-text nature of these reports. In this work, we (1) created a microbiology culture template to structure free-text microbiology reports, (2) generated an annotated microbiology report corpus, and (3) built a microbiology information extraction system. Specifically, we combined rule-based, hybrid, and statistical techniques to extract microbiology entities and fill templates for structuring data. System performances were favorable, with entity f1-score 0.889 and relation f1-score 0.795. We plan to incorporate these extractions as features for our ongoing ventilator-associated pneumonia surveillance project, though this tool can be used as an upstream process in other applications. Our newly created corpus includes 1442 unique gram stain and culture microbiology reports generated from a cohort of 715 patients at the University of Washington Medical Facilities. PMID:26306288

  16. Computer analysis of phytochrome sequences and reevaluation of the phytochrome secondary structure by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sühnel, J; Hermann, G; Dornberger, U; Fritzsche, H

    1997-07-18

    A repertoire of various methods of computer sequence analysis was applied to phytochromes in order to gain new insights into their structure and function. A statistical analysis of 23 complete phytochrome sequences revealed regions of non-random amino acid composition, which are supposed to be of particular structural or functional importance. All phytochromes other than phyD and phyE from Arabidopsis have at least one such region at the N-terminus between residues 2 and 35. A sequence similarity search of current databases indicated striking homologies between all phytochromes and a hypothetical 84.2-kDa protein from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. Furthermore, scanning the phytochrome sequences for the occurrence of patterns defined in the PROSITE database detected the signature of the WD repeats of the beta-transducin family within the functionally important 623-779 region (sequence numbering of phyA from Avena) in a number of phytochromes. A multiple sequence alignment performed with 23 complete phytochrome sequences is made available via the IMB Jena World-Wide Web server (http://www.imb-jena.de/PHYTO.html). It can be used as a working tool for future theoretical and experimental studies. Based on the multiple alignment striking sequence differences between phytochromes A and B were detected directly at the N-terminal end, where all phytochromes B have an additional stretch of 15-42 amino acids. There is also a variety of positions with totally conserved but different amino acids in phytochromes A and B. Most of these changes are found in the sequence segment 150-200. It is, therefore, suggested that this region might be of importance in determining the photosensory specificity of the two phytochromes. The secondary structure prediction based on the multiple alignment resulted in a small but significant beta-sheet content. This finding is confirmed by a reevaluation of the secondary structure using FTIR spectroscopy.

  17. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  18. A Metal-Organic Framework Containing Unusual Eight-Connected Zr–-Oxo Secondary Building Units and Orthogonal Carboxylic Acids for Ultra-sensitive Metal Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Carboni, Michaël; Lin, Zekai; Abney, Carter W.; Zhang, Teng; Lin, Wenbin

    2015-08-21

    Two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with Zr-oxo secondary building units (SBUs) were prepared by using p,p'-terphenyldicarboxylate (TPDC) bridging ligands pre-functionalized with orthogonal succinic acid (MOF-1) and maleic acid groups (MOF-2). Single-crystal X-ray structure analysis of MOF-1 provides the first direct evidence for eight-connected SBUs in UiO-type MOFs. In contrast, MOF-2 contains twelve-connected SBUs as seen in the traditional UiO MOF topology. These structural assignments were confirmed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. The highly porous MOF-1 is an excellent fluorescence sensor for metal ions with the detection limit of <0.5 ppb for Mn2+ and three to four orders of magnitude greater sensitivity for metal ions than previously reported luminescent MOFs.

  19. Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase transcription by hnRNP K and DNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Kasturi; Wang, Meng; Cai, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Nana; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene (Th) transcription is critical for specifying and maintaining the dopaminergic neuronal phenotype. Here we define a molecular regulatory mechanism for Th transcription conserved in tetrapod vertebrates. We show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a transactivator of Th transcription. It binds to previously unreported and evolutionarily conserved G:C-rich regions in the Th proximal promoter. hnRNP K directly binds C-rich single DNA strands within these conserved regions and also associates with double-stranded sequences when proteins, such as CREB, are bound to an adjacent cis-regulatory element. The single DNA strands within the conserved G:C-rich regions adopt either G-quadruplex or i-motif secondary structures. We also show that small molecule-mediated stabilization of these secondary structures represses Th promoter activity. These data suggest that these secondary structures are targets for pharmacological modulation of the dopaminergic phenotype. PMID:25493445

  20. The FT-IR spectrometric analysis of the changes of polyphenol oxidase II secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunhua; Dai, Ya; Liu, Qingliang; Xie, Yongshu; Xu, Xiaolong

    2003-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase II is a novel protein purified from tobacco, which acts as a key role in plant defense system. From the analysis of FT-IR spectrums, Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) spectrums and second-derivative spectrums of PPO II at different pH and peroxide PPO II adduct, the secondary structure fractions are analyzed. PPO II at low pH (pH=3.0) and peroxide PPO II adduct almost keep the same secondary structure of native PPO II. The percentages of β-turn and random coil increase rapidly and the percentages of α-helix and anti-parallel β-sheet decrease rapidly at high pH (pH=10.0) comparing with that of native PPO II. All these conclusions are proved by the secondary structure calculations of circular dichroism spectrums in different states.

  1. Relationship between chain collapse and secondary structure formation in a partially folded protein.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kanako; Yamada, Yoshiteru; Matsumura, Yoshitaka; Tsukamoto, Seiichi; Yamamoto-Ohtomo, Mio; Ohtomo, Hideaki; Okabe, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Ikeguchi, Masamichi

    2014-06-01

    Chain collapse and secondary structure formation are frequently observed during the early stages of protein folding. Is the chain collapse brought about by interactions between secondary structure units or is it due to polymer behavior in a poor solvent (coil-globule transition)? To answer this question, we measured small-angle X-ray scattering for a series of β-lactoglobulin mutants under conditions in which they assume a partially folded state analogous to the folding intermediates. Mutants that were designed to disrupt the secondary structure units showed the gyration radii similar to that of the wild type protein, indicating that chain collapse is due to coil-globule transitions. PMID:25100622

  2. Two-dimensional self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides; adsorption-induced secondary structural transition on hydrophilic substrate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Abiko, Souhei; Himeiwa, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Takatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of sequential amphiphilic peptides on solid substrates triggered the spontaneous construction of nanoscaled architecture. An amphiphilic peptide designed with a cationic amino acid as a hydrophilic residue turned an anionic mica substrate into a water-repellent surface, simply by adsorbing it on the substrate surface. In contrast, an amphiphilic peptide designed with an anionic amino-acid residue formed a precisely controlled fiber array comprising a β-sheet fiber monolayer at the anionic substrate/water interface. This phenomenon was based on the secondary structural transition from random-coil to β-sheet, which occurred specifically when amphiphilic peptide adsorbed on the substrate surface. Such surface-specific nonorder/order transition was implemented by exploiting the strength of adsorption between the peptide and the substrate. A strategic design exploiting weak bonding such as hydrophobic interactions is essential for constructing precisely controlled nano-architectures in two dimensions.

  3. RNA secondary structure prediction based on SHAPE data in helix regions.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mohadeseh; Zare-Mirakabad, Fatemeh; Montaseri, Soheila

    2015-09-01

    RNA molecules play important and fundamental roles in biological processes. Frequently, the functional form of single-stranded RNA molecules requires a specific tertiary structure. Classically, RNA structure determination has mostly been accomplished by X-Ray crystallography or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance approaches. These experimental methods are time consuming and expensive. In the past two decades, some computational methods and algorithms have been developed for RNA secondary structure prediction. In these algorithms, minimum free energy is known as the best criterion. However, the results of algorithms show that minimum free energy is not a sufficient criterion to predict RNA secondary structure. These algorithms need some additional knowledge about the structure, which has to be added in the methods. Recently, the information obtained from some experimental data, called SHAPE, can greatly improve the consistency between the native and predicted RNA secondary structure. In this paper, we investigate the influence of SHAPE data on four types of RNA substructures, helices, loops, base pairs from the start and end of helices and two base pairs from the start and end of helices. The results show that SHAPE data in helix regions can improve the prediction. We represent a new method to apply SHAPE data in helix regions for finding RNA secondary structure. Finally, we compare the results of the method on a set of RNAs to predict minimum free energy structure based on considering all SHAPE data and only SHAPE data in helix regions as pseudo free energy and without SHAPE data (without any pseudo free energy). The results show that RNA secondary structure prediction based on considering only SHAPE data in helix regions is more successful than not considering SHAPE data and it provides competitive results in comparison with considering all SHAPE data.

  4. Influence of secondary structure on in-source decay of protein in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Osaka, Issey; Sakakura, Motoshi

    2012-01-01

    The susceptibility of the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone to specific cleavage by in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) was studied from the standpoint of the secondary structure of three proteins. A naphthalene derivative, 5-amino-1-naphtol (5,1-ANL), was used as the matrix. The resulting c'-ions, which originate from the cleavage at N-Cα bonds in flexible secondary structures such as turn and bend, and are free from intra-molecular hydrogen-bonded α-helix structure, gave relatively intense peaks. Furthermore, ISD spectra of the proteins showed that the N-Cα bonds of specific amino acid residues, namely Gly-Xxx, Xxx-Asp, and Xxx-Asn, were more susceptible to MALDI-ISD than other amino acid residues. This is in agreement with the observation that Gly, Asp and Asn residues usually located in turns, rather than α-helix. The results obtained indicate that protein molecules embedded into the matrix crystal in the MALDI experiments maintain their secondary structures as determined by X-ray crystallography, and that MALDI-ISD has the capability for providing information concerning the secondary structure of protein.

  5. Dynamics of beta and proliferating cell nuclear antigen sliding clamps in traversing DNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Yao, N; Hurwitz, J; O'Donnell, M

    2000-01-14

    Chromosomal replicases of cellular organisms utilize a ring shaped protein that encircles DNA as a mobile tether for high processivity in DNA synthesis. These "sliding clamps" have sufficiently large linear diameters to encircle duplex DNA and are perhaps even large enough to slide over certain DNA secondary structural elements. This report examines the Escherichia coli beta and human proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamps for their ability to slide over various DNA secondary structures. The results show that these clamps are capable of traversing a 13-nucleotide ssDNA loop, a 4-base pair stem-loop, a 4-nucleotide 5' tail, and a 15-mer bubble within the duplex. However, upon increasing the size of these structures (20-nucleotide loop, 12-base pair stem-loop, 28-nucleotide 5' tail, and 20-nucleotide bubble) the sliding motion of the beta and proliferating cell nuclear antigen over these elements is halted. Studies of the E. coli replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, in chain elongation with the beta clamp demonstrate that upon encounter with an oligonucleotide annealed in its path, it traverses the duplex and resumes synthesis on the 3' terminus of the oligonucleotide. This sliding and resumption of synthesis occurs even when the oligonucleotide contains a secondary structure element, provided the beta clamp can traverse the structure. However, upon encounter with a downstream oligonucleotide containing a large internal secondary structure, the holoenzyme clears the obstacle by strand displacing the oligonucleotide from the template. Implications of these protein dynamics to DNA transactions are discussed. PMID:10625694

  6. A set of nearest neighbor parameters for predicting the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi John; Turner, Douglas H.; Mathews, David H.

    2006-01-01

    A complete set of nearest neighbor parameters to predict the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation was derived. These parameters can be used with available free energy nearest neighbor parameters to extend the secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences to temperatures other than 37°C. The parameters were tested by predicting the secondary structures of sequences with known secondary structure that are from organisms with known optimal growth temperatures. Compared with the previous set of enthalpy nearest neighbor parameters, the sensitivity of base pair prediction improved from 65.2 to 68.9% at optimal growth temperatures ranging from 10 to 60°C. Base pair probabilities were predicted with a partition function and the positive predictive value of structure prediction is 90.4% when considering the base pairs in the lowest free energy structure with pairing probability of 0.99 or above. Moreover, a strong correlation is found between the predicted melting temperatures of RNA sequences and the optimal growth temperatures of the host organism. This indicates that organisms that live at higher temperatures have evolved RNA sequences with higher melting temperatures. PMID:16982646

  7. RNAmutants: a web server to explore the mutational landscape of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Waldispühl, Jerome; Devadas, Srinivas; Berger, Bonnie; Clote, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The history and mechanism of molecular evolution in DNA have been greatly elucidated by contributions from genetics, probability theory and bioinformatics--indeed, mathematical developments such as Kimura's neutral theory, Kingman's coalescent theory and efficient software such as BLAST, ClustalW, Phylip, etc., provide the foundation for modern population genetics. In contrast to DNA, the function of most noncoding RNA depends on tertiary structure, experimentally known to be largely determined by secondary structure, for which dynamic programming can efficiently compute the minimum free energy secondary structure. For this reason, understanding the effect of pointwise mutations in RNA secondary structure could reveal fundamental properties of structural RNA molecules and improve our understanding of molecular evolution of RNA. The web server RNAmutants provides several efficient tools to compute the ensemble of low-energy secondary structures for all k-mutants of a given RNA sequence, where k is bounded by a user-specified upper bound. As we have previously shown, these tools can be used to predict putative deleterious mutations and to analyze regulatory sequences from the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency genomes. Web server is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAmutants/, and downloadable binaries at http://rnamutants.csail.mit.edu/.

  8. RNAmutants: a web server to explore the mutational landscape of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Waldispühl, Jerome; Devadas, Srinivas; Berger, Bonnie; Clote, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The history and mechanism of molecular evolution in DNA have been greatly elucidated by contributions from genetics, probability theory and bioinformatics--indeed, mathematical developments such as Kimura's neutral theory, Kingman's coalescent theory and efficient software such as BLAST, ClustalW, Phylip, etc., provide the foundation for modern population genetics. In contrast to DNA, the function of most noncoding RNA depends on tertiary structure, experimentally known to be largely determined by secondary structure, for which dynamic programming can efficiently compute the minimum free energy secondary structure. For this reason, understanding the effect of pointwise mutations in RNA secondary structure could reveal fundamental properties of structural RNA molecules and improve our understanding of molecular evolution of RNA. The web server RNAmutants provides several efficient tools to compute the ensemble of low-energy secondary structures for all k-mutants of a given RNA sequence, where k is bounded by a user-specified upper bound. As we have previously shown, these tools can be used to predict putative deleterious mutations and to analyze regulatory sequences from the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency genomes. Web server is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAmutants/, and downloadable binaries at http://rnamutants.csail.mit.edu/. PMID:19531740

  9. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  10. Artificial Intelligence in Prediction of Secondary Protein Structure Using CB513 Database

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Zikrija; Purisevic, Elvir; Omanovic, Samir; Coralic, Zlatan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe CB513 a non-redundant dataset, suitable for development of algorithms for prediction of secondary protein structure. A program was made in Borland Delphi for transforming data from our dataset to make it suitable for learning of neural network for prediction of secondary protein structure implemented in MATLAB Neural-Network Toolbox. Learning (training and testing) of neural network is researched with different sizes of windows, different number of neurons in the hidden layer and different number of training epochs, while using dataset CB513. PMID:21347158

  11. Control of stability and structure of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimta, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    The stabilities, structures, and functions of nucleic acids are responsive to surrounding conditions. Living cells contain biomolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides, and other soluble and insoluble low-molecular weight components, that occupy a significant fraction of the cellular volume (up to 40%), resulting in a highly crowded intracellular environment. We have proven that conditions that mimic features of this intra-cellular environment alter the physical properties affect the stability, structure, and function of nucleic acids. The ability to control structure of nucleic acids by mimicking intra-cellular conditions will be useful in nanotechnology applications of nucleic acids. This paper describes methods that can be used to analyze quantitatively the intra-cellular environment effects caused by cosolutes on nucleic acid structures and to regulate properties of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

  12. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information.

    PubMed

    Bose, Tungadri; Dutta, Anirban; Mh, Mohammed; Gandhi, Hemang; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, 'FASTR', for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. 'FASTR' - the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant 'fastr' string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the 'FASTR' methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  13. Secondary Structural Change Can Occur Diffusely and Not Modularly during Protein Folding and Unfolding Reactions.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Pooja; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-05-11

    A major goal of protein folding studies is to understand the structural basis of the coupling between stabilizing interactions, which leads to cooperative conformational change. The goal is challenging because of the difficulty in simultaneously measuring global cooperativity by determining population distributions of the conformations present, and the structures of these conformations. Here, hydrogen exchange (HX) into the small protein monellin was carried out under conditions where structure-opening is rate limiting for most backbone amide sites. Detection by mass spectrometry allowed characterization of not only segment-specific structure-opening rates but also the cooperativity of unfolding of the different secondary structural segments of the protein. The segment-specific pattern of HX reveals that the backbone hydrogen-bonding network disassembles in a structurally diffuse, asynchronous manner. A comparison of the site-specific transient opening rates of secondary and tertiary structure in the protein provides a structural rationale for the observation that unfolding is hierarchical and describable by exponential kinetics, despite being diffuse. Since unfolding was studied in native conditions, the sequence of events during folding in the same conditions will be the reverse of the sequence of events observed during unfolding. Hence, the formation of secondary structural units during folding would also occur in a non-cooperative, diffuse, and asynchronous manner. PMID:27093885

  14. Web-Beagle: a web server for the alignment of RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Eugenio; Pietrosanto, Marco; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Web-Beagle (http://beagle.bio.uniroma2.it) is a web server for the pairwise global or local alignment of RNA secondary structures. The server exploits a new encoding for RNA secondary structure and a substitution matrix of RNA structural elements to perform RNA structural alignments. The web server allows the user to compute up to 10 000 alignments in a single run, taking as input sets of RNA sequences and structures or primary sequences alone. In the latter case, the server computes the secondary structure prediction for the RNAs on-the-fly using RNAfold (free energy minimization). The user can also compare a set of input RNAs to one of five pre-compiled RNA datasets including lncRNAs and 3′ UTRs. All types of comparison produce in output the pairwise alignments along with structural similarity and statistical significance measures for each resulting alignment. A graphical color-coded representation of the alignments allows the user to easily identify structural similarities between RNAs. Web-Beagle can be used for finding structurally related regions in two or more RNAs, for the identification of homologous regions or for functional annotation. Benchmark tests show that Web-Beagle has lower computational complexity, running time and better performances than other available methods. PMID:25977293

  15. Orientation Determination of Protein Helical Secondary Structure Using Linear and Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Ye, Shuji; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically presented the orientation determination of protein helical secondary structures using vibrational spectroscopic methods, particularly the nonlinear Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, along with linear vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering. SFG amide I signals can be collected using different polarization combinations of the input laser beams and output signal beam to measure the second order nonlinear optical susceptibility components of the helical amide I modes, which are related to their molecular hyperpolarizability elements through the orientation distribution of these helices. The molecular hyperpolarizability elements of amide I modes of a helix can be calculated based on the infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of the helix; these quantities are determined by using the bond additivity model to sum over the individual infrared dipole transition moments and Raman polarizability tensors, respectively, of the peptide units (or the amino acid residues). The computed overall infrared transition dipole moment and Raman polarizability tensor of a helix can be validated by experimental data using polarized infrared and polarized Raman spectroscopy on samples with well-aligned helical structures. From the deduced SFG hyperpolarizability elements and measured SFG second order nonlinear susceptibility components, orientation information regarding helical structures can be determined. Even though such orientation information can also be measured using polarized infrared or polarized Raman amide I signals, SFG has a much lower detection limit, which can be used to study the orientation of a helix when its surface coverage is much lower than a monolayer. In addition, the combination of different vibrational spectroscopic techniques, e.g., SFG and Attenuated Total Reflectance – Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, provides more

  16. Secondary structure models of the 3′ untranslated regions of diverse R2 RNAs

    PubMed Central

    RUSCHAK, AMY M.; MATHEWS, DAVID H.; BIBILLO, ARKADIUSZ; SPINELLI, SHERRY L.; CHILDS, JESSICA L.; EICKBUSH, THOMAS H.; TURNER, DOUGLAS H.

    2004-01-01

    The RNA structure of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the R2 retrotransposable element is recognized by the R2-encoded reverse transcriptase in a reaction called target primed reverse transcription (TPRT). To provide insight into structure–function relationships important for TPRT, we have created alignments that reveal the secondary structure for 22 Drosophila and five silkmoth 3′ UTR R2 sequences. In addition, free energy minimization has been used to predict the secondary structure for the 3′ UTR R2 RNA of Forficula auricularia. The predicted structures for Bombyx mori and F. auricularia are consistent with chemical modification data obtained with β-ethoxy-α-ketobutyraldehyde (kethoxal), dimethyl sulfate, and 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate. The structures appear to have common helices that are likely important for function. PMID:15146081

  17. New insights from cluster analysis methods for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Emily; Heitsch, Christine

    2016-05-01

    A widening gap exists between the best practices for RNA secondary structure prediction developed by computational researchers and the methods used in practice by experimentalists. Minimum free energy predictions, although broadly used, are outperformed by methods which sample from the Boltzmann distribution and data mine the results. In particular, moving beyond the single structure prediction paradigm yields substantial gains in accuracy. Furthermore, the largest improvements in accuracy and precision come from viewing secondary structures not at the base pair level but at lower granularity/higher abstraction. This suggests that random errors affecting precision and systematic ones affecting accuracy are both reduced by this 'fuzzier' view of secondary structures. Thus experimentalists who are willing to adopt a more rigorous, multilayered approach to secondary structure prediction by iterating through these levels of granularity will be much better able to capture fundamental aspects of RNA base pairing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:278-294. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  18. The four ingredients of single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction. A unifying perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Any method for RNA secondary structure prediction is determined by four ingredients. The architecture is the choice of features implemented by the model (such as stacked basepairs, loop length distributions, etc.). The architecture determines the number of parameters in the model. The scoring scheme is the nature of those parameters (whether thermodynamic, probabilistic, or weights). The parameterization stands for the specific values assigned to the parameters. These three ingredients are referred to as “the model.” The fourth ingredient is the folding algorithms used to predict plausible secondary structures given the model and the sequence of a structural RNA. Here, I make several unifying observations drawn from looking at more than 40 years of methods for RNA secondary structure prediction in the light of this classification. As a final observation, there seems to be a performance ceiling that affects all methods with complex architectures, a ceiling that impacts all scoring schemes with remarkable similarity. This suggests that modeling RNA secondary structure by using intrinsic sequence-based plausible “foldability” will require the incorporation of other forms of information in order to constrain the folding space and to improve prediction accuracy. This could give an advantage to probabilistic scoring systems since a probabilistic framework is a natural platform to incorporate different sources of information into one single inference problem. PMID:23695796

  19. The four ingredients of single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction. A unifying perspective.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Elena

    2013-07-01

    Any method for RNA secondary structure prediction is determined by four ingredients. The architecture is the choice of features implemented by the model (such as stacked basepairs, loop length distributions, etc.). The architecture determines the number of parameters in the model. The scoring scheme is the nature of those parameters (whether thermodynamic, probabilistic, or weights). The parameterization stands for the specific values assigned to the parameters. These three ingredients are referred to as "the model." The fourth ingredient is the folding algorithms used to predict plausible secondary structures given the model and the sequence of a structural RNA. Here, I make several unifying observations drawn from looking at more than 40 years of methods for RNA secondary structure prediction in the light of this classification. As a final observation, there seems to be a performance ceiling that affects all methods with complex architectures, a ceiling that impacts all scoring schemes with remarkable similarity. This suggests that modeling RNA secondary structure by using intrinsic sequence-based plausible "foldability" will require the incorporation of other forms of information in order to constrain the folding space and to improve prediction accuracy. This could give an advantage to probabilistic scoring systems since a probabilistic framework is a natural platform to incorporate different sources of information into one single inference problem.

  20. Flow structure in submarine meandering channels, a continuous discussion on secondary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, J. D.; Parker, G.; Sequeiros, O.; Spinewine, B.; Garcia, M. H.; Pirmez, C.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the flow structure in deep-sea turbidity currents is important for the formation of submarine meandering channels. Similarly to the case of subaerial channels, several types of secondary flows include turbulence-, curvature- and bed morphodynamic-driven flow structures that modulate sediment transport and channel bed morphodynamics. This study focuses on [1] a review of long-time research effort (Abad et al., 2011) that tackles the description of the secondary flow associated with a subaqueous bottom current (saline) in a high-curvature meandering channel and [2] ongoing numerical simulations of similar settings as the experiments to describe the entire flow structure. In the case of subaerial channels, the classical Rozovskiian paradigm is often invoked which indicates that the near-bottom secondary flow in a bend is directed inward. It has recently been suggested based on experimental and theoretical considerations, however, that this pattern is reversed (near-bottom secondary flow is directed outward) in the case of submarine meandering channels. Experimental results presented here, on the other hand, indicate near-bottom secondary flows that have the same direction as observed in a river (normal secondary flow). The implication is an apparent contradiction between experimental results. This study combines theory, experiments, reconstructions of field flows and ongoing simulations to resolve this apparent contradiction based on the flow densimetric Froude number. Three ranges of densimetric Froude number are found, such that a) in an upper regime, secondary flow is reversed, b) in a middle regime, it is normal and c) in a lower regime, it is reversed. These results are applied to field scale channel-forming turbidity currents in the Amazon submarine canyon-fan system (Amazon Channel) and the Monterey canyon and a saline underflow in the Black Sea flowing from the Bosphorus. Our analysis indicates that secondary flow should be normal

  1. Predicting, Monitoring, and Managing Hypercalcemia Secondary to 13-Cis-Retinoic Acid Therapy in Children With High-risk Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suet Ching; Murphy, Dermot; Sastry, Jairam; Shaikh, Mohamad G

    2015-08-01

    13-cis-retinoic acid is an established component of treatment for children with high-risk neuroblastoma. However, significant hypercalcemia is increasingly recognized as a potentially life-threatening dosage-related side effect. We present 2 patients with significant hypercalcemia secondary to 13-cis-retinoic acid and their management, and identified the predictive factors for susceptibility to hypercalcemia. Assessing glomerular filtration rate and concomitant medication help predict individual susceptibility to hypercalcemia. Calcium levels should be monitored at days 1, 7, and 14 of each course of retinoic acid. An algorithm for the management of hypercalcemia during the affected and subsequent cycles of retinoid therapy is proposed.

  2. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  3. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  4. Backbone assignment and secondary structure of Rnd1, an unusual Rho family small GTPase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Mao, Xi'an; Liu, Deli; Buck, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Rho GTPases have attracted considerable interest as signaling molecules due to their variety of functional roles in cells. Rnd1 is a relatively recently discovered Rho GTPase with no enzymatic activity against its bound GTP nucleotide, setting it apart from other family members. Research has revealed a critical role for Rnd1 not only in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development, axon guidance, but also in gastric cancer and in endothelial cells during inflammation. Structural information is crucial for understanding the mechanism that forms the basis for protein-protein interactions and functions, but until recently there were no reports of NMR studies directly on the Rnd1 protein. In this paper we report assignments for the majority of Rnd1 NMR resonances based on 2D and 3D NMR spectra. Rnd1 assignment was a challenging task, however, despite optimization strategies that have facilitated NMR studies of the protein (Cao and Buck in Small GTPase 2:295-304, 2012). Besides common triple-resonance experiments, 3D HNCA, 3D HN(CO)CA, 3D HNCO which are usually employed for sequence assignment, 3D NOESY experiments and specific labeling of 13 kinds of amino acids were also utilized to gain as many (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N resonances assignments as possible. For 170 cross peaks observed out of 183 possible mainchain N-H correlations in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum, backbone assignment was finally completed for 127 resonances. The secondary structure was then defined by chemical shifts and TALOS+ based on the assignments. The overall structure in solution compares well with that of Rnd1 in a crystal, except for two short segments, residues 77-83 and residues 127-131. Given that some features are shared among Rho GTPases, Rnd1 assignments are also compared with two other family members, Cdc42 and Rac1. The overall level of Rnd1 assignment is lower than for Cdc42 and Rac1, consistent with its lower stability and possibly increased internal dynamics. However, while the Rnd1

  5. Backbone assignment and secondary structure of Rnd1, an unusual Rho family small GTPase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Mao, Xi'an; Liu, Deli; Buck, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Rho GTPases have attracted considerable interest as signaling molecules due to their variety of functional roles in cells. Rnd1 is a relatively recently discovered Rho GTPase with no enzymatic activity against its bound GTP nucleotide, setting it apart from other family members. Research has revealed a critical role for Rnd1 not only in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development, axon guidance, but also in gastric cancer and in endothelial cells during inflammation. Structural information is crucial for understanding the mechanism that forms the basis for protein-protein interactions and functions, but until recently there were no reports of NMR studies directly on the Rnd1 protein. In this paper we report assignments for the majority of Rnd1 NMR resonances based on 2D and 3D NMR spectra. Rnd1 assignment was a challenging task, however, despite optimization strategies that have facilitated NMR studies of the protein (Cao and Buck in Small GTPase 2:295-304, 2012). Besides common triple-resonance experiments, 3D HNCA, 3D HN(CO)CA, 3D HNCO which are usually employed for sequence assignment, 3D NOESY experiments and specific labeling of 13 kinds of amino acids were also utilized to gain as many (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N resonances assignments as possible. For 170 cross peaks observed out of 183 possible mainchain N-H correlations in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum, backbone assignment was finally completed for 127 resonances. The secondary structure was then defined by chemical shifts and TALOS+ based on the assignments. The overall structure in solution compares well with that of Rnd1 in a crystal, except for two short segments, residues 77-83 and residues 127-131. Given that some features are shared among Rho GTPases, Rnd1 assignments are also compared with two other family members, Cdc42 and Rac1. The overall level of Rnd1 assignment is lower than for Cdc42 and Rac1, consistent with its lower stability and possibly increased internal dynamics. However, while the Rnd1

  6. Bioinformatics approaches for structural and functional analysis of proteins in secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Sanchita; Singh, Swati; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-11-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is an affluent storehouse of large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides. These secondary metabolites are produced by withanolide biosynthetic pathway. Very less information is available on structural and functional aspects of enzymes involved in withanolides biosynthetic pathways of Withiana somnifera. We therefore performed a bioinformatics analysis to look at functional and structural properties of these important enzymes. The pathway enzymes taken for this study were 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, and cycloartenol synthase. The prediction of secondary structure was performed for basic structural information. Three-dimensional structures for these enzymes were predicted. The physico-chemical properties such as pI, AI, GRAVY and instability index were also studied. The current information will provide a platform to know the structural attributes responsible for the function of these protein until experimental structures become available.

  7. RNA secondary structure modeling at consistent high accuracy using differential SHAPE.

    PubMed

    Rice, Greggory M; Leonard, Christopher W; Weeks, Kevin M

    2014-06-01

    RNA secondary structure modeling is a challenging problem, and recent successes have raised the standards for accuracy, consistency, and tractability. Large increases in accuracy have been achieved by including data on reactivity toward chemical probes: Incorporation of 1M7 SHAPE reactivity data into an mfold-class algorithm results in median accuracies for base pair prediction that exceed 90%. However, a few RNA structures are modeled with significantly lower accuracy. Here, we show that incorporating differential reactivities from the NMIA and 1M6 reagents--which detect noncanonical and tertiary interactions--into prediction algorithms results in highly accurate secondary structure models for RNAs that were previously shown to be difficult to model. For these RNAs, 93% of accepted canonical base pairs were recovered in SHAPE-directed models. Discrepancies between accepted and modeled structures were small and appear to reflect genuine structural differences. Three-reagent SHAPE-directed modeling scales concisely to structurally complex RNAs to resolve the in-solution secondary structure analysis problem for many classes of RNA.

  8. Classroom Structure and Teacher Efficacy in Serving Students with Disabilities: Differences in Elementary and Secondary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shippen, Margaret E.; Flores, Margaret M.; Crites, Steven A.; Patterson, DaShaunda; Ramsey, Michelle L.; Houchins, David E.; Jolivette, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differential classroom structure and efficacy reported by general and special educators at the elementary and secondary level. General and special educators (n = 774, return rate of 37%) from a large school district in the southeast US participated in the study. The participants completed a modified…

  9. Understanding of Relation Structures of Graphical Models by Lower Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Buuren, Onne; Heck, André; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2016-01-01

    A learning path has been developed on system dynamical graphical modelling, integrated into the Dutch lower secondary physics curriculum. As part of the developmental research for this learning path, students' understanding of the relation structures shown in the diagrams of graphical system dynamics based models has been investigated. One of our…

  10. Teachers Working in Collaborative Structures: A Case Study of a Secondary School in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, David Hagen

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a study that explores collaborative structures of shared decision-making in an urban secondary school in the USA. The data in the study came from unstructured interviews with 20 teachers, the principal, the assistant principal, a counsellor and 10 students. The interviews took place over a three-week period in June of 2001…

  11. The Turn of the Screw: An Exercise in Protein Secondary Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikaart, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An exercise using simple paper strips to illustrate protein helical and sheet secondary structures is presented. Drawing on the rich historical context of the use of physical models in protein biochemistry by early practitioners, in particular Linus Pauling, the purpose of this activity is to cultivate in students a hands-on, intuitive sense of…

  12. Secondary School Students' Understanding of Mathematical Induction: Structural Characteristics and the Process of Proof Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palla, Marina; Potari, Despina; Spyrou, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the meaning students attribute to the structure of mathematical induction (MI) and the process of proof construction using mathematical induction in the context of a geometric recursion problem. Two hundred and thirteen 17-year-old students of an upper secondary school in Greece participated in the study. Students'…

  13. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA.

  14. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA. PMID:26107892

  15. Topology and Secondary Structure of the N-terminal Domain of Diacylglycerol Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Soennichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2002-09-28

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) functions as a homotrimer of 13 kDa subunits, each of which has three transmembrane segments. This enzyme is conditionally essential to some bacteria and serves as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, stability, folding, and misfolding. In this work, the detailed topology and secondary structure of DAGKs N-terminus up through the loop

  16. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  17. NMR assignments, secondary structure, and global fold of calerythrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein from Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed Central

    Aitio, H.; Annila, A.; Heikkinen, S.; Thulin, E.; Drakenberg, T.; Kilpeläinen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Calerythrin is a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein isolated from gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Based on amino acid sequence homology, it has been suggested that calerythrin belongs to the family of invertebrate sarcoplasmic EF-hand calcium-binding proteins (SCPs), and therefore it is expected to function as a calcium buffer. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain structural information on the protein in solution. Backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N assignments were obtained from triple resonance experiments HNCACB, HN(CO)CACB, HNCO, CC(CO)NH, and [15N]-edited TOCSY, and HCCH-TOCSY. Secondary structure was determined by using secondary chemical shifts and characteristic NOEs. In addition, backbone N-H residual dipolar couplings were measured from a spin-state selective [1H, 15N] correlation spectrum acquired from a sample dissolved in a dilute liquid crystal. Four EF-hand motifs with characteristic helix-loop-helix patterns were observed. Three of these are typical calcium-binding EF-hands, whereas site 2 is an atypical nonbinding site. The global fold of calerythrin was assessed by dipolar couplings. Measured dipolar couplings were compared with values calculated from four crystal structures of proteins with sequence homology to calerythrin. These data allowed us to recognize an overall similarity between the folds of calerythrin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins from the sandworm Nereis diversicolor and the amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum. PMID:10631973

  18. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-01

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin.

  19. Secondary flow structure in a model curved artery: 3D morphology and circulation budget analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rate of change of circulation within control regions encompassing the large-scale vortical structures associated with secondary flows, i.e. deformed Dean-, Lyne- and Wall-type (D-L-W) vortices at planar cross-sections in a 180° curved artery model (curvature ratio, 1/7). Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments were performed independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number, 4.2) and using Newtonian blood-analog fluids. The MRV-technique performed at Stanford University produced phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields. Secondary flow field comparisons of MRV-data to PIV-data at various cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were made. A wavelet-decomposition-based approach was implemented to characterize various secondary flow morphologies. We hypothesize that the persistence and decay of arterial secondary flow vortices is intrinsically related to the influence of the out-of-plane flow, tilting, in-plane convection and diffusion-related factors within the control regions. Evaluation of these factors will elucidate secondary flow structures in arterial hemodynamics. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE). The MRV data were acquired at Stanford University in collaboration with Christopher Elkins and John Eaton.

  20. Secondary structure of the 3' untranslated region of flaviviruses: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Proutski, V; Gould, E A; Holmes, E C

    1997-03-15

    Genetic algorithm-based RNA secondary structure prediction was used in combination with comparative sequence analysis to construct models of folding for the distal part of the 3'-untranslated region of flaviviruses belonging to four serological groups. Elements of RNA secondary structure that are preserved among all the flaviviruses studied were revealed, despite the high degree of sequence divergence between them. At the same time, structural elements were observed that distinguish members of different serological groups and, in particular, a region of remarkable structural divergence between the tick-borne and mosquito-borne flaviviruses was found. Application of the genetic algorithm also revealed that the 3'-terminus of flaviviral genomic RNA may take on alternative conformations, which are not observed in the 3'-terminus of complementary minus strand RNA. These alternative folding patterns may have roles in the regulation of transcription and translation initiation and in the switch between them.

  1. Shape and secondary structure prediction for ncRNAs including pseudoknots based on linear SVM

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate secondary structure prediction provides important information to undefirstafinding the tertiary structures and thus the functions of ncRNAs. However, the accuracy of the native structure derivation of ncRNAs is still not satisfactory, especially on sequences containing pseudoknots. It is recently shown that using the abstract shapes, which retain adjacency and nesting of structural features but disregard the length details of helix and loop regions, can improve the performance of structure prediction. In this work, we use SVM-based feature selection to derive the consensus abstract shape of homologous ncRNAs and apply the predicted shape to structure prediction including pseudoknots. Results Our approach was applied to predict shapes and secondary structures on hundreds of ncRNA data sets with and without psuedoknots. The experimental results show that we can achieve 18% higher accuracy in shape prediction than the state-of-the-art consensus shape prediction tools. Using predicted shapes in structure prediction allows us to achieve approximate 29% higher sensitivity and 10% higher positive predictive value than other pseudoknot prediction tools. Conclusions Extensive analysis of RNA properties based on SVM allows us to identify important properties of sequences and structures related to their shapes. The combination of mass data analysis and SVM-based feature selection makes our approach a promising method for shape and structure prediction. The implemented tools, Knot Shape and Knot Structure are open source software and can be downloaded at: http://www.cse.msu.edu/~achawana/KnotShape. PMID:23369147

  2. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  3. Single-molecule reconstruction of oligonucleotide secondary structure by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice; Thompson, Ruth; Leung, Carl; Roy, Debdulal; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2014-08-27

    Based on soft-touch atomic force microscopy, a method is described to reconstruct the secondary structure of single extended biomolecules, without the need for crystallization. The method is tested by accurately reproducing the dimensions of the B-DNA crystal structure. Importantly, intramolecular variations in groove depth of the DNA double helix are resolved, which would be inaccessible for methods that rely on ensemble-averaging.

  4. Anthropogenic and natural sources of acidity and metals and their influence on the structure of stream food webs.

    PubMed

    Hogsden, Kristy L; Harding, Jon S

    2012-03-01

    We compared food web structure in 20 streams with either anthropogenic or natural sources of acidity and metals or circumneutral water chemistry in New Zealand. Community and diet analysis indicated that mining streams receiving anthropogenic inputs of acidic and metal-rich drainage had much simpler food webs (fewer species, shorter food chains, less links) than those in naturally acidic, naturally high metal, and circumneutral streams. Food webs of naturally high metal streams were structurally similar to those in mining streams, lacking fish predators and having few species. Whereas, webs in naturally acidic streams differed very little from those in circumneutral streams due to strong similarities in community composition and diets of secondary and top consumers. The combined negative effects of acidity and metals on stream food webs are clear. However, elevated metal concentrations, regardless of source, appear to play a more important role than acidity in driving food web structure. PMID:22088498

  5. Purification and the Secondary Structure of Fucoidanase from Fusarium sp. LD8

    PubMed Central

    Qianqian, Wu; Shuang, Ma; Hourong, Xiao; Min, Zhang; Jingmin, Cai

    2011-01-01

    The fucoidanase from Fusarium sp. (LD8) was obtained by solid-state fermentation. The fermented solid medium was extracted by citric acid buffer, and the extracts were precipitated by acetone and purified by Sephadex G-100 successively. The results showed that the specific fucoidanase activity of purified enzyme was 22.7-fold than that of the crude enzyme. The recovery of the enzyme was 23.9%. The purified enzyme gave a single band on SDS-PAGE gel, and the molecular weight of fucoidanase was about 64 kDa. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 4.5. The enzyme properties were also studied. The results showed that the optimum temperature and pH were 60°C and 6.0, respectively; the temperature of half inactivation was 50°C, and the most stable pH for the enzyme was 6.0. KM, and the Vmax of the enzyme was 8.9 mg·L−1 and 2.02 mg·min−1·mL−1 by using fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus as substrate. The compositions of the secondary structure of fucoidanase were estimated by FTIR, the second derivative spectra, and the curve-fitting analysis of the amide I bands in their spectra. The results showed that β-sheet was the dominant component (58.6%) and α-helix was the least (12%); the content of β-turn and random coil were 15.39% and 14.5%, respectively. PMID:21977051

  6. A permutation based simulated annealing algorithm to predict pseudoknotted RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Herbert H; Wiese, Kay C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoknots are RNA tertiary structures which perform essential biological functions. This paper discusses SARNA-Predict-pk, a RNA pseudoknotted secondary structure prediction algorithm based on Simulated Annealing (SA). The research presented here extends previous work of SARNA-Predict and further examines the effect of the new algorithm to include prediction of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. An evaluation of the performance of SARNA-Predict-pk in terms of prediction accuracy is made via comparison with several state-of-the-art prediction algorithms using 20 individual known structures from seven RNA classes. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of nine prediction algorithms. Three of these are dynamic programming algorithms: Pseudoknot (pknotsRE), NUPACK, and pknotsRG-mfe. One is using the statistical clustering approach: Sfold and the other five are heuristic algorithms: SARNA-Predict-pk, ILM, STAR, IPknot and HotKnots algorithms. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that SARNA-Predict-pk can out-perform other state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of prediction accuracy. This supports the use of the proposed method on pseudoknotted RNA secondary structure prediction of other known structures. PMID:26558299

  7. Protein secondary-structure description with a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Gerald R; Hinsen, Konrad

    2015-07-01

    A coarse-grained geometrical model for protein secondary-structure description and analysis is presented which uses only the positions of the C(α) atoms. A space curve connecting these positions by piecewise polynomial interpolation is constructed and the folding of the protein backbone is described by a succession of screw motions linking the Frenet frames at consecutive C(α) positions. Using the ASTRAL subset of the SCOPe database of protein structures, thresholds are derived for the screw parameters of secondary-structure elements and demonstrate that the latter can be reliably assigned on the basis of a C(α) model. For this purpose, a comparative study with the widely used DSSP (Define Secondary Structure of Proteins) algorithm was performed and it was shown that the parameter distribution corresponding to the ensemble of all pure C(α) structures in the RCSB Protein Data Bank matches that of the ASTRAL database. It is expected that this approach will be useful in the development of structure-refinement techniques for low-resolution data. PMID:26143913

  8. RNApdbee—a webserver to derive secondary structures from pdb files of knotted and unknotted RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Antczak, Maciej; Zok, Tomasz; Popenda, Mariusz; Lukasiak, Piotr; Adamiak, Ryszard W.; Blazewicz, Jacek; Szachniuk, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In RNA structural biology and bioinformatics an access to correct RNA secondary structure and its proper representation is of crucial importance. This is true especially in the field of secondary and 3D RNA structure prediction. Here, we introduce RNApdbee—a new tool that allows to extract RNA secondary structure from the pdb file, and presents it in both textual and graphical form. RNApdbee supports processing of knotted and unknotted structures of large RNAs, also within protein complexes. The method works not only for first but also for high order pseudoknots, and gives an information about canonical and non-canonical base pairs. A combination of these features is unique among existing applications for RNA structure analysis. Additionally, a function of converting between the text notations, i.e. BPSEQ, CT and extended dot-bracket, is provided. In order to facilitate a more comprehensive study, the webserver integrates the functionality of RNAView, MC-Annotate and 3DNA/DSSR, being the most common tools used for automated identification and classification of RNA base pairs. RNApdbee is implemented as a publicly available webserver with an intuitive interface and can be freely accessed at http://rnapdbee.cs.put.poznan.pl/. PMID:24771339

  9. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  10. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  11. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer.

  12. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  13. A Field Measurement of Isocyanic Acid (HNCO): Evidence of a Secondary Source and Presence in Cloud Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Liggio, G.; Wentzell, J. J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Modini, R. L.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Schroder, J.; Bertram, A. K.; Hawkins, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) has been shown to cause a variety of adverse health effects via protein carbamylation reactions. It is proposed as a key compound in smoke related health issues due to its well-known sources, biomass burning and cigarette smoke. In spite of this, our understanding of the atmospheric fate of this toxic compound is incomplete. More ambient measurements are needed to elucidate additional sources and to better characterize the sinks of HNCO in the atmosphere. The recent development of the Acetate Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Acid-CIMS) has enabled on-line measurement of HNCO at ambient mixing ratios. Ambient measurements of HNCO were performed in La Jolla, CA during the spring/summer of 2012, using the Acid-CIMS. HNCO mixing ratios were found to be approximately 150 pptv during the night, but typically increased to over 300 pptv in the early afternoon. From the observed diurnal profile and the correlation of HNCO with temperature and other secondary compounds (e.g. nitric acid), we report evidence of a secondary, photochemical source of HNCO. The observed HNCO likely arose as a combination of primary and secondary sources. We have also detected HNCO in cloudwater by coupling the Acid-CIMS to a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first field evidence of cloud scavenging of HNCO. Our result show that the cloud scavenging of HNCO may be more efficient than predicted from its effective Henry's law constant. Campaign-averaged diurnal profiles of Black Carbon (BC), isocyanic acid (HNCO) and nitric acid (HNO3). Dotted lines show the averaged time of sunrise and sunset during the campaign.

  14. Male secondary sexual structures and the systematics of the Thereus oppia species group (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Eumaeini).

    PubMed

    Robbins, Robert K; Heredia, María Dolores; Busby, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The Thereus oppia species group includes species with and without a scent pad, which is a histologically and morphologically characterized male secondary sexual structure on the dorsal surface of the forewing. To assess the hypothesis that these structures are lost evolutionarily, but not regained (Dollo's Law), the taxonomy of this species group is revised. Thereus lomalarga sp. n., and Thereus brocki sp. n., are described. Diagnostic traits, especially male secondary structures, within the Thereus oppia species group are illustrated. Distributional and biological information is summarized for each species. Three species have been reared, and the caterpillars eat Loranthaceae. An inferred phylogeny is consistent with the hypothesis that scent pads in the Thereus oppia species group have been lost evolutionarily twice (in allopatry), and not re-gained. PMID:26448715

  15. Male secondary sexual structures and the systematics of the Thereus oppia species group (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Eumaeini)

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Robert K.; Heredia, María Dolores; Busby, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Thereus oppia species group includes species with and without a scent pad, which is a histologically and morphologically characterized male secondary sexual structure on the dorsal surface of the forewing. To assess the hypothesis that these structures are lost evolutionarily, but not regained (Dollo’s Law), the taxonomy of this species group is revised. Thereus lomalarga sp. n., and Thereus brocki sp. n., are described. Diagnostic traits, especially male secondary structures, within the Thereus oppia species group are illustrated. Distributional and biological information is summarized for each species. Three species have been reared, and the caterpillars eat Loranthaceae. An inferred phylogeny is consistent with the hypothesis that scent pads in the Thereus oppia species group have been lost evolutionarily twice (in allopatry), and not re-gained. PMID:26448715

  16. Analysis of Secondary Structure and Self-Assembly of Amelogenin by Variable Temperature Circular Dichroism and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Yoon, Il; Hegde, Balachandra G.; Daming, Fan; Du, Chang; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenin is a proline-rich enamel matrix protein known to play an important role in the oriented growth of enamel crystals. Amelogenin self-assembles to form nanospheres and higher order structures mediated by hydrophobic interactions. This study aims to obtain a better insight into the relationship between primary-secondary structure and self-assembly of amelogenin by applying computational and biophysical methods. Variable temperature circular dichroism studies indicated that under physiological pH recombinant full-length porcine amelogenin contains unordered structures in equilibrium with polyproline type II (PPII) structure, the latter being more populated at lower temperatures. Increasing the concentration of rP172 resulted in the promotion of folding to an ordered β-structured assembly. Isothermal titration calorimetry dilution studies revealed that, at all temperatures, self-assembly is entropically driven due to the hydrophobic effect and the molar heat of assembly (ΔHA) decreases with temperature. Using a computational approach, a profile of domains in the amino acid sequence that have a high propensity to assemble and to have PPII structures has been identified. We conclude that the assembly properties of amelogenin are due to complementarity between the hydrophobic and PPII helix prone regions. PMID:19274734

  17. Secondary structure of the HIV-2 leader RNA comprising the tRNA-primer binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Berkhout, B; Schoneveld, I

    1993-01-01

    The initiation of reverse transcription of a retroviral RNA genome occurs by a tRNA primer bound near the 5' end of the genomic RNA at a position called the primer-binding site (PBS). To understand the molecular basis for this RNA-RNA interaction, the secondary structure of the leader RNA of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) RNA was analyzed. In vitro synthesized HIV-2 RNA was probed with various structure-specific enzymes and chemicals. A computer program was then used to predict the secondary structure consistent with these data. In addition, the nucleotide sequences of different HIV-2 isolates were used to screen for the occurrence of covariation among putative base pairs. The primary sequences have diverged rapidly in some HIV-2 isolates, however, some strikingly conserved secondary structure elements were identified. Most nucleotides in the leader region are involved in base pairing. An exception is the PBS sequence, of which 15 out of 18 nucleotides are exposed in an internal loop. These findings suggest that the overall structure of the HIV-2 genome has evolved to facilitate an optimal interaction with its tRNA primer. Images PMID:8464701

  18. Influence of MLS laser radiation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity and secondary structure of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Kamila; Nowacka, Olga; Wróbel, Dominika; Pieszyński, Ireneusz; Bryszewska, Maria; Kujawa, Jolanta

    2014-03-01

    The biostimulating activity of low level laser radiation of various wavelengths and energy doses is widely documented in the literature, but the mechanisms of the intracellular reactions involved are not precisely known. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of low level laser radiation from an multiwave locked system (MLS) of two wavelengths (wavelength = 808 nm in continuous emission and 905 nm in pulsed emission) on the human erythrocyte membrane and on the secondary structure of human serum albumin (HSA). Human erythrocytes membranes and HSA were irradiated with laser light of low intensity with surface energy density ranging from 0.46 to 4.9 J cm(-2) and surface energy power density 195 mW cm(-2) (1,000 Hz) and 230 mW cm(-2) (2,000 Hz). Structural and functional changes in the erythrocyte membrane were characterized by its fluidity, while changes in the protein were monitored by its secondary structure. Dose-dependent changes in erythrocyte membrane fluidity were induced by near-infrared laser radiation. Slight changes in the secondary structure of HSA were also noted. MLS laser radiation influences the structure and function of the human erythrocyte membrane resulting in a change in fluidity.

  19. Conserved RNA secondary structures and long-range interactions in hepatitis C viruses.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Markus; Dünnes, Nadia; Zayas, Margarita; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Niepmann, Michael; Marz, Manja

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotropic virus with a plus-strand RNA genome of ∼9.600 nt. Due to error-prone replication by its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) residing in nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B), HCV isolates are grouped into seven genotypes with several subtypes. By using whole-genome sequences of 106 HCV isolates and secondary structure alignments of the plus-strand genome and its minus-strand replication intermediate, we established refined secondary structures of the 5' untranslated region (UTR), the cis-acting replication element (CRE) in NS5B, and the 3' UTR. We propose an alternative structure in the 5' UTR, conserved secondary structures of 5B stem-loop (SL)1 and 5BSL2, and four possible structures of the X-tail at the very 3' end of the HCV genome. We predict several previously unknown long-range interactions, most importantly a possible circularization interaction between distinct elements in the 5' and 3' UTR, reminiscent of the cyclization elements of the related flaviviruses. Based on analogy to these viruses, we propose that the 5'-3' UTR base-pairing in the HCV genome might play an important role in viral RNA replication. These results may have important implications for our understanding of the nature of the cis-acting RNA elements in the HCV genome and their possible role in regulating the mutually exclusive processes of viral RNA translation and replication.

  20. Aliphatic structure of humic acids; a clue to their origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Maciel, G.E.; Dennis, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (both 1H and 13C) of humic acids from diverse depositional environments indicate the presence of aromatic chemical structures, most likely derived from lignin of vascular plants, and complex, paraffinic structures, most likely derived from algal or microbial sources. The latter components account for a major fraction of humic acid structures in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, suggesting that algae or microbes play a large role in humification of organic remains from both systems. ?? 1981.

  1. Early Increases in Bile Acids Post Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Are Driven by Insulin-Sensitizing, Secondary Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Flynn, Charles Robb; Cai, Steven; Xiao, Yi; Tamboli, Robyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and resolution of diabetes. Over the last decade, it has become well accepted that this resolution of diabetes occurs before significant weight loss; however, the mechanisms behind this effect remain unknown and could represent novel therapeutic targets for obesity and diabetes. Bile acids have been identified as putative mediators of these weight loss-independent effects. Objective: To identify the longitudinal changes in bile acids after RYGB, which may provide mechanistic insight into the weight loss-independent effects of RYGB. Design: Observational study before/after intervention. Setting: Academic medical center. Patients/Participants: Samples were collected from morbidly obese patients (n = 21) before and after RYGB. Intervention: RYGB. Main Outcome Measures: Seventeen individual bile acid species were measured preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Anthropometric, hormonal, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp data were also examined to identify physiological parameters associated with bile acid changes. Results: Fasting total plasma bile acids increased after RYGB; however, increases were bimodal and were observed only at 1 (P < .05) and 24 months (P < .01). One-month increases were secondary to surges in ursodeoxycholic acid and its glycine and taurine conjugates, bacterially derived bile acids with putative insulin-sensitizing effects. Increases at 24 months were due to gradual rises in primary unconjugated bile acids as well as deoxycholic acid and its glycine conjugate. Plasma bile acid changes were not significantly associated with any anthropometric or hormonal measures, although hepatic insulin sensitivity was significantly improved at 1 month. Conclusions: Overall findings suggest that bacterially derived bile acids may mediate the early improvements at 1 month after RYGB. Future studies should examine the changes in specific bile

  2. "Well-determined" regions in RNA secondary structure prediction: analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zuker, M; Jacobson, A B

    1995-01-01

    Recent structural analyses of genomic RNAs from RNA coliphages suggest that both well-determined base paired helices and well-determined structural domains that are identified by "energy dot plot" analysis using the RNA folding package mfold, are likely to be predicted correctly. To test these observations with another group of large RNAs, we have analyzed 15 ribosomal RNAs. Published secondary structure models that were derived by comparative sequence analysis were used to evaluate the predicted structures. Both the optimal predicted fold and the predicted "energy dot plot" of each sequence were examined. Each prediction was obtained from a single computer run on an entire ribosomal RNA sequence. All predicted base pairs in optimal foldings were examined for agreement with proven base pairs in the comparative models. Our analyses show that the overall correspondence between the predicted and comparative models varied for different RNAs and ranges from a low of 27% to high of 70%, with a mean value of 49%. The correspondence improves to a mean value of 81% when the analysis is limited to well-determined helices. In addition to well-determined helices, large well-determined structural domains can be observed in "energy dot plots" of some 16S ribosomal RNAs. The predicted domains correspond closely with structural domains that are found by the comparative method in the same RNAs. Our analyses also show that measuring the agreement between predicted and comparative secondary structure models underestimates the reliability of structural prediction by mfold. PMID:7544463

  3. Self-Efficacy, School Resources, Job Stressors and Burnout among Spanish Primary and Secondary School Teachers: A Structural Equation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betoret, Fernando Domenech

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between school resources, teacher self-efficacy, potential multi-level stressors and teacher burnout using structural equation modelling. The causal structure for primary and secondary school teachers was also examined. The sample was composed of 724 primary and secondary Spanish school teachers. The changes…

  4. Minimum-free-energy distribution of RNA secondary structures: Entropic and thermodynamic properties of rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfsheimer, S.; Hartmann, A. K.

    2010-08-01

    We study the distribution of the minimum free energy (MFE) for the Turner model of pseudoknot free RNA secondary structures over ensembles of random RNA sequences. In particular, we are interested in those rare and intermediate events of unexpected low MFEs. Generalized ensemble Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods allow us to explore the rare-event tail of the MFE distribution down to probabilities such as 10-70 and to study the relationship between the sequence entropy and structural properties for sequence ensembles with fixed MFEs. Entropic and structural properties of those ensembles are compared with natural RNA of the same reduced MFE ( z score).

  5. Determination of Protein Secondary Structure from Infrared Spectra Using Partial Least-Squares Regression.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Kieaibi E; Blanch, Ewan W; Doig, Andrew J

    2016-07-12

    Infrared (IR) spectra contain substantial information about protein structure. This has previously most often been exploited by using known band assignments. Here, we convert spectral intensities in bins within Amide I and II regions to vectors and apply machine learning methods to determine protein secondary structure. Partial least squares was performed on spectra of 90 proteins in H2O. After preprocessing and removal of outliers, 84 proteins were used for this work. Standard normal variate and second-derivative preprocessing methods on the combined Amide I and II data generally gave the best performance, with root-mean-square values for prediction of ∼12% for α-helix, ∼7% for β-sheet, 7% for antiparallel β-sheet, and ∼8% for other conformations. Analysis of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of 16 proteins in D2O showed that secondary structure determination was slightly poorer than in H2O. Interval partial least squares was used to identify the critical regions within spectra for secondary structure prediction and showed that the sides of bands were most valuable, rather than their peak maxima. In conclusion, we have shown that multivariate analysis of protein FTIR spectra can give α-helix, β-sheet, other, and antiparallel β-sheet contents with good accuracy, comparable to that of circular dichroism, which is widely used for this purpose. PMID:27322779

  6. Visualizing the formation of an RNA folding intermediate through a fast highly modular secondary structure switch

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yi; Gracia, Brant; Herschlag, Daniel; Russell, Rick; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediates play important roles in RNA folding but can be difficult to characterize when short-lived or not significantly populated. By combining 15N relaxation dispersion NMR with chemical probing, we visualized a fast (kex=k1+k−1≈423 s−1) secondary structural switch directed towards a low-populated (∼3%) partially folded intermediate in tertiary folding of the P5abc subdomain of the ‘Tetrahymena' group I intron ribozyme. The secondary structure switch changes the base-pairing register across the P5c hairpin, creating a native-like structure, and occurs at rates of more than two orders of magnitude faster than tertiary folding. The switch occurs robustly in the absence of tertiary interactions, Mg2+ or even when the hairpin is excised from the three-way junction. Fast, highly modular secondary structural switches may be quite common during RNA tertiary folding where they may help smoothen the folding landscape by allowing folding to proceed efficiently via additional pathways. PMID:27292179

  7. Exploiting natural variation of secondary metabolism identifies a gene controlling the glycosylation diversity of dihydroxybenzoic acids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Svedin, Elisabeth; Mo, Huaping; Atwell, Susanna; Dilkes, Brian P; Chapple, Clint

    2014-11-01

    Plant secondary metabolism is an active research area because of the unique and important roles the specialized metabolites have in the interaction of plants with their biotic and abiotic environment, the diversity and complexity of the compounds and their importance to human medicine. Thousands of natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana characterized with increasing genomic precision are available, providing new opportunities to explore the biochemical and genetic mechanisms affecting variation in secondary metabolism within this model species. In this study, we focused on four aromatic metabolites that were differentially accumulated among 96 Arabidopsis natural accessions as revealed by leaf metabolic profiling. Using UV, mass spectrometry, and NMR data, we identified these four compounds as different dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) glycosides, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid) 5-O-β-D-glucoside, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid 3-O-β-D-glucoside, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid 5-O-β-D-xyloside, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid 3-O-β-D-xyloside. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using recombinant inbred lines generated from C24 and Col-0 revealed a major-effect QTL controlling the relative proportion of xylosides vs. glucosides. Association mapping identified markers linked to a gene encoding a UDP glycosyltransferase gene. Analysis of Transfer DNA (T-DNA) knockout lines verified that this gene is required for DHBA xylosylation in planta and recombinant protein was able to xylosylate DHBA in vitro. This study demonstrates that exploiting natural variation of secondary metabolism is a powerful approach for gene function discovery.

  8. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda)

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Karim, Rezaul; Tan, Yew Seong; Teh, Huey Fang; Danial, Asma Dazni; Ho, Li Sim; Khalid, Norzulaani; Appleton, David Ross; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger) has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery) callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin), shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue. PMID:27258536

  9. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda).

    PubMed

    Ng, Theresa Lee Mei; Karim, Rezaul; Tan, Yew Seong; Teh, Huey Fang; Danial, Asma Dazni; Ho, Li Sim; Khalid, Norzulaani; Appleton, David Ross; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger) has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery) callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin), shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue. PMID:27258536

  10. Secondary palatal closure in rats in association with relative maternofetal levels of folic acid, vitamin B12, and homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Weingärtner, Jens; Maile, Sergei; Proff, Peter; Reicheneder, Claudia; Bienengräber, Volker; Fanghänel, Jochen; Gedrange, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    Animal experiments are used in embryological and teratological studies of matters relevant to humans. In gravid rats, a decrease in the levels of folic acid and vitamin B12 was observed in maternal blood and in amniotic fluid. At the time of secondary palatal closure (14th day of pregnancy), the folic acid level of the amniotic fluid was 73% lower than that of the maternal blood. A drop in vitamin B12 in conjunction with an increase in amniotic homocysteine levels is seen as a risk factor for malformation of the palate. The understanding of causes of cleft generation could lead to a prophylactic treatment approach.

  11. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids: Relevant Secondary Metabolites. Chemical and Ecological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Jose I.; Carignan, Mario O.

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomically diverse marine, freshwater and terrestrial organisms have evolved the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and metabolize a variety of UV-absorbing substances called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as part of an overall strategy to diminish the direct and indirect damaging effects of environmental ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Whereas the enzymatic machinery to synthesize MAAs was probably inherited from cyanobacteria ancestors via the endosymbionts hypothesis, metazoans lack this biochemical pathway, but can acquire and metabolize these compounds by trophic transference, symbiotic or bacterial association. In this review we describe the structure and physicochemical properties of MAAs, including the recently discovered compounds and the modern methods used for their isolation and identification, updating previous reviews. On this basis, we review the metabolism and distribution of this unique class of metabolites among marine organism. PMID:21556168

  12. Leader length and secondary structure modulate mRNA function under conditions of stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, M.

    1988-07-01

    Simina virus 40-based plasmids that direct the synthesis of preproinsulin in cultured monkey cells were used to study the effects of mRNA structure on translational efficiency. Lengthening the leader sequence enhanced translation in this system. The enhancement was most obvious when an unstructured sequence (two, four, or eight copies of the oligonculeotide AGCTAAGTAAGTAAGTA) was inserted upstream from a region of deliberate secondary structure; the degree of enhancement was proportional to the number of copies of the inserted oligonucleotide. Lengthening the leader sequence on the 3' side of a stem-and-loop structure, in contrast, did not offset the potentially inhibitory effect of the hairpin structure. Both the facilitating effect of length and the inhibitory effect of secondary structure were demonstrated most easily under conditions of mRNA competition, which was brought about by an abrupt shift in the tonicity of the culture medium. These experiments suggest a simple structural basis for the long-recognized differential response of viral and cellular mRNAs to hypertonic stress. The fact that the translatability of structure-prone mRNAs varies with changes in the environment may also have general implications for gene expression in eucaryotic cells.

  13. Circumstances and mechanisms of inhibition of translation by secondary structure in eucaryotic mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, M

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes in vitro experiments with two types of intramolecular duplex structures that inhibit translation in cis by preventing the formation of an initiation complex or by causing the complex to be abortive. One stem-loop structure (delta G = -30 kcal/mol) prevented mRNA from engaging 40S subunits when the hairpin occurred 12 nucleotides (nt) from the cap but had no deleterious effect when it was repositioned 52 nt from the cap. This result confirms prior in vivo evidence that the 40S subunit-factor complex, once bound to mRNA, has considerable ability to penetrate secondary structure. Consequently, translation is most sensitive to secondary structure at the entry site for ribosomes, i.e., the 5' end of the mRNA. The second stem-loop structure (hp7; delta G = -61 kcal/mol, located 72 nt from the cap) was too stable to be unwound by 40S ribosomes, hp7 did not prevent a 40S ribosomal subunit from binding but caused the 40S subunit to stall on the 5' side of the hairpin, exactly as the scanning model predicts. Control experiments revealed that 80S elongating ribosomes could disrupt duplex structures, such as hp7, that were too stable to be penetrated by the scanning 40S ribosome-factor complex. A third type of base-paired structure shown to inhibit translation in vivo involves a long-range interaction between the 5' and 3' noncoding sequences. Images PMID:2601712

  14. Direct high-performance liquid chromatographic enantioseparation of secondary amino acids on Cinchona alkaloid-based chiral zwitterionic stationary phases. Unusual temperature behavior.

    PubMed

    Ilisz, István; Gecse, Zsanett; Pataj, Zoltán; Fülöp, Ferenc; Tóth, Géza; Lindner, Wolfgang; Péter, Antal

    2014-10-10

    Two chiral stationary phases containing a quinine- or a quinidine-based zwitterionic ion-exchanger as chiral selector were applied for the enantioseparation of 27 unusual cyclic secondary α-amino acids. The effects of the nature and concentration of the bulk solvent, the acid and base additives, the structures of the analytes and temperature on the enantioresolution were investigated. To study the effects of temperature and to obtain thermodynamic parameters, experiments were carried out at constant mobile phase compositions in the temperature range -5 to 55 °C. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that in most cases the separations were enthalpy-driven, but some entropy-driven separations were also observed. The sequence of elution of the enantiomers was determined in most cases.

  15. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Xianyang; Stagno, Jason R.; Bhandari, Yuba R.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  16. Sequence and secondary structure of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Krakowetz, Chantel N; Chilton, Neil B

    2015-02-01

    The complete DNA sequences and secondary structure of the mitochondrial (mt) 16S ribosomal (r) RNA gene were determined for six Ixodes scapularis adults. There were 44 variable nucleotide positions in the 1252 bp sequence alignment. Most (95%) nucleotide alterations did not affect the integrity of the secondary structure of the gene because they either occurred at unpaired positions or represented compensatory changes that maintained the base pairing in helices. A large proportion (75%) of the intraspecific variation in DNA sequence occurred within Domains I, II and VI of the 16S gene. Therefore, several regions within this gene may be highly informative for studies of the population genetics and phylogeography of I. scapularis, a major vector of pathogens of humans and domestic animals in North America.

  17. Extremely Slow Dynamics of an Abiotic Helical Assembly: Unusual Relevance to the Secondary Structure of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Avinash, M B; Govindaraju, T

    2013-02-21

    Serendipitously, we found that isoleucine methylester functionalized perylenediimide 1 undergoes an extremely slow supramolecular helical assembly over a day's time. Surprisingly, heating led to irreversible chiral denaturation. However, reversible helical assembly could be achieved only in the presence of nondenatured aggregates of 1, which act as seeds. The intriguing functional relevance deduced from 1 was employed to draw parallels with the secondary structure of proteins, envisaging its plausible implications.

  18. A generalized threading model using integer programming that allows for secondary structure element deletion.

    PubMed

    Ellrott, Kyle; Guo, Jun-tao; Olman, Victor; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    Integer programming is a combinatorial optimization method that has been successfully applied to the protein threading problem. We seek to expand the model optimized by this technique to allow for a more accurate description of protein threading. We have developed and implemented an expanded model of integer programming that has the capability to model secondary structure element deletion, which was not possible in previous version of integer programming based optimization. PMID:17503397

  19. Secondary relaxation dynamics in rigid glass-forming molecular liquids with related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangqian; Wang, Meng; Liu, Riping; Ngai, Kia L.; Tian, Yongjun; Wang, Li-Min; Capaccioli, Simone

    2015-09-01

    The dielectric relaxation in three glass-forming molecular liquids, 1-methylindole (1MID), 5H-5-Methyl-6,7-dihydrocyclopentapyrazine (MDCP), and Quinaldine (QN) is studied focusing on the secondary relaxation and its relation to the structural α-relaxation. All three glass-formers are rigid and more or less planar molecules with related chemical structures but have dipoles of different strengths at different locations. A strong and fast secondary relaxation is detected in the dielectric spectra of 1MID, while no resolved β-relaxation is observed in MDCP and QN. If the observed secondary relaxation in 1MID is identified with the Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, then apparently the relation between the α- and β-relaxation frequencies of 1MID is not in accord with the Coupling Model (CM). The possibility of the violation of the prediction in 1MID as due to either the formation of hydrogen-bond induced clusters or the involvement of intramolecular degree of freedom is ruled out. The violation is explained by the secondary relaxation originating from the in-plane rotation of the dipole located on the plane of the rigid molecule, contributing to dielectric loss at higher frequencies and more intense than the JG β-relaxation generated by the out-of-plane rotation. MDCP has smaller dipole moment located in the plane of the molecule; however, presence of the change of curvature of dielectric loss, ɛ″(f), at some frequency on the high-frequency flank of the α-relaxation reveals the JG β-relaxation in MDCP and which is in accord with the CM prediction. QN has as large an in-plane dipole moment as 1MID, and the absence of the resolved secondary relaxation is explained by the smaller coupling parameter than the latter in the framework of the CM.

  20. Chemical and physical structures of proteinoids and related polyamino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hajime; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Nomoto, Shinya

    Studies of polyamino acid formation pathways in the prebiotic condition are important for the study of the origins of life. Several pathways of prebiotic polyamino acid formation have been reported. Heating of monoammonium malate [1] and heating of amino acids in molten urea [2] are important pathways of the prebiotic peptide formation. The former case, globular structure called proteinoid microsphere is formed in aqueous conditions. The later case, polyamino acids are formed from unrestricted amino acid species. Heating of aqueous aspargine is also interesting pathway for the prebiotic polyamino acid formation, because polyamino acid formation proceeds in aqueous condition [3]. In this study, we analyzed the chemical structure of the proteinoids and related polyamino acids formed in the above three pathways using with mass spectrometer. In addition, their physical structures are analyzed by the electron and optical microscopes, in order to determine the self-organization abilities. We discuss the relation between the chemical and the physical structures for the origins of life. References [1] Harada, K., J. Org. Chem., 24, 1662 (1959), Fox, S. W., Harada, K., and Kendrick, J., Science, 129, 1221 (1959). [2] Terasaki, M., Nomoto, S., Mita, H., and Shimoyama, A., Chem. Lett., 480 (2002), Mita, H., Nomoto, S., Terasaki, M., Shimoyama, A., and Yamamoto, Y., Int. J. Astrobiol., 4, 145 (2005). [3] Kovacs, K and Nagy, H., Nature, 190, 531 (1961), Munegumi, T., Tanikawa, N., Mita, H. and Harada, K., Viva Origino, 22, 109 (1994).

  1. The Chemical Structure and Acid Deterioration of Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollinger, William K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the chemical structure of paper, including subatomic particles, atoms and molecules, and the forces that bond atoms into molecules, molecules into chains, chains into sheets, and sheets into layers. Acid is defined, and the deleterious role of acid in breaking the forces that bond atoms into molecules is detailed. (EJS)

  2. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  3. Secondary structure encodes a cooperative tertiary folding funnel in the Azoarcus ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Mustoe, Anthony M.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    A requirement for specific RNA folding is that the free-energy landscape discriminate against non-native folds. While tertiary interactions are critical for stabilizing the native fold, they are relatively non-specific, suggesting additional mechanisms contribute to tertiary folding specificity. In this study, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to explore how secondary structure shapes the tertiary free-energy landscape of the Azoarcus ribozyme. We show that steric and connectivity constraints posed by secondary structure strongly limit the accessible conformational space of the ribozyme, and that these so-called topological constraints in turn pose strong free-energy penalties on forming different tertiary contacts. Notably, native A-minor and base-triple interactions form with low conformational free energy, while non-native tetraloop/tetraloop–receptor interactions are penalized by high conformational free energies. Topological constraints also give rise to strong cooperativity between distal tertiary interactions, quantitatively matching prior experimental measurements. The specificity of the folding landscape is further enhanced as tertiary contacts place additional constraints on the conformational space, progressively funneling the molecule to the native state. These results indicate that secondary structure assists the ribozyme in navigating the otherwise rugged tertiary folding landscape, and further emphasize topological constraints as a key force in RNA folding. PMID:26481360

  4. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  5. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, C; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Wang, C; Besenbacher, F; Dong, M

    2015-05-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils. PMID:25839069

  6. 3-d structure-based amino acid sequence alignment of esterases, lipases and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Cygler, M.; Schrag, J.D.; Sussman, J.L.

    1993-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, enzymes with potential as pretreatment drugs for organophosphate toxicity, are members of a larger family of homologous proteins that includes carboxylesterases, cholesterol esterases, lipases, and several nonhydrolytic proteins. A computer-generated alignment of 18 of the proteins, the acetylcholinesases, butyrylcholinesterases, carboxylesterases, some esterases, and the nonenzymatic proteins has been previously presented. More recently, the three-dimensional structures of two enzymes enzymes in this group, acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica and lipase from Geotrichum candidum, have been determined. Based on the x-ray structures and the superposition of these two enzymes, it was possible to obtain an improved amino acid sequence alignment of 32 members of this family of proteins. Examination of this alignment reveals that 24 amino acids are invariant in all of the hydrolytic proteins, and an additional 49 are well conserved. Conserved amino acids include those of the active site, the disulfide bridges, the salt bridges, in the core of the proteins, and at the edges of secondary structural elements. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures makes it possible to find a well-defined structural basis for the conservation of many of these amino acids.

  7. Peripheral vagus nerve stimulation significantly affects lipid composition and protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain regions in rats.

    PubMed

    Surowka, Artur Dawid; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Recent immunohistochemical studies point to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve as the point of departure of initial changes which are related to the gradual pathological developments in the dopaminergic system. In the light of current investigations, it is likely that biochemical changes within the peripheral nervous system may influence the physiology of the dopaminergic system, suggesting a putative role for it in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. By using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, coupled with statistical analysis, we examined the effect of chronic, unilateral electrical vagus nerve stimulation on changes in lipid composition and in protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain structures in rats. It was found that the chronic vagal nerve stimulation strongly affects the chain length of fatty acids within the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, striatum, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and the motor cortex. In particular, the level of lipid unsaturation was found significantly increasing in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and motor cortex as a result of vagal nerve stimulation. When it comes to changes in protein secondary structure, we could see that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways are particularly affected by vagus nerve stimulation. This is due to the co-occurrence of statistically significant changes in the content of non-ordered structure components, alpha helices, beta sheets, and the total area of Amide I. Macromolecular changes caused by peripheral vagus nerve stimulation may highlight a potential connection between the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system in rat during the development of neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Peripheral vagus nerve stimulation significantly affects lipid composition and protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain regions in rats.

    PubMed

    Surowka, Artur Dawid; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Recent immunohistochemical studies point to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve as the point of departure of initial changes which are related to the gradual pathological developments in the dopaminergic system. In the light of current investigations, it is likely that biochemical changes within the peripheral nervous system may influence the physiology of the dopaminergic system, suggesting a putative role for it in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. By using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, coupled with statistical analysis, we examined the effect of chronic, unilateral electrical vagus nerve stimulation on changes in lipid composition and in protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain structures in rats. It was found that the chronic vagal nerve stimulation strongly affects the chain length of fatty acids within the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, striatum, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and the motor cortex. In particular, the level of lipid unsaturation was found significantly increasing in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and motor cortex as a result of vagal nerve stimulation. When it comes to changes in protein secondary structure, we could see that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways are particularly affected by vagus nerve stimulation. This is due to the co-occurrence of statistically significant changes in the content of non-ordered structure components, alpha helices, beta sheets, and the total area of Amide I. Macromolecular changes caused by peripheral vagus nerve stimulation may highlight a potential connection between the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system in rat during the development of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25893743

  9. Compensatory evolution of a precursor messenger RNA secondary structure in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for the evolutionary maintenance of a hairpin structure possibly involved in intron processing had been found in intron 1 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) in diverse Drosophila species. In this study, the putative hairpin structure was evaluated systematically in Drosophila melanogaster by elimination of either side of the stem using site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these mutations and the compensatory double mutant on intron splicing efficiency and ADH protein production were assayed in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider L2 cells and germ-line transformed adult flies. Mutations that disrupt the putative hairpin structure right upstream of the intron branch point were found to cause a significant reduction in both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. In contrast, the compensatory double mutant that restores the putative hairpin structure was indistinguishable from the WT in both splicing efficiency and ADH level. It was also observed by mutational analysis that a more stable secondary structure (with a longer stem) in this intron decreases both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. Implications for RNA secondary structure and intron evolution are discussed. PMID:12972637

  10. Sequence-specific H NMR assignments and secondary structure in the sea anemone polypeptide Stichodactyla helianthus neurotoxin I

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, R.H.; Mabbutt, B.C.; Kem, W.R.; Norton, R.S. )

    1989-02-21

    Sequence-specific assignments are reported for the 500-MHz H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the 48-residue polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (Sh I). Spin systems were first identified by using two-dimensional relayed or multiple quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy, double quantum spectroscopy, and spin lock experiments. Specific resonance assignments were then obtained from nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivities between protons from residues adjacent in the amino acid sequence. Of a total of 265 potentially observable resonances, 248 (i.e., 94%) were assigned, arising from 39 completely and 9 partially assigned amino acid spin systems. The secondary structure of Sh I was defined on the basis of the pattern of sequential NOE connectivities. NOEs between protons on separate strands of the polypeptide backbone, and backbone amide exchange rates. Sh I contains a four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet encompassing residues 1-5, 16-24, 30-33, and 40-46, with a {beta}-bulge at residues 17 and 18 and a reverse turn, probably a type II {beta}-turn, involving residues 27-30. No evidence of {alpha}-helical structure was found.

  11. Sheath structure in plasma with two species of positive ions and secondary electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Yun, Zhao; Nong, Xiang; Jing, Ou; De-Hui, Li; Bin-Bin, Lin

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a collisionless plasma sheath are investigated by using a fluid model in which two species of positive ions and secondary electrons are taken into account. It is shown that the positive ion speeds at the sheath edge increase with secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient, and the sheath structure is affected by the interplay between the two species of positive ions and secondary electrons. The critical SEE coefficients and the sheath widths depend strongly on the positive ion charge number, mass and concentration in the cases with and without SEE. In addition, ion kinetic energy flux to the wall and the impact of positive ion species on secondary electron density at the sheath edge are also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475220 and 11405208), the Program of Fusion Reactor Physics and Digital Tokamak with the CAS “One-Three-Five” Strategic Planning, the National ITER Program of China (Grant No. 2015GB101003), and the Higher Education Natural Science Research Project of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. 2015KJ009).

  12. Using probe secondary structure information to enhance Affymetrix GeneChip background estimates

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Fodor, Anthony A.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data. A number of statistical techniques have been developed to correct for this background noise. Here, we demonstrate that probe minimum folding energy and structure can be used to enhance a previously existing model for background noise correction. We estimate that probe secondary structure accounts for up to 3% of all variation on Affymetrix microarrays. PMID:17387043

  13. Mapping protein and nucleic acid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, I. V.; Zrelov, P. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Polozov, R. V.; Sivozhelezov, V. S.; Stepanenko, V. A.; Chirgadze, Yu. N.

    2013-09-01

    Methods and algorithms to analyze surfaces of globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, and RNA have been developed. These methods for the construction of maps of fragments of these objects in the original cylindrical projection developed herein essentially broaden the possibilities for studying the distribution of charges and surface topography of biological structures. This approach significantly supplements the qualitative characteristics of methods of visualizing biopolymer structures.

  14. Secondary structure, dynamics, and architecture of the p7 membrane protein from hepatitis C virus by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gabriel A; Opella, Stanley J

    2011-06-01

    P7 is a small membrane protein that is essential for the infectivity of hepatitis C virus. Solution-state NMR experiments on p7 in DHPC micelles, including hydrogen/deuterium exchange, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and bicelle 'q-titration,' demonstrate that the protein has a range of dynamic properties and distinct structural segments. These data along with residual dipolar couplings yield a secondary structure model of p7. We were able to confirm previous proposals that the protein has two transmembrane segments with a short interhelical loop containing the two basic residues K33 and R35. The 63-amino acid protein has a remarkably complex structure made up of seven identifiable sections, four of which are helical segments with different tilt angles and dynamics. A solid-state NMR two-dimensional separated local field spectrum of p7 aligned in phospholipid bilayers provided the tilt angles of two of these segments. A preliminary structural model of p7 derived from these NMR data is presented.

  15. VMD-SS: A graphical user interface plug-in to calculate the protein secondary structure in VMD program

    PubMed Central

    Yahyavi, Masoumeh; Falsafi-Zadeh, Sajad; Karimi, Zahra; Kalatarian, Giti; Galehdari, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The investigation on the types of secondary structure (SS) of a protein is important. The evolution of secondary structures during molecular dynamics simulations is a useful parameter to analyze protein structures. Therefore, it is of interest to describe VMD-SS (a software program) for the identification of secondary structure elements and its trajectories during simulation for known structures available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The program helps to calculate (1) percentage SS, (2) SS occurrence in each residue, (3) percentage SS during simulation, and (4) percentage residues in all SS types during simulation. The VMD-SS plug-in was designed using TCL script and stride to calculate secondary structure features. Availability The database is available for free at http://science.scu.ac.ir/HomePage.aspx?TabID=13755 PMID:25258493

  16. Insights on peptide backbone N-H acidity: Structure of anions, hydration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Antoni; Henry, Bernard; Ruiz-López, Manuel F.

    2013-03-01

    Despite the key role played by deamidation reactions in biochemical phenomena such as aging processes, knowledge of factors determining peptide backbone N-H acidities is scarce. We report a theoretical study on this topic by means of quantum-chemical calculations. Gas-phase acidities and pKa's in water have been estimated. The results agree reasonably well with available experimental data. Further analysis suggests that the secondary peptide structure, in addition to hydration effects, is the main factor determining pKa. In particular, we predict N-H protons to be more acidic in β-turns than in α-helices, a finding that may have broad biological implications.

  17. Enhancement of Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation Spectroscopic Methods to Investigate the Secondary Structure of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lishan; Sahu, Indra D.; Mayo, Daniel J.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Troxel, Kaylee; Zhou, Andy; Shockley, Erin; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a significant improvement of a new structural biology approach designed to probe the secondary structure of membrane proteins using the pulsed EPR technique of Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. Previously, we showed that we could characterize an α-helical secondary structure with ESEEM spectroscopy using a 2H-labeled Val side chain coupled with site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL). In order to further develop this new approach, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were conducted on several different hydrophobic residues that are commonly found in membrane proteins. 2H-SL distance distributions from the MD results indicated that 2H-labeled Leu was a very strong candidate to significantly improve this ESEEM approach. In order to test this hypothesis, the secondary structure of the α-helical M2δ peptide of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) incorporated into a bicelle was investigated with 2H-labeled Leu d10 at position 10 (i) and nitroxide spin labels positioned 1, 2, 3 and 4 residues away (denoted i+1 to i+4) with ESEEM spectroscopy. The ESEEM data reveal a unique pattern that is characteristic of an α-helix (3.6 residues per turn). Strong 2H modulation was detected for the i+3 and i+4 samples, but not for the i+2 sample. The 2H modulation depth observed for 2H-labeled d10 Leu was significantly enhanced (x4) when compared to previous ESEEM measurements that used 2H-labeled d8 Val. Computational studies indicate that deuterium nuclei on the Leu sidechain are closer to the spin label when compared to Val. The enhancement of 2H modulation and the corresponding Fourier Transform (FT) peak intensity for 2H-labeled Leu significantly reduces the ESEEM data acquisition time for Leu when compared to Val. This research demonstrates that a different 2H-labeled amino acid residue can be used as an efficient ESEEM probe further substantiating this important biophysical technique. Finally, this new method can provide pertinent

  18. RNA folding with soft constraints: reconciliation of probing data and thermodynamic secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Washietl, Stefan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic folding algorithms and structure probing experiments are commonly used to determine the secondary structure of RNAs. Here we propose a formal framework to reconcile information from both prediction algorithms and probing experiments. The thermodynamic energy parameters are adjusted using ‘pseudo-energies’ to minimize the discrepancy between prediction and experiment. Our framework differs from related approaches that used pseudo-energies in several key aspects. (i) The energy model is only changed when necessary and no adjustments are made if prediction and experiment are consistent. (ii) Pseudo-energies remain biophysically interpretable and hold positional information where experiment and model disagree. (iii) The whole thermodynamic ensemble of structures is considered thus allowing to reconstruct mixtures of suboptimal structures from seemingly contradicting data. (iv) The noise of the energy model and the experimental data is explicitly modeled leading to an intuitive weighting factor through which the problem can be seen as folding with ‘soft’ constraints of different strength. We present an efficient algorithm to iteratively calculate pseudo-energies within this framework and demonstrate how this approach can be used in combination with SHAPE chemical probing data to improve secondary structure prediction. We further demonstrate that the pseudo-energies correlate with biophysical effects that are known to affect RNA folding such as chemical nucleotide modifications and protein binding. PMID:22287623

  19. A novel secondary structure based on fused five-membered rings motif

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Jesmita; Kishore, Raghuvansh; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of protein structures indicates the existence of a novel, fused five-membered rings motif, comprising of two residues (i and i + 1), stabilized by interresidue Ni+1–H∙∙∙Ni and intraresidue Ni+1–H∙∙∙O=Ci+1 hydrogen bonds. Fused-rings geometry is the common thread running through many commonly occurring motifs, such as β-turn, β-bulge, Asx-turn, Ser/Thr-turn, Schellman motif, and points to its structural robustness. A location close to the beginning of a β-strand is rather common for the motif. Devoid of side chain, Gly seems to be a key player in this motif, occurring at i, for which the backbone torsion angles cluster at ~(−90°, −10°) and (70°, 20°). The fused-rings structures, distant from each other in sequence, can hydrogen bond with each other, and the two segments aligned to each other in a parallel fashion, give rise to a novel secondary structure, topi, which is quite common in proteins, distinct from two major secondary structures, α-helix and β-sheet. Majority of the peptide segments making topi are identified as aggregation-prone and the residues tend to be conserved among homologous proteins. PMID:27511362

  20. Mitochondrial RNase P RNAs in ascomycete fungi: lineage-specific variations in RNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Seif, Elias R; Forget, Lise; Martin, Nancy C; Lang, B Franz

    2003-09-01

    The RNA subunit of mitochondrial RNase P (mtP-RNA) is encoded by a mitochondrial gene (rnpB) in several ascomycete fungi and in the protists Reclinomonas americana and Nephroselmis olivacea. By searching for universally conserved structural elements, we have identified previously unknown rnpB genes in the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of two fission yeasts, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Schizosaccharomyces octosporus; in the budding yeast Pichia canadensis; and in the archiascomycete Taphrina deformans. The expression of mtP-RNAs of the predicted size was experimentally confirmed in the two fission yeasts, and their precise 5' and 3' ends were determined by sequencing of cDNAs generated from circularized mtP-RNAs. Comparative RNA secondary structure modeling shows that in contrast to mtP-RNAs of the two protists R. americana and N. olivacea, those of ascomycete fungi all have highly reduced secondary structures. In certain budding yeasts, such as Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, we find only the two most conserved pairings, P1 and P4. A P18 pairing is conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives, whereas nearly half of the minimum bacterial consensus structure is retained in the RNAs of fission yeasts, Aspergillus nidulans and Taphrina deformans. The evolutionary implications of the reduction of mtP-RNA structures in ascomycetes will be discussed.

  1. A simple system for the identification of fluorescent dyes capable of reporting differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity among amyloidogenic protein oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Thioflavin T and Congo Red are fluorescent dyes that are commonly used to identify the presence of amyloid structures, ordered protein aggregates. Despite the ubiquity of their use, little is known about their mechanism of interaction with amyloid fibrils, or whether other dyes, whose photophysics indicate that they may be more responsive to differences in macromolecular secondary structure and hydrophobicity, would be better suited to the identification of pathologically relevant oligomeric species in amyloid diseases. In order to systematically address this question, we have designed a strategy that discretely introduces differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity amidst otherwise identical polyamino acids. This strategy will enable us to quantify and compare the affinities of Thioflavin T, Congo Red, and other, incompletely explored, fluorescent dyes for different secondary structural elements and hydrophobic motifs. With this information, we will identify dyes that give the most robust and quantitative information about structural differences among the complex population of oligomeric species present along an aggregation pathway between soluble monomers and amyloid fibrils, and correlate the resulting structural information with differential oligomeric toxicity.

  2. Structural characteristics of fulvic acids from Continental Shelf sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Breger, I.A.; Mattingly, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Fulvic acids are those components of soil organic matter that remain soluble after a dilute alkaline extract of the soil is acidified to pH 2 (refs 1, 2). This extraction procedure has been applied to marine sediments, and the organic compounds so recovered have been called marine sedimentary fulvic acids. These fulvic acids are thought to form more complex humic substances in marine sediments by condensation reactions3. However, the chemical structural compositions of marine fulvic acids have not been defined sufficiently to allow this precursor relationship to be made. Here NMR spectroscopy is used to identify more clearly the chemical structural components of some marine sedimentary fulvic acids, thus enabling a more useful examination of their relationship to more complex humic substances. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. RNA secondary structure prediction by centroids in a Boltzmann weighted ensemble.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Chan, Chi Yu; Lawrence, Charles E

    2005-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structure by free energy minimization has been the standard for over two decades. Here we describe a novel method that forsakes this paradigm for predictions based on Boltzmann-weighted structure ensemble. We introduce the notion of a centroid structure as a representative for a set of structures and describe a procedure for its identification. In comparison with the minimum free energy (MFE) structure using diverse types of structural RNAs, the centroid of the ensemble makes 30.0% fewer prediction errors as measured by the positive predictive value (PPV) with marginally improved sensitivity. The Boltzmann ensemble can be separated into a small number (3.2 on average) of clusters. Among the centroids of these clusters, the "best cluster centroid" as determined by comparison to the known structure simultaneously improves PPV by 46.5% and sensitivity by 21.7%. For 58% of the studied sequences for which the MFE structure is outside the cluster containing the best centroid, the improvements by the best centroid are 62.5% for PPV and 31.4% for sensitivity. These results suggest that the energy well containing the MFE structure under the current incomplete energy model is often different from the one for the unavailable complete model that presumably contains the unique native structure. Centroids are available on the Sfold server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org.

  4. Synthesis, structure, and biological applications of α-fluorinated β-amino acids and derivatives.

    PubMed

    March, Taryn L; Johnston, Martin R; Duggan, Peter J; Gardiner, James

    2012-11-01

    This review gives a broad overview of the state of play with respect to the synthesis, conformational properties, and biological activity of α-fluorinated β-amino acids and derivatives. General methods are described for the preparation of monosubstituted α-fluoro-β-amino acids (Scheme 1). Nucleophilic methods for the introduction of fluorine predominantly involve the reaction of DAST with alcohols derived from α-amino acids, whereas electrophilic sources of fluorine such as NFSI have been used in conjunction with Arndt-Eistert homologation, conjugate addition or organocatalyzed Mannich reactions. α,α-Difluoro-β-amino acids have also been prepared using DAST; however, this area of synthesis is largely dominated by the use of difluorinated Reformatsky reagents to introduce the difluoro ester functionality (Scheme 9). α-Fluoro-β-amino acids and derivatives analyzed by X-ray crystal and NMR solution techniques are found to adopt preferred conformations which are thought to result from stereoelectronic effects associated with F located close to amines, amides, and esters (Figs. 2-6). α-Fluoro amide and β-fluoro ethylamide/amine effects can influence the secondary structure of α-fluoro-β-amino acid-containing derivatives including peptides and peptidomimetics (Figs. 7-9). α-Fluoro-β-amino acids are also components of a diverse range of bioactive anticancer (e.g., 5-fluorouracil), antifungal, and antiinsomnia agents as well as protease inhibitors where such fluorinated analogs have shown increased potency and spectrum of activity.

  5. Perturbation-induced secondary flow structures due to fractured stents in arterial curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Popma, Christopher; Penna, Leanne; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    An in vitro experimental investigation of secondary flow structures was performed downstream of a model stent that embodied a ``Type-IV'' stent fracture, i.e. complete transverse fracture of elements and element displacement (of 3 diameters). One part of the fractured stent was located in the curved region of a test section comprised of a 180-degree bent tube, and the velocity field measured with PIV. Secondary flow morphologies downstream of the stent were identified with a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) using a 2D Ricker wavelet. A comparison of wavelet transformed vorticity fields of fractured and unfractured model stents is presented under physiological inflow conditions. During systolic deceleration, a breakdown in symmetry of vortical structures occurred with the unfractured stent, but not with the fractured model stent. Potential mechanisms to explain the differences in secondary flow morphologies include redirection of vorticity from the meridional plane of the bend to the normal plane and diffusion of vorticity. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  6. Structural and functional interaction of fatty acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-05-01

    The human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant, the most common in the FABP family, has been associated with elevated liver triglyceride levels. How this amino acid substitution elicits these effects is not known. This issue was addressed using human recombinant wild-type (WT) and T94A variant L-FABP proteins as well as cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the respective proteins (genotyped as TT, TC and CC). The T94A substitution did not alter or only slightly altered L-FABP binding affinities for saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, nor did it change the affinity for intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Nevertheless, the T94A substitution markedly altered the secondary structural response of L-FABP induced by binding long chain fatty acids or intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Finally, the T94A substitution markedly decreased the levels of induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, fatty acid transport protein 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α itself meditated by the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Thus, although the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of human L-FABP for long chain fatty acids, it significantly altered human L-FABP structure and stability, as well as the conformational and functional response to these ligands.

  7. TT2NE: a novel algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Michaël; Orland, Henri

    2011-01-01

    We present TT2NE, a new algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. The method is based on a classification of RNA structures according to their topological genus. TT2NE is guaranteed to find the minimum free energy structure regardless of pseudoknot topology. This unique proficiency is obtained at the expense of the maximum length of sequences that can be treated, but comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms shows that TT2NE significantly improves the quality of predictions. Analysis of TT2NE's incorrect predictions sheds light on the need to study how sterical constraints limit the range of pseudoknotted structures that can be formed from a given sequence. An implementation of TT2NE on a public server can be found at http://ipht.cea.fr/rna/tt2ne.php. PMID:21593129

  8. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  10. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  11. The effect of structural disorder on the secondary electron emission of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, L. A.; Larciprete, R.; Cimino, R.

    2016-09-01

    The dependance of the secondary electron yield (SEY) on the degree of crystallinity of graphite has been investigated during the amorphization of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples by means of Ar+ bombardment. Photoemission and Raman spectroscopies were used to follow the structural damage while the SEY curves were measured from very low energies up to 1000 eV. We found that the increase of lattice defects lowers the contribution of the π electrons in the valence band and loss spectra and smears out the intense modulations in the low energy secondary electron yield (LE-SEY) curve. Raman spectroscopy results showed that ion induced lattice amorphization is confined in a near-surface layer. The evolution of SEY curves was observed with the progressive Ar+ dosage after crystal damage as due to the modification of the electronic transport properties within the damaged near surface layer.

  12. Effects of precursor concentration and acidic sulfate in aqueous glyoxal-OH radical oxidation and implications for secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Perri, Mark J; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Turpin, Barbara J

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that aqueous OH radical oxidation of glyoxal yields low-volatility compounds. When this chemistry takes place in clouds and fogs, followed by droplet evaporation (or if it occurs in aerosol water), the products are expected to remain partially in the particle phase, forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acidic sulfate exists ubiquitously in atmospheric water and has been shown to enhance SOA formation through aerosol phase reactions. In this work, we investigate how starting concentrations of glyoxal (30-3000 microM) and the presence of acidic sulfate (0-840 microM) affect product formation in the aqueous reaction between glyoxal and OH radical. The oxalic acid yield decreased with increasing precursor concentrations, and the presence of sulfuric acid did not alter oxalic acid concentrations significantly. A dilute aqueous chemistry model successfully reproduced oxalic acid concentrations, when the experiment was performed at cloud-relevant concentrations (glyoxal <300 microM), but predictions deviated from measurements at increasing concentrations. Results elucidate similarities and differences in aqueous glyoxal chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. They validate for the first time the accuracy of model predictions at cloud-relevant concentrations. These results suggest that cloud processing of glyoxal could be an important source of SOA. PMID:19924930

  13. Effects of precursor concentration and acidic sulfate in aqueous glyoxal-OH radical oxidation and implications for secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Perri, Mark J; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Turpin, Barbara J

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that aqueous OH radical oxidation of glyoxal yields low-volatility compounds. When this chemistry takes place in clouds and fogs, followed by droplet evaporation (or if it occurs in aerosol water), the products are expected to remain partially in the particle phase, forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acidic sulfate exists ubiquitously in atmospheric water and has been shown to enhance SOA formation through aerosol phase reactions. In this work, we investigate how starting concentrations of glyoxal (30-3000 microM) and the presence of acidic sulfate (0-840 microM) affect product formation in the aqueous reaction between glyoxal and OH radical. The oxalic acid yield decreased with increasing precursor concentrations, and the presence of sulfuric acid did not alter oxalic acid concentrations significantly. A dilute aqueous chemistry model successfully reproduced oxalic acid concentrations, when the experiment was performed at cloud-relevant concentrations (glyoxal <300 microM), but predictions deviated from measurements at increasing concentrations. Results elucidate similarities and differences in aqueous glyoxal chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. They validate for the first time the accuracy of model predictions at cloud-relevant concentrations. These results suggest that cloud processing of glyoxal could be an important source of SOA.

  14. Structural effects of liana presence in secondary tropical dry forests using ground LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Azofeifa, A.; Portillo-Quintero, C.; Durán, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    Lianas, woody vines, are a key component of tropical forest because they may reduce carbon storage potential. Lianas are increasing in density and biomass in tropical forests, but it is unknown what the potential consequences of these increases are for forest dynamics. Lianas may proliferate in disturbed areas, such as regenerating forests, but little is known about the role of lianas in secondary succession. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the ground LiDAR to detect differences in the vertical structure of stands of different ages with and without lianas in tropical dry forests. Specifically, we used a terrestrial laser scanner called VEGNET to assess whether liana presence influences the vertical signature of stands of different ages, and whether successional trajectories as detected by the VEGNET could be altered by liana presence. We deployed the VEGNET ground LiDAR system in 15 secondary forests of different ages early (21 years old since land abandonment), intermediate (32-35 years old) and late stages (> 80 years old) with and without lianas. We compared laser-derived vegetation components such as Plant Area Index (PAI), plant area volume density (PAVD), and the radius of gyration (RG) across forest stands between liana and no-liana treatments. In general forest stands without lianas show a clearer distinction of vertical strata and the vertical height of accumulated PAVD. A significant increase of PAI was found from intermediate to late stages in stands without lianas, but in stands where lianas were present there was not a significant trend. This suggests that lianas may be influencing successional trajectories in secondary forests, and these effects can be captured by terrestrial laser scanners such as the VEGNET. This research contributes to estimate the potential effects of lianas in secondary dry forests and highlight the role of ground LiDAR to monitor structural changes in tropical forests due to liana presence.

  15. Terpenylic acid and nine-carbon multifunctional compounds formed during the aging of β-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kei; Jia, Tianyu; Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Morino, Yu; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Imamura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Recent field and laboratory studies suggest that forest aerosol particles contain more highly functionalized organic molecules than pinonic acid, a traditional molecular maker of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. To investigate the reaction mechanisms during the aging of biogenic SOAs, the gases and particles formed from the ozonolysis of β- and α-pinene were exposed to OH radicals in a laboratory chamber. The particle samples were collected before and after OH exposure for analysis by liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Pinic acid and terpenylic acid were abundant products in both β- and α-pinene ozonolysis SOA particles. Terpenylic acid and products with m/z 201.08 present in β-pinene SOA particles increased upon exposing SOA to OH radicals, whereas 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid present in α-pinene SOA particles increased upon exposing SOA to OH radicals. The products with m/z 201.08 were suggested to be C9H14O5 compounds. Similar C9H14O5 compounds and terpenylic acid were also detected in SOA particles formed from the photooxidation of nopinone, a major first-generation product of β-pinene ozonolysis. The OH-initiated oxidation of nopinone will contribute to the formation of terpenylic acid and C9H14O5 compounds during the aging of β-pinene SOA. A formation mechanism for terpenylic acid via gas-phase diaterpenylic acid formation followed by self-dehydration in the condensed phase was suggested.

  16. Atmospheric oxalic acid and related secondary organic aerosols in Qinghai Lake, a continental background site in Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Gehui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Chunlei; Cao, Junji

    2013-11-01

    Summertime PM2.5 aerosols collected from Qinghai Lake (3200 m a.s.l.), a remote continental site in the northeastern part of Tibetan Plateau, were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyals. Oxalic acid (C2) is the dominant dicarboxylic acid in the samples, followed by malonic, succinic and azelaic acids. Total dicarboxylic acids (231 ± 119 ng m-3), ketocarboxylic acids (8.4 ± 4.3 ng m-3), and α-dicarbonyls (2.7 ± 2.1 ng m-3) at the Tibetan background site are 2-5 times less than those detected in lowland areas such as 14 Chinese megacities. Compared to those in other urban and marine areas enhancements in relative abundances of C2/total diacids and diacids-C/WSOC of the PM2.5 samples suggest that organic aerosols in the region are more oxidized due to strong solar radiation. Molecular compositions and air mass trajectories demonstrate that the above secondary organic aerosols in the Qinghai Lake atmosphere are largely derived from long-range transport. Ratios of oxalic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal to levoglucosan in PM2.5 aerosols emitted from household burning of yak dung, a major energy source for Tibetan in the region, are 30-400 times lower than those in the ambient air, which further indicates that primary emission from biomass burning is a negligible source of atmospheric oxalic acid and α-dicarbonyls at this background site.

  17. In situ protein secondary structure determination in ice: Raman spectroscopy-based process analytical tool for frozen storage of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Roessl, Ulrich; Leitgeb, Stefan; Pieters, Sigrid; De Beer, Thomas; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A Raman spectroscopy-based method for in situ monitoring of secondary structural composition of proteins during frozen and thawed storage was developed. A set of reference proteins with different α-helix and β-sheet compositions was used for calibration and validation in a chemometric approach. Reference secondary structures were quantified with circular dichroism spectroscopy in the liquid state. Partial least squares regression models were established that enable estimation of secondary structure content from Raman spectra. Quantitative secondary structure determination in ice was accomplished for the first time and correlation with existing (qualitative) protein structural data from the frozen state was achieved. The method can be used in the presence of common stabilizing agents and is applicable in an industrial freezer setup. Raman spectroscopy represents a powerful, noninvasive, and flexibly applicable tool for protein stability monitoring during frozen storage.

  18. Structure of seven organic salts assembled from 2,6-diaminopyridine with monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids, and tetracarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xingjun; Zhang, Huan; Wen, Xianhong; Liu, Bin; Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2015-08-01

    Studies concentrating on non-covalent interactions between the organic base of 2,6-diaminopyridine, and carboxylic acids have led to an increased understanding of the role 2,6-diaminopyridine in binding with carboxylic acid derivatives. Here anhydrous and hydrated multi-component organic acid-base salts of 2,6-diaminopyridine have been prepared with the carboxylic acids as nicotinic acid, o-chlorobenzoic acid, 1,3-benzodioxole-5-carboxylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, and butane-1,2,3,4-tetracarboxylic acid. The seven crystalline compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared (IR), melting point (mp), and elemental analysis. All structures adopted the hetero R22(8) supramolecular synthons. The supramolecular architectures bear extensive Nsbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯O, Nsbnd H⋯O, and CH⋯O associations as well as other nonbonding contacts as CHsbnd N, CH2sbnd O, π-π, C-π, O-π, Cl-π, Clsbnd O, and Osbnd O interactions. The role of weak and strong hydrogen bonding in the crystal packing is ascertained.

  19. Incorporating chemical modification constraints into a dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Disney, Matthew D.; Childs, Jessica L.; Schroeder, Susan J.; Zuker, Michael; Turner, Douglas H.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure has been revised to accommodate folding constraints determined by chemical modification and to include free energy increments for coaxial stacking of helices when they are either adjacent or separated by a single mismatch. Furthermore, free energy parameters are revised to account for recent experimental results for terminal mismatches and hairpin, bulge, internal, and multibranch loops. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, in vivo modification was performed on 5S rRNA in both Escherichia coli and Candida albicans with 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate, dimethyl sulfate, and kethoxal. The percentage of known base pairs in the predicted structure increased from 26.3% to 86.8% for the E. coli sequence by using modification constraints. For C. albicans, the accuracy remained 87.5% both with and without modification data. On average, for these sequences and a set of 14 sequences with known secondary structure and chemical modification data taken from the literature, accuracy improves from 67% to 76%. This enhancement primarily reflects improvement for three sequences that are predicted with <40% accuracy on the basis of energetics alone. For these sequences, inclusion of chemical modification constraints improves the average accuracy from 28% to 78%. For the 11 sequences with <6% pseudoknotted base pairs, structures predicted with constraints from chemical modification contain on average 84% of known canonical base pairs. PMID:15123812

  20. Importance of the RNA secondary structure for the relative accumulation of clustered viral microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Contrant, Maud; Fender, Aurélie; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Randrianjafy, Ramy; Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Richer, Delphine; Pfeffer, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Micro (mi)RNAs are small non-coding RNAs with key regulatory functions. Recent advances in the field allowed researchers to identify their targets. However, much less is known regarding the regulation of miRNAs themselves. The accumulation of these tiny regulators can be modulated at various levels during their biogenesis from the transcription of the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) to the stability of the mature miRNA. Here, we studied the importance of the pri-miRNA secondary structure for the regulation of mature miRNA accumulation. To this end, we used the Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus, which encodes a cluster of 12 pre-miRNAs. Using small RNA profiling and quantitative northern blot analysis, we measured the absolute amount of each mature miRNAs in different cellular context. We found that the difference in expression between the least and most expressed viral miRNAs could be as high as 60-fold. Using high-throughput selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension, we then determined the secondary structure of the long primary transcript. We found that highly expressed miRNAs derived from optimally structured regions within the pri-miRNA. Finally, we confirmed the importance of the local structure by swapping stem-loops or by targeted mutagenesis of selected miRNAs, which resulted in a perturbed accumulation of the mature miRNA. PMID:24831544

  1. Sequence-specific polypeptoids: A diverse family of heteropolymers with stable secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, Kent; Barron, Annelise E.; Goldsmith, Richard A.; Armand, Philippe; Bradley, Erin K.; Truong, Kiet T. V.; Dill, Ken A.; Cohen, Fred E.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.

    1998-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized a family of structured oligo-N-substituted-glycines (peptoids) up to 36 residues in length by using an efficient solid-phase protocol to incorporate chemically diverse side chains in a sequence-specific fashion. We investigated polypeptoids containing side chains with a chiral center adjacent to the main chain nitrogen. Some of these sequences have stable secondary structure, despite the achirality of the polymer backbone and its lack of hydrogen bond donors. In both aqueous and organic solvents, peptoid oligomers as short as five residues give rise to CD spectra that strongly resemble those of peptide α-helices. Differential scanning calorimetry and CD measurements show that polypeptoid secondary structure is highly stable and that unfolding is reversible and cooperative. Thermodynamic parameters obtained for unfolding are similar to those obtained for the α-helix to coil transitions of peptides. This class of biomimetic polymers may enable the design of self-assembling macromolecules with novel structures and functions. PMID:9539732

  2. The RNAmute web server for the mutational analysis of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Churkin, Alexander; Gabdank, Idan; Barash, Danny

    2011-07-01

    RNA mutational analysis at the secondary-structure level can be useful to a wide-range of biological applications. It can be used to predict an optimal site for performing a nucleotide mutation at the single molecular level, as well as to analyze basic phenomena at the systems level. For the former, as more sequence modification experiments are performed that include site-directed mutagenesis to find and explore functional motifs in RNAs, a pre-processing step that helps guide in planning the experiment becomes vital. For the latter, mutations are generally accepted as a central mechanism by which evolution occurs, and mutational analysis relating to structure should gain a better understanding of system functionality and evolution. In the past several years, the program RNAmute that is structure based and relies on RNA secondary-structure prediction has been developed for assisting in RNA mutational analysis. It has been extended from single-point mutations to treat multiple-point mutations efficiently by initially calculating all suboptimal solutions, after which only the mutations that stabilize the suboptimal solutions and destabilize the optimal one are considered as candidates for being deleterious. The RNAmute web server for mutational analysis is available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/~xrnamute/XRNAmute.

  3. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  4. Effective stiffness and formation of secondary structures in a protein-like model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škrbić, Tatjana; Hoang, Trinh X.; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-08-01

    We use Wang-Landau and replica exchange techniques to study the effect of an increasing stiffness on the formation of secondary structures in protein-like systems. Two possible models are considered. In both models, a polymer chain is formed by tethered beads where non-consecutive backbone beads attract each other via a square-well potential representing the tendency of the chain to fold. In addition, smaller hard spheres are attached to each non-terminal backbone bead along the direction normal to the chain to mimic the steric hindrance of side chains in real proteins. The two models, however, differ in the way bending rigidity is enforced. In the first model, partial overlap between consecutive beads is allowed. This reduces the possible bending angle between consecutive bonds thus producing an effective entropic stiffness that competes with a short-range attraction, and leads to the formation of secondary structures characteristic of proteins. We discuss the low-temperature phase diagram as a function of increasing interpenetration and find a transition from a planar, beta-like structure, to helical shape. In the second model, an energetic stiffness is explicitly introduced by imposing an infinitely large energy penalty for bending above a critical angle between consecutive bonds, and no penalty below it. The low-temperature phase of this model does not show any sign of protein-like secondary structures. At intermediate temperatures, however, where the chain is still in the coil conformation but stiffness is significant, we find the two models to predict a quite similar dependence of the persistence length as a function of the stiffness. This behaviour is rationalized in terms of a simple geometrical mapping between the two models. Finally, we discuss the effect of shrinking side chains to zero and find the above mapping to still hold true.

  5. Effective stiffness and formation of secondary structures in a protein-like model.

    PubMed

    Škrbić, Tatjana; Hoang, Trinh X; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-08-28

    We use Wang-Landau and replica exchange techniques to study the effect of an increasing stiffness on the formation of secondary structures in protein-like systems. Two possible models are considered. In both models, a polymer chain is formed by tethered beads where non-consecutive backbone beads attract each other via a square-well potential representing the tendency of the chain to fold. In addition, smaller hard spheres are attached to each non-terminal backbone bead along the direction normal to the chain to mimic the steric hindrance of side chains in real proteins. The two models, however, differ in the way bending rigidity is enforced. In the first model, partial overlap between consecutive beads is allowed. This reduces the possible bending angle between consecutive bonds thus producing an effective entropic stiffness that competes with a short-range attraction, and leads to the formation of secondary structures characteristic of proteins. We discuss the low-temperature phase diagram as a function of increasing interpenetration and find a transition from a planar, beta-like structure, to helical shape. In the second model, an energetic stiffness is explicitly introduced by imposing an infinitely large energy penalty for bending above a critical angle between consecutive bonds, and no penalty below it. The low-temperature phase of this model does not show any sign of protein-like secondary structures. At intermediate temperatures, however, where the chain is still in the coil conformation but stiffness is significant, we find the two models to predict a quite similar dependence of the persistence length as a function of the stiffness. This behaviour is rationalized in terms of a simple geometrical mapping between the two models. Finally, we discuss the effect of shrinking side chains to zero and find the above mapping to still hold true. PMID:27586943

  6. The Interplay between Adolescent Needs and Secondary School Structures: Fostering Developmentally Responsive Middle and High School Environments across the Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbrock, Cheryl R.; Kiefer, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the developmental responsiveness of secondary school environments may be an important factor in supporting students as they make the transition from one school to the next. Students' needs may or may not be met depending on the nature of the fit between their basic and developmental needs and secondary school structures at the…

  7. (Structure and stability of nucleic acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the conformations of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides in order to relate their structures to their biological roles. We have discovered a novel conformation for a guanine-rich sequence which occurs in telomeres. This finding of one biologically relevant non-Watson-Crick base pair suggests that other non-standard pairs may be important. We have continued a systematic study of the thermodynamics of base pair formation in double stranded DNA. We have established the conformation and thermodynamics of a 3 in. viral RNA structural element. We have made a direct comparison between the thermodynamic stability of mismatched bases and the kinetics of misincorporation of bases by DNA polymerase. Drosophila spermatogenesis and sickle hemoglobin polymerization have been studied with the differential polarization microscope, which was invented and developed in this laboratory. Left-handed Z-RNA, discovered in this laboratory in 1984, has been characterized by NMR, circular dichroism and Raman scattering. (MHB)

  8. Prediction of RNA secondary structures: from theory to models and real molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Peter

    2006-05-01

    RNA secondary structures are derived from RNA sequences, which are strings built form the natural four letter nucleotide alphabet, {AUGC}. These coarse-grained structures, in turn, are tantamount to constrained strings over a three letter alphabet. Hence, the secondary structures are discrete objects and the number of sequences always exceeds the number of structures. The sequences built from two letter alphabets form perfect structures when the nucleotides can form a base pair, as is the case with {GC} or {AU}, but the relation between the sequences and structures differs strongly from the four letter alphabet. A comprehensive theory of RNA structure is presented, which is based on the concepts of sequence space and shape space, being a space of structures. It sets the stage for modelling processes in ensembles of RNA molecules like evolutionary optimization or kinetic folding as dynamical phenomena guided by mappings between the two spaces. The number of minimum free energy (mfe) structures is always smaller than the number of sequences, even for two letter alphabets. Folding of RNA molecules into mfe energy structures constitutes a non-invertible mapping from sequence space onto shape space. The preimage of a structure in sequence space is defined as its neutral network. Similarly the set of suboptimal structures is the preimage of a sequence in shape space. This set represents the conformation space of a given sequence. The evolutionary optimization of structures in populations is a process taking place in sequence space, whereas kinetic folding occurs in molecular ensembles that optimize free energy in conformation space. Efficient folding algorithms based on dynamic programming are available for the prediction of secondary structures for given sequences. The inverse problem, the computation of sequences for predefined structures, is an important tool for the design of RNA molecules with tailored properties. Simultaneous folding or cofolding of two or more RNA

  9. (Structure and stability of nucleic acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    We study the conformations of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides in order to understand their biological roles. We have determined the structure of the most common type of hairpin loop found in ribosomal RNA--the extra-stable tetraloop. It is actually a biloop with the other two bases in the loop forming a non-Watson-Crick base pair. This is the highest resolution structure reported for an RNA molecule in solution so far. We have obtained structures of pseudoknots and we have deduced general rules for their formation. We are presently studying a pseudoknot which is necessary for the replication of a retrovirus. The research done in the laboratory has been reported in 24 publications, plus 7 manuscripts in press or submitted. The research was done by 14 graduate students and 7 postdoctoral fellows. Five graduate students have received their Ph.D.s and 4 postdoctorals have finished their stay here. There are presently 9 graduate students and 3 postdoctorals working on the project; 2 new postdoctorals are expected this summer. One undergraduate student usually participates in the research during the year; this summer two undergraduates are working on the project. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Secondary structure of chorion proteins of the teleostean fish Dentex dentex by ATR FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, V A; Chryssikos, D G; Gionis, V; Pavlidis, M A; Paipetis, A; Hamodrakas, S J

    2000-11-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy and ATR-IR spectroscopy were applied to study the secondary structure of the eggshell (chorion) proteins of the teleostean fish Dentex dentex. Raman and IR spectra clearly indicate an abundance of antiparallel beta-pleated sheet conformation in chorion proteins. This finding is further supported by analysis of the vibrational data by regression techniques and deconvolution procedures. Thus, the common morphological characteristics of D. dentex, Salmo gairdneri, and other teleostean fish chorions may be explained on the basis of common secondary structure features of their constituent proteins. A detailed understanding of the interactions that dictate the self-assembly of fish chorion proteins to form the fish eggshell awaits determination of amino acid sequences. PMID:11162733

  11. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  12. Multithreaded comparative RNA secondary structure prediction using stochastic context-free grammars

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prediction of the structure of large RNAs remains a particular challenge in bioinformatics, due to the computational complexity and low levels of accuracy of state-of-the-art algorithms. The pfold model couples a stochastic context-free grammar to phylogenetic analysis for a high accuracy in predictions, but the time complexity of the algorithm and underflow errors have prevented its use for long alignments. Here we present PPfold, a multithreaded version of pfold, which is capable of predicting the structure of large RNA alignments accurately on practical timescales. Results We have distributed both the phylogenetic calculations and the inside-outside algorithm in PPfold, resulting in a significant reduction of runtime on multicore machines. We have addressed the floating-point underflow problems of pfold by implementing an extended-exponent datatype, enabling PPfold to be used for large-scale RNA structure predictions. We have also improved the user interface and portability: alongside standalone executable and Java source code of the program, PPfold is also available as a free plugin to the CLC Workbenches. We have evaluated the accuracy of PPfold using BRaliBase I tests, and demonstrated its practical use by predicting the secondary structure of an alignment of 24 complete HIV-1 genomes in 65 minutes on an 8-core machine and identifying several known structural elements in the prediction. Conclusions PPfold is the first parallelized comparative RNA structure prediction algorithm to date. Based on the pfold model, PPfold is capable of fast, high-quality predictions of large RNA secondary structures, such as the genomes of RNA viruses or long genomic transcripts. The techniques used in the parallelization of this algorithm may be of general applicability to other bioinformatics algorithms. PMID:21501497

  13. Landscape and variation of RNA secondary structure across the human transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Flynn, Ryan A; Manor, Ohad; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Zhang, Jiajing; Spitale, Robert C; Snyder, Michael P; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-01-30

    In parallel to the genetic code for protein synthesis, a second layer of information is embedded in all RNA transcripts in the form of RNA structure. RNA structure influences practically every step in the gene expression program. However, the nature of most RNA structures or effects of sequence variation on structure are not known. Here we report the initial landscape and variation of RNA secondary structures (RSSs) in a human family trio (mother, father and their child). This provides a comprehensive RSS map of human coding and non-coding RNAs. We identify unique RSS signatures that demarcate open reading frames and splicing junctions, and define authentic microRNA-binding sites. Comparison of native deproteinized RNA isolated from cells versus refolded purified RNA suggests that the majority of the RSS information is encoded within RNA sequence. Over 1,900 transcribed single nucleotide variants (approximately 15% of all transcribed single nucleotide variants) alter local RNA structure. We discover simple sequence and spacing rules that determine the ability of point mutations to impact RSSs. Selective depletion of 'riboSNitches' versus structurally synonymous variants at precise locations suggests selection for specific RNA shapes at thousands of sites, including 3' untranslated regions, binding sites of microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins genome-wide. These results highlight the potentially broad contribution of RNA structure and its variation to gene regulation.

  14. Probing the structure of nucleic acids with Ni(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoying.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of nucleic acids determines their biological function. Interest in the development of novel probes from structures of nucleic acid has led to the discovery of conformation-specific oxidation of guanine sites in DNA and RNA using Ni(II) complexes. The reaction is highly dependent upon the nature of Ni(II) complexes with the most important feature of a strong in-plane ligand field. The unique properties of Ni(II) complexes combining redox and coordination features provide sensitive probes for nucleic acid conformation. One of these nickel complexes, NiCR, has been shown to selectively promote cleavage of DNA at guanine sites held accessible through the formation of unusual secondary structures such as ends, mismatches, bulges and loops. An unique mechanism for the base and conformation-specific oxidation of DNA promoted by Ni(II) complexes is proposed, involving direct ligation of nickel to N-7 of guanine delivering a non-diffusible oxidizing species. NiCR has been proved to be a sensitive and predictable probe for the tertiary structure of RNAs. The specific sites of oxidation of tRNS[sup phe] promoted by NiCR correspond to the most accessible guanine residues determined by theoretic calculations. NiCR has also been successfully applied to probe the tertiary structure of self-splicing Tetrahymena pre-rRNA intron, and has provided important information about the folding of this intron, especially in the region of the catalytic core.

  15. Sensing of Double-Stranded DNA/RNA Secondary Structures by Water Soluble Homochiral Perylene Bisimide Dyes.

    PubMed

    Gershberg, Jana; Radić Stojković, Marijana; Škugor, Marko; Tomić, Sanja; Rehm, Thomas H; Rehm, Stefanie; Saha-Möller, Chantu R; Piantanida, Ivo; Würthner, Frank

    2015-05-18

    A broad series of homochiral perylene bisimide (PBI) dyes were synthesized that are appended with amino acids and cationic side chains at the imide positions. Self-assembly behavior of these ionic PBIs has been studied in aqueous media by UV/Vis spectroscopy, revealing formation of excitonically coupled H-type aggregates. The interactions of these ionic PBIs with different ds-DNA and ds-RNA have been explored by thermal denaturation, fluorimetric titration and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. These PBIs strongly stabilized ds-DNA/RNA against thermal denaturation as revealed by high melting temperatures of the formed PBI/polynucleotide complexes. Fluorimetric titrations showed that these PBIs bind to ds-DNA/RNA with high binding constants depending on the number of the positive charges in the side chains. Thus, spermine-containing PBIs with six positive charges each showed higher binding constants (logKs =9.2-9.8) than their dioxa analogues (logKs =6.5-7.9) having two positive charges each. Induced circular dichroism (ICD) of PBI assemblies created within DNA/RNA grooves was observed. These ICD profiles are strongly dependent on the steric demand of the chiral substituents of the amino acid units and the secondary structure of the DNA or RNA. The observed ICD effects can be explained by non-covalent binding of excitonically coupled PBI dimer aggregates into the minor groove of DNA and major groove of RNA which is further supported by molecular modeling studies. PMID:25900531

  16. Sensing of Double-Stranded DNA/RNA Secondary Structures by Water Soluble Homochiral Perylene Bisimide Dyes.

    PubMed

    Gershberg, Jana; Radić Stojković, Marijana; Škugor, Marko; Tomić, Sanja; Rehm, Thomas H; Rehm, Stefanie; Saha-Möller, Chantu R; Piantanida, Ivo; Würthner, Frank

    2015-05-18

    A broad series of homochiral perylene bisimide (PBI) dyes were synthesized that are appended with amino acids and cationic side chains at the imide positions. Self-assembly behavior of these ionic PBIs has been studied in aqueous media by UV/Vis spectroscopy, revealing formation of excitonically coupled H-type aggregates. The interactions of these ionic PBIs with different ds-DNA and ds-RNA have been explored by thermal denaturation, fluorimetric titration and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. These PBIs strongly stabilized ds-DNA/RNA against thermal denaturation as revealed by high melting temperatures of the formed PBI/polynucleotide complexes. Fluorimetric titrations showed that these PBIs bind to ds-DNA/RNA with high binding constants depending on the number of the positive charges in the side chains. Thus, spermine-containing PBIs with six positive charges each showed higher binding constants (logKs =9.2-9.8) than their dioxa analogues (logKs =6.5-7.9) having two positive charges each. Induced circular dichroism (ICD) of PBI assemblies created within DNA/RNA grooves was observed. These ICD profiles are strongly dependent on the steric demand of the chiral substituents of the amino acid units and the secondary structure of the DNA or RNA. The observed ICD effects can be explained by non-covalent binding of excitonically coupled PBI dimer aggregates into the minor groove of DNA and major groove of RNA which is further supported by molecular modeling studies.

  17. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology

  18. Understanding of Relation Structures of Graphical Models by Lower Secondary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buuren, Onne; Heck, André; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2016-10-01

    A learning path has been developed on system dynamical graphical modelling, integrated into the Dutch lower secondary physics curriculum. As part of the developmental research for this learning path, students' understanding of the relation structures shown in the diagrams of graphical system dynamics based models has been investigated. One of our main findings is that only some students understand these structures correctly. Reality-based interpretation of the diagrams can conceal an incorrect understanding of diagram structures. As a result, students seemingly have no problems interpreting the diagrams until they are asked to construct a graphical model. Misconceptions have been identified that are the consequence of the fact that the equations are not clearly communicated by the diagrams or because the icons used in the diagrams mislead novice modellers. Suggestions are made for improvements.

  19. [The effect of crystallization of calcium carbonate on the secondary structure of pepsin].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu-fa; Tang, Jun-ming; Ma, Xiao-ming; Guo, Yu-ming; Zhang, Xiu-ying; Yang, Lin

    2003-06-01

    The effect of crystallization of calcium carbonate on the secondary structure of pepsin was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, derivative, deconvolution and curve-fitting techniques in this paper. The result shows that the pure protein is composed of 24.38% alpha-helices, 29.91% beta-sheets, 39.22% beta-turns and 6.49% random structures, and the pepsin in the CaCO3/pepsin solution is composed of 2.09% alpha-helices, 93.304% beta-sheets, 4.60% beta-turns and 0.006% random structures. From these data we can see that the alpha-helices decrease and the beta-turns increase with the formation of the crystal of calcium carbonate. The essence of these changes is discussed in the paper.

  20. Neural-network design applied to protein-secondary-structure predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, R.C.; Head-Gordon, T.

    1995-04-01

    The success of neural networks is often limited by a sparse database of training examples, deficient neural-network architectures, and nonglobal optimization of the network variables. The convolution of these three problems has curtailed the application of network models to protein-structure predictions, where homology modeling or information theory approaches are considered better controlled alternatives. This paper introduces our broad objective of disentangling the three degrading features of neural networks cited above, beginning with improved designs of network architectures used in the prediction of protein secondary structure. This work demonstrates that network architecture design considerations greatly improve generalization and more efficiently extract complex sequence-structure relationships from the existing database, as compared to arbitrary architectures with the same size input window.

  1. Sequence-specific sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of eglin c

    SciTech Connect

    Hyberts, S.G.; Wagner, G. )

    1990-02-13

    Sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments were obtained for eglin c, a polypeptide inhibitor of the granulocytic proteinases elastase and cathepsin G and some other proteinases. The protein consists of a single polypeptide chain of 70 residues. All proton resonances were assigned except for some labile protons of arginine side chains. The patterns of nuclear Overhauser enhancements and coupling constants and the observation of slow hydrogen exchange were used to characterize the secondary structure of the protein. The results indicate that the solution structure of the free inhibitor is very similar to the crystal structure reported for the same protein in the complex with subtilisin Carlsberg. However, a part of the binding loop seems to have a significantly different conformation in the free protein.

  2. Proton NMR assignment and secondary structural elements of human transforming growth factor. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.C.; Mueller, L.; Jeffs, P.W. )

    1989-01-24

    The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of human transforming growth factor {alpha} (hTGF-{alpha}) has been completely assigned, and secondary structural elements have been identified as a preliminary step in determining the structure of this protein by distance geometry methods. Many of these structural elements closely correspond to those previously found in a truncated human EGF and murine EGF. These include the presence of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet between residues G19 and C34 with a type I {beta}-turn at V25-D28, a type II {beta}-turn at H35-Y38, and another short {beta}-sheet between residues Y38-V39 and H45-A46.

  3. Pitch accent alignment in romance: primary and secondary associations with metrical structure.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Fivela, Barbara Gili

    2005-01-01

    The article describes the contrastive possibilities of alignment of high accents in three Romance varieties, namely, Central Catalan, Neapolitan Italian, and Pisa Italian. The Romance languages analyzed in this article provide crucial evidence that small differences in alignment in rising accents should be encoded phonologically. To account for such facts within the AM model, the article develops the notion of "phonological anchoring" as an extension of the concept of secondary association originally proposed by Pierrehumbert and Beckman (1988), and later adopted by Grice (1995), Grice, Ladd, and Arvaniti (2000), and others to explain the behavior of edge tones. The Romance data represent evidence that not only peripheral edge tones seek secondary associations. We claim that the phonological representation of pitch accents should include two independent mechanisms to encode alignment properties with metrical structure: (1) encoding of the primary phonological association (or affiliation) between the tone and its tone-bearing unit; and (2), for some specific cases, encoding of the secondary phonological anchoring of tones to prosodic edges (moras, syllables, and prosodic words). The Romance data described in the article provide crucial evidence of mora-edge, syllable-edge, and word-edge H tonal associations.

  4. Interplay between desolvation and secondary structure in mediating cosolvent and temperature induced alpha-synuclein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, V. L.; Webb, W. W.; Eliezer, D.

    2012-10-01

    Both increased temperature and moderate concentrations of fluorinated alcohols enhance aggregation of the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS). Here, we investigate the secondary structural rearrangements induced by heating and trifluoroethanol [TFE]. At low TFE concentrations, CD spectra feature a negative peak characteristic of disordered polypeptides near 200 nm and a slight shoulder around 220 nm suggesting some polyproline-II content. Upon heating, these peaks weaken, while a weak negative signal develops at 222 nm. At high TFE concentrations, the spectra show distinct minima at 208 and 222 nm, indicative of considerable α-helical structure, which diminish upon heating. We observe a crossover between the low-TFE and high-TFE behavior near 15% TFE, where we previously showed that a partially helical intermediate is populated. We postulate that the protein is well solvated by water at low TFE concentrations and by TFE at high TFE concentrations, but may become desolvated at the crossover point. We discuss the potential roles and interplay of desolvation and helical secondary structure in driving αS aggregation.

  5. Pan-eukaryote ITS2 homologies revealed by RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2007-01-01

    For evolutionary comparisons, phylogenetics and evaluation of potential interbreeding taxa of a species, various loci have served for animals and plants and protistans. One [second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA] is highly suitable for all. Its sequence is species specific. It has already been used extensively and very successfully for plants and some protistans, and a few animals (where historically, the mitochondrial genes have dominated species studies). Despite initial impressions that ITS2 is too variable, it has proven to provide useful biological information at higher taxonomic levels, even across all eukaryotes, thanks to the conserved aspects of its transcript secondary structure. The review of all eukaryote groups reveals that ITS2 is expandable, but always retains in its RNA transcript a common core structure of two helices with hallmark characteristics important for ribosomal RNA processing. This aspect of its RNA transcript secondary structure can rescue difficult alignment problems, making the ITS2 a more powerful tool for phylogenetics. Equally important, the recognition of eukaryote-wide homology regions provides extensive and detailed information to test experimental studies of ribosomal rRNA processing. PMID:17459886

  6. A global sampling approach to designing and reengineering RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Levin, Alex; Lis, Mieszko; Ponty, Yann; O'Donnell, Charles W; Devadas, Srinivas; Berger, Bonnie; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2012-11-01

    The development of algorithms for designing artificial RNA sequences that fold into specific secondary structures has many potential biomedical and synthetic biology applications. To date, this problem remains computationally difficult, and current strategies to address it resort to heuristics and stochastic search techniques. The most popular methods consist of two steps: First a random seed sequence is generated; next, this seed is progressively modified (i.e. mutated) to adopt the desired folding properties. Although computationally inexpensive, this approach raises several questions such as (i) the influence of the seed; and (ii) the efficiency of single-path directed searches that may be affected by energy barriers in the mutational landscape. In this article, we present RNA-ensign, a novel paradigm for RNA design. Instead of taking a progressive adaptive walk driven by local search criteria, we use an efficient global sampling algorithm to examine large regions of the mutational landscape under structural and thermodynamical constraints until a solution is found. When considering the influence of the seeds and the target secondary structures, our results show that, compared to single-path directed searches, our approach is more robust, succeeds more often and generates more thermodynamically stable sequences. An ensemble approach to RNA design is thus well worth pursuing as a complement to existing approaches. RNA-ensign is available at http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/RNAensign. PMID:22941632

  7. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on secondary structure and emulsifying behavior of sweet potato protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood Khan, Nasir; Mu, Tai-Hua; Sun, Hong-Nan; Zhang, Miao; Chen, Jing-Wang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, secondary structures of sweet potato protein (SPP) after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (200-600 MPa) were evaluated and emulsifying properties of emulsions with HHP-treated SPP solutions in different pH values (3, 6, and 9) were investigated. Circular dichroism analysis confirmed the modification of the SPP secondary structure. Surface hydrophobicity increased at pH 3 and decreased at 6 and 9. Emulsifying activity index at pH 6 increased with an increase in pressure, whereas emulsifying stability index increased at pH 6 and 9. Oil droplet sizes decreased, while volume frequency distribution of the smaller droplets increased at pH 3 and 6 with the HHP treatment. Emulsion viscosity increased at pH 6 and 9 and pseudo-plastic flow behaviors were not altered for all emulsions produced with HHP-treated SPP. These results suggested that HHP could modify the SPP structure for better emulsifying properties, which could increase the use of SPP emulsion in the food industry.

  8. Secondary Structure of Corona Proteins Determines the Cell Surface Receptors Used by Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles used for biological and biomedical applications encounter a host of extracellular proteins. These proteins rapidly adsorb onto the nanoparticle surface, creating a protein corona. Poly(ethylene glycol) can reduce, but not eliminate, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins. As a result, the adsorbed proteins, rather than the nanoparticle itself, determine the cellular receptors used for binding, the internalization mechanism, the intracellular transport pathway, and the subsequent immune response. Using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, we first characterize a set of polystyrene nanoparticles in which the same adsorbed protein, bovine serum albumin, leads to binding to two different cell surface receptors: native albumin receptors and scavenger receptors. Using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of the adsorbed bovine serum albumin protein controls the cellular receptors used by the protein–nanoparticle complexes. These results show that protein secondary structure is a key parameter in determining the cell surface receptor used by a protein–nanoparticle complex. We expect this link between protein structure and cellular outcomes will provide a molecular basis for the design of nanoparticles for use in biological and biomedical applications. PMID:24779411

  9. Reactivity of NaCl with Secondary Organic Acids: An Important Mechanism of the Chloride Depletion in Sea Salt Particles Mixed with Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Kelly, S.; Gilles, M. K.; Shilling, J. E.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sea salt particles, one of the major sources of atmospheric aerosols, undergo complex multi-phase reactions and have profound consequences on their physical and chemical properties, thus on climate. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of sea salt chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Some studies have also showed that the chloride deficit cannot be fully compensated for this mechanism. We present an important pathway contributing to this chloride depletion: reactions of weak organic acids with sea salt particles. NaCl particles internally mixed with secondary organic materials generated from the reactions of limonene and alpha-pinene with ozone served as surrogates for sea salt particles mixed with organic materials. Chemical imaging analysis of these particles was conducted using complementary techniques including computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). Substantial chloride depletion and formation of organic salts were observed along with distinctive changes in particle morphology after hydration/dehydration processes. The results indicate that secondary organic acids can effectively react with NaCl particles resulting in displacement of chloride and release of gaseous HCl. This is consistent with a recent field study showing chloride depletion in sea salt particles mixed with organic materials which cannot be fully compensated by inorganic acid displacement. Although the formation of the organic salts is not thermodynamically favored in bulk aqueous solution, these reactions are driven by the high volatility and evaporation of gaseous HCl in particles, especially during hydration/dehydration processes. The

  10. ß-CARYOPHYLLINIC ACID: AN ATMOSPHERIC TRACER FOR ß-CARYOPHYLLENE SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical compositions of ambient PM2.5 samples, collected in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA, and a sample of secondary organic aerosol, formed by irradiating a mixture of the sesquiterpene, ß-caryophyllene, and oxides of nitrogen in a smog chamber, wer...

  11. Comparative structure and biomechanics of plant primary and secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J; Jarvis, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Recent insights into the physical biology of plant cell walls are reviewed, summarizing the essential differences between primary and secondary cell walls and identifying crucial gaps in our knowledge of their structure and biomechanics. Unexpected parallels are identified between the mechanism of expansion of primary cell walls during growth and the mechanisms by which hydrated wood deforms under external tension. There is a particular need to revise current "cartoons" of plant cell walls to be more consistent with data from diverse approaches and to go beyond summarizing limited aspects of cell walls, serving instead as guides for future experiments and for the application of new techniques.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron images for real sample structures in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Wang, H Y; Li, Y G; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for the study of electron beam interaction with solids have been mostly concerned with specimens of simple geometry. In this article, we propose a simulation algorithm for treating arbitrary complex structures in a real sample. The method is based on a finite element triangular mesh modeling of sample geometry and a space subdivision for accelerating simulation. Simulation of secondary electron image in scanning electron microscopy has been performed for gold particles on a carbon substrate. Comparison of the simulation result with an experiment image confirms that this method is effective to model complex morphology of a real sample.

  13. Comparative structure and biomechanics of plant primary and secondary cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Jarvis, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent insights into the physical biology of plant cell walls are reviewed, summarizing the essential differences between primary and secondary cell walls and identifying crucial gaps in our knowledge of their structure and biomechanics. Unexpected parallels are identified between the mechanism of expansion of primary cell walls during growth and the mechanisms by which hydrated wood deforms under external tension. There is a particular need to revise current “cartoons” of plant cell walls to be more consistent with data from diverse approaches and to go beyond summarizing limited aspects of cell walls, serving instead as guides for future experiments and for the application of new techniques. PMID:22936943

  14. Unique structural features of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Cashikar, A G; Rao, M N

    1995-06-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme is a homodimer of 60 kDa subunits each containing one atom of zinc and iron in the active site. Circular dichroism spectral studies on the purified enzyme reveals that a large portion of the peptide backbone is in the unordered and beta-turn conformation. A unique feature of the red kidney bean acid phosphatase, which we have found, is that one of the two cysteines of each subunit is involved in the formation of an inter-subunit disulphide. The thiol group of the other cysteine is not necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Western blot analysis with antibodies raised against kidney bean acid phosphatase could not recognize acid phosphatases from other sources except from potato. This paper emphasizes the fact that acid phosphatases are functionally, but not structurally, conserved enzymes. PMID:7590853

  15. Crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Sonneck, Marcel; Peppel, Tim; Spannenberg, Anke; Wohlrab, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    The crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid, C12H22O2, an α,β-unsaturated carb-oxy-lic acid with a melting point (295 K) near room temperature, is characterized by carb-oxy-lic acid inversion dimers linked by pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The carb-oxy-lic acid group and the following three carbon atoms of the chain of the (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid mol-ecule lie almost in one plane (r.m.s. deviation for the four C atoms and two O atoms = 0.012 Å), whereas the remaining carbon atoms of the hydro-carbon chain adopt a nearly fully staggered conformation [moduli of torsion angles vary from 174.01 (13) to 179.97 (13)°]. PMID:26279945

  16. GraphClust: alignment-free structural clustering of local RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dominic; Backofen, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Clustering according to sequence–structure similarity has now become a generally accepted scheme for ncRNA annotation. Its application to complete genomic sequences as well as whole transcriptomes is therefore desirable but hindered by extremely high computational costs. Results: We present a novel linear-time, alignment-free method for comparing and clustering RNAs according to sequence and structure. The approach scales to datasets of hundreds of thousands of sequences. The quality of the retrieved clusters has been benchmarked against known ncRNA datasets and is comparable to state-of-the-art sequence–structure methods although achieving speedups of several orders of magnitude. A selection of applications aiming at the detection of novel structural ncRNAs are presented. Exemplarily, we predicted local structural elements specific to lincRNAs likely functionally associating involved transcripts to vital processes of the human nervous system. In total, we predicted 349 local structural RNA elements. Availability: The GraphClust pipeline is available on request. Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22689765

  17. Secondary structures of short peptide chains in the gas phase: Double resonance spectroscopy of protected dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wutharath; Dognon, Jean-Pierre; Canuel, Clélia; Piuzzi, François; Dimicoli, Iliana; Mons, Michel; Compagnon, Isabelle; von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard

    2005-02-01

    The conformational structure of short peptide chains in the gas phase is studied by laser spectroscopy of a series of protected dipeptides, Ac-Xxx-Phe-NH2, Xxx=Gly, Ala, and Val. The combination of laser desorption with supersonic expansion enables us to vaporize the peptide molecules and cool them internally; IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy in comparison to density functional theory calculations on Ac-Gly-Phe-NH2 permits us to identify and characterize the conformers populated in the supersonic expansion. Two main conformations, corresponding to secondary structures of proteins, are found to compete in the present experiments. One is composed of a doubly γ-fold corresponding to the 27 ribbon structure. Topologically, this motif is very close to a β-strand backbone conformation. The second conformation observed is the β-turn, responsible for the chain reversal in proteins. It is characterized by a relatively weak hydrogen bond linking remote NH and CO groups of the molecule and leading to a ten-membered ring. The present gas phase experiment illustrates the intrinsic folding properties of the peptide chain and the robustness of the β-turn structure, even in the absence of a solvent. The β-turn population is found to vary significantly with the residues within the sequence; the Ac-Val-Phe-NH2 peptide, with its two bulky side chains, exhibits the largest β-turn population. This suggests that the intrinsic stabilities of the 27 ribbon and the β-turn are very similar and that weakly polar interactions occurring between side chains can be a decisive factor capable of controlling the secondary structure.

  18. Secondary Airflow Structure around Clustered Shrubs and Its Significance for Vegetated Dune Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wanyin; Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqiang; Lu, Junfeng

    2016-04-01

    Shrubs have an important significance in aeolian processes due to their disturbance of the local airflow. In the formation of vegetated dunes, there is an iterative interaction between shrub geometry, the structure of the secondary airflow, and the interaction between neighboring shrubs. Understanding the dynamics of vegetated dunes thus requires an insight into the airflow fields around shrubs. Based on aerodynamic and aeolian sand physics theory, this project measured the complex secondary flow field and aeolian sand deposition pattern around single and cluster shrubs with varied densities (i.e., 0.05, 0.08, 0.15, 0.20) and gap ratios (the ratio of the gap spacing between the shrub models to the center-to-center distance for the shrub models, ranged from 1.1 to 1.8 with side-by-side arrangement and 1.2 to 4.3 with tandem arrangement) using the particle image velocimetry system through wind tunnle simulation. The relationship between the secondary airflow structure and the shrub's porosity and arrangement was analyzed quantitatively. Research results revealed that porosity (density) is the key parameter to affect the flow patterns around single shrub. Compared to solid obstacles, bleed flow through the shrubs has great influence on the secondary airflow patterns around itself. Under cluster modes, the distance between two adjacent shrubs has great influence on flow field structures around them. The flow patterns around two side-by-side arranged shrubs can be classified into three kinds of modes, that is: single-bluff-body, biased flow pattern and parallel vortex streets. The flow patterns around two tandem arranged shrubs can be classified into three regimes, that is: the extended body regime, reattachment regime and co-shedding regime. The "shadow zone" with low velocity in the lee of shrubs is the optimal position for sand deposition, but its form, size and orientation would varied with the shrub porosity and gap ratio between them. With the increase of the gap

  19. Sequence-specific 1H assignment and secondary structure of the bacteriocin AS-48 cyclic peptide.

    PubMed

    Langdon, G M; Bruix, M; Gálvez, A; Valdivia, E; Maqueda, M; Rico, M

    1998-07-01

    The bacteriocin AS-48 is a cationic peptide (7149 Da) having a broad antimicrobial spectrum, encoded by the 68 kb conjugative plasmid pMB2 from Enterococcus faecalis S-48. It is a unique peptide since it has a cyclic structure, which is achieved by the formation of a tail-head peptide bond after ribosomal synthesis (Gálvez et al., 1989; Martínez-Bueno et al., 1994; Samyn et al., 1994). Preliminary CD and calorimetric studies (data not shown) pointed towards a highly helical and very stable three dimensional structure. All the information gathered until now indicates that the target of AS-48 is the cytoplasmic membrane in which it opens channels or pores, leading to dissipation of the proton motive force and cell death, which in some cases is also followed by bacterial lysis (Gálvez et al., 1991). This peptide is a suitable tool for studying protein-membrane interactions, and it also offers promising perspectives for biotechnological applications. Knowledge of the 3D structure of AS-48 is a first step in the conduct of further structure-function studies. Here we report the complete 1H NMR assignment of its proton resonances together with the resulting secondary structure pattern as prerequisites for the determination of a high-resolution 3D solution structure.

  20. Ambient modal identification of a primary-secondary structure by Fast Bayesian FFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Siu-Kui; Zhang, Feng-Liang

    2012-04-01

    The Mong Man Wai Building is a seven-storied reinforced concrete structure situated on the campus of the City University of Hong Kong. On its roof a two-storied steel frame has been recently constructed to host a new wind tunnel laboratory. The roof frame and the main building form a primary-secondary structure. The dynamic characteristics of the resulting system are of interest from a structural dynamics point of view. This paper presents work on modal identification of the structure using ambient vibration measurement. An array of tri-axial acceleration data has been obtained using a number of setups to cover all locations of interest with a limited number of sensors. Modal identification is performed using a recently developed Fast Bayesian FFT method. In addition to the most probable modal properties, their posterior uncertainties can also be assessed using the method. The posterior uncertainty of mode shape is assessed by the expected value of the Modal Assurance Criteria (MAC) of the most probable mode shape with a random mode shape consistent with the posterior distribution. The mode shapes of the overall structural system are obtained by assembling those from individual setups using a recently developed least-square method. The identification results reveal a number of interesting features about the structural system and provide important information defining the baseline modal properties of the building. Practical interpretation of the statistics of modal parameters calculated from frequentist and Bayesian context is also discussed.

  1. A thermodynamic approach for the targeting of nucleic acid structures using their complementary single strands.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Ting; Carr, Caroline; Siebler, Hollie; Waters, Lela; Khutsishvili, Irine; Iseka, Fany; Domack, Brian; Olsen, Chris M; Marky, Luis A

    2011-01-01

    The main focus of our investigations is to further our understanding of the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid structures. We report on a thermodynamic approach to study the reaction of a variety of intramolecular nucleic acid structures with their respective complementary strands. Specifically, we have used a combination of isothermal titration (ITC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and spectroscopy techniques to determine standard thermodynamic profiles for the reaction of a triplex, G-quadruplex, hairpin loops, pseudoknot, and three-arm junctions with their complementary strands. Reaction enthalpies are measured directly in ITC titrations, and compared with those obtained indirectly from Hess cycles using DSC unfolding data. All reactions investigated yielded favorable free energy contributions, indicating that each single strand is able to invade and disrupt the corresponding intramolecular DNA structure. These favorable free energy terms are enthalpy-driven, resulting from a favorable compensation of exothermic contributions due to the formation of additional base-pair stacks in the duplex product, and endothermic contributions, from the disruption of base stacking contributions of the reactant single strands. The overall results provide a thermodynamic approach that can be used in the targeting of nucleic acids, especially the secondary structures formed by mRNA, with oligonucleotides for the control of gene expression.

  2. Combined effects of ozone and nitrogen on secondary compounds, amino acids, and aphid performance in Scots pine

    SciTech Connect

    Kainulainen, P.; Holopainen, J.K.; Holopainen, T.

    2000-02-01

    Combined effects of O{sub 3} and N supply on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were studied in two separate growth chamber experiments exposing seedlings to 0, 0.075, 0.15, and 0.3 {micro}L/L of O{sub 3} during 8 h/d, 5 d/wk for a period of 5 wk. Seedlings were fertilized with low, medium, and high levels of N. Ozone and N availability affected concentrations of several primary and secondary metabolites. More changes on metabolites were detected in Exp. 1 (with seedlings ceasing their annual growth) than in Exp. 2 (with seedlings actively growing). Overall, high O{sub 3} exposure levels significantly decreased concentrations of monoterpenes and increased concentrations of resin acids. Concentrations of total phenolics were not affected by O{sub 3} exposure. Mostly lower concentrations of monoterpenes and resin acids were found at a medium N-fertilization level than at low and high N-fertilization levels, while total phenolic concentration decreased by enhanced N availability. In Exp. 1, significantly elevated concentrations of free amino acids were found at O{sub 3} concentration of 0.3 {micro}L/L. Nitrogen availability did not have remarkable effects on amino acid concentrations. In Exp. 1, both {sub 3} and N had a significant effect on the MRGR of the aphid Schizolachnus pineti. In Exp. 2, the weight of the females and nymphs and the total number of reproduced nymphs were significantly affected by O{sub 3} and N. Only a few interaction effects were found, suggesting that the N supply does not significantly modify O{sub 3}-induced effects on studied primary and secondary compounds and aphid performance in Scots pine seedlings.

  3. Membrane Association and Destabilization by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Requires Changes in Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Michael J.; Brown, Angela C.; Edrington, Thomas C.; Baranwal, Somesh; Du, Yurong; Lally, Edward T.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a common inhabitant of the upper aerodigestive tract of humans and non-human primates and is associated with disseminated infections, including lung and brain abscesses, pediatric infective endocarditis in children, and localized aggressive periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans secretes a repeats-in-toxin protein, leukotoxin, which exclusively kills lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1-bearing cells. The toxin's pathological mechanism is not fully understood; however, experimental evidence indicates that it involves the association with and subsequent destabilization of the target cell's plasma membrane. We have long hypothesized that leukotoxin secondary structure is strongly correlated with membrane association and/or destabilization. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by analyzing lipid-induced changes in leukotoxin conformation. Upon incubation of leukotoxin with lipids that favor leukotoxin-membrane association, we observed an increase in leukotoxin α-helical content that was not observed with lipids that favor membrane destabilization. The change in leukotoxin conformation after incubation with these lipids suggests that membrane binding and membrane destabilization have distinct secondary structural requirements, suggesting that they are independent events. These studies thus provide insight into the mechanism of cell damage that leads to disease progression by A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:23678967

  4. Improving the prediction of secondary structure of 'TIM-barrel' enzymes.

    PubMed

    Niermann, T; Kirschner, K

    1991-02-01

    The information contained in aligned sets of homologous protein sequences should improve the score of secondary structure prediction. Seven different enzymes having the (beta/alpha)8 or TIM-barrel fold were used to optimize the prediction with regard to this class of enzymes. The alpha-helix, beta-strand and loop propensities of the Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson method were averaged at aligned residue positions, leading to a significant improvement over the average score obtained from single sequences. The increased accuracy correlates with the average sequence variability of the aligned set. Further improvements were obtained by using the following averaged properties as weights for the averaged state propensities: amphipathic moment and alpha-helix; hydropathy and beta-strand; chain flexibility and loop. The clustering of conserved residues at the C-terminal ends of the beta-strands was used as an additional positive weight for beta-strand propensity and increased the prediction of otherwise unpredicted beta-strands decisively. The automatic weighted prediction method identifies greater than 95% of the secondary structure elements of the set of seven TIM-barrel enzymes.

  5. Secondary flow structures under simple harmonic inflow in a bent pipe model for curved arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Autumn; Seagrave, Penelope; Shu, Fangjun; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2010-11-01

    Inward centrifuging of fluid in the inviscid core of a 180 degree curved pipe leads to Lyne-type vortices under zero-mean harmonic oscillations, along with the formation of vortices in the Stokes' layer, that rotate in the same directional sense as their steady flow counterpart (Dean vortices). Under physiological conditions, the development of the Lyne-type vortices is believed to be influenced by the systolic pulse, and its associated rapid acceleration and deceleration. Experimental data acquired using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for three harmonic waveforms of different frequencies clarify the conditions under which Lyne vortices form. Multiple vortex pairs were observed for all waveforms and frequencies investigated, including Dean and Lyne-type vortex structures at a Womersley number of 4.22, much lower than previously reported. Hence, frequency alone is not an adequate governing parameter to characterize secondary flow structures in pulsatile flows. A regime map of the secondary flow was sought by using an acceleration-based parameter and the Dean number.

  6. Transcriptome-wide interrogation of RNA secondary structure in living cells with icSHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Spitale, Robert C; Lee, Byron; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    icSHAPE (in vivo click selective 2-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment) captures RNA secondary structure at a transcriptome-wide level by measuring nucleotide flexibility at base resolution. Living cells are treated with the icSHAPE chemical NAI-N3 followed by selective chemical enrichment of NAI-N3–modified RNA, which provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with similar methods leveraging deep sequencing. Purified RNA is then reverse-transcribed to produce cDNA, with SHAPE-modified bases leading to truncated cDNA. After deep sequencing of cDNA, computational analysis yields flexibility scores for every base across the starting RNA population. The entire experimental procedure can be completed in ~5 d, and the sequencing and bioinformatics data analysis take an additional 4–5 d with no extensive computational skills required. Comparing in vivo and in vitro icSHAPE measurements can reveal in vivo RNA-binding protein imprints or facilitate the dissection of RNA post-transcriptional modifications. icSHAPE reactivities can additionally be used to constrain and improve RNA secondary structure prediction models. PMID:26766114

  7. Transcriptome-wide interrogation of RNA secondary structure in living cells with icSHAPE.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Spitale, Robert C; Lee, Byron; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-02-01

    icSHAPE (in vivo click selective 2-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment) captures RNA secondary structure at a transcriptome-wide level by measuring nucleotide flexibility at base resolution. Living cells are treated with the icSHAPE chemical NAI-N3 followed by selective chemical enrichment of NAI-N3-modified RNA, which provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with similar methods leveraging deep sequencing. Purified RNA is then reverse-transcribed to produce cDNA, with SHAPE-modified bases leading to truncated cDNA. After deep sequencing of cDNA, computational analysis yields flexibility scores for every base across the starting RNA population. The entire experimental procedure can be completed in ∼5 d, and the sequencing and bioinformatics data analysis take an additional 4-5 d with no extensive computational skills required. Comparing in vivo and in vitro icSHAPE measurements can reveal in vivo RNA-binding protein imprints or facilitate the dissection of RNA post-transcriptional modifications. icSHAPE reactivities can additionally be used to constrain and improve RNA secondary structure prediction models.

  8. 18S rRNA secondary structure and phylogenetic position of Peloridiidae (Insecta, hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Ouvrard, D; Campbell, B C; Bourgoin, T; Chan, K L

    2000-09-01

    A secondary structure model for 18S rRNA of peloridiids, relict insects with a present-day circumantarctic distribution, is constructed using comparative sequence analysis, thermodynamic folding, a consensus method using 18S rRNA models of other taxa, and support of helices based on compensatory substitutions. Results show that probable in vivo configuration of 18S rRNA is not predictable using current free-energy models to fold the entire molecule concurrently. This suggests that refinements in free-energy minimization algorithms are needed. Molecular phylogenetic datasets were created using 18S rRNA nucleotide alignments produced by CLUSTAL and rigorous interpretation of homologous position based on certain secondary substructures. Phylogenetic analysis of a hemipteran data matrix of 18S rDNA sequences placed peloridiids sister to Heteroptera. Resolution of affiliations between the three main euhemipteran lineages was unresolved. The peloridiid 18S RNA model presented here provides the most accurate template to date for aligning homologous nucleotides of hemipteran taxa. Using folded 18S rRNA to infer homology of character as morpho-molecular structures or nucleotides and scoring particular sites or substructures is discussed. PMID:10991793

  9. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  10. Direct RNA motif definition and identification from multiple sequence alignments using secondary structure profiles.

    PubMed

    Gautheret, D; Lambert, A

    2001-11-01

    We present here a new approach to the problem of defining RNA signatures and finding their occurrences in sequence databases. The proposed method is based on "secondary structure profiles". An RNA sequence alignment with secondary structure information is used as an input. Two types of weight matrices/profiles are constructed from this alignment: single strands are represented by a classical lod-scores profile while helical regions are represented by an extended "helical profile" comprising 16 lod-scores per position, one for each of the 16 possible base-pairs. Database searches are then conducted using a simultaneous search for helical profiles and dynamic programming alignment of single strand profiles. The algorithm has been implemented into a new software, ERPIN, that performs both profile construction and database search. Applications are presented for several RNA motifs. The automated use of sequence information in both single-stranded and helical regions yields better sensitivity/specificity ratios than descriptor-based programs. Furthermore, since the translation of alignments into profiles is straightforward with ERPIN, iterative searches can easily be conducted to enrich collections of homologous RNAs.

  11. A Tool Preference Choice Method for RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by SVM with Statistical Tests

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Chiou-Yi; Yang, Chang-Biau; Chang, Chia-Hung; Tseng, Chiou-Ting; Chen, Hung-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    The Prediction of RNA secondary structures has drawn much attention from both biologists and computer scientists. Many useful tools have been developed for this purpose. These tools have their individual strengths and weaknesses. As a result, based on support vector machines (SVM), we propose a tool choice method which integrates three prediction tools: pknotsRG, RNAStructure, and NUPACK. Our method first extracts features from the target RNA sequence, and adopts two information-theoretic feature selection methods for feature ranking. We propose a method to combine feature selection and classifier fusion in an incremental manner. Our test data set contains 720 RNA sequences, where 225 pseudoknotted RNA sequences are obtained from PseudoBase, and 495 nested RNA sequences are obtained from RNA SSTRAND. The method serves as a preprocessing way in analyzing RNA sequences before the RNA secondary structure prediction tools are employed. In addition, the performance of various configurations is subject to statistical tests to examine their significance. The best base-pair accuracy achieved is 75.5%, which is obtained by the proposed incremental method, and is significantly higher than 68.8%, which is associated with the best predictor, pknotsRG. PMID:23641141

  12. Use of secondary lead for new generations of lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guibert, A.; Chaumont, B.; Albert, L.; Caillerie, J. L.; Ueberschaer, A.; Höhn, R.; Davis, W.; Weighall, M. J.

    Secondary lead will become more and more the main source of raw material for battery producers. The final objective of this study is to define maximum levels of impurities compatible with the use of secondary lead for oxide production for maintenance-free automotive batteries. Today, statistical investigations show that the quality of secondary lead can vary with the smelter, and can be adjusted in certain cases, but it is necessary to evaluate more accurately the effect of each harmful impurity (alone or in combination). Impurities affect principally the self-discharge of batteries. Addition of impurities to the electrolyte has been proved to give non-realistic values of their real influence in batteries. In order to obtain accurate results of the effect of impurities at various levels, syntheses of Barton or mill oxides containing Bi or Ag added to lead of high purity have been undertaken. It has been clearly shown that levels up to 200 ppm Bi or 40 ppm Ag can be admitted without significant differences in the performances of automotive batteries.

  13. Tuning the Formations of Metal-Organic Frameworks by Modification of Ratio of Reactant, Acidity of Reaction System, and Use of a Secondary Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Q; Xie, YB; Li, JR; Yuan, DQ; Yakovenko, AA; Sun, JH; Zhou, HC

    2012-01-01

    Four porous coordination networks (PCNs), {[Zn3O(H2O)(3)(adc)(3)]center dot 2(C2H6NH2)center dot 2(DMF)center dot 3(H2O)}(n) (PCN-131), Zn-2(DMA)(2)(adc)(2)]center dot 2(DMA)}(n) (PCN-132), {[Zn3O(DMF)(adc)(3)(4,4'-bpy)]center dot 2(C2H6NH2)center dot S}(n) (PCN-131'), and {[Zn(adc)(4,4'-bpy)(0.5)]center dot S}(n) (PCN-132'), have been synthesized by the assembly of anthrancene-9,10-dicarboxylic acid (H(2)adc) with Zn(II) under different reaction conditions, including modifications of reactant ratio, acidity variations, and the use of a secondary ligand. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that PCN-131, obtained from the dimethylformamide (DMF) solution under acid condition, has a three-dimentional (3D) framework structure with one-dimensional (1D) honeycomb channels. PCN-132 isolated from dimethylacetamide (DMA) solution without adding acid in synthesis is a two-dimensional (2D) layer compound. By employing 4,4'-bipyridyl (4,4'-bpy) as a secondary ligand, PCN-131' and PCN-132' were synchronously synthesized as a mixture outcome with more PCN-131' than PCN-132'. In PCN-131', 4,4'-bpy acting as a secondary ligand is arranged inside the honeycomb channel of the 3D PCN-131, resulting in an effective improvement of thermal stability of the network, while in PCN-132', 4,4'-bpy ligands link 2D layers of PCN-132 to form a pillared-layer 3D framework Gas adsorption has been performed for selected materials. The results show that the framework of PCN-131 is thermally unstable after removing the solvent molecules coordinated to their metal sites. While PCN-131' is stable for gas uptake, with an evaluated Langmuir surface area of 199.04 m(2) g(-1), it shows a selective adsorption of CO2 over CH4.

  14. Cygnus Pressured Cargo Module: Validation of Mathematical Model and Dynamic Qualification of Secondary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Marina; Luison, Dario; Tizzani, Luca

    2012-07-01

    Thales Alenia Space Italy is in charge to develop build- up, integrate and verify Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM). This cargo is characterized by the large amount of payload, wrapped in foam, transferred in soft stowage bags, connected to the structure of support by belts. The paper summarizes the several tests performed to acquire the dynamic properties of bags. On the basis of the empirical results a reliable linear model was generated and used for a successful campaign of qualification of secondary structure. It is also demonstrated that the empirical-linear model of the soft-stowage bag was also the reason of a significant reduction of loads, which allowed achieving more easily the goal of carried mass, for PCM. The validation of PCM by Modal Survey Test is presented as well, emphasizing that the more realistic modeling of the soft bags has made easier the definition of a very simple test configuration.

  15. In solution cation-induced secondary and tertiary structure alterations of human calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Imani, Mehdi; Bahrami, Yaser; Jaliani, Hossein Zarei; Ardestani, Sussan Kaboudanian

    2014-10-01

    Calprotectin (CP) is widely considered to have diverse roles including growth inhibitory and apoptosis induction in a number of tumor cell lines and antimicrobial activities. As CP has been proposed to bind metal ions with high affinity, we have studied its functional and primarily its structural behavior upon Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) chelation solely and along with Ca(2+). We employed fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism to determine the resulting modifications. Based upon our findings it is clear that treating CP with ions effectively weakened its natural growth inhibitory activity. Moreover, structural analysis of Zn(2+) and Mn(2+)-treated CPs indicated remarkable alterations in the regular secondary structures in favor of irregular structures while Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) treatment of CP after incubation with Ca(2+) displayed no remarkable shifts. Tertiary structure investigation using fluorescence spectroscopy showed that CP undergoes conformational changes upon Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) treatment whereby Trp residues of protein is slightly exposed to the hydrophilic environment, compactness of CP is compromised, whereas in Ca(2+)-treated CP, the tertiary structure integrity is intact upon Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) chelation. Interestingly, CP structural modifications upon Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) treatment was significantly comparable, probably due to similar radii and charges of ions. Taken all together, we have concluded that CP maintains its normal nature in Ca(2+)-loaded state when treated with Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) ions. It can be suggested that Ca(2+) not only stabilize CP structure but also helps CP to keep its structure upon metal ions chelation which is involved in host organism defense system.

  16. Probing secondary structures of peptide chains using gas phase laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mons, Michel

    2006-03-01

    A bottom-up approach involving conformer-specific IR studies of short peptide sequences enables us to map the intramolecular interactions that shape the peptide backbone, in particular those H-bonds that are responsible for stability and formation of secondary structures in proteins, like turns or helices. The combination of laser-desorption of solid samples coupled to the efficient cooling in a supersonic expansion makes it possible to isolate in the gas phase the lowest conformations of the energy landscape of small flexible biomolecules. The low temperature achieved enables spectroscopists to record UV spectra in which the contribution of each conformer populated can be distinguished and the corresponding conformation identified using IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy. Data collected are directly comparable to the best quantum chemistry calculations on these species and therefore constitute a severe test for the theoretical methods used. It will be shown how investigation of sequences with an increasing number of building blocks permits to deduce the robust structural trends of a peptide backbone: i) local conformational preference of the backbone in one-residue chains, ii) in capped dipeptides, the competition between a succession of local conformational preferences and overall folded structures, in which a different type of H-bonding scheme, involving distant H-bonding sites along the backbone, takes place: in particular beta-turns, the secondary structure responsible for chain reversals, and finally iii) evidence for the spontaneous helical folding (short 3-10 helix) of three-residue chains will be presented, illustrating the relative weakness of the H-bonding in these molecular assemblies.

  17. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    PubMed

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  18. Heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol surfaces: A possible source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröske, R.; Kleffmann, J.; Wiesen, P.

    2003-05-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on different secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was investigated with the focus on a possible formation of nitrous acid (HONO). In one set of experiments different organic aerosols were produced in the reactions of O3 with alpha-pinene, limonene or catechol and OH radicals with toluene or limonene, respectively. The aerosols were sampled on filters and exposed to humidified NO2 mixtures under atmospheric conditions. The estimated upper limits for the uptake coefficients of NO2 and the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 -> HONO are in the range of 10-6 and 10-7, respectively. The integrated HONO formation for 1 h reaction time was <1013 cm-2 geometrical surface and <1017 g-1 particle mass. In a second set of experiments the conversion of NO2 into HONO in the presence of organic particles was carried out in an aerosol flow tube under atmospheric conditions. In this case the aerosols were produced in the reaction of O3 with beta-pinene, limonene or catechol, respectively. The upper limits for the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 -> HONO were in the range of 7 x 10-7 - 9 x 10-6. The results from the present study show that heterogeneous formation of nitrous acid on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is unimportant for the atmosphere.

  19. Heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol surfaces: A possible source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröske, R.; Kleffmann, J.; Wiesen, P.

    2003-02-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on different secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was investigated with the focus on a possible formation of nitrous acid (HONO). In one set of experiments different organic aerosols were produced in the reactions of O3 with α-pinene, limonene or catechol and OH radicals with toluene or limonene, respectively. The aerosols were sampled on filters and exposed to humidified NO2 mixtures under atmospheric conditions. The estimated upper limits for the uptake coefficients of NO2 and the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 →HONO are in the range of 10-6 and 10-7, respectively. The integrated HONO formation for 1 h reaction time was <1013 cm-2 geometrical surface and <1017 g-1 particle mass. In a second set of experiments the conversion of NO2 into HONO in the presence of organic particles was carried out in an aerosol flow tube under atmospheric conditions. In this case the aerosols were produced in the reaction of O3 with β-pinene, limonene or catechol, respectively. The upper limits for the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 → HONO were in the range of 7×10-7 -9×10-6. The results from the present study show that heterogeneous formation of nitrous acid on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is unimportant for the atmosphere.

  20. Secondary Structure Prediction of Protein Constructs Using Random Incremental Truncation and Vacuum-Ultraviolet CD Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pukáncsik, Mária; Orbán, Ágnes; Nagy, Kinga; Matsuo, Koichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Maurin, Damien; Hart, Darren; Kézsmárki, István; Vertessy, Beata G

    2016-01-01

    A novel uracil-DNA degrading protein factor (termed UDE) was identified in Drosophila melanogaster with no significant structural and functional homology to other uracil-DNA binding or processing factors. Determination of the 3D structure of UDE is excepted to provide key information on the description of the molecular mechanism of action of UDE catalysis, as well as in general uracil-recognition and nuclease action. Towards this long-term aim, the random library ESPRIT technology was applied to the novel protein UDE to overcome problems in identifying soluble expressing constructs given the absence of precise information on domain content and arrangement. Nine constructs of UDE were chosen to decipher structural and functional relationships. Vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectroscopy was performed to define the secondary structure content and location within UDE and its truncated variants. The quantitative analysis demonstrated exclusive α-helical content for the full-length protein, which is preserved in the truncated constructs. Arrangement of α-helical bundles within the truncated protein segments suggested new domain boundaries which differ from the conserved motifs determined by sequence-based alignment of UDE homologues. Here we demonstrate that the combination of ESPRIT and VUVCD spectroscopy provides a new structural description of UDE and confirms that the truncated constructs are useful for further detailed functional studies. PMID:27273007

  1. Secondary Structure Prediction of Protein Constructs Using Random Incremental Truncation and Vacuum-Ultraviolet CD Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pukáncsik, Mária; Orbán, Ágnes; Nagy, Kinga; Matsuo, Koichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Maurin, Damien; Hart, Darren; Kézsmárki, István; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2016-01-01

    A novel uracil-DNA degrading protein factor (termed UDE) was identified in Drosophila melanogaster with no significant structural and functional homology to other uracil-DNA binding or processing factors. Determination of the 3D structure of UDE is excepted to provide key information on the description of the molecular mechanism of action of UDE catalysis, as well as in general uracil-recognition and nuclease action. Towards this long-term aim, the random library ESPRIT technology was applied to the novel protein UDE to overcome problems in identifying soluble expressing constructs given the absence of precise information on domain content and arrangement. Nine constructs of UDE were chosen to decipher structural and functional relationships. Vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectroscopy was performed to define the secondary structure content and location within UDE and its truncated variants. The quantitative analysis demonstrated exclusive α-helical content for the full-length protein, which is preserved in the truncated constructs. Arrangement of α-helical bundles within the truncated protein segments suggested new domain boundaries which differ from the conserved motifs determined by sequence-based alignment of UDE homologues. Here we demonstrate that the combination of ESPRIT and VUVCD spectroscopy provides a new structural description of UDE and confirms that the truncated constructs are useful for further detailed functional studies. PMID:27273007

  2. Structural equation modeling for analyzing erythrocyte fatty acids in Framingham.

    PubMed

    Pottala, James V; Djira, Gemechis D; Espeland, Mark A; Ye, Jun; Larson, Martin G; Harris, William S

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that several types of erythrocyte fatty acids (i.e., omega-3, omega-6, and trans) are associated with risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, there are complex metabolic and dietary relations among fatty acids, which induce correlations that are typically ignored when using them as risk predictors. A latent variable approach could summarize these complex relations into a few latent variable scores for use in statistical models. Twenty-two red blood cell (RBC) fatty acids were measured in Framingham (N = 3196). The correlation matrix of the fatty acids was modeled using structural equation modeling; the model was tested for goodness-of-fit and gender invariance. Thirteen fatty acids were summarized by three latent variables, and gender invariance was rejected so separate models were developed for men and women. A score was developed for the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) latent variable, which explained about 30% of the variance in the data. The PUFA score included loadings in opposing directions among three omega-3 and three omega-6 fatty acids, and incorporated the biosynthetic and dietary relations among them. Whether the PUFA factor score can improve the performance of risk prediction in cardiovascular diseases remains to be tested.

  3. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  4. SeqFold: genome-scale reconstruction of RNA secondary structure integrating high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhengqing; Snyder, Michael P; Chang, Howard Y

    2013-02-01

    We present an integrative approach, SeqFold, that combines high-throughput RNA structure profiling data with computational prediction for genome-scale reconstruction of RNA secondary structures. SeqFold transforms experimental RNA structure information into a structure preference profile (SPP) and uses it to select stable RNA structure candidates representing the structure ensemble. Under a high-dimensional classification framework, SeqFold efficiently matches a given SPP to the most likely cluster of structures sampled from the Boltzmann-weighted ensemble. SeqFold is able to incorporate diverse types of RNA structure profiling data, including parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS), selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq), fragmentation sequencing (FragSeq) data generated by deep sequencing, and conventional SHAPE data. Using the known structures of a wide range of mRNAs and noncoding RNAs as benchmarks, we demonstrate that SeqFold outperforms or matches existing approaches in accuracy and is more robust to noise in experimental data. Application of SeqFold to reconstruct the secondary structures of the yeast transcriptome reveals the diverse impact of RNA secondary structure on gene regulation, including translation efficiency, transcription initiation, and protein-RNA interactions. SeqFold can be easily adapted to incorporate any new types of high-throughput RNA structure profiling data and is widely applicable to analyze RNA structures in any transcriptome.

  5. Periodicity in DNA primary structure is defined by secondary structure of the coded protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zhurkin, V B

    1981-01-01

    A 10.5-base periodicity found earlier is inherent in both eu- and prokaryotic coding nucleotide sequences. In the case of noncoding eukaryotic sequences no periodicity is found, so the 10.5-base oscillation seemingly does not correlate with the nucleosomal organization of DNA. It is shown that the DNA fragments, coding the alpha-helical protein segments, manifest the pronounced 10.5-base periodicity, while those regions of DNA which code the beta-structure have a 6-base oscillation. The repeating pattern of nucleotide sequences can be used for comparison of the DNA segments with low degree of homology. PMID:7243595

  6. Severe anion gap metabolic acidosis from acetaminophen use secondary to 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zand, Ladan; Muriithi, Angela; Nelsen, Eric; Franco, Pablo M; Greene, Eddie L; Qian, Qi; El-Zoghby, Ziad M

    2012-12-01

    Anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA) is commonly encountered in medical practice. Acetaminophen-induced AGMA is, however, not widely recognized. We report 2 cases of high anion gap metabolic acidosis secondary to 5-oxoproline accumulation resulting from acetaminophen consumption: the first case caused by acute one-time ingestion of large quantities of acetaminophen and the second case caused by chronic repeated ingestion in a patient with chronic liver disease. Recognition of this entity facilitated timely diagnosis and effective treatment. Given acetaminophen is commonly used over the counter medication, increased recognition of this adverse effect is of important clinical significance.

  7. A modified acidic approach for DNA extraction from plant species containing high levels of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, M M; Siqueira, M V B M; Val, T M; Pavanelli, J C; Monteiro, M; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Gimenes, M A

    2014-08-25

    Purified genomic DNA can be difficult to obtain from some plant species because of the presence of impurities such as polysaccharides, which are often co-extracted with DNA. In this study, we developed a fast, simple, and low-cost protocol for extracting DNA from plants containing high levels of secondary metabolites. This protocol does not require the use of volatile toxic reagents such as mercaptoethanol, chloroform, or phenol and allows the extraction of high-quality DNA from wild and cultivated tropical species.

  8. DFT study of H-bonds in the peptide secondary structures: The backbone-side-chain and polar side-chains interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vener, M. V.; Egorova, A. N.; Fomin, D. P.; Tsirelson, V. G.

    2010-05-01

    The backbone-side-chain interactions in the peptide secondary structures are studied by the density functional theory methods with/without periodic boundary conditions. The alanine-based two-stranded β-sheet structure infinite models and the cluster models of the C5 structures modified by the glutamic acid residue are considered. Several low-energy structures have been localized in the BLYP/plane-wave and the BLYP/6-311++G** approximations. Combined use of the quantum-topological analysis of the electron density and frequency shifts enables us to detect and describe quantitatively the non-covalent interactions and H-bonds. We found that the strongest backbone-side-chain interaction (˜37 kJ/mol) is due to the intra-chain H-bond formed by the C dbnd O backbone group and by the COOH side-chain group. The OH…O distance equals to 1.727 Å and the frequency shift of the OH stretching vibration is 370 cm -1. The polar side-chains interaction is studied in the infinite model of the alanine-based two-stranded β-sheet structure modified by the glutamic acid/lysine residues. Moderate inter-chain H-bond (˜40 kJ/mol) is formed by glutamic acid COOH group and lysine NH 2 group. The OH…N distance equals to 1.707 Å and the frequency shift of the OH stretching vibration is 770 cm -1.

  9. R2R - software to speed the depiction of aesthetic consensus RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With continuing identification of novel structured noncoding RNAs, there is an increasing need to create schematic diagrams showing the consensus features of these molecules. RNA structural diagrams are typically made either with general-purpose drawing programs like Adobe Illustrator, or with automated or interactive programs specific to RNA. Unfortunately, the use of applications like Illustrator is extremely time consuming, while existing RNA-specific programs produce figures that are useful, but usually not of the same aesthetic quality as those produced at great cost in Illustrator. Additionally, most existing RNA-specific applications are designed for drawing single RNA molecules, not consensus diagrams. Results We created R2R, a computer program that facilitates the generation of aesthetic and readable drawings of RNA consensus diagrams in a fraction of the time required with general-purpose drawing programs. Since the inference of a consensus RNA structure typically requires a multiple-sequence alignment, the R2R user annotates the alignment with commands directing the layout and annotation of the RNA. R2R creates SVG or PDF output that can be imported into Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape or CorelDRAW. R2R can be used to create consensus sequence and secondary structure models for novel RNA structures or to revise models when new representatives for known RNA classes become available. Although R2R does not currently have a graphical user interface, it has proven useful in our efforts to create 100 schematic models of distinct noncoding RNA classes. Conclusions R2R makes it possible to obtain high-quality drawings of the consensus sequence and structural models of many diverse RNA structures with a more practical amount of effort. R2R software is available at http://breaker.research.yale.edu/R2R and as an Additional file. PMID:21205310

  10. Mature MiRNAs Form Secondary Structure, which Suggests Their Function beyond RISC

    PubMed Central

    Belter, Agnieszka; Gudanis, Dorota; Rolle, Katarzyna; Piwecka, Monika; Gdaniec, Zofia; Naskręt-Barciszewska, Mirosława Z.; Barciszewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The generally accepted model of the miRNA-guided RNA down-regulation suggests that mature miRNA targets mRNA in a nucleotide sequence-specific manner. However, we have shown that the nucleotide sequence of miRNA is not the only determinant of miRNA specificity. Using specific nucleases, T1, V1 and S1 as well as NMR, UV/Vis and CD spectroscopies, we found that miR-21, miR-93 and miR-296 can adopt hairpin and/or homoduplex structures. The secondary structure of those miRNAs in solution is a function of RNA concentration and ionic conditions. Additionally, we have shown that a formation of miRNA hairpin is facilitated by cellular environment.Looking for functional consequences of this observation, we have perceived that structure of these miRNAs resemble RNA aptamers, short oligonucleotides forming a stable 3D structures with a high affinity and specificity for their targets. We compared structures of anti-tenascin C (anti-Tn-C) aptamers, which inhibit brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO IV) and selected miRNA. A strong overexpression of miR-21, miR-93 as well Tn-C in GBM may imply some connections between them. The structural similarity of these miRNA hairpins and anti-Tn-C aptamers indicates that miRNAs may function also beyond RISC and are even more sophisticated regulators, that it was previously expected. We think that the knowledge of the miRNA structure may give a new insight into miRNA-dependent gene regulation mechanism and be a step forward in the understanding their function and involvement in cancerogenesis. This may improve design process of anti-miRNA therapeutics. PMID:25423301

  11. Impact of Microscale and Pilot-Scale Freeze-Drying on Protein Secondary Structures: Sucrose Formulations of Lysozyme and Catalase.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn-Hendrik; Leskinen, Jari T T; Molnár, Ferdinand; Ketolainen, Jarkko

    2015-11-01

    Microscale (MS) freeze-drying offers rapid process cycles for early-stage formulation development. The effects of the MS approach on the secondary structures of two model proteins, lysozyme and catalase, were compared with pilot-scale (PS) vial freeze-drying. The secondary structures were assessed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Formulations were made with increasing sucrose-protein ratios. Freeze-drying protocols involved regular cooling without thermal treatment and annealing with MS and PS equipment, and cooling rate variations with the MS. Principal component analysis of smoothed second-derivative amide I spectra revealed sucrose-protein ratio-dependent shifts toward α-helical structures. Transferability of sucrose-protein formulations from MS to PS vial freeze-drying was evidenced at regular cooling rates. Local differences in protein secondary structures between the bottom and top of sucrose-catalase samples could be detected at the sucrose-catalase ratios of 1 and 2, this being related to the initial filling height and ice crystal morphology. Annealing revealed temperature, protein, formulation, and sample location-dependent effects influencing surface morphology at the top, or causing protein secondary structure perturbation at the bottom. With the MS approach, protein secondary structure differences at different cooling rates could be detected for sucrose-lysozyme samples at the sucrose-lysozyme ratio of 1.

  12. Association of BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes polymorphisms and secondary protein structure changes with reproduction traits in Mehraban ewes.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, R; Zamani, P; Deljou, A; Rezvan, H

    2013-07-25

    BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes are well known due to their important effects on litter size and mechanisms controlling ovulation rate in sheep. In the present study, polymorphisms of BMPR-1B gene exon 8 and GDF9 gene exon 1 were detected by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing methods in 100 Mehraban ewes. The PCR reaction forced to amplify 140 and 380-bp fragments of BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes, respectively. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPS) were identified in two different SSCP patterns of BMPR-1B gene (CC and CA genotypes) that deduced one amino acid exchange. Also, two SNPS were identified in three different SSCP patterns of GDF9 gene (AA, AG and GG genotypes) that deduced one amino acid exchanges. Two different secondary structures of protein were predicted for BMPR-1B exon 8, but the secondary protein structures predicted for GDF9 exon 1 were similar together. The evaluation of the associations between the SSCP patterns and the protein structure changes with reproduction traits showed that BMPR-1B exon 8 genotypes have significant effects on some of reproduction traits but the GDF9 genotypes did not have any significant effect. The CA genotype of BMPR-1B exon 8 had a significant positive effect on reproduction performance and could be considered as an important and new mutation, affecting the ewes reproduction performance. Marker assisted selection using BMPR-IB gene could be noticed to improve the reproduction traits in Mehraban sheep.

  13. Internal transcribed spacer 1 secondary structure analysis reveals a common core throughout the anaerobic fungi (Neocallimastigomycota).

    PubMed

    Koetschan, Christian; Kittelmann, Sandra; Lu, Jingli; Al-Halbouni, Djamila; Jarvis, Graeme N; Müller, Tobias; Wolf, Matthias; Janssen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is a popular barcode marker for fungi and in particular the ITS1 has been widely used for the anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota). A good number of validated reference sequences of isolates as well as a large number of environmental sequences are available in public databases. Its highly variable nature predisposes the ITS1 for low level phylogenetics; however, it complicates the establishment of reproducible alignments and the reconstruction of stable phylogenetic trees at higher taxonomic levels (genus and above). Here, we overcame these problems by proposing a common core secondary structure of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi employing a Hidden Markov Model-based ITS1 sequence annotation and a helix-wise folding approach. We integrated the additional structural information into phylogenetic analyses and present for the first time an automated sequence-structure-based taxonomy of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi. The methodology developed is transferable to the ITS1 of other fungal groups, and the robust taxonomy will facilitate and improve high-throughput anaerobic fungal community structure analysis of samples from various environments.

  14. Function of RNA secondary structures in transcriptional attenuation of the Bacillus subtilis pyr operon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Turner, R J; Switzer, R L

    1996-12-10

    The Bacillus subtilis pyr operon is regulated by exogenous pyrimidines by a transcriptional attenuation mechanism. Transcription in vitro from pyr DNA templates specifying attenuation regions yielded terminated and read-through transcripts of the expected lengths. Addition of the PyrR regulatory protein plus UMP led to greatly increased termination. Synthetic antisense deoxyoligonucleotides were used to probe possible secondary structures in the pyr mRNA that were proposed to play roles in controlling attenuation. Oligonucleotides predicted to disrupt terminator structures suppressed termination, whereas oligonucleotides predicted to disrupt the stem of antiterminator stem-loops strongly promoted termination at the usual termination site. Oligonucleotides that disrupt a previously unrecognized stem-loop structure, called the anti-antiterminator, the formation of which interferes with formation of the downstream antiterminator, suppressed termination. We propose that transcriptional attenuation of the pyr operon is governed by switching between alternative antiterminator versus anti-antiterminator plus terminator structures, and that PyrR acts by UMP-dependent binding to and stabilization of the anti-antiterminator.

  15. Conformational analysis and clustering of short and medium size loops connecting regular secondary structures: a database for modeling and prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Donate, L. E.; Rufino, S. D.; Canard, L. H.; Blundell, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    Loops are regions of nonrepetitive conformation connecting regular secondary structures. We identified 2,024 loops of one to eight residues in length, with acceptable main-chain bond lengths and peptide bond angles, from a database of 223 protein and protein-domain structures. Each loop is characterized by its sequence, main-chain conformation, and relative disposition of its bounding secondary structures as described by the separation between the tips of their axes and the angle between them. Loops, grouped according to their length and type of their bounding secondary structures, were superposed and clustered into 161 conformational classes, corresponding to 63% of all loops. Of these, 109 (51% of the loops) were populated by at least four nonhomologous loops or four loops sharing a low sequence identity. Another 52 classes, including 12% of the loops, were populated by at least three loops of low sequence similarity from three or fewer nonhomologous groups. Loop class suprafamilies resulting from variations in the termini of secondary structures are discussed in this article. Most previously described loop conformations were found among the classes. New classes included a 2:4 type IV hairpin, a helix-capping loop, and a loop that mediates dinucleotide-binding. The relative disposition of bounding secondary structures varies among loop classes, with some classes such as beta-hairpins being very restrictive. For each class, sequence preferences as key residues were identified; those most frequently at these conserved positions than in proteins were Gly, Asp, Pro, Phe, and Cys. Most of these residues are involved in stabilizing loop conformation, often through a positive phi conformation or secondary structure capping. Identification of helix-capping residues and beta-breakers among the highly conserved positions supported our decision to group loops according to their bounding secondary structures. Several of the identified loop classes were associated with

  16. Suppression of secondary electron yield by micro-porous array structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, M.; He, Y. N.; Hu, S. G.; Wang, R.; Hu, T. C.; Yang, J.; Cui, W. Z.

    2013-02-01

    We study secondary electron yield (SEY) suppression for metal materials using a roughened surface with a micro-porous array. First, we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the electron trajectory in a single cylindrical well using a phenomenological model of secondary electron emission and the SEY suppression efficiency of a micro-porous array. The simulation results show that the SEY of a roughened surface is affected significantly by the aspect ratio of the micro-pores and the surface porosity of the metal plate. Then, to verify the simulation results, we produce a micro-porous array on metal plates using photolithography and measure their SEYs. We show that the micro-porous array structure can efficiently suppress the SEY of metal materials, and the measurements agree quantitatively with the corresponding simulation results. Finally, we derive an analytical formula to evaluate easily the SEY suppression efficiency of the Ag micro-porous array. In total, the micro-porous array proposed in this paper offers an alternative to SEY suppression in related areas such as multipactor effects in satellite payloads or electron cloud effects in accelerators.

  17. Suppression of secondary electron yield by micro-porous array structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, M.; He, Y. N.; Hu, S. G.; Wang, R.; Hu, T. C.; Yang, J.; Cui, W. Z.

    2013-02-21

    We study secondary electron yield (SEY) suppression for metal materials using a roughened surface with a micro-porous array. First, we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the electron trajectory in a single cylindrical well using a phenomenological model of secondary electron emission and the SEY suppression efficiency of a micro-porous array. The simulation results show that the SEY of a roughened surface is affected significantly by the aspect ratio of the micro-pores and the surface porosity of the metal plate. Then, to verify the simulation results, we produce a micro-porous array on metal plates using photolithography and measure their SEYs. We show that the micro-porous array structure can efficiently suppress the SEY of metal materials, and the measurements agree quantitatively with the corresponding simulation results. Finally, we derive an analytical formula to evaluate easily the SEY suppression efficiency of the Ag micro-porous array. In total, the micro-porous array proposed in this paper offers an alternative to SEY suppression in related areas such as multipactor effects in satellite payloads or electron cloud effects in accelerators.

  18. [Isolation and structural elucidation of secondary metabolites from marine Streptomyces sp. SCSIO 1934].

    PubMed

    Niu, Siwen; Li, Sumei; Tian, Xinpeng; Hu, Tao; Ju, Jianhua; Ynag, Xiaohong; Zhang, Si; Zhang, Changsheng

    2011-07-01

    Marine Actinobacteria are emerging as new resources for bioactive natural products with promise in novel drug discovery. In recent years, the richness and diversity of marine Actinobacteria from the South China Sea and their ability in producing bioactive products have been investigated. The objective of this work is to isolate and identify bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine actinobacterium SCSIO 1934 derived from sediments of South China Sea. The strain was identified as a Streptomyces spieces by analyzing its 16S rDNA sequence. Streptomyces sp. SCSIO 1934 was fermented under optimized conditions and seven bioactive secondary metabolites were isolated and purified by chromatographic methods including colum chromatography over silica gel and Sephadex LH-20. Their structures were elucidated as 17-O-demethylgeldanamycin (1), lebstatin (2), 17-O-demethyllebstatin (3), nigericin (4), nigericin sodium salt (5), abierixin (6), respectively, by detailed NMR spectroscopic data (1H, 13C, COSY, HSQC and HMBC). This work provided a new marine actinobacterium Streptomyces sp. SCSIO 1934, capable of producing diverse bioactive natural products.

  19. Synthesis and structural characterisation of amides from picolinic acid and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Prarthana; Barry, Sarah M.; Houlihan, Kate M.; Murphy, Michael J.; Turner, Peter; Jensen, Paul; Rutledge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Coupling picolinic acid (pyridine-2-carboxylic acid) and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid with N-alkylanilines affords a range of mono- and bis-amides in good to moderate yields. These amides are of interest for potential applications in catalysis, coordination chemistry and molecular devices. The reaction of picolinic acid with thionyl chloride to generate the acid chloride in situ leads not only to the N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides as expected but also the corresponding 4-chloro-N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides in the one pot. The two products are readily separated by column chromatography. Chlorinated products are not observed from the corresponding reactions of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. X-Ray crystal structures for six of these compounds are described. These structures reveal a general preference for cis amide geometry in which the aromatic groups (N-phenyl and pyridyl) are cis to each other and the pyridine nitrogen anti to the carbonyl oxygen. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments provide a window on amide bond isomerisation in solution. PMID:25954918

  20. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  1. Structural Requirements for the Procoagulant Activity of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, Julia; Jaax, Miriam; Leiting, Silke; Appel, Bettina; Greinacher, Andreas; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects. PMID:23226277

  2. [Study on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure treatment on the secondary structure of mushroom polyphenoloxidase by SRCD and FTIR].

    PubMed

    Yi, Jian-yong; Dong, Peng; Wang, Yong-tao; Jiang, Bin; Liao, Xiao-jun; Hu, Xiao-song; Zhang, Yan

    2012-02-01

    The secondary structure of the mushroom polyphenoloxidase treated by the high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) was analyzed by the synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The alpha-helix content of mushroom PPO was decreased after HHP treatment, which indicated that the secondary structure of PPO was changed. There was a discrepancy of the result of the secondary structure content between untreated or HHP-treated mushroom PPO analyzed by SRCD and FTIR spectra, and this discrepancy may be due to the different determination temperature, the concentration of the PPO solution and the spectra analysis method etc. The fluorescence spectra showed that the fluorescence intensity of the mushroom PPO was decreased after HHP treatment, and a red shift was observed after HHP treatment, which indicated that the tertiary structure of the enzyme molecule has been modified.

  3. The increased level of COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elzbieta; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Platelet activation is increasingly postulated as a possible component of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in MS. Arachidonic acid cascade metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key pathway of platelet activation. The aim of our study was to investigate the COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SP MS) patients. The blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (man n = 22; female n = 28), suffering from SP MS, diagnosed according to the revised McDonald criteria. Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma after arachidonic acid stimulation. The level of COX activity and thromboxane B2 concentration were determined by ELISA method. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the level of malondialdehyde. The results were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. We found that blood platelets obtained from SP MS patients were more sensitive to arachidonic acid and their response measured as platelet aggregation was stronger (about 14 %) relative to control. We also observed a significantly increased activity of COX (about 40 %) and synthesis of thromboxane B2 (about 113 %). The generation of malondialdehyde as a marker of lipid peroxidation was about 10 % higher in SP MS than in control. Cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism is significantly increased in blood platelets of patients with SP MS. Future clinical studies are required to recommend the use of low-dose aspirin, and possibly other COX inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular risk in MS. PMID:27507559

  4. The investigation of the secondary structures of various peptide sequences of β-casein by the multicanonical simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaşar, F.; Çelik, S.; Köksel, H.

    2006-05-01

    The structural properties of Arginine-Glutamic acid-Leucine-Glutamic acid-Glutamic acid-Leucine-Asparagine-Valine-Proline-Glycine (RELEELNVPG, in one letter code), Glutamic acid-Glutamic acid-Glutamine-Glutamine-Glutamine-Threonine-Glutamic acid (EEQQQTE) and Glutamic acid-Aspartic acid-Glutamic acid-Leucine-Glutamine-Aspartic acid-Lysine-Isoleucine (EDELQDKI) peptide sequences of β-casein were studied by three-dimensional molecular modeling. In this work, the three-dimensional conformations of each peptide from their primary sequences were obtained by multicanonical simulations. With using major advantage of this simulation technique, Ramachandran plots were prepared and analysed to predict the relative occurrence probabilities of β-turn, γ-turn and helical structures. Structural predictions of these sequences of β-casein molecule indicate the presence of high level of helical structures and βIII-turns. The occurrence probabilities of inverse and classical β-turns were low. The probability of helical structure of each sequence significantly decreased when the temperature increased. Our results show these peptides have highly helical structure and better agreement with the results of spectroscopic techniques and other prediction methods.

  5. Poly(L-lysine) and Clay Nanocomposite with Desired Matrix Secondary Structure: Effects of Polypeptide Molecular Weight

    SciTech Connect

    Hule,R.; Pochan, D.

    2007-01-01

    Nanocomposites (NC) were formed using cationic poly(L-lysine) (PLL), a semicrystalline polypeptide, that was reinforced by sodium montmorillonite (MMT) clay via solution intercalation technique. By varying solution conditions such as pH, temperature, and polypeptide concentration in the presence of clay platelets, the secondary structure of PLL was controllably altered into {alpha}-helical, {beta}-sheet, and random coil. The high molecular weight polypeptide shows a strong propensity to fold into the {beta}-sheet structure when cast as films, irrespective of the initial secondary structure in solution. Nanocomposite local morphology confirms intercalated MMT platelets with PLL over a wide range of compositions.

  6. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  7. Design and analysis of supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror on a space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenjie; Chai, Wenyi; Feng, Liangjie; Yang, Wengang; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xuewu

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical stability is a significant segment for an on-axis space telescope to assure its assembly accuracy as well as the image quality in the rigorous space environment, supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror as a main structure of the on-axis space telescope must be designed reasonably to meet the mission requirements of the space telescope. Meanwhile, in view of the limitation of the satellite launching cost, it is necessary to reduce the weight and power compensation during the supporting structure design based on the satisfaction of telescope performance. Two types of supporting structure for a space telescope are designed, one is three-tripod structure which has three tripods located on the optical bench to support the secondary mirror assemblies and keep the distance between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror, the other is barrel supporting structure which includes a tube and a secondary mirror support with four spider struts. To compare the mechanical performance and launching cost of the two kinds of supporting structure, both structural and thermal analysis model are established. The analysis results indicates that the three-tripod support is lighter, has better mechanical performance and needs less power compensation than the barrel support.

  8. 1H and 13C NMR characterization and secondary structure of the K2 polysaccharide of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 52145.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria Michela; De Castro, Cristina; Naldi, Teresa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Tomás, Juan M; Regué, Miguel

    2005-09-26

    The complete (1)H and (13)C NMR characterization of the tetrasaccharide repeating unit from the K2 polysaccharide of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 52145 is reported. [chemical structure] In addition a model for its secondary structure was suggested on the basis of dynamic and molecular calculations.

  9. Translation with secondary structure: Dynamic blockages in totally asymmetric simple exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Leah

    2011-03-01

    The totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) is often used as a model for protein synthesis, with the lattice and particles representing the mRNA and ribosomes, respectively. Here we model the effect of secondary structure (folding) of the mRNA by introducing a dynamic blockage region in the lattice. If the region is unoccupied by particles, the blockage can close and prevent upstream particles from moving into it, representing the folding of that section of mRNA. Reopening of the blockage, allowing particles to pass, represents unfolding. We study the effects of the blockage size, closing/opening probabilities, and TASEP parameters on the particle current and blockage switching rates.

  10. Innovative FT-IR Imaging of Protein Film Secondary Structure Before and After Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bonwell, E.; Wetzel, D

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of globular protein occur during thermal processing. An infrared reflecting mirrored optical substrate that is unaffected by heat allows recording infrared spectra of protein films in a reflection absorption mode on the stage of an FT-IR microspectrometer. Hydrated films of myoglobin protein cast from solution on the mirrored substrate are interrogated before and after thermal denaturation to allow a direct comparison. Focal plane array imaging of 280 protein films allowed selection of the same area in the image from which to extract spectra. After treatment, 110 of 140 spectra from multiple films showed a dramatic shift from the {alpha}-helix form (1650 {+-} 5 cm{sup -1}) to aggregated forms on either side of the original band. Seventy maxima were near 1625 cm{sup -1}, and 40 shifted in the direction of 1670 cm{sup -1}. The method developed was applied to films cast from two other commercial animal and plant protein sources.

  11. Peptide secondary structure modulates single-walled carbon nanotube fluorescence as a chaperone sensor for nitroaromatics

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Daniel A.; Pratt, George W.; Zhang, Jingqing; Nair, Nitish; Hansborough, Adam J.; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Reuel, Nigel F.; Barone, Paul W.; Strano, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    A class of peptides from the bombolitin family, not previously identified for nitroaromatic recognition, allows near-infrared fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes to transduce specific changes in their conformation. In response to the binding of specific nitroaromatic species, such peptide–nanotube complexes form a virtual “chaperone sensor,” which reports modulation of the peptide secondary structure via changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes, near-infrared photoluminescence. A split-channel microscope constructed to image quantized spectral wavelength shifts in real time, in response to nitroaromatic adsorption, results in the first single-nanotube imaging of solvatochromic events. The described indirect detection mechanism, as well as an additional exciton quenching-based optical nitroaromatic detection method, illustrate that functionalization of the carbon nanotube surface can result in completely unique sites for recognition, resolvable at the single-molecule level. PMID:21555544

  12. Class Anxiety in Secondary Education: Exploring Structural Relations with Perceived Control, Engagement, Disaffection, and Performance.

    PubMed

    González, Antonio; Faílde Garrido, José María; Rodríguez Castro, Yolanda; Carrera Rodríguez, María Victoria

    2015-09-14

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between class-related anxiety with perceived control, teacher-reported behavioral engagement, behavioral disaffection, and academic performance. Participants were 355 compulsory secondary students (9th and 10th grades; Mean age = 15.2 years; SD = 1.8 years). Structural equation models revealed performance was predicted by perceived control, anxiety, disaffection, and engagement. Perceived control predicted anxiety, disaffection, and engagement. Anxiety predicted disaffection and engagement, and partially mediated the effects from control on disaffection (β = -.277, p < .005; CI = -.378, -.197) and engagement (β = .170, p < .002; CI = .103 .258). The negative association between anxiety and performance was mediated by engagement and disaffection (β = -.295, p < .002; CI = -.439, -.182). Anxiety, engagement, and disaffection mediated the effects of control on performance (β = .352, p < .003; CI = .279, .440). The implications of these results are discussed in the light of current theory and educational interventions.

  13. Isoprene Epoxydiols as Precursors to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake Studies with Authentic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Zhang, Haofei; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formed from the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions, have recently been proposed as precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the basis of mass spectrometric evidence. In the present study, IEPOX isomers were synthesized in high purity (> 99%) to investigate their potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies followed by reaction product analyses. IEPOX-derived SOA was substantially observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols, with conservative lower-bound yields of 4.7–6.4% for β-IEPOX and 3.4–5.5% for δ-IEPOX, providing direct evidence for IEPOX isomers as precursors to isoprene SOA. These chamber studies demonstrate that IEPOX uptake explains the formation of known isoprene SOA tracers found in ambient aerosols, including 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, dimers, and IEPOX-derived organosulfates. Additionally, we show reactive uptake on the acidified sulfate aerosols supports a previously unreported acid-catalyzed intramolecular rearrangement of IEPOX to cis- and trans-3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols (3-MeTHF-3,4-diols) in the particle phase. Analysis of these novel tracer compounds by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) suggests that they contribute to a unique factor resolved from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of AMS organic aerosol spectra collected from low-NOx, isoprene-dominated regions influenced by the presence of acidic aerosols. PMID:22103348

  14. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase: The application of a plant secondary metabolite enzyme in biocatalytic chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2016-09-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from the secondary metabolism of Cannabis sativa L. catalyzes the oxidative formation of an intramolecular CC bond in cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to synthesize Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is the direct precursor of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Aiming on a biotechnological production of cannabinoids, we investigated the potential of the heterologously produced plant oxidase in a cell-free system on preparative scale. THCAS was characterized in an aqueous/organic two-liquid phase setup in order to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate and to allow in situ product removal. Compared to the single phase aqueous setup the specific activity decreased by a factor of approximately 2 pointing to a substrate limitation of CBGA in the two-liquid phase system. However, the specific activity remained stable for at least 3h illustrating the benefit of the two-liquid phase setup. In a repeated-batch setup, THCAS showed only a minor loss of specific activity in the third batch pointing to a high intrinsic stability and high solvent tolerance of the enzyme. Maximal space-time-yields of 0.121gL(-1)h(-1) were reached proving the two-liquid phase concept suitable for biotechnological production of cannabinoids. PMID:27369551

  15. Secondary-structure characterization by far-UV CD of highly purified uncoupling protein 1 expressed in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Douette, Pierre; Navet, Rachel; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Brans, Alain; Sluse-Goffart, Claudine; Matagne, André; Sluse, Francis E

    2004-01-01

    The rat UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1) is a mitochondrial inner-membrane carrier involved in energy dissipation and heat production. We expressed UCP1 carrying a His6 epitope at its C-terminus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria. The recombinant-tagged UCP1 was purified by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography to homogeneity (>95%). This made it suitable for subsequent biophysical characterization. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments showed that n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside-solubilized UCP1-His6 retained its PN (purine nucleotide)-binding capacity. The far-UV CD spectrum of the functional protein clearly indicated the predominance of alpha-helices in the UCP1 secondary structure. The UCP1 secondary structure exhibited an alpha-helical degree of approx. 68%, which is at least 25% higher than the previously reported estimations based on computational predictions. Moreover, the helical content remained unchanged in free and PN-loaded UCP1. A homology model of the first repeat of UCP1, built on the basis of X-ray-solved close parent, the ADP/ATP carrier, strengthened the CD experimental results. Our experimental and computational results indicate that (i) alpha-helices are the major component of UCP1 secondary structure; (ii) PN-binding mechanism does not involve significant secondary-structure rearrangement; and (iii) UCP1 shares similar secondary-structure characteristics with the ADP/ATP carrier, at least for the first repeat. PMID:14766012

  16. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm × 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  17. Secondary correction of unsatisfactory blepharoplasty: removing multilaminated septal structures and grafting of preaponeurotic fat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y W; Park, H J; Kim, S

    2000-11-01

    Oriental blepharoplasty, commonly known as a "double eyelid operation," is the most frequently practiced cosmetic procedure in Orientals, who have probably become more fold conscious because of social westernization and an influx of Caucasians into their society. Anatomically, the upper eyelids of an Oriental are considerably different from those of a white person, and nearly half of Orientals have single eyelids. When performing blepharoplasty, an appropriate design and operative technique must be carefully selected, taking into consideration the anatomical characteristics of Koreans to obtain an aesthetically pleasing result. However, the incidence of complications is high. Patients who are faced with unsatisfactory results are often perplexed by the fact that such a commonly performed procedure could have a very high rate of dissatisfaction and that an improvement is not easy. An unfavorable result need not imply a postoperative complication, but only that the result is not acceptable to the patient, whose goal may not be based on good aesthetic principles. The most common sources of dissatisfaction are postoperative asymmetry and high placement of the lid fold. From 1991 to 1998, secondary blepharoplasty was performed on 72 patients by slitting transversely, removing the multilaminated septal structures exposed to the previous operative scar, spreading the preaponeurotic fat that extruded, and removing the septal structures into a space where the scar was eliminated to prevent secondary adhesion. The average age of the patients was 26.5 years, and the average follow-up period was 2 years. No remarkable complication was encountered after operation with this method, and the desired aesthetic improvements were achieved in the majority of the patients.

  18. Molecular structural studies of lichen substances II: atranorin, gyrophoric acid, fumarprotocetraric acid, rhizocarpic acid, calycin, pulvinic dilactone and usnic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Newton, Emma M.; Wynn-Williams, David D.

    2003-06-01

    The FT-Raman and infrared vibrational spectra of some important lichen compounds from two metabolic pathways are characterised. Key biomolecular marker bands have been suggested for the spectroscopic identification of atranorin, gyrophoric acid, fumarprotocetraric acid rhizocarpic acid, calycin, pulvinic dilactone and usnic acid. A spectroscopic protocol has been defined for the detection of these molecules in organisms subjected to environmental stresses such as UV-radiation exposure, desiccation and low temperatures. Use of the protocol will be made for the assessment of survival strategies used by stress-tolerant lichens in Antarctic cold deserts.

  19. Detection of secondary structure in glycosaminoglycans via the H n.m.r. signal of the acetamido NH group.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J E; Heatley, F

    1982-01-01

    Two simple methods for dissolving salts of acid glycosaminoglycans with inorganic cations (e.g. Li+ and Na+) in dry dimethyl sulphoxide are described. Complete n.m.r. spectra of, e.g., Na+ and Li+ salts of chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate were obtained on these solutions. In [2H6]dimethyl sulphoxide the NH resonance of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy hexosides is in the range 7.2-8.0 delta, but is downfield (8.3-9.3 delta) when the NH is H-bonded to -CO2-. Heparan sulphate shows two NH resonances, of which one (at 8.3 delta) is probably indicative of H-bonding. Space-filling models show that a very close approach of NH to -CO2- across the alpha-glucosaminidic bond is possible, and a solution configuration for heparan sulphate is proposed. The n.m.r. results are entirely compatible with interpretations of periodate-oxidation kinetics, based on H-bonded secondary structures present in hyaluronate and chondroitin sulphates, but not in dermatan (or keratan) sulphate. Images Fig. 2. PMID:7181855

  20. Recurrent high anion gap metabolic acidosis secondary to 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Tailor, Prayus; Raman, Tuhina; Garganta, Cheryl L; Njalsson, Runa; Carlsson, Katarina; Ristoff, Ellinor; Carey, Hugh B

    2005-07-01

    High anion gap metabolic acidosis in adults is a severe metabolic disorder for which the primary organic acid usually is apparent by clinical history and standard laboratory testing. We report a case of recurrent high anion gap metabolic acidosis in a 48-year-old man who initially presented with anorexia and malaise. Physical examination was unrevealing. Arterial pH was 6.98, P co 2 was 5 mm Hg, and chemistry tests showed a bicarbonate level of 3 mEq/L (3 mmol/L), anion gap of 32 mEq/L (32 mmol/L), and a negative toxicology screen result, except for an acetaminophen (paracetamol) level of 7.5 mug/mL. Metabolic acidosis resolved with administration of intravenous fluids. Subsequently, he experienced 5 more episodes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis during an 8-month span. Methanol, ethylene glycol, acetone, ethanol, d -lactate, and hippuric acid screens were negative. Lactate levels were modestly elevated, and acetaminophen levels were elevated for 5 of 6 admissions. These episodes defied explanation until 3 urinary organic acid screens, obtained on separate admissions, showed striking elevations of 5-oxoproline levels. Inborn errors of metabolism in the gamma-glutamyl cycle causing recurrent 5-oxoprolinuria and high anion gap metabolic acidosis are rare, but well described in children. Recently, there have been several reports of apparent acquired 5-oxoprolinuria and high anion gap metabolic acidosis in adults in association with acetaminophen use. Acetaminophen may, in susceptible individuals, disrupt regulation of the gamma-glutamyl cycle and result in excessive 5-oxoproline production. Suspicion for 5-oxoproline-associated high anion gap metabolic acidosis should be entertained when the cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis remains poorly defined, the anion gap cannot be explained reasonably by measured organic acids, and there is concomitant acetaminophen use.

  1. An Exploration of Secondary Students' Mental States When Learning About Acids and Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ju; Hou, I.-Lin; Chiu, Houn-Lin; Treagust, David F.

    2014-02-01

    This study explored factors of students' mental states, including emotion, intention, internal mental representation, and external mental representation, which can affect their learning performance. In evaluating students' mental states during the science learning process and the relationship between mental states and learning achievement, valid, reliable, and scalable measures of students' mental states and learning achievement are needed. This paper presents the development of the Mental State Conceptual Learning Inventory (MSCLI) to identify students' mental states before and after learning about acids and bases. This instrument is time efficient and convenient and can be administered to large student samples so that teachers and researchers can gain profound insights into their students' learning of acids and bases in science class. The results of this study indicate that students' mental states are highly correlated with their achievement. As a whole, low-achieving students tended to have negative emotions and low intentions, were not good at internal visualization, and were unable to interpret graphics and draw pictures. In contrast, high-achieving students had positive emotions and intentions when learning life-related topics about acids and bases, and were good at internal visualization and drawing and interpreting graphics.

  2. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  3. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of