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Sample records for acid sequence deduced

  1. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  2. Sequence of cDNA for rat cystathionine gamma-lyase and comparison of deduced amino acid sequence with related Escherichia coli enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, P F; Maxwell, I H; Su, L J; Baumann, M; Glode, L M

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone for cystathionine gamma-lyase was isolated from a rat cDNA library in lambda gt11 by screening with a monospecific antiserum. The identity of this clone, containing 600 bp proximal to the 3'-end of the gene, was confirmed by positive hybridization selection. Northern-blot hybridization showed the expected higher abundance of the corresponding mRNA in liver than in brain. Two further cDNA clones from a plasmid pcD library were isolated by colony hybridization with the first clone and were found to contain inserts of 1600 and 1850 bp. One of these was confirmed as encoding cystathionine gamma-lyase by hybridization with two independent pools of oligodeoxynucleotides corresponding to partial amino acid sequence information for cystathionine gamma-lyase. The other clone (estimated to represent all but 8% of the 5'-end of the mRNA) was sequenced and its deduced amino acid sequence showed similarity to those of the Escherichia coli enzymes cystathionine beta-lyase and cystathionine gamma-synthase throughout its length, especially to that of the latter. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2201285

  3. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    PubMed

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  4. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  5. Molecular cloning, coding nucleotides and the deduced amino acid sequence of P-450BM-1 from Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    He, J S; Ruettinger, R T; Liu, H M; Fulco, A J

    1989-12-22

    The gene encoding barbiturate-inducible cytochrome P-450BM-1 from Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 has been cloned and sequenced. An open reading frame in the 1.9 kb of cloned DNA correctly predicted the NH2-terminal sequence of P-450BM-1 previously determined by protein sequencing, and, in toto, predicted a polypeptide of 410 amino acid residues with an Mr of 47,439. The sequence is most, but less than 27%, similar to that of P-450CAM from Pseudomonas putida, so that P-450BM-1 clearly belongs to a new P-450-gene family, distinct especially from that of the P-450 domain of P-450BM-3, a barbiturate-inducible single polypeptide cytochrome P-450:NADPH-P-450 reductase from the same strain of B. megaterium (Ruettinger, R.T., Wen, L.-P. and Fulco, A.J. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 10987-10995). PMID:2597681

  6. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activity: nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosylation factor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Price, S R; Nightingale, M; Tsai, S C; Williamson, K C; Adamik, R; Chen, H C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1988-01-01

    Three (two soluble and one membrane) guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that enhance ADP-ribosylation of the Gs alpha stimulatory subunit of the adenylyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) complex by choleragen have recently been purified from bovine brain. To further define the structure and function of these ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), we isolated a cDNA clone (lambda ARF2B) from a bovine retinal library by screening with a mixed heptadecanucleotide probe whose sequence was based on the partial amino acid sequence of one of the soluble ARFs from bovine brain. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of lambda ARF2B with sequences of peptides from the ARF protein (total of 60 amino acids) revealed only two differences. Whether these are cloning artifacts or reflect the existence of more than one ARF protein remains to be determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of ARF, Go alpha (the alpha subunit of a G protein that may be involved in regulation of ion fluxes), and c-Ha-ras gene product p21 show similarities in regions believed to be involved in guanine nucleotide binding and GTP hydrolysis. ARF apparently lacks a site analogous to that ADP-ribosylated by choleragen in G-protein alpha subunits. Although both the ARF proteins and the alpha subunits bind guanine nucleotides and serve as choleragen substrates, they must interact with the toxin A1 peptide in different ways. In addition to serving as an ADP-ribose acceptor, ARF interacts with the toxin in a manner that modifies its catalytic properties. PMID:3135549

  7. cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant-associated proteolipid SPL(Phe)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Fox, J.L.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Hydrophobic surfactant-associated protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 was isolated from either/ethanol or chloroform/methanol extracts of mammalian pulmonary surfactant. Automated Edman degradation in a gas-phase sequencer showed the major N-terminus of the human low molecular weight protein to be Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-Try-Cys-Trp-Leu-Cys-Arg-Ala-Leu-. Because of the N-terminal phenylalanine, the surfactant protein was designated SPL(Phe). Antiserum generated against hydrophobic surfactant protein(s) from bovine pulmonary surfactant recognized protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 in immunoblot analysis and was used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library constructed from adult human lung poly(A)/sup +/ RNA. This resulted in identification of a 1.4-kilobase cDNA clone that was shown to encode the N-terminus of the surfactant polypeptide SPL(Phe) (Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-) within an open reading frame for a larger protein. Expression of a fused ..beta..-galactosidase-SPL (Phe) gene in Escherichia coli yielded an immunoreactive M/sub r/ 34,000 fusion peptide. Hybrid-arrested translation with the cDNA and immunoprecipitation of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled in vitro translation products of human poly(A)/sup +/ RNA with a surfactant polyclonal antibody resulted in identification of a M/sub r/ 40,000 precursor protein. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA from human lung detected a 2.0-kilobase RNA that was more abundant in adult lung than in fetal lung. These proteins, and specifically SPL(Phe), may therefore be useful for synthesis of replacement surfactants for treatment of hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants or of other surfactant-deficient states.

  8. Evolution of vertebrate IgM: complete amino acid sequence of the constant region of Ambystoma mexicanum mu chain deduced from cDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Wiles, M V; Charlemagne, J; Schwager, J

    1992-10-01

    cDNA clones coding for the constant region of the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) mu heavy immunoglobulin chain were selected from total spleen RNA, using a cDNA polymerase chain reaction technique. The specific 5'-end primer was an oligonucleotide homologous to the JH segment of Xenopus laevis mu chain. One of the clones, JHA/3, corresponded to the complete constant region of the axolotl mu chain, consisting of a 1362-nucleotide sequence coding for a polypeptide of 454 amino acids followed in 3' direction by a 179-nucleotide untranslated region and a polyA+ tail. The axolotl C mu is divided into four typical domains (C mu 1-C mu 4) and can be aligned with the Xenopus C mu with an overall identity of 56% at the nucleotide level. Percent identities were particularly high between C mu 1 (59%) and C mu 4 (71%). The C-terminal 20-amino acid segment which constitutes the secretory part of the mu chain is strongly homologous to the equivalent sequences of chondrichthyans and of other tetrapods, including a conserved N-linked oligosaccharide, the penultimate cysteine and the C-terminal lysine. The four C mu domains of 13 vertebrate species ranging from chondrichthyans to mammals were aligned and compared at the amino acid level. The significant number of mu-specific residues which are conserved into each of the four C mu domains argues for a continuous line of evolution of the vertebrate mu chain. This notion was confirmed by the ability to reconstitute a consistent vertebrate evolution tree based on the phylogenic parsimony analysis of the C mu 4 sequences. PMID:1382992

  9. Deduced amino acid sequence of the small hydrophobic protein of US avian pneumovirus has greater identity with that of human metapneumovirus than those of non-US avian pneumoviruses.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Abdul S; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Huang, Zhuhui; Samal, Siba K

    2003-05-01

    We report here the nucleotide and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus strain Colorado (APV/CO). The SH gene of APV/CO is 628 nucleotides in length from gene-start to gene-end. The longest ORF of the SH gene encoded a protein of 177 aas in length. Comparison of the deduced aa sequence of the SH protein of APV/CO with the corresponding published sequences of other members of genera metapneumovirus showed 28% identity with the newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV), but no discernable identity with the APV subgroup A or B. Collectively, this data supports the hypothesis that: (i) APV/CO is distinct from European APV subgroups and belongs to the novel subgroup APV/C (APV/US); (ii) APV/CO is more closely related to hMPV, a mammalian metapneumovirus, than to either APV subgroup A or B. The SH gene of APV/CO was cloned using a genomic walk strategy which initiated cDNA synthesis from genomic RNA that traversed the genes in the order 3'-M-F-M2-SH-G-5', thus confirming that gene-order of APV/CO conforms in the genus Metapneumovirus. We also provide the sequences of transcription-signals and the M-F, F-M2, M2-SH and SH-G intergenic regions of APV/CO.

  10. Amino acid sequence homology between N- and C-terminal halves of a carbonic anhydrase in Porphyridium purpureum, as deduced from the cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, S; Miyachi, S

    1996-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from Porphyridium purpureum, a unicellular red alga, was purified >209-fold to a specific activity of 1,147 units/mg protein. cDNA clones for this CA were isolated. The longest clone, comprising 1,960 base pairs, contained an open reading frame which encoded a 571-amino acid polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 62,094 Da. The N- and C-terminal halves of the putative mature Porphyridium CA have amino acid sequence homology to each other (>70%) and to other prokaryotic-type CAs. Both regions contain, at equivalent positions, one set of three possible zinc-liganding amino acid residues conserved among prokaryotic-type CAs. CA purified from Porphyridium contained two atoms of zinc per molecule. We propose that the Porphyridium CA has evolved by duplication of an ancestral CA gene followed by the fusion of the duplicated CA gene. The CA truncated into the putative mature form was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein was active. Clones expressing separately the N- and C-terminal halves of the CA were constructed. CA activity was present in extracts of E. coli cells expressing the N-terminal half, while no detectable activity was found in cells expressing the C-terminal half.

  11. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen β and α chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both β and α) gene products, respectively, all of which being ˜90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to β2-microglobulin (β2M). The membraneembedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II α chains than to class II β chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a β2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  12. Deduced amino acid sequence, gene structure and chromosomal location of a novel human class Mu glutathione S-transferase, GSTM4.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, S; Spurr, N K; Hayes, J D; Wolf, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Mu-Class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are subject to marked inter-individual variation in man, owing to the fact that 40-50% of the population fail to express M1 subunits. Mu-Class GST from two lymphoblastoid cell lines (expressing M1 subunits and the other 'nulled' for M1) have been studied. Both cell lines were found to express a Mu-Class GST that has not been described previously. The cDNA encoding this novel transferase, designated 'GSTM4' has been isolated and the enzyme shown to be comprised of 218 amino acids (including the initiator methionine residue) with an M(r) of approx. 25.5 kDa. Molecular cloning demonstrated that the lymphoblastoid cell line which expressed GSTM1 possessed the b allelic variant (i.e. that with an asparagine residue at position 173). The genes for GSTM4 and GSTM1b have been cloned and found to contain seven introns and eight exons. The coding region of the GSTM4 gene, including the seven introns, encompasses 5.0 kb, whereas the same region of GSTM1b is 5.5 kb; the difference in the size of the two genes is due to the length of intron 7. DNA sequencing allowed a GSTM4-gene-specific oligo-primer to be designed which has been utilized in a PCR-based assay to determine that the GSTM4 gene is located on chromosome 1. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8471052

  13. cDNA cloning and deduced amino acid sequence of a major, glycine-rich cuticular protein from the coleopteran Tenebrio molitor. Temporal and spatial distribution of the transcript during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Charles, J P; Bouhin, H; Quennedey, B; Courrent, A; Delachambre, J

    1992-06-15

    In Coleoptera, the elytra (forewings), with a very hard and thick cuticle, protect the membranous and delicate hindwings against mechanical stress. We have isolated and characterized a cDNA encoding a major cuticle protein in Tenebrio molitor, named ACP-20. The deduced amino acid sequence is roughly tripartite, with two terminal glycine-rich domains and a central region showing pronounced similarities with some other hard cuticle proteins. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses reveal that ACP-20 gene expression is developmentally regulated since transcript accumulation occurs only in epidermal regions synthesizing hard cuticle and is restricted to the period of preecdysial adult cuticle deposition. Moreover, application of a juvenile hormone analogue prevents the appearance of the transcript, indicating that juvenile hormone, a key molecule involved in the control of insect metamorphosis, negatively regulates the expression of the ACP-20 gene.

  14. Primary structure of the 5 S subunit of transcarboxylase as deduced from the genomic DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C G; Kumar, G K; Shenoy, B C; Haase, F C; Phillips, N F; Park, V M; Magner, W J; Hejlik, D P; Wood, H G; Samols, D

    1993-09-13

    Transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii is a complex biotin-containing enzyme composed of 30 polypeptides of three different types. It is composed of six dimeric outer subunits associated with a central cylindrical hexameric subunit through 12 biotinyl subunits; three outer subunits on each face of the central hexamer. Each outer dimer is termed a 5 S subunit which associates with two biotinyl subunits. The enzyme catalyzes a two-step reaction in which methylmalonyl-CoA and pyruvate form propionyl-CoA and oxalacetate, the 5 S subunit specifically catalyzing one of these reactions. We report here the cloning, sequencing and expression of the monomer of the 5 S subunit. The gene was identified by matching amino acid sequences derived from isolated authentic 5 S peptides with the deduced sequence of an open reading frame present on a cloned P. shermanii genomic fragment known to contain the gene encoding the 1.3 S biotinyl subunit. The cloned 5 S gene encodes a protein of 519 amino acids, M(r) 57,793. The deduced sequence shows regions of extensive homology with that of pyruvate carboxylase and oxalacetate decarboxylase, two enzymes which catalyze the same or reverse reaction. A fragment was subcloned into pUC19 in an orientation such that the 5 S open reading frame could be expressed from the lac promoter of the vector. Crude extracts prepared from these cells contained an immunoreactive band on Western blots which co-migrated with authentic 5 S and were fully active in catalyzing the 5 S partial reaction. We conclude that we have cloned, sequenced and expressed the monomer of the 5 S subunit and that the expressed product is catalytically active. PMID:8365490

  15. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  16. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  17. Evolutionary relationships of a plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organism and Acholeplasma laidlawii deduced from two ribosomal protein gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, P O; Sears, B B

    1992-01-01

    The families within the class Mollicutes are distinguished by their morphologies, nutritional requirements, and abilities to metabolize certain compounds. Biosystematic classification of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) has been difficult because these organisms have not been cultured in vitro, and hence their nutritional requirements have not been determined nor have physiological characterizations been possible. To investigate the evolutionary relationship of the MLOs to other members of the class Mollicutes, a segment of a ribosomal protein operon was cloned and sequenced from an aster yellows-type MLO which is pathogenic for members of the genus Oenothera and from Acholeplasma laidlawii. The deduced amino acid sequence data from the rpl22 and rps3 genes indicate that the MLOs are more closely related to A. laidlawii than to animal mycoplasmas, confirming previous results from 16S rRNA sequence comparisons. This conclusion is also supported by the finding that the UGA codon is not read as a tryptophan codon in the MLO and A. laidlawii, in contrast to its usage in Mycoplasma capricolum. PMID:1556079

  18. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  19. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  20. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  1. Molecular basis of human body odour formation: insights deduced from corynebacterial genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Barzantny, H; Brune, I; Tauch, A

    2012-02-01

    During the past few decades, there has been an increased interest in the essential role of commensal skin bacteria in human body odour formation. It is now generally accepted that skin bacteria cause body odour by biotransformation of sweat components secreted in the human axillae. Especially, aerobic corynebacteria have been shown to contribute strongly to axillary malodour, whereas other human skin residents seem to have little influence. Analysis of odoriferous sweat components has shown that the major odour-causing substances in human sweat include steroid derivatives, short volatile branched-chain fatty acids and sulphanylalkanols. In this mini-review, we describe the molecular basis of the four most extensively studied routes of human body odour formation, while focusing on the underlying enzymatic processes. Considering the previously reported role of β-oxidation in odour formation, we analysed the genetic repertoire of eight Corynebacterium species concerning fatty acid metabolism. We particularly focused on the metabolic abilities of the lipophilic axillary isolate Corynebacterium jeikeium K411.

  2. Deduced consensus sequence of Sindbis virus strain AR339: mutations contained in laboratory strains which affect cell culture and in vivo phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, K L; Simpson, D A; Lin, S C; Knott, T A; Polo, J M; Pence, D F; Johannsen, D B; Heidner, H W; Davis, N L; Johnston, R E

    1996-01-01

    The consensus sequence of the Sindbis virus AR339 isolate, the prototype alphavirus, has been deduced. THe results presented here suggest (i) that a substantial proportion of the sequence divergence evident between the consensus sequence and sequences of laboratory strains of AR339 has resulted from selection for efficient growth in cell culture, (ii) that many of these changes affect the virulence of the virus in animal models, and (iii) that such modified genetic backgrounds present in laboratory strains can exert a significant influence on genetic studies of virus pathogenesis and host range. A laboratory strain of Sindbis virus AR339 was sequenced and cloned as a cDNA (pTRSB) from which infectious virus (TRSB) could be derived. The consensus sequence was deduced from the complete sequences of pTRSB and HRsp (E. G. Strauss, C. M. Rice, and J. H. Strauss, Virology 133:92-110, 1984), from partial sequences of the glycoprotein genes of three other AR339 laboratory strains, and by comparison with the sequences of the glycoprotein genes of three other AR339 sequence. HRsp differed form the consensus sequence by eight coding changes, and TRSB differed by three coding changes. In the 5' untranslated region, HRsp differed from the consensus sequence at nucleotide (nt) 5. These differences were likely the result of cell culture passage of the original AR339 isolate. At three of the difference loci (one in TRSB and two in HRsp), selection of cell-culture-adaptive mutations was documented with Sindbis virus or other alphaviruses. Selection in cell culture often results in attenuation of virulence in animals. Considering the TRSB and HRsp sequences together, one noncoding difference from the consensus (an A-for-G substitution in the 5' untranslated region at nt 5) and six coding differences in the glycoprotein genes (at E2 amino acids 1, 3, 70, and 172 and at E1 amino acids 72 and 237) were at loci which, either individually or in combination, significantly affected

  3. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hori, H; Lim, B L; Osawa, S

    1985-02-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other.

  4. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroshi; Lim, Byung-Lak; Osawa, Syozo

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other. PMID:16593540

  5. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hori, H; Lim, B L; Osawa, S

    1985-02-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other. PMID:16593540

  6. Evolution of tissue-specific keratins as deduced from novel cDNA sequences of the lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Schaffeld, Michael; Bremer, Miriam; Hunzinger, Christian; Markl, Jürgen

    2005-03-01

    Lungfishes are possibly the closest extant relatives of the land vertebrates (tetrapods). We report here the cDNA and predicted amino acid sequences of 13 different keratins (ten type I and three type II) of the lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus. These keratins include the orthologs of human K8 and K18. The lungfish keratins were also identified in tissue extracts using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, keratin blot binding assays and immunoblotting. The identified keratin spots were analyzed by peptide mass fingerprinting which assigned seven sequences (inclusively Protopterus K8 and K18) to their respective protein spot. The peptide mass fingerprints also revealed the fact that the major epidermal type I and type II keratins of this lungfish have not yet been sequenced. Nevertheless, phylogenetic trees constructed from multiple sequence alignments of keratins from lungfish and distantly related vertebrates such as lamprey, shark, trout, frog, and human reveal new insights into the evolution of K8 and K18, and unravel a variety of independent keratin radiation events. PMID:15819414

  7. Primary structure of bovine pituitary secretory protein I (chromogranin A) deduced from the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.G.; Cohn, D.V.; Gorr, S.U.; Ornstein, D.L.; Kashdan, M.A.; Levine, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Secretory protein I (SP-I), also referred to as chromogranin A, is an acidic glycoprotein that has been found in every tissue of endocrine and neuroendocrine origin examined but never in exocrine or epithelial cells. Its co-storage and co-secretion with peptide hormones and neurotransmitters suggest that it has an important endocrine or secretory function. The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a bovine pituitary lambdagt11 expression library using an antiserum to parathyroid SP-I. The largest clone (SP4B) hybridized to a transcript of 2.1 kilobases in RNA from parathyroid, pituitary, and adrenal medulla. Immunoblots of bacterial lysates derived from SP4B lysognes demonstrated specific antibody binding to an SP4B/..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein (160 kDa) with a cDNA-derived component of 46 kDa. Radioimmunoassay of the bacterial lystates with SP-I antiserum yielded parallel displacement curves of /sup 125/I-labeled SP-I by the SP4B lysate and authentic SP-I. SP4B contains a cDNA of 1614 nucleotides that encodes a 449-amino acid protein (calculated mass, 50 kDa). The nucleotide sequences of the pituitary SP-I cDNA and adrenal medullary SP-I cDNAs are nearly identical. Analysis of genomic DNA suggests that pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid SP-I are products of the same gene.

  8. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  9. Evolution of multicellular animals as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences: a possible early emergence of the Mesozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Ohama, T; Kumazaki, T; Hori, H; Osawa, S

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA from a mesozoan Dicyema misakiense and three metazoan species, i.e., an acorn-worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a moss-animal Bugula neritina, and an octopus Octopus vulgaris have been determined. A phylogenic tree of multicellular animals has been constructed from 73 5S rRNA sequences available at present including those from the above four sequences. The tree suggests that the mesozoan is the most ancient multicellular animal identified so far, its emergence time being almost the same as that of flagellated or ciliated protozoans. The branching points of planarians and nematodes are a little later than that of the mesozoan but are clearly earlier than other metazoan groups including sponges and jellyfishes. Many metazoan groups seem to have diverged within a relatively short period. PMID:6539911

  10. Evolution of multicellular animals as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences: a possible early emergence of the Mesozoa.

    PubMed

    Ohama, T; Kumazaki, T; Hori, H; Osawa, S

    1984-06-25

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA from a mesozoan Dicyema misakiense and three metazoan species, i.e., an acorn-worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a moss-animal Bugula neritina, and an octopus Octopus vulgaris have been determined. A phylogenic tree of multicellular animals has been constructed from 73 5S rRNA sequences available at present including those from the above four sequences. The tree suggests that the mesozoan is the most ancient multicellular animal identified so far, its emergence time being almost the same as that of flagellated or ciliated protozoans. The branching points of planarians and nematodes are a little later than that of the mesozoan but are clearly earlier than other metazoan groups including sponges and jellyfishes. Many metazoan groups seem to have diverged within a relatively short period.

  11. Evolution of multicellular animals as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences: a possible early emergence of the Mesozoa.

    PubMed

    Ohama, T; Kumazaki, T; Hori, H; Osawa, S

    1984-06-25

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA from a mesozoan Dicyema misakiense and three metazoan species, i.e., an acorn-worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a moss-animal Bugula neritina, and an octopus Octopus vulgaris have been determined. A phylogenic tree of multicellular animals has been constructed from 73 5S rRNA sequences available at present including those from the above four sequences. The tree suggests that the mesozoan is the most ancient multicellular animal identified so far, its emergence time being almost the same as that of flagellated or ciliated protozoans. The branching points of planarians and nematodes are a little later than that of the mesozoan but are clearly earlier than other metazoan groups including sponges and jellyfishes. Many metazoan groups seem to have diverged within a relatively short period. PMID:6539911

  12. Age of the fossil Dali Man in north-central China deduced from chronostratigraphy of the loess?paleosol sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jule; Jin, Changzhu; Zhu, Yizhi

    2002-11-01

    Dali Man, an archaic type of early Homo sapiens, is of great significance to the origin of Homo sapiens. Achievements have been made during the past decades in the understanding of the fossil human skull as well as the accompanying mammalian fossils and stone artifacts. However, the absolute age of the fossil Dali Man still remains unclear. Based on the magnetic susceptibility of loess sediments and the relationship of terracing process with climatic condition, we correlated the loess sequence and the subjacent terrace alluvium at the Dali Man site with the well-studied loess-paleosol sequence at Luochuan in the central part of the Chinese Loess Plateau. The correlation indicates that the loess-paleosol sequence at the Dali Man site extends down to the paleosol S2, and the underlying fluvial deposits correspond to the loess L3. Because the Dali Man skull appears in the basal gravel layer of the terrace, and because the deposition of the terrace gravels would occur during the transition from S3 paleosol formation to L3 loess accumulation, the age of the fossil Dali Man is inferred to be ca 270 ka, which is equivalent to the age of the boundary between the loess L3 and paleosol S3 on the magnetic susceptibility time series of the Luochuan loess-paleosol sequence.

  13. Primary structure of the T3 gamma subunit of the T3/T cell antigen receptor complex deduced from cDNA sequences: evolution of the T3 gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Krissansen, G W; Owen, M J; Verbi, W; Crumpton, M J

    1986-01-01

    cDNA clones, whose fusion proteins were recognised by an anti-(T3 gamma chain) serum, were isolated from a lambda gt11 expression library prepared from the human T leukaemia cell line J6. The clones encoded a unique sequence related to that of the T3 delta chain, and hybridised to two mRNA transcripts of 0.8 and 3.5 kb in size, whose expression was restricted to T lymphocytes. The 182 amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA revealed a typical signal peptide, a predominantly hydrophilic 89 amino residue domain with two N-glycosylation sites, a hydrophobic domain with a centrally located glutamic acid residue and a 44-residue domain with at least one potential serine phosphorylation site for protein kinase C. Given this arrangement the T3 gamma polypeptide most probably has a transmembrane orientation with the N-terminal domain exposed on the cell surface. The amino acid and nucleotide sequences showed marked homology with those of the T3 delta chain, suggesting that the respective genes arose by duplication about 200 million years ago. The intracellular and membrane-proximal half of the extracellular domains were especially well conserved. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:2944745

  14. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  15. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  16. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  17. Functional groups of sialic acids involved in binding to siglecs (sialoadhesins) deduced from interactions with synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Kelm, S; Brossmer, R; Isecke, R; Gross, H J; Strenge, K; Schauer, R

    1998-08-01

    The siglecs, formerly called sialoadhesins, are a family of I-type lectins binding to sialic acids on the cell surface. Five members of this family have been identified: sialoadhesin, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Schwann cell myelin protein (SMP), CD22 and CD33. We have investigated the relevance of substituents at position C-9 and in the N-acetyl group of N-acetylneuraminic acid, using a series of synthetic sialic-acid analogues either on resialylated human erythrocytes or as free alpha-glycosides in hapten inhibition. All five siglecs require the hydroxy group at C-9 for binding, suggesting hydrogen bonding of this substituent with the binding site. Remarkable differences were found among the proteins in their specificity for modifications of the N-acetyl group. Whereas sialoadhesin, MAG and SMP do not tolerate a hydroxy group as in N-glycolylneuraminic acid, they bind to halogenated acetyl residues. In the case of MAG, N-fluoroacetylneuraminic acid is bound about 17-fold better than N-acetylneuraminic acid. In contrast, human and murine CD22 both show good affinity for N-glycolylneuraminic acid, but only human CD22 bound the halogenated compounds. In conclusion, our data indicate that interactions of the hydroxy group at position 9 and the N-acyl substituent contribute significantly to the binding strength. PMID:9738906

  18. Amino acid sequence heterogeneity of the chromosomal encoded Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato major antigen P100.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, W; Farencena, A; Redl, B; Sambri, V; Cevenini, R; Stöffler, G

    1995-04-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the chromosomal encoded major antigen p100 of the European Borrelia garinii isolate B29 was determined and the deduced amino acid sequence was compared to the homologous antigen p83 of the North American Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31 and the p100 of the European Borrelia afzelii (group VS461) strain PKo. p100 of strain B29 shows 87% amino acid sequence identity to strain B31 and 79.2% to strain PKo, p100 of strain B31 and PKo shows 62.5% identity to each other. In addition, partial nucleotide sequences of the most heterogeneous region of the p100 gene of two other Borrelia garinii isolates (PBi and VS286) have been determined and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with all p100 of Borrelia garinii published so far. We found an amino acid sequence identity between 88.6 and 100% within the same genospecies. The N-terminal part of the p100 proteins is highly conserved whereas a striking heterogeneous region within the C-terminal part of the proteins was observed.

  19. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  20. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  1. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  2. Phylogeny of immunoglobulin heavy chain isotypes: structure of the constant region of Ambystoma mexicanum upsilon chain deduced from cDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Kerfourn, F; Wiles, M V; Schwager, J; Charlemagne, J

    1993-01-01

    An RNA polymerase chain reaction strategy was used to amplify and clone a cDNA segment encoding for the complete constant part of the axolotl IgY heavy (C upsilon) chain. C upsilon is 433 amino acids long and organized into four domains (C upsilon 1-C upsilon 4); each has the typical internal disulfide bond and invariant tryptophane residues. Axolotl C upsilon is most closely related to Xenopus C upsilon (40% identical amino acid residues) and C upsilon 1 shares 46.4% amino acid residues among these species. The presence of additional cysteines in C upsilon 1 and C upsilon 2 domains is consistent with an additional intradomain S-S bond similar to that suggested for Xenopus C upsilon and C chi, and for the avian C upsilon and the human C epsilon. C upsilon 4 ends with the Gly-Lys dipeptide characteristic of secreted mammalian C gamma 3, human C epsilon 4, and avian and anuran C upsilon 4, and contains the consensus [G/GT(AA)] nucleotide splice signal sequence for joining C upsilon 4 to the transmembrane region. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of an ancestral structural relationship between amphibian, avian upsilon chains, and mammalian epsilon chains. However, these molecules have different biological properties: axolotl IgY is secretory Ig, anuran and avian IgY behave like mammalian IgG, and mammalian IgE is implicated in anaphylactic reactions. PMID:8344718

  3. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szymański, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  4. Concept model of the formation process of humic acid-kaolin complexes deduced by trichloroethylene sorption experiments and various characterizations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaojing; He, Jiangtao; Su, Sihui; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Fei

    2016-05-01

    To explore the interactions between soil organic matter and minerals, humic acid (HA, as organic matter), kaolin (as a mineral component) and Ca(2+) (as metal ions) were used to prepare HA-kaolin and Ca-HA-kaolin complexes. These complexes were used in trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption experiments and various characterizations. Interactions between HA and kaolin during the formation of their complexes were confirmed by the obvious differences between the Qe (experimental sorbed TCE) and Qe_p (predicted sorbed TCE) values of all detected samples. The partition coefficient kd obtained for the different samples indicated that both the organic content (fom) and Ca(2+) could significantly impact the interactions. Based on experimental results and various characterizations, a concept model was developed. In the absence of Ca(2+), HA molecules first patched onto charged sites of kaolin surfaces, filling the pores. Subsequently, as the HA content increased and the first HA layer reached saturation, an outer layer of HA began to form, compressing the inner HA layer. As HA loading continued, the second layer reached saturation, such that an outer-third layer began to form, compressing the inner layers. In the presence of Ca(2+), which not only can promote kaolin self-aggregation but can also boost HA attachment to kaolin, HA molecules were first surrounded by kaolin. Subsequently, first and second layers formed (with inner layer compression) via the same process as described above in the absence of Ca(2+), except that the second layer continued to load rather than reach saturation, within the investigated conditions, because of enhanced HA aggregation caused by Ca(2+). PMID:26933902

  5. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  6. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  7. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  8. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  9. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  10. A new antifungal peptide from the seeds of Phytolacca americana: characterization, amino acid sequence and cDNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Shao, F; Hu, Z; Xiong, Y M; Huang, Q Z; WangCG; Zhu, R H; Wang, D C

    1999-03-19

    An antifungal peptide from seeds of Phytolacca americana, designated PAFP-s, has been isolated. The peptide is highly basic and consists of 38 residues with three disulfide bridges. Its molecular mass of 3929.0 was determined by mass spectrometry. The complete amino acid sequence was obtained from automated Edman degradation, and cDNA cloning was successfully performed by 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence of a partial cDNA corresponded to the amino acid sequence from chemical sequencing. PAFP-s exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity, and its activities differed among various fungi. PAFP-s displayed no inhibitory activity towards Escherichia coli. PAFP-s shows significant sequence similarities and the same cysteine motif with Mj-AMPs, antimicrobial peptides from seeds of Mirabilis jalapa belonging to the knottin-type antimicrobial peptide.

  11. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Raducha, M.; Edwards, Y.H.; Weiss, M.J.; Slaughter, C.; Lafferty, M.A.; Harris, H.

    1987-03-01

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1) was isolated from a lambdagt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed.

  12. The amino-acid sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chains of red kangaroo and Virginia opossum.

    PubMed

    De Jong, W W; Terwindt, E C

    1976-08-16

    The amino acid sequence of the A chain of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was completely determined by manual Edman degradation of tryptic, thermolytic and cyanogen bromide peptides. The sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chain from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) was deduced from amino acid analyses and partial Edman degradation of peptides. The 173-residue A chains of kangaroo and opossum differ in six positions, whereas comparison with the bovine alpha-crystallin A chain reveals 17 and 22 substitutions, respectively. Most substitutions occur in the COOH-terminal part of the chain.

  13. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  14. The properties and environment of primitive solar nebulae as deduced from observations of solar-type pre-main sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen E.; Edwards, Suzan; Strom, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: (1) current observation evidence for the presence of circumstellar disks associated with solar type pre-main sequence (PMS) stars; (2) the properties of such disks; and (3) the disk environment.

  15. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Pisum sativum. Properties, nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Mücke, U; Wohlfarth, T; Fiedler, U; Bäumlein, H; Rücknagel, K P; König, S

    1996-04-15

    To study the molecular structure and function of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) from plants the protein was isolated from pea seeds and partially characterised. The active enzyme which occurs in the form of higher oligomers consists of two different subunits appearing in SDS/PAGE and mass spectroscopy experiments. For further experiments, like X-ray crystallography, it was necessary to elucidate the protein sequence. Partial cDNA clones encoding pyruvate decarboxylase from seeds of Pisum sativum cv. Miko have been obtained by means of polymerase chain reaction techniques. The first sequences were found using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designated according to conserved amino acid sequences of known pyruvate decarboxylases. The missing parts of one cDNA were amplified applying the 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends systems. The amino acid sequence deduced from the entire cDNA sequence displays strong similarity to pyruvate decarboxylases from other organisms, especially from plants. A molecular mass of 64 kDa was calculated for this protein correlating with estimations for the smaller subunit of the oligomeric enzyme. The PCR experiments led to at least three different clones representing the middle part of the PDC cDNA indicating the existence of three isozymes. Two of these isoforms could be confirmed on the protein level by sequencing tryptic peptides. Only anaerobically treated roots showed a positive signal for PDC mRNA in Northern analysis although the cDNA from imbibed seeds was successfully used for PCR.

  16. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  17. Palaeoclimatic record in the loess-palaeosol sequence of the Strelitsa type section (Don glaciation area, Russia) deduced from rock magnetic and palynological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virina, Elena I.; Heller, Friedrich; Faustov, Stanislav S.; Bolikhovskaya, Nathalia S.; Krasnenkov, Robert V.; Gendler, Tatyana; Hailwood, Ernie A.; Hus, Jozeph

    2000-07-01

    Until now, palaeoclimatic reconstructions for the major stages in the development of the Quaternary loess-palaeosol sequence on the Russian Plain have been based on pedological, palynological and faunal (vertebrates and molluscs) analyses. In order to demonstrate the palaeoclimatic influence on the magnetic properties of this sequence, the magnetic susceptibility signature of the Strelitsa type section in the Upper Don basin is compared with a detailed landscape - climate reconstruction of loess and soil from palynological data. Large amplitude fluctuations of palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironment are reflected clearly in the lithology and in the rock magnetic properties, which usually are enhanced in wet and warm interglacial periods, but stay at low levels during cold glacial epochs. Palynological climate zonation, however, is sometimes in conflict with the pedologic-magnetic record. Strong climate fluctuations, as indicated by changing pollen assemblages, are not always paralleled by corresponding changes in lithology and/or rock magnetic properties. Alternatively, light coloured illuvial horizons with low magnetic signal sometimes appear to have formed during early stages of interglacials, and the top parts of some palaeosols apparently formed during glacial stages.

  18. Dynamic source parameters of the March-May 1969 Serdo Earthquake Sequence in central Afar, Ethiopia, deduced from teleseismic body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, Fekadu; Kim, Won-Young; KulháNek, Ota

    1989-05-01

    Long-period teleseismic P and S waveforms for the largest four earthquakes in the Serdo sequence are compared with synthetic seismograms to infer mechanisms, focal depths, source time functions, and dynamic energy release. For all four events studied, the mechanisms are predominantly strike slip. Depth estimates obtained for the four earthquakes by matching synthetic seismograms to the observations are found to lie between 5 and 8 km. The azimuthal variation of observed body wave duration for the main event indicates that the rupture propagated from NE to SW. Average seismic moments obtained from body wave synthetics vary from 4.6×1017 to 2.5×1018 N m. Average final displacements, stress drops, and lengths of the fault are found to lie between 0.16 and 0.56 m, 0.45 and 1.56 MPa, and 10 and 16 km, respectively. The low stress drop value obtained may indicate the presence of softer materials near the source. The energy release shows that the mode of energy release during the sequence took place in two steps, mainly by the two largest shocks.

  19. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  20. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  1. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of Sarcocystis neurona of horses and opossums to other cyst-forming coccidia deduced from SSU rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Lacher, David W; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of the nuclear-encoded small subunit rRNA (ssurRNA) gene were performed to examine the origin, phylogeny, and biogeographic relationships of Sarcocystis neurona isolates from opossums and horses from the State of Michigan, USA, in relation to other cyst-forming coccidia. A total of 31 taxa representing all recognized subfamilies and genera of Sarcocystidae were included in the analyses with clonal isolates of two opossum and two horse S. neurona. Phylogenies obtained by the four tree-building methods were consistent with the classical taxonomy based on morphological criteria. The "isosporid" coccidia Neospora, Toxoplasma, Besnoitia, Isospora lacking stieda bodies, and Hyaloklossia formed a sister group to the Sarcocystis spp. Sarcocystis species were divided into three main lineages; S. neurona isolates were located in the second lineage and clustered with S. mucosa, S. dispersa, S. lacertae, S. rodentifelis, S. muris, and Frenkelia spp. Alignment of S. neurona SSU rRNA gene sequences of Michigan opossum isolates (MIOP5, MIOP20) and a S. neurona Michigan horse isolate (MIH8) showed 100% identity. These Michigan isolates differed in 2/1085 bp (0.2%) from a Kentucky S. neurona horse isolate (SN5). Additionally, S. neurona isolates from horses and opossums were identical based on the ultrastructural features and PCR-RFLP analyses thus forming a phylogenetically indistinct group in these regions. These findings revealed the concordance between the morphological and molecular data and confirmed that S. neurona from opossums and horses originated from the same phylogenetic origin.

  3. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  4. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  5. deducing the sequence of deformations during chain building from the analysis of minor structures: the case of the Sicily Belt (Central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, Fabrizio; Renda, Pietro; Favara, Rocco

    2010-05-01

    the structural evolution of the Sicily chain using overprinting mesoscopic fabrics and their relationships to larger structures. The geometric differences existing between some types of structures within the belt and their overprinting relationships allow delineating the timing of deformations during chain building and post-collision tectonic history. The overall structural setting of the mountain chain reflects therefore the deformation and the progressive thrusting migration forelandwards, with extensional faulting overprinting and inverting formed thrusts. Most of the data available for this work come from detailed analysis in a few key areas, ranging along the Northern Sicily, where minor structures are overprinted to form a single sequence. Our study of outcrops throughout the region has recognised that the progression of deformation is represented by four regionally-significant structural stages (layer-parallel shortening, folding-and-thrusting, extension and renewed thrusting). The first stage of deformation includes several sub-stages (layer-parallel shortening, bed-parallel simple shear and fold nucleation). Deformation continued in a second stage, where thrusting was coupled by fold amplification and tightening. Kinematic evolution is provided by a third stage, where dominantly negative inversion of previous weakened zones and mechanical discontinuities occurred, coupled by normal faults activation. Out-of-sequence thrusting follows the chain thinning phase, as the late orogenic deformation phase of the contractional tectonics which affected Sicily. Each stage is defined as a discrete phase of deformation, characterised by the development of a characteristic set of structures, such as cleavage, folds, faults and veins. Each deformative step may be sequentially framed in a kinematic history, where a continuous shortening process, halted by an extension episode due to chain overthickening, in a tectonic setting dominated by collisional tectonics.

  6. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of complementary DNA encoding rat mammary gland medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Safford, R.; de Silva, J.; Lucas, C.; Windust, J.H.C.; Shedden, J.; James, C.M.; Sidebottom, C.M.; Slabas, A.R.; Tombs, M.P.; Hughes, S.G.

    1987-03-10

    Poly(A) + RNA from pregnant rat mammary glands was size-fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and fractions enriched in medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase (MCH) were identified by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. A cDNA library was constructed, in pBR322, from enriched poly(A) + RNA and screened with two oligonucleotide probes deduced from rat MCH amino acid sequence data. Cross-hybridizing clones were isolated and found to contain cDNA inserts ranging from approx. 1100 to 1550 base pairs (bp). A 1550-bp cDNA insert, from clone 43H09, was confirmed to encode MCH by hybrid-select translation/immunoprecipitation studies and by comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence of the clone to the amino acid sequence of the MCH peptides. Northern blot analysis revealed the size of the MCH mRNA to be 1500 nucleotides, and it is therefore concluded that the 1550-bp insert (including G x C tails) of clone 43H09 represents a full- or near-full-length copy of the MCH gene. The rat MCH sequence is the first reported sequence of a thioesterase from a mammalian source, but comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of MCH and the recently published mallard duck medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioesterase reveals significant homology. In particular, a seven amino acid sequence containing the proposed active serine of the duck thioesterase is found to be perfectly conserved in rat MCH.

  7. Primitive Extracellular Lipid Components on the Surface of the Charophytic Alga Klebsormidium flaccidum and Their Possible Biosynthetic Pathways as Deduced from the Genome Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Satoshi; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Kato, Tsubasa; Yuno-Ohta, Naoko; Nobusawa, Takashi; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Klebsormidium flaccidum is a charophytic alga living in terrestrial and semiaquatic environments. K. flaccidum grows in various habitats, such as low-temperature areas and under desiccated conditions, because of its ability to tolerate harsh environments. Wax and cuticle polymers that contribute to the cuticle layer of plants are important for the survival of land plants, as they protect against those harsh environmental conditions and were probably critical for the transition from aquatic microorganism to land plants. Bryophytes, non-vascular land plants, have similar, but simpler, extracellular waxes and polyester backbones than those of vascular plants. The presence of waxes in terrestrial algae, especially in charophytes, which are the closest algae to land plants, could provide clues in elucidating the mechanism of land colonization by plants. Here, we compared genes involved in the lipid biosynthetic pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana to the K. flaccidum and the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genomes, and identified wax-related genes in both algae. A simple and easy extraction method was developed for the recovery of the surface lipids from K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Although these algae have wax components, their surface lipids were largely different from those of land plants. We also investigated aliphatic substances in the cell wall fraction of K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Many of the fatty acids were determined to be lipophilic monomers in K. flaccidum, and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that their possible binding mode was distinct from that of A. thaliana. Thus, we propose that K. flaccidum has a cuticle-like hydrophobic layer composed of lipids and glycoproteins, with a different composition from the cutin polymer typically found in land plant cuticles. PMID:27446179

  8. Primitive Extracellular Lipid Components on the Surface of the Charophytic Alga Klebsormidium flaccidum and Their Possible Biosynthetic Pathways as Deduced from the Genome Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Satoshi; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Kato, Tsubasa; Yuno-Ohta, Naoko; Nobusawa, Takashi; Ohtaka, Kinuka; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Klebsormidium flaccidum is a charophytic alga living in terrestrial and semiaquatic environments. K. flaccidum grows in various habitats, such as low-temperature areas and under desiccated conditions, because of its ability to tolerate harsh environments. Wax and cuticle polymers that contribute to the cuticle layer of plants are important for the survival of land plants, as they protect against those harsh environmental conditions and were probably critical for the transition from aquatic microorganism to land plants. Bryophytes, non-vascular land plants, have similar, but simpler, extracellular waxes and polyester backbones than those of vascular plants. The presence of waxes in terrestrial algae, especially in charophytes, which are the closest algae to land plants, could provide clues in elucidating the mechanism of land colonization by plants. Here, we compared genes involved in the lipid biosynthetic pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana to the K. flaccidum and the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genomes, and identified wax-related genes in both algae. A simple and easy extraction method was developed for the recovery of the surface lipids from K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Although these algae have wax components, their surface lipids were largely different from those of land plants. We also investigated aliphatic substances in the cell wall fraction of K. flaccidum and C. reinhardtii. Many of the fatty acids were determined to be lipophilic monomers in K. flaccidum, and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that their possible binding mode was distinct from that of A. thaliana. Thus, we propose that K. flaccidum has a cuticle-like hydrophobic layer composed of lipids and glycoproteins, with a different composition from the cutin polymer typically found in land plant cuticles. PMID:27446179

  9. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  10. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  11. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  12. Purification to homogeneity and amino acid sequence analysis of two anionic species of human interleukin 1

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Two anionic species of human IL-1 have been purified to homogeneity. These molecules were characterized as having pI of 5.4 and 5.2 and molecular weights identical to IL-1/6.8 (17,500). The specific activities of IL-1/5.4 and IL-1/5.2, as measured in the mouse thymocyte co-mitogenic assay, were identical to that of IL-1/6.8, namely 1.2 X 10(7) U/mg, with half-maximal stimulation observed at 2 X 10(-11) M. IL- 1/5.4 and IL-1/5.2 were found to be antigenically distinct from IL- 1/6.8 in an ELISA. IL-1/5.4 was structurally distinct from IL-1/6.8 based on reverse-phase HPLC or CNBr peptides. Intact IL-1/5.2 and three intact CNBr peptides of IL-1/5.4 were sequenced, with the identification of 74 amino acid residues. These sequences were found to correspond exactly with the amino acid sequence deduced from the IL-1- alpha cDNA reported by March et al. PMID:3487613

  13. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  14. The amino acid sequence of Staphylococcus aureus penicillinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the penicillinase (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) from Staphylococcus aureus strain PC1 was determined. The protein consists of a single polypeptide chain of 257 residues, and the sequence was determined by characterization of tryptic, chymotryptic, peptic and CNBr peptides, with some additional evidence from thermolysin and S. aureus proteinase peptides. A mistake in the preliminary report of the sequence is corrected; residues 113-116 are now thought to be -Lys-Lys-Val-Lys- rather than -Lys-Val-Lys-Lys-. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50056 (91 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1218078

  15. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Blumberg, B.S.; Putnam, F.W.

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  16. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Takahashi, Y; Blumberg, B S; Putnam, F W

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO4/PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  17. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found.

  18. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  19. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  20. Thimet oligopeptidase: similarity to 'soluble angiotensin II-binding protein' and some corrections to the published amino acid sequence of the rat testis enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, N; Dando, P M; Rawlings, N D; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence of pig liver soluble angiotensin II-binding protein [Sugiura, Hagiwara and Hirose (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 18067-18072] is similar over most of its length to that reported for rat testis thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15) by Pierotti, Dong, Glucksman, Orlowski and Roberts [(1990) (Biochemistry 29, 10323-10329]. We have found that homogeneous rat testis thimet oligopeptidase binds angiotensin II with the same distinctive characteristics as the pig liver protein. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences reported for the two proteins pointed to the likelihood that sequencing errors had caused two segments of the amino acid sequence of the rat protein to be translated out of frame, and re-sequencing of selected parts of the clone (kindly provided by the previous authors) confirmed this. The revised deduced amino acid sequence of rat thimet oligopeptidase contains 687 residues, representing a protein of 78,308 Da, and is more closely related to those of the pig liver protein and other known homologues of thimet oligopeptidase than that described previously. Images Figure 1 PMID:8216239

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of evolutionary relationships of the planctomycete division of the domain bacteria based on amino acid sequences of elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C; Fuerst, J A

    2001-05-01

    Sequences from the tuf gene coding for the elongation factor EF-Tu were amplified and sequenced from the genomic DNA of Pirellula marina and Isosphaera pallida, two species of bacteria within the order Planctomycetales. A near-complete (1140-bp) sequence was obtained from Pi. marina and a partial (759-bp) sequence was obtained for I. pallida. Alignment of the deduced Pi. marina EF-Tu amino acid sequence against reference sequences demonstrated the presence of a unique 11-amino acid sequence motif not present in any other division of the domain Bacteria. Pi. marina shared the highest percentage amino acid sequence identity with I. pallida but showed only a low percentage identity with other members of the domain Bacteria. This is consistent with the concept of the planctomycetes as a unique division of the Bacteria. Neither primary sequence comparison of EF-Tu nor phylogenetic analysis supports any close relationship between planctomycetes and the chlamydiae, which has previously been postulated on the basis of 16S rRNA. Phylogenetic analysis of aligned EF-Tu amino acid sequences performed using distance, maximum-parsimony, and maximum-likelihood approaches yielded contradictory results with respect to the position of planctomycetes relative to other bacteria. It is hypothesized that long-branch attraction effects due to unequal evolutionary rates and mutational saturation effects may account for some of the contradictions. PMID:11443344

  2. Development of an expert system for amino acid sequence identification.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Saulinskas, E F; Johnson, P; Harrington, P B

    1996-08-01

    An expert system for amino acid sequence identification has been developed. The algorithm uses heuristic rules developed by human experts in protein sequencing. The system is applied to the chromatographic data of phenylthiohydantoin-amino acids acquired from an automated sequencer. The peak intensities in the current cycle are compared with those in the previous cycle, while the calibration and succeeding cycles are used as ancillary identification criteria when necessary. The retention time for each chromatographic peak in each cycle is corrected by the corresponding peak in the calibration cycle at the same run. The main improvement of our system compared with the onboard software used by the Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer is that each peak in each cycle is assigned an identification name according to the corrected retention time to be used for the comparison with different cycles. The system was developed from analyses of ribonuclease A and evaluated by runs of four other protein samples that were not used in rule development. This paper demonstrates that rules developed by human experts can be automatically applied to sequence assignment. The expert system performed more accurately than the onboard software of the protein sequencer, in that the misidentification rates for the expert system were around 7%, whereas those for the onboard software were between 13 and 21%.

  3. Degassing of Aso Volcano, Japan through an Acid Crater Lake: Differentiation of Volcanic Gas-Hydrothermal Fluids Deduced from Volcanic Plume Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Yoshikawa, S.; Miyabuchi, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Yudamari crater lake at Nakadake, Aso volcano, Japan is a hot and acid crater lake of 200-m-diameter. The active degassing occurs from a fumarolic area and through the crater lake, with SO2 emission of about 500 t/d. The fumarolic area locates at the southern wall of the crater lake shore and its activity is characterized by the high-temperature gas emission indicated by the red-glowing fumaroles. Degassing and evaporation are also intense from the crater lake surface. Since the crater lake is surrounded by steep slope, we cannot reach neither to the crater lake nor the fumarolic area for direct sampling. In order to characterize the degassing activity of these sources and evaluate differentiation process at volcanic-hydrothermal system beneath the crater lake, we conducted measurements of volcanic plumes to estimate composition of gases originating from the two gas sources; the crater lake (lake gas) and the high-temperature fumaroles (fumarolic gas) by the use of the Multi-GAS and alkaline-filter technique. Compositions of the lake gas and fumarolic gas are variable depending of the observation period, but the gases from the two sources have distinct compositions; fumarolic gases have higher CO2/SO2, HCl/SO2 and lower SO2/H2S ratio than the lake gases, but they have similar H2/CO2 ratios. The low HCl and H2S contents of the lake gases indicate the lake gases are derived by evaporation of the lake water, and their HCl/H2O ratios are consistent with this model. However, the high H2 and CO2 content in the lake gases also indicate that the lake gas is a mixture of bubbling gases and evaporation. The H2/CO2 ratio, which is less likely to be changed by dissolution into the lake water, is similar for the fumarolic gas and the lake gas, suggesting that both gases are derived from a common high-temperature fluid. The RH (=log(H2/H2O)) and SO2/H2S ratio of the fumarolic gases range from -2 to -3 and from10 to 30, respectively, corresponding to the apparent equilibrium

  4. The genome of RNA tumor viruses contains polyadenylic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Cartas, M

    1972-04-01

    The 70S genome of two RNA tumor viruses, murine sarcoma virus and avian myeloblastosis virus, binds to Millipore filters in buffer with high salt concentration and to glass fiber filters containing poly(U). These observations suggest that 70S RNA contains adenylic acid-rich sequences. When digested by pancreatic RNase, 70S RNA of murine sarcoma virus yielded poly(A) sequences that contain 91% adenylic acid. These poly(A) sequences sedimented as a relatively homogenous peak in sucrose gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 4-5 S, but had a mobility during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that corresponds to molecules that sediment at 6-7 S. If we estimate a molecular weight for each sequence of 30,000-60,000 (100-200 nucleotides) and a molecular weight for viral 70S RNA of 3-12 million, each viral genome could contain 1-8 poly(A) sequences. Possible functions of poly(A) in the infecting viral RNA may include a role in the initiation of viral DNA or RNA synthesis, in protein maturation, or in the assembly of the viral genome.

  5. Gene structure and amino acid sequence of Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth) myelin DM20: phylogenetic relation of the fish.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Y; Kasama-Yoshida, H; Sakuma, M; Kobayashi, Y; Cao, Y; Hasegawa, M; Kojima, H; Tamai, Y; Tanokura, M; Kurihara, T

    1999-07-01

    The structure of Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth) proteolipid protein/DM20 gene excluding exon 1 was determined, and the amino acid sequence of Latimeria DM20 corresponding to exons 2-7 was deduced. The nucleotide sequence of exon 3 suggests that only DM20 isoform is expressed in Latimeria. The structure of proteolipid protein/DM20 gene is well preserved among human, dog, mouse, and Latimeria. Southern blot analysis indicates that Latimeria DM20 gene is a single-copy gene. When the amino acid sequences of DM20 were compared among various species, Latimeria was more similar to tetrapods than other fishes including lungfish, confirming the previous finding by immunoreactivity (Waehneldt and Malotka 1989 J. Neurochem. 52:1941-1943). However, when phylogenetic trees were constructed from the DM20 sequences, lungfish was clearly the closest to tetrapods. Latimeria was situated outside of lungfish by the maximum likelihood method. The apparent similarity of Latimeria DM20 to tetrapod proteolipid protein/DM20 is explained by the slow amino acid substitution rate of Latimeria DM20.

  6. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  7. Nucleic acid sequence design via efficient ensemble defect optimization.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Joseph N; Wolfe, Brian R; Pierce, Niles A

    2011-02-01

    We describe an algorithm for designing the sequence of one or more interacting nucleic acid strands intended to adopt a target secondary structure at equilibrium. Sequence design is formulated as an optimization problem with the goal of reducing the ensemble defect below a user-specified stop condition. For a candidate sequence and a given target secondary structure, the ensemble defect is the average number of incorrectly paired nucleotides at equilibrium evaluated over the ensemble of unpseudoknotted secondary structures. To reduce the computational cost of accepting or rejecting mutations to a random initial sequence, candidate mutations are evaluated on the leaf nodes of a tree-decomposition of the target structure. During leaf optimization, defect-weighted mutation sampling is used to select each candidate mutation position with probability proportional to its contribution to the ensemble defect of the leaf. As subsequences are merged moving up the tree, emergent structural defects resulting from crosstalk between sibling sequences are eliminated via reoptimization within the defective subtree starting from new random subsequences. Using a Θ(N(3) ) dynamic program to evaluate the ensemble defect of a target structure with N nucleotides, this hierarchical approach implies an asymptotic optimality bound on design time: for sufficiently large N, the cost of sequence design is bounded below by 4/3 the cost of a single evaluation of the ensemble defect for the full sequence. Hence, the design algorithm has time complexity Ω(N(3) ). For target structures containing N ∈{100,200,400,800,1600,3200} nucleotides and duplex stems ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, RNA sequence designs at 37°C typically succeed in satisfying a stop condition with ensemble defect less than N/100. Empirically, the sequence design algorithm exhibits asymptotic optimality and the exponent in the time complexity bound is sharp.

  8. On combining protein sequences and nucleic acid sequences in phylogenetic analysis: the homeobox protein case.

    PubMed

    Agosti, D; Jacobs, D; DeSalle, R

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid encoding genes contain character state information that may be useful for phylogenetic analysis on at least two levels. The nucleotide sequence and the translated amino acid sequences have both been employed separately as character states for cladistic studies of various taxa, including studies of the genealogy of genes in multigene families. In essence, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences are two different ways of character coding the information in a gene. Silent positions in the nucleotide sequence (first or third positions in codons that can accrue change without changing the identity of the amino acid that the triplet codes for) may accrue change relatively rapidly and become saturated, losing the pattern of historical divergence. On the other hand, non-silent nucleotide alterations and their accompanying amino acid changes may evolve too slowly to reveal relationships among closely related taxa. In general, the dynamics of sequence change in silent and non-silent positions in protein coding genes result in homoplasy and lack of resolution, respectively. We suggest that the combination of nucleic acid and the translated amino acid coded character states into the same data matrix for phylogenetic analysis addresses some of the problems caused by the rapid change of silent nucleotide positions and overall slow rate of change of non-silent nucleotide positions and slowly changing amino acid positions. One major theoretical problem with this approach is the apparent non-independence of the two sources of characters. However, there are at least three possible outcomes when comparing protein coding nucleic acid sequences with their translated amino acids in a phylogenetic context on a codon by codon basis. First, the two character sets for a codon may be entirely congruent with respect to the information they convey about the relationships of a certain set of taxa. Second, one character set may display no information concerning a phylogenetic

  9. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  10. Amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta chains of adult hemoglobin of the slender loris, Loris tardigradus.

    PubMed

    Maita, T; Goodman, M; Matsuda, G

    1978-08-01

    alpha and beta chains from adult hemoglobin of the slender loris (Loris tardigradus) were isolated by Amberlite CG-50 column chromatography. After S-aminoethylation, both chains were digested with trypsin and the amino acid sequences of the tryptic peptides obtained were analyzed. Further, the order of these tryptic peptides in each chain was deduced from their homology with the primary structures of alpha and beta chains of human adult hemoglobin. Comparing the primary structures of the alpha and beta chains of adult hemoglobin of the slender loris thus obtained with those of adult hemoglobin of the slow loris, 4 amino acid substitutions in the alpha chains and 2 in the beta chains were recognized.

  11. The amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli cyanase.

    PubMed

    Chin, C C; Anderson, P M; Wold, F

    1983-01-10

    The amino acid sequence of the enzyme cyanase (cyanate hydrolase) from Escherichia coli has been determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact protein and of its component peptides. The primary peptides used in the sequencing were produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage at the methionine residues, yielding 4 peptides plus free homoserine from the NH2-terminal methionine, and by trypsin cleavage at the 7 arginine residues after acetylation of the lysines. Secondary peptides required for overlaps and COOH-terminal sequences were produced by chymotrypsin or clostripain cleavage of some of the larger peptides. The complete sequence of the cyanase subunit consists of 156 amino acid residues (Mr 16,350). Based on the observation that the cysteine-containing peptide is obtained as a disulfide-linked dimer, it is proposed that the covalent structure of cyanase is made up of two subunits linked by a disulfide bond between the single cystine residue in each subunit. The native enzyme (Mr 150,000) then appears to be a complex of four or five such subunit dimers.

  12. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  13. Amino acid sequence and domain structure of entactin. Homology with epidermal growth factor precursor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Entactin (nidogen), a 150-kD sulfated glycoprotein, is a major component of basement membranes and forms a highly stable noncovalent complex with laminin. The complete amino acid sequence of mouse entactin has been derived from sequencing of cDNA clones. The 5.9-kb cDNA contains a 3,735-bp open reading frame followed by a 3'- untranslated region of 2.2 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 1,245- residue polypeptide with an unglycosylated Mr of 136,500, a 28-residue signal peptide, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and two potential Ca2+-binding sites. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicts that the molecule consists of two globular domains of 70 and 36 kD separated by a cysteine-rich domain of 28 kD. The COOH-terminal globular domain shows homology to the EGF precursor and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Entactin contains six EGF-type cysteine-rich repeat units and one copy of a cysteine-repeat motif found in thyroglobulin. The Arg-Gly-Asp cell recognition sequence is present in one of the EGF-type repeats, and a synthetic peptide from the putative cell-binding site of entactin was found to promote the attachment of mouse mammary tumor cells. PMID:3264556

  14. Bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase: complete amino acid sequence and localization of phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, J; Uyeda, K

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (EC 2.7.1.105/3.1.3.46) is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C; phosphorylation results in activation of kinase. This activation of heart enzyme is in contrast to results with the liver isozyme, in which phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the kinase activity. As an initial step toward understanding this difference between the isozymes we have determined the DNA sequence of the heart enzyme and analyzed the amino acid sequence with special emphasis on the location of the phosphorylation site. We isolated and sequenced two overlapping cDNA fragments, which together could encode the complete amino acid sequence of bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, a protein of 530 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 60,679. Since the deduced protein contained amino acid sequences identical to the sequences of four known tryptic peptides from this enzyme we concluded that the deduced protein sequence did represent bovine heart enzyme. In addition, a cDNA fragment hybridized to a 4-kilobase mRNA from bovine heart. The phosphorylation sites of the heart enzyme were located near the C terminus, whereas the phosphorylation site of the liver isozyme is known to be located near the N terminus. These opposite locations of the phosphorylation sites may explain the contrasting effect of the covalent modification on the enzymes' activities. Images PMID:2164212

  15. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of a novel 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid acylase gene of Bacillus laterosporus and its expression in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Aramori, I; Fukagawa, M; Tsumura, M; Iwami, M; Ono, H; Kojo, H; Kohsaka, M; Ueda, Y; Imanaka, H

    1991-12-01

    A strain of Bacillus species which produced an enzyme named glutaryl 7-ACA acylase which converts 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid (glutaryl 7-ACA) to 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) was isolated from soil. The gene for the glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was cloned with pHSG298 in Escherichia coli JM109, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the M13 dideoxy chain termination method. The DNA sequence revealed only one large open reading frame composed of 1,902 bp corresponding to 634 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a potential signal sequence in its amino-terminal region. Expression of the gene for glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was performed in both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme preparations purified from either recombinant strain of E. coli or B. subtilis were shown to be identical with each other as regards the profile of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were composed of a single peptide with the molecular size of 70 kDa. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the two enzyme preparations revealed that both amino-terminal sequences (the first nine amino acids) were identical and completely coincided with residues 28 to 36 of the open reading frame. Extracellular excretion of the enzyme was observed in a recombinant strain of B. subtilis. PMID:1744041

  16. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  17. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  18. The thermostability of two kinds of recombinant ∆6-fatty acid desaturase with different N-terminal sequence lengths in low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, He; Zhu, Yu

    2013-09-01

    Two recombinant Rhizopus stolonifer ∆6-fatty acid desaturase enzymes with different-length N-termini were cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain INVScl: LRsD6D begins with the sequence of the N-terminal of the R. stolonifer ∆6-fatty acid desaturase native, encoding a deduced polypeptide of 459 amino acids (M-S-T-L-D-R-Q-S-I-F-T-I-K-E-L-E-S-I-S-Q-R-I-H-D-G-D-E-E-A-M-K-F), whereas SRsD6D begins with the amino acid sequence of the predicted ORF, encoding a deduced polypeptide of 430 amino acids (M-K-F) and LRsD6D is longer than SRsD6D by 29 amino acids (M-S-T-L-D-R-Q-S-I-F-T-I-K-E-L-E-S-I-S-Q-R-I-H-D-G-D-E-E-A). Bioinformatic analysis characterized the two recombinant ∆6-fatty acid desaturase enzymes with different-length N-termini, including three conserved histidine-rich motifs, hydropathy profile, and a cytochrome b5-like domain in the N-terminus. When the coding sequence was expressed in S. cerevisiae strain INVScl, the coding produced ∆6-fatty acid desaturase activity exhibited by RsD6D, leading to a novel peak corresponding to γ-linolenic acid methyl ester standards, which was detected with the same retention time. The residual activity of LRsD6D was 74 % at 15 °C for 4 h and that of SRsD6D was 43 %. Purified recombinant LRsD6D was more stable than SRsD6D, indicating that the N-terminal extension, containing mostly hydrophobic residues, affected the overall stability of recombinant LRsD6D.

  19. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit of human leukocyte adhesion receptor Mo1 (complement receptor type 3)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Mo1 (complement receptor type 3, CR3; CD11b/CD18) is an adhesion- promoting human leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer (alpha subunit 155 kD [CD11b] noncovalently linked to a beta subunit of 95 kD [CD18]). The complete amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA of the human alpha subunit is reported. The protein consists of 1,136 amino acids with a long amino-terminal extracytoplasmic domain, a 26-amino acid hydrophobic transmembrane segment, and a 19-carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The extracytoplasmic region has three putative Ca2+- binding domains with good homology and one with weak homology to the "lock washer" Ca2+-binding consensus sequence. These metal-binding domains explain the divalent cation-dependent functions mediated by Mo1. The alpha subunit is highly homologous to the alpha subunit of leukocyte p150,95 and to a lesser extent, to the alpha subunit of other "integrin" receptors such as fibronectin, vitronectin, and platelet IIb/IIIa receptors in humans and position-specific antigen-2 (PS2) in Drosophila. Mo1 alpha, like p150, contains a unique 187-amino acid stretch NH2-terminal to the metal-binding domains. This region could be involved in some of the specific functions mediated by these leukocyte glycoproteins. PMID:2454931

  20. New approaches for computer analysis of nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Ghandour, G; Ost, F; Tavare, S; Korn, L J

    1983-09-01

    A new high-speed computer algorithm is outlined that ascertains within and between nucleic acid and protein sequences all direct repeats, dyad symmetries, and other structural relationships. Large repeats, repeats of high frequency, dyad symmetries of specified stem length and loop distance, and their distributions are determined. Significance of homologies is assessed by a hierarchy of permutation procedures. Applications are made to papovaviruses, the human papillomavirus HPV, lambda phage, the human and mouse mitochondrial genomes, and the human and mouse immunoglobulin kappa-chain genes. PMID:6577449

  1. Cloning, DNA sequencing and heterologous expression of the gene for thermostable N-acylamino acid racemase from Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, S; Hatano, K

    1995-03-01

    The gene encoding the novel enzyme N-acylamino acid racemase (AAR) was cloned in recombinant phage lambda-4 from the DNA library of Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60, a rare actinomycete, using antiserum against the enzyme. The cloned gene was subcloned and transformed in Escherichia coli JM105 using pUC118 as a vector. The AAR gene consists of an open-reading frame of 1104 nucleotides, which specifies a 368-amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 39411Da. The molecular mass deduced from the AAR gene is in good agreement with the subunit molecular mass (40kDa) of AAR from Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60. The guanosine plus cytosine content of the AAR gene was about 70%. Although the AAR gene uses the unusual initiation codon GTG, the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli using the lac promoter of pUC118. The amount of the enzyme produced by the transformant was 16 times that produced by Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60. When the unusual initiation codon GTG was changed to ATG, the enzyme productivity of the transformant increased to more than 37 times that of Amycolatopsis sp. TS-1-60. In the comparison of the DNA sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of AAR with those of known racemases and epimerases in data bases, no significant sequence homology was found. However, AAR resembles mandelate racemase in that requires metal ions for enzyme activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  3. Bovine thrombospondin-2: complete complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequence and immunolocalization in the external zones of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Danik, M; Chinn, A M; Lafeuillade, B; Keramidas, M; Aguesse-Germon, S; Penhoat, A; Chen, H; Mosher, D F; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1999-06-01

    Given the variety of biological functions in the adrenal cortex that are controlled by ACTH, we hypothesized that some extracellular proteins act as biological relays for this systemic hormone. One candidate protein [corticotropin-induced secreted protein (CISP)] was purified from the conditioned medium of bovine adrenocortical cells on the basis of a 5- to 14-fold increase in its synthesis after the addition of ACTH. We report here the cloning of overlapping complementary DNAs that span the sequence encoding the full-length protein (1170 amino acids). The deduced CISP protein sequence is 89% identical to that of human thrombospondin-2 (TSP2), but only 61% identical to that of bovine TSP1, confirming that CISP is the bovine ortholog of TSP2. The bovine TSP2 sequence aligned perfectly with human, mouse, and chicken TSP2 sequences, except for a gap of 2 amino acids located in a linker region. All 58 cysteine residues that are conserved in other species were present in the bovine sequence as well as most of the functional domains. Most endocrine tissues (adrenal cortex, testis, ovary, and placenta) appeared to express TSP2, as determined by Western blot analysis. The highest levels of TSP2 protein were found in the adrenal cortex, followed by the heart, spleen, brain, and kidney. A differential extent of N-glycosylation or tissular proteolytic maturation may be responsible for the mol wt differences observed between bovine TSP2 detected in the medium from primary cultures and that in fresh tissue extracts. The immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of TSP2 in the bovine adrenal gland revealed that the protein is much more abundant in the external zones (zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata) than in the internal reticularis zone, a pattern similar to that reported for ACTH receptors. This distribution clearly suggests that TSP2 is a candidate relay protein for a subset of ACTH actions in the adrenal cortex. PMID:10342868

  4. Heterogeneity of amino acid sequence in hippopotamus cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Borden, D; Tarr, G E; Margoliash, E

    1978-12-25

    The amino acid sequences of chymotryptic and tryptic peptides of Hippopotamus amphibius cytochrome c were determined by a recent modification of the manual Edman sequential degradation procedure. They were ordered by comparison with the structure of the hog protein. The hippopotamus protein differs in three positions: serine, alanine, and glutamine replace alanine, glutamic acid, and lysine in positions 43, 92, and 100, respectively. Since the artiodactyl suborders diverged in the mid-Eocene some 50 million years ago, the fact that representatives of some of them show no differences in their cytochromes c (cow, sheep, and hog), while another exhibits as many as three such differences, verifies that even in relatively closely related lines of descent the rate at which cytochrome c changes in the course of evolution is not constant. Furthermore, 10.6% of the hippopotamus cytochrome c preparation was shown to contain isoleucine instead of valine at position 3, indicating that one of the four animals from which the protein was obtained was heterozygous in the cytochrome c gene. Such heterogeneity is a necessary condition of evolutionary variation and has not been previously observed in the cytochrome c of a wild mammalian population.

  5. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  6. Sequence analysis of four acidic beta-crystallin subunits of amphibian lenses: phylogenetic comparison between beta- and gamma-crystallins.

    PubMed

    Lu, S F; Pan, F M; Chiou, S H

    1996-04-16

    beta-Crystallins composed of the most heterogeneous group of subunit chains among the three major crystallin families of vertebrates, i.e. alpha-, beta- and gamma-crystallins, are less well understood at the structural and functional levels than the other two. They comprise a multigene family with at least three basic (betaB1-3) and four acidic (betaA1-4) subunit polypeptides. In order to facilitate the determination of the primary sequences of all these ubiquitous crystallin subunits present in all vertebrate species, cDNA mixture was synthesized from the poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from bullfrog eye lenses. We report here a protocol of Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was used to amplify cDNAs encoding beta-crystallin acidic subunit polypeptides by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Four complete full-length reading frames with two each of 597 and 648 base pairs, which cover four deduced protein sequences of 198 (betaA1-1 and betaA1-2) and 215 (betaA3-1 and betaA3-2) amino acids including the universal initiating methionine, were revealed by nucleotide sequencing. They show about 96-98% sequence similarity among themselves and 76-80%, 80-83% to the homologous betaA1/A3 crystallins of bovine and human species respectively, revealing the close structural relationship among acidic subunits of all beta-crystallins even from remotely related species. In this study a phylogenetic comparison based on amino-acid sequences of various betaA1/A3 crystallins plus the major basic beta-crystallin (betaBp) and gamma-crystallin from different vertebrate species is made using a combination of distance matrix and approximate parsimony methods, which correctly groups these betaA crystallin chains together as one family distinct from basic beta-crystallins and gamma-crystallin and further corroborates the supposition that beta- and gamma-crystallins form a superfamily with a common ancestry.

  7. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  8. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  9. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  10. Nucleotide sequence of SHV-2 beta-lactamase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Garbarg-Chenon, A.; Godard, V.; Labia, R.; Nicolas, J.C. )

    1990-07-01

    The nucleotide sequence of plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase SHV-2 from Salmonella typhimurium (SHV-2pHT1) was determined. The gene was very similar to chromosomally encoded beta-lactamase LEN-1 of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Compared with the sequence of the Escherichia coli SHV-2 enzyme (SHV-2E.coli) obtained by protein sequencing, the deduced amino acid sequence of SHV-2pHT1 differed by three amino acid substitutions.

  11. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones.

  12. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  13. GC base sequence recognition by oligo(imidazolecarboxamide) and C-terminus-modified analogues of distamycin deduced from circular dichroism, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and methidiumpropylethylenediaminetetraacetate-iron(II) footprinting studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Rhodes, A L; Wyatt, M D; Forrow, S; Hartley, J A

    1993-04-27

    The DNA binding properties of a series of imidazole-containing and C-terminus-modified analogues 4-7 of distamycin are described. These analogues contain one to four imidazole units, respectively. Data from the ethidium displacement assay showed that these compounds bind in the minor groove of DNA, with the relative order of binding constants of 6 (Im3) > 7 (Im4) > 5 (Im2) > 4 (Im1). The reduced binding constants of these compounds for poly(dA-dT) relative to distamycin, while they still interact strongly with poly(dG-dC), provided evidence of GC sequence acceptance. The preferences for GC-rich sequences by these compounds were established from a combination of circular dichroism (CD) titration, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), and methidiumpropylethylenediaminetetraacetate-iron(II) [MPE.Fe-(II)] footprinting studies. In the CD studies, these compounds produced significantly larger DNA-induced ligand bands with poly(dG-dC) than poly(dA-dT) at comparable ligand concentrations. 1H-NMR studies of the binding of 5 to d-[CATGGCCATG]2 provided further evidence of the recognition of GC sequences by these compounds, and suggested that the ligand was located on the underlined sequence in the minor groove with the C-terminus oriented over the T residue. MPE footprinting studies on a GC-rich BamHI/SalI fragment of pBR322 provided unambiguous evidence for the GC sequence selectivity for some of these compounds. Compounds 4 and 7 produced poor footprints on the gels; however, analogues 5 and 6 gave strong footprints.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Conserved TAAATG sequence at the transcriptional and translational initiation sites of vaccinia virus late genes deduced by structural and functional analysis of the HindIII H genome fragment.

    PubMed

    Rosel, J L; Earl, P L; Weir, J P; Moss, B

    1986-11-01

    The sequence of the 8,600-base-pair HindIII H fragment, located at the center of the vaccinia virus genome, was determined to analyze several late genes. Seven major complete open reading frames (ORFs) and two that started from or continued into adjacent DNA segments were identified. ORFs were closely spaced and present on both DNA strands. Some adjacent ORFs had oppositely oriented overlapping termination codons or contiguous stop and start codons. Nucleotide compositional analysis indicated that the A-T frequency was consistently lowest in the first codon position. The sizes of the polypeptides predicted from the DNA sequence were compared with those determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cell-free translation products of mRNAs selected by hybridization to cloned single-stranded DNA segments or synthesized in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Six transcripts that initiated within the HindIII H DNA fragment were detected, and of these, four were synthesized only at late times, one was synthesized only early, and one was synthesized early and late. The sites on the genome corresponding to the 5' ends of the transcripts were located by high-resolution nuclease S1 analysis. For late genes, the transcriptional and translational initiation sites mapped within a few nucleotides of each other, and in each case the sequence TAAATGG occurred at the start of the ORF. The extremely short leader and the absence of A or G in the -3 position, relative to the first nucleotide of the initiation codon, distinguishes the majority of vaccinia virus late genes from eucaryotic and vaccinia virus early genes.

  15. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  16. Amino acid sequence of horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle troponin C.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kagami, O; Takagi, T; Konishi, K

    1989-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of troponin C obtained from horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle was determined by sequence analysis and alignments of chemically and enzymatically cleaved peptides. Troponin C is composed of 153 amino acid residues with a blocked N-terminus and contains no tryptophan or cysteine residue. The site I, one of the four Ca2+-binding sites, is considered to have lost its ability to bind Ca2+ owing to the replacements of certain amino acid residues.

  17. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor. PMID:24338313

  18. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor.

  19. tax and rex Sequences of bovine leukaemia virus from globally diverse isolates: rex amino acid sequence more variable than tax.

    PubMed

    McGirr, K M; Buehring, G C

    2005-02-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is an important agricultural problem with high costs to the dairy industry. Here, we examine the variation of the tax and rex genes of BLV. The tax and rex genes share 420 bases and have overlapping reading frames. The tax gene encodes a protein that functions as a transactivator of the BLV promoter, is required for viral replication, acts on cellular promoters, and is responsible for oncogenesis. The rex facilitates the export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus and regulates transcription. We have sequenced five new isolates of the tax/rex gene. We examined the five new and three previously published tax/rex DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of BLV isolates from cattle in representative regions worldwide. The highest variation among nucleic acid sequences for tax and rex was 7% and 5%, respectively; among predicted amino acid sequences for Tax and Rex, 9% and 11%, respectively. Significantly more nucleotide changes resulted in predicted amino acid changes in the rex gene than in the tax gene (P < or = 0.0006). This variability is higher than previously reported for any region of the viral genome. This research may also have implications for the development of Tax-based vaccines. PMID:15702995

  20. A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes hlyA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, B W; Turner, G; Sooknanan, R; Malek, L T

    1997-01-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system primarily targeting mRNA from the Listeria monocytogenes hlyA gene was developed. This system enabled the detection of low numbers (< 10 CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes cells inoculated into a variety of dairy and egg products after 48 h of enrichment in modified listeria enrichment broth. PMID:8979357

  1. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  2. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  3. The amino acid sequence of elephant (Elephas maximus) myoglobin and the phylogeny of Proboscidea.

    PubMed

    Dene, H; Goodman, M; Romero-Herrera, A E

    1980-02-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of skeletal myoglobin from the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is reported. The functional significance of variations seen when this sequence is compared with that of sperm whale myoglobin is explored in the light of the crystallographic model available for the latter molecule. The phylogenetic implications of the elephant myoglobin amino acid sequence are evaluated by using the maximum parsimony technique. A similar analysis is also presented which incorporates all of the proteins sequenced from the elephant. These results are discussed with respect to current views on proboscidean phylogeny.

  4. Listeriolysin genes: complete sequence of ilo from Listeria ivanovii and of lso from Listeria seeligeri.

    PubMed

    Haas, A; Dumbsky, M; Kreft, J

    1992-02-28

    The complete DNA sequences coding for the thiol-activated cytolysins from Listeria ivanovii, ivanolysin O (ILO) and for seeligerolysin O (LSO) from Listeria seeligeri have been determined. The deduced amino acid sequences revealed that: (i) the primary translation products comprise 528 (ILO) and 530 (LSO) amino acids, respectively, (ii) ILO contains two cysteines, LSO has a substitution in the conserved cysteine motif.

  5. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  6. Evolution of an Enzyme from a Noncatalytic Nucleic Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gysbers, Rachel; Tram, Kha; Gu, Jimmy; Li, Yingfu

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which enzymes arose from both abiotic and biological worlds remains an unsolved natural mystery. We postulate that an enzyme can emerge from any sequence of any functional polymer under permissive evolutionary conditions. To support this premise, we have arbitrarily chosen a 50-nucleotide DNA fragment encoding for the Bos taurus (cattle) albumin mRNA and subjected it to test-tube evolution to derive a catalytic DNA (DNAzyme) with RNA-cleavage activity. After only a few weeks, a DNAzyme with significant catalytic activity has surfaced. Sequence comparison reveals that seven nucleotides are responsible for the conversion of the noncatalytic sequence into the enzyme. Deep sequencing analysis of DNA pools along the evolution trajectory has identified individual mutations as the progressive drivers of the molecular evolution. Our findings demonstrate that an enzyme can indeed arise from a sequence of a functional polymer via permissive molecular evolution, a mechanism that may have been exploited by nature for the creation of the enormous repertoire of enzymes in the biological world today. PMID:26091540

  7. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  8. Structural features of cartilage matrix protein deduced from cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Argraves, W S; Deák, F; Sparks, K J; Kiss, I; Goetinck, P F

    1987-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the Mr 54,000 chicken cartilage matrix protein (CMP) were selected from a cartilage cDNA expression library by immunological means. Antibodies elicited against insert-encoded protein purified from one of the clones reacted specifically with chicken CMP in immunoblots of total cartilage extract, providing positive identification of the cDNA clones isolated. The cDNAs detect a 3.4-kilobase transcript that was present in sternal cartilage and in cartilaginous but not in precartilaginous embryonic limb tissues. The cDNAs code for 416 amino acids of the chicken CMP, including its COOH terminus. There are two striking features in the deduced CMP amino acid sequence: first, it contains a region with significant homologies to repeat sequences in the precursor for epidermal growth factor; and second, it is made up of two large homologous repeat sequences. These results provide the first detailed structural information on the CMP and establish it as a developmentally regulated marker of cartilage differentiation. Images PMID:3025875

  9. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  10. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  11. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  12. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  13. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  14. Primary structure of human corticosteroid binding globulin, deduced from hepatic and pulmonary cDNAs, exhibits homology with serine protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, G.L.; Smith, C.L.; Goping, I.S.; Underhill, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced cDNAs for corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) prepared from human liver and lung mRNAs. The results indicate that CBG mRNA is relatively abundant in the liver but is also present in the lung, testis, and kidney. The liver CBG cDNA contains an open reading frame for a 405-amino acid (M/sub r/ 45,149) polypeptide. This includes a predominantly hydrophobic, leader sequence of 22 residues that precedes the known NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence of human CBG. We, therefore, predict that the mature protein is composed of 383 amino acids and is a polypeptide of M/sub r/ 42,646. A second, in-frame, 72-base-pair cistron of unknown significance exists between the TAA termination codon for CBG and a possible polyadenylylation signal (AATAAA) located 16 nucleotides before the polyadenylylation site. The deduced amino acid sequence of mature CBG contains two cysteine residues and consensus sequences for the attachment of six possible N-linked oligosaccharide chains. The sequences of the human lung and liver CBG cDNAs differ by only one nucleotide within the proposed leader sequence,and they attribute this to a point mutation. No sequence homology was found between CBG and other steroid binding proteins, but there is a remarkable similarity between the amino acid sequences of CBG and of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, and this extends to other members of the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) superfamily

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  19. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  20. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  1. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  2. Amino acid sequence of a new mitochondrially synthesized proteolipid of the ATP synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Velours, J; Esparza, M; Hoppe, J; Sebald, W; Guerin, B

    1984-01-01

    The purification and the amino acid sequence of a proteolipid translated on ribosomes in yeast mitochondria is reported. This protein, which is a subunit of the ATP synthase, was purified by extraction with chloroform/methanol (2/1) and subsequent chromatography on phosphocellulose and reverse phase h.p.l.c. A mol. wt. of 5500 was estimated by chromatography on Bio-Gel P-30 in 80% formic acid. The complete amino acid sequence of this protein was determined by automated solid phase Edman degradation of the whole protein and of fragments obtained after cleavage with cyanogen bromide. The sequence analysis indicates a length of 48 amino acid residues. The calculated mol. wt. of 5870 corresponds to the value found by gel chromatography. This polypeptide contains three basic residues and no negatively charged side chain. The three basic residues are clustered at the C terminus. The primary structure of this protein is in full agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the putative polypeptide encoded by the mitochondrial aap1 gene recently discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, this protein shows 50% homology with the amino acid sequence of a putative polypeptide encoded by an unidentified reading frame also discovered near the mitochondrial ATPase subunit 6 gene in Aspergillus nidulans. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6323165

  3. TranslatorX: multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences guided by amino acid translations.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Zardoya, Rafael; Telford, Maximilian J

    2010-07-01

    We present TranslatorX, a web server designed to align protein-coding nucleotide sequences based on their corresponding amino acid translations. Many comparisons between biological sequences (nucleic acids and proteins) involve the construction of multiple alignments. Alignments represent a statement regarding the homology between individual nucleotides or amino acids within homologous genes. As protein-coding DNA sequences evolve as triplets of nucleotides (codons) and it is known that sequence similarity degrades more rapidly at the DNA than at the amino acid level, alignments are generally more accurate when based on amino acids than on their corresponding nucleotides. TranslatorX novelties include: (i) use of all documented genetic codes and the possibility of assigning different genetic codes for each sequence; (ii) a battery of different multiple alignment programs; (iii) translation of ambiguous codons when possible; (iv) an innovative criterion to clean nucleotide alignments with GBlocks based on protein information; and (v) a rich output, including Jalview-powered graphical visualization of the alignments, codon-based alignments coloured according to the corresponding amino acids, measures of compositional bias and first, second and third codon position specific alignments. The TranslatorX server is freely available at http://translatorx.co.uk.

  4. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  5. Homology of amino acid sequences of rat liver cathepsins B and H with that of papain.

    PubMed Central

    Takio, K; Towatari, T; Katunuma, N; Teller, D C; Titani, K

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of rat liver lysosomal thiol endopeptidases, cathepsins B and H, are presented and compared with that of the plant thiol protease papain. The 252-residue sequence of cathepsin B and the 220-residue sequence of cathepsin H were determined largely by automated Edman degradation of their intact polypeptide chains and of the two chains of each enzyme generated by limited proteolysis. Subfragments of the chains were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl and tryptophanyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of cathepsins B and H with each other and with that of papain demonstrates a striking homology among their primary structures. Sequence identity is extremely high in regions which, according to the three-dimensional structure of papain, constitute the catalytic site. The results not only reveal the first structural features of mammalian thiol endopeptidases but also provide insight into the evolutionary relationships among plant and mammalian thiol proteases. PMID:6574504

  6. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  7. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  8. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  9. The amino acid sequence of mitogenic lectin-B from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yurino, N; Kino, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1997-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-B (PL-B) has been analyzed by first sequencing seven lysylendopeptidase peptides derived from the reduced and S-pyridylethylated PL-B and then connecting them by analyzing the arginylendopeptidase peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated PL-B. PL-B consists of 295 amino acid residues and two oligosaccharides linked to Asn96 and Asn139, and has a molecular mass of 34,493 Da. PL-B is composed of seven repetitive chitin-binding domains having 48-79% sequence homology with each other. Twelve amino acid residues including eight cysteine residues in these domains are absolutely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains of plant lectins and class I chitinases. Also, it was strongly suggested that the extremely high hemagglutinating and mitogenic activities of PL-B may be ascribed to its seven-domain structure.

  10. ConSurf 2010: calculating evolutionary conservation in sequence and structure of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Erez, Elana; Martz, Eric; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2010-07-01

    It is informative to detect highly conserved positions in proteins and nucleic acid sequence/structure since they are often indicative of structural and/or functional importance. ConSurf (http://consurf.tau.ac.il) and ConSeq (http://conseq.tau.ac.il) are two well-established web servers for calculating the evolutionary conservation of amino acid positions in proteins using an empirical Bayesian inference, starting from protein structure and sequence, respectively. Here, we present the new version of the ConSurf web server that combines the two independent servers, providing an easier and more intuitive step-by-step interface, while offering the user more flexibility during the process. In addition, the new version of ConSurf calculates the evolutionary rates for nucleic acid sequences. The new version is freely available at: http://consurf.tau.ac.il/.

  11. Amino acid repeats cause extraordinary coding sequence variation in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Scala, Clea; Tian, Xiangjun; Mehdiabadi, Natasha J; Smith, Margaret H; Saxer, Gerda; Stephens, Katie; Buzombo, Prince; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Protein sequences are normally the most conserved elements of genomes owing to purifying selection to maintain their functions. We document an extraordinary amount of within-species protein sequence variation in the model eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum stemming from triplet DNA repeats coding for long strings of single amino acids. D. discoideum has a very large number of such strings, many of which are polyglutamine repeats, the same sequence that causes various human neurological disorders in humans, like Huntington's disease. We show here that D. discoideum coding repeat loci are highly variable among individuals, making D. discoideum a candidate for the most variable proteome. The coding repeat loci are not significantly less variable than similar non-coding triplet repeats. This pattern is consistent with these amino-acid repeats being largely non-functional sequences evolving primarily by mutation and drift. PMID:23029418

  12. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  13. Shark myoglobins. II. Isolation, characterization and amino acid sequence of myoglobin from Galeorhinus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Suzuki, T; Yata, T

    1985-01-01

    Native oxymyoglobin (MbO2) was isolated from red muscle of G. japonicus by chromatographic separation from metmyoglobin (metMb) on DEAE-cellulose and the amino acid sequence of the major chain was determined with the aid of sequence homology with that of G. australis. It was shown to differ in amino acid sequence from that of G. australis by 10 replacements, to be acetylated at the amino terminus and to contain glutamine at the distal (E7) residue. It was also shown to have a spectrum very similar to that of mammalian MbO2. However, the pH-dependence for the autoxidation of MbO2 was seen to be quite different from that of sperm whale (Physeter catodon) MbO2. Although the sequence homology between sperm whale and G. japonicus myoglobins is about 40%, their hydropathy profiles were very similar, indicating that they have a similar geometry in their globin folding.

  14. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  15. Visible sensing of nucleic acid sequences using a genetically encodable unmodified mRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Narita, Atsushi; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sando, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported a molecular beacon-mRNA (MB-mRNA) strategy for nucleic acid detection/sensing in a cell-free translation system using unmodified RNA as a probe. Here in this presentation, we report that a combination with RNase H activity, which induces an additional process of irreversible cleavage of MB-domain, achieves an improved sequence selectivity (one nucleotide selectivity) and an enhanced sensitivity. This improved system finally enabled visible sensing of target nucleic acid sequence at a single nucleotide resolution under isothermal conditions.

  16. Amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from Hyalophora cecropia

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Å.; Xanthopoulos, K. G.; Boman, H. G.; Bennich, H.

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from the giant silk moth Hyalophora cecropia have been determined. This enzyme is one of several immune proteins produced by the diapausing pupae after injection of bacteria. Cecropia lysozyme is composed of 120 amino acids, has a mol. wt. of 13.8 kd and shows great similarity with vertebrate lysozymes of the chicken type. The amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity and for the binding of substrate are essentially conserved. Three allelic variants of the Cecropia enzyme are identified. A comparison of the chicken and the Cecropia lysozymes shows that there is a 40% identity at both the amino acid and the nucleotide level. Some evolutionary aspects of the sequence data are discussed. PMID:16453632

  17. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids. PMID:27222814

  18. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids.

  19. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences.

  20. AcalPred: a sequence-based tool for discriminating between acidic and alkaline enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment.

  1. AcalPred: A Sequence-Based Tool for Discriminating between Acidic and Alkaline Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment. PMID:24130738

  2. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  3. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  4. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the major immunogen from three serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Makoff, A J; Paynter, C A; Rowlands, D J; Boothroyd, J C

    1982-01-01

    Cloned cDNA molecules from three serotypes of FMDV have been sequenced around the VP1-coding region. The predicted amino acid sequences for VP1 were compared with the published sequences and variable regions identified. The amino acid sequences were also analysed for hydrophilic regions. Two of the variable regions, numbered 129-160 and 193-204 overlapped hydrophilic regions, and were therefore identified as potentially immunogenic. These regions overlap regions shown by others to be immunogenic. PMID:6298715

  5. Quantitative detection of Aspergillus spp. by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Perlin, David S

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and quantitative detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate an early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). As nucleic acid-based detection is a viable option, we demonstrate that Aspergillus burdens can be rapidly and accurately detected by a novel real-time nucleic acid assay other than qPCR by using the combination of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and the molecular beacon (MB) technology. Here, we detail a real-time NASBA assay to determine quantitative Aspergillus burdens in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids of rats with experimental IPA.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  7. Amino acid sequence of the encephalitogenic basic protein from human myelin

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    Myelin from the central nervous system contains an unusual basic protein, which can induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The basic protein from human brain was digested with trypsin and other enzymes and the sequence of the 170 amino acids was determined. The localization of the encephalitogenic determinants was described. Possible roles for the protein in the structure and function of myelin are discussed. PMID:4108501

  8. Sequence-specific formation of d-amino acids in a monoclonal antibody during light exposure.

    PubMed

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The photoirradiation of a monoclonal antibody 1 (mAb1) at λ = 254 nm and λmax = 305 nm resulted in the sequence-specific generation of d-Val, d-Tyr, and potentially d-Ala and d-Arg, in the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY. d-Amino acid formation is most likely the product of reversible intermediary carbon-centered radical formation at the (α)C-positions of the respective amino acids ((α)C(•) radicals) through the action of Cys thiyl radicals (CysS(•)). The latter can be generated photochemically either through direct homolysis of cystine or through photoinduced electron transfer from Trp and/or Tyr residues. The potential of mAb1 sequences to undergo epimerization was first evaluated through covalent H/D exchange during photoirradiation in D2O, and proteolytic peptides exhibiting deuterium incorporation were monitored by HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Subsequently, mAb1 was photoirradiated in H2O, and peptides, for which deuterium incorporation in D2O had been documented, were purified by HPLC and subjected to hydrolysis and amino acid analysis. Importantly, not all peptide sequences which incorporated deuterium during photoirradiation in D2O also exhibited photoinduced d-amino acid formation. For example, the heavy chain sequence [12-18] VQPGGSL showed significant deuterium incorporation during photoirradiation in D2O, but no photoinduced formation of d-amino acids was detected. Instead this sequence contained ca. 22% d-Val in both a photoirradiated and a control sample. This observation could indicate that d-Val may have been generated either during production and/or storage or during sample preparation. While sample preparation did not lead to the formation of d-Val or other d-amino acids in the control sample for the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY, we may have to consider that during hydrolysis N-terminal residues (such as in VQPGGSL) may be more prone to epimerization. We conclude that the photoinduced, radical-dependent formation of d-amino acids

  9. The complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-B from the leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, M; Yamagami, T; Funatsu, G

    1995-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-B (PLC-B) has been determined by first sequencing all 19 tryptic peptides derived from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated (RCm-) PLC-B and then connecting them by analyzing the chymotryptic peptides from three fragments produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage of RCm-PLC-B. PLC-B consists of 274 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 29,473 Da. Six cysteine residues are linked by disulfide bonds between Cys20 and Cys67, Cys50 and Cys57, and Cys159 and Cys188. From 58-68% sequence homology of PLC-B with five class III chitinases, it was concluded that PLC-B is a basic class III chitinase.

  10. Allelic polymorphism in arabian camel ribonuclease and the amino acid sequence of bactrian camel ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Welling, G W; Mulder, H; Beintema, J J

    1976-04-01

    Pancreatic ribonucleases from several species (whitetail deer, roe deer, guinea pig, and arabian camel) exhibit more than one amino acid at particular positions in their amino acid sequences. Since these enzymes were isolated from pooled pancreas, the origin of this heterogeneity is not clear. The pancreatic ribonucleases from 11 individual arabian camels (Camelus dromedarius) have been investigated with respect to the lysine-glutamine heterogeneity at position 103 (Welling et al., 1975). Six ribonucleases showed only one basic band and five showed two bands after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting a gene frequency of about 0.75 for the Lys gene and about 0.25 for the Gln gene. The amino acid sequence of bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) ribonuclease isolated from individual pancreatic tissue was determined and compared with that of arabian camel ribonuclease. The only difference was observed at position 103. In the ribonucleases from two unrelated bactrian camels, only glutamine was observed at that position. PMID:962846

  11. Nucleotide sequence of Crithidia fasciculata cytosol 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    MacKay, R M; Gray, M W; Doolittle, W F

    1980-11-11

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the cytosol 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid of the trypanosomatid protozoan Crithidia fasciculata has been determined by a combination of T1-oligonucleotide catalog and gel sequencing techniques. The sequence is: GAGUACGACCAUACUUGAGUGAAAACACCAUAUCCCGUCCGAUUUGUGAAGUUAAGCACC CACAGGCUUAGUUAGUACUGAGGUCAGUGAUGACUCGGGAACCCUGAGUGCCGUACUCCCOH. This 5S ribosomal RNA is unique in having GAUU in place of the GAAC or GAUC found in all other prokaryotic and eukaryotic 5S RNAs, and thought to be involved in interactions with tRNAs. Comparisons to other eukaryotic cytosol 5S ribosomal RNA sequences indicate that the four major eukaryotic kingdoms (animals, plants, fungi, and protists) are about equally remote from each other, and that the latter kingdom may be the most internally diverse.

  12. Pattern recognition in nucleic acid sequences. II. An efficient method for finding locally stable secondary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I; Goad, W B

    1982-01-01

    We present a method for calculating all possible single hairpin loop secondary structures in a nucleic acid sequence by the order of N2 operations where N is the total number of bases. Each structure may contain any number of bulges and internal loops. Most natural sequences are found to be indistinguishable from random sequences in the potential of forming secondary structures, which is defined by the frequency of possible secondary structures calculated by the method. There is a strong correlation between the higher G+C content and the higher structure forming potential. Interestingly, the removal of intervening sequences in mRNAs is almost always accompanied by an increase in the G+C content, which may suggest an involvement of structural stabilization in the mRNA maturation. PMID:6174936

  13. Data on meq gene sequence analysis of Ludhiana MDV isolates.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mridula; Deka, Dipak; Ramneek

    2016-12-01

    The data described are related to the article entitled "Sequence Analysis of Meq oncogene among Indian isolates of Marek׳s Disease Herpesvirus" M. Gupta, D. Deka, Ramneek, 2016. Seven meq genes of Ludhiana Marek׳s disease virus (MDV) field isolates were PCR amplified by using proof reading Platinum Pfx DNA polymerase enzyme, sequenced and then analyzed for the distinct polymorphisms and point mutations. The sequences were named as LDH 1758, LDH 2003, LDH 2483, LDH 2614, LDH 2700, LDH 2929 and LDH 3262. At this point, their deduced Meq amino acid sequences were compared with GenBank available already sequenced meq genes worldwide in their deduced amino acid form to study their identity/similarity with each other. PMID:27656677

  14. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  15. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Anahtar, Melis N.; Bowman, Brittany A.; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  16. Design of nucleic acid sequences for DNA computing based on a thermodynamic approach.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fumiaki; Kameda, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masahito; Ohuchi, Azuma

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm for designing multiple sequences of nucleic acids that have a uniform melting temperature between the sequence and its complement and that do not hybridize non-specifically with each other based on the minimum free energy (DeltaG (min)). Sequences that satisfy these constraints can be utilized in computations, various engineering applications such as microarrays, and nano-fabrications. Our algorithm is a random generate-and-test algorithm: it generates a candidate sequence randomly and tests whether the sequence satisfies the constraints. The novelty of our algorithm is that the filtering method uses a greedy search to calculate DeltaG (min). This effectively excludes inappropriate sequences before DeltaG (min) is calculated, thereby reducing computation time drastically when compared with an algorithm without the filtering. Experimental results in silico showed the superiority of the greedy search over the traditional approach based on the hamming distance. In addition, experimental results in vitro demonstrated that the experimental free energy (DeltaG (exp)) of 126 sequences correlated well with DeltaG (min) (|R| = 0.90) than with the hamming distance (|R| = 0.80). These results validate the rationality of a thermodynamic approach. We implemented our algorithm in a graphic user interface-based program written in Java.

  17. Nucleotide and Predicted Amino Acid Sequence-Based Analysis of the Avian Metapneumovirus Type C Cell Attachment Glycoprotein Gene: Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Epidemiology of U.S. Pneumoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rene; Lwamba, Humphrey M.; Kapczynski, Darrell R.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Seal, Bruce S.

    2003-01-01

    A serologically distinct avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) was isolated in the United States after an outbreak of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) in February 1997. The newly recognized U.S. virus was subsequently demonstrated to be genetically distinct from European subtypes and was designated aMPV serotype C (aMPV/C). We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the cell attachment glycoprotein (G) of aMPV/C (Colorado strain and three Minnesota isolates) and predicted amino acid sequence by sequencing cloned cDNAs synthesized from intracellular RNA of aMPV/C-infected cells. The nucleotide sequence comprised 1,321 nucleotides with only one predicted open reading frame encoding a protein of 435 amino acids, with a predicted Mr of 48,840. The structural characteristics of the predicted G protein of aMPV/C were similar to those of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) attachment G protein, including two mucin-like regions (heparin-binding domains) flanking both sides of a CX3C chemokine motif present in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. Comparison of the deduced G-protein amino acid sequence of aMPV/C with those of aMPV serotypes A, B, and D, as well as hRSV revealed overall predicted amino acid sequence identities ranging from 4 to 16.5%, suggesting a distant relationship. However, G-protein sequence identities ranged from 72 to 97% when aMPV/C was compared to other members within the aMPV/C subtype or 21% for the recently identified human MPV (hMPV) G protein. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide changes were greater than one in the G gene when comparing the more recent Minnesota isolates to the original Colorado isolate. Epidemiologically, this indicates positive selection among U.S. isolates since the first outbreak of TRT in the United States. PMID:12682171

  18. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken; SNL,

    2016-07-12

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  19. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Kamlesh D; SNL,

    2012-06-01

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  20. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of a human monocyte chemoattractant, a putative mediator of cellular immune reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, E A; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J; Tanaka, S; Griffin, P R; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    In a study of the structural basis for leukocyte specificity of chemoattractants, we determined the complete amino acid sequence of human glioma-derived monocyte chemotactic factor (GDCF-2), a peptide that attracts human monocytes but not neutrophils. The choice of a tumor cell product for analysis was dictated by its relative abundance and an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor (LDCF), the agonist thought to account for monocyte accumulation in cellular immune reactions. By a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry, it was established that GDCF-2 comprises 76 amino acid residues, commencing at the N terminus with pyroglutamic acid. The peptide contains four half-cystines, at positions 11, 12, 36, and 52, which create a pair of loops, clustered at the disulfide bridges. The relative positions of the half-cystines are almost identical to those of monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MDNCF), a peptide of similar mass but with only 24% sequence identity to GDCF. Thus, GDCF and MDNCF have a similar gross secondary structure because of the loops formed by the clustered disulfides, and their different leukocyte specificities are most likely determined by the large differences in primary sequence. PMID:2648385

  2. Amino acid sequences of lower vertebrate parvalbumins and their evolution: parvalbumins of boa, turtle, and salamander.

    PubMed

    Maeda, N; Zhu, D X; Fitch, W M

    1984-11-01

    One major parvalbumin each was isolated from the skeletal muscle of two reptiles, a boa snake, Boa constrictor, and a map turtle, Graptemys geographica, while two parvalbumins were isolated from an amphibian, the salamander Amphiuma means. The amino acid sequences of all four parvalbumins were determined from the sequences of their tryptic peptides, which were ordered partially by homology to other parvalbumins. Phylogenetic study of these and 16 other parvalbumin sequences revealed that the turtle parvalbumin belongs to beta lineage, while the salamander sequences belong, one each, to the alpha and beta lineages defined by Goodman and Pechère (1977). Boa parvalbumin, however, while belonging to the beta lineage, clusters within the fish in all reasonably parsimonious trees. The most parsimonious trees show many parallel or back mutations in the evolution of many parvalbumin residues, although the residues responsible for Ca2+ binding are very well conserved. These most parsimonious trees show an actinopterygian rather than a crossoptyrigian origin of the tetrapods in both the alpha and beta groups. One of two electric eel parvalbumins is evolving more than 10 times faster than its paralogous partner, suggesting it may be on its way to becoming a pseudogene. It is concluded that varying rates of amino acid replacement, much homoplasy, considerable gene duplication, plus complicated lineages make the set of parvalbumin sequences unsuitable for systematic study of the origin of the tetrapods and other higher-taxa divergence, although it may be suitable within a genus or family.

  3. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  4. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  5. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  6. Reaction sequences in simulated neutralized current acid waste slurry during processing with formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Langowski, M.H.; Powell, M.R.; Larson, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic wastes as glass for permanent disposal. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is supporting the HWVP design activities by conducting laboratory-scale studies using a HWVP simulated waste slurry. Conditions which affect the slurry processing chemistry were evaluated in terms of offgas composition and peak generation rate and changes in slurry composition. A standard offgas profile defined in terms of three reaction phases, decomposition of H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, destruction of NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and production of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} was used as a baseline against which changes were evaluated. The test variables include nitrite concentration, acid neutralization capacity, temperature, and formic acid addition rate. Results to date indicate that pH is an important parameter influencing the N{sub 2}O/NO{sub x} generation ratio; nitrite can both inhibit and activate rhodium as a catalyst for formic acid decomposition to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and a separate reduced metal phase forms in the reducing environment. These data are being compiled to provide a basis for predicting the HWVP feed processing chemistry as a function of feed composition and operation variables, recommending criteria for chemical adjustments, and providing guidelines with respect to important control parameters to consider during routine and upset plant operation.

  7. The complete amino acid sequence of lectin-C from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, A; Funatsu, G

    1995-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-C (PL-C) consisting of 126 residues has been determined. PL-C is an acidic simple protein with molecular mass of 13,747 Da and consists of three cysteine-rich domains with 51-63% homology. PL-C shows homology to chitin-binding proteins such as wheat germ agglutinin, and all eight cysteine residues in the three domains of PL-C are completely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains.

  8. Amino-acid sequence of a cooperative, dimeric myoglobin from the gastropod mollusc, Buccinum undatum L.

    PubMed

    Wen, D; Laursen, R A

    1994-10-19

    The complete amino-acid sequence of a dimeric myoglobin from the radular mussel of the gastropod mollusc, Buccinum undatum L. has been determined. The globin, which shows cooperative binding of oxygen, contains 146 amino acids, is N-terminal aminoacetylated, and has histidine residues at position 65 and 97, corresponding to the heme-binding histidines seen in mammalian myoglobins. It shows about 75% and 50% homology, respectively, with the dimeric molluscan myoglobins from Busycon canaliculatum and Cerithidea rhizophorarum, the former of which also shows weak cooperatively, but much less similarity to other species of myoglobin and hemoglobin.

  9. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  10. Amino acid sequence of human cholinesterase. Annual report, 30 September 1984-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, O.

    1985-10-01

    The active-site serine residue is located 198 amino acids from the N-terminal. The active-site peptide was isolated from three different genetic types of human serum cholinesterase: from usual, atypical, and atypical-silent genotypes. It was found that the amino acid sequence of the active-site peptide was identical in all three genotypes. Comparison of the complete sequences of cholinesterase from human serum and acetylcholinesterase from the electric organ of Torpedo californica shows an identity of 53%. Cholinesterase is of interest to the Department of Defense because cholinesterase protects against organophosphate poisons of the type used in chemical warfare. The structural results presented here will serve as the basis for cloning the gene for cholinesterase. The potential uses of large amounts of cholinesterase would be for cleaning up spills of organophosphates and possibly for detoxifying exposed personnel.

  11. Amino acid sequence differences in pancreatic ribonucleases from water buffalo breeds from Indonesia and Italy.

    PubMed

    Sidik, A; Martena, B; Beintema, J J

    1979-12-01

    The amino acid sequences of the pancreatic ribonucleases from river-breed water buffaloes from Italy and swamp-breed water buffaloes from Indonesia differ at three positions. One of the differences involves a replacement of asparagine-34, with covalently attached carbohydrate on all molecules, in the river-breed enzyme by serine in the swamp-breed enzyme. The ribonuclease content of the pancreas differs considerably between breeds and is lower in river buffaloes. A ribonuclease preparation from two swamp buffaloes contained a minor glycosylated component. Preliminary evidence was obtained that the amino acid sequence of this component has factors in common with the main component of the swamp-breed ribonuclease and with the river-breed enzyme.

  12. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-10-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  13. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the alpha-amylase-pullulanase gene from Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum.

    PubMed

    Melasniemi, H; Paloheimo, M; Hemiö, L

    1990-03-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene (apu) encoding the thermostable alpha-amylase-pullulanase of Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum was determined. An open reading frame of 4425 bp was present. The deduced polypeptide (Mr 165,600), including a 31 amino acid putative signal sequence, comprised 1475 amino acids, with no cysteine residues. The structural gene was preceded by the consensus promoter sequence TTGACA TATAAT, a putative regulatory sequence and a putative ribosome-binding sequence AAAGGGGG. The codon usage resembled that of Bacillus genes. The deduced sequence of the mature apu product showed similarities to various amylolytic enzymes, especially the neopullulanase of Bacillus stearothermophilus, whereas the signal sequence showed similarity to those of the alpha-amylases of B. stearothermophilus and B. subtilis. Three regions thought to be highly conserved in the primary structure of alpha-amylases could also be distinguished in the apu product, two being partly 'duplicated' in this alpha-1,4/alpha-1,6-active enzyme.

  15. Self-sequencing of amino acids and origins of polyfunctional protocells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    The role of proteins in the origin of living things is discussed. It has been experimentally established that amino acids can sequence themselves under simulated geological conditions with highly nonrandom products which accordingly contain diverse information. Multiple copies of each type of macromolecule are formed, resulting in greater power for any protoenzymic molecule than would accrue from a single copy of each type. Thermal proteins are readily incorporated into laboratory protocells. The experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells is discussed.

  16. Comparisons of the Distribution of Nucleotides and Common Sequences in Deoxyribonucleic Acid from Selected Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Skalka, A.; Hanson, P.

    1972-01-01

    Results from comparisons of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from several classes of bacteriophages suggest that most phage chromosomes contain either a homogeneous distribution of nucleotides or are made up of a few, rather large segments of different quanine plus cytosine (G + C) contents which are internally homogeneous. Among those temperate phages tested, most contained segmented DNA. Comparisons of sequence similarities among segments from lambdoid phage DNA species revealed the following order in relatedness to λ: 82 (and 434) > 21 > 424 > φ80. Most common sequences are found in the highest G + C segments, which in λ contain head and tail genes. Hybridization tests with λ and 186 or P2 DNA species verified that the lambdoids and 186 and P2 belong to two distinct groups. There are fewer homologous sequences between the DNA species of coliphages λ and P2 or 186 than there are between the DNA species of coliphage λ and salmonella phage P22. PMID:4553679

  17. Structure of the fully modified left-handed cyclohexene nucleic acid sequence GTGTACAC.

    PubMed

    Robeyns, Koen; Herdewijn, Piet; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2008-02-13

    CeNA oligonucleotides consist of a phosphorylated backbone where the deoxyribose sugars are replaced by cyclohexene moieties. The X-ray structure determination and analysis of a fully modified octamer sequence GTGTACAC, which is the first crystal structure of a carbocyclic-based nucleic acid, is presented. This particular sequence was built with left-handed building blocks and crystallizes as a left-handed double helix. The helix can be characterized as belonging to the (mirrored) A-type family. Crystallographic data were processed up to 1.53 A, and the octamer sequence crystallizes in the space group R32. The sugar puckering is found to adopt the 3H2 half-chair conformation which mimics the C3'-endo conformation of the ribose sugar. The double helices stack on top of each other to form continuous helices, and static disorder is observed due to this end-to-end stacking.

  18. Amino acid sequence of a protease inhibitor isolated from Sarcophaga bullata determined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papayannopoulos, I A; Biemann, K

    1992-02-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protease inhibitor isolated from the hemolymph of Sarcophaga bullata larvae was determined by tandem mass spectrometry. Homology considerations with respect to other protease inhibitors with known primary structures assisted in the choice of the procedure followed in the sequence determination and in the alignment of the various peptides obtained from specific chemical cleavage at cysteines and enzyme digests of the S. bullata protease inhibitor. The resulting sequence of 57 residues is as follows: Val Asp Lys Ser Ala Cys Leu Gln Pro Lys Glu Val Gly Pro Cys Arg Lys Ser Asp Phe Val Phe Phe Tyr Asn Ala Asp Thr Lys Ala Cys Glu Glu Phe Leu Tyr Gly Gly Cys Arg Gly Asn Asp Asn Arg Phe Asn Thr Lys Glu Glu Cys Glu Lys Leu Cys Leu.

  19. Fatty Acid Profile and Unigene-Derived Simple Sequence Repeat Markers in Tung Tree (Vernicia fordii)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Jia, Baoguang; Tan, Xiaofeng; Thammina, Chandra S.; Long, Hongxu; Liu, Min; Wen, Shanna; Song, Xianliang; Cao, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) provides the sole source of tung oil widely used in industry. Lack of fatty acid composition and molecular markers hinders biochemical, genetic and breeding research. The objectives of this study were to determine fatty acid profiles and develop unigene-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in tung tree. Fatty acid profiles of 41 accessions showed that the ratio of α-eleostearic acid was increasing continuously with a parallel trend to the amount of tung oil accumulation while the ratios of other fatty acids were decreasing in different stages of the seeds and that α-eleostearic acid (18∶3) consisted of 77% of the total fatty acids in tung oil. Transcriptome sequencing identified 81,805 unigenes from tung cDNA library constructed using seed mRNA and discovered 6,366 SSRs in 5,404 unigenes. The di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellites accounted for 92% of the SSRs with AG/CT and AAG/CTT being the most abundant SSR motifs. Fifteen polymorphic genic-SSR markers were developed from 98 unigene loci tested in 41 cultivated tung accessions by agarose gel and capillary electrophoresis. Genbank database search identified 10 of them putatively coding for functional proteins. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that all 15 polymorphic SSR-associated unigenes were expressed in tung seeds and some of them were highly correlated with oil composition in the seeds. Dendrogram revealed that most of the 41 accessions were clustered according to the geographic region. These new polymorphic genic-SSR markers will facilitate future studies on genetic diversity, molecular fingerprinting, comparative genomics and genetic mapping in tung tree. The lipid profiles in the seeds of 41 tung accessions will be valuable for biochemical and breeding studies. PMID:25167054

  20. Some properties and amino acid sequence of plastocyanin from a green alga, Ulva arasakii.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, F; Fukazawa, T; Mishina, Y; Sugimura, Y

    1989-08-01

    Plastocyanin was purified from a multicellular, marine green alga, Ulva arasakii, by conventional methods to homogeneity. The oxidized plastocyanin showed absorption maxima at 252, 276.8, 460, 595.3, and 775 nm, and shoulders at 259, 265, 269, and 282.5 nm; the ratio A276.8/A595.3 was 1.5. The midpoint redox potential was determined to be 0.356 V at pH 7.0 with a ferri- and ferrocyanide system. The molecular weight was estimated to be 10,200 and 11,000 by SDS-PAGE and by gel filtration, respectively. U. arasakii also has a small amount of cytochrome c6, like Enteromorpha prolifera. The amino acid sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin was determined by Edman degradation and by carboxypeptidase digestion of the plastocyanin, six tryptic peptides, and five staphylococcal protease peptides. The plastocyanin contained 98 amino acid residues, giving a molecular weight of 10,236 including one copper atom. The complete sequence is as follows: AQIVKLGGDDGALAFVPSKISVAAGEAIEFVNNAGFPHNIVFDEDAVPAGVDADAISYDDYLNSKGETV VRKLSTPGVY G VYCEPHAGAGMKMTITVQ. The sequence of U. arasakii plastocyanin is closet to that of the E. prolifera protein (85% homology). A phylogenetic tree of five algal and two higher plant plastocyanins was constructed by comparing the amino acid differences. The branching order is considered to be as follows: a blue-green alga, unicellular green algae, multicellular green algae, and higher plants. PMID:2509442

  1. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of chitinase-A from leaves of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamagami, T; Tanigawa, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1998-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed leaf chitinase-A was determined. First all 11 tryptic peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated form of the enzyme were sequenced. Then the same form of the enzyme was cleaved with cyanogen bromide, giving three fragments. The fragments were digested with chymotrypsin or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. Last, the 11 tryptic peptides were put in order. Of seven cysteine residues, six were linked by disulfide bonds (between Cys25 and Cys74, Cys89 and Cys98, and Cys195 and Cys208); Cys176 was free. The enzyme consisted of 208 amino acid residues and had a molecular weight of 22,391. It consisted of only one polypeptide chain without a chitin-binding domain. The length of the chain was almost the same as that of the catalytic domains of class IL chitinases. These findings suggested that this enzyme is a new kind of class IIL chitinase, although its sequence resembles that of catalytic domains of class IL chitinases more than that of the class IIL chitinases reported so far. Discussion on the involvement of specific tryptophan residue in the active site of PLC-A is also given based on the sequence similarity with rye seed chitinase-c.

  3. Metazoan remaining genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis: sequence conservation and evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor R; Thompson, Julie D; Ortega, José Miguel; Prosdocimi, Francisco

    2014-12-24

    Essential amino acids (EAA) consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS) and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL) relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  4. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  5. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  7. BeadCons: detection of nucleic acid sequences by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Horejsh, Douglas; Martini, Federico; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2005-11-01

    Molecular beacons are single-stranded nucleic acid structures with a terminal fluorophore and a distal, terminal quencher. These molecules are typically used in real-time PCR assays, but have also been conjugated with solid matrices. This unit describes protocols related to molecular beacon-conjugated beads (BeadCons), whose specific hybridization with complementary target sequences can be resolved by cytometry. Assay sensitivity is achieved through the concentration of fluorescence signal on discrete particles. By using molecular beacons with different fluorophores and microspheres of different sizes, it is possible to construct a fluid array system with each bead corresponding to a specific target nucleic acid. Methods are presented for the design, construction, and use of BeadCons for the specific, multiplexed detection of unlabeled nucleic acids in solution. The use of bead-based detection methods will likely lead to the design of new multiplex molecular diagnostic tools.

  8. Measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a sequence-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peter Z; Haworth, Ian S; Cai, Qi; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Grant, Gian Paola G; Price, Eric A; Sowa, Glenna Z; Popova, Anna; Herreros, Bruno; He, Honghang

    2008-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedures for measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a nitroxide probe that can be attached to any nucleotide within a given sequence. Two nitroxides are attached to phosphorothioates that are chemically substituted at specific sites of DNA or RNA. Inter-nitroxide distances are measured using a four-pulse double electron–electron resonance technique, and the measured distances are correlated to the parent structures using a Web-accessible computer program. Four to five days are needed for sample labeling, purification and distance measurement. The procedures described herein provide a method for probing global structures and studying conformational changes of nucleic acids and protein/nucleic acid complexes. PMID:17947978

  9. [Partial sequence homology of FtsZ in phylogenetics analysis of lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Xiu-zhu

    2005-10-01

    FtsZ is a structurally conserved protein, which is universal among the prokaryotes. It plays a key role in prokaryote cell division. A partial fragment of the ftsZ gene about 800bp in length was amplified and sequenced and a partial FtsZ protein phylogenetic tree for the lactic acid bacteria was constructed. By comparing the FtsZ phylogenetic tree with the 16S rDNA tree, it was shown that the two trees were similar in topology. Both trees revealed that Pediococcus spp. were closely related with L. casei group of Lactobacillus spp. , but less related with other lactic acid cocci such as Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The results also showed that the discriminative power of FtsZ was higher than that of 16S rDNA for either inter-species or inter-genus and could be a very useful tool in species identification of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:16342751

  10. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group.

  11. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group. PMID:1368578

  12. N-terminal amino acid sequences and some characteristics of fibrinolytic/hemorrhagic metalloproteinases purified from Bothrops jararaca venom.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masugi; Sugiki, Masahiko; Anai, Keita; Yoshida, Etsuo

    2002-08-01

    We determined the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the fibrinolytic/hemorrhagic metalloproteinases (jararafibrases I, III and IV) purified from Bothrops jararaca venom. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of jararafibrase I and its degradation products were identical to those of jararhagin, another hemorrhagic metalloproteinase purified from the same snake venom. Together with enzymatic and immunological properties, we concluded that those two enzymes are identical. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of jararafibrase III was quite similar to C-type lectin isolated from Crotalus atrox, and the protein had a hemagglutinating activity on intact rat red blood cells. PMID:12165326

  13. Protein sequence analysis by incorporating modified chaos game and physicochemical properties into Chou's general pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunrui; Sun, Dandan; Liu, Shenghui; Zhang, Yusen

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution we introduced a novel graphical method to compare protein sequences. By mapping a protein sequence into 3D space based on codons and physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids, we are able to get a unique P-vector from the 3D curve. This approach is consistent with wobble theory of amino acids. We compute the distance between sequences by their P-vectors to measure similarities/dissimilarities among protein sequences. Finally, we use our method to analyze four datasets and get better results compared with previous approaches. PMID:27375218

  14. Molecular characterization of the body site-specific human epidermal cytokeratin 9: cDNA cloning, amino acid sequence, and tissue specificity of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Langbein, L; Heid, H W; Moll, I; Franke, W W

    1993-12-01

    Differentiation of human plantar and palmar epidermis is characterized by the suprabasal synthesis of a major special intermediate-sized filament (IF) protein, the type I (acidic) cytokeratin 9 (CK 9). Using partial amino acid (aa) sequence information obtained by direct Edman sequencing of peptides resulting from proteolytic digestion of purified CK 9, we synthesized several redundant primers by 'back-translation'. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription of mRNAs from human foot sole epidermis, including 5'-primer extension, resulted in multiple overlapping cDNA clones, from which the complete cDNA (2353 bp) could be constructed. This cDNA encoded the CK 9 polypeptide with a calculated molecular weight of 61,987 and an isoelectric point at about pH 5.0. The aa sequence deduced from cDNA was verified in several parts by comparison with the peptide sequences and showed the typical structure of type I CKs, with a head (153 aa), and alpha-helical coiled-coil-forming rod (306 aa), and a tail (163 aa) domain. The protein displayed the highest homology to human CK 10, not only in the highly conserved rod domain but also in large parts of the head and the tail domains. On the other hand, the aa sequence revealed some remarkable differences from CK 10 and other CKs, even in the most conserved segments of the rod domain. The nuclease digestion pattern seen on Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA indicated the existence of a unique CK 9 gene. Using CK 9-specific riboprobes for hybridization on Northern blots of RNAs from various epithelia, a mRNA of about 2.4 kb in length could be identified only in foot sole epidermis, and a weaker cross-hybridization signal was seen in RNA from bovine heel pad epidermis at about 2.0 kb. A large number of tissues and cell cultures were examined by PCR of mRNA-derived cDNAs, using CK 9-specific primers. But even with this very sensitive signal amplification, only palmar

  15. Protein meta-functional signatures from combining sequence, structure, evolution, and amino acid property information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Horst, Jeremy A; Cheng, Gong; Nickle, David C; Samudrala, Ram

    2008-09-26

    Protein function is mediated by different amino acid residues, both their positions and types, in a protein sequence. Some amino acids are responsible for the stability or overall shape of the protein, playing an indirect role in protein function. Others play a functionally important role as part of active or binding sites of the protein. For a given protein sequence, the residues and their degree of functional importance can be thought of as a signature representing the function of the protein. We have developed a combination of knowledge- and biophysics-based function prediction approaches to elucidate the relationships between the structural and the functional roles of individual residues and positions. Such a meta-functional signature (MFS), which is a collection of continuous values representing the functional significance of each residue in a protein, may be used to study proteins of known function in greater detail and to aid in experimental characterization of proteins of unknown function. We demonstrate the superior performance of MFS in predicting protein functional sites and also present four real-world examples to apply MFS in a wide range of settings to elucidate protein sequence-structure-function relationships. Our results indicate that the MFS approach, which can combine multiple sources of information and also give biological interpretation to each component, greatly facilitates the understanding and characterization of protein function.

  16. Bacteria obtained from a sequencing batch reactor that are capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed

    Mohn, W W

    1995-06-01

    Eleven isolates capable of growth on the resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DhA) were obtained from a sequencing batch reactor designed to treat a high-strength process stream from a paper mill. The isolates belonged to two groups, represented by strains DhA-33 and DhA-35, which were characterized. In the bioreactor, bacteria like DhA-35 were more abundant than those like DhA-33. The population in the bioreactor of organisms capable of growth on DhA was estimated to be 1.1 x 10(6) propagules per ml, based on a most-probable-number determination. Analysis of small-subunit rRNA partial sequences indicated that DhA-33 was most closely related to Sphingomonas yanoikuyae (Sab = 0.875) and that DhA-35 was most closely related to Zoogloea ramigera (Sab = 0.849). Both isolates additionally grew on other abietanes, i.e., abietic and palustric acids, but not on the pimaranes, pimaric and isopimaric acids. For DhA-33 and DhA-35 with DhA as the sole organic substrate, doubling times were 2.7 and 2.2 h, respectively, and growth yields were 0.30 and 0.25 g of protein per g of DhA, respectively. Glucose as a cosubstrate stimulated growth of DhA-33 on DhA and stimulated DhA degradation by the culture. Pyruvate as a cosubstrate did not stimulate growth of DhA-35 on DhA and reduced the specific rate of DhA degradation of the culture. DhA induced DhA and abietic acid degradation activities in both strains, and these activities were heat labile. Cell suspensions of both strains consumed DhA at a rate of 6 mumol mg of protein-1 h-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Development of a SCAR (sequence-characterised amplified region) marker for acid resistance-related gene in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Wen; Li, Kai; Yang, Shi-Ling; Tian, Shu-Fen; He, Ling

    2015-03-01

    A sequence characterised amplified region marker was developed to determine an acid resistance-related gene in Lactobacillus plantarum. A random amplified polymorphic DNA marker named S116-680 was reported to be closely related to the acid resistance of the strains. The DNA band corresponding to this marker was cloned and sequenced with the induction of specific designed PCR primers. The results of PCR test helped to amplify a clear specific band of 680 bp in the tested acid-resistant strains. S116-680 marker would be useful to explore the acid-resistant mechanism of L. plantarum and to screen desirable malolactic fermentation strains.

  18. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Lange, Bernd Markus; McCaskill, David G.

    2001-01-01

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  19. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  20. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  1. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  2. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  3. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  4. Sequence-defined bioactive macrocycles via an acid-catalysed cascade reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porel, Mintu; Thornlow, Dana N.; Phan, Ngoc N.; Alabi, Christopher A.

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic macrocycles derived from sequence-defined oligomers are a unique structural class whose ring size, sequence and structure can be tuned via precise organization of the primary sequence. Similar to peptides and other peptidomimetics, these well-defined synthetic macromolecules become pharmacologically relevant when bioactive side chains are incorporated into their primary sequence. In this article, we report the synthesis of oligothioetheramide (oligoTEA) macrocycles via a one-pot acid-catalysed cascade reaction. The versatility of the cyclization chemistry and modularity of the assembly process was demonstrated via the synthesis of >20 diverse oligoTEA macrocycles. Structural characterization via NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of conformational isomers, which enabled the determination of local chain dynamics within the macromolecular structure. Finally, we demonstrate the biological activity of oligoTEA macrocycles designed to mimic facially amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The preliminary results indicate that macrocyclic oligoTEAs with just two-to-three cationic charge centres can elicit potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Amino acid sequence and variant forms of favin, a lectin from Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Hopp, T P; Hemperly, J J; Cunningham, B A

    1982-04-25

    We have determined the complete amino acid sequence (182 residues) of the beta chain of favin, the glucose-binding lectin from fava beans (Vicia faba), and have established that the carbohydrate moiety is attached to Asn 168. Together with the sequence of the alpha chain previously reported (Hemperly, J. J., Hopp, T. P., Becker, J. W., and Cunningham, B. A. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 6803-6810), these data complete the analysis of the primary structure of the lectin. We have also examined minor polypeptides that appear in all preparations of favin. Two lower molecular weight species (Mr = 9,500-11,600) appear to be fragments of the beta chain resulting from cleavage following Asn 76, whereas six high molecular weight forms (Mr = 25,000 or greater) appear to include aggregates of the beta chain and possibly some alternative products of chain processing. PMID:7068646

  6. Pyrosequencing on templates generated by asymmetric nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (asymmetric-NASBA).

    PubMed

    Jia, Huning; Chen, Zhiyao; Wu, Haiping; Ye, Hui; Yan, Zhengyu; Zhou, Guohua

    2011-12-21

    Pyrosequencing is an ideal tool for verifying the sequence of amplicons. To enable pyrosequencing on amplicons from nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), asymmetric NASBA with unequal concentrations of T7 promoter primer and reverse transcription primer was proposed. By optimizing the ratio of two primers and the concentration of dNTPs and NTPs, the amount of single-stranded cDNA in the amplicons from asymmetric NASBA was found increased 12 times more than the conventional NASBA through the real-time detection of a molecular beacon specific to cDNA of interest. More than 20 bases have been successfully detected by pyrosequencing on amplicons from asymmetric NASBA using Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) as an amplification template. The primary results indicate that the combination of NASBA with a pyrosequencing system is practical, and should open a new field in clinical diagnosis.

  7. Primary structure of the monomer of the 12S subunit of transcarboxylase as deduced from DNA and characterization of the product expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C G; Kumar, G K; Haase, F C; Phillips, N F; Woo, S B; Park, V M; Magner, W J; Shenoy, B C; Wood, H G; Samols, D

    1993-09-01

    Transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii is a complex biotin-containing enzyme composed of 30 polypeptides of three different types: a hexameric central 12S subunit to which 6 outer 5S subunits are attached through 12 1.3S biotinyl subunits. The enzyme catalyzes a two-step reaction in which methylmalonyl coenzyme A and pyruvate serve as substrates to form propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) and oxalacetate, the 12S subunit specifically catalyzing one of the two reactions. We report here the cloning, sequencing, and expression of the 12S subunit. The gene was identified by matching amino acid sequences derived from isolated authentic 12S peptides with the deduced sequence of an open reading frame present in a cloned P. shermanii genomic fragment known to contain the gene encoding the 1.3S biotinyl subunit. The cloned 12S gene encodes a protein of 604 amino acids and of M(r) 65,545. The deduced sequence shows regions of extensive homology with the beta subunit of mammalian propionyl-CoA carboxylase as well as regions of homology with acetyl-CoA carboxylase from several species. Two genomic fragments were subcloned into pUC19 in an orientation such that the 12S open reading frame could be expressed from the lac promoter of the vector. Crude extracts prepared from these cells contained an immunoreactive band on Western blots (immunoblots) which comigrated with authentic 12S. The Escherichia coli-expressed 12S was purified to apparent homogeneity by a three-step procedure and compared with authentic 12S from P. shermanii. Their quaternary structures were identical by electron microscopy, and the E. coli 12S preparation was fully active in the reactions catalyzed by this subunit. We conclude that we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed the 12S subunit which exists in a hexameric active form in E.coli. PMID:8366018

  8. Morphological tranformation of calcite crystal growth by prismatic "acidic" polypeptide sequences.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I; Giocondi, J L; Orme, C A; Collino, J; Evans, J S

    2007-02-13

    Many of the interesting mechanical and materials properties of the mollusk shell are thought to stem from the prismatic calcite crystal assemblies within this composite structure. It is now evident that proteins play a major role in the formation of these assemblies. Recently, a superfamily of 7 conserved prismatic layer-specific mollusk shell proteins, Asprich, were sequenced, and the 42 AA C-terminal sequence region of this protein superfamily was found to introduce surface voids or porosities on calcite crystals in vitro. Using AFM imaging techniques, we further investigate the effect that this 42 AA domain (Fragment-2) and its constituent subdomains, DEAD-17 and Acidic-2, have on the morphology and growth kinetics of calcite dislocation hillocks. We find that Fragment-2 adsorbs on terrace surfaces and pins acute steps, accelerates then decelerates the growth of obtuse steps, forms clusters and voids on terrace surfaces, and transforms calcite hillock morphology from a rhombohedral form to a rounded one. These results mirror yet are distinct from some of the earlier findings obtained for nacreous polypeptides. The subdomains Acidic-2 and DEAD-17 were found to accelerate then decelerate obtuse steps and induce oval rather than rounded hillock morphologies. Unlike DEAD-17, Acidic-2 does form clusters on terrace surfaces and exhibits stronger obtuse velocity inhibition effects than either DEAD-17 or Fragment-2. Interestingly, a 1:1 mixture of both subdomains induces an irregular polygonal morphology to hillocks, and exhibits the highest degree of acute step pinning and obtuse step velocity inhibition. This suggests that there is some interplay between subdomains within an intra (Fragment-2) or intermolecular (1:1 mixture) context, and sequence interplay phenomena may be employed by biomineralization proteins to exert net effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  9. The amino-acid sequences of sculpin islet somatostatin-28 and peptide YY.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Cutfield, J F

    1987-04-01

    Two pancreatic peptides, somatostatin-28 and peptide YY, have been isolated from the Brockmann bodies of the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin). Following purification by reverse-phase HPLC, each peptide was sequenced completely through to the carboxyl-terminus by gas-phase Edman degradation. Somatostatin-28 was the major form of somatostatin detected and is similar to the gene II product from anglerfish. Peptide YY (36 amino acids) more closely resembles porcine neuropeptide YY and intestinal peptide YY than it does the pancreatic polypeptides. PMID:2883025

  10. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA using triple helix-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are attractive targets for molecular recognition because of the central role they play in gene expression. Since most noncoding RNAs are in a double-helical conformation, recognition of such structures is a formidable problem. Herein, we describe a method for sequence-selective recognition of biologically relevant double-helical RNA (illustrated on ribosomal A-site RNA) using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) that form a triple helix in the major grove of RNA under physiologically relevant conditions. Protocols for PNA preparation and binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry are described in detail.

  11. Sequence selective double strand DNA cleavage by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting using nuclease S1.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, V; Frank-Kamenetskii, M D; Egholm, M; Buchardt, O; Nielsen, P E

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for sequence specific double strand DNA cleavage using PNA (peptide nucleic acid) targeting is described. Nuclease S1 digestion of double stranded DNA gives rise to double strand cleavage at an occupied PNA strand displacement binding site, and under optimized conditions complete cleavage can be obtained. The efficiency of this cleavage is more than 10 fold enhanced when a tandem PNA site is targeted, and additionally enhanced if this site is in trans rather than in cis orientation. Thus in effect, the PNA targeting makes the single strand specific nuclease S1 behave like a pseudo restriction endonuclease. Images PMID:8502550

  12. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  13. WinGene/WinPep: user-friendly software for the analysis of amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Hennig, L

    1999-06-01

    WinGene1.0/WinPep1.2 is a pair of Microsoft Windows programs designed to read nucleotide or amino acid sequence data. These versatile programs have the following capabilities: (i) searches for open reading frames and their translation, (ii) assisting the design of primers for PCR and (iii) calculation of molecular weight, isoelectric point and molar absorbtion coefficients of polypeptides. Furthermore, hydropathic plots and helical wheel displays are easily produced. The programs run with an intuitive Windows interface, contain a comprehensive help file and enable data exchange with other applications by means of the Copy&Paste command. The software is free for academic and noncommercial users.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly L-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  15. Purification and amino acid sequence of aminopeptidase P from pig kidney.

    PubMed

    Vergas Romero, C; Neudorfer, I; Mann, K; Schäfer, W

    1995-04-01

    Aminopeptidase P from kidney cortex was purified in high yield (recovery greater than or equal to 20%) by a series of column chromatographic steps after solubilization of the membrane-bound glycoprotein with n-butanol. A coupled enzymic assay, using Gly-Pro-Pro-NH-Nap as substrate and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV as auxilliary enzyme, was used to monitor the purification. The purification procedure yielded two forms of aminopeptidase P differing in their carbohydrate composition (glycoforms). Both enzyme preparations were homogeneous as assessed by SDS/PAGE silver staining, and isoelectric focusing. Both forms possessed the same substrate specificity, catalysed the same reaction, and consisted of identical protein chains. The amino acid sequence determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry consisted of 623 amino acids. Six N-glycosylation sites, all contained in the N-terminal half of the protein, were characterized. PMID:7744038

  16. Mass spectrometric detection of the amino acid sequence polymorphism of the hepatitis C virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Kaysheva, A L; Ivanov, Yu D; Frantsuzov, P A; Krohin, N V; Pavlova, T I; Uchaikin, V F; Konev, V А; Kovalev, O B; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-03-01

    A method for detection and identification of the hepatitis C virus antigen (HCVcoreAg) in human serum with consideration for possible amino acid substitutions is proposed. The method is based on a combination of biospecific capturing and concentrating of the target protein on the surface of the chip for atomic force microscope (AFM chip) with subsequent protein identification by tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. Biospecific AFM-capturing of viral particles containing HCVcoreAg from serum samples was performed by use of AFM chips with monoclonal antibodies (anti-HCVcore) covalently immobilized on the surface. Biospecific complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS/MS analysis allowed to reliably identify the HCVcoreAg in the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. Analysis of MS/MS spectra, with the account taken of the possible polymorphisms in the amino acid sequence of the HCVcoreAg, enabled us to increase the number of identified peptides.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  18. WAViS server for handling, visualization and presentation of multiple alignments of nucleotide or amino acids sequences.

    PubMed

    Zika, Radek; Paces, Jan; Pavlícek, Adam; Paces, Václav

    2004-07-01

    Web Alignment Visualization Server contains a set of web-tools designed for quick generation of publication-quality color figures of multiple alignments of nucleotide or amino acids sequences. It can be used for identification of conserved regions and gaps within many sequences using only common web browsers. The server is accessible at http://wavis.img.cas.cz.

  19. ANTICALIgN: visualizing, editing and analyzing combined nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments for combinatorial protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Jarasch, Alexander; Kopp, Melanie; Eggenstein, Evelyn; Richter, Antonia; Gebauer, Michaela; Skerra, Arne

    2016-07-01

    ANTIC ALIGN: is an interactive software developed to simultaneously visualize, analyze and modify alignments of DNA and/or protein sequences that arise during combinatorial protein engineering, design and selection. ANTIC ALIGN: combines powerful functions known from currently available sequence analysis tools with unique features for protein engineering, in particular the possibility to display and manipulate nucleotide sequences and their translated amino acid sequences at the same time. ANTIC ALIGN: offers both template-based multiple sequence alignment (MSA), using the unmutated protein as reference, and conventional global alignment, to compare sequences that share an evolutionary relationship. The application of similarity-based clustering algorithms facilitates the identification of duplicates or of conserved sequence features among a set of selected clones. Imported nucleotide sequences from DNA sequence analysis are automatically translated into the corresponding amino acid sequences and displayed, offering numerous options for selecting reading frames, highlighting of sequence features and graphical layout of the MSA. The MSA complexity can be reduced by hiding the conserved nucleotide and/or amino acid residues, thus putting emphasis on the relevant mutated positions. ANTIC ALIGN: is also able to handle suppressed stop codons or even to incorporate non-natural amino acids into a coding sequence. We demonstrate crucial functions of ANTIC ALIGN: in an example of Anticalins selected from a lipocalin random library against the fibronectin extradomain B (ED-B), an established marker of tumor vasculature. Apart from engineered protein scaffolds, ANTIC ALIGN: provides a powerful tool in the area of antibody engineering and for directed enzyme evolution.

  20. 3-d structure-based amino acid sequence alignment of esterases, lipases and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Cygler, M.; Schrag, J.D.; Sussman, J.L.

    1993-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, enzymes with potential as pretreatment drugs for organophosphate toxicity, are members of a larger family of homologous proteins that includes carboxylesterases, cholesterol esterases, lipases, and several nonhydrolytic proteins. A computer-generated alignment of 18 of the proteins, the acetylcholinesases, butyrylcholinesterases, carboxylesterases, some esterases, and the nonenzymatic proteins has been previously presented. More recently, the three-dimensional structures of two enzymes enzymes in this group, acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica and lipase from Geotrichum candidum, have been determined. Based on the x-ray structures and the superposition of these two enzymes, it was possible to obtain an improved amino acid sequence alignment of 32 members of this family of proteins. Examination of this alignment reveals that 24 amino acids are invariant in all of the hydrolytic proteins, and an additional 49 are well conserved. Conserved amino acids include those of the active site, the disulfide bridges, the salt bridges, in the core of the proteins, and at the edges of secondary structural elements. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures makes it possible to find a well-defined structural basis for the conservation of many of these amino acids.

  1. Multiple Amino Acid Sequence Alignment Nitrogenase Component 1: Insights into Phylogenetics and Structure-Function Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Howard, James B.; Kechris, Katerina J.; Rees, Douglas C.; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as “core” for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf) yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification provides the bases

  2. Correlations Between Amino Acids at Different Sites in Local Sequences of Protein Fragments with Given Structural Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen; Liu, Hai-yan

    2007-02-01

    Ample evidence suggests that the local structures of peptide fragments in native proteins are to some extent encoded by their local sequences. Detecting such local correlations is important but it is still an open question what would be the most appropriate method. This is partly because conventional sequence analyses treat amino acid preferences at each site of a protein sequence independently, while it is often the inter-site interactions that bring about local sequence-structure correlations. Here a new scheme is introduced to capture the correlation between amino acid preferences at different sites for different local structure types. A library of nine-residue fragments is constructed, and the fragments are divided into clusters based on their local structures. For each local structure cluster or type, chi-square tests are used to identify correlated preferences of amino acid combinations at pairs of sites. A score function is constructed including both the single site amino acid preferences and the dual-site amino acid combination preferences, which can be used to identify whether a sequence fragment would have a strong tendency to form a particular local structure in native proteins. The results show that, given a local structure pattern, dual-site amino acid combinations contain different information from single site amino acid preferences. Representative examples show that many of the statistically identified correlations agree with previously-proposed heuristic rules about local sequence-structure correlations, or are consistent with physical-chemical interactions required to stabilize particular local structures. Results also show that such dual-site correlations in the score function significantly improves the Z-score matching a sequence fragment to its native local structure relative to non-native local structures, and certain local structure types are highly predictable from the local sequence alone if inter-site correlations are considered.

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus CECT 9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443, Acetic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Grape Must

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus strain CECT9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT8443, acetic acid bacteria isolated from grape must. Gluconobacter species are well known for their ability to oxidize sugar alcohols into the corresponding acids. Our objective was to select strains to oxidize effectively d-glucose. PMID:27365351

  4. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  5. Partial amino acid sequences around sulfhydryl groups of soybean beta-amylase.

    PubMed

    Nomura, K; Mikami, B; Morita, Y

    1987-08-01

    Sulfhydryl (SH) groups of soybean beta-amylase were modified with 5-(iodoaceto-amidoethyl)aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (IAEDANS) and the SH-containing peptides exhibiting fluorescence were purified after chymotryptic digestion of the modified enzyme. The sequence analysis of the peptides derived from the modification of all SH groups in the denatured enzyme revealed the existence of six SH groups, in contrast to five reported previously. One of them was found to have extremely low reactivity toward SH-reagents without reduction. In the native state, IAEDANS reacted with 2 mol of SH groups per mol of the enzyme (SH1 and SH2) accompanied with inactivation of the enzyme owing to the modification of SH2 located near the active site of this enzyme. The selective modification of SH2 with IAEDANS was attained after the blocking of SH1 with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). The amino acid sequences of the peptides containing SH1 and SH2 were determined to be Cys-Ala-Asn-Pro-Gln and His-Gln-Cys-Gly-Gly-Asn-Val-Gly-Asp-Ile-Val-Asn-Ile-Pro-Ile-Pro-Gln-Trp, respectively.

  6. Detection of piscine nodaviruses by real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA).

    PubMed

    Starkey, William G; Millar, Rose Mary; Jenkins, Mary E; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Muir, K Fiona; Richards, Randolph H

    2004-05-01

    Nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification procedure based on target-specific primers and probes, and the co-ordinated activity of 3 enzymes: AMV reverse transcriptase, RNase H, and T7 RNA polymerase. We have developed a real-time NASBA procedure for detection of piscine nodaviruses, which have emerged as major pathogens of marine fish. Viral RNA was isolated by guanidine thiocyanate lysis followed by purification on silica particles. Primers were designed to target sequences in the nodavirus capsid protein gene, yielding an amplification product of 120 nucleotides. Amplification products were detected in real-time with a molecular beacon (FAM labelled/methyl-red quenched) that recognised an internal region of the target amplicon. Amplification and detection were performed at 41 degrees C for 90 min in a Corbett Research Rotorgene. Based on the detection of cell culture-derived nodavirus, and a synthetic RNA target, the real-time NASBA procedure was approximately 100-fold more sensitive than single-tube RT-PCR. When used to test a panel of 37 clinical samples (negative, n = 18; positive, n = 19), the real-time NASBA assay correctly identified all 18 negative and 19 positive samples. In comparison, the RT-PCR procedure identified all 18 negative samples, but only 16 of the positive samples. These results suggest that real-time NASBA may represent a sensitive and specific diagnostic procedure for piscine nodaviruses.

  7. From amino acid sequence to bioactivity: The biomedical potential of antitumor peptides.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Gutiérrez-Jácome, Alberto; Pérez-Pérez, Martín; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gael; Catalán-García, Sandra; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-06-01

    Chemoprevention is the use of natural and/or synthetic substances to block, reverse, or retard the process of carcinogenesis. In this field, the use of antitumor peptides is of interest as, (i) these molecules are small in size, (ii) they show good cell diffusion and permeability, (iii) they affect one or more specific molecular pathways involved in carcinogenesis, and (iv) they are not usually genotoxic. We have checked the Web of Science Database (23/11/2015) in order to collect papers reporting on bioactive peptide (1691 registers), which was further filtered searching terms such as "antiproliferative," "antitumoral," or "apoptosis" among others. Works reporting the amino acid sequence of an antiproliferative peptide were kept (60 registers), and this was complemented with the peptides included in CancerPPD, an extensive resource for antiproliferative peptides and proteins. Peptides were grouped according to one of the following mechanism of action: inhibition of cell migration, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, antioxidative mechanisms, inhibition of gene transcription/cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, disorganization of tubulin structure, cytotoxicity, or unknown mechanisms. The main mechanisms of action of those antiproliferative peptides with known amino acid sequences are presented and finally, their potential clinical usefulness and future challenges on their application is discussed.

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II was determined by automated Edman degradation of the protein and selected fragments. Cleavage of the protein by enzymatic and chemical techniques established an unambiguous sequence for the protein. Lol p II contains 97 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular weight of 10,882. The protein lacks cysteine and glutamine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. Theoretical predictions by Fraga's (Fraga, S. (1982) Can. J. Chem. 60, 2606-2610) and Hopp and Woods' (Hopp, T. P., and Woods, K. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 3824-3828) methods indicate the presence of four hydrophilic regions, which may contribute to sequential or parts of conformational B-cell epitopes. Analysis of amphipathic regions by Berzofsky's method indicates the presence of a highly amphipathic region, which may contain, or contribute to, an Ia/T-cell epitope. This latter segment of Lol p II was found to be highly homologous with an antibody-binding segment of the major rye allergen Lol p I and may explain why immune responsiveness to both the allergens is associated with HLA-DR3.

  9. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-12-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses.

  10. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J H; Eng, J; Yalow, R S

    1990-01-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled pork insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report we describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. We demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in our immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. Squirrel monkey glucagon is identical with the usual glucagon found in Old World mammals, which predicts that the glucagons of other New World monkeys would not differ from the usual Old World mammalian glucagon. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species. PMID:2263627

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of the myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani.

    PubMed

    Jones, B N; Wang, C C; Dwulet, F E; Lehman, L D; Meuth, J L; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1979-04-25

    The complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the Pacific spotted dolphin, Stenella attenuata graffmani, was determined by the automated Edman degradation of several large peptides obtained by specific cleavage of the protein. The acetimidated apomyoglobin was selectively cleaved at its two methionyl residues with cyanogen bromide and at its three arginyl residues by trypsin. By subjecting four of these peptides and the apomyoglobin to automated Edman degradation, over 80% of the primary structure of the protein was obtained. The remainder of the covalent structure was determined by the sequence analysis of peptides that resulted from further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide fragment. This fragment was cleaved at its glutamyl residues with staphylococcal protease and its lysyl residues with trypsin. The action of trypsin was restricted to the lysyl residues by chemical modification of the single arginyl residue of the fragment with 1,2-cyclohexanedione. The primary structure of this myoglobin proved to be identical with that from the Atlantic bottlenosed dolphin and Pacific common dolphin but differs from the myoglobins of the killer whale and pilot whale at two positions. The above sequence identities and differences reflect the close taxonomic relationship of these five species of Cetacea. PMID:454657

  12. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jinghua ); Eng, J.; Yalow, R.S. City Univ. of New York, NY )

    1990-12-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled park insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report the authors describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. They demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in their immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species.

  13. Purification, amino acid sequence and characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II have been purified to homogeneity from kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum, thus this represents the first report of the purification, sequencing and characterisation of marsupial IGFs. N-Terminal protein sequencing reveals that there are six amino acid differences between kangaroo and human IGF-I. Kangaroo IGF-II has been partially sequenced and no differences were found between human and kangaroo IGF-II in the 53 residues identified. Thus the IGFs appear to be remarkably structurally conserved during mammalian radiation. In addition, in vitro characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I demonstrated that the functional properties of human, kangaroo and chicken IGF-I are very similar. In an assay measuring the ability of the proteins to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts, all IGF-I proteins were found to be equally potent. The ability of all three proteins to compete for binding with radiolabelled human IGF-I to type-1 IGF receptors in L6 myoblasts and in Sminthopsis crassicaudata transformed lung fibroblasts, a marsupial cell line, was comparable. Furthermore, kangaroo and human IGF-I react equally in a human IGF-I RIA using a human reference standard, radiolabelled human IGF-I and a polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human IGF-I. This study indicates that not only is the primary structure of eutherian and metatherian IGF-I conserved, but also the proteins appear to be functionally similar.

  14. The evolution of proteins from random amino acid sequences: II. Evidence from the statistical distributions of the lengths of modern protein sequences.

    PubMed

    White, S H

    1994-04-01

    This paper continues an examination of the hypothesis that modern proteins evolved from random heteropeptide sequences. In support of the hypothesis, White and Jacobs (1993, J Mol Evol 36:79-95) have shown that any sequence chosen randomly from a large collection of nonhomologous proteins has a 90% or better chance of having a lengthwise distribution of amino acids that is indistinguishable from the random expectation regardless of amino acid type. The goal of the present study was to investigate the possibility that the random-origin hypothesis could explain the lengths of modern protein sequences without invoking specific mechanisms such as gene duplication or exon splicing. The sets of sequences examined were taken from the 1989 PIR database and consisted of 1,792 "super-family" proteins selected to have little sequence identity, 623 E. coli sequences, and 398 human sequences. The length distributions of the proteins could be described with high significance by either of two closely related probability density functions: The gamma distribution with parameter 2 or the distribution for the sum of two exponential random independent variables. A simple theory for the distributions was developed which assumes that (1) protoprotein sequences had exponentially distributed random independent lengths, (2) the length dependence of protein stability determined which of these protoproteins could fold into compact primitive proteins and thereby attain the potential for biochemical activity, (3) the useful protein sequences were preserved by the primitive genome, and (4) the resulting distribution of sequence lengths is reflected by modern proteins. The theory successfully predicts the two observed distributions which can be distinguished by the functional form of the dependence of protein stability on length. The theory leads to three interesting conclusions. First, it predicts that a tetra-nucleotide was the signal for primitive translation termination. This prediction is

  15. Sequence Design for a Test Tube of Interacting Nucleic Acid Strands.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Brian R; Pierce, Niles A

    2015-10-16

    We describe an algorithm for designing the equilibrium base-pairing properties of a test tube of interacting nucleic acid strands. A target test tube is specified as a set of desired "on-target" complexes, each with a target secondary structure and target concentration, and a set of undesired "off-target" complexes, each with vanishing target concentration. Sequence design is performed by optimizing the test tube ensemble defect, corresponding to the concentration of incorrectly paired nucleotides at equilibrium evaluated over the ensemble of the test tube. To reduce the computational cost of accepting or rejecting mutations to a random initial sequence, the structural ensemble of each on-target complex is hierarchically decomposed into a tree of conditional subensembles, yielding a forest of decomposition trees. Candidate sequences are evaluated efficiently at the leaf level of the decomposition forest by estimating the test tube ensemble defect from conditional physical properties calculated over the leaf subensembles. As optimized subsequences are merged toward the root level of the forest, any emergent defects are eliminated via ensemble redecomposition and sequence reoptimization. After successfully merging subsequences to the root level, the exact test tube ensemble defect is calculated for the first time, explicitly checking for the effect of the previously neglected off-target complexes. Any off-target complexes that form at appreciable concentration are hierarchically decomposed, added to the decomposition forest, and actively destabilized during subsequent forest reoptimization. For target test tubes representative of design challenges in the molecular programming and synthetic biology communities, our test tube design algorithm typically succeeds in achieving a normalized test tube ensemble defect ≤1% at a design cost within an order of magnitude of the cost of test tube analysis.

  16. Sequence-Specific Electrical Purification of Nucleic Acids with Nanoporous Gold Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Daggumati, Pallavi; Appelt, Sandra; Matharu, Zimple; Marco, Maria L; Seker, Erkin

    2016-06-22

    Nucleic-acid-based biosensors have enabled rapid and sensitive detection of pathogenic targets; however, these devices often require purified nucleic acids for analysis since the constituents of complex biological fluids adversely affect sensor performance. This purification step is typically performed outside the device, thereby increasing sample-to-answer time and introducing contaminants. We report a novel approach using a multifunctional matrix, nanoporous gold (np-Au), which enables both detection of specific target sequences in a complex biological sample and their subsequent purification. The np-Au electrodes modified with 26-mer DNA probes (via thiol-gold chemistry) enabled sensitive detection and capture of complementary DNA targets in the presence of complex media (fetal bovine serum) and other interfering DNA fragments in the range of 50-1500 base pairs. Upon capture, the noncomplementary DNA fragments and serum constituents of varying sizes were washed away. Finally, the surface-bound DNA-DNA hybrids were released by electrochemically cleaving the thiol-gold linkage, and the hybrids were iontophoretically eluted from the nanoporous matrix. The optical and electrophoretic characterization of the analytes before and after the detection-purification process revealed that low target DNA concentrations (80 pg/μL) can be successfully detected in complex biological fluids and subsequently released to yield pure hybrids free of polydisperse digested DNA fragments and serum biomolecules. Taken together, this multifunctional platform is expected to enable seamless integration of detection and purification of nucleic acid biomarkers of pathogens and diseases in miniaturized diagnostic devices.

  17. Amino acid sequence analysis and characterization of a ribonuclease from starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Itagaki, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to phylogenetically characterize the location of the RNase T2 enzyme in the starfish (Asterias amurensis). We isolated an RNase T2 ribonuclease (RNase Aa) from the ovaries of starfish and determined its amino acid sequence by protein chemistry and cloning cDNA encoding RNase Aa. The isolated protein had 231 amino acid residues, a predicted molecular mass of 25,906 Da, and an optimal pH of 5.0. RNase Aa preferentially released guanylic acid from the RNA. The catalytic sites of the RNase T2 family are conserved in RNase Aa; furthermore, the distribution of the cysteine residues in RNase Aa is similar to that in other animal and plant T2 RNases. RNase Aa is cleaved at two points: 21 residues from the N-terminus and 29 residues from the C-terminus; however, both fragments may remain attached to the protein via disulfide bridges, leading to the maintenance of its conformation, as suggested by circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that starfish RNase Aa is evolutionarily an intermediate between protozoan and oyster RNases. PMID:26920046

  18. Sequence analysis of genes encoding ribosomal proteins of amitochondriate protists: L1 of Trichomonas vaginalis and L29 of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Hashimoto, T

    1999-08-01

    Two genes encoding the ribosomal proteins were cloned and sequenced from amitochondriate protists, L1 (L10a in mammalian nomenclature) from Trichomonas vaginalis and L29 (L35 in mammalian nomenclature) from Giardia lamblia. The deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed by sequence alignments and phylogenetic reconstructions. Both the T. vaginalis L1 and the G. lamblia L29 displayed eukaryotic sequence features, when compared with all the homologs from the three primary kingdoms.

  19. Amino acid sequences of neuropeptides in the sinus gland of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex: a novel neuropeptide proteolysis site.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, R W

    1987-08-01

    The sinus gland is a major neurosecretory structure in Crustacea. Five peptides, labeled C, D, E, F, and I, isolated from the sinus gland of the land crab have been hypothesized to arise from the incomplete proteolysis at two internal sites on a single biosynthetic intermediate peptide "H", based on amino acid composition additivities and pulse-chase radiolabeling studies. The presence of only a single major precursor for the sinus gland peptides implies that peptide H may be synthesized on a common precursor with crustacean hyperglycemic hormone forms, "J" and "L," and a peptide, "K," similar to peptides with molt inhibiting activity. Here I report amino acid sequences of these peptides. The amino terminal sequence of the parent peptide, H, (and the homologous fragments) proved refractory to Edman degradation. Data from amino acid analysis and carboxypeptidase digestion of the naturally occurring fragments and of fragments produced by endopeptidase digestion were used together with Edman degradation to obtain the sequences. Amino acid analysis of fragments of the naturally occurring "overlap" peptides (those produced by internal cleavage at one site on H) was used to obtain the sequences across the cleavage sites. The amino acid sequence of the land crab peptide H is Arg-Ser-Ala-Asp-Gly-Phe-Gly-Arg-Met-Glu-Ser-Leu-Leu-Thr-Ser-Leu-Arg-Gly- Ser-Ala-Glu- Ser-Pro-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly-Glu-Ala-Ser-Ala-Ala-His-Pro-Leu-Glu. In vivo cleavage at one site involves excision of arginine from the sequence Leu-Arg-Gly, whereas cleavage at the other site involves excision of serine from the sequence Glu-Ser-Leu. Proteolysis at the latter sequence has not been previously reported in intact secretory granules. The aspartate at position 4 is possibly covalently modified.

  20. Enzyme-free translation of DNA into sequence-defined synthetic polymers structurally unrelated to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jia; Hili, Ryan; Liu, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The translation of DNA sequences into corresponding biopolymers enables the production, function and evolution of the macromolecules of life. In contrast, methods to generate sequence-defined synthetic polymers with similar levels of control have remained elusive. Here, we report the development of a DNA-templated translation system that enables the enzyme-free translation of DNA templates into sequence-defined synthetic polymers that have no necessary structural relationship with nucleic acids. We demonstrate the efficiency, sequence-specificity and generality of this translation system by oligomerizing building blocks including polyethylene glycol, α-(D)-peptides, and β-peptides in a DNA-programmed manner. Sequence-defined synthetic polymers with molecular weights of 26 kDa containing 16 consecutively coupled building blocks and 90 densely functionalized β-amino acid residues were translated from DNA templates using this strategy. We integrated the DNA-templated translation system developed here into a complete cycle of translation, coding sequence replication, template regeneration and re-translation suitable for the iterated in vitro selection of functional sequence-defined synthetic polymers unrelated in structure to nucleic acids.

  1. Finite pure integer programming algorithms employing only hyperspherically deduced cuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Three algorithms are developed that may be based exclusively on hyperspherically deduced cuts. The algorithms only apply, therefore, to problems structured so that these cuts are valid. The algorithms are shown to be finite.

  2. Boronic acid functionalized peptidyl synthetic lectins: Combinatorial library design, peptide sequencing, and selective glycoprotein recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bicker, Kevin L.; Sun, Jing; Lavigne, John J.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of cell membrane and secreted glycoproteins is a hallmark of various disease states, including cancer. The natural lectins currently used in the recognition of these glycoproteins are costly, difficult to produce, and unstable towards rigorous use. Herein we describe the design and synthesis of several boronic acid functionalized peptide-based synthetic lectin (SL) libraries, as well as the optimized methodology for obtaining peptide sequences of these SLs. SL libraries were subsequently used to identify SLs with as high as 5-fold selectivity for various glycoproteins. SLs will inevitably find a role in cancer diagnositics, given that they do not suffer from the drawbacks of natural lectins and that the combinatorial nature of these libraries allows for the identification of an SL for nearly any glycosylated biomolecule. PMID:21405093

  3. Kinetics of amyloid aggregation of mammal apomyoglobins and correlation with their amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Vilasi, Silvia; Dosi, Roberta; Iannuzzi, Clara; Malmo, Clorinda; Parente, Augusto; Irace, Gaetano; Sirangelo, Ivana

    2006-03-01

    In protein deposition disorders, a normally soluble protein is deposited as insoluble aggregates, referred to as amyloid. The intrinsic effects of specific mutations on the rates of protein aggregation and amyloid formation of unfolded polypeptide chains can be correlated with changes in hydrophobicity, propensity to convert alpha-helical to beta sheet conformation and charge. In this paper, we report the aggregation rates of buffalo, horse and bovine apomyoglobins. The experimental values were compared with the theoretical ones evaluated considering the amino acid differences among the sequences. Our results show that the mutations which play critical roles in the rate-determining step of apomyoglobin aggregation are those located within the N-terminal region of the molecule.

  4. GAWK, a novel human pituitary polypeptide: isolation, immunocytochemical localization and complete amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Benjannet, S; Leduc, R; Lazure, C; Seidah, N G; Marcinkiewicz, M; Chrétien, M

    1985-01-16

    During the course of reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) purification of a postulated big ACTH (1) from human pituitary gland extracts, a highly purified peptide bearing no resemblance to any known polypeptide was isolated. The complete sequence of this 74 amino acid polypeptide, called GAWK, has been determined. Search on a computer data bank on the possible homology to any known protein or fragment, using a mutation data matrix, failed to reveal any homology greater than 30%. An antibody produced against a synthetic fragment allowed us to detect several immunoreactive forms. The antisera also enabled us to localize the polypeptide, by immunocytochemistry, in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.

  5. Evolutionary connections of biological kingdoms based on protein and nucleic acid sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolutionary trees are developed from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the methods of numerical taxonomy. Trees are presented for bacterial ferredoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes , cytochromes c2 and c', and 5.8S ribosomal RNA; the implications for early evolution are discussed; and a composite tree showing the branching of the anaerobes, aerobes, archaebacteria, and eukaryotes is shown. Single lines are found for all oxygen-evolving photosynthetic forms and for the salt-loving and high-temperature forms of archaebacteria. It is argued that the eukaryote mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytoplasmic host material are descended from free-living prokaryotes that formed symbiotic associations, with more than one symbiotic event involved in the evolution of each organelle.

  6. Identification of amino acid sequences in the polyomavirus capsid proteins that serve as nuclear localization signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. Jr; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The molecular mechanism participating in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Recently, the nuclear localization signal sequences (NLS) of many nuclear proteins have been identified, and most have been found to be composed of a highly basic amino acid stretch. A genetic "subtractive" and a biochemical "additive" approach were used in our studies to identify the NLS's of the polyomavirus structural capsid proteins. An NLS was identified at the N-terminus (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) of the major capsid protein VP1 and at the C-terminus (Glu307 -Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Glu-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) of the VP2/VP3 minor capsid proteins.

  7. Purification, properties and complete amino acid sequence of the ferredoxin from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, J M; Jacquot, J P; de Lamotte-Guéry, F; Beauvallet, C; Dutka, S; Gadal, P; Decottignies, P

    1988-03-01

    The ferredoxin was purified from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protein showed typical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. When compared with spinach ferredoxin, the C. reinhardtii protein was less effective in the catalysis of NADP+ photoreduction, but its activity was higher in the light activation of C. reinhardtii malate dehydrogenase (NADP). The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and of peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions and by CNBr cleavage. The protein consists of 94 residues, with Tyr at both NH2 and COOH termini. The positions of the four cysteines binding the two iron atoms are similar to those found in other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The primary structure of C. reinhardtii ferredoxin showed a great homology (about 80%) with ferredoxins from two other green algae.

  8. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification in nanoliter volumes.

    PubMed

    Gulliksen, Anja; Solli, Lars; Karlsen, Frank; Rogne, Henrik; Hovig, Eivind; Nordstrøm, Trine; Sirevåg, Reidun

    2004-01-01

    Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal method specifically designed for amplification of RNA. Fluorescent molecular beacon probes enable real-time monitoring of the amplification process. Successful identification, utilizing the real-time NASBA technology, was performed on a microchip with oligonucleotides at a concentration of 1.0 and 0.1 microM, in 10- and 50-nL reaction chambers, respectively. The microchip was developed in a silicon-glass structure. An instrument providing thermal control and an optical detection system was built for amplification readout. Experimental results demonstrate distinct amplification processes. Miniaturized real-time NASBA in microchips makes high-throughput diagnostics of bacteria, viruses, and cancer markers possible, at reduced cost and without contamination.

  9. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay for detection of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Abd el-Galil, Khaled H; el-Sokkary, M A; Kheira, S M; Salazar, Andre M; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2005-11-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay in combination with a molecular beacon was developed for the real-time detection and quantification of hepatitis A virus (HAV). A 202-bp, highly conserved 5' noncoding region of HAV was targeted. The sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was tested with 10-fold dilutions of viral RNA, and a detection limit of 1 PFU was obtained. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by testing with other environmental pathogens and indicator microorganisms, with only HAV positively identified. When combined with immunomagnetic separation, the NASBA assay successfully detected as few as 10 PFU from seeded lake water samples. Due to its isothermal nature, its speed, and its similar sensitivity compared to the real-time RT-PCR assay, this newly reported real-time NASBA method will have broad applications for the rapid detection of HAV in contaminated food or water.

  10. Detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus by real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification.

    PubMed

    Starkey, William G; Smail, David A; Bleie, Hogne; Muir, K Fiona; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Richards, Randolph H

    2006-10-17

    We have developed a real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) procedure for detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Primers were designed to target a 124 nucleotide region of ISAV genome segment 8. Amplification products were detected in real-time with a molecular beacon (carboxyfluorescin [FAM]-labelled and methyl-red quenched) that recognised an internal region of the target amplicon. Amplification and detection were performed at 41 degrees C for 90 min in a Corbett Research Rotorgene. The real-time NASBA assay was compared to a conventional RT-PCR for ISAV detection. From a panel of 45 clinical samples, both assays detected ISAV in the same 19 samples. Based on the detection of a synthetic RNA target, the real-time NASBA procedure was approximately 100x more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR. These results suggest that real-time NASBA may represent a useful diagnostic procedure for ISAV.

  11. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes.

  12. Parameters of proteome evolution from histograms of amino-acid sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, Jacob Bock; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Maslov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    Background The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is mostly driven by gene duplications, deletions, and sequence modifications of existing proteins. Indirect information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the proteome-wide distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. Results We introduce a simple mathematical framework based on a stochastic birth-and-death model that allows one to extract some of this information and apply it to the set of all pairs of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and H. sapiens. It was found that the histogram of sequence identities p generated by an all-to-all alignment of all protein sequences encoded in a genome is well fitted with a power-law form ~ p-γ with the value of the exponent γ around 4 for the majority of organisms used in this study. This implies that the intra-protein variability of substitution rates is best described by the Gamma-distribution with the exponent α ≈ 0.33. Different features of the shape of such histograms allow us to quantify the ratio between the genome-wide average deletion/duplication rates and the amino-acid substitution rate. Conclusion We separately measure the short-term ("raw") duplication and deletion rates rdup∗, rdel∗ which include gene copies that will be removed soon after the duplication event and their dramatically reduced long-term counterparts rdup, rdel. High deletion rate among recently duplicated proteins is consistent with a scenario in which they didn't have enough time to significantly change their functional roles and thus are to a large degree disposable. Systematic trends of each of the four duplication/deletion rates with the total number of genes in the genome were analyzed. All but the deletion rate of recent duplicates rdel∗ were shown to systematically increase with Ngenes. Abnormally flat shapes

  13. Cloning and sequencing of Indian water buffalo interleukin-18 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, P; Bera, B C

    2005-04-01

    Summary Full-length cDNA (582 bp) of the interleukin-18 (IL-18) gene of the Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence has 99% and 95% similarity with the IL-18 sequences of cattle and sheep, respectively. There are two amino acid substitutions at positions 132 and 182 in buffalo IL-18 compared with that of cattle. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the IL-18 sequence of fish forms a different lineage and is most divergent from that of cattle, buffalo, sheep, pig, dog, horse, human, monkey, mouse, rat and chicken.

  14. Trypsin inhibitors from ridged gourd (Luffa acutangula Linn.) seeds: purification, properties, and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Haldar, U C; Saha, S K; Beavis, R C; Sinha, N K

    1996-02-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors, LA-1 and LA-2, have been isolated from ridged gourd (Luffa acutangula Linn.) seeds and purified to homogeneity by gel filtration followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The isoelectric point is at pH 4.55 for LA-1 and at pH 5.85 for LA-2. The Stokes radius of each inhibitor is 11.4 A. The fluorescence emission spectrum of each inhibitor is similar to that of the free tyrosine. The biomolecular rate constant of acrylamide quenching is 1.0 x 10(9) M-1 sec-1 for LA-1 and 0.8 x 10(9) M-1 sec-1 for LA-2 and that of K2HPO4 quenching is 1.6 x 10(11) M-1 sec-1 for LA-1 and 1.2 x 10(11) M-1 sec-1 for LA-2. Analysis of the circular dichroic spectra yields 40% alpha-helix and 60% beta-turn for La-1 and 45% alpha-helix and 55% beta-turn for LA-2. Inhibitors LA-1 and LA-2 consist of 28 and 29 amino acid residues, respectively. They lack threonine, alanine, valine, and tryptophan. Both inhibitors strongly inhibit trypsin by forming enzyme-inhibitor complexes at a molar ratio of unity. A chemical modification study suggests the involvement of arginine of LA-1 and lysine of LA-2 in their reactive sites. The inhibitors are very similar in their amino acid sequences, and show sequence homology with other squash family inhibitors. PMID:8924202

  15. Microfluidic platform for isolating nucleic acid targets using sequence specific hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Morabito, Kenneth; Tang, Jay X.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2013-01-01

    The separation of target nucleic acid sequences from biological samples has emerged as a significant process in today's diagnostics and detection strategies. In addition to the possible clinical applications, the fundamental understanding of target and sequence specific hybridization on surface modified magnetic beads is of high value. In this paper, we describe a novel microfluidic platform that utilizes a mobile magnetic field in static microfluidic channels, where single stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules are isolated via nucleic acid hybridization. We first established efficient isolation of biotinylated capture probe (BP) using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. Subsequently, we investigated the hybridization of target ssDNA with BP bound to beads and explained these hybridization kinetics using a dual-species kinetic model. The number of hybridized target ssDNA molecules was determined to be about 6.5 times less than that of BP on the bead surface, due to steric hindrance effects. The hybridization of target ssDNA with non-complementary BP bound to bead was also examined, and non-specific hybridization was found to be insignificant. Finally, we demonstrated highly efficient capture and isolation of target ssDNA in the presence of non-target ssDNA, where as low as 1% target ssDNA can be detected from mixture. The microfluidic method described in this paper is significantly relevant and is broadly applicable, especially towards point-of-care biological diagnostic platforms that require binding and separation of known target biomolecules, such as RNA, ssDNA, or protein. PMID:24404041

  16. Detection of Vibrio cholerae by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Fykse, Else M; Skogan, Gunnar; Davies, William; Olsen, Jaran Strand; Blatny, Janet M

    2007-03-01

    A multitarget molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay for the specific detection of Vibrio cholerae has been developed. The genes encoding the cholera toxin (ctxA), the toxin-coregulated pilus (tcpA; colonization factor), the ctxA toxin regulator (toxR), hemolysin (hlyA), and the 60-kDa chaperonin product (groEL) were selected as target sequences for detection. The beacons for the five different genetic targets were evaluated by serial dilution of RNA from V. cholerae cells. RNase treatment of the nucleic acids eliminated all NASBA, whereas DNase treatment had no effect, showing that RNA and not DNA was amplified. The specificity of the assay was investigated by testing several isolates of V. cholerae, other Vibrio species, and Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli strains. The toxR, groEL, and hlyA beacons identified all V. cholerae isolates, whereas the ctxA and tcpA beacons identified the O1 toxigenic clinical isolates. The NASBA assay detected V. cholerae at 50 CFU/ml by using the general marker groEL and tcpA that specifically indicates toxigenic strains. A correlation between cell viability and NASBA was demonstrated for the ctxA, toxR, and hlyA targets. RNA isolated from different environmental water samples spiked with V. cholerae was specifically detected by NASBA. These results indicate that NASBA can be used in the rapid detection of V. cholerae from various environmental water samples. This method has a strong potential for detecting toxigenic strains by using the tcpA and ctxA markers. The entire assay including RNA extraction and NASBA was completed within 3 h.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of beta-papillomaviruses as inferred from nucleotide and amino acid sequence data.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Marc; Köhler, Anja; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the beta-group seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. Papillomaviruses are host specific and are considered closely co-evolving with their hosts. Evolutionary incongruence between early genes and late genes has been reported among oncogenic genital alpha-papillomaviruses and considerably challenge phylogenetic reconstructions. We investigated the relationships of 29 beta-HPV (25 types plus four putative new types, subtypes, or variants) as inferred from codon aligned and amino acid sequence data of the genes E1, E2, E6, E7, L1, and L2 using likelihood, distance, and parsimony approaches. An analysis of a L1 fragment included additional nucleotide and amino acid sequences from seven non-human beta-papillomaviruses. Early genes and late genes evolution did not conflict significantly in beta-papillomaviruses based on partition homogeneity tests (p > or = 0.001). As inferred from the complete genome analyses, beta-papillomaviruses were monophyletic and segregated into four highly supported monophyletic assemblages corresponding to the species 1, 2, 3, and fused 4/5. They basically split into the species 1 and the remainder of beta-papillomaviruses, whose species 3, 4, and 5 constituted the sistergroup of species 2. beta-Papillomaviruses have been isolated from humans, apes, and monkeys, and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment showed non-human papillomaviruses highly polyphyletic nesting within the HPV species. Thus, host and virus phylogenies were not congruent in beta-papillomaviruses, and multiple invasions across species borders may contribute (additionally to host-linked evolution) to their diversification.

  18. A single molecular beacon probe is sufficient for the analysis of multiple nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Hayson, Aaron; Ballantyne, Jack; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2010-08-16

    Molecular beacon (MB) probes are dual-labeled hairpin-shaped oligodeoxyribonucleotides that are extensively used for real-time detection of specific RNA/DNA analytes. In the MB probe, the loop fragment is complementary to the analyte: therefore, a unique probe is required for the analysis of each new analyte sequence. The conjugation of an oligonucleotide with two dyes and subsequent purification procedures add to the cost of MB probes, thus reducing their application in multiplex formats. Here we demonstrate how one MB probe can be used for the analysis of an arbitrary nucleic acid. The approach takes advantage of two oligonucleotide adaptor strands, each of which contains a fragment complementary to the analyte and a fragment complementary to an MB probe. The presence of the analyte leads to association of MB probe and the two DNA strands in quadripartite complex. The MB probe fluorescently reports the formation of this complex. In this design, the MB does not bind the analyte directly; therefore, the MB sequence is independent of the analyte. In this study one universal MB probe was used to genotype three human polymorphic sites. This approach promises to reduce the cost of multiplex real-time assays and improve the accuracy of single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping.

  19. Canine amino acid transport system Xc(-): cDNA sequence, distribution and cystine transport activity in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Takuya; Kanemaki, Nobuyuki; Onda, Ken; Sato, Reiichiro; Ichihara, Nobuteru; Ochiai, Hideharu

    2014-04-01

    The cystine transport activity of a lens epithelial cell line originated from a canine mature cataract was investigated. The distinct cystine transport activity was observed, which was inhibited to 28% by extracellular 1 mM glutamate. The cDNA sequences of canine cysteine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and 4F2hc were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences were 527 and 533 amino acid polypeptides, respectively. The amino acid sequences of canine xCT and 4F2hc showed high similarities (>80%) to those of humans. The expression of xCT in lens epithelial cell line was confirmed by western blot analysis. RT-PCR analysis revealed high level expression only in the brain, and it was below the detectable level in other tissues.

  20. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Smith, R.F.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  1. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT.

  2. Amino acid sequence surrounding the chondroitin sulfate attachment site of thrombomodulin regulates chondroitin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Izumikawa, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a cell-surface glycoprotein and a critical mediator of endothelial anticoagulant function. TM exists as both a chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycan (PG) form and a non-PG form lacking a CS chain (α-TM); therefore, TM can be described as a part-time PG. Previously, we reported that α-TM bears an immature, truncated linkage tetrasaccharide structure (GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl). However, the biosynthetic mechanism to generate part-time PGs remains unclear. In this study, we used several mutants to demonstrate that the amino acid sequence surrounding the CS attachment site influences the efficiency of chondroitin polymerization. In particular, the presence of acidic residues surrounding the CS attachment site was indispensable for the elongation of CS. In addition, mutants defective in CS elongation did not exhibit anti-coagulant activity, as in the case with α-TM. Together, these data support a model for CS chain assembly in which specific core protein determinants are recognized by a key biosynthetic enzyme involved in chondroitin polymerization.

  3. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT. PMID:25708409

  4. A novel phytase with sequence similarity to purple acid phosphatases is expressed in cotyledons of germinating soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, C E; Grabau, E A

    2001-08-01

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate) is the major storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds. During germination, stored reserves are used as a source of nutrients by the plant seedling. Phytic acid is degraded by the activity of phytases to yield inositol and free phosphate. Due to the lack of phytases in the non-ruminant digestive tract, monogastric animals cannot utilize dietary phytic acid and it is excreted into manure. High phytic acid content in manure results in elevated phosphorus levels in soil and water and accompanying environmental concerns. The use of phytases to degrade seed phytic acid has potential for reducing the negative environmental impact of livestock production. A phytase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from cotyledons of germinated soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.). Peptide sequence data generated from the purified enzyme facilitated the cloning of the phytase sequence (GmPhy) employing a polymerase chain reaction strategy. The introduction of GmPhy into soybean tissue culture resulted in increased phytase activity in transformed cells, which confirmed the identity of the phytase gene. It is surprising that the soybean phytase was unrelated to previously characterized microbial or maize (Zea mays) phytases, which were classified as histidine acid phosphatases. The soybean phytase sequence exhibited a high degree of similarity to purple acid phosphatases, a class of metallophosphoesterases.

  5. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  6. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  7. Cloning of an Erwinia herbicola gene necessary for gluconic acid production and enhanced mineral phosphate solubilization in Escherichia coli HB101: nucleotide sequence and probable involvement in biosynthesis of the coenzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Liu, S T; Lee, L Y; Tai, C Y; Hung, C H; Chang, Y S; Wolfram, J H; Rogers, R; Goldstein, A H

    1992-09-01

    Escherichia coli is capable of synthesizing the apo-glucose dehydrogenase enzyme (GDH) but not the cofactor pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), which is essential for formation of the holoenzyme. Therefore, in the absence of exogenous PQQ, E. coli does not produce gluconic acid. Evidence is presented to show that the expression of an Erwinia herbicola gene in E. coli HB101(pMCG898) resulted in the production of gluconic acid, which, in turn, implied PQQ biosynthesis. Transposon mutagenesis showed that the essential gene or locus was within a 1.8-kb region of a 4.5-kb insert of the plasmid pMCG898. This 1.8-kb region contained only one apparent open reading frame. In this paper, we present the nucleotide sequence of this open reading frame, a 1,134-bp DNA fragment coding for a protein with an M(r) of 42,160. The deduced sequence of this protein had a high degree of homology with that of gene III (M(r), 43,600) of a PQQ synthase gene complex from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus previously identified by Goosen et al. (J. Bacteriol. 171:447-455, 1989). In minicell analysis, pMCG898 encoded a protein with an M(r) of 41,000. These data indicate that E. coli HB101(pMCG898) produced the GDH-PQQ holoenzyme, which, in turn, catalyzed the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid in the periplasmic space. As a result of the gluconic acid production, E. coli HB101(pMCG898) showed an enhanced mineral phosphate-solubilizing phenotype due to acid dissolution of the hydroxyapatite substrate.

  8. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo-Ik ); Hammes, G.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  9. Polyvinyl-alcohol-based magnetic beads for rapid and efficient separation of specific or unspecific nucleic acid sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Jürgen; Parker, Jeffrey; à Brassard, Lothar

    2001-01-01

    The versatile application of polyvinyl-alcohol-based magnetic M-PVA beads is demonstrated in the separation of genomic DNA, sequence specific nucleic acid purification, and binding of bacteria for subsequent DNA extraction and detection. It is shown that nucleic acids can be obtained in high yield and purity using M-PVA beads, making sample preparation efficient, fast and highly adaptable for automation processes.

  10. Pancreatic ribonucleases of mammals with ruminant-like digestion. Amino-acid sequences of hippopotamus and sloth ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Havinga, J; Beintema, J J

    1980-09-01

    High levels of pancreatic ribonucleases are found in ruminants, species that have a ruminant-like digestion and several species with coecal digestion. Pancreatic ribonucleases from several independently evolved species with ruminant-like digestion were investigated to test a hypothesis that glycosylation of ribonucleases may have some function in species with coecal digestion and that glycosylation of the enzyme may not be advantageous for ruminants. Ribonucleases from the hippopotamus, two-toed sloth and three-toed sloth were isolated by extraction with sulfuric acid and affinity chromatography. Complete amino acid sequences were determined for the ribonucleases from the hippopotamus and two-toed sloth and a partial sequence for the enzyme from the three-toed sloth. The amino acids 75-78 of hippopotamus ribonuclease were positioned by homology with other artiodactyl ribonucleases. In hippopotamus ribonuclease a heterogeneity was found at position 37, half of the molecules containing glutamine acid the other half lysine. Hippopotamus ribonuclease differs less from pig and bovine ribonuclease than these differ from each other, because more ancestral characteristics have been retained. Although hippopotamus ribonuclease contains all four Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences previously found to be glycosylation sites in one or more pancreatic ribonucleases, only the sequence Ans-Met-Thr (34-36) is glycosylated in the variant with glutamine at position 37, while the variant with lysine at this position is carbohydrate-free. Both sloth ribonucleases are completely glycosylated at the sequence Ans-Met-Thr (34-36) with a simple type of carbohydrate chain. The amino acid sequence of two-toed sloth ribonuclease shows some interesting coupled replacements.

  11. Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation

    DOEpatents

    Castro, Alonso

    2004-06-01

    A method for rapid and efficient detection of a target DNA or RNA sequence is provided. A primer having a 3'-hydroxyl group at one end and having a sequence of nucleotides sufficiently homologous with an identifying sequence of nucleotides in the target DNA is selected. The primer is hybridized to the identifying sequence of nucleotides on the DNA or RNA sequence and a reporter molecule is synthesized on the target sequence by progressively binding complementary nucleotides to the primer, where the complementary nucleotides include nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. Fluorescence emitted by fluorophores on single reporter molecules is detected to identify the target DNA or RNA sequence.

  12. Detection of Dengue Viral RNA Using a Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.; Lee, Eun Mi; Putvatana, Ravithat; Shurtliff, Roxanne N.; Porter, Kevin R.; Suharyono, Wuryadi; Watts, Douglas M.; King, Chwan-Chuen; Murphy, Gerald S.; Hayes, Curtis G.; Romano, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    Faster techniques are needed for the early diagnosis of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever during the acute viremic phase of infection. An isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay was optimized to amplify viral RNA of all four dengue virus serotypes by a set of universal primers and to type the amplified products by serotype-specific capture probes. The NASBA assay involved the use of silica to extract viral nucleic acid, which was amplified without thermocycling. The amplified product was detected by a probe-hybridization method that utilized electrochemiluminescence. Using normal human plasma spiked with dengue viruses, the NASBA assay had a detection threshold of 1 to 10 PFU/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were determined by testing 67 dengue virus-positive and 21 dengue virus-negative human serum or plasma samples. The “gold standard” used for comparison and evaluation was the mosquito C6/36 cell culture assay followed by an immunofluorescent assay. Viral infectivity titers in test samples were also determined by a direct plaque assay in Vero cells. The NASBA assay was able to detect dengue viral RNA in the clinical samples at plaque titers below 25 PFU/ml (the detection limit of the plaque assay). Of the 67 samples found positive by the C6/36 assay, 66 were found positive by the NASBA assay, for a sensitivity of 98.5%. The NASBA assay had a specificity of 100% based on the negative test results for the 21 normal human serum or plasma samples. These results indicate that the NASBA assay is a promising assay for the early diagnosis of dengue infections. PMID:11473994

  13. Identification of tropomyosins as major allergens in antarctic krill and mantis shrimp and their amino acid sequence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Kanna; Suma, Yota; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Lu, Ying; Ushio, Hideki; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Tropomyosin represents a major allergen of decapod crustaceans such as shrimps and crabs, and its highly conserved amino acid sequence (>90% identity) is a molecular basis of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity among decapods. At present, however, little information is available about allergens in edible crustaceans other than decapods. In this study, the major allergen in two species of edible crustaceans, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba and mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria that are taxonomically distinct from decapods, was demonstrated to be tropomyosin by IgE-immunoblotting using patient sera. The cross-reactivity of the tropomyosins from both species with decapod tropomyosins was also confirmed by inhibition IgE immunoblotting. Sequences of the tropomyosins from both species were determined by complementary deoxyribonucleic acid cloning. The mantis shrimp tropomyosin has high sequence identity (>90% identity) with decapod tropomyosins, especially with fast-type tropomyosins. On the other hand, the Antarctic krill tropomyosin is characterized by diverse alterations in region 13-42, the amino acid sequence of which is highly conserved for decapod tropomyosins, and hence, it shares somewhat lower sequence identity (82.4-89.8% identity) with decapod tropomyosins than the mantis shrimp tropomyosin. Quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that Antarctic krill contains tropomyosin at almost the same level as decapods, suggesting that its allergenicity is equivalent to decapods. However, mantis shrimp was assumed to be substantially not allergenic because of the extremely low content of tropomyosin. PMID:18521668

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk

    PubMed Central

    Meneghel, Julie; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. PMID:26941141

  15. Update of PROFEAT: a web server for computing structural and physicochemical features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Rao, H B; Zhu, F; Yang, G B; Li, Z R; Chen, Y Z

    2011-07-01

    Sequence-derived structural and physicochemical features have been extensively used for analyzing and predicting structural, functional, expression and interaction profiles of proteins and peptides. PROFEAT has been developed as a web server for computing commonly used features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence. To facilitate more extensive studies of protein and peptides, numerous improvements and updates have been made to PROFEAT. We added new functions for computing descriptors of protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions, segment descriptors for local properties of protein sequences, topological descriptors for peptide sequences and small molecule structures. We also added new feature groups for proteins and peptides (pseudo-amino acid composition, amphiphilic pseudo-amino acid composition, total amino acid properties and atomic-level topological descriptors) as well as for small molecules (atomic-level topological descriptors). Overall, PROFEAT computes 11 feature groups of descriptors for proteins and peptides, and a feature group of more than 400 descriptors for small molecules plus the derived features for protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. Our computational algorithms have been extensively tested and used in a number of published works for predicting proteins of specific structural or functional classes, protein-protein interactions, peptides of specific functions and quantitative structure activity relationships of small molecules. PROFEAT is accessible free of charge at http://bidd.cz3.nus.edu.sg/cgi-bin/prof/protein/profnew.cgi.

  16. Genome Sequence of a Candidate World Health Organization Reference Strain of Zika Virus for Nucleic Acid Testing

    PubMed Central

    Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Musso, Didier; Blümel, Johannes; Thézé, Julien; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the sequence of a candidate reference strain of Zika virus (ZIKV) developed on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO). The ZIKV reference strain is intended for use in nucleic acid amplification (NAT)-based assays for the detection and quantification of ZIKV RNA. PMID:27587826

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia stabilis LA20W, a Trehalose Producer That Uses Levulinic Acid as a Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuya; Koike, Hideaki; Kondo, Susumu; Hori, Tomoyuki; Kanno, Manabu; Kimura, Nobutada; Morita, Tomotake; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia stabilis LA20W produces trehalose using levulinic acid (LA) as a substrate. Here, we report the 7.97-Mb draft genome sequence of B. stabilis LA20W, which will be useful in investigations of the enzymes involved in LA metabolism and the mechanism of LA-induced trehalose production. PMID:27491978

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes. PMID:26941141

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacter tropicalis Type Strain NBRC16470, a Producer of Optically Pure d-Glyceric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Hideaki; Sato, Shun; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the 3.7-Mb draft genome sequence of Acetobacter tropicalis NBRC16470T, which can produce optically pure d-glyceric acid (d-GA; 99% enantiomeric excess) from raw glycerol feedstock derived from biodiesel fuel production processes. PMID:25523780

  20. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058, a probiotic strain with high conjugated linoleic acid production ability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei

    2015-11-20

    Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 was isolated from sauerkraut and identified to synthesize the beneficial metabolite conjugated linoleic acid. The genome contains a 319,7363-bp chromosome and three plasmids. The sequence will facilitate identification and characterization of the genetic determinants for its putative biological benefits.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Cutaneotrichosporon curvatus DSM 101032 (Formerly Cryptococcus curvatus), an Oleaginous Yeast Producing Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Thomas; Hackenschmidt, Silke; Nadler, Florian; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneotrichosporon curvatus DSM 101032 is an oleaginous yeast that can be isolated from various habitats and is capable of producing substantial amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of any C. curvatus species. PMID:27174275

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CFL1, a Lactic Acid Bacterium Isolated from French Handcrafted Fermented Milk.

    PubMed

    Meneghel, Julie; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Irlinger, Françoise; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Passot, Stéphanie; Béal, Catherine; Layec, Séverine; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2016-03-03

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used for the production of yogurt and cheeses. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. bulgaricus CFL1 to improve our knowledge on its stress-induced damages following production and end-use processes.

  3. Genome Sequence of a Candidate World Health Organization Reference Strain of Zika Virus for Nucleic Acid Testing.

    PubMed

    Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Musso, Didier; Blümel, Johannes; Thézé, Julien; Pybus, Oliver G; Baylis, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    We report here the sequence of a candidate reference strain of Zika virus (ZIKV) developed on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO). The ZIKV reference strain is intended for use in nucleic acid amplification (NAT)-based assays for the detection and quantification of ZIKV RNA. PMID:27587826

  4. Ultra high-throughput nucleic acid sequencing as a tool for virus discovery in the turkey gut.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, the use of the next generation of nucleic acid sequencing technology (i.e., 454 pyrosequencing, as developed by Roche/454 Life Sciences) has allowed an in-depth look at the uncultivated microorganisms present in complex environmental samples, including samples with agricultural importance....

  5. Genome Sequence of a Candidate World Health Organization Reference Strain of Zika Virus for Nucleic Acid Testing.

    PubMed

    Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Musso, Didier; Blümel, Johannes; Thézé, Julien; Pybus, Oliver G; Baylis, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    We report here the sequence of a candidate reference strain of Zika virus (ZIKV) developed on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO). The ZIKV reference strain is intended for use in nucleic acid amplification (NAT)-based assays for the detection and quantification of ZIKV RNA.

  6. Amino acid sequence of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase and cDNA sequence encoding Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. A new family of fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Baunsgaard, L; Dalbøge, H; Houen, G; Rasmussen, E M; Welinder, K G

    1993-04-01

    Sequence analysis and cDNA cloning of Coprinus peroxidase (CIP) were undertaken to expand the understanding of the relationships of structure, function and molecular genetics of the secretory heme peroxidases from fungi and plants. Amino acid sequencing of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, and cDNA sequencing of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase showed that the mature proteins are identical in amino acid sequence, 343 residues in size and preceded by a 20-residue signal peptide. Their likely identity to peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus is discussed. CIP has an 8-residue, glycine-rich N-terminal extension blocked with a pyroglutamate residue which is absent in other fungal peroxidases. The presence of pyroglutamate, formed by cyclization of glutamine, and the finding of a minor fraction of a variant form lacking the N-terminal residue, indicate that signal peptidase cleavage is followed by further enzymic processing. CIP is 40-45% identical in amino-acid sequence to 11 lignin peroxidases from four fungal species, and 42-43% identical to the two known Mn-peroxidases. Like these white-rot fungal peroxidases, CIP has an additional segment of approximately 40 residues at the C-terminus which is absent in plant peroxidases. Although CIP is much more similar to horseradish peroxidase (HRP C) in substrate specificity, specific activity and pH optimum than to white-rot fungal peroxidases, the sequences of CIP and HRP C showed only 18% identity. Hence, CIP qualifies as the first member of a new family of fungal peroxidases. The nine invariant residues present in all plant, fungal and bacterial heme peroxidases are also found in CIP. The present data support the hypothesis that only one chromosomal CIP gene exists. In contrast, a large number of secretory plant and fungal peroxidases are expressed from several peroxidase gene clusters. Analyses of three batches of CIP protein and of 49 CIP clones revealed the existence of only two highly similar alleles indicating less

  7. Cry1Aa binding to the cadherin receptor does not require conserved amino acid sequences in the domain II loops

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Tanaka, Shiho; Otsuki, Manami; Hoshino, Yasushi; Morimoto, Chinatsu; Kotani, Takuya; Harashima, Yuko; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Sato, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the binding mechanism of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) Cry toxin to the cadherin receptor is indispensable to understanding the specific insecticidal activity of this toxin. To this end, we constructed 30 loop mutants by randomly inserting four serial amino acids covering all four receptor binding loops (loops α8, 1, 2 and 3) and analysed their binding affinities for Bombyx mori cadherin receptors via Biacore. High binding affinities were confirmed for all 30 mutants containing loop sequences that differed from those of wild-type. Insecticidal activities were confirmed in at least one mutant from loops 1, 2 and 3, suggesting that there is no critical amino acid sequence for the binding of the four loops to BtR175. When two mutations at different loops were integrated into one molecule, no reduction in binding affinity was observed compared with wild-type sequences. Based on these results, we discussed the binding mechanism of Cry toxin to cadherin protein. PMID:23145814

  8. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2C from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin.

    PubMed

    Elleman, T C

    1972-08-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of a protein from the reduced and carboxymethylated high-sulphur fraction of wool has been determined. 2. The sequence of this S-carboxymethylkerateine (SCMK-B2C) of 151 amino acid residues displays much internal homology and an unusual residue distribution. Thus a ten-residue sequence occurs four times near the N-terminus and five times near the C-terminus with few changes. These regions contain much of the molecule's half-cystine, whereas between them there is a region of 19 residues that are mainly small and devoid of cystine and proline. 3. Certain models of the wool fibre based on its mechanical and physical properties propose a matrix of small compact globular units linked together to form beaded chains. The unusual distribution of the component residues of protein SCMK-B2C suggests structures in the wool-fibre matrix compatible with certain features of the proposed models.

  9. Sequence-Specific Recognition of MicroRNAs and Other Short Nucleic Acids with Solid-State Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Osama K; Wang, Fanny; Ruzicka, Jan A; Taylor, Ethan W; Hall, Adam R

    2016-03-01

    The detection and quantification of short nucleic acid sequences has many potential applications in studying biological processes, monitoring disease initiation and progression, and evaluating environmental systems, but is challenging by nature. We present here an assay based on the solid-state nanopore platform for the identification of specific sequences in solution. We demonstrate that hybridization of a target nucleic acid with a synthetic probe molecule enables discrimination between duplex and single-stranded molecules with high efficacy. Our approach requires limited preparation of samples and yields an unambiguous translocation event rate enhancement that can be used to determine the presence and abundance of a single sequence within a background of nontarget oligonucleotides. PMID:26824296

  10. Sequence dependent N-terminal rearrangement and degradation of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, M.; Christensen, L.; Schmidt, J.; Haaima, G.; Orgel, L.; Nielsen, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the PNA (peptide nucleic acid) thymine monomer inverted question markN-[2-(thymin-1-ylacetyl)]-N-(2-aminoaminoethyl)glycine inverted question mark and those of various PNA oligomers (5-8-mers) have been measured at room temperature (20 degrees C) as a function of pH. The thymine monomer undergoes N-acyl transfer rearrangement with a half-life of 34 days at pH 11 as analyzed by 1H NMR; and two reactions, the N-acyl transfer and a sequential degradation, are found by HPLC analysis to occur at measurable rates for the oligomers at pH 9 or above. Dependent on the amino-terminal sequence, half-lives of 350 h to 163 days were found at pH 9. At pH 12 the half-lives ranged from 1.5 h to 21 days. The results are discussed in terms of PNA as a gene therapeutic drug as well as a possible prebiotic genetic material.

  11. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of hemoglobin II from Lucina pectinata.

    PubMed

    Torres-Mercado, Elineth; Renta, Jessicca Y; Rodríguez, Yolanda; López-Garriga, Juan; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2003-11-01

    Hemoglobin II from the clam Lucina pectinata is an oxygen-reactive protein with a unique structural organization in the heme pocket involving residues Gln65 (E7), Tyr30 (B10), Phe44 (CD1), and Phe69 (E11). We employed the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and methods to synthesize various cDNA(HbII). An initial 300-bp cDNA clone was amplified from total RNA by RT-PCR using degenerate oligonucleotides. Gene-specific primers derived from the HbII-partial cDNA sequence were used to obtain the 5' and 3' ends of the cDNA by RACE. The length of the HbII cDNA, estimated from overlapping clones, was approximately 2114 bases. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA size of HbII agrees with the estimated size using cDNA data. The coding region of the full-length HbII cDNA codes for 151 amino acids. The calculated molecular weight of HbII, including the heme group and acetylated N-terminal residue, is 17,654.07 Da.

  12. Nucleotide sequence variation of chitin synthase genes among ectomycorrhizal fungi and its potential use in taxonomy.

    PubMed Central

    Mehmann, B; Brunner, I; Braus, G H

    1994-01-01

    DNA sequences of single-copy genes coding for chitin synthases (UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine:chitin 4-beta-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase; EC 2.4.1.16) were used to characterize ectomycorrhizal fungi. Degenerate primers deduced from short, completely conserved amino acid stretches flanking a region of about 200 amino acids of zymogenic chitin synthases allowed the amplification of DNA fragments of several members of this gene family. Different DNA band patterns were obtained from basidiomycetes because of variation in the number and length of amplified fragments. Cloning and sequencing of the most prominent DNA fragments revealed that these differences were due to various introns at conserved positions. The presence of introns in basidiomycetous fungi therefore has a potential use in identification of genera by analyzing PCR-generated DNA fragment patterns. Analyses of the nucleotide sequences of cloned fragments revealed variations in nucleotide sequences from 4 to 45%. By comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences, the majority of the DNA fragments were identified as members of genes for chitin synthase class II. The deduced amino acid sequences from species of the same genus differed only in one amino acid residue, whereas identity between the amino acid sequences of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous fungi within the same taxonomic class was found to be approximately 43 to 66%. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence of class II chitin synthase-encoding gene fragments by using parsimony confirmed the current taxonomic groupings. In addition, our data revealed a fourth class of putative zymogenic chitin synthesis. Images PMID:7944356

  13. Cloning and sequencing of cDNAs encoding a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Rebmann, G; Hertig, C; Bull, J; Mauch, F; Dudler, R

    1991-02-01

    We report here the complete amino acid sequence of a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as deduced from cDNA clones representing mRNA from leaves infected with the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe graminis. The protein consists of 312 amino acids, of which the first 22 form a putative signal sequence, and has a calculated pI of 5.7. Sequence comparison revealed that the putative wheat peroxidase is most similar to the turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase, with which it shares 57% identical and 13% conserved amino acids.

  14. Cloning and sequencing of cDNAs encoding a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Rebmann, G; Hertig, C; Bull, J; Mauch, F; Dudler, R

    1991-02-01

    We report here the complete amino acid sequence of a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as deduced from cDNA clones representing mRNA from leaves infected with the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe graminis. The protein consists of 312 amino acids, of which the first 22 form a putative signal sequence, and has a calculated pI of 5.7. Sequence comparison revealed that the putative wheat peroxidase is most similar to the turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase, with which it shares 57% identical and 13% conserved amino acids. PMID:1893103

  15. Identification of Delta5-fatty acid desaturase from the cellular slime mold dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-01

    cDNA fragments putatively encoding amino acid sequences characteristic of the fatty acid desaturase were obtained using expressed sequence tag (EST) information of the Dictyostelium cDNA project. Using this sequence, we have determined the cDNA sequence and genomic sequence of a desaturase. The cloned cDNA is 1489 nucleotides long and the deduced amino acid sequence comprised 464 amino acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. The whole sequence was 38.6% identical to the initially identified Delta5-desaturase of Mortierella alpina. We have confirmed its function as Delta5-desaturase by over expression mutation in D. discoideum and also the gain of function mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the lipids from transformed D. discoideum and yeast demonstrated the accumulation of Delta5-desaturated products. This is the first report concering fatty acid desaturase in cellular slime molds.

  16. Identification of Delta5-fatty acid desaturase from the cellular slime mold dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-01

    cDNA fragments putatively encoding amino acid sequences characteristic of the fatty acid desaturase were obtained using expressed sequence tag (EST) information of the Dictyostelium cDNA project. Using this sequence, we have determined the cDNA sequence and genomic sequence of a desaturase. The cloned cDNA is 1489 nucleotides long and the deduced amino acid sequence comprised 464 amino acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain. The whole sequence was 38.6% identical to the initially identified Delta5-desaturase of Mortierella alpina. We have confirmed its function as Delta5-desaturase by over expression mutation in D. discoideum and also the gain of function mutation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of the lipids from transformed D. discoideum and yeast demonstrated the accumulation of Delta5-desaturated products. This is the first report concering fatty acid desaturase in cellular slime molds. PMID:10504413

  17. Sample Prep, Workflow Automation and Nucleic Acid Fractionation for Next Generation Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Roskey, Mark

    2010-06-03

    Mark Roskey of Caliper LifeSciences discusses how the company's technologies fit into the next generation sequencing workflow on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  18. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 metF gene and its homology with the corresponding sequence of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, G V; Stauffer, L T

    1988-05-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium LT2 metF gene, encoding 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, has been cloned. Strains with multicopy plasmids carrying the metF gene overproduce the enzyme 44-fold. The nucleotide sequence of the metF gene was determined, and an open reading frame of 888 nucleotides was identified. The polypeptide deduced from the DNA sequence contains 296 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 33,135 daltons. Mung bean nuclease mapping experiments located the transcription start point and possible transcription termination region for the gene. There is a 25 bp nucleotide sequence between the translation termination site and the possible transcription termination region. This region possesses a GC-rich sequence that could form a stable stem and loop structure once transcribed (delta G = -9 kcal/mol), followed by an AT-rich sequence, both of which are characteristic of rho-independent transcription terminators. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the S. typhimurium metF gene are compared with the corresponding sequences of the Escherichia coli metF gene. The nucleotide sequences show 85% homology. Most of the nucleotide differences found do not alter the amino acid sequences, which show 95% homology. The results also show that a change has occurred in the metF region of the S. typhimurium chromosome as compared to the E. coli chromosome.

  19. Deducing Reaction Mechanism: A Guide for Students, Researchers, and Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Simon J.; Pitman, Catherine L.; Miller, Alexander J. M.

    2016-01-01

    An introductory guide to deducing the mechanism of chemical reactions is presented. Following a typical workflow for probing reaction mechanism, the guide introduces a wide range of kinetic and mechanistic tools. In addition to serving as a broad introduction to mechanistic analysis for students and researchers, the guide has also been used by…

  20. Sequence Comparison and Phylogeny of Nucleotide Sequence of Coat Protein and Nucleic Acid Binding Protein of a Distinct Isolate of Shallot virus X from India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, S; Baranwal, V K

    2011-06-01

    Shallot virus X (ShVX), a type species in the genus Allexivirus of the family Alfaflexiviridae has been associated with shallot plants in India and other shallot growing countries like Russia, Germany, Netherland, and New Zealand. Coat protein (CP) and nucleic acid binding protein (NB) region of the virus was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from scales leaves of shallot bulbs. The partial cDNA contained two open reading frames encoding proteins of molecular weights of 28.66 and 14.18 kDa belonging to Flexi_CP super-family and viral NB super-family, respectively. The percent identity and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of CP and NB region of the virus associated with shallot indicated that it was a distinct isolate of ShVX.

  1. Sequence Comparison and Phylogeny of Nucleotide Sequence of Coat Protein and Nucleic Acid Binding Protein of a Distinct Isolate of Shallot virus X from India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, S; Baranwal, V K

    2011-06-01

    Shallot virus X (ShVX), a type species in the genus Allexivirus of the family Alfaflexiviridae has been associated with shallot plants in India and other shallot growing countries like Russia, Germany, Netherland, and New Zealand. Coat protein (CP) and nucleic acid binding protein (NB) region of the virus was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from scales leaves of shallot bulbs. The partial cDNA contained two open reading frames encoding proteins of molecular weights of 28.66 and 14.18 kDa belonging to Flexi_CP super-family and viral NB super-family, respectively. The percent identity and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of CP and NB region of the virus associated with shallot indicated that it was a distinct isolate of ShVX. PMID:23637504

  2. Purification of two chitinases from Rhizopus oligosporus and isolation and sequencing of the encoding genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, K; Takaya, N; Kojima, N; Horiuchi, H; Ohta, A; Takagi, M

    1992-01-01

    Two chitinases were purified from Rhizopus oligosporus, a filamentous fungus belonging to the class Zygomycetes, and designated chitinase I and chitinase II. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined, and two synthetic oligonucleotide probes corresponding to these amino acid sequences were synthesized. Southern blot analyses of the total genomic DNA from R. oligosporus with these oligonucleotides as probes indicated that one of the two genes encoding these two chitinases was contained in a 2.9-kb EcoRI fragment and in a 3.6-kb HindIII fragment and that the other one was contained in a 2.9-kb EcoRI fragment and in a 11.5-kb HindIII fragment. Two DNA fragments were isolated from the phage bank of R. oligosporus genomic DNA with the synthetic oligonucleotides as probes. The restriction enzyme analyses of these fragments coincided with the Southern blot analyses described above and the amino acid sequences deduced from their nucleotide sequences contained those identical to the determined N-terminal amino acid sequences of the purified chitinases, indicating that each of these fragments contained a gene encoding chitinase (designated chi 1 and chi 2, encoding chitinase I and II, respectively). The deduced amino acid sequences of these two genes had domain structures similar to that of the published sequence of chitinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, except that they had an additional C-terminal domain. Furthermore, there were significant differences between the molecular weights experimentally determined with the two purified enzymes and those deduced from the nucleotide sequences for both genes. Analysis of the N- and C-terminal amino acid sequences of both chitinases and comparison of them with the amino acid sequences deduced from the nucleotide sequences revealed posttranslational processing not only at the N-terminal signal sequences but also at the C-terminal domains. It is concluded that these chitinases are synthesized with pre- and prosequences in

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Brassiceae based on the nucleotide sequences of the S-locus related gene, SLR1.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Ryuichi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2002-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences of orthologs of the S-locus related gene, SLR1, in 20 species of Brassicaceae were determined and compared with the previously reported SLR1 sequences of six species. Identities of deduced amino-acid sequences with Brassica oleracea SLR1 ranged from 66.0% to 97.6%, and those with B. oleracea SRK and SLR2 were less than 62% and 55%, respectively. In multiple alignment of deduced amino-acid sequences, the 180-190th amino-acid residues from the initial methionine were highly variable, this variable region corresponding to hypervariable region I of SLG and SRK. A phylogenetic tree based on the deduced amino-acid sequences showed a close relationship of SLR1 orthologs of species in the Brassicinae and Raphaninae. Brassica nigra SLR1 was found to belong to the same clade as Sinapis arvensis and Diplotaxis siifolia, while the sequences of the other Brassica species belonged to another clade together with B. oleracea and Brassica rapa. The phylogenetic tree was similar to previously reported trees constructed using the data of electrophoretic band patterns of chloroplast DNA, though minor differences were found. Based on synonymous substitution rates in SLR1, the diversification time of SLR1 orthologs between species in the Brassicinae was estimated. The evolution and function of SLR1 and the phylogenetic relationship of Brassiceae plants are discussed.

  4. Amino acid sequence and structural properties of protein p12, an African swine fever virus attachment protein.

    PubMed Central

    Alcamí, A; Angulo, A; López-Otín, C; Muñoz, M; Freije, J M; Carrascosa, A L; Viñuela, E

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding the African swine fever virus protein p12, which is involved in virus attachment to the host cell, has been mapped and sequenced in the genome of the Vero-adapted virus strain BA71V. The determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence and the hybridization of oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence to cloned restriction fragments allowed the mapping of the gene in fragment EcoRI-O, located in the central region of the viral genome. The DNA sequence of an EcoRI-XbaI fragment showed an open reading frame which is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 61 amino acids. The expression of this open reading frame in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and in Escherichia coli gave rise to a 12-kDa polypeptide that was immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for protein p12. The hydrophilicity profile indicated the existence of a stretch of 22 hydrophobic residues in the central part that may anchor the protein in the virus envelope. Three forms of the protein with apparent molecular masses of 17, 12, and 10 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been observed, depending on the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine, indicating that disulfide bonds are responsible for the multimerization of the protein. This result was in agreement with the existence of a cysteine-rich domain in the C-terminal region of the predicted amino acid sequence. The protein was synthesized at late times of infection, and no posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation, phosphorylation, or fatty acid acylation were detected. Images PMID:1583732

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the Bet v 1-homologous allergen Fra a 1 in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) shows the presence of an intron and little variability in amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Musidlowska-Persson, Anna; Alm, Rikard; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2007-02-01

    The Fra a 1 allergen in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) is homologous to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, which has numerous isoforms differing in terms of amino acid sequence and immunological impact. To map the extent of sequence differences in the Fra a 1 allergen, PCR cloning and sequencing was applied. Several genomic sequences of Fra a 1, with a length of either 584, 591 or 594 nucleotides, were obtained from three different strawberry varieties. All contained one intron, with the length of either 101 or 110 nucleotides. By sequencing 30 different clones, eight different DNA sequences were obtained, giving in total five potential Fra a 1 protein isoforms, with high sequence similarity (>97% sequence identity) and only seven positions of amino acid variability, which were largely confirmed by mass spectrometry of expressed proteins. We conclude that the sequence variability in the strawberry allergen Fra a 1 is small, within and between strawberry varieties, and that multiple spots, previously detected in 2DE, are presumably due to differences in post-translational modification rather than differences in amino acid sequence. The most abundant Fra a 1 isoform sequence, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli after removal of the intron, was recognized by IgE from strawberry allergic patients. It cross-reacted with antibodies to Bet v 1 and the homologous apple allergen Mal d 1 (61 and 78% sequence identity, respectively), and will be used in further analyses of variation in Fra a 1-expression.

  6. Amino acid sequence of an intracellular, phosphate-starvation-induced ribonuclease from cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells.

    PubMed

    Löffler, A; Glund, K; Irie, M

    1993-06-15

    The primary structure of an intracellular ribonuclease (RNase LX) from cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells has been determined. Previous studies have shown that the protein is located inside the tomato cells but outside the vacuoles and that its synthesis is induced after depleting the cells for phosphate [Löffler, A., Abel, S., Jost, W., Beintema, J. J., Glund, K. (1992) Plant Physiol. 98, 1472-1478]. Sequence analysis was carried out by analysis of peptides isolated after enzymatic and chemical cleavage of the protein. RNase LX consists of 213 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 24300 Da and an isoelectric point of 5.33. The enzyme contains 10 half-cystines and there are no potential N-glycosylation sites detectable in the sequence. RNase LX, as compared to an extracellular tomato RNase (RNase LE), which is also phosphate regulated and the amino acid sequence of which was recently established [Jost, W., Bak, H., Glund, K., Terpstra, P. & Beintema, J. J. (1991) Eur. J. Biochem. 198, 1-6] has 60% of all amino acids identical and in identical positions, revealing a high degree of similarity between both proteins. In contrast to RNase LE, RNase LX has a C-terminal extension of nine amino acids. The C-terminal tetrapeptide HDEF may be a retention signal of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8319673

  7. Purification of a marsupial insulin: amino-acid sequence of insulin from the eastern grey kangaroo Macropus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Treacy, G B; Shaw, D C; Griffiths, M E; Jeffrey, P D

    1989-03-24

    Insulin has been purified from kangaroo pancreas by acidic ethanol extraction, diethyl ether precipitation and gel filtration. The amino-acid sequence of this, the first marsupial insulin to be studied, is reported. It differs from human insulin by only four amino-acid substitutions, all in regions of the molecule previously known to be variable. However, it should be noted that one of these, asparagine for threonine at A8, has not been reported before. Computer comparisons of all 43 insulin sequences reported to date with kangaroo insulin show it to be most closely related to a group of mammalian insulins (dog, pig, cow, human) known to be of high biological potency. The measurement of blood glucose lowering in the rabbit by kangaroo insulin is consistent with this conclusion. Comparisons of amino-acid sequences of other proteins with their kangaroo counterparts show a greater difference, in line with the time of divergence of marsupials. The limited differences observed in insulin and cytochrome c suggest that their structures need to be closely conserved in order to maintain function.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an efficient L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified-one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution among enterococci.

  9. Rational design of translational pausing without altering the amino acid sequence dramatically promotes soluble protein expression: a strategic demonstration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Jin, Jingjie; Gu, Wei; Wei, Bo; Lei, Yun; Xiong, Sheng; Zhang, Gong

    2014-11-10

    The production of many pharmaceutical and industrial proteins in prokaryotic hosts is hindered by the insolubility of industrial expression products resulting from misfolding. Even with a correct primary sequence, an improper translation elongation rate in a heterologous expression system is an important cause of misfolding. In silico analysis revealed that most of the endogenous Escherichia coli genes display translational pausing sites that promote correct folding, and almost 1/5 genes have pausing sites at the 3'-termini of their coding sequence. Therefore, we established a novel strategy to efficiently promote the expression of soluble and active proteins without altering the amino acid sequence or expression conditions. This strategy uses the rational design of translational pausing based on structural information solely through synonymous substitutions, i.e. no change on the amino acids sequence. We demonstrated this strategy on a promising antiviral candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CVN), which could not be efficiently expressed in any previously reported system. By introducing silent mutations, we increased the soluble expression level in E. coli by 2000-fold without altering the CVN protein sequence, and the specific activity was slightly higher for the optimized CVN than for the wild-type variant. This strategy introduces new possibilities for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins.

  10. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered.

  11. Isolation and a partial amino acid sequence of insulin from the islet tissue of cod (Gadus callarias)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P. T.; Reid, K. B. M.

    1968-01-01

    1. Insulin has been isolated by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography from extracts of the discrete islet tissue of cod. The final preparation yielded a single band on electrophoresis at two pH values. The biological potency was 11·5 international units/mg. in mouse-convulsion and other assay procedures. 2. Glycine and methionine were shown to be the N-terminal amino acids of the A and B chains respectively. An estimate of the molecular weight together with amino acid analyses indicated that cod insulin, like the bovine hormone, consists of 51 amino acid residues. In contrast, the amino acid composition differs markedly from bovine insulin. 3. Oxidation of insulin with performic acid yielded the A and B peptide chains, which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography. Sequence studies on smaller peptides isolated from enzymic digests or from dilute acetic acid hydrolysates of the two chains have established the sequential order of 14 of the 21 amino acid residues of the A chain and 25 of the 30 amino acid residues of the B chain. PMID:4866431

  12. Identification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of the conjugation-inducing glycoprotein (blepharmone) in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Mayumi; Harumoto, Terue

    2001-01-01

    Conjugation in Blepharisma japonicum is induced by interaction between complementary mating-types I and II, which excrete blepharmone (gamone 1) and blepharismone (gamone 2), respectively. Gamone 1 transforms type II cells such that they can unite, and gamone 2 similarly transforms type I cells. Moreover, each gamone promotes the production of the other gamone. Gamone 2 has been identified as calcium-3-(2′-formylamino-5′-hydroxy-benzoyl) lactate and has been synthesized chemically. Gamone 1 was isolated and characterized as a glycoprotein of 20–30 kDa containing 175 amino acids and 6 sugars. However, the amino acid sequence and arrangement of sugars in this gamone are still unknown. To determine partial amino acid sequences of gamone 1, we established a method of isolation based on the finding that this glycoprotein can be concentrated by a Con A affinity column. Gamone 1 is extremely unstable and loses its biological activity once adsorbed to any of the columns that we tested. By using a Con A affinity column and native PAGE, we detected a 30-kDa protein corresponding to gamone 1 activity and determined the partial amino acid sequences of the four peptides. To isolate gamone 1 cDNA, we isolated mRNA from mating-type I cells stimulated by synthetic gamone 2 and then performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures by using gene-specific primers and cloned cDNA of gamone 1. The cDNA sequence contains an ORF of 305 amino acids and codes a possibly novel protein. We also estimated the arrangement of sugars by comparing the affinity to various lectin columns. PMID:11724922

  13. Identification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of the conjugation-inducing glycoprotein (blepharmone) in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, M; Harumoto, T

    2001-12-01

    Conjugation in Blepharisma japonicum is induced by interaction between complementary mating-types I and II, which excrete blepharmone (gamone 1) and blepharismone (gamone 2), respectively. Gamone 1 transforms type II cells such that they can unite, and gamone 2 similarly transforms type I cells. Moreover, each gamone promotes the production of the other gamone. Gamone 2 has been identified as calcium-3-(2'-formylamino-5'-hydroxy-benzoyl) lactate and has been synthesized chemically. Gamone 1 was isolated and characterized as a glycoprotein of 20-30 kDa containing 175 amino acids and 6 sugars. However, the amino acid sequence and arrangement of sugars in this gamone are still unknown. To determine partial amino acid sequences of gamone 1, we established a method of isolation based on the finding that this glycoprotein can be concentrated by a Con A affinity column. Gamone 1 is extremely unstable and loses its biological activity once adsorbed to any of the columns that we tested. By using a Con A affinity column and native PAGE, we detected a 30-kDa protein corresponding to gamone 1 activity and determined the partial amino acid sequences of the four peptides. To isolate gamone 1 cDNA, we isolated mRNA from mating-type I cells stimulated by synthetic gamone 2 and then performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures by using gene-specific primers and cloned cDNA of gamone 1. The cDNA sequence contains an ORF of 305 amino acids and codes a possibly novel protein. We also estimated the arrangement of sugars by comparing the affinity to various lectin columns.

  14. Cloning and sequence analysis of the muramidase-2 gene from Enterococcus hirae.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C P; Kariyama, R; Daneo-Moore, L; Shockman, G D

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular muramidase-2 of Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 was purified to homogeneity by substrate binding, guanidine-HCl extraction, and reversed-phase chromatography. A monoclonal antibody, 2F8, which specifically recognizes muramidase-2, was used to screen a genomic library of E. hirae ATCC 9790 DNA in bacteriophage lambda gt11. A positive phage clone containing a 4.5-kb DNA insert was isolated and analyzed. The EcoRI-digested 4.5-kb fragment was cut into 2.3-, 1.0-, and 1.5-kb pieces by using restriction enzymes KpnI, Sau3AI, and PstI, and each fragment was subcloned into plasmid pJDC9 or pUC19. The nucleotide sequence of each subclone was determined. The sequence data indicated an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 666 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular mass of 70,678 Da. The first 24 N-terminal amino acids of purified extracellular muramidase-2 were in very good agreement with the deduced amino acid sequence after a 49-amino-acid putative signal sequence. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed the presence at the C-terminal region of the protein of six highly homologous repeat units separated by nonhomologous intervening sequences that are highly enriched in serine and threonine. The overall sequence showed a high degree of homology with a recently cloned Streptococcus faecalis autolysin. Images PMID:1347040

  15. Sequence of the cDNA and 5'-flanking region for human acid alpha-glucosidase, detection of an intron in the 5' untranslated leader sequence, definition of 18-bp polymorphisms, and differences with previous cDNA and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Martiniuk, F; Mehler, M; Tzall, S; Meredith, G; Hirschhorn, R

    1990-03-01

    Acid maltase or acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes glycogen to glucose and is deficient in glycogen storage disease type II. Previously, we isolated a partial cDNA (1.9 kb) for human GAA; we have now used this cDNA to isolate and determine sequence in longer cDNAs from four additional independent cDNA libraries. Primer extension studies indicated that the mRNA extended approximately 200 bp 5' of the cDNA sequence obtained. Therefore, we isolated a genomic fragment containing 5' cDNA sequences that overlapped the previous cDNA sequence and extended an additional 24 bp to an initiation codon within a Kozak consensus sequence. The sequence of the genomic clone revealed an intron-exon junction 32 bp 5' to the ATG, indicating that the 5' leader sequence was interrupted by an intron. The remaining 186 bp of 5' untranslated sequence was identified approximately 3 kb upstream. The promoter region upstream from the start site of transcription was GC rich and contained areas of homology to Sp1 binding sites but no identifiable CAAT or TATA box. The combined data gave a nucleotide sequence of 2,856 bp for the coding region from the ATG to a stop codon, predicting a protein of 952 amino acids. The 3' untranslated region contained 555 bp with a polyadenylation signal at 3,385 bp followed by 16 bp prior to a poly(A) tail. This sequence of the GAA coding region differs from that reported by Hoefsloot et al. (1988) in three areas that change a total of 42 amino acids. Direct determination of the amino acid sequence in one of these areas confirmed the nucleotide sequence reported here but also disagreed with the directly determined amino acid sequence reported by Hoefsloot et al. (1988). At two other areas, changes in base pairs predicted new restriction sites that were identified in cDNAs from several independent libraries. The amino acid changes in all three ares increased the homology to rabbit-human isomaltase. Therefore, we believe that our

  16. DNA Sequence and Expression Variation of Hop (Humulus lupulus) Valerophenone Synthase (VPS), a Key Gene in Bitter Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Consuelo B.; Whittock, Lucy D.; Whittock, Simon P.; Leggett, Grey; Koutoulis, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Background The hop plant (Humulus lupulus) is a source of many secondary metabolites, with bitter acids essential in the beer brewing industry and others having potential applications for human health. This study investigated variation in DNA sequence and gene expression of valerophenone synthase (VPS), a key gene in the bitter acid biosynthesis pathway of hop. Methods Sequence variation was studied in 12 varieties, and expression was analysed in four of the 12 varieties in a series across the development of the hop cone. Results Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in VPS, seven of which were synonymous. The two non-synonymous polymorphisms did not appear to be related to typical bitter acid profiles of the varieties studied. However, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of VPS expression during hop cone development showed a clear link with the bitter acid content. The highest levels of VPS expression were observed in two triploid varieties, ‘Symphony’ and ‘Ember’, which typically have high bitter acid levels. Conclusions In all hop varieties studied, VPS expression was lowest in the leaves and an increase in expression was consistently observed during the early stages of cone development. PMID:18519445

  17. A knowledge engineering approach to recognizing and extracting sequences of nucleic acids from scientific literature.

    PubMed

    García-Remesal, Miguel; Maojo, Victor; Crespo, José

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a knowledge engineering approach to automatically recognize and extract genetic sequences from scientific articles. To carry out this task, we use a preliminary recognizer based on a finite state machine to extract all candidate DNA/RNA sequences. The latter are then fed into a knowledge-based system that automatically discards false positives and refines noisy and incorrectly merged sequences. We created the knowledge base by manually analyzing different manuscripts containing genetic sequences. Our approach was evaluated using a test set of 211 full-text articles in PDF format containing 3134 genetic sequences. For such set, we achieved 87.76% precision and 97.70% recall respectively. This method can facilitate different research tasks. These include text mining, information extraction, and information retrieval research dealing with large collections of documents containing genetic sequences.

  18. A knowledge engineering approach to recognizing and extracting sequences of nucleic acids from scientific literature.

    PubMed

    García-Remesal, Miguel; Maojo, Victor; Crespo, José

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a knowledge engineering approach to automatically recognize and extract genetic sequences from scientific articles. To carry out this task, we use a preliminary recognizer based on a finite state machine to extract all candidate DNA/RNA sequences. The latter are then fed into a knowledge-based system that automatically discards false positives and refines noisy and incorrectly merged sequences. We created the knowledge base by manually analyzing different manuscripts containing genetic sequences. Our approach was evaluated using a test set of 211 full-text articles in PDF format containing 3134 genetic sequences. For such set, we achieved 87.76% precision and 97.70% recall respectively. This method can facilitate different research tasks. These include text mining, information extraction, and information retrieval research dealing with large collections of documents containing genetic sequences. PMID:21096556

  19. Sequence and crystallization of influenza virus B/Beijing/1/87 neuraminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, W.P.; Daniels, R.S.; Dayan, S.; Gagnon, J.; Cusack, S.; Ruigrok, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Influenza B/Beijing/1/87 neuraminidase heads were isolated from virus via trypsin digestion and characterized by PAGE, N-terminal sequencing, electron microscopy, and enzyme activity. The heads were crystallized into two crystal forms; tetragonal plates, like other neuraminidase crystals described before, that diffract to medium resolution (3 A) and a new form consisting of trigonal prisms or needles that diffract to high resolution (at least 2 A). The gene segment coding for neuraminidase was sequenced and compared with the neuraminidase sequence of B/Lee/40. The deduced amino acid sequences for neuraminidase showed only a 7% difference, whereas those for the NB proteins differed by 20%.

  20. Identification of novel rice low phytic acid mutations via TILLING by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate or InsP6) accounts for 75-85% of the total phosphorus in seeds. Low phytic acid (lpa) mutants exhibit decreases in seed InsP6 with corresponding increases in inorganic P which, unlike phytic acid P, is readily utilized by humans and monogastric ...

  1. Complete amino acid sequence of an acidic, cardiotoxic phospholipase A2 from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra): a novel cobra venom enzyme with "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Chung, M C; Kini, R M

    1997-02-15

    A phospholipase A2 (OHV A-PLA2) from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is an acidic protein exhibiting cardiotoxicity, myotoxicity, and antiplatelet activity. The complete amino acid sequence of OHV A-PLA2 has been determined using a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometric techniques. OHV A-PLA2 is composed of a single chain of 124 amino acid residues with 14 cysteines and a calculated molecular weight of 13719 Da. It contains the loop of residues (62-66) found in pancreatic PLA2s and hence belongs to class IB enzymes. This pancreatic loop is between two proline residues (Pro 59 and Pro 68) and contains several hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Asp). This region has high degree of conformational flexibility and is on the surface of the molecule, and hence it may be a potential protein-protein interaction site. A relatively low sequence homology is found between OHV A-PLA2 and other known cardiotoxic PLA2s, and hence a contiguous segment could not be identified as a site responsible for the cardiotoxic activity.

  2. Evaluation of a novel food composition database that includes glutamine and other amino acids derived from gene sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Lenders, CM; Liu, S; Wilmore, DW; Sampson, L; Dougherty, LW; Spiegelman, D; Willett, WC

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the content of glutamine in major food proteins. Subjects/Methods We used a validated 131-food item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to identify the foods that contributed the most to protein intake among 70 356 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS, 1984). The content of glutamine and other amino acids in foods was calculated based on protein fractions generated from gene sequencing methods (Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics) and compared with data from conventional (USDA) and modified biochemical (Khun) methods. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to compare the participants’ dietary intakes of amino acids by sequencing and USDA methods. Results The glutamine content varied from 0.01 to to 9.49 g/100 g of food and contributed from 1 to to 33% of total protein for all FFQ foods with protein. When comparing the sequencing and Kuhn’s methods, the proportion of glutamine in meat was 4.8 vs 4.4%. Among NHS participants, mean glutamine intake was 6.84 (s.d.=2.19) g/day and correlation coefficients for amino acid between intakes assessed by sequencing and USDA methods ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 for absolute intake, −0.08 to 0.90 after adjusting for 100 g of protein, and 0.88 to 0.99 after adjusting for 1000 kcal. The between-person coefficient of variation of energy-adjusted intake of glutamine was 16%. Conclusions These data suggest that (1) glutamine content can be estimated from gene sequencing methods and (2) there is a reasonably wide variation in energy-adjusted glutamine intake, allowing for exploration of glutamine consumption and disease. PMID:19756030

  3. The amino acid sequences of the cytochromes c553 from Porphyridium cruentum and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    PubMed

    Sprinkle, J R; Hermodson, M; Krogmann, D W

    1986-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of cytochrome c553 from the eukaryotic red alga Porphyridium cruentum and from the prokaryotic cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae have been determined from the tryptic and cyanogen bromide peptides. The results indicate that a charged region of these proteins has evolved with special rapidity to accomodate a rapid evolution of a binding site in the P700 electron acceptor complex.

  4. First draft genome sequencing of indole acetic acid producing and plant growth promoting fungus Preussia sp. BSL10.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-05-10

    Preussia sp. BSL10, family Sporormiaceae, was actively producing phytohormone (indole-3-acetic acid) and extra-cellular enzymes (phosphatases and glucosidases). The fungus was also promoting the growth of arid-land tree-Boswellia sacra. Looking at such prospects of this fungus, we sequenced its draft genome for the first time. The Illumina based sequence analysis reveals an approximate genome size of 31.4Mbp for Preussia sp. BSL10. Based on ab initio gene prediction, total 32,312 coding sequences were annotated consisting of 11,967 coding genes, pseudogenes, and 221 tRNA genes. Furthermore, 321 carbohydrate-active enzymes were predicted and classified into many functional families. PMID:26995610

  5. The amino acid sequence of GTP:AMP phosphotransferase from beef-heart mitochondria. Extensive homology with cytosolic adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Wieland, B; Tomasselli, A G; Noda, L H; Frank, R; Schulz, G E

    1984-09-01

    The amino acid sequence of GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK3) from beef-heart mitochondria has been determined, except for one segment of about 33 residues in the middle of the polypeptide chain. The established sequence has been unambiguously aligned to the sequence of cytosolic ATP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK1) from pig muscle, allowing for six insertions and deletions. With 30% of all aligned residues being identical, the homology between AK3 and AK1 is well established. As derived from the known three-dimensional structure of AK1, the missing segment is localized at a small surface area of the molecule, far apart from the active center. The pattern of conserved residues demonstrates that earlier views on substrate binding have to be modified. The observation of three different consecutive N-termini indicates enzyme processing.

  6. Fusion protein predicted amino acid sequence of the first US avian pneumovirus isolate and lack of heterogeneity among other US isolates.

    PubMed

    Seal, B S; Sellers, H S; Meinersmann, R J

    2000-02-01

    Avian pneumovirus (APV) was first isolated from turkeys in the west-central US following emergence of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) during 1996. Subsequently, several APV isolates were obtained from the north-central US. Matrix (M) and fusion (F) protein genes of these isolates were examined for sequence heterogeneity and compared with European APV subtypes A and B. Among US isolates the M gene shared greater than 98% nucleotide sequence identity with only one nonsynonymous change occurring in a single US isolate. Although the F gene among US APV isolates shared 98% nucleotide sequence identity, nine conserved substitutions were detected in the predicted amino acid sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence of the US APV isolate's F protein had 72% sequence identity to the F protein of APV subtype A and 71% sequence identity to the F protein of APV subtype B. This compares with 83% sequence identity between the APV subtype A and B predicted amino acid sequences of the F protein. The US isolates were phylogenetically distinguishable from their European counterparts based on F gene nucleotide or predicted amino acid sequences. Lack of sequence heterogeneity among US APV subtypes indicates these viruses have maintained a relatively stable population since the first outbreak of TRT. Phylogenetic analysis of the F protein among APV isolates supports classification of US isolates as a new APV subtype C.

  7. Amino acid sequence and glycosylation of functional unit RtH2-e from Rapana thomasiana (gastropod) hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Stoeva, Stanka; Idakieva, Krasimira; Betzel, Christian; Genov, Nicolay; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2002-03-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin functional unit RtH2-e was determined by direct sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of peptides obtained by cleavage with EndoLysC proteinase, chymotrypsin, and trypsin. The single-polypeptide chain of RtH2-e consists of 413 amino acid residues and contains two consensus sequences NXS/T (positions 11-19 and 127-129), potential sites for N-glycosylation. Monosaccharide analysis of RtH2-e revealed a carbohydrate content of about 1.1% and the presence of xylose, fucose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine, demonstrating that only N-linked carbohydrate chains of high-mannose type seem to be present. On basis of the monosaccharide composition and MALDI-MS analysis of native and PNGase-F-treated chymotryptic glycopeptide fragment of RtH2-e the oligosaccharide Man(5)GlcNAc(2), attached to Asn(127), is suggested. Multiple sequence alignments with other molluscan hemocyanin e functional units revealed an identity of 63% to the cephalopod Octopus dofleini and of 69% to the gastropod Haliotis tuberculata. The present results are discussed in view of the recently determined X-ray structure of the functional unit g of the O. dofleini hemocyanin. PMID:11888200

  8. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features.

  9. Amino acid sequences of lysozymes newly purified from invertebrates imply wide distribution of a novel class in the lysozyme family.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yoshikawa, A; Hotani, T; Fukuda, S; Sugimura, K; Imoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Lysozymes were purified from three invertebrates: a marine bivalve, a marine conch, and an earthworm. The purified lysozymes all showed a similar molecular weight of 13 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Their N-terminal sequences up to the 33rd residue determined here were apparently homologous among them; in addition, they had a homology with a partial sequence of a starfish lysozyme which had been reported before. The complete sequence of the bivalve lysozyme was determined by peptide mapping and subsequent sequence analysis. This was composed of 123 amino acids including as many as 14 cysteine residues and did not show a clear homology with the known types of lysozymes. However, the homology search of this protein on the protein or nucleic acid database revealed two homologous proteins. One of them was a gene product, CELF22 A3.6 of C. elegans, which was a functionally unknown protein. The other was an isopeptidase of a medicinal leech, named destabilase. Thus, a new type of lysozyme found in at least four species across the three classes of the invertebrates demonstrates a novel class of protein/lysozyme family in invertebrates. The bivalve lysozyme, first characterized here, showed extremely high protein stability and hen lysozyme-like enzymatic features. PMID:9914527

  10. General Constraints on Cross Sections Deduced from Surrogate Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W

    2003-08-14

    Cross sections that cannot be measured in the laboratory, e.g. because the target lifetime is too short, can be inferred indirectly from a different reaction forming the same compound system, but with a more accessible beam/target combination (the ''surrogate-reaction'' technique). The reactions share the same compound system and a common decay mechanism, but they involve different formation processes. Therefore, an implicit constraint is imposed on the inferred cross section deduced from the measured surrogate-reaction data, through the common decay mechanism. In this paper, the mathematical consequences of this implicit constraint are investigated. General formulas are derived from upper and lower bounds on the inferred cross section, estimated from surrogate data in a procedure which does not require any modeling of the common decay process. As an example, the formulas developed here are applied to the case of the {sup 235}U(n,f) cross section, deduced from {sup 234}U(t,pf) surrogate data. The calculated bounds are not very tight in this particular case. However, by introducing a few qualitative assumptions about the physics of the fission process, meaningful bounds on the deduced cross section are obtained. Upper and lower limits for the cross-section ratio of the (n,f) reaction on the {sup 235}U isomer at E{sub x} = 77 eV relative to the (n,f) reaction on the ground state are also calculated. The generalization of this technique to other surrogate reactions is discussed.

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains SRCC 1675 and 28RC, Which Vary in Acid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Reichenberger, Erin R.; Kim, Gwang-Hee; Breidt, Frederick; Kay, Kathryn; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The level of acid resistance among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains varies, and strains with higher resistance to acid may have a lower infectious dose. The complete genome sequences belonging to two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with different levels of acid resistance are presented here. PMID:27469964

  12. Complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains SRCC 1675 and 28RC that vary in acid resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The level of acid resistance among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains varies, and strains with higher resistance to acid may have a lower infectious dose. The complete genome sequences belonging to two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with different levels of acid resistance are presented....

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains SRCC 1675 and 28RC, Which Vary in Acid Resistance.

    PubMed

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Fratamico, Pina M; Reichenberger, Erin R; Kim, Gwang-Hee; Breidt, Frederick; Kay, Kathryn; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The level of acid resistance among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains varies, and strains with higher resistance to acid may have a lower infectious dose. The complete genome sequences belonging to two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with different levels of acid resistance are presented here. PMID:27469964

  14. Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) interleukin-2: sequence analysis reveals high nucleotide and amino acid identity with interleukin-2 of cattle and other ruminants.

    PubMed

    Sreekumar, E; Premraj, A; Saravanakumar, M; Rasool, T J

    2002-08-01

    A 4400-bp genomic sequence and a 332-bp truncated cDNA sequence of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene of Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and cloned. The coding sequence of the buffalo IL-2 gene was assembled from the 5' end of the genomic clone and the truncated cDNA clone. This sequence had 98.5% nucleotide identity and 98% amino acid identity with cattle IL-2. Three amino acid substitutions were observed at positions 63, 124 and 135. Comparison of the predicted protein structure of buffalo IL-2 with that of human and cattle IL-2 did not reveal significant differences. The putative amino acids responsible for IL-2 receptor binding were conserved in buffalo, cattle and human IL-2. The amino acid sequence of buffalo IL-2 also showed very high identity with that of other ruminants, indicating functional cross-reactivity.

  15. Amino acid sequence and some properties of phytolacain G, a cysteine protease from growing fruit of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Uchikoba, T; Arima, K; Yonezawa, H; Shimada, M; Kaneda, M

    2000-10-18

    A protease, phytolacain G, has been found to appear on CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography of greenish small-size fruits of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana L, from ca. 2 weeks after flowering, and increases during fruit enlargement. Reddish ripe fruit of the pokeweed contained both phytolacain G and R. The molecular mass of phytolacain G was estimated to be 25.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Its amino acid sequence was reconstructed by automated sequence analysis of the peptides obtained after cleavage with Achromobacter protease I, chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme is composed of 216 amino acid residues, of which it shares 152 identical amino acid residues (70%) with phytolacain R, 126 (58%) with melain G, 108 (50%) with papain, 106 (49%) with actinidain, and 96 (44%) with stem bromelain. The amino acid residues forming the substrate binding S(2) pocket of papain, Tyr67, Pro68, Trp69, Val133, and Phe207, were predicted to be replaced by Trp, Met, His, Ala, and Ser in phytolacain G, respectively. As a consequence of these substitutions, the S(2) pocket is expected to be less hydrophobic in phytolacain G than in papain.

  16. Fad7 gene identification and fatty acids phenotypic variation in an olive collection by EcoTILLING and sequencing approaches.

    PubMed

    Sabetta, Wilma; Blanco, Antonio; Zelasco, Samanta; Lombardo, Luca; Perri, Enzo; Mangini, Giacomo; Montemurro, Cinzia

    2013-08-01

    The ω-3 fatty acid desaturases (FADs) are enzymes responsible for catalyzing the conversion of linoleic acid to α-linolenic acid localized in the plastid or in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this research we report the genotypic and phenotypic variation of Italian Olea europaea L. germoplasm for the fatty acid composition. The phenotypic oil characterization was followed by the molecular analysis of the plastidial-type ω-3 FAD gene (fad7) (EC 1.14.19), whose full-length sequence has been here identified in cultivar Leccino. The gene consisted of 2635 bp with 8 exons and 5'- and 3'-UTRs of 336 and 282 bp respectively, and showed a high level of heterozygousity (1/110 bp). The natural allelic variation was investigated both by a LiCOR EcoTILLING assay and the PCR product direct sequencing. Only three haplotypes were identified among the 96 analysed cultivars, highlighting the strong degree of conservation of this gene. PMID:23685785

  17. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA–pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences by Watson–Crick pairing via double duplex-invasion complex formation. We show that psoralen-conjugated pcPNAs can deliver site-specific photoadducts and mediate targeted gene modification within both episomal and chromosomal DNA in mammalian cells without detectable off-target effects. Most of the induced psoralen-pcPNA mutations were single-base substitutions and deletions at the predicted pcPNA-binding sites. The pcPNA-directed mutagenesis was found to be dependent on PNA concentration and UVA dose and required matched pairs of pcPNAs. Neither of the individual pcPNAs alone had any effect nor did complementary PNA pairs of the same sequence. These results identify pcPNAs as new tools for site-specific gene modification in mammalian cells without purine sequence restriction, thereby providing a general strategy for designing gene targeting molecules. PMID:17977869

  18. Amino acid sequence homology among the 2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenases: mitochondrial and cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases form a homologous system with lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Birktoft, J J; Fernley, R T; Bradshaw, R A; Banaszak, L J

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of porcine heart mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; L-malate: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.37) has been compared with the sequences of six different lactate dehydrogenases (LDH; L-lactate: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27) and with the "x-ray" sequence of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (sMDH). The main points are that (i) all three enzymes are homologous; (ii) invariant residues in the catalytic center of these enzymes include a histidine and an internally located aspartate that function as a proton relay system; (iii) numerous residues important to coenzyme binding are conserved, including several glycines and charged residues; and (iv) amino acid side chains present in the subunit interface common to the MDHs and LDHs appear to be better conserved than those in the protein interior. It is concluded that LDH, sMDH, and mMDH are derived from a common ancestral gene and probably have similar catalytic mechanisms. PMID:6959107

  19. Enzymatic generation of peptides flanked by basic amino acids to obtain MS/MS spectra with 2× sequence coverage

    PubMed Central

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Nan, Jie; Chaulk, Steven G; Fahlman, Richard P; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID) typically lack redundant peptide sequence information in the form of e.g. b- and y-ion series due to frequent use of sequence-specific endopeptidases cleaving C- or N-terminal to Arg or Lys residues. METHODS Here we introduce arginyl-tRNA protein transferase (ATE, EC 2.3.2.8) for proteomics. ATE recognizes acidic amino acids or oxidized Cys at the N-terminus of a substrate peptide and conjugates an arginine from an aminoacylated tRNAArg onto the N-terminus of the substrate peptide. This enzymatic reaction is carried out under physiological conditions and, in combination with Lys-C/Asp-N double digest, results in arginylated peptides with basic amino acids on both termini. RESULTS We demonstrate that in vitro arginylation of peptides using yeast arginyl tRNA protein transferase 1 (yATE1) is a robust enzymatic reaction, specific to only modifying N-terminal acidic amino acids. Precursors originating from arginylated peptides generally have an increased protonation state compared with their non-arginylated forms. Furthermore, the product ion spectra of arginylated peptides show near complete 2× fragment ladders within the same MS/MS spectrum using commonly available electrospray ionization peptide fragmentation modes. Unexpectedly, arginylated peptides generate complete y- and c-ion series using electron transfer dissociation (ETD) despite having an internal proline residue. CONCLUSIONS We introduce a rapid enzymatic method to generate peptides flanked on either terminus by basic amino acids, resulting in a rich, redundant MS/MS fragment pattern. © 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25380496

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-. cap alpha. /sub 2/-glycoprotein and its homology to histocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Gejyo, F.; Takagaki, K.; Haupt, H.; Schwick, H.G.; Buergi, W.; Marti, T.; Schaller, J.; Rickli, E.; Brossmer, R.

    1988-02-01

    In the present study the complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein was determined. This protein whose biological function is unknown consists of a single polypeptide chain of 276 amino acid residues including 8 tryptophan residues and has a pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus. The location of the two disulfide bonds in the polypeptide chain was also established. The three glycans, whose structure was elucidated with the aid of 500 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, were sialylated N-biantennas. The molecular weight calculated from the polypeptide and carbohydrate structure is 38,478, which is close to the reported value of approx. = 41,000 based on physicochemical measurements. The predicted secondary structure appeared to comprised of 23% ..cap alpha..-helix, 27% ..beta..-sheet, and 22% ..beta..-turns. The three N-glycans were found to be located in ..beta..-turn regions. An unexpected finding was made by computer analysis of the sequence data; this revealed that Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein is closely related to antigens of the major histocompatibility complex in amino acid sequence and in domain structure. There was an unusually high degree of sequence homology with the ..cap alpha.. chains of class I histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, this plasma protein was shown to be a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein appears to be truncated secretory major histocompatibility complex-related molecule, and it may have a role in the expression of the immune response.

  1. Sequence of echinochloa hoja blanca tenuivirus RNA-5.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, J R; Muñoz, M; Wu, R; Espinoza, A M

    1996-01-01

    The sequence is presented of RNA-5 of Echinochloa hoja blanca tenuivirus, a second tenuivirus associated with rice cultivation in Latin America (after rice hoja blanca virus). The RNA is 1334 nucleotides long and contains in the complementary sense RNA a single long open reading frame. The deduced amino acid sequence of this open reading frame shows that it encodes a highly basic and hydrophilic 44 kD protein (pc5) with about 50% similarity to the pc5 protein of maize stripe virus (MStV). This and other features of the RNA are discussed. PMID:8879129

  2. ENTPRISE: An Algorithm for Predicting Human Disease-Associated Amino Acid Substitutions from Sequence Entropy and Predicted Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The advance of next-generation sequencing technologies has made exome sequencing rapid and relatively inexpensive. A major application of exome sequencing is the identification of genetic variations likely to cause Mendelian diseases. This requires processing large amounts of sequence information and therefore computational approaches that can accurately and efficiently identify the subset of disease-associated variations are needed. The accuracy and high false positive rates of existing computational tools leave much room for improvement. Here, we develop a boosted tree regression machine-learning approach to predict human disease-associated amino acid variations by utilizing a comprehensive combination of protein sequence and structure features. On comparing our method, ENTPRISE, to the state-of-the-art methods SIFT, PolyPhen-2, MUTATIONASSESSOR, MUTATIONTASTER, FATHMM, ENTPRISE exhibits significant improvement. In particular, on a testing dataset consisting of only proteins with balanced disease-associated and neutral variations defined as having the ratio of neutral/disease-associated variations between 0.3 and 3, the Mathews Correlation Coefficient by ENTPRISE is 0.493 as compared to 0.432 by PPH2-HumVar, 0.406 by SIFT, 0.403 by MUTATIONASSESSOR, 0.402 by PPH2-HumDiv, 0.305 by MUTATIONTASTER, and 0.181 by FATHMM. ENTPRISE is then applied to nucleic acid binding proteins in the human proteome. Disease-associated predictions are shown to be highly correlated with the number of protein-protein interactions. Both these predictions and the ENTPRISE server are freely available for academic users as a web service at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/entprise/. PMID:26982818

  3. ENTPRISE: An Algorithm for Predicting Human Disease-Associated Amino Acid Substitutions from Sequence Entropy and Predicted Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The advance of next-generation sequencing technologies has made exome sequencing rapid and relatively inexpensive. A major application of exome sequencing is the identification of genetic variations likely to cause Mendelian diseases. This requires processing large amounts of sequence information and therefore computational approaches that can accurately and efficiently identify the subset of disease-associated variations are needed. The accuracy and high false positive rates of existing computational tools leave much room for improvement. Here, we develop a boosted tree regression machine-learning approach to predict human disease-associated amino acid variations by utilizing a comprehensive combination of protein sequence and structure features. On comparing our method, ENTPRISE, to the state-of-the-art methods SIFT, PolyPhen-2, MUTATIONASSESSOR, MUTATIONTASTER, FATHMM, ENTPRISE exhibits significant improvement. In particular, on a testing dataset consisting of only proteins with balanced disease-associated and neutral variations defined as having the ratio of neutral/disease-associated variations between 0.3 and 3, the Mathews Correlation Coefficient by ENTPRISE is 0.493 as compared to 0.432 by PPH2-HumVar, 0.406 by SIFT, 0.403 by MUTATIONASSESSOR, 0.402 by PPH2-HumDiv, 0.305 by MUTATIONTASTER, and 0.181 by FATHMM. ENTPRISE is then applied to nucleic acid binding proteins in the human proteome. Disease-associated predictions are shown to be highly correlated with the number of protein-protein interactions. Both these predictions and the ENTPRISE server are freely available for academic users as a web service at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/entprise/.

  4. The sequence diversity and expression among genes of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway in industrial Saccharomyces strains.

    PubMed

    Goncerzewicz, Anna; Misiewicz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Folic acid is an important vitamin in human nutrition and its deficiency in pregnant women's diets results in neural tube defects and other neurological damage to the fetus. Additionally, DNA synthesis, cell division and intestinal absorption are inhibited in case of adults. Since this discovery, governments and health organizations worldwide have made recommendations concerning folic acid supplementation of food for women planning to become pregnant. In many countries this has led to the introduction of fortifications, where synthetic folic acid is added to flour. It is known that Saccharomyces strains (brewing and bakers' yeast) are one of the main producers of folic acid and they can be used as a natural source of this vitamin. Proper selection of the most efficient strains may enhance the folate content in bread, fermented vegetables, dairy products and beer by 100% and may be used in the food industry. The objective of this study was to select the optimal producing yeast strain by determining the differences in nucleotide sequences in the FOL2, FOL3 and DFR1 genes of folic acid biosynthesis pathway. The Multitemperature Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (MSSCP) method and further nucleotide sequencing for selected strains were applied to indicate SNPs in selected gene fragments. The RT qPCR technique was also applied to examine relative expression of the FOL3 gene. Furthermore, this is the first time ever that industrial yeast strains were analysed regarding genes of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway. It was observed that a correlation exists between the folic acid amount produced by industrial yeast strains and changes in the nucleotide sequence of adequate genes. The most significant changes occur in the DFR1 gene, mostly in the first part, which causes major protein structure modifications in KKP 232, KKP 222 and KKP 277 strains. Our study shows that the large amount of SNP contributes to impairment of the selected enzymes and S. cerevisiae and S

  5. The sequence diversity and expression among genes of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway in industrial Saccharomyces strains.

    PubMed

    Goncerzewicz, Anna; Misiewicz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Folic acid is an important vitamin in human nutrition and its deficiency in pregnant women's diets results in neural tube defects and other neurological damage to the fetus. Additionally, DNA synthesis, cell division and intestinal absorption are inhibited in case of adults. Since this discovery, governments and health organizations worldwide have made recommendations concerning folic acid supplementation of food for women planning to become pregnant. In many countries this has led to the introduction of fortifications, where synthetic folic acid is added to flour. It is known that Saccharomyces strains (brewing and bakers' yeast) are one of the main producers of folic acid and they can be used as a natural source of this vitamin. Proper selection of the most efficient strains may enhance the folate content in bread, fermented vegetables, dairy products and beer by 100% and may be used in the food industry. The objective of this study was to select the optimal producing yeast strain by determining the differences in nucleotide sequences in the FOL2, FOL3 and DFR1 genes of folic acid biosynthesis pathway. The Multitemperature Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (MSSCP) method and further nucleotide sequencing for selected strains were applied to indicate SNPs in selected gene fragments. The RT qPCR technique was also applied to examine relative expression of the FOL3 gene. Furthermore, this is the first time ever that industrial yeast strains were analysed regarding genes of the folic acid biosynthesis pathway. It was observed that a correlation exists between the folic acid amount produced by industrial yeast strains and changes in the nucleotide sequence of adequate genes. The most significant changes occur in the DFR1 gene, mostly in the first part, which causes major protein structure modifications in KKP 232, KKP 222 and KKP 277 strains. Our study shows that the large amount of SNP contributes to impairment of the selected enzymes and S. cerevisiae and S

  6. "De-novo" amino acid sequence elucidation of protein G'e by combined "Top-Down" and "Bottom-Up" mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Koy, Cornelia; Cui, Weidong; Yan, Yuetian; Gross, Michael L.; Glocker, Michael O.

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometric de-novo sequencing was applied to review the amino acid sequence of a commercially available recombinant protein Ǵ with great scientific and economic importance. Substantial deviations to the published amino acid sequence (Uniprot Q54181) were found by the presence of 46 additional amino acids at the N-terminus, including a so-called "His-tag" as well as an N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylation and α- N-phosphogluconoylation, respectively. The unexpected amino acid sequence of the commercial protein G' comprised 241 amino acids and resulted in a molecular mass of 25,998.9 ± 0.2 Da for the unmodified protein. Due to the higher mass that is caused by its extended amino acid sequence compared with the original protein G' (185 amino acids), we named this protein "protein G'e." By means of mass spectrometric peptide mapping, the suggested amino acid sequence, as well as the N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylations, was confirmed with 100% sequence coverage. After the protein G'e sequence was determined, we were able to determine the expression vector pET-28b from Novagen with the Xho I restriction enzyme cleavage site as the best option that was used for cloning and expressing the recombinant protein G'e in E. coli. A dissociation constant ( K d ) value of 9.4 nM for protein G'e was determined thermophoretically, showing that the N-terminal flanking sequence extension did not cause significant changes in the binding affinity to immunoglobulins.

  7. "De-novo" amino acid sequence elucidation of protein G'e by combined "top-down" and "bottom-up" mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yefremova, Yelena; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Opuni, Kwabena F M; Koy, Cornelia; Cui, Weidong; Yan, Yuetian; Gross, Michael L; Glocker, Michael O

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometric de-novo sequencing was applied to review the amino acid sequence of a commercially available recombinant protein G´ with great scientific and economic importance. Substantial deviations to the published amino acid sequence (Uniprot Q54181) were found by the presence of 46 additional amino acids at the N-terminus, including a so-called "His-tag" as well as an N-terminal partial α-N-gluconoylation and α-N-phosphogluconoylation, respectively. The unexpected amino acid sequence of the commercial protein G' comprised 241 amino acids and resulted in a molecular mass of 25,998.9 ± 0.2 Da for the unmodified protein. Due to the higher mass that is caused by its extended amino acid sequence compared with the original protein G' (185 amino acids), we named this protein "protein G'e." By means of mass spectrometric peptide mapping, the suggested amino acid sequence, as well as the N-terminal partial α-N-gluconoylations, was confirmed with 100% sequence coverage. After the protein G'e sequence was determined, we were able to determine the expression vector pET-28b from Novagen with the Xho I restriction enzyme cleavage site as the best option that was used for cloning and expressing the recombinant protein G'e in E. coli. A dissociation constant (K(d)) value of 9.4 nM for protein G'e was determined thermophoretically, showing that the N-terminal flanking sequence extension did not cause significant changes in the binding affinity to immunoglobulins. PMID:25560987

  8. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/. PMID:26424080

  9. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/ PMID:26424080

  10. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/.

  11. Serology in the Digital Age: Using Long Synthetic Peptides Created from Nucleic Acid Sequences as Antigens in Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Rönnberg, Bengt; Cistjakovs, Maksims; Lundkvist, Åke; Pipkorn, Rudiger; Blomberg, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibodies to microbes, or to autoantigens, are important markers of disease. Antibody detection (serology) can reveal both past and recent infections. There is a great need for development of rational ways of detecting and quantifying antibodies, both for humans and animals. Traditionally, serology using synthetic antigens covers linear epitopes using up to 30 amino acid peptides. Methods: We here report that peptides of 100 amino acids or longer (“megapeptides”), designed and synthesized for optimal serological performance, can successfully be used as detection antigens in a suspension multiplex immunoassay (SMIA). Megapeptides can quickly be created just from pathogen sequences. A combination of rational sequencing and bioinformatic routines for definition of diagnostically-relevant antigens can, thus, rapidly yield efficient serological diagnostic tools for an emerging infectious pathogen. Results: We designed megapeptides using bioinformatics and viral genome sequences. These long peptides were tested as antigens for the presence of antibodies in human serum to the filo-, herpes-, and polyoma virus families in a multiplex microarray system. All of these virus families contain recently discovered or emerging infectious viruses. Conclusion: Long synthetic peptides can be useful as serological diagnostic antigens, serving as biomarkers, in suspension microarrays. PMID:27600087

  12. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2C from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of a protein from the reduced and carboxymethylated high-sulphur fraction of wool has been determined. 2. The sequence of this S-carboxymethylkerateine (SCMK-B2C) of 151 amino acid residues displays much internal homology and an unusual residue distribution. Thus a ten-residue sequence occurs four times near the N-terminus and five times near the C-terminus with few changes. These regions contain much of the molecule's half-cystine, whereas between them there is a region of 19 residues that are mainly small and devoid of cystine and proline. 3. Certain models of the wool fibre based on its mechanical and physical properties propose a matrix of small compact globular units linked together to form beaded chains. The unusual distribution of the component residues of protein SCMK-B2C suggests structures in the wool-fibre matrix compatible with certain features of the proposed models. PMID:4678578

  13. Amino acid sequence coevolution in the insect bursicon ligand-receptor system.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L

    2012-06-01

    The pattern of amino acid residue replacement in the components of the bursicon signaling system (involving the BURSα/BURSβ heterodimer and its receptor BURSrec) was reconstructed across a phylogeny of 17 insect species, in order to test for the co-occurrence of replacements at sets of individual sites. Sets of three or more branches with perfectly concordant changes occurred to a greater extent than expected by chance, given the observed level of amino acid change. The latter sites (SPC sites) were found to have distinctive characteristics: (1) the mean number of changes was significantly lower at SPC sites than that at other sites with multiple changes; (2) SPC sites had a significantly greater tendency toward parallel amino acid changes than other sites with multiple changes, but no greater tendency toward convergent changes; and (3) parallel changes tended to involve relatively similar amino acids, as indicated by relatively low mean chemical distances. The results implicated functional constraint, permitting only a limited subset of amino acids in a given site, as a major factor in causing both parallel amino acid replacement and coordinated amino acid changes in different sites of the same protein and of interacting proteins in this system.

  14. Characterization of DNA-binding sequences for CcaR in the cephamycin-clavulanic acid supercluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed

    Santamarta, I; López-García, M T; Kurt, A; Nárdiz, N; Alvarez-Álvarez, R; Pérez-Redondo, R; Martín, J F; Liras, P

    2011-08-01

    RT-PCR analysis of the genes in the clavulanic acid cluster revealed three transcriptional polycistronic units that comprised the ceaS2-bls2-pah2-cas2, cyp-fd-orf12-orf13 and oppA2-orf16 genes, whereas oat2, car, oppA1, claR, orf14, gcaS and pbpA were expressed as monocistronic transcripts. Quantitative RT-PCR of Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 and the mutant S. clavuligerus ccaR::aph showed that, in the mutant, there was a 1000- to 10,000-fold lower transcript level for the ceaS2 to cas2 polycistronic transcript that encoded CeaS2, the first enzyme of the clavulanic acid pathway that commits arginine to clavulanic acid biosynthesis. Smaller decreases in expression were observed in the ccaR mutant for other genes in the cluster. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF analysis confirmed the absence in the mutant strain of proteins CeaS2, Bls2, Pah2 and Car that are required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis, and CefF and IPNS that are required for cephamycin biosynthesis. Gel shift electrophoresis using recombinant r-CcaR protein showed that it bound to the ceaS2 and claR promoter regions in the clavulanic acid cluster, and to the lat, cefF, cefD-cmcI and ccaR promoter regions in the cephamycin C gene cluster. Footprinting experiments indicated that triple heptameric conserved sequences were protected by r-CcaR, and allowed identification of heptameric sequences as CcaR binding sites.

  15. Microcrack growth parameters for compact bone deduced from stiffness variations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D

    1998-07-01

    This paper shows how information on the fatigue behaviour of microcracks can be obtained by the analysis of stiffness changes measured during cyclic loading. Relationships between crack length, growth rate and cyclic stress intensity were deduced, and compared with previous empirical equations. Results show that the crack growth rate decreases rapidly with increasing length; this behaviour is typical of short-crack fatigue in many materials and is interpreted in terms of microstructural barriers to growth. Implications for the role of microcracks in remodelling and adaptation phenomena are discussed.

  16. The nucleotide sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 reveals a new amino acid substitution in exon 4 which is also present in HLA-B{sup *}2706

    SciTech Connect

    Rudwaleit, M.; Bowness, P.; Wordsworth, P.

    1996-12-31

    The HLA-B27 subtype HLA-B{sup *}2704 is virtually absent in Caucasians but common in Orientals, where it is associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The amino acid sequence of HLA-B{sup *}2704 has been established by peptide mapping and was shown to differ by two amino acids from HLA-B{sup *}2705, HLA-B{sup *}2704 is characterized by a serine for aspartic acid substitution at position 77 and glutamic acid for valine at position 152. To date, however, no nucleotide sequence confirming these changes at the DNA level has been published. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  17. The shikimate pathway: review of amino acid sequence, function and three-dimensional structures of the enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Jallu, Shais; Singh, T P

    2015-06-01

    The aromatic compounds such as aromatic amino acids, vitamin K and ubiquinone are important prerequisites for the metabolism of an organism. All organisms can synthesize these aromatic metabolites through shikimate pathway, except for mammals which are dependent on their diet for these compounds. The pathway converts phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate to chorismate through seven enzymatically catalyzed steps and chorismate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of variety of aromatic compounds. These enzymes have shown to play a vital role for the viability of microorganisms and thus are suggested to present attractive molecular targets for the design of novel antimicrobial drugs. This review focuses on the seven enzymes of the shikimate pathway, highlighting their primary sequences, functions and three-dimensional structures. The understanding of their active site amino acid maps, functions and three-dimensional structures will provide a framework on which the rational design of antimicrobial drugs would be based. Comparing the full length amino acid sequences and the X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes from bacteria, fungi and plant sources would contribute in designing a specific drug and/or in developing broad-spectrum compounds with efficacy against a variety of pathogens.

  18. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  19. Characterization of fatty acid-producing wastewater microbial communities using next generation sequencing technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    While wastewater represents a viable source of bacterial biodiesel production, very little is known on the composition of these microbial communities. We studied the taxonomic diversity and succession of microbial communities in bioreactors accumulating fatty acids using 454-pyro...

  20. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of WIPO... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid...

  1. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of WIPO... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid...

  2. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of WIPO... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid...

  3. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of WIPO... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid...

  4. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of WIPO... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid...

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of the major component myoglobin from the goose-beaked whale, Ziphius cavirostris.

    PubMed

    Lehman, L D; Jones, B N; Dwulet, F E; Bogardt, R A; Gurd, F R

    1980-10-21

    The complete primary structure of the major component myoglobin from the goose-beaked whale, Ziphius cavirostris, was determined by specific cleavage of the protein to obtain large peptides which are readily degraded by the automatic sequencer. Over 80% of the amino acid sequence was established from the three peptides resulting from the cleavage of the apomyoglobin at its two methionine residues with cyanogen bromide along with the four peptides resulting from the cleavage with trypsin of the citraconylated apomyoglobin at its three arginine residues. Further digestion of the central cyanogen bromide peptide with S. aureus strain V8 protease and the 1,2-cyclohexanedione-treated central cyanogen bromide peptide with trypsin enabled the determination of the remainder of the covalent structure. This myoglobin differs from the cetacean myoglobins determined to date at 12 to 17 positions. These large sequence differences reflect the distant taxonomic relationships between the goose-beaked whale and the other species of Cetacea the myoglobin sequences of which have previously been determined.

  6. Characteristic of HIV-1 in V3 loop region based on seroreactivity and amino acid sequences in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Kruavon; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Hoisanka, Narin; Boonsarthorn, Naphasawan; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Warachit, Paijit; Yamazaki, Shudo; Honda, Mitsuo

    2002-06-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the envelop (env) protein has been used for determining genetic subtype and phenotypic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. Based on the seroreactivity of the HIV-1 subtype by V3 peptide binding enzyme immunoassay (EIA) of 351 samples obtained in 1998 from HIV-1 infected individuals and AIDS patients, we found that 283 (80.6%) were subtype E, 20 (5.7%) were subtype B, 28 (8.0%) were cross-reactive between both types and 20 (5.7%) were non-typeable. The degree of seroreactivity of HIV-1 subtype E decreased significantly when the amino acid at the crown of the V3 loop was substituted from a GPGQ motif to GPGR motif. Interestingly, AIDS patients who had V3 sequences of subtype E as GPGR motif had a stronger immunoreactivity to GPGQ motif peptides than to GPGR motif peptides, in contradiction for their proviral sequences. The results suggested that mutations in the V3 loop may lead to a changed immunoreactivity that makes HIV-1 mutants unrecognizable or allow escape from the primary immune response by means of neutralizing sensitivity. In connection with vaccine development, it should be pointed out that the combination of V3 sequencing and peptide EIA could provide a novel approach to obtain a primarily infected virus sequence as a target for a preventive AIDS vaccine.

  7. Peptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Ha, K S

    1997-10-31

    The partial amino acid sequences of two catechol 1,2-dioxygenases (CD I1 and CD I2) from Acinetobacter lwoffii K24 have been determined by analysis of peptides after cleavages with endopeptidase Lys-C, endopeptidase Glu-C, trypsin, and chemicals (cyanogen bromide and BNPS-skatole). They include 248 amino acid sequences (4 fragments) of CD I1 and 211 amino acid sequences (5 fragments) of CD I2. Two enzymes have more than 50% sequence homology with type I catechol 1,2-dioxygenases and less than 30% sequence homology with type II catechol 1,2-dioxygenases. Two enzymes have similar hydropathy profiles in the N-terminal region, suggesting that they have similar secondary structures. PMID:9387151

  8. New Insights into Poly(Lactic-co-glycolic acid) Microstructure: Using Repeating Sequence Copolymers to Decipher Complex NMR and Thermal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stayshich, Ryan M.; Meyer, Tara Y.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence, which Nature uses to spectacular advantage, has not been fully exploited in synthetic copolymers. To investigate the effect of sequence and stereosequence on the physical properties of copolymers a family of complex isotactic, syndiotactic and atactic repeating sequence poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) copolymers (RSC PLGAs) were prepared and their NMR and thermal behavior was studied. The unique suitability of polymers prepared from the bioassimilable lactic and glycolic acid monomers for biomedical applications makes them ideal candidates for this type of sequence engineering. Polymers with repeating units of LG, GLG and LLG (L = lactic, G = glycolic) with controlled and varied tacticities were synthesized by assembly of sequence specific, stereopure dimeric, trimeric and hexameric segmer units. Specifically labeled deuterated lactic and glycolic acid segmers were likewise prepared and polymerized. Molecular weights for the copolymers ranged from Mn = 12-40 kDa by size exclusion chromatography in THF. Although the effects of sequence-influenced solution conformation were visible in all resonances of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra, the diastereotopic methylene resonances in the 1H NMR (CDCl3) for the glycolic units of the copolymers proved most sensitive. An octad level of resolution, which corresponds to an astounding 31-atom distance between the most separated stereocenters, was observed in some mixed sequence polymers. Importantly, the level of sensitivity of a particular NMR resonance to small differences in sequence was found to depend on the sequence itself. Thermal properties were also correlated with sequence. PMID:20681726

  9. Effects of the amino acid sequence on thermal conduction through β-sheet crystals of natural silk protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Bai, Zhitong; Ban, Heng; Liu, Ling

    2015-11-21

    Recent experiments have discovered very different thermal conductivities between the spider silk and the silkworm silk. Decoding the molecular mechanisms underpinning the distinct thermal properties may guide the rational design of synthetic silk materials and other biomaterials for multifunctionality and tunable properties. However, such an understanding is lacking, mainly due to the complex structure and phonon physics associated with the silk materials. Here, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that the amino acid sequence plays a key role in the thermal conduction process through β-sheets, essential building blocks of natural silks and a variety of other biomaterials. Three representative β-sheet types, i.e. poly-A, poly-(GA), and poly-G, are shown to have distinct structural features and phonon dynamics leading to different thermal conductivities. A fundamental understanding of the sequence effects may stimulate the design and engineering of polymers and biopolymers for desired thermal properties. PMID:26455593

  10. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the chiton Liolophura japonica and a phylogenetic tree for molluscan globins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Furukohri, T; Okamoto, S

    1993-02-01

    Myoglobin was isolated from the radular muscle of the chiton Liolophura japonica, a primitive archigastropodic mollusc. Liolophura contains three monomeric myoglobins (I, II, and III), and the complete amino acid sequence of myoglobin I has been determined. It is composed of 145 amino acid residues, and the molecular mass was calculated to be 16,070 D. The E7 distal histidine, which is replaced by valine or glutamine in several molluscan globins, is conserved in Liolophura myoglobin. The autoxidation rate at physiological conditions indicated that Liolophura oxymyoglobin is fairly stable when compared with other molluscan myoglobins. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura myoglobin shows low homology (11-21%) with molluscan dimeric myoglobins and hemoglobins, but shows higher homology (26-29%) with monomeric myoglobins from the gastropodic molluscs Aplysia, Dolabella, and Bursatella. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from 19 molluscan globin sequences. The tree separated them into two distinct clusters, a cluster for muscle myoglobins and a cluster for erythrocyte or gill hemoglobins. The myoglobin cluster is divided further into two subclusters, corresponding to monomeric and dimeric myoglobins, respectively. Liolophura myoglobin was placed on the branch of monomeric myoglobin lineage, showing that it diverged earlier from other monomeric myoglobins. The hemoglobin cluster is also divided into two subclusters. One cluster contains homodimeric, heterodimeric, tetrameric, and didomain chains of erythrocyte hemoglobins of the blood clams Anadara, Scapharca, and Barbatia. Of special interest is the other subcluster. It consists of three hemoglobin chains derived from the bacterial symbiontharboring clams Calyptogena and Lucina, in which hemoglobins are supposed to play an important role in maintaining the symbiosis with sulfide bacteria.

  11. Identification and localization of amino acid substitutions between two phenobarbital-inducible rat hepatic microsomal cytochromes P-450 by micro sequence analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, P M; Ryan, D E; Levin, W; Shively, J E

    1983-01-01

    Two isozymes of rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450--P-450b and P-450e--were compared by micro sequence analyses of their NH2 termini and tryptic fragments. These two phenobarbital-inducible hemoproteins, which are immunochemically indistinguishable with antibody against cytochrome P-450b, have extensive sequence homology. Automated Edman degradation of the native proteins revealed identical amino acids for the first 35 residues. Sequence determinations of the tryptic peptides, which constitute approximately 75% of each protein molecule, have thus far shown 10 amino acid differences between the two isozymes. Results of our amino acid sequence analyses established that two of the cDNAs, pcP-450pb1 and pcP-450pb4, reported by Fujii-Kuriyama et al. [Fujii-Kuriyama, Y., Mizukami, Y., Kamajiri, K., Sogawa, K. & Muramatsu, M. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 2793-2797] encode cytochrome P-450b whereas pcP-450pb2, a third cDNA whose nucleotide sequence differed slightly from that of the other two (six amino acid substitutions), encodes cytochrome P-450e. In addition to establishing the identity of these cloned cDNAs we provide direct evidence for seven additional amino acid differences between cytochromes P-450b and P-450e that occur beyond the region (Arg358) encoded by the cloned cDNA for cytochrome P-450e. Together, the amino acid sequences determined by micro sequence analysis and recombinant DNA techniques reveal 13 amino acid differences between these two isozymes. This report highlights the complementary nature of two different molecular approaches to elucidation of the amino acid sequences of isozymes with extensive structural homology. PMID:6572377

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Ustilago trichophora RK089, a Promising Malic Acid Producer.

    PubMed

    Zambanini, Thiemo; Buescher, Joerg M; Meurer, Guido; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    The basidiomycetous smut fungus Ustilago trichophora RK089 produces malate from glycerol. De novo genome sequencing revealed a 20.7-Mbp genome (301 gap-closed contigs, 246 scaffolds). A comparison to the genome of Ustilago maydis 521 revealed all essential genes for malate production from glycerol contributing to metabolic engineering for improving malate production. PMID:27469969

  13. Rapid Nucleic Acid Sequencing Methods--Alternative Approaches to Facilitating Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Charles F. A.

    1982-01-01

    Because advanced students had difficulty in interpreting cleavage patterns obtained by gel electrophoresis related to rapid sequencing techniques for DNA and RNA, several formats were developed to aid in understanding this topic. Formats included print, print plus scrambled print, interactive computer-based instruction, and high-resolution…

  14. Isolation and amino acid sequence of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Tensen, C P; Verhoeven, A H; Gaus, G; Janssen, K P; Keller, R; Van Herp, F

    1991-01-01

    The crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is synthesized as part of a larger preprohormone in which the sequence of CHH is N-terminally flanked by a peptide for which the name CPRP (CHH precursor-related peptide) is proposed. Both CHH and CPRP are present in the sinus gland, the neurohemal organ of neurosecretory cells located in the eyestalk of decapod crustaceans. This paper describes the isolation and sequence analysis of CPRPs isolated from sinus glands of the crab Carcinus maenas, the crayfish Orconectes limosus and the lobster Homarus americanus. The published sequence of "peptide H" isolated from the land crab, Cardisoma carnifex, has now been recognized as a CPRP in this species. Sequence comparison reveals a high level of identity for the N-terminal region (residues 1-13) between all four peptides, while identity in the C-terminal domain is high between lobster and crayfish CPRP on the one hand, and between both crab species on the other. Conserved N-terminal residues include a putative monobasic processing site at position 11, which suggests that CPRP may be a biosynthetic intermediate from which a potentially bioactive decapeptide can be derived.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Ustilago trichophora RK089, a Promising Malic Acid Producer

    PubMed Central

    Zambanini, Thiemo; Buescher, Joerg M.; Meurer, Guido; Blank, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    The basidiomycetous smut fungus Ustilago trichophora RK089 produces malate from glycerol. De novo genome sequencing revealed a 20.7-Mbp genome (301 gap-closed contigs, 246 scaffolds). A comparison to the genome of Ustilago maydis 521 revealed all essential genes for malate production from glycerol contributing to metabolic engineering for improving malate production. PMID:27469969

  16. The sequence of rat leukosialin (W3/13 antigen) reveals a molecule with O-linked glycosylation of one third of its extracellular amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Barclay, A N; Willis, A C; Williams, A F

    1987-01-01

    Leukosialin is one of the major glycoproteins of thymocytes and T lymphocytes and is notable for a very high content of O-linked carbohydrate structures. The full protein sequence for rat leukosialin as translated from cDNA clones is now reported. The molecule contains 371 amino acids with 224 residues outside the cell, one transmembrane sequence and 124 cytoplasmic residues. Data from the peptide sequence and carbohydrate composition suggest that one in three of the extracellular amino acids may be O-glycosylated with no N-linked glycosylation sites. The cDNA sequence contained a CpG rich region in the 3' coding sequence and a large 3' non-coding region which included tandem repeats of the sequence GGAT. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2965006

  17. An Interpretation of the Ancestral Codon from Miller’s Amino Acids and Nucleotide Correlations in Modern Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Nicolas; de Leon, Miguel Ponce

    2015-01-01

    Purine bias, which is usually referred to as an “ancestral codon”, is known to result in short-range correlations between nucleotides in coding sequences, and it is common in all species. We demonstrate that RWY is a more appropriate pattern than the classical RNY, and purine bias (Rrr) is the product of a network of nucleotide compensations induced by functional constraints on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Through deductions from universal correlation properties, we also demonstrate that amino acids from Miller’s spark discharge experiment are compatible with functional primeval proteins at the dawn of living cell radiation on earth. These amino acids match the hydropathy and secondary structures of modern proteins. PMID:25922573

  18. Mutation-selection models of coding sequence evolution with site-heterogeneous amino acid fitness profiles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    Modeling the interplay between mutation and selection at the molecular level is key to evolutionary studies. To this end, codon-based evolutionary models have been proposed as pertinent means of studying long-range evolutionary patterns and are widely used. However, these approaches have not yet consolidated results from amino acid level phylogenetic studies showing that selection acting on proteins displays strong site-specific effects, which translate into heterogeneous amino acid propensities across the columns of alignments; related codon-level studies have instead focused on either modeling a single selective context for all codon columns, or a separate selective context for each codon column, with the former strategy deemed too simplistic and the latter deemed overparameterized. Here, we integrate recent developments in nonparametric statistical approaches to propose a probabilistic model that accounts for the heterogeneity of amino acid fitness profiles across the coding positions of a gene. We apply the model to a dozen real protein-coding gene alignments and find it to produce biologically plausible inferences, for instance, as pertaining to site-specific amino acid constraints, as well as distributions of scaled selection coefficients. In their account of mutational features as well as the heterogeneous regimes of selection at the amino acid level, the modeling approaches studied here can form a backdrop for several extensions, accounting for other selective features, for variable population size, or for subtleties of mutational features, all with parameterizations couched within population-genetic theory. PMID:20176949

  19. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... submissions in computer readable form. (a) The computer readable form required by § 1.821(e) shall meet the following requirements: (1) The computer readable form shall contain a single “Sequence Listing” as either...

  20. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... submissions in computer readable form. (a) The computer readable form required by § 1.821(e) shall meet the following requirements: (1) The computer readable form shall contain a single “Sequence Listing” as either...

  1. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... submissions in computer readable form. (a) The computer readable form required by § 1.821(e) shall meet the following requirements: (1) The computer readable form shall contain a single “Sequence Listing” as either...

  2. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... submissions in computer readable form. (a) The computer readable form required by § 1.821(e) shall meet the following requirements: (1) The computer readable form shall contain a single “Sequence Listing” as either...

  3. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... submissions in computer readable form. (a) The computer readable form required by § 1.821(e) shall meet the following requirements: (1) The computer readable form shall contain a single “Sequence Listing” as either...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  6. Detection of peptidic sequences in the ancient acidic sediments of Río Tinto, Spain.

    PubMed

    Colín-García, María; Kanawati, Basem; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Phillippe; Amils, Ricardo; Parro, Victor; García, Miriam; Fernández-Remolar, David

    2011-12-01

    Biomarkers are molecules that are produced by or can be associated with biological activities. They can be used as tracers that give us an idea of the ancient biological communities that produced them, the paleoenvironmental conditions where they lived, or the mechanism involved in their transformation and preservation. As a consequence, the preservation potential of molecules over time depends largely on their nature, but also on the conditions of the environment, which controls the decomposition kinetics. In this context, proteins and nucleic acids, which are biomolecules bearing biological information, are among the most labile molecules. In this research, we report the presence of short-chained peptides obtained from extracts of ferruginous sedimentary deposits that have been produced under the acidic and oxidizing solutions of Río Tinto, Spain. These preliminary results go against the paradigmatic idea that considers the acidic and oxidizing environments inappropriate for the preservation of molecular information.

  7. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of a Dengue-1 virus isolated on Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, C; Yung, V; Araya, P; Tognarelli, J; Villagra, E; Vera, L; Fernández, J

    2008-01-01

    Dengue-1 viruses responsible for the dengue fever outbreak in Easter Island in 2002 were isolated from acute-phase sera of dengue fever patients. In order to analyze the complete genome sequence, we designed primers to amplify contiguous segments across the entire sequence of the viral genome. RT-PCR products obtained were cloned, and complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were determined. This report constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of a DENV-1 isolate from Chile. Phylogenetic analysis shows that an Easter Island isolate is most closely related to Pacific DENV-1 genotype IV viruses.

  8. Sequencing and Transcriptional Analysis of the Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Abscisic Acid-Producing Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Shu, Dan; Yang, Jie; Ding, Zhong-Tao; Tan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a model species with great importance as a pathogen of plants and has become used for biotechnological production of ABA. The ABA cluster of B. cinerea is composed of an open reading frame without significant similarities (bcaba3), followed by the genes (bcaba1 and bcaba2) encoding P450 monooxygenases and a gene probably coding for a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (bcaba4). In B. cinerea ATCC58025, targeted inactivation of the genes in the cluster suggested at least three genes responsible for the hydroxylation at carbon atom C-1' and C-4' or oxidation at C-4' of ABA. Our group has identified an ABA-overproducing strain, B. cinerea TB-3-H8. To differentiate TB-3-H8 from other B. cinerea strains with the functional ABA cluster, the DNA sequence of the 12.11-kb region containing the cluster of B. cinerea TB-3-H8 was determined. Full-length cDNAs were also isolated for bcaba1, bcaba2, bcaba3 and bcaba4 from B. cinerea TB-3-H8. Sequence comparison of the four genes and their flanking regions respectively derived from B. cinerea TB-3-H8, B05.10 and T4 revealed that major variations were located in intergenic sequences. In B. cinerea TB-3-H8, the expression profiles of the four function genes under ABA high-yield conditions were also analyzed by real-time PCR. PMID:25268614

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Moraxella osloensis Strain KMC41, a Producer of 4-Methyl-3-Hexenoic Acid, a Major Malodor Compound in Laundry.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takatsugu; Hirakawa, Hideki; Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Sato, Jun; Matsumura, Yuta; Mitani, Asako; Niwano, Yu; Takeuchi, Kohei; Kubota, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Moraxella osloensis strain KMC41, isolated from laundry with malodor. The KMC41 genome comprises a 2,445,556-bp chromosome and three plasmids. A fatty acid desaturase and at least four β-oxidation-related genes putatively associated with 4-methyl-3-hexenoic acid generation were detected in the KMC41 chromosome. PMID:27445387

  10. L-Rhamnose-binding lectin from eggs of the Echinometra lucunter: Amino acid sequence and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; de Melo, Arthur Alves; de Almeida, Alexandra Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; da Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2015-01-01

    An L-rhamnose-binding lectin named ELEL was isolated from eggs of the rock boring sea urchin Echinometra lucunter by affinity chromatography on lactosyl-agarose. ELEL is a homodimer linked by a disulfide bond with subunits of 11 kDa each. The new lectin was inhibited by saccharides possessing the same configuration of hydroxyl groups at C-2 and C-4, such as L-rhamnose, melibiose, galactose and lactose. The amino acid sequence of ELEL was determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The ELEL subunit has 103 amino acids, including nine cysteine residues involved in four conserved intrachain disulfide bonds and one interchain disulfide bond. The full sequence of ELEL presents conserved motifs commonly found in rhamnose-binding lectins, including YGR, DPC and KYL. A three-dimensional model of ELEL was created, and molecular docking revealed favorable binding energies for interactions between ELEL and rhamnose, melibiose and Gb3 (Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer). Furthermore, ELEL was able to agglutinate Gram-positive bacterial cells, suggesting its ability to recognize pathogens.

  11. Amino acid sequence and some properties of lectin-D from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, A; Funatsu, G

    1996-08-01

    Two pokeweed lectins, designated PL-D1 and PL-D2, have been isolated from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) using chitin affinity column chromatography followed by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-200 column and fast protein liquid chromatography on a Mono-Q column, and their amino acid sequences have been analyzed. PL-D1 consists of 84 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 9317, while PL-D2 has an identical sequence with PL-D1 except lack of the C-terminal Leu-Thr. PL-D is composed of two chitin-binding domains, A and B, with 50% homology with each other. Both PL-Ds did not agglutinate native rabbit erythrocytes, but showed about 0.1% of the agglutinating activity of wheat germ agglutinin toward trypsin-treated erythrocytes. In the presence of beta (1-->4) linked oligomers of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, which inhibit the hemagglutination, PL-D1 had an ultraviolet-difference spectrum with maxima at 292-294 nm and 284-285 nm, attributed to the red shift of the tryptophan residue, suggesting the location of tryptophan residue(s) at or near saccharide-binding site of PL-D1.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of dicyemid mesozoans (phylum Dicyemida) from innexin amino acid sequences: dicyemids are not related to Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito G; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-06-01

    Dicyemid mesozoans are endoparasites, or endosymbionts, found only in the renal sac of benthic cephalopod molluscs. The body organization of dicyemids is very simple, consisting of usually 10 to 40 cells, with neither body cavities nor differentiated organs. Dicyemids were considered as primitive animals, and the out-group of all metazoans, or as occupying a basal position of lophotrochozoans close to flatworms. We cloned cDNAs encoding for the gap junction component proteins, innexin, from the dicyemids. Its expression pattern was observed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In adult individuals, the innexin was expressed in calottes, infusorigens, and infusoriform embryos. The unique temporal pattern was observed in the developing infusoriform embryos. Innexin amino acid sequences had taxon-specific indels which enabled identification of the 3 major protostome lineages, i.e., 2 ecdysozoans (arthropods and nematodes) and the lophotrochozoans. The dicyemids show typical, lophotrochozoan-type indels. In addition, the Bayesian and maximum likelihood trees based on the innexin amino acid sequences suggested dicyemids to be more closely related to the higher lophotrochozoans than to the flatworms. Flatworms were the sister group, or consistently basal, to the other lophotrochozoan clade that included dicyemids, annelids, molluscs, and brachiopods.

  13. The complete amino acid sequence of the major Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Prosopsis juliflora.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, A N; Carvalho, M M; Xavier Filho, J; Blanco-Labra, A; Shewry, P R; Richardson, M

    1991-01-01

    The major inhibitor of trypsin in seeds of Prosopsis juliflora was purified by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE- and CM-Sepharose and preparative reverse phase HPLC on a Vydac C-18 column. The protein inhibited trypsin in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, but had only weak activity against chymotrypsin and did not inhibit human salivary or porcine pancreatic alpha-amylases. SDS-PAGE indicated that the inhibitor has a Mr of ca 20,000, and IEF-PAGE showed that the pI is 8.8. The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automatic degradation, and by DABITC/PITC microsequence analysis of peptides obtained from enzyme digestions of the reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein with trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, the Glu-specific protease from S. aureus and the Lys-specific protease from Lysobacter enzymogenes. The inhibitor consisted of two polypeptide chains, of 137 residues (alpha chain) and 38 residues (beta chain) linked together by a single disulphide bond. The amino acid sequence of the protein exhibited homology with a number of Kunitz proteinase inhibitors from other legume seeds, the bifunctional subtilisin/alpha-amylase inhibitors from cereals and the taste-modifying protein miraculin. PMID:1367792

  14. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197442

  15. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  16. Comparison of amino acid sequence of bovine coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) with that of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Katayama, K; Ericsson, L H; Enfield, D L; Walsh, K A; Neurath, H; Davie, E W; Titani, K

    1979-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine blood coagulation Factor IX (Christmas Factor) is presented and compared with the sequences of other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins and pancreatic trypsinogen. The 416-residue sequence of Factor IX was determined largely by automated Edman degradation of two large segments, containing 181 and 235 residues, isolated after activating Factor IX with a protease from Russell's viper venom. Subfragments of the two segments were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl, tryptophyl, and asparaginyl-glycyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of Factor IX, Factor X, and Protein C demonstrates that they are homologous throughout. Their homology with prothrombin, however, is restricted to the amino-terminal region, which is rich in gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, and the carboxyl-terminal region, which represents the catalytic domain of these proteins and corresponds to that of pancreatic serine proteases.

  17. Purification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Rodriguez, S; Segura-Nieto, M; Chagolla-Lopez, A; Verver y Vargas-Cortina, A; Martinez-Gallardo, N; Blanco-Labra, A

    1993-01-01

    A protein proteinase inhibitor was purified from a seed extract of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel-filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. It is a 69-amino acid protein with a high content of valine, arginine, and glutamic acid, but lacking in methionine. The inhibitor has a relative molecular weight of 7400 and an isoelectric point of 7.5. It is a serine proteinase inhibitor that recognizes chymotrypsin, trypsin, and trypsin-like proteinase activities extracted from larvae of the insect Prostephanus truncatus. This inhibitor belongs to the potato-I inhibitor family, showing the closest homology (59.5%) with the Lycopersicum peruvianum trypsin inhibitor, and (51%) with the proteinase inhibitor 5 extracted from the seeds of Cucurbita maxima. The position of the lysine-aspartic acid residues present in the active site of the amaranth inhibitor are found in almost the same relative position as in the inhibitor from C. maxima. PMID:8290633

  18. Retention and loss of amino acid biosynthetic pathways based on analysis of whole-genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Payne, Samuel H; Loomis, William F

    2006-02-01

    Plants and fungi can synthesize each of the 20 amino acids by using biosynthetic pathways inherited from their bacterial ancestors. However, the ability to synthesize nine amino acids (Phe, Trp, Ile, Leu, Val, Lys, His, Thr, and Met) was lost in a wide variety of eukaryotes that evolved the ability to feed on other organisms. Since the biosynthetic pathways and their respective enzymes are well characterized, orthologs can be recognized in whole genomes to understand when in evolution pathways were lost. The pattern of pathway loss and retention was analyzed in the complete genomes of three early-diverging protist parasites, the amoeba Dictyostelium, and six animals. The nine pathways were lost independently in animals, Dictyostelium, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium. Seven additional pathways appear to have been lost in one or another parasite, demonstrating that they are dispensable in a nutrition-rich environment. Our predictions of pathways retained and pathways lost based on computational analyses of whole genomes are validated by minimal-medium studies with mammals, fish, worms, and Dictyostelium. The apparent selective advantages of retaining biosynthetic capabilities for amino acids available in the diet are considered.

  19. The nucleotide sequences of some large ribonuclease T1 products from bacteriophage R17 ribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, Peter G. N.

    1971-01-01

    A method of `fingerprinting' high-molecular-weight 32P-labelled RNA species, using a two-dimensional thin-layer-chromatographic separation of ribonuclease T1 digestion products, has been applied to RNA from the Escherichia coli bacteriophage R17. The `fingerprinting' technique, besides giving a unique pattern that can be used as a characterization of the RNA, has made it possible to isolate a number of the larger oligonucleotides and to determine their nucleotide sequences. ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:5158505

  20. A case of orthologous sequences of hemocyanin subunits for an evolutionary study of horseshoe crabs: amino acid sequence comparison of immunologically identical subunits of Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus.

    PubMed

    Sugita, H; Shishikura, F

    1995-10-01

    About 83% of the amino acid sequence of hemocyanin subunit HR6 from the Southeast Asian horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, has been determined. There is a difference of about 43% between HR6 and complete sequences of chelicerate hemocyanin subunits from the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, and a tarantula, Eurypelma californicum. However, the immunologically identical subunits HR6 and HT6 from Tachypleus tridentatus (Japanese horseshoe crab) show 2.7% sequence difference. Based on the amino acid sequences of HR6 and HT6, the divergence between C. rotundicauda and T. tridentatus occurred about 9.6 million years ago. In the case of horseshoe crab hemocyanin subunits, it seems that the orthologous homologues in many homologous subunits between species are immunologically detectable.

  1. Nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences of a cDNA coding for pre-uteroglobin from the lung of the hare (Lepus capensis).

    PubMed Central

    López de Haro, M S; Nieto, A

    1986-01-01

    An almost full-length cDNA coding for pre-uteroglobin from hare lung was cloned and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that hare pre-uteroglobin contained 91 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 21 residues. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of hare pre-uteroglobin cDNA with that previously reported for the rabbit gene indicated five silent point substitutions and six others leading to amino acid changes in the coding region. The untranslated regions of both pre-uteroglobin mRNAs were very similar. The amino acid changes observed are discussed in relation to the different progesterone-binding abilities of both homologous proteins. PMID:3019311

  2. Triose phosphate isomerase from the coelacanth. An approach to the rapid determination of an amino acid sequence with small amounts of material.

    PubMed

    Kolb, E; Harris, J I; Bridgen, J

    1974-02-01

    The preparation and purification of cyanogen bromide fragments from [(14)C]carboxymethylated coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase is presented. The automated sequencing of these fragments, the lysine-blocked tryptic peptides derived from them, and also of the intact protein, is described. Combination with results from manual sequence analysis has given the 247-residue amino acid sequence of coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase in 4 months, by using 100mg of enzyme. (Two small adjacent peptides were placed by homology with the rabbit enzyme.) Comparison of this sequence with that of the rabbit muscle enzyme shows that 207 (84%) of the residues are identical. This slow rate of evolutionary change (corresponding to two amino acid substitutions per 100 residues per 100 million years) is similar to that found for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The reliability of sequence information obtained by automated methods is discussed.

  3. Human immunoglobulin subclasses. Partial amino acid sequence of the constant region of a γ4 chain

    PubMed Central

    Pink, J. R. L.; Buttery, S. H.; De Vries, G. M.; Milstein, C.

    1970-01-01

    The heavy chain of a human myeloma protein (Vin) belonging to the γ4 subclass was subjected to tryptic digestion after reduction and carboxymethylation. Cyanogen bromide fragments were also prepared and all 19 tryptic peptides that account for one of them (the Fc-like fragment) were studied. Selected peptic peptides were isolated and provided evidence for the order of 15 of the tryptic peptides. In addition the sequence of two large peptic peptides derived from two sections of the molecule including all the interchain bridges is presented. Comparison with published data on other chains allows us to propose a sequence of γ4 chains that extends from just before the presumed starting point of the invariable region (at about residue 113) to the C-terminal end of the chain (approx. residue 446), except for a section of about 50 residues. The results of the comparison suggest that the immunoglobulin subclasses have a recent independent evolutionary origin in different species. Implications for complement fixation and for the evolutionary origin of antibody diversity are also discussed. PMID:4192699

  4. Purification, properties, and partial amino acid sequences of thermostable xylanases from Streptomyces thermoviolaceus OPC-520

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujibo, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Katsushiro; Kuda, Takashi; Minami, Kazushi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Inamori, Yoshihiko ); Hasegawa, Toru )

    1992-01-01

    Two types of xylanases (1,4-{beta}-D-xylan xylanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.8) were isolated from the culture filtrate of a thermophilic actinomycete, Streptomyces thermoviolaceus OPC-520. The enzymes (STX-I and STX-II) were purified by chromatography with DEAE-Toyopearl 650 M, CM-Toyopearl 650 M, Sephadex G-75, Phenyl-Toyopearl 650 M, and Mono Q HR. The purified enzymes showed single bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weights of STX-I and STX-II were 54,000 and 33,000, respectively. The pIs were 4.2 (STX-I) and 8.0 (STX-II). The optimum pH levels for the activity of STX-I and STX-II were pH 7.0. The optimum temperature for the activity of STX-I was 70C, and that for the activity of STX-II was 60C. The enzymes were completely inhibited by N-bromosuccinimide. The enzymes degraded xylan, producing xylose and xylobiose as the predominant products, indicating that they were endoxylanases. STX-I showed high sequence homology with the exoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi (47% homology), and STX-II showed high sequence homology with the xylanase from Bacillus pumilus (46% homology).

  5. Inferences from protein and nucleic acid sequences - Early molecular evolution, divergence of kingdoms and rates of change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Mclaughlin, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Description of new sensitive, objective methods for establishing the probable common ancestry of very distantly related sequences and the quantitative evolutionary change which has taken place. These methods are applied to four families of proteins and nucleic acids and evolutionary trees will be derived where possible. Of the three families containing duplications of genetic material, two are nucleic acids: transfer RNA and 5S ribosomal RNA. Both of these structures are functional in the synthesis of coded proteins, and prototypes must have been present in the cell at the inception of the fundamental coding process that all living things share. There are many types of tRNA which recognize the various nucleotide triplets and the 20 amino acids. These types are thought to have arisen as a result of many gene duplications. Relationships among these types are discussed. The 5S ribosomal RNA, presently functional in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, is very likely descended from an early form incorporating almost a complete duplication of genetic material. The amount of evolution in the various lines can again be compared. The other two families containing duplications are proteins; ferredoxin and cytochrome c.

  6. Amino acid sequence diversity of the major human papillomavirus capsid protein: implications for current and next generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amina I; Bissett, Sara L; Beddows, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Despite the fidelity of host cell polymerases, the human papillomavirus (HPV) displays a degree of genomic polymorphism resulting in distinct genotypes and intra-type variants. The current HPV vaccines target the most prevalent genotypes associated with cervical cancer (HPV16/18) and genital warts (HPV6/11). Although these vaccines confer some measure of cross-protection, a multivalent HPV vaccine is in the pipeline that aims to broaden vaccine protection against other cervical cancer-associated genotypes including HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, HPV52 and HPV58. Both current and next generation vaccines comprise virus-like particles, based upon the major capsid protein, L1, and vaccine-induced, type-specific protection is likely mediated by neutralizing antibodies targeting L1 surface-exposed domains. The aim of this study was to perform an in silico analysis of existing full length L1 sequences representing vaccine-relevant HPV genotypes in order to address the degree of naturally-occurring, intra-type polymorphisms. In total, 1281 sequences from the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe were assembled. Intra-type entropy was low and/or limited to non-surface-exposed residues for HPV6, HPV11 and HPV52 suggesting a minimal effect on vaccine antibodies for these genotypes. For HPV16, intra-type entropy was high but the present analysis did not reveal any significant polymorphisms not previously identified. For HPV31, HPV33, HPV58, however, intra-type entropy was high, mostly mapped to surface-exposed domains and in some cases within known neutralizing antibody epitopes. For HPV18 and HPV45 there were too few sequences for a definitive analysis, but HPV45 displayed some degree of surface-exposed residue diversity. In most cases, the reference sequence for each genotype represented a minority variant and the consensus L1 sequences for HPV18, HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 did not reflect the L1 sequence of the currently available HPV pseudoviruses. These data highlight a number of variant

  7. Recognition of protein phosphorylation site based on amino acids sequence features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important reversible post-translational modifications (PTMs), and the theoretical recognition of the phosphorylation site is one of the important content of the computational biology. In the paper, we use the amino acid component, the position-dependent residue statistics and the non-adjacent residue pair frequency as the recognition parameters, and use Jensen-Shannon Divergence with Quadratic Discriminant analysis(JSDQD) as the method for predicting the phosphorylation sites. The 7-fold cross-validation test accuracies for the CK2, PKA and PKC kinase families are 90%, 90% and 86%, respectively.

  8. Cloning and characterization of the ferulic acid catabolic genes of Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Masai, Eiji; Harada, Kyo; Peng, Xue; Kitayama, Hirotaka; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2002-09-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 degrades ferulic acid to vanillin, and it is further metabolized through the protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathway. We obtained a Tn5 mutant of SYK-6, FA2, which was able to grow on vanillic acid but not on ferulic acid. A cosmid which complemented the growth deficiency of FA2 on ferulic acid was isolated. The 5.2-kb BamHI-EcoRI fragment in this cosmid conferred the transformation activity of ferulic acid to vanillin on Escherichia coli host cells. A sequencing analysis revealed the genes ferB and ferA in this fragment; these genes consist of 852- and 2,127-bp open reading frames, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence of ferB showed 40 to 48% identity with that of the feruloyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase/lyase genes of Pseudomonas and Amycolatopsis ferulic acid degraders. On the other hand, the deduced amino acid sequence of ferA showed no significant similarity to the feruloyl-CoA synthetase genes of other ferulic acid degraders. However, the deduced amino acid sequence of ferA did show 31% identity with pimeloyl-CoA synthetase of Pseudomonas mendocina 35, which has been classified as a new superfamily of acyl-CoA synthetase (ADP forming) with succinyl-CoA synthetase (L. B. Sánchez, M. Y. Galperin, and M. Müller, J. Biol. Chem. 275:5794-5803, 2000). On the basis of the enzyme activity of E. coli carrying each of these genes, ferA and ferB were shown to encode a feruloyl-CoA synthetase and feruloyl-CoA hydratase/lyase, respectively. p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and sinapinic acid were converted to their corresponding benzaldehyde derivatives by the cell extract containing FerA and FerB, thereby indicating their broad substrate specificities. We found a ferB homolog, ferB2, upstream of a 5-carboxyvanillic acid decarboxylase gene (ligW) involved in the degradation of 5,5'-dehydrodivanillic acid. The deduced amino acid sequence of ferB2 showed 49% identity with ferB, and its gene product showed feruloyl-CoA hydratase

  9. Isolation and amino acid sequences of opossum vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and cholecystokinin octapeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Yu, J; Rattan, S; Yalow, R S

    1992-01-01

    Evolutionary history suggests that the marsupials entered South America from North America about 75 million years ago and subsequently dispersed into Australia before the separation between South America and Antarctica-Australia. A question of interest is whether marsupial peptides resemble the corresponding peptides of Old or New World mammals. Previous studies had shown that "little" gastrin of the North American marsupial, the opossum, is identical in length to that of the New World mammals, the guinea pig and chinchilla. In this report, we demonstrate that opossum cholecystokinin octapeptide, like that of the Australian marsupials, the Eastern quoll and the Tamar wallaby, is identical to the cholecystokinin octapeptide of Old World mammals and differs from that of the guinea pig and chinchilla. However, opossum vasoactive intestinal polypeptide differs from the usual Old World mammalian vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in five sites: [sequence; see text]. PMID:1542675

  10. Evolution of early life inferred from protein and ribonucleic acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Schwartz, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical structures of ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochrome sequences have been employed to construct a phylogenetic tree which connects all major photosynthesizing organisms: the three types of bacteria, blue-green algae, and chloroplasts. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteria, eukaryotic cytoplasmic components and mitochondria are also included in the phylogenetic tree. Anaerobic nonphotosynthesizing bacteria similar to Clostridium were the earliest organisms, arising more than 3.2 billion years ago. Bacterial photosynthesis evolved nearly 3.0 billion years ago, while oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, originating in the blue-green algal line, came into being about 2.0 billion years ago. The phylogenetic tree supports the symbiotic theory of the origin of eukaryotes.

  11. Deoxyribonucleic Acid Base Sequence Homologies of Some Budding and Prosthecate Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Richard L.; Hirsch, Peter

    1972-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of a number of budding and prosthecate bacteria was determined by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) homology experiments of the direct binding type. Strains of Hyphomicrobium sp. isolated from aquatic habitats were found to have relatedness values ranging from 9 to 70% with strain “EA-617,” a subculture of the Hyphomicrobium isolated by Mevius from river water. Strains obtained from soil enrichments had lower values with EA-617, ranging from 3 to 5%. Very little or no homology was detected between the amino acid-utilizing strain Hyphomicrobium neptunium and other Hyphomicrobium strains, although significant homology was observed with the two Hyphomonas strains examined. No homology could be detected between prosthecate bacteria of the genera Rhodomicrobium, Prosthecomicrobium, Ancalomicrobium, or Caulobacter, and Hyphomicrobium strain EA-617 or H. neptunium LE-670. The grouping of Hyphomicrobium strains by their relatedness values agrees well with a grouping according to the base composition of their DNA species. It is concluded that bacteria possessing cellular extensions represent a widely diverse group of organisms. PMID:5018022

  12. Analysis of a nucleotide-binding site of 5-lipoxygenase by affinity labelling: binding characteristics and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Y; Hammarberg, T; Radmark, O; Samuelsson, B; Ng, C F; Funk, C D; Loscalzo, J

    2000-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) catalyses the first two steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid. 5LO activity is stimulated by ATP; however, a consensus ATP-binding site or nucleotide-binding site has not been found in its protein sequence. In the present study, affinity and photoaffinity labelling of 5LO with 5'-p-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) and 2-azido-ATP showed that 5LO bound to the ATP analogues quantitatively and specifically and that the incorporation of either analogue inhibited ATP stimulation of 5LO activity. The stoichiometry of the labelling was 1.4 mol of FSBA/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 1 mol/mol) or 0.94 mol of 2-azido-ATP/mol of 5LO (of which ATP competed with 0.77 mol/mol). Labelling with FSBA prevented further labelling with 2-azido-ATP, indicating that the same binding site was occupied by both analogues. Other nucleotides (ADP, AMP, GTP, CTP and UTP) also competed with 2-azido-ATP labelling, suggesting that the site was a general nucleotide-binding site rather than a strict ATP-binding site. Ca(2+), which also stimulates 5LO activity, had no effect on the labelling of the nucleotide-binding site. Digestion with trypsin and peptide sequencing showed that two fragments of 5LO were labelled by 2-azido-ATP. These fragments correspond to residues 73-83 (KYWLNDDWYLK, in single-letter amino acid code) and 193-209 (FMHMFQSSWNDFADFEK) in the 5LO sequence. Trp-75 and Trp-201 in these peptides were modified by the labelling, suggesting that they were immediately adjacent to the C-2 position of the adenine ring of ATP. Given the stoichiometry of the labelling, the two peptide sequences of 5LO were probably near each other in the enzyme's tertiary structure, composing or surrounding the ATP-binding site of 5LO. PMID:11042125

  13. Seven theses on pigeon homing deduced from empirical findings

    PubMed

    Wallraff

    1996-01-01

    Experimental findings obtained in recent years make it possible to recognize and distinguish the most relevant components determining homing flights of displaced pigeons. Conclusions deduced from these experiments, more or less compelling or tentative, are presented in the form of seven theses, supplemented by several subtheses along with reference to empirical data. The principal theses are as follows. (1) Passively displaced pigeons find the way home by using location-dependent signals and not by path integration based on recording of motion. Pigeons are able to home, even from unfamiliar areas, without access to potentially useful information during transport to the release site. (2) Home-related orientation of pigeons in unfamiliar areas requires positional information acquired olfactorily from atmospheric trace gases. Empirically deduced details of olfactory navigation are enumerated (connection with winds and the sun, inaccuracy, spatial range, time course of sampling and memorizing spatial information, etc.). The critical gap in our knowledge, i.e. the nature and spatio-temporal distribution of the substances involved, is provisionally filled by speculation. (3) In familiar areas, known from previous flights, the visual landscape is used additionally to find the way home. (4) Initial orientation of pigeons does not exclusively reflect home-related navigation but includes components independent of the position with respect to home. Observed bearings are co-determined by a general preference for a certain compass direction and by distracting features of the nearby landscape. (5) Proportions among components controlling initial orientation according to theses 2-4 are highly variable depending on local, temporal and experimental conditions and on the life histories of the pigeons. This complexity greatly restricts recognition of the navigationally relevant components of behaviour at a given release site. (6) Sensory inputs, being neither olfactory nor visual, do

  14. A Possible Mechanism of Zika Virus Associated Microcephaly: Imperative Role of Retinoic Acid Response Element (RARE) Consensus Sequence Repeats in the Viral Genome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Himanshu N; Pareek, Vikas; Raza, Khursheed; Dantham, Subrahamanyam; Kumar, Pavan; Mochan, Sankat; Faiq, Muneeb A

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the reports of microcephaly as a consistent outcome in the fetuses of pregnant women infected with ZIKV in Brazil, Zika virus (ZIKV)-microcephaly etiomechanistic relationship has recently been implicated. Researchers, however, are still struggling to establish an embryological basis for this interesting causal handcuff. The present study reveals robust evidence in favor of a plausible ZIKV-microcephaly cause-effect liaison. The rationale is based on: (1) sequence homology between ZIKV genome and the response element of an early neural tube developmental marker "retinoic acid" in human DNA and (2) comprehensive similarities between the details of brain defects in ZIKV-microcephaly and retinoic acid embryopathy. Retinoic acid is considered as the earliest factor for regulating anteroposterior axis of neural tube and positioning of structures in developing brain through retinoic acid response elements (RARE) consensus sequence (5'-AGGTCA-3') in promoter regions of retinoic acid-dependent genes. We screened genomic sequences of already reported virulent ZIKV strains (including those linked to microcephaly) and other viruses available in National Institute of Health genetic sequence database (GenBank) for the RARE consensus repeats and obtained results strongly bolstering our hypothesis that ZIKV strains associated with microcephaly may act through precipitation of dysregulation in retinoic acid-dependent genes by introducing extra stretches of RARE consensus sequence repeats in the genome of developing brain cells. Additional support to our hypothesis comes from our findings that screening of other viruses for RARE consensus sequence repeats is positive only for those known to display neurotropism and cause fetal brain defects (for which maternal-fetal transmission during developing stage may be required). The numbers of RARE sequence repeats appeared to match with the virulence of screened positive viruses. Although, bioinformatic evidence and embryological

  15. A Possible Mechanism of Zika Virus Associated Microcephaly: Imperative Role of Retinoic Acid Response Element (RARE) Consensus Sequence Repeats in the Viral Genome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Himanshu N; Pareek, Vikas; Raza, Khursheed; Dantham, Subrahamanyam; Kumar, Pavan; Mochan, Sankat; Faiq, Muneeb A

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the reports of microcephaly as a consistent outcome in the fetuses of pregnant women infected with ZIKV in Brazil, Zika virus (ZIKV)-microcephaly etiomechanistic relationship has recently been implicated. Researchers, however, are still struggling to establish an embryological basis for this interesting causal handcuff. The present study reveals robust evidence in favor of a plausible ZIKV-microcephaly cause-effect liaison. The rationale is based on: (1) sequence homology between ZIKV genome and the response element of an early neural tube developmental marker "retinoic acid" in human DNA and (2) comprehensive similarities between the details of brain defects in ZIKV-microcephaly and retinoic acid embryopathy. Retinoic acid is considered as the earliest factor for regulating anteroposterior axis of neural tube and positioning of structures in developing brain through retinoic acid response elements (RARE) consensus sequence (5'-AGGTCA-3') in promoter regions of retinoic acid-dependent genes. We screened genomic sequences of already reported virulent ZIKV strains (including those linked to microcephaly) and other viruses available in National Institute of Health genetic sequence database (GenBank) for the RARE consensus repeats and obtained results strongly bolstering our hypothesis that ZIKV strains associated with microcephaly may act through precipitation of dysregulation in retinoic acid-dependent genes by introducing extra stretches of RARE consensus sequence repeats in the genome of developing brain cells. Additional support to our hypothesis comes from our findings that screening of other viruses for RARE consensus sequence repeats is positive only for those known to display neurotropism and cause fetal brain defects (for which maternal-fetal transmission during developing stage may be required). The numbers of RARE sequence repeats appeared to match with the virulence of screened positive viruses. Although, bioinformatic evidence and embryological

  16. Nucleotide sequence of a complementary DNA encoding pea cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.A.; Zilinskas, B.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors now report the nucleotide sequence of the cytosolic Cu/Zn SOD cloned from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from mRNA extracted from leaves of 7- to 10-d pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.). The clone was isolated using a 22-base synthetic oligonucleotide complementary to the amino acid sequence CGIIGLQG. This sequence, found at the protein's carboxy terminus, is highly conserved among plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but not chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs. The 738-base pair sequence contains an open reading frame specifying 152 codons and a predicted M{sub r} of 18,024 D. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous (79-82% identity) with the sequences of other known plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but less highly conserved (63-65%) when compared with several chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs including pea (10).

  17. Analyses of mitochondrial amino acid sequence datasets support the proposal that specimens of Hypodontus macropi from three species of macropodid hosts represent distinct species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypodontus macropi is a common intestinal nematode of a range of kangaroos and wallabies (macropodid marsupials). Based on previous multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence data sets, H. macropi has been proposed to be complex of species. To test this proposal using independent molecular data, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial (mt) genomes of individuals of H. macropi from three different species of hosts (Macropus robustus robustus, Thylogale billardierii and Macropus [Wallabia] bicolor) as well as that of Macropicola ocydromi (a related nematode), and undertook a comparative analysis of the amino acid sequence datasets derived from these genomes. Results The mt genomes sequenced by next-generation (454) technology from H. macropi from the three host species varied from 13,634 bp to 13,699 bp in size. Pairwise comparisons of the amino acid sequences predicted from these three mt genomes revealed differences of 5.8% to 18%. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence data sets using Bayesian Inference (BI) showed that H. macropi from the three different host species formed distinct, well-supported clades. In addition, sliding window analysis of the mt genomes defined variable regions for future population genetic studies of H. macropi in different macropodid hosts and geographical regions around Australia. Conclusions The present analyses of inferred mt protein sequence datasets clearly supported the hypothesis that H. macropi from M. robustus robustus, M. bicolor and T. billardierii represent distinct species. PMID:24261823

  18. Construction strategy for an internal amplification control for real-time diagnostic assays using nucleic Acid sequence-based amplification: development and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; D'Agostino, Martin; Pla, Maria; Cook, Nigel

    2004-12-01

    An important analytical control in molecular amplification-based methods is an internal amplification control (IAC), which should be included in each reaction mixture. An IAC is a nontarget nucleic acid sequence which is coamplified simultaneously with the target sequence. With negative results for the target nucleic acid, the absence of an IAC signal indicates that amplification has failed. A general strategy for the construction of an IAC for inclusion in molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assays is presented. Construction proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, a double-stranded DNA molecule that contains nontarget sequences flanked by target sequences complementary to the NASBA primers is produced. At the 5' end of this DNA molecule is a T7 RNA polymerase binding sequence. In the second phase of construction, RNA transcripts are produced from the DNA by T7 RNA polymerase. This RNA is the IAC; it is amplified by the target NASBA primers and is detected by a molecular beacon probe complementary to the internal nontarget sequences. As a practical example, an IAC for use in an assay for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is described, its incorporation and optimization within the assay are detailed, and its application to spiked and natural clinical samples is shown to illustrate the correct interpretation of the diagnostic results.

  19. Sequence-specific labeling of nucleic acids and proteins with methyltransferases and cofactor analogues.

    PubMed

    Hanz, Gisela Maria; Jung, Britta; Giesbertz, Anna; Juhasz, Matyas; Weinhold, Elmar

    2014-11-22

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet or SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (MTase) catalyze the transfer of the activated methyl group from AdoMet to specific positions in DNA, RNA, proteins and small biomolecules. This natural methylation reaction can be expanded to a wide variety of alkylation reactions using synthetic cofactor analogues. Replacement of the reactive sulfonium center of AdoMet with an aziridine ring leads to cofactors which can be coupled with DNA by various DNA MTases. These aziridine cofactors can be equipped with reporter groups at different positions of the adenine moiety and used for Sequence-specific Methyltransferase-Induced Labeling of DNA (SMILing DNA). As a typical example we give a protocol for biotinylation of pBR322 plasmid DNA at the 5'-ATCGAT-3' sequence with the DNA MTase M.BseCI and the aziridine cofactor 6BAz in one step. Extension of the activated methyl group with unsaturated alkyl groups results in another class of AdoMet analogues which are used for methyltransferase-directed Transfer of Activated Groups (mTAG). Since the extended side chains are activated by the sulfonium center and the unsaturated bond, these cofactors are called double-activated AdoMet analogues. These analogues not only function as cofactors for DNA MTases, like the aziridine cofactors, but also for RNA, protein and small molecule MTases. They are typically used for enzymatic modification of MTase substrates with unique functional groups which are labeled with reporter groups in a second chemical step. This is exemplified in a protocol for fluorescence labeling of histone H3 protein. A small propargyl group is transferred from the cofactor analogue SeAdoYn to the protein by the histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) MTase Set7/9 followed by click labeling of the alkynylated histone H3 with TAMRA azide. MTase-mediated labeling with cofactor analogues is an enabling technology for many exciting applications including identification and functional study of MTase substrates as

  20. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  1. Using Triple Helix Forming Peptide Nucleic Acids for Sequence-selective Recognition of Double-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; Cheruiyot, Samwel K.; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in regulation of gene expression. Specific recognition and inhibition of these biologically important RNAs that form complex double-helical structures will be highly useful for fundamental studies in biology and practical applications in medicine. This protocol describes a strategy developed in our laboratory for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using triple helix forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that bind in the major grove of RNA helix. The strategy developed uses chemically modified nucleobases, such as 2-aminopyridine (M) that enables strong triple helical binding at physiologically relevant conditions, and 2-pyrimidinone (P) and 3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazine (E) that enable recognition of isolated pyrimidines in the purine rich strand of the RNA duplex. Detailed protocols for preparation of modified PNA monomers, solid-phase synthesis and HPLC purification of PNA oligomers, and measuring dsRNA binding affinity using isothermal titration calorimetry are included. PMID:25199637

  2. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification using molecular beacons for detection of enterovirus RNA in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Landry, Marie L; Garner, Robin; Ferguson, David

    2005-07-01

    Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) using molecular beacon technology (NASBA-beacon) was compared to standard NASBA with postamplification hybridization using electrochemiluminescently labeled probes (NASBA-ECL) for detection of enteroviruses (EV) in 133 cerebrospinal fluid and 27 stool samples. NASBA-ECL and NASBA-beacon were similar in sensitivity, detecting 55 (100%) and 52 (94.5%) EV-positive samples, respectively. There were no false positives. Both NASBA assays were significantly more sensitive than culture. Real-time NASBA-beacon reagents and equipment rental were more expensive than those for NASBA-ECL; however, time to result was shortened by 1.5 h, hands-on time was reduced by 25 min, and the assay was much simpler for technologists to learn and perform.

  3. Red Cell Membrane Permeability Deduced from Bulk Diffusion Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Redwood, W. R.; Rall, E.; Perl, W.

    1974-01-01

    The permeability coefficients of dog red cell membrane to tritiated water and to a series of[14C]amides have been deduced from bulk diffusion measurements through a "tissue" composed of packed red cells. Red cells were packed by centrifugation inside polyethylene tubing. The red cell column was pulsed at one end with radiolabeled solute and diffusion was allowed to proceed for several hours. The distribution of radioactivity along the red cell column was measured by sequential slicing and counting, and the diffusion coefficient was determined by a simple plotting technique, assuming a one-dimensional diffusional model. In order to derive the red cell membrane permeability coefficient from the bulk diffusion coefficient, the red cells were assumed to be packed in a regular manner approximating closely spaced parallelopipeds. The local steady-state diffusional flux was idealized as a one-dimensional intracellular pathway in parallel with a one-dimensional extracellular pathway with solute exchange occurring within the series pathway and between the pathways. The diffusion coefficients in the intracellular and extracellular pathways were estimated from bulk diffusion measurements through concentrated hemoglobin solutions and plasma, respectively; while the volume of the extracellular pathway was determined using radiolabeled sucrose. The membrane permeability coefficients were in satisfactory agreement with the data of Sha'afi, R. I., C. M. Gary-Bobo, and A. K. Solomon (1971. J. Gen. Physiol. 58:238) obtained by a rapid-reaction technique. The method is simple and particularly well suited for rapidly permeating solutes. PMID:4443795

  4. Deducing high-altitude precipitation from glacier mass balance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesen, Rianne H.; Immerzeel, Walter W.; Wanders, Niko

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution of precipitation in mountainous terrain is generally not well known due to underrepresentation of gauge observations at higher elevations. Precipitation tends to increase with elevation, but since observations are mainly performed in the valleys, the vertical precipitation gradient cannot be deduced from these measurements. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of gridded meteorological data is often too coarse to resolve individual mountain chains. Still, a reliable estimate of high-elevation precipitation is required for many hydrological applications. We present a method to determine the vertical precipitation gradient in mountainous terrain, making use of glacier mass balance observations. These measurements have the advantage that they provide a basin-wide precipitation estimate at high elevations. The precipitation gradient is adjusted until the solid precipitation over the glacier area combined with the calculated melt gives the measured annual glacier mass balance. Results for the glacierized regions in Central Europe and Scandinavia reveal spatially coherent patterns, with predominantly positive precipitation gradients ranging from -4 to +28 % (100 m)‑1. In some regions, precipitation amounts at high elevations are up to four times as large as in the valleys. A comparison of the modelled winter precipitation with observed snow accumulation on glaciers shows a good agreement. Precipitation measured at the few high-altitude meteorological stations is generally lower than our estimate, which may result from precipitation undercatch. Our findings will improve the precipitation forcing for glacier modelling and hydrological studies in mountainous terrain.

  5. Venus surface properties deduced from radar and radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, P. G.

    1989-01-01

    The brightness of surface features on side looking radar images of Venus is determined by many factors: the angles of incidence and reflection, polarization, surface geometry and composition, and so forth. The contribution from surface properties themselves can only be deduced by combining several types of measurement. For instance, without additional information, it is impossible to distinguish the effects of changes in surface roughness from those in dielectric constant. In common with the Moon and Mars, the surface of Venus appears to scatter radar waves in two ways: small-scale surface inhomogeneities, i.e., those smaller than the incident wavelength, depolarize and scatter the energy over a wide range of angles. The Pioneer Venus radar mapper experiment made three overlapping sets of measurements of the equatorial region of Venus from 15 deg S latitude to 45 deg N; the backscatter cross section at a range of incidence angles, the shape and intensity of radar echoes from the nadir, and the microwave brightness temperature of the surface. These techniques developed during the analysis of Pioneer Venus data will be used during the Magellan mission to extract measurements of surface slopes and dielectric constants over all areas covered by the SAR and altimeter antennae, with a resolution of about 10 km. A knowledge of the mechanisms that govern surface scattering will also be useful in the analysis of higher resolution side looking radar images, particularly in distinguishing the effects of changing roughness from those caused by a long range surface tilt or changing dielectric constant.

  6. A nomenclature for the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase gene family based on amino acid sequence identities.

    PubMed

    Lawton, M P; Cashman, J R; Cresteil, T; Dolphin, C T; Elfarra, A A; Hines, R N; Hodgson, E; Kimura, T; Ozols, J; Phillips, I R

    1994-01-01

    A nomenclature based on comparisons of amino acid sequences is proposed for the members of the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family. This nomenclature is based on evidence of a single gene family composed of five genes. The percentage identities of the amino acid sequences of the five known forms of mammalian FMO are between 52 and 57% in rabbit and between 50 and 58% across species lines. The identities of all orthologs are greater than 82%. There is no evidence for multiple, highly related forms of the enzyme or for more than one mammalian FMO gene family. In the proposed system, the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase gene family is designated as "FMO" and the individual genes are distinguished by an Arabic numeral. The FMOs known as the "liver" and "lung" enzymes become FMO1 and FMO2, and the more recently described forms of the enzymes become FMO3, FMO4, and FMO5. Human FMO gene designations, FMO1 and FMO3, remain unchanged, but the gene designated FMO2 becomes FMO4. Following convention, the genes and cDNA designations will be italicized and the mRNA and protein designations will be nonitalicized. The purpose of the proposed nomenclature is to provide for the unambiguous identification of orthologous forms of mammalian FMOs, regardless of the species or tissue in question. The proposed classification considers only members of the mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase gene family and has no bearing on the generally accepted definition of a multisubstrate flavin-containing monooxygenase.

  7. Calibration-curve-free quantitative PCR: a quantitative method for specific nucleic acid sequences without using calibration curves.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hidenori; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Morita, Nao; Kurata, Shinya; Nakamura, Kazunori; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Noda, Naohiro

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a simple quantitative method for specific nucleic acid sequences without using calibration curves. This method is based on the combined use of competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence quenching. We amplified a gene of interest (target) from DNA samples and an internal standard (competitor) with a sequence-specific fluorescent probe using PCR and measured the fluorescence intensities before and after PCR. The fluorescence of the probe is quenched on hybridization with the target by guanine bases, whereas the fluorescence is not quenched on hybridization with the competitor. Therefore, quench rate (i.e., fluorescence intensity after PCR divided by fluorescence intensity before PCR) is always proportional to the ratio of the target to the competitor. Consequently, we can calculate the ratio from quench rate without using a calibration curve and then calculate the initial copy number of the target from the ratio and the initial copy number of the competitor. We successfully quantified the copy number of a recombinant DNA of genetically modified (GM) soybean and estimated the GM soybean contents. This method will be particularly useful for rapid field tests of the specific gene contamination in samples.

  8. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the deep-sea tube worm haemoglobin remarkably resembles that of annelid haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Takagi, T; Ohta, S

    1988-01-01

    The deep-sea giant tube worm Lamellibrachia, belonging to the phylum Vestimentifera, contains two extracellular haemoglobins, an Mr 3,000,000 haemoglobin and an Mr 440,000 haemoglobin. The former has a hexagonal bilayer structure and consists of six polypeptide chains (AI-VI); a study of its haem content shows that not all of the chains contain haem. The Mr 440,000 haemoglobin consists of four haem-containing chains (BI-IV). We isolated most of the chains by reverse-phase chromatography and determined the amino acid sequences of the 21-45 N-terminal residues. Eight chains (AI-IV and BI-IV) showed significant homology with haem-containing chains of annelid giant haemoglobin. The highest homology was found between Lamellibrachia chain AI and Tylorrhynchus chain I; surprisingly, 18 out of the 20 N-terminal residues are identical. On the other hand, chain AV, with an unusual Mr of 32,000, showed a rather different sequence and is likely to be a non-haem chain which might act as a linker protein in the assembly of the haem-containing chains. From these results, we conclude that the tube worm Mr 3,000,000 haemoglobin is highly homologous with annelid haemoglobin. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3202832

  9. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO4/PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. We, therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, we further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin. Images PMID:3033645

  10. Amino acid sequence and chemical modification of a novel alpha-neurotoxin (Oh-5) from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom.

    PubMed

    Lin, S R; Leu, L F; Chang, L S; Chang, C C

    1997-04-01

    A novel alpha-neurotoxin, Oh-5, was isolated from king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom and purified by successive SP-Sephadex C-25 column chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. The complete sequence of Oh-5 was determined by Edman degradation of peptide fragments generated by endopeptidases, i.e., trypsin, Saccharomyces aureus V8 protease and lysyl endopeptidase. This novel toxin comprises 72 amino acid residues with 10 cysteines. The sequence shows 89% sequence homology with Oh-4, and 60% with Toxins a and b from the same venom. The tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine and arginine residues in Oh-5 were modified with tetranitromethane (TNM), 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl (NPS) chloride, trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS), and p-hydroxyphenylglyoxal (HPG), respectively. Modification of Tyr-4 or Trp-27 did not affect the lethal toxicity at all, while the Tyr-4 and 23 nitrated derivative retained about 50% of the lethality of native toxin. Selective trinitrophenylation of Lys-51 or 69 resulted in a decrease in lethality by 29%, and 50% lethality was retained after modification of Lys-2, 51, and 69. A drastic decrease in lethality to 26% was observed when both Arg-35 and 37 were modified. The neurotoxicity was further decreased when Arg-9 was additionally modified. These results suggest that the aromatic residues, Tyr-4 and Trp-27, are not crucial for the neurotoxicity, whereas the cationic residues are involved in multipoint contact between the toxin molecule and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The residues Tyr-23 and Arg-35 and 37 in the central loop of Oh-5 seem to contribute greatly to the neurotoxicity.

  11. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  12. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes. PMID:20864443

  13. Nucleic acid amplification in vitro: detection of sequences with low copy numbers and application to diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Guatelli, J C; Gingeras, T R; Richman, D D

    1989-01-01

    The enzymatic amplification of specific nucleic acid sequences in vitro has revolutionized the use of nucleic acid hybridization assays for viral detection. With this method, the copy number of a pathogen-specific sequence is increased several orders of magnitude before detection is attempted. The sensitivity and specificity of detection are thus markedly improved. Mullis and Faloona devised the first method of sequence amplification in vitro, the polymerase chain reaction (K.B. Mullis and F.A. Faloona, Methods Enzymol. 155:355-350, 1987). By this method, synthetic oligonucleotide primers direct repeated, target-specific, deoxyribonucleic acid-synthetic reactions, resulting in an exponential increase in the amount of the specific target sequence. The application of sequence amplification to viral detection was initially performed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and human T-cell lymphoma virus type I. In principle, however, this approach can be applied to the detection of any deoxyribonucleic or ribonucleic acid virus; the only requirement is that sufficient nucleotide sequence data exist to allow the synthesis of target-specific oligonucleotide primers. The use of target amplification in vitro will permit a variety of studies of viral pathogenesis which have not been feasible because of the low copy number of the viral nucleic acids in infected material. This approach is particularly applicable to the study of human retroviral infections, which are chronic and persistent and are characterized by low titers of virus in tissues. In addition, target amplification in vitro will facilitate the development of new methods of sequence detection, which will be useful for rapid viral diagnosis in the clinical laboratory. PMID:2650862

  14. Amino acid sequence homology between Piv, an essential protein in site-specific DNA inversion in Moraxella lacunata, and transposases of an unusual family of insertion elements.

    PubMed Central

    Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1994-01-01

    Deletion analysis of the subcloned DNA inversion region of Moraxella lacunata indicates that Piv is the only M. lacunata-encoded factor required for site-specific inversion of the tfpQ/tfpI pilin segment. The predicted amino acid sequence of Piv shows significant homology solely with the transposases/integrases of a family of insertion sequence elements, suggesting that Piv is a novel site-specific recombinase. Images PMID:8021196

  15. Cloning and sequencing of parafusin, a calcium-dependent exocytosis-related phosphoglycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S V; Wyroba, E; Andersen, A P; Satir, B H

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA for parafusin, an evolutionarily conserved phosphoglycoprotein involved in exocytosis, has been cloned and sequenced from a unicellular eukaryote, Paramecium tetraurelia. A Paramecium cDNA library was screened with an oligonucleotide probe synthesized to an internal amino acid sequence of isolated parafusin. The insert was 3 kb long with an open reading frame of 1.75 kb. Data base searches of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that Paramecium parafusin had a 50.7% sequence identity to rabbit muscle phosphoglucomutase, although no detectable phosphoglucomutase activity has been detected in isolated parafusin. The deduced parafusin amino acid sequence had four inserts and two deletions, which might confer on the protein specific functions in signal transduction events related to exocytosis. Furthermore, searches for potential phosphorylation sites showed the presence of a protein kinase C site (KDFSFR) specific to parafusin. Southern blot analysis with probes specific for parafusin and phosphoglucomutase suggested that these proteins were products of different genes. We propose that parafusin and phosphoglucomutase are members of a superfamily that conserve homologies important for the tertiary structure of the molecules. Images PMID:7937900

  16. Cloning and sequencing of parafusin, a calcium-dependent exocytosis-related phosphoglycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, S V; Wyroba, E; Andersen, A P; Satir, B H

    1994-10-11

    A cDNA for parafusin, an evolutionarily conserved phosphoglycoprotein involved in exocytosis, has been cloned and sequenced from a unicellular eukaryote, Paramecium tetraurelia. A Paramecium cDNA library was screened with an oligonucleotide probe synthesized to an internal amino acid sequence of isolated parafusin. The insert was 3 kb long with an open reading frame of 1.75 kb. Data base searches of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that Paramecium parafusin had a 50.7% sequence identity to rabbit muscle phosphoglucomutase, although no detectable phosphoglucomutase activity has been detected in isolated parafusin. The deduced parafusin amino acid sequence had four inserts and two deletions, which might confer on the protein specific functions in signal transduction events related to exocytosis. Furthermore, searches for potential phosphorylation sites showed the presence of a protein kinase C site (KDFSFR) specific to parafusin. Southern blot analysis with probes specific for parafusin and phosphoglucomutase suggested that these proteins were products of different genes. We propose that parafusin and phosphoglucomutase are members of a superfamily that conserve homologies important for the tertiary structure of the molecules.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zilian; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zilian; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained.

  20. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-04-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  1. Alignment of nucleotide or amino acid sequences on microcomputers, using a modification of Sellers' (1974) algorithm which avoids the need for calculation of the complete distance matrix.

    PubMed

    Tyson, H; Haley, B

    1985-10-01

    A program to calculate optimum alignment between two sequences, which may be DNA, amino acid or other information, has been written in PASCAL. The Sellers' algorithm for calculating distance between sequences has been modified to reduce its demands on microcomputer memory space by more than half. Gap penalties and mismatch scores are user-adjustable. In 48 K of memory the program aligns sequences up to 170 elements in length; optimum alignment and total distance between a pair of sequences are displayed. The program aligns longer sequences by subdivision of both sequences into corresponding, overlapping sections. Section length and amount of section overlap are user-defined. More importantly, extension of this modification of Sellers' algorithm to align longer sequences, given hardware and compilers/languages capable of using a larger memory space (e.g. 640 K), shows that it is now possible to align, without subdivision, sequences with up to 700 elements each. The increase in computation time for this program with increasing sequence lengths aligned without subdivision is curvilinear, but total times are essentially dependent on hardware/language/compiler combinations. The statistical significance of an alignment is examined with conventional Monte Carlo approaches. PMID:3852712

  2. Complementation cloning and sequence analysis of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hemL gene encoding glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Matters, G.L.; Beale, S.I. )

    1993-05-01

    Glutamate-1-semialdehyde amino-transferase (GSAT) catalyzes formation of the tetrapyrrole precursor, [delta]-aminolevulinic acid. GSAT is encoded by the hemL gene. A Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hemL cDNA was selected from a vegetative stage expression library by complementation of Escherichia coli hemL mutant GE 1377. In vitro GSAT activity was ten-fold higher in an extract of the complemented hemL cells than in an extract of uncomplemented mutant cells. The complementing cDNA is 2010 bp long and includes 591 bp of 3' noncoding DNA and an estimated 27 bp of 5' noncoding DNA. The coding region includes the sequence for a putative 30-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide and a 433-amino acid mature protein. The mature protein deduced from the Chlamydomonas cDNA sequence has a molecular weight of 45,880, compared to the value of 43,000 reported for purified Chlamydomonas GSAT (d. Jahn et al., 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266:161-167). The deduced peptide is 74% identical to Synechococcus GSAT, 70% identical to barley GSAT and 66% identical to tobacco GSAT. The putative pyridoxal binding region has the sequence TTMGKVIGG, which differs somewhat from those reported for other aminotransferases. The deduced putative chloroplast transit peptide has recognizable similarity to barley GSAT transit peptide. Southern analysis of genomic DNA from Chlamydomonas strain CC124, using the cDNA as a probe, indicates that GSAT is probably encoded by a single gene.

  3. Atmospheric response to Saharan dust deduced from ECMWF reanalysis increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, P.; Alpert, P.; Barkan, J.; Kirchner, I.; Machenhauer, B.

    2003-04-01

    This study focuses on the atmospheric temperature response to dust deduced from a new source of data - the European Reanalysis (ERA) increments. These increments are the systematic errors of global climate models, generated in reanalysis procedure. The model errors result not only from the lack of desert dust but also from a complex combination of many kinds of model errors. Over the Sahara desert the dust radiative effect is believed to be a predominant model defect which should significantly affect the increments. This dust effect was examined by considering correlation between the increments and remotely-sensed dust. Comparisons were made between April temporal variations of the ERA analysis increments and the variations of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer aerosol index (AI) between 1979 and 1993. The distinctive structure was identified in the distribution of correlation composed of three nested areas with high positive correlation (> 0.5), low correlation, and high negative correlation (<-0.5). The innermost positive correlation area (PCA) is a large area near the center of the Sahara desert. For some local maxima inside this area the correlation even exceeds 0.8. The outermost negative correlation area (NCA) is not uniform. It consists of some areas over the eastern and western parts of North Africa with a relatively small amount of dust. Inside those areas both positive and negative high correlations exist at pressure levels ranging from 850 to 700 hPa, with the peak values near 775 hPa. Dust-forced heating (cooling) inside the PCA (NCA) is accompanied by changes in the static stability of the atmosphere above the dust layer. The reanalysis data of the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast(ECMWF) suggests that the PCA (NCA) corresponds mainly to anticyclonic (cyclonic) flow, negative (positive) vorticity, and downward (upward) airflow. These facts indicate an interaction between dust-forced heating /cooling and atmospheric circulation. The

  4. Extremely acidophilic protists from acid mine drainage host Rickettsiales-lineage endosymbionts that have intervening sequences in their 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brett J; Hugenholtz, Philip; Dawson, Scott C; Banfield, Jillian F

    2003-09-01

    During a molecular phylogenetic survey of extremely acidic (pH < 1), metal-rich acid mine drainage habitats in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, Calif., we detected 16S rRNA gene sequences of a novel bacterial group belonging to the order Rickettsiales in the Alphaproteobacteria. The closest known relatives of this group (92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) are endosymbionts of the protist Acanthamoeba. Oligonucleotide 16S rRNA probes were designed and used to observe members of this group within acidophilic protists. To improve visualization of eukaryotic populations in the acid mine drainage samples, broad-specificity probes for eukaryotes were redesigned and combined to highlight this component of the acid mine drainage community. Approximately 4% of protists in the acid mine drainage samples contained endosymbionts. Measurements of internal pH of the protists showed that their cytosol is close to neutral, indicating that the endosymbionts may be neutrophilic. The endosymbionts had a conserved 273-nucleotide intervening sequence (IVS) in variable region V1 of their 16S rRNA genes. The IVS does not match any sequence in current databases, but the predicted secondary structure forms well-defined stem loops. IVSs are uncommon in rRNA genes and appear to be confined to bacteria living in close association with eukaryotes. Based on the phylogenetic novelty of the endosymbiont sequences and initial culture-independent characterization, we propose the name "Candidatus Captivus acidiprotistae." To our knowledge, this is the first report of an endosymbiotic relationship in an extremely acidic habitat.

  5. Next-generation re-sequencing of genes involved in increased platelet reactivity in diabetic patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Postula, Marek; Janicki, Piotr K; Eyileten, Ceren; Rosiak, Marek; Kaplon-Cieslicka, Agnieszka; Sugino, Shigekazu; Wilimski, Radosław; Kosior, Dariusz A; Opolski, Grzegorz; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rare missense genetic variants in several genes related to platelet functions and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) response are associated with the platelet reactivity in patients with diabetes type 2 (T2D) on ASA therapy. Fifty eight exons and corresponding introns of eight selected genes, including PTGS1, PTGS2, TXBAS1, PTGIS, ADRA2A, ADRA2B, TXBA2R, and P2RY1 were re-sequenced in 230 DNA samples from T2D patients by using a pooled PCR amplification and next-generation sequencing by Illumina HiSeq2000. The observed non-synonymous variants were confirmed by individual genotyping of 384 DNA samples comprising of the individuals from the original discovery pools and additional verification cohort of 154 ASA-treated T2DM patients. The association between investigated phenotypes (ASA induced changes in platelets reactivity by PFA-100, VerifyNow and serum thromboxane B2 level [sTxB2]), and accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was tested using statistical collapsing tests. We identified a total of 35 exonic variants, including 3 common missense variants, 15 rare missense variants, and 17 synonymous variants in 8 investigated genes. The rare missense variants exhibited statistically significant difference in the accumulation pattern between a group of patients with increased and normal platelet reactivity based on PFA-100 assay. Our study suggests that genetic burden of the rare functional variants in eight genes may contribute to differences in the platelet reactivity measured with the PFA-100 assay in the T2DM patients treated with ASA. PMID:26599574

  6. Predicting Secretory Proteins of Malaria Parasite by Incorporating Sequence Evolution Information into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition via Grey System Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The malaria disease has become a cause of poverty and a major hindrance to economic development. The culprit of the disease is the parasite, which secretes an array of proteins within the host erythrocyte to facilitate its own survival. Accordingly, the secretory proteins of malaria parasite have become a logical target for drug design against malaria. Unfortunately, with the increasing resistance to the drugs thus developed, the situation has become more complicated. To cope with the drug resistance problem, one strategy is to timely identify the secreted proteins by malaria parasite, which can serve as potential drug targets. However, it is both expensive and time-consuming to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite by experiments alone. To expedite the process for developing effective drugs against malaria, a computational predictor called “iSMP-Grey” was developed that can be used to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite based on the protein sequence information alone. During the prediction process a protein sample was formulated with a 60D (dimensional) feature vector formed by incorporating the sequence evolution information into the general form of PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) via a grey system model, which is particularly useful for solving complicated problems that are lack of sufficient information or need to process uncertain information. It was observed by the jackknife test that iSMP-Grey achieved an overall success rate of 94.8%, remarkably higher than those by the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iSMP-Grey is freely accessible to the public at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iSMP-Grey. Moreover, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematical equations involved in this paper. PMID:23189138

  7. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  8. Predicting secretory proteins of malaria parasite by incorporating sequence evolution information into pseudo amino acid composition via grey system model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The malaria disease has become a cause of poverty and a major hindrance to economic development. The culprit of the disease is the parasite, which secretes an array of proteins within the host erythrocyte to facilitate its own survival. Accordingly, the secretory proteins of malaria parasite have become a logical target for drug design against malaria. Unfortunately, with the increasing resistance to the drugs thus developed, the situation has become more complicated. To cope with the drug resistance problem, one strategy is to timely identify the secreted proteins by malaria parasite, which can serve as potential drug targets. However, it is both expensive and time-consuming to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite by experiments alone. To expedite the process for developing effective drugs against malaria, a computational predictor called "iSMP-Grey" was developed that can be used to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite based on the protein sequence information alone. During the prediction process a protein sample was formulated with a 60D (dimensional) feature vector formed by incorporating the sequence evolution information into the general form of PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) via a grey system model, which is particularly useful for solving complicated problems that are lack of sufficient information or need to process uncertain information. It was observed by the jackknife test that iSMP-Grey achieved an overall success rate of 94.8%, remarkably higher than those by the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iSMP-Grey is freely accessible to the public at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iSMP-Grey. Moreover, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematical equations involved in this paper.

  9. Genome sequence of a food spoilage lactic acid bacterium, Leuconostoc gasicomitatum LMG 18811T, in association with specific spoilage reactions.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Per; Paulin, Lars; Säde, Elina; Salovuori, Noora; Alatalo, Edward R; Björkroth, K Johanna; Auvinen, Petri

    2011-07-01

    Leuconostoc gasicomitatum is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP), nutrient-rich foods. Its role has been verified by challenge tests in gas and slime formation, development of pungent acidic and buttery off odors, and greening of beef. MAP meats have especially been prone to L. gasicomitatum spoilage. In addition, spoilage of vacuum-packaged vegetable sausages and marinated herring has been reported. The genomic sequencing project of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T was prompted by a need to understand the growth and spoilage potentials of L. gasicomitatum, to study its phylogeny, and to be able to knock out and overexpress the genes. Comparative genomic analysis was done within L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T and the three fully assembled Leuconostoc genomes (those of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc citreum, and Leuconostoc kimchii) available. The genome of L. gasicomitatum LMG 18811T is plasmid-free and contains a 1,954,080-bp circular chromosome with an average GC content of 36.7%. It includes genes for the phosphoketolase pathway and alternative pathways for pyruvate utilization. As interesting features associated with the growth and spoilage potential, LMG 18811T possesses utilization strategies for ribose, external nucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleobases and it has a functional electron transport chain requiring only externally supplied heme for respiration. In respect of the documented specific spoilage reactions, the pathways/genes associated with a buttery off odor, meat greening, and slime formation were recognized. Unexpectedly, genes associated with platelet binding and collagen adhesion were detected, but their functionality and role in food spoilage and processing environment contamination need further study.

  10. Open questions in origin of life: experimental studies on the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences by a chemical synthetic biology approach.

    PubMed

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Anella, Fabrizio; Wieczorek, Rafal; Stano, Pasquale; Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review we present some experimental approaches to the important issue in the origin of life, namely the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences. The formation of macromolecules on prebiotic Earth faces practical and conceptual difficulties. From the chemical viewpoint, macromolecules are formed by chemical pathways leading to the condensation of building blocks (amino acids, or nucleotides) in long-chain copolymers (proteins and nucleic acids, respectively). The second difficulty deals with a conceptual problem, namely with the emergence of specific sequences among a vast array of possible ones, the huge "sequence space", leading to the question "why these macromolecules, and not the others?" We have recently addressed these questions by using a chemical synthetic biology approach. In particular, we have tested the catalytic activity of small peptides, like Ser-His, with respect to peptide- and nucleotides-condensation, as a realistic model of primitive organocatalysis. We have also set up a strategy for exploring the sequence space of random proteins and RNAs (the so-called "never born biopolymer" project) with respect to the production of folded structures. Being still far from solved, the main aspects of these "open questions" are discussed here, by commenting on recent results obtained in our groups and by providing a unifying view on the problem and possible solutions. In particular, we propose a general scenario for macromolecule formation via fragment-condensation, as a scheme for the emergence of specific sequences based on molecular growth and selection.

  11. Evolution of phosphagen kinase V. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two molluscan arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ban, T; Furukohri, T

    1997-06-20

    The cDNAs of arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica (Polyplacophora) and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus (Gastropoda) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the complete nucleotide sequences of 1669 and 1624 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Liolophura arginine kinase is 1050 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 349 amino acid residues, and that for Battilus is 1077 nucleotides and 358 residues. The validity of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence was supported by chemical sequencing of internal tryptic peptides. The molecular masses were calculated to be 39,057 and 39,795 Da, respectively. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura arginine kinase showed 65-68% identity with those of Battilus and Nordotis (abalone) arginine kinases, and the homology between Battilus and Nordotis was 79%. Molluscan arginine kinases also show lower, but significant homology (38-43%) with rabbit creatine kinase. The sequences of arginine kinases could be used as a molecular clock to elucidate the phylogeny of Mollusca, one of the most diverse animal phyla.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Berta ATCC 8392 and a Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Isolate of This Strain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ashley; Koziol, Adam G.; Carrillo, Catherine D.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Berta has been isolated in multiple animal species and has been implicated in human disease. Here, we report a 4.7-Mbp draft genome sequence of S. enterica serovar Berta (ATCC strain 8392) and a nalidixic acid-resistant isolate derived from this strain. PMID:27103707

  13. Species specific identification of spore-producing microbes using the gene sequence of small acid-soluble spore coat proteins for amplification based diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    PCR (polymerase chain reaction) primers for the detection of certain Bacillus species, such as Bacillus anthracis. The primers specifically amplify only DNA found in the target species and can distinguish closely related species. Species-specific PCR primers for Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus globigii and Clostridium perfringens are disclosed. The primers are directed to unique sequences within sasp (small acid soluble protein) genes.

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens BS2 and Pusillimonas noertemannii BS8, Soil Bacteria That Cooperate To Degrade the Poly-γ-d-Glutamic Acid Anthrax Capsule.

    PubMed

    Stabler, Richard A; Negus, David; Pain, Arnab; Taylor, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    A mixed culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens BS2 and Pusillimonas noertemannii BS8 degraded poly-γ-d-glutamic acid; when the 2 strains were cultured separately, no hydrolytic activity was apparent. Here we report the draft genome sequences of both soil isolates.

  15. Draft genome sequence of Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain CASD, an efficient D-lactic acid-producing bacterium with high-concentration lactate tolerance capability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Su, Fei; Wang, Limin; Xu, Ke; Zhao, Bo; Xu, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Sporolactobacillus inulinus CASD is an efficient D-lactic acid producer with high optical purity. Here we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of S. inulinus (2,930,096 bp). The large number of annotated two-component system genes makes it possible to explore the mechanism of extraordinary lactate tolerance of S. inulinus CASD.

  16. High nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities in tumour necrosis factor-alpha amongst Indian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), Indian cattle (Bos indicus) and other ruminants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K; Bind, R B; Walunj, S S; Saini, M

    2004-08-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and Indian cattle (Bos indicus) was reverse transcribed and amplified using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The nucleotide sequences of cDNAs were determined after cloning into pGEM-T-Easy vector (Promega, Madison, WI) and compared with reported nucleotide sequences of TNF-alpha cDNA from other species. The nucleotide sequences of TNF-alpha from Indian cattle revealed significantly high similarities at nucleotide (99.2%) and amino acid (100%) levels with those of cattle (Bos taurus; Zebu). The sequences from buffalo had 98.4% nucleotide and 99.1% amino acid similarities with Indian cattle, indicating functional cross-reactivity. One amino acid deletion at position 63 and one substitution (A-->P) at position 64 were observed in buffalo compared with Indian cattle. The amino acid deletion at position 63 was predicted due to differences in pre-mRNA splicing.

  17. Preliminary results on interstellar reddening as deduced from filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laget, M.

    1972-01-01

    Filter photometry has been used to derive the interstellar reddening law from stars through the study of a single spectral type, B0. The deficiency in the far ultraviolet flux of a supergiant relative to a main sequence star is compared with the difference in the flux distribution due to a change of one spectral class. Individual interstellar reddening curves show the general feature reported by Stecher (1969) and by Bless and Savage (1970). There is a large amount of scatter in the far ultraviolet which may be partially due to a real difference in interstellar extinction and partially due to observational inaccuracy.

  18. Deducing protein function by forensic integrative cell biology.

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, William C

    2013-12-01

    Our ability to sequence genomes has provided us with near-complete lists of the proteins that compose cells, tissues, and organisms, but this is only the beginning of the process to discover the functions of cellular components. In the future, it's going to be crucial to develop computational analyses that can predict the biological functions of uncharacterised proteins. At the same time, we must not forget those fundamental experimental skills needed to confirm the predictions or send the analysts back to the drawing board to devise new ones.

  19. Using triple-helix-forming Peptide nucleic acids for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; Cheruiyot, Samwel K; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-09-08

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in regulation of gene expression. Specific recognition and inhibition of these biologically important RNAs that form complex double-helical structures will be highly useful for fundamental studies in biology and practical applications in medicine. This protocol describes a strategy developed in our laboratory for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using triple-helix-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that bind in the major grove of the RNA helix. The strategy developed uses chemically modified nucleobases, such as 2-aminopyridine (M), which enables strong triple-helical binding under physiologically relevant conditions, and 2-pyrimidinone (P) and 3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazine (E), which enable recognition of isolated pyrimidines in the purine-rich strand of the RNA duplex. Detailed protocols for preparation of modified PNA monomers, solid-phase synthesis, HPLC purification of PNA oligomers, and measuring dsRNA binding affinity using isothermal titration calorimetry are included.

  20. The amino acid sequences of two alpha chains of hemoglobins from Komodo dragon Varanus komodoensis and phylogenetic relationships of amniotes.

    PubMed

    Fushitani, K; Higashiyama, K; Moriyama, E N; Imai, K; Hosokawa, K

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate phylogenetic relationships among amniotes and the evolution of alpha globins, hemoglobins were analyzed from the Komodo dragon (Komodo monitor lizard) Varanus komodoensis, the world's largest extant lizard, inhabiting Komodo Islands, Indonesia. Four unique globin chains (alpha A, alpha D, beta B, and beta C) were isolated in an equal molar ratio by high performance liquid chromatography from the hemolysate. The amino acid sequences of two alpha chains were determined. The alpha D chain has a glutamine at E7 as does an alpha chain of a snake, Liophis miliaris, but the alpha A chain has a histidine at E7 like the majority of hemoglobins. Phylogenetic analyses of 19 globins including two alpha chains of Komodo dragon and ones from representative amniotes showed the following results: (1) The a chains of squamates (snakes and lizards), which have a glutamine at E7, are clustered with the embryonic alpha globin family, which typically includes the alpha D chain from birds; (2) birds form a sister group with other reptiles but not with mammals; (3) the genes for embryonic and adult types of alpha globins were possibly produced by duplication of the ancestral alpha gene before ancestral amniotes diverged, indicating that each of the present amniotes might carry descendants of the two types of alpha globin genes; (4) squamates first split off from the ancestor of other reptiles and birds.

  1. The amino acid sequences of two alpha chains of hemoglobins from Komodo dragon Varanus komodoensis and phylogenetic relationships of amniotes.

    PubMed

    Fushitani, K; Higashiyama, K; Moriyama, E N; Imai, K; Hosokawa, K

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate phylogenetic relationships among amniotes and the evolution of alpha globins, hemoglobins were analyzed from the Komodo dragon (Komodo monitor lizard) Varanus komodoensis, the world's largest extant lizard, inhabiting Komodo Islands, Indonesia. Four unique globin chains (alpha A, alpha D, beta B, and beta C) were isolated in an equal molar ratio by high performance liquid chromatography from the hemolysate. The amino acid sequences of two alpha chains were determined. The alpha D chain has a glutamine at E7 as does an alpha chain of a snake, Liophis miliaris, but the alpha A chain has a histidine at E7 like the majority of hemoglobins. Phylogenetic analyses of 19 globins including two alpha chains of Komodo dragon and ones from representative amniotes showed the following results: (1) The a chains of squamates (snakes and lizards), which have a glutamine at E7, are clustered with the embryonic alpha globin family, which typically includes the alpha D chain from birds; (2) birds form a sister group with other reptiles but not with mammals; (3) the genes for embryonic and adult types of alpha globins were possibly produced by duplication of the ancestral alpha gene before ancestral amniotes diverged, indicating that each of the present amniotes might carry descendants of the two types of alpha globin genes; (4) squamates first split off from the ancestor of other reptiles and birds. PMID:8752011

  2. Purification and partial amino acid sequence of suppressive lymphokine from a CD8+ CD57+ human T hybridoma.

    PubMed Central

    Quan, C P; Watanabe, S; Vuillier, F; Pires, R; Matsuo, T; Stanislawski, M; Pillot, J; Bouvet, J P

    1993-01-01

    A T-suppressor (TS) lymphokine was purified from the supernatant of a T hybridoma established from CD3+ CD8+ CD57+ lymphocytes of a healthy bone marrow transplant patient. Using polyclonal rabbit antibodies, raised against a TS-enriched preparation, a specific protein of 47,000 MW was identified, which was used to prepare monoclonal antibodies. The screening of hybridomas was carried out by strip-ELISA, in which the 47,000 MW band, transferred on a membrane, served as antigen. One of these monoclonal antibodies (IgM kappa) was selected for purification of the native TS molecule, which exhibited the high suppressive activity on the phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and alloantigen responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The establishment of amino acid sequences of five trypsinized cleavage peptides confirmed that this protein has not been previously identified. This lymphokine--also detected in the supernatant of normal CD8+ CD57+ lymphocytes--is likely involved in bone marrow transplantation tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7682534

  3. Detection and quantification of the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Casper, Erica T; Paul, John H; Smith, Matthew C; Gray, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal method of RNA amplification that has been previously used in clinical diagnostic testing. A real-time NASBA assay has been developed for the detection of rbcL mRNA from the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. This assay is sensitive to one K. brevis cell and 1.0 fg of in vitro transcript, with occasional detection of lower concentrations of transcript. The assay did not detect rbcL mRNA from a wide range of nontarget organisms and environmental clones, while 10 strains (all tested) of K. brevis were detected. By the use of standard curves based on time to positivity, concentrations of K. brevis in environmental samples were predicted by NASBA and classified into different levels of blooms per the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) system. NASBA classification matched FWC classification (based on cell counts) 72% of the time. Those samples that did not match were off by only one class. NASBA is sensitive, rapid, and effective and may be used as an additional or alternative method to detect and quantify K. brevis in the marine environment. PMID:15294808

  4. Purification, characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease from bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, A J; Shoshani, I; Minuth, M; Awad, J A; Elce, J S; Johnson, R A

    1995-03-01

    We previously reported the extraction of a factor from bovine sperm that activated adenylyl cyclases of rat brain and human platelets, and identified it as a trypsin-like protease that was referred to as "ninhibin." This proteolytic activity was purified to near homogeneity from an alkaline extract of washed sperm particles by sequential chromatography on p-aminobenzamidine agarose and CM-Sephadex. Purification was greater than 100-fold with nearly 30% recovery of protease activity exhibiting a major band of approximately 40 kDa. An approximately 45-kDa form of the protease was also evident in crude extracts and was preferentially isolated when the enzyme was prepared in the presence of a mixture of protease inhibitors. The larger form of the protease was substantially less effective in stimulating adenylyl cyclase than was the smaller form; it is likely to be a zymogen form from which the smaller, more active form is derived. Purified forms of acrosin and ninhibin exhibited similar mobilities on PAGE, similar capacities for activating adenylyl cyclase, similar patterns of proteolytic fragmentation, and similar immunoblot patterns obtained with an antibody against purified bovine acrosin. More importantly, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of bovine ninhibin was found to be identical with that of bovine acrosin and caprine acrosin and more than 75% identical with porcine acrosin. The data support the conclusion that the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease previously referred to as ninhibin is, in fact, acrosin. PMID:7756444

  5. Purification and complete amino acid sequence of a new type of sweet protein taste-modifying activity, curculin.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, H; Theerasilp, S; Aiuchi, T; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1990-09-15

    A new taste-modifying protein named curculin was extracted with 0.5 M NaCl from the fruits of Curculigo latifolia and purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. Purified curculin thus obtained gave a single band having a Mr of 12,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 8 M urea. The molecular weight determined by low-angle laser light scattering was 27,800. These results suggest that native curculin is a dimer of a 12,000-Da polypeptide. The complete amino acid sequence of curculin was determined by automatic Edman degradation. Curculin consists of 114 residues. Curculin itself elicits a sweet taste. After curculin, water elicits a sweet taste, and sour substances induce a stronger sense of sweetness. No protein with both sweet-tasting and taste-modifying activities has ever been found. There are five sets of tripeptides common to miraculin (a taste-modifying protein), six sets of tripeptides common to thaumatin (a sweet protein), and two sets of tripeptides common to monellin (a sweet protein). Anti-miraculin serum was not immunologically reactive with curculin. The mechanism of the taste-modifying action of curculin is discussed. PMID:2394746

  6. Development and evaluation of a real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification assay for rapid detection of influenza A.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine; Hibbitts, Sam; Owen, Neil; Corden, Sally A; Harrison, Graham; Fox, Julie; Gelder, Colin; Westmoreland, Diana

    2004-12-01

    The development and introduction of effective treatment for influenza A in the form of neuraminidase inhibitors have made the rapid diagnosis of infection important especially in high-risk populations. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time nucleic acid sequenced based amplification (NASBA) using a molecular beacon that could detect a wide range of influenza A subtypes and strains in a single reaction by targeting a conserved region of the influenza genome, and to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity against traditional laboratory techniques on a range of clinical samples usefulness during the 2003/2004 influenza season. The results demonstrated the assay to be highly sensitive and specific, detecting <0.1 TCID50 of virus stock. Three hundred eighty-nine clinical samples were tested in total from two patient groups. Overall, the real-time NASBA assay detected 64% (66/103) more influenza positive samples than cell culture and direct immunofluorescence (IF) and, therefore, was shown to be more sensitive in detecting influenza A in a wide range of respiratory samples than traditional methods. In conclusion, the real-time influenza A assay demonstrated clinical usefulness in both hospital and community populations.

  7. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays for rapid detection of West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, R S; Kerst, A J

    2001-12-01

    The development and application of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assays for the detection of West Nile (WN) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses are reported. Two unique detection formats were developed for the NASBA assays: a postamplification detection step with a virus-specific internal capture probe and electrochemiluminescence (NASBA-ECL assay) and a real-time assay with 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled virus-specific molecular beacon probes (NASBA-beacon assay). The sensitivities and specificities of these NASBA assays were compared to those of a newly described standard reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and TaqMan assays for SLE virus and to a previously published TaqMan assay for WN virus. The NASBA assays demonstrated exceptional sensitivities and specificities compared to those of virus isolation, the TaqMan assays, and standard RT-PCR, with the NASBA-beacon assay yielding results in less than 1 h. These assays should be of utility in the diagnostic laboratory to complement existing diagnostic testing methodologies and as a tool in conducting flavivirus surveillance in the United States.

  8. Robust strand exchange reactions for the sequence-specific, real-time detection of nucleic acid amplicons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Sherry; Bhadra, Sanchita; Li, Bingling; Wu, Yuefeng Rose; Milligan, John N; Ellington, Andrew D

    2015-03-17

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA is a powerful isothermal nucleic acid amplification method that can generate upward of 10(9) copies from less than 100 copies of template DNA within an hour. Unfortunately, although the amplification reactions are extremely powerful, real-time and specific detection of LAMP products remains analytically challenging. In order to both improve the specificity of LAMP detection and to make readout simpler and more reliable, we have replaced the intercalating dye typically used for monitoring in real-time fluorescence with a toehold-mediated strand exchange reaction termed one-step strand displacement (OSD). Due to the inherent sequence specificity of toehold-mediated strand exchange, the OSD reporter could successfully distinguish side products from true amplicons arising from templates corresponding to the biomedically relevant M. tuberculosis RNA polymerase (rpoB) and the melanoma-related biomarker BRAF. OSD allowed the Yes/No detection of rpoB in a complex mixture such as synthetic sputum and also demonstrated single nucleotide specificity in Yes/No detection of a mutant BRAF allele (V600E) in the presence of 20-fold more of the wild-type gene. Real-time detection of different genes in multiplex LAMP reactions also proved possible. The development of simple, readily designed, modular equivalents of TaqMan probes for isothermal amplification reactions should generally improve the applicability of these reactions and may eventually assist with the development of point-of-care tests.

  9. The predicted amino acid sequence of alpha-internexin is that of a novel neuronal intermediate filament protein.

    PubMed Central

    Fliegner, K H; Ching, G Y; Liem, R K

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratory recently isolated and began to characterize a 66 kd rat brain cytoskeletal protein, dubbed alpha-internexin for its interactions in vitro with several other cytoskeletal proteins. Although alpha-internexin bore several of the characteristics of intermediate filament (IF) proteins, including the recognition by an antibody reactive with all IF proteins, it did not polymerize into 10 nm filaments under the conditions tested. Here we show that the predicted amino acid sequence of a cDNA encoding alpha-internexin shows the latter to be an IF protein, probably most closely related to the neurofilament proteins. Northern blotting shows that alpha-internexin expression is brain specific, and that rat brain alpha-internexin mRNA levels are maximal prior to birth and decline into adulthood, while the converse is seen for NF-L, the low molecular weight neurofilament subunit, suggesting that these two proteins play different roles in the developing brain. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2311576

  10. Systematic Exploration of an Efficient Amino Acid Substitution Matrix: MIQS.

    PubMed

    Tomii, Kentaro; Yamada, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid sequence comparisons to find similarities between proteins are fundamental sequence information analyses for inferring protein structure and function. In this study, we improve amino acid substitution matrices to identify distantly related proteins. We systematically sampled and benchmarked substitution matrices generated from the principal component analysis (PCA) subspace based on a set of typical existing matrices. Based on the benchmark results, we identified a region of highly sensitive matrices in the PCA subspace using kernel density estimation (KDE). Using the PCA subspace, we were able to deduce a novel sensitive matrix, called MIQS, which shows better detection performance for detecting distantly related proteins than those of existing matrices. This approach to derive an efficient amino acid substitution matrix might influence many fields of protein sequence analysis. MIQS is available at http://csas.cbrc.jp/Ssearch/ . PMID:27115635

  11. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara; D'Elia, Tom

    2016-08-01

    We report the first complete genome sequence of tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV), a tobamovirus originally isolated from tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum) collected in Okeechobee, Florida. The complete genome of TSAMV is 6,350 nucleotides long and contains four open reading frames encoding the following proteins: i) 126-kDa methyltransferase/helicase (3354 nt), ii) 183-kDa polymerase (4839 nt), iii) movement protein (771 nt) and iv) coat protein (483 nt). The complete genome sequence of TSAMV shares 80.4 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and 71.2-74.2 % identity with other tobamoviruses naturally infecting members of the Solanaceae plant family. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the 126-kDa and 183-kDa proteins and the complete genome sequence place TSAMV in a subcluster with PMMoV within the Solanaceae-infecting subgroup of tobamoviruses.

  12. Variation in seed fatty acid composition and sequence divergence in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated sesame.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenbang; Tonnis, Brandon; Morris, Brad; Wang, Richard B; Zhang, Amy L; Pinnow, David; Wang, Ming Li

    2014-12-01

    Sesame germplasm harbors genetic diversity which can be useful for sesame improvement in breeding programs. Seven accessions with different levels of oleic acid were selected from the entire USDA sesame germplasm collection (1232 accessions) and planted for morphological observation and re-examination of fatty acid composition. The coding region of the FAD2 gene for fatty acid desaturase (FAD) in these accessions was also sequenced. Cultivated sesame accessions flowered and matured earlier than the wild species. The cultivated sesame seeds contained a significantly higher percentage of oleic acid (40.4%) than the seeds of the wild species (26.1%). Nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated species. Some nucleotide polymorphisms led to amino acid changes, one of which was located in the enzyme active site and may contribute to the altered fatty acid composition. Based on the morphology observation, chemical analysis, and sequence analysis, it was determined that two accessions were misnamed and need to be reclassified. The results obtained from this study are useful for sesame improvement in molecular breeding programs.

  13. Evolution of alpha-lactalbumins. The complete amino acid sequence of the alpha-lactalbumin from a marsupial (Macropus rufogriseus) and corrections to regions of sequence in bovine and goat alpha-lactalbumins.

    PubMed

    Shewale, J G; Sinha, S K; Brew, K

    1984-04-25

    alpha-Lactalbumin was purified from a whey protein fraction of the milk of the red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus). The complete amino acid sequence was determined from the results of automatic sequenator analyses of the intact protein, the three cyanogen bromide fragments, and of peptides generated from the larger, COOH-terminal CNBr fragment by digestion with trypsin or staphylococcal protease. This is the first sequence to be determined of an alpha-lactalbumin from a marsupial and differs from known eutherian alpha-lactalbumins in size and locations of deletions in alignments with the homologous type c lysozymes, as well as in having amino acid substitutions at 8 sites that are invariant in known eutherian proteins. Some corrections are also reported for two regions of sequence in both bovine and goat alpha-lactalbumins. The new and previously published information on alpha-lactalbumin sequences is analyzed in relation to the evolutionary history of the alpha-lactalbumin line as well as the relationship of structure to function in these proteins. PMID:6715332

  14. Advance of the perihelion of Mercury deduced from QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    I deduce the new gravitational formula from the variance in mass of QFT and GR (H05-0029-08, E15-0039 -08, E14-0032-08, D31-0054-10) in the partial differential: f (QFT) = f (GR) = delta∂ (m v)/delta∂ t = f _{P} + f _{C} , f _{P} = m delta∂ v / delta∂ t = - ( G m M /r (2) ) r / r, f _{C} = v delta∂ m / delta∂ t = - ( G m M / r (2) ) v / c (1), f (QFT) is the quasi-Casimir pressure of net virtual neutrinos nuν _{0} flux (after counteract contrary direction nuν _{0}). f (GR) is equivalent to Einstein’s equation, Eq. (1) is a new version of GR and can be solved exactly. Its core content is that the gravity produced by particles collide cannot linear addition, i.e., the nonlinearity of Einstein equation had been replaced by the nonlinearity caused by the variable mass in Eq.(1). Einstein equation can be inferred from Eq.(1) thereby from QFT, but QFT cannot be inferred from Eq.(1) or GR. f (QFT) is essential but f (GR) is phenomenological. Eq.(1) is obtained just by to absorb the essence of corpuscule collided gravitation origin ism proposed by Fatio in 1690 and 1920 Majorana’s experiment concept about gravitational shield effect again fuse with QFT. In my paper ‘QFT’S advance of the perihelion of Mercury, China Science &Technology Overview 125 88-90 (2011)’ QFT gravitational potential U = - G M /r is just the distribution density of net nuν _{0} flux, from SR we again get that: f (QFT) = f _{P} + f _{C}, f _{P} = - m ( delta∂ U / delta∂ r) r / r, f _{C} = - m ( delta∂U / delta∂ r) v / c (2), f _{ P} correspond the change rate of three-dimensional momentum p, f _{C} correspond the change rate of fourth dimensional momentum i m c which show directly as a dissipative force of mass change. According to Eq.(2) the circular motion is instability and elliptic motion is in the auto-stability state. In the fluctuation vacuum a particle with mass M neighbor another particle with mass m, the renormalization mass M and m will be less than that when

  15. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions via a Novel Matrix-Based Sequence Representation Model with Amino Acid Contact Information.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijie; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-09-24

    Identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is a difficult and important problem in biology. Since experimental methods for predicting PPIs are both expensive and time-consuming, many computational methods have been developed to predict PPIs and interaction networks, which can be used to complement experimental approaches. However, these methods have limitations to overcome. They need a large number of homology proteins or literature to be applied in their method. In this paper, we propose a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation approach to predict PPIs, using an ensemble learning method for classification. We construct the matrix of Amino Acid Contact (AAC), based on the statistical analysis of residue-pairing frequencies in a database of 6323 protein-protein complexes. We first represent the protein sequence as a Substitution Matrix Representation (SMR) matrix. Then, the feature vector is extracted by applying algorithms of Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on the SMR matrix. Finally, we feed the feature vector into a Random Forest (RF) for judging interaction pairs and non-interaction pairs. Our method is applied to several PPI datasets to evaluate its performance. On the S . c e r e v i s i a e dataset, our method achieves 94 . 83 % accuracy and 92 . 40 % sensitivity. Compared with existing methods, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 11 percentage points. On the H . p y l o r i dataset, our method achieves 89 . 06 % accuracy and 88 . 15 % sensitivity, the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 76 % . On the H u m a n PPI dataset, our method achieves 97 . 60 % accuracy and 96 . 37 % sensitivity, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 1 . 30 % . In addition, we test our method on a very important PPI network, and it achieves 92 . 71 % accuracy. In the Wnt-related network, the accuracy of our method is increased by 16 . 67 % . The source code and all datasets are available

  16. Identification of Protein–Protein Interactions via a Novel Matrix-Based Sequence Representation Model with Amino Acid Contact Information

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yijie; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Identification of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is a difficult and important problem in biology. Since experimental methods for predicting PPIs are both expensive and time-consuming, many computational methods have been developed to predict PPIs and interaction networks, which can be used to complement experimental approaches. However, these methods have limitations to overcome. They need a large number of homology proteins or literature to be applied in their method. In this paper, we propose a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation approach to predict PPIs, using an ensemble learning method for classification. We construct the matrix of Amino Acid Contact (AAC), based on the statistical analysis of residue-pairing frequencies in a database of 6323 protein–protein complexes. We first represent the protein sequence as a Substitution Matrix Representation (SMR) matrix. Then, the feature vector is extracted by applying algorithms of Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on the SMR matrix. Finally, we feed the feature vector into a Random Forest (RF) for judging interaction pairs and non-interaction pairs. Our method is applied to several PPI datasets to evaluate its performance. On the S.cerevisiae dataset, our method achieves 94.83% accuracy and 92.40% sensitivity. Compared with existing methods, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 0.11 percentage points. On the H.pylori dataset, our method achieves 89.06% accuracy and 88.15% sensitivity, the accuracy of our method is increased by 0.76%. On the Human PPI dataset, our method achieves 97.60% accuracy and 96.37% sensitivity, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 1.30%. In addition, we test our method on a very important PPI network, and it achieves 92.71% accuracy. In the Wnt-related network, the accuracy of our method is increased by 16.67%. The source code and all datasets are available at https://figshare.com/s/580c11dce13e63cb9a53. PMID

  17. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions via a Novel Matrix-Based Sequence Representation Model with Amino Acid Contact Information.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijie; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is a difficult and important problem in biology. Since experimental methods for predicting PPIs are both expensive and time-consuming, many computational methods have been developed to predict PPIs and interaction networks, which can be used to complement experimental approaches. However, these methods have limitations to overcome. They need a large number of homology proteins or literature to be applied in their method. In this paper, we propose a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation approach to predict PPIs, using an ensemble learning method for classification. We construct the matrix of Amino Acid Contact (AAC), based on the statistical analysis of residue-pairing frequencies in a database of 6323 protein-protein complexes. We first represent the protein sequence as a Substitution Matrix Representation (SMR) matrix. Then, the feature vector is extracted by applying algorithms of Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on the SMR matrix. Finally, we feed the feature vector into a Random Forest (RF) for judging interaction pairs and non-interaction pairs. Our method is applied to several PPI datasets to evaluate its performance. On the S . c e r e v i s i a e dataset, our method achieves 94 . 83 % accuracy and 92 . 40 % sensitivity. Compared with existing methods, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 11 percentage points. On the H . p y l o r i dataset, our method achieves 89 . 06 % accuracy and 88 . 15 % sensitivity, the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 76 % . On the H u m a n PPI dataset, our method achieves 97 . 60 % accuracy and 96 . 37 % sensitivity, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 1 . 30 % . In addition, we test our method on a very important PPI network, and it achieves 92 . 71 % accuracy. In the Wnt-related network, the accuracy of our method is increased by 16 . 67 % . The source code and all datasets are available

  18. Amino acid sequence similarity of the VP7 protein of human rotavirus HCR3 to that of canine and feline rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Clark, H F; Gouvea, V

    1994-01-01

    The sequence of the VP7 gene of human rotavirus strain HCR3 was determined and its predicted amino acid sequence was compared with that of other rotavirus strains. The VP7 gene is 1062 nucleotides long and contains a single open reading frame of 981 nucleotides capable of encoding a protein of 326 amino acids. The VP7 amino acid sequence similarity of strain HCR3 to those of various human and animal G3 serotypes ranged from 88.7 to 99.4%, and from 60.4 to 88.3% to strains representing each of the other 13 G serotypes. Alignment of four variable regions [VR4, VR5(A), VR7(B) and VR8(C)] of HCR3 with those of G3 strains of different host species showed that HCR3 possesses a sequence almost identical to that of canine rotaviruses and feline rotavirus strain CAT97 in all four regions. A considerable divergence in regions VR4, VR7(B) and VR8(C) was found with strains of human, mouse, monkey, horse and rabbit rotaviruses. This observation together with results of our previous study on VP4 indicated that human rotavirus HCR3 is genetically more closely related to animal rotaviruses than to other human rotaviruses. PMID:8113730

  19. Identification of multiple lipid genes with modifications in expression and sequence associated with the evolution of hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in Physaria fendleri.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Liu, Jinjie; Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; McGlew, Kathleen; Thrower, Nicholas A; Larson, Matt; Lu, Chaofu; Alonso, Ana P; Ohlrogge, John

    2016-05-01

    Two Brassicaceae species, Physaria fendleri and Camelina sativa, are genetically very closely related to each other and to Arabidopsis thaliana. Physaria fendleri seeds contain over 50% hydroxy fatty acids (HFAs), while Camelina sativa and Arabidopsis do not accumulate HFAs. To better understand how plants evolved new biochemical pathways with the capacity to accumulate high levels of unusual fatty acids, transcript expression and protein sequences of developing seeds of Physaria fendleri, wild-type Camelina sativa, and Camelina sativa expressing a castor bean (Ricinus communis) hydroxylase were analyzed. A number of potential evolutionary adaptations within lipid metabolism that probably enhance HFA production and accumulation in Physaria fendleri, and, in their absence, limit accumulation in transgenic tissues were revealed. These adaptations occurred in at least 20 genes within several lipid pathways from the onset of fatty acid synthesis and its regulation to the assembly of triacylglycerols. Lipid genes of Physaria fendleri appear to have co-evolved through modulation of transcriptional abundances and alterations within protein sequences. Only a handful of genes showed evidence for sequence adaptation through gene duplication. Collectively, these evolutionary changes probably occurred to minimize deleterious effects of high HFA amounts and/or to enhance accumulation for physiological advantage. These results shed light on the evolution of pathways for novel fatty acid production in seeds, help explain some of the current limitations to accumulation of HFAs in transgenic plants, and may provide improved strategies for future engineering of their production.

  20. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.