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Sample records for acid sequence designated

  1. Design, synthesis, and characterization of a protein sequencing reagent yielding amino acid derivatives with enhanced detectability by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Aebersold, R.; Bures, E. J.; Namchuk, M.; Goghari, M. H.; Shushan, B.; Covey, T. C.

    1992-01-01

    We report the design, chemical synthesis, and structural and functional characterization of a novel reagent for protein sequence analysis by the Edman degradation, yielding amino acid derivatives rapidly detectable at high sensitivity by ion-evaporation mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that the reagent 3-[4'(ethylene-N,N,N-trimethylamino)phenyl]-2-isothiocyanate is chemically stable and shows coupling and cyclization/cleavage yields comparable to phenylisothiocyanate, the standard reagent in chemical sequence analysis, under conditions typically encountered in manual or automated sequence analysis. Amino acid derivatives generated with this reagent were detectable by ion-evaporation mass spectrometry at the subfemtomole sensitivity level at a pace of one sample per minute. Furthermore, derivatives were identified by their mass, thus permitting the rapid and highly sensitive determination of the molecular nature of modified amino acids. Derivatives of amino acids with acidic, basic, polar, or hydrophobic side chains were reproducibly detectable at comparable sensitivities. The polar nature of the reagent required covalent immobilization of polypeptides prior to automated sequence analysis. This reagent, used in automated sequence analysis, has the potential for overcoming the limitations in sensitivity, speed, and the ability to characterize modified amino acid residues inherent in the chemical sequencing methods that are currently used. PMID:1304351

  2. Molecular beacon sequence design algorithm.

    PubMed

    Monroe, W Todd; Haselton, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    A method based on Web-based tools is presented to design optimally functioning molecular beacons. Molecular beacons, fluorogenic hybridization probes, are a powerful tool for the rapid and specific detection of a particular nucleic acid sequence. However, their synthesis costs can be considerable. Since molecular beacon performance is based on its sequence, it is imperative to rationally design an optimal sequence before synthesis. The algorithm presented here uses simple Microsoft Excel formulas and macros to rank candidate sequences. This analysis is carried out using mfold structural predictions along with other free Web-based tools. For smaller laboratories where molecular beacons are not the focus of research, the public domain algorithm described here may be usefully employed to aid in molecular beacon design.

  3. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  5. EGNAS: an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The molecular recognition based on the complementary base pairing of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the fundamental principle in the fields of genetics, DNA nanotechnology and DNA computing. We present an exhaustive DNA sequence design algorithm that allows to generate sets containing a maximum number of sequences with defined properties. EGNAS (Exhaustive Generation of Nucleic Acid Sequences) offers the possibility of controlling both interstrand and intrastrand properties. The guanine-cytosine content can be adjusted. Sequences can be forced to start and end with guanine or cytosine. This option reduces the risk of “fraying” of DNA strands. It is possible to limit cross hybridizations of a defined length, and to adjust the uniqueness of sequences. Self-complementarity and hairpin structures of certain length can be avoided. Sequences and subsequences can optionally be forbidden. Furthermore, sequences can be designed to have minimum interactions with predefined strands and neighboring sequences. Results The algorithm is realized in a C++ program. TAG sequences can be generated and combined with primers for single-base extension reactions, which were described for multiplexed genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thereby, possible foldback through intrastrand interaction of TAG-primer pairs can be limited. The design of sequences for specific attachment of molecular constructs to DNA origami is presented. Conclusions We developed a new software tool called EGNAS for the design of unique nucleic acid sequences. The presented exhaustive algorithm allows to generate greater sets of sequences than with previous software and equal constraints. EGNAS is freely available for noncommercial use at http://www.chm.tu-dresden.de/pc6/EGNAS. PMID:22716030

  6. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  7. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  8. The complete amino acid sequence of prochymosin.

    PubMed Central

    Foltmann, B; Pedersen, V B; Jacobsen, H; Kauffman, D; Wybrandt, G

    1977-01-01

    The total sequence of 365 amino acid residues in bovine prochymosin is presented. Alignment with the amino acid sequence of porcine pepsinogen shows that 204 amino acid residues are common to the two zymogens. Further comparison and alignment with the amino acid sequence of penicillopepsin shows that 66 residues are located at identical positions in all three proteases. The three enzymes belong to a large group of proteases with two aspartate residues in the active center. This group forms a family derived from one common ancestor. PMID:329280

  9. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  10. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  11. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  12. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  13. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  14. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  15. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-06-15

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects.

  16. Primer design for large scale sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, S; Vingron, M; Poustka, A; Wiemann, S

    1998-01-01

    We have developed PRIDE, a primer design program that automatically designs primers in single contigs or whole sequencing projects to extend the already known sequence and to double strand single-stranded regions. The program is fully integrated into the Staden package (GAP4) and accessible with a graphical user interface. PRIDE uses a fuzzy logic-based system to calculate primer qualities. The computational performance of PRIDE is enhanced by using suffix trees to store the huge amount of data being produced. A test set of 110 sequencing primers and 11 PCR primer pairs has been designed on genomic templates, cDNAs and sequences containing repetitive elements to analyze PRIDE's success rate. The high performance of PRIDE, combined with its minimal requirement of user interaction and its fast algorithm, make this program useful for the large scale design of primers, especially in large sequencing projects. PMID:9611248

  17. Design of multispecific protein sequences using probabilistic graphical modeling.

    PubMed

    Fromer, Menachem; Yanover, Chen; Linial, Michal

    2010-02-15

    In nature, proteins partake in numerous protein- protein interactions that mediate their functions. Moreover, proteins have been shown to be physically stable in multiple structures, induced by cellular conditions, small ligands, or covalent modifications. Understanding how protein sequences achieve this structural promiscuity at the atomic level is a fundamental step in the drug design pipeline and a critical question in protein physics. One way to investigate this subject is to computationally predict protein sequences that are compatible with multiple states, i.e., multiple target structures or binding to distinct partners. The goal of engineering such proteins has been termed multispecific protein design. We develop a novel computational framework to efficiently and accurately perform multispecific protein design. This framework utilizes recent advances in probabilistic graphical modeling to predict sequences with low energies in multiple target states. Furthermore, it is also geared to specifically yield positional amino acid probability profiles compatible with these target states. Such profiles can be used as input to randomly bias high-throughput experimental sequence screening techniques, such as phage display, thus providing an alternative avenue for elucidating the multispecificity of natural proteins and the synthesis of novel proteins with specific functionalities. We prove the utility of such multispecific design techniques in better recovering amino acid sequence diversities similar to those resulting from millions of years of evolution. We then compare the approaches of prediction of low energy ensembles and of amino acid profiles and demonstrate their complementarity in providing more robust predictions for protein design.

  18. Cancer genome-sequencing study design.

    PubMed

    Mwenifumbo, Jill C; Marra, Marco A

    2013-05-01

    Discoveries from cancer genome sequencing have the potential to translate into advances in cancer prevention, diagnostics, prognostics, treatment and basic biology. Given the diversity of downstream applications, cancer genome-sequencing studies need to be designed to best fulfil specific aims. Knowledge of second-generation cancer genome-sequencing study design also facilitates assessment of the validity and importance of the rapidly growing number of published studies. In this Review, we focus on the practical application of second-generation sequencing technology (also known as next-generation sequencing) to cancer genomics and discuss how aspects of study design and methodological considerations - such as the size and composition of the discovery cohort - can be tailored to serve specific research aims.

  19. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  20. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  1. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  2. The complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequence of guinea pig endometrial prorelaxin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y A; Bryant-Greenwood, G D; Mandel, M; Greenwood, F C

    1992-03-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the relaxin gene transcript in the endometrium of the late pregnant guinea pig has been determined. The strategy used was a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers designed from the mRNA sequence of porcine preprorelaxin, rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR, and blunt end cloning in M13 mp18. With heterologous primers, a 226-basepair (bp) segment of the guinea pig relaxin gene sequence was obtained and was used to design a guinea pig-specific primer for use with the rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR method. The latter allowed completion of the sequence of 336 bp, with a 96-bp overlap. The sequence obtained shows greater homology at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels with porcine and human relaxins H1 and H2 than with rat relaxin, supporting the thesis that the guinea pig is not a rodent. The transcription of the guinea pig endometrial relaxin gene during pregnancy was confirmed by Northern analysis of guinea pig endometrial tissues with a species-specific cDNA probe. The endometrial relaxin gene is transcribed during pregnancy, but not in lactation, consistent with the observed immunostaining for relaxin.

  3. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  4. Sequence design in lattice models by graph theoretical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjeev, B. S.; Patra, S. M.; Vishveshwara, S.

    2001-01-01

    A general strategy has been developed based on graph theoretical methods, for finding amino acid sequences that take up a desired conformation as the native state. This problem of inverse design has been addressed by assigning topological indices for the monomer sites (vertices) of the polymer on a 3×3×3 cubic lattice. This is a simple design strategy, which takes into account only the topology of the target protein and identifies the best sequence for a given composition. The procedure allows the design of a good sequence for a target native state by assigning weights for the vertices on a lattice site in a given conformation. It is seen across a variety of conformations that the predicted sequences perform well both in sequence and in conformation space, in identifying the target conformation as native state for a fixed composition of amino acids. Although the method is tested in the framework of the HP model [K. F. Lau and K. A. Dill, Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] it can be used in any context if proper potential functions are available, since the procedure derives unique weights for all the sites (vertices, nodes) of the polymer chain of a chosen conformation (graph).

  5. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  6. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  7. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  8. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  9. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  10. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  11. High-throughput sequencing and vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Luciani, F

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have reshaped genome research. The resulting increase in sequencing depth and resolution has led to an unprecedented level of genomic detail and thus an increasing awareness of the complexity of animal, human and pathogen genomes. This has resulted in new approaches to vaccine research. On the one hand, the increase in genome complexity challenges our ability to study and understand pathogen biology and pathogen-host interactions. On the other hand, the increase in genomic data also provides key information for developing and designing improved vaccines against pathogens that were previously extremely difficult to deal with, such as rapidly mutating RNA viruses or bacteria that have complex interactions with the host immune system. This review describes how the broad application of NGS technologies to genome research is affecting vaccine research. It focuses on implications for the field of viral genomics, and includes recent animal and human studies.

  12. Dipeptide Sequence Determination: Analyzing Phenylthiohydantoin Amino Acids by HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Janice S.; Tang, Chung-Fei; Reed, Steven S.

    2000-02-01

    Amino acid composition and sequence determination, important techniques for characterizing peptides and proteins, are essential for predicting conformation and studying sequence alignment. This experiment presents improved, fundamental methods of sequence analysis for an upper-division biochemistry laboratory. Working in pairs, students use the Edman reagent to prepare phenylthiohydantoin derivatives of amino acids for determination of the sequence of an unknown dipeptide. With a single HPLC technique, students identify both the N-terminal amino acid and the composition of the dipeptide. This method yields good precision of retention times and allows use of a broad range of amino acids as components of the dipeptide. Students learn fundamental principles and techniques of sequence analysis and HPLC.

  13. Amino acid sequence of mouse submaxillary gland renin.

    PubMed Central

    Misono, K S; Chang, J J; Inagami, T

    1982-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of the heavy chain and light chain of mouse submaxillary gland renin have been determined. The heavy chain consists of 288 amino acid residues having a Mr of 31,036 calculated from the sequence. The light chain contains 48 amino acid residues with a Mr of 5,458. The sequence of the heavy chain was determined by automated Edman degradations of the cyanogen bromide peptides and tryptic peptides generated after citraconylation, as well as other peptides generated therefrom. The sequence of the light chain was derived from sequence analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide cleavage or by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus protease. The sequences in the active site regions in renin containing two catalytically essential aspartyl residues 32 and 215 were found identical with those in pepsin, chymosin, and penicillopepsin. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of renin with that of porcine pepsin indicated a 42% sequence identity of the heavy chain with the amino-terminal and middle regions and a 46% identity of the light chain with the carboxyl-terminal region of the porcine pepsin sequence. Residues identical in renin and pepsin are distributed throughout the length of the molecules, suggesting a similarity in their overall structures. PMID:6812055

  14. Amino Acid Sequence of Human Cholinesterase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    liquid chromatography (HPLC). Activity testing of the aged, DFP-labeled cholinesterase showed that 99.8% of the active sites had been labeled, since...acids were quantitated by ninhydrin at the AAA Labs, or by derivatization with phenylisothiocyanate at the University of Michigan. The latter method

  15. Not all sequence tags are created equal: designing and validating sequence identification tags robust to indels.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C

    2012-01-01

    Ligating adapters with unique synthetic oligonucleotide sequences (sequence tags) onto individual DNA samples before massively parallel sequencing is a popular and efficient way to obtain sequence data from many individual samples. Tag sequences should be numerous and sufficiently different to ensure sequencing, replication, and oligonucleotide synthesis errors do not cause tags to be unrecoverable or confused. However, many design approaches only protect against substitution errors during sequencing and extant tag sets contain too few tag sequences. We developed an open-source software package to validate sequence tags for conformance to two distance metrics and design sequence tags robust to indel and substitution errors. We use this software package to evaluate several commercial and non-commercial sequence tag sets, design several large sets (max(count) = 7,198) of edit metric sequence tags having different lengths and degrees of error correction, and integrate a subset of these edit metric tags to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers and sequencing adapters. We validate a subset of these edit metric tagged PCR primers and sequencing adapters by sequencing on several platforms and subsequent comparison to commercially available alternatives. We find that several commonly used sets of sequence tags or design methodologies used to produce sequence tags do not meet the minimum expectations of their underlying distance metric, and we find that PCR primers and sequencing adapters incorporating edit metric sequence tags designed by our software package perform as well as their commercial counterparts. We suggest that researchers evaluate sequence tags prior to use or evaluate tags that they have been using. The sequence tag sets we design improve on extant sets because they are large, valid across the set, and robust to the suite of substitution, insertion, and deletion errors affecting massively parallel sequencing workflows on all currently used platforms.

  16. Cystatin. Amino acid sequence and possible secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, C; Anastasi, A; Crow, H; McDonald, J K; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of cystatin, the protein from chicken egg-white that is a tight-binding inhibitor of many cysteine proteinases, is reported. Cystatin is composed of 116 amino acid residues, and the Mr is calculated to be 13 143. No striking similarity to any other known sequence has been detected. The results of computer analysis of the sequence and c.d. spectrometry indicate that the secondary structure includes relatively little alpha-helix (about 20%) and that the remainder is mainly beta-structure. PMID:6712597

  17. Mouse Vk gene classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Helmberg, A; Kroemer, G; Kofler, R

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region gene usage in the immune response, estimates of V gene germline complexity, and other nucleic acid hybridization-based studies depend on the extent to which such genes are related (i.e., sequence similarity) and their organization in gene families. While mouse Igh heavy chain V region (VH) gene families are relatively well-established, a corresponding systematic classification of Igk light chain V region (Vk) genes has not been reported. The present analysis, in the course of which we reviewed the known extent of the Vk germline gene repertoire and Vk gene usage in a variety of responses to foreign and self antigens, provides a classification of mouse Vk genes in gene families composed of members with greater than 80% overall nucleic acid sequence similarity. This classification differed in several aspects from that of VH genes: only some Vk gene families were as clearly separated (by greater than 25% sequence dissimilarity) as typical VH gene families; most Vk gene families were closely related and, in several instances, members from different families were very similar (greater than 80%) over large sequence portions; frequently, classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity diverged from existing classifications based on amino-terminal protein sequence similarity. Our data have implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and describe potentially important differences in sequence organization between VH and Vk genes.

  18. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences

    PubMed Central

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Adir, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel. PMID:27307442

  19. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences.

    PubMed

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D; Adir, Noam

    2016-06-28

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel.

  20. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  1. AbDesign: An algorithm for combinatorial backbone design guided by natural conformations and sequences.

    PubMed

    Lapidoth, Gideon D; Baran, Dror; Pszolla, Gabriele M; Norn, Christoffer; Alon, Assaf; Tyka, Michael D; Fleishman, Sarel J

    2015-08-01

    Computational design of protein function has made substantial progress, generating new enzymes, binders, inhibitors, and nanomaterials not previously seen in nature. However, the ability to design new protein backbones for function--essential to exert control over all polypeptide degrees of freedom--remains a critical challenge. Most previous attempts to design new backbones computed the mainchain from scratch. Here, instead, we describe a combinatorial backbone and sequence optimization algorithm called AbDesign, which leverages the large number of sequences and experimentally determined molecular structures of antibodies to construct new antibody models, dock them against target surfaces and optimize their sequence and backbone conformation for high stability and binding affinity. We used the algorithm to produce antibody designs that target the same molecular surfaces as nine natural, high-affinity antibodies; in five cases interface sequence identity is above 30%, and in four of those the backbone conformation at the core of the antibody binding surface is within 1 Å root-mean square deviation from the natural antibodies. Designs recapitulate polar interaction networks observed in natural complexes, and amino acid sidechain rigidity at the designed binding surface, which is likely important for affinity and specificity, is high compared to previous design studies. In designed anti-lysozyme antibodies, complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) at the periphery of the interface, such as L1 and H2, show greater backbone conformation diversity than the CDRs at the core of the interface, and increase the binding surface area compared to the natural antibody, potentially enhancing affinity and specificity.

  2. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  3. Extensive amino acid sequence homologies between animal lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Paroutaud, P.; Levi, G.; Teichberg, V.I.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have established the amino acid sequence of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from the electric eel and the sequences of several peptides from a similar lectin isolated from human placenta. These sequences were compared with the published sequences of peptides derived from the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectin from human lung and with sequences deduced from cDNAs assigned to the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins from chicken embryo skin and human hepatomas. Significant homologies were observed. One of the highly conserved regions that contains a tryptophan residue and two glutamic acid resides is probably part of the ..beta..-D-galactoside binding site, which, on the basis of spectroscopic studies of the electric eel lectin, is expected to contain such residues. The similarity of the hydropathy profiles and the predicted secondary structure of the lectins from chicken skin and electric eel, in spite of differences in their amino acid sequences, strongly suggests that these proteins have maintained structural homologies during evolution and together with the other ..beta..-D-galactoside binding lectins were derived form a common ancestor gene.

  4. Amino acid sequence of porcine spleen cathepsin D.

    PubMed Central

    Shewale, J G; Tang, J

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of porcine spleen cathepsin D heavy chain has been determined and, hence, the complete structure of this enzyme is now known. The sequence of heavy chain was constructed by aligning the structures of peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, trypsin, and endo-proteinase Lys C cleavages. The structure of the light chain has been published previously. The cathepsin D molecule contains 339 amino acid residues in two polypeptide chains: a 97-residue light chain and a 242-residue heavy chain, with a combined Mr of 36,779 (without carbohydrate). There are two carbohydrate units linked to asparagine residues 70 and 192. The disulfide bond arrangement in cathepsin D is probably similar to that of pepsin, because the positions of six half-cystine residues are conserved. The active site aspartyl residues, corresponding to aspartic acid-32 and -215 of pepsin, are located at residues 33 and 224 in the cathepsin D molecule. The amino acid sequence around these aspartyl residues is strongly conserved. Cathepsin D shows a strong homology with other acid proteases. When the sequence of cathepsin D, renin, and pepsin are aligned, 32.7% of the residues are identical. The homology is observed throughout the length of the molecules, indicating that three-dimensional structures of all three molecules are similar. PMID:6587385

  5. TranslatorX: multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences guided by amino acid translations.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Zardoya, Rafael; Telford, Maximilian J

    2010-07-01

    We present TranslatorX, a web server designed to align protein-coding nucleotide sequences based on their corresponding amino acid translations. Many comparisons between biological sequences (nucleic acids and proteins) involve the construction of multiple alignments. Alignments represent a statement regarding the homology between individual nucleotides or amino acids within homologous genes. As protein-coding DNA sequences evolve as triplets of nucleotides (codons) and it is known that sequence similarity degrades more rapidly at the DNA than at the amino acid level, alignments are generally more accurate when based on amino acids than on their corresponding nucleotides. TranslatorX novelties include: (i) use of all documented genetic codes and the possibility of assigning different genetic codes for each sequence; (ii) a battery of different multiple alignment programs; (iii) translation of ambiguous codons when possible; (iv) an innovative criterion to clean nucleotide alignments with GBlocks based on protein information; and (v) a rich output, including Jalview-powered graphical visualization of the alignments, codon-based alignments coloured according to the corresponding amino acids, measures of compositional bias and first, second and third codon position specific alignments. The TranslatorX server is freely available at http://translatorx.co.uk.

  6. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  7. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  8. The amino acid sequence of iguana (Iguana iguana) pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W; Beintema, J J; Hofsteenge, J

    1994-01-15

    The pyrimidine-specific ribonuclease superfamily constitutes a group of homologous proteins so far found only in higher vertebrates. Four separate families are found in mammals, which have resulted from gene duplications in mammalian ancestors. To learn more about the evolutionary history of this superfamily, the primary structure and other characteristics of the pancreatic enzyme from iguana (Iguana iguana), a herbivorous lizard species belonging to the reptiles, have been determined. The polypeptide chain consists of 119 amino acid residues. The positions of insertions and deletions in the sequence are identical to those in the enzyme from snapping turtle. However, the two enzymes differ at 54% of the amino acid positions. Iguana ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses three recognition sites for carbohydrate attachment, and has a high number of acidic residues in a localized part of the sequence.

  9. Designing to See and Share Structure in Number Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mor, Yishay; Noss, Richard; Hoyles, Celia; Kahn, Ken; Simpson, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a design experiment in the domain of number sequences conducted in the course of the "WebLabs" project. We iteratively designed and tested a set of activities and tools in which 10-14 year old students used the "ToonTalk" programming environment to construct models of sequences and series, and then shared…

  10. Amino acid sequence of bovine heart coupling factor 6.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, J K; Jacobs, J W; Kanner, B I; Racker, E; Bradshaw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine heart mitochondrial coupling factor 6 (F6) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and derived peptides. Preparations based on heat precipitation and ethanol extraction showed allotypic variation at three positions while material further purified by HPLC yielded only one sequence that also differed by a Phe-Thr replacement at residue 62. The mature protein contains 76 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 9006 and a pI of approximately equal to 5, in good agreement with experimentally measured values. The charged amino acids are mainly clustered at the termini and in one section in the middle; these three polar segments are separated by two segments relatively rich in nonpolar residues. Chou-Fasman analysis suggests three stretches of alpha-helix coinciding (or within) the high-charge-density sequences with a single beta-turn at the first polar-nonpolar junction. Comparison of the F6 sequence with those of other proteins did not reveal any homologous structures. PMID:6149548

  11. Amino acid sequence and comparative antigenicity of chicken metallothionein.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, C C; Fullmer, C S; Garvey, J S

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of metallothionein (MT) from chicken liver is reported. The primary structure was determined by automated sequence analysis of peptides produced by limited acid hydrolysis and by trypsin digestion. The comparative antigenicity of chicken MT was determined by radioimmunoassay using rabbit anti-rat MT polyclonal antibody. Chicken MT consists of 63 amino acids as compared to 61 found in MTs from mammals. One insertion (and two substitutions) occurs in the amino-terminal region, a region considered invariant among mammalian MTs. Eighteen of the 20 cysteines in chicken MT were aligned with cysteines from other mammalian sequences. Two cysteines near the carboxyl terminus are shifted by one residue due to the insertion of proline in that region. Overall, the chicken protein showed approximately equal to 68% sequence identity in a comparison with various mammalian MTs. The affinity of the polyclonal antibody for chicken MT was decreased by 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to that of a mammalian MT (rat MT isoforms). This reduced affinity is attributed to major substitutions in chicken MT in the regions of the principal determinants of mammalian MTs. Theoretical analysis of the primary structure predicted the secondary structure to consist of reverse turns and random coils with no stable beta or helix conformations. There is no evidence that chicken MT differs functionally from mammalian MTs. PMID:2448773

  12. Can computationally designed protein sequences improve secondary structure prediction?

    PubMed

    Bondugula, Rajkumar; Wallqvist, Anders; Lee, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Computational sequence design methods are used to engineer proteins with desired properties such as increased thermal stability and novel function. In addition, these algorithms can be used to identify an envelope of sequences that may be compatible with a particular protein fold topology. In this regard, we hypothesized that sequence-property prediction, specifically secondary structure, could be significantly enhanced by using a large database of computationally designed sequences. We performed a large-scale test of this hypothesis with 6511 diverse protein domains and 50 designed sequences per domain. After analysis of the inherent accuracy of the designed sequences database, we realized that it was necessary to put constraints on what fraction of the native sequence should be allowed to change. With mutational constraints, accuracy was improved vs. no constraints, but the diversity of designed sequences, and hence effective size of the database, was moderately reduced. Overall, the best three-state prediction accuracy (Q(3)) that we achieved was nearly a percentage point improved over using a natural sequence database alone, well below the theoretical possibility for improvement of 8-10 percentage points. Furthermore, our nascent method was used to augment the state-of-the-art PSIPRED program by a percentage point.

  13. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  14. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  15. Design and Analysis of Single-Cell Sequencing Experiments.

    PubMed

    Grün, Dominic; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-05

    Recent advances in single-cell sequencing hold great potential for exploring biological systems with unprecedented resolution. Sequencing the genome of individual cells can reveal somatic mutations and allows the investigation of clonal dynamics. Single-cell transcriptome sequencing can elucidate the cell type composition of a sample. However, single-cell sequencing comes with major technical challenges and yields complex data output. In this Primer, we provide an overview of available methods and discuss experimental design and single-cell data analysis. We hope that these guidelines will enable a growing number of researchers to leverage the power of single-cell sequencing.

  16. Rational experiment design for sequencing-based RNA structure mapping.

    PubMed

    Aviran, Sharon; Pachter, Lior

    2014-12-01

    Structure mapping is a classic experimental approach for determining nucleic acid structure that has gained renewed interest in recent years following advances in chemistry, genomics, and informatics. The approach encompasses numerous techniques that use different means to introduce nucleotide-level modifications in a structure-dependent manner. Modifications are assayed via cDNA fragment analysis, using electrophoresis or next-generation sequencing (NGS). The recent advent of NGS has dramatically increased the throughput, multiplexing capacity, and scope of RNA structure mapping assays, thereby opening new possibilities for genome-scale, de novo, and in vivo studies. From an informatics standpoint, NGS is more informative than prior technologies by virtue of delivering direct molecular measurements in the form of digital sequence counts. Motivated by these new capabilities, we introduce a novel model-based in silico approach for quantitative design of large-scale multiplexed NGS structure mapping assays, which takes advantage of the direct and digital nature of NGS readouts. We use it to characterize the relationship between controllable experimental parameters and the precision of mapping measurements. Our results highlight the complexity of these dependencies and shed light on relevant tradeoffs and pitfalls, which can be difficult to discern by intuition alone. We demonstrate our approach by quantitatively assessing the robustness of SHAPE-Seq measurements, obtained by multiplexing SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) chemistry in conjunction with NGS. We then utilize it to elucidate design considerations in advanced genome-wide approaches for probing the transcriptome, which recently obtained in vivo information using dimethyl sulfate (DMS) chemistry.

  17. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  18. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  19. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-01-01

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  20. The amino acid sequence of rabbit cardiac troponin I.

    PubMed Central

    Grand, R J; Wilkinson, J M

    1976-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of troponin I from rabbit cardiac muscle was determined by the isolation of four unique CNBr fragments, together with overlapping tryptic peptides containing radioactive methionine residues. Overlap data for residues 35-36, 93-94 and 140-145 are incomplete, the sequence at these positions being based on homology with the sequence of the fast-skeletal-muscle protein. Cardiac troponin I is a single polypeptide chain of 206 residues with mol.wt. 23550 and an extinction coefficient, E 1%,1cm/280, of 4.37. The protein has a net positive charge of 14 and is thus somewhat more basic than troponin I from fast-skeletal muscle. Comparison of the sequences of troponin I from cardiac and fast skeletal muscle show that the cardiac protein has 26 extra residues at the N-terminus which account for the larger size of the protein. In the remainder of sequence there is a considerable degree of homology, this being greater in the C-terminal two-thirds of the molecule. The region in the cardiac protein corresponding to the peptide with inhibitory activity from the fast-skeletal-muscle protein is very similar and it seems unlikely that this is the cause of the difference in inhibitory activity between the two proteins. The region responsible for binding troponin C, however, possesses a lower degree of homology. Detailed evidence on which the sequence is based has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50072 (20 pages), at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7QB, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1976) 153, 5. PMID:1008822

  1. Software scripts for quality checking of high-throughput nucleic acid sequencers.

    PubMed

    Lazo, G R; Tong, J; Miller, R; Hsia, C; Rausch, C; Kang, Y; Anderson, O D

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a graphical interface to allow the researcher to view and assess the quality of sequencing results using a series of program scripts developed to process data generated by automated sequencers. The scripts are written in Perl programming language and are executable under the cgibin directory of a Web server environment. The scripts direct nucleic acid sequencing trace file data output from automated sequencers to be analyzed by the phred molecular biology program and are displayed as graphical hypertext mark-up language (HTML) pages. The scripts are mainly designed to handle 96-well microtiter dish samples, but the scripts are also able to read data from 384-well microtiter dishes 96 samples at a time. The scripts may be customized for different laboratory environments and computer configurations. Web links to the sources and discussion page are provided.

  2. Amino acid sequence of a mouse immunoglobulin mu chain.

    PubMed Central

    Kehry, M; Sibley, C; Fuhrman, J; Schilling, J; Hood, L E

    1979-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the mouse mu chain from the BALB/c myeloma tumor MOPC 104E is reported. The C mu region contains four consecutive homology regions of approximately 110 residues and a COOH-terminal region of 19 residues. A comparison of this mu chain from mouse with a complete mu sequence from human (Ou) and a partial mu chain sequence from dog (Moo) reveals a striking gradient of increasing homology from the NH2-terminal to the COOH-terminal portion of these mu chains, with the former being the least and the latter the most highly conserved. Four of the five sites of carbohydrate attachment appear to be at identical residue positions when the constant regions of the mouse and human mu chains are compared. The mu chain of MOPC 104E has a carbohydrate moiety attached in the second hypervariable region. This is particularly interesting in view of the fact that MOPC 104E binds alpha-(1 leads to 3)-dextran, a simple carbohydrate. The structural and functional constraints imposed by these comparative sequence analyses are discussed. PMID:111247

  3. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid sequence detection by single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A; Shera, E.B.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There has been considerable interest in the development of very sensitive clinical diagnostic techniques over the last few years. Many pathogenic agents are often present in extremely small concentrations in clinical samples, especially at the initial stages of infection, making their detection very difficult. This project sought to develop a new technique for the detection and accurate quantification of specific bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences in clinical samples. The scheme involved the use of novel hybridization probes for the detection of nucleic acids combined with our recently developed technique of single-molecule electrophoresis. This project is directly relevant to the DOE`s Defense Programs strategic directions in the area of biological warfare counter-proliferation.

  4. BeadCons: detection of nucleic acid sequences by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Horejsh, Douglas; Martini, Federico; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2005-11-01

    Molecular beacons are single-stranded nucleic acid structures with a terminal fluorophore and a distal, terminal quencher. These molecules are typically used in real-time PCR assays, but have also been conjugated with solid matrices. This unit describes protocols related to molecular beacon-conjugated beads (BeadCons), whose specific hybridization with complementary target sequences can be resolved by cytometry. Assay sensitivity is achieved through the concentration of fluorescence signal on discrete particles. By using molecular beacons with different fluorophores and microspheres of different sizes, it is possible to construct a fluid array system with each bead corresponding to a specific target nucleic acid. Methods are presented for the design, construction, and use of BeadCons for the specific, multiplexed detection of unlabeled nucleic acids in solution. The use of bead-based detection methods will likely lead to the design of new multiplex molecular diagnostic tools.

  5. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of alpha-type gliadins from wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed Central

    Kasarda, D D; Okita, T W; Bernardin, J E; Baecker, P A; Nimmo, C C; Lew, E J; Dietler, M D; Greene, F C

    1984-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence for an alpha-type gliadin protein of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linnaeus) endosperm has been derived from a cloned cDNA sequence. An additional cDNA clone that corresponds to about 75% of a similar alpha-type gliadin has been sequenced and shows some important differences. About 97% of the composite sequence of A-gliadin (an alpha-type gliadin fraction) has also been obtained by direct amino acid sequencing. This sequence shows a high degree of similarity with amino acid sequences derived from both cDNA clones and is virtually identical to one of them. On the basis of sequence information, after loss of the signal sequence, the mature alpha-type gliadins may be divided into five different domains, two of which may have evolved from an ancestral gliadin gene, whereas the remaining three contain repeating sequences that may have developed independently. Images PMID:6589619

  6. Mathematical Characterization of Protein Sequences Using Patterns as Chemical Group Combinations of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayanta Kumar; Das, Provas; Ray, Korak Kumar; Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequence similarity is the fundamental concept behind the protein phylogenetic tree formation. By virtue of this method, we can explain the evolutionary relationships, but further explanations are not possible unless sequences are studied through the chemical nature of individual amino acids. Here we develop a new methodology to characterize the protein sequences on the basis of the chemical nature of the amino acids. We design various algorithms for studying the variation of chemical group transitions and various chemical group combinations as patterns in the protein sequences. The amino acid sequence of conventional myosin II head domain of 14 family members are taken to illustrate this new approach. We find two blocks of maximum length 6 aa as 'FPKATD' and 'Y/FTNEKL' without repeating the same chemical nature and one block of maximum length 20 aa with the repetition of chemical nature which are common among all 14 members. We also check commonality with another motor protein sub-family kinesin, KIF1A. Based on our analysis we find a common block of length 8 aa both in myosin II and KIF1A. This motif is located in the neck linker region which could be responsible for the generation of mechanical force, enabling us to find the unique blocks which remain chemically conserved across the family. We also validate our methodology with different protein families such as MYOI, Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Altogether, our studies provide a new methodology for investigating the conserved amino acids' pattern in different proteins.

  7. Translating HIV sequences into quantitative fitness landscapes predicts viral vulnerabilities for rational immunogen design.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Andrew L; Mann, Jaclyn K; Omarjee, Saleha; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2013-03-21

    A prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine offers the best hope to curb the HIV-AIDS epidemic gripping sub-Saharan Africa, but it remains elusive. A major challenge is the extreme viral sequence variability among strains. Systematic means to guide immunogen design for highly variable pathogens like HIV are not available. Using computational models, we have developed an approach to translate available viral sequence data into quantitative landscapes of viral fitness as a function of the amino acid sequences of its constituent proteins. Predictions emerging from our computationally defined landscapes for the proteins of HIV-1 clade B Gag were positively tested against new in vitro fitness measurements and were consistent with previously defined in vitro measurements and clinical observations. These landscapes chart the peaks and valleys of viral fitness as protein sequences change and inform the design of immunogens and therapies that can target regions of the virus most vulnerable to selection pressure.

  8. Translating HIV sequences into quantitative fitness landscapes predicts viral vulnerabilities for rational immunogen design

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Andrew L.; Mann, Jaclyn K.; Omarjee, Saleha; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine offers the best hope to curb the HIV-AIDS epidemic gripping sub-Saharan Africa, but remains elusive. A major challenge is the extreme viral sequence variability among strains. Systematic means to guide immunogen design for highly variable pathogens like HIV are not available. Using computational models, we have developed an approach to translate available viral sequence data into quantitative landscapes of viral fitness as a function of the amino acid sequences of its constituent proteins. Predictions emerging from our computationally defined landscapes for the proteins of HIV-1 clade B Gag were positively tested against new in vitro fitness measurements, and were consistent with previously defined in vitro measurements and clinical observations. These landscapes chart the peaks and valleys of viral fitness as protein sequences change, and inform the design of immunogens and therapies that can target regions of the virus most vulnerable to selection pressure. PMID:23521886

  9. PAM sequence design for dimmable visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuo, Huang; Wang, Jun-Bo; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Guan, Rui; Chen, Ming

    2017-02-01

    In current visible light communication (VLC) systems employing intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD), the transmitted optical intensity signal must satisfy the nonnegativity, peak optical intensity and illumination constraints. By taking into account the three constraints, we first present the signal space for the pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) sequences in the maximum flickering time period (MFTP). Then, to minimize the error probability of the VLC systems, we seek to find the PAM sequences providing the largest minimum Euclidean distance. Since the objective function is nonconvex and nondifferentiable, it is difficult to solve the original optimization problem directly. Thus, two methods corresponding to the joint design and greedy algorithm, are proposed to design the PAM sequences in VLC. The two methods offer a tradeoff between the symbol error rate (SER) performance and design complexity.

  10. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus collagenase.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, H; Shibano, Y; Morihara, K; Fukushima, J; Inami, S; Keil, B; Gilles, A M; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1992-01-01

    The DNA encoding the collagenase of Vibrio alginolyticus was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited both collagenase antigen and collagenase activity. The open reading frame from the ATG initiation codon was 2442 bp in length for the collagenase structural gene. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature collagenase consists of 739 amino acids with an Mr of 81875. The amino acid sequences of 20 polypeptide fragments were completely identical with the deduced amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was similar to the chemically determined composition of purified collagenase reported previously. The analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene were rigorously performed, but we could not detect any significant sequence similarity to other collagenases. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1311172

  11. Mathematical Characterization of Protein Sequences Using Patterns as Chemical Group Combinations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Jana, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequence similarity is the fundamental concept behind the protein phylogenetic tree formation. By virtue of this method, we can explain the evolutionary relationships, but further explanations are not possible unless sequences are studied through the chemical nature of individual amino acids. Here we develop a new methodology to characterize the protein sequences on the basis of the chemical nature of the amino acids. We design various algorithms for studying the variation of chemical group transitions and various chemical group combinations as patterns in the protein sequences. The amino acid sequence of conventional myosin II head domain of 14 family members are taken to illustrate this new approach. We find two blocks of maximum length 6 aa as ‘FPKATD’ and ‘Y/FTNEKL’ without repeating the same chemical nature and one block of maximum length 20 aa with the repetition of chemical nature which are common among all 14 members. We also check commonality with another motor protein sub-family kinesin, KIF1A. Based on our analysis we find a common block of length 8 aa both in myosin II and KIF1A. This motif is located in the neck linker region which could be responsible for the generation of mechanical force, enabling us to find the unique blocks which remain chemically conserved across the family. We also validate our methodology with different protein families such as MYOI, Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Altogether, our studies provide a new methodology for investigating the conserved amino acids’ pattern in different proteins. PMID:27930687

  12. Nucleic acid (cDNA) and amino acid sequences of the maize endosperm protein glutelin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Prat, S; Cortadas, J; Puigdomènech, P; Palau, J

    1985-01-01

    The cDNA coding for a glutelin-2 protein from maize endosperm has been cloned and the complete amino acid sequence of the protein derived for the first time. An immature maize endosperm cDNA bank was screened for the expression of a beta-lactamase:glutelin-2 (G2) fusion polypeptide by using antibodies against the purified 28 kd G2 protein. A clone corresponding to the 28 kd G2 protein was sequenced and the primary structure of this protein was derived. Five regions can be defined in the protein sequence: an 11 residue N-terminal part, a repeated region formed by eight units of the sequence Pro-Pro-Pro-Val-His-Leu, an alternating Pro-X stretch 21 residues long, a Cys rich domain and a C-terminal part rich in Gln. The protein sequence is preceded by 19 residues which have the characteristics of the signal peptide found in secreted proteins. Unlike zeins, the main maize storage proteins, 28 kd glutelin-2 has several homologous sequences in common with other cereal storage proteins. Images PMID:3839076

  13. Purification, amino acid sequence and immunological characterization of Ole e 6, a cysteine-enriched allergen from olive tree pollen.

    PubMed

    Batanero, E; Ledesma, A; Villalba, M; Rodríguez, R

    1997-06-30

    The Ole e 6 allergen from olive tree pollen has been isolated by combining gel permeation and reverse-phase chromatographies. It is a single and highly acidic (pI 4.2) polypeptide chain protein. Its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence has been determined by Edman degradation. Total RNA from the olive tree pollen was isolated, and a specific cDNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction using a degenerate oligonucleotide primer designed according to the NH2-terminal sequence of the protein. The nucleotide sequencing of the cDNA rendered an open reading frame encoding a 50 amino acid polypeptide chain, in which two sets of the sequential motif Cys-X3-Cys-X3-Cys are present. No sequence similarity has been found between this protein and other previously described polypeptides.

  14. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications. (a) Nucleotide...

  15. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications. (a) Nucleotide...

  16. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications. (a) Nucleotide...

  17. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications. (a) Nucleotide...

  18. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nucleotide and/or amino acid... Biotechnology Invention Disclosures Application Disclosures Containing Nucleotide And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.821 Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications. (a) Nucleotide...

  19. Greene SCPrimer: a rapid comprehensive tool for designing degenerate primers from multiple sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Jabado, Omar J.; Palacios, Gustavo; Kapoor, Vishal; Hui, Jeffrey; Renwick, Neil; Zhai, Junhui; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is widely applied in clinical and environmental microbiology. Primer design is key to the development of successful assays and is often performed manually by using multiple nucleic acid alignments. Few public software tools exist that allow comprehensive design of degenerate primers for large groups of related targets based on complex multiple sequence alignments. Here we present a method for designing such primers based on tree building followed by application of a set covering algorithm, and demonstrate its utility in compiling Multiplex PCR primer panels for detection and differentiation of viral pathogens. PMID:17135211

  20. Gene sequence and predicted amino acid sequence of the motA protein, a membrane-associated protein required for flagellar rotation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G E; Macnab, R M; Stader, J; Matsumura, P; Burks, C

    1984-01-01

    The motA and motB gene products of Escherichia coli are integral membrane proteins necessary for flagellar rotation. We determined the DNA sequence of the region containing the motA gene and its promoter. Within this sequence, there is an open reading frame of 885 nucleotides, which with high probability (98% confidence level) meets criteria for a coding sequence. The 295-residue amino acid translation product had a molecular weight of 31,974, in good agreement with the value determined experimentally by gel electrophoresis. The amino acid sequence, which was quite hydrophobic, was subjected to a theoretical analysis designed to predict membrane-spanning alpha-helical segments of integral membrane proteins; four such hydrophobic helices were predicted by this treatment. Additional amphipathic helices may also be present. A remarkable feature of the sequence is the existence of two segments of high uncompensated charge density, one positive and the other negative. Possible organization of the protein in the membrane is discussed. Asymmetry in the amino acid composition of translated DNA sequences was used to distinguish between two possible initiation codons. The use of this method as a criterion for authentication of coding regions is described briefly in an Appendix. PMID:6090403

  1. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  2. Computer selection of oligonucleotide probes from amino acid sequences for use in gene library screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Wallace, D C

    1984-01-11

    We present a computer program, FINPROBE, which utilizes known amino acid sequence data to deduce minimum redundancy oligonucleotide probes for use in screening cDNA or genomic libraries or in primer extension. The user enters the amino acid sequence of interest, the desired probe length, the number of probes sought, and the constraints on oligonucleotide synthesis. The computer generates a table of possible probes listed in increasing order of redundancy and provides the location of each probe in the protein and mRNA coding sequence. Activation of a next function provides the amino acid and mRNA sequences of each probe of interest as well as the complementary sequence and the minimum dissociation temperature of the probe. A final routine prints out the amino acid sequence of the protein in parallel with the mRNA sequence listing all possible codons for each amino acid.

  3. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  4. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  5. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  6. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  7. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1979-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence has been determined for a fragment of human ceruloplasmin [ferroxidase; iron(II):oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.16.3.1]. The fragment (designated Cp F5) contains 159 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 18,650; it lacks carbohydrate, is rich in histidine, and contains one free cysteine that may be part of a copper-binding site. This fragment is present in most commercial preparations of ceruloplasmin, probably owing to proteolytic degradation, but can also be obtained by limited cleavage of single-chain ceruloplasmin with plasmin. Cp F5 probably is an intact domain attached to the COOH-terminal end of single-chain ceruloplasmin via a labile interdomain peptide bond. A model of the secondary structure predicted by empirical methods suggests that almost one-third of the amino acid residues are distributed in alpha helices, about a third in beta-sheet structure, and the remainder in beta turns and unidentified structures. Computer analysis of the amino acid sequence has not demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between this ceruloplasmin fragment and any other protein, but there is some evidence for an internal duplication.

  9. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  10. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  11. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  12. Human retroviruses and aids, 1992. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Berzofsky, J.A.; Pavlakis, G.N.; Smith, R.F.

    1992-10-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (H) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions below of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  13. From designer Lewis acid to designer Brønsted acid towards more reactive and selective acid catalysis

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Hisashi

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the development of acid catalysis for selective organic transformations conducted in our laboratories for the past 30 years. Several important concepts in designing of catalysts are described with some examples. Further, recent developments in super Brønsted acid and their applications in a one-pot procedure to construct complex molecules with high diastereoselectivities are described. PMID:18941293

  14. Completion of the amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 chain from type I calf skin collagen. Amino acid sequence of alpha 1(I)B8.

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, R W; Breitkreutz, D; Meitinger, M; Fietzek, P P

    1983-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the 279-residue CNBr peptide CB8 from the alpha 1 chain of type I calf skin collagen is presented. It was determined by sequencing overlapping fragments of CB8 produced by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, trypsin, Endoproteinase Arg-C and hydroxylamine. Tryptic cleavages were also made specific for lysine by blocking arginine residues with cyclohexane-1,2-dione. This completes the amino acid sequence analysis of the 1054-residues-long alpha (I) chain of calf skin collagen. PMID:6354180

  15. Micropillar sequence designs for fundamental inertial flow transformations.

    PubMed

    Stoecklein, Daniel; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Owsley, Keegan; Xie, Yu; Di Carlo, Dino; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2014-11-07

    The ability to control the shape of a flow in a passive microfluidic device enables potential applications in chemical reaction control, particle separation, and complex material fabrication. Recent work has demonstrated the concept of sculpting fluid streams in a microchannel using a set of pillars or other structures that individually deform a flow in a predictable pre-computed manner. These individual pillars are then placed in a defined sequence within the channel to yield the composition of the individual flow deformations - and ultimately complex user-defined flow shapes. In this way, an elegant mathematical operation can yield the final flow shape for a sequence without an experiment or additional numerical simulation. Although these approaches allow for programming complex flow shapes without understanding the detailed fluid mechanics, the design of an arbitrary flow shape of interest remains difficult, requiring significant design iteration. The development of intuitive basic operations (i.e. higher-level functions that consist of combinations of obstacles) that act on the flow field to create a basis for more complex transformations would be useful in systematically achieving a desired flow shape. Here, we show eight transformations that could serve as a partial basis for more complex transformations. We initially used in-house, freely available custom software (uFlow), which allowed us to arrive at these transformations that include making a fluid stream concave and convex, tilting, stretching, splitting, adding a vertex, shifting, and encapsulating another flow stream. The pillar sequences corresponding to these transformations were subsequently fabricated and optically analyzed using confocal imaging - yielding close agreement with uFlow-predicted shapes. We performed topological analysis on each transformation, characterizing potential sequences leading to these outputs and trends associated with changing diameter and placement of the pillars. We

  16. Unimodular sequence design under frequency hopping communication compatibility requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Peng; Cui, Guolong; Kong, Lingjiang; Yang, Jianyu

    2016-12-01

    The integrated design for both radar and anonymous communication has drawn more attention recently since wireless communication system appeals to enhance security and reliability. Given the frequency hopping (FH) communication system, an effective way to realize integrated design is to meet the spectrum compatibility between these two systems. The paper deals with a unimodular sequence design technique which considers optimizing both the spectrum compatibility and peak sidelobes levels (PSL) of auto-correlation function (ACF). The spectrum compatibility requirement realizes anonymous communication for the FH system and provides this system lower probability of intercept (LPI) since the spectrum of the FH system is hidden in that of the radar system. The proposed algorithm, named generalized fitting template (GFT) technique, converts the sequence optimization design problem to a iterative fitting process. In this process, the power spectrum density (PSD) and PSL behaviors of the generated sequences fit both PSD and PSL templates progressively. Two templates are established based on the spectrum compatibility requirement and the expected PSL. As noted, in order to ensure the communication security and reliability, spectrum compatibility requirement is given a higher priority to achieve in the GFT algorithm. This algorithm realizes this point by adjusting the weight adaptively between these two terms during the iteration process. The simulation results are analyzed in terms of bit error rate (BER), PSD, PSL, and signal-interference rate (SIR) for both the radar and FH systems. The performance of GFT is compared with SCAN, CAN, FRE, CYC, and MAT algorithms in the above aspects, which shows its good effectiveness.

  17. An Integrated Sequence-Structure Database incorporating matching mRNA sequence, amino acid sequence and protein three-dimensional structure data.

    PubMed Central

    Adzhubei, I A; Adzhubei, A A; Neidle, S

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a non-homologous database, termed the Integrated Sequence-Structure Database (ISSD) which comprises the coding sequences of genes, amino acid sequences of the corresponding proteins, their secondary structure and straight phi,psi angles assignments, and polypeptide backbone coordinates. Each protein entry in the database holds the alignment of nucleotide sequence, amino acid sequence and the PDB three-dimensional structure data. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each entry are selected on the basis of exact matches of the source organism and cell environment. The current version 1.0 of ISSD is available on the WWW at http://www.protein.bio.msu.su/issd/ and includes 107 non-homologous mammalian proteins, of which 80 are human proteins. The database has been used by us for the analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in mRNA sequences showing their correlation with the three-dimensional structure features in the encoded proteins. Possible ISSD applications include optimisation of protein expression, improvement of the protein structure prediction accuracy, and analysis of evolutionary aspects of the nucleotide sequence-protein structure relationship. PMID:9399866

  18. Sequence-defined bioactive macrocycles via an acid-catalysed cascade reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porel, Mintu; Thornlow, Dana N.; Phan, Ngoc N.; Alabi, Christopher A.

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic macrocycles derived from sequence-defined oligomers are a unique structural class whose ring size, sequence and structure can be tuned via precise organization of the primary sequence. Similar to peptides and other peptidomimetics, these well-defined synthetic macromolecules become pharmacologically relevant when bioactive side chains are incorporated into their primary sequence. In this article, we report the synthesis of oligothioetheramide (oligoTEA) macrocycles via a one-pot acid-catalysed cascade reaction. The versatility of the cyclization chemistry and modularity of the assembly process was demonstrated via the synthesis of >20 diverse oligoTEA macrocycles. Structural characterization via NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of conformational isomers, which enabled the determination of local chain dynamics within the macromolecular structure. Finally, we demonstrate the biological activity of oligoTEA macrocycles designed to mimic facially amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The preliminary results indicate that macrocyclic oligoTEAs with just two-to-three cationic charge centres can elicit potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor.

  20. A blind testing design for authenticating ancient DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Golenberg, E M; Shoshani, J

    1997-04-01

    Reproducibility is a serious concern among researchers of ancient DNA. We designed a blind testing procedure to evaluate laboratory accuracy and authenticity of ancient DNA obtained from closely related extant and extinct species. Soft tissue and bones of fossil and contemporary museum proboscideans were collected and identified based on morphology by one researcher, and other researchers carried out DNA testing on the samples, which were assigned anonymous numbers. DNA extracted using three principal isolation methods served as template in PCR amplifications of a segment of the cytochrome b gene (mitochondrial genome), and the PCR product was directly sequenced and analyzed. The results show that such a blind testing design performed in one laboratory, when coupled with phylogenetic analysis, can nonarbitrarily test the consistency and reliability of ancient DNA results. Such reproducible results obtained from the blind testing can increase confidence in the authenticity of ancient sequences obtained from postmortem specimens and avoid bias in phylogenetic analysis. A blind testing design may be applicable as an alternative to confirm ancient DNA results in one laboratory when independent testing by two laboratories is not available.

  1. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  2. The ABRF Edman Sequencing Research Group 2008 Study: Investigation into Homopolymeric Amino Acid N-Terminal Sequence Tags and Their Effects on Automated Edman Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, R. S.; Smith, J. S.; Sandoval, W.; Leone, J. W.; Hunziker, P.; Hampton, B.; Linse, K. D.; Denslow, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    The Edman Sequence Research Group (ESRG) of the Association of Biomolecular Resource designs and executes interlaboratory studies investigating the use of automated Edman degradation for protein and peptide analysis. In 2008, the ESRG enlisted the help of core sequencing facilities to investigate the effects of a repeating amino acid tag at the N-terminus of a protein. Commonly, to facilitate protein purification, an affinity tag containing a polyhistidine sequence is conjugated to the N-terminus of the protein. After expression, polyhistidine-tagged protein is readily purified via chelation with an immobilized metal affinity resin. The addition of the polyhistidine tag presents unique challenges for the determination of protein identity using Edman degradation chemistry. Participating laboratories were asked to sequence one protein engineered in three configurations: with an N-terminal polyhistidine tag; with an N-terminal polyalanine tag; or with no tag. Study participants were asked to return a data file containing the uncorrected amino acid picomole yields for the first 17 cycles. Initial and repetitive yield (R.Y.) information and the amount of lag were evaluated. Information about instrumentation and sample treatment was also collected as part of the study. For this study, the majority of participating laboratories successfully called the amino acid sequence for 17 cycles for all three test proteins. In general, laboratories found it more difficult to call the sequence containing the polyhistidine tag. Lag was observed earlier and more consistently with the polyhistidine-tagged protein than the polyalanine-tagged protein. Histidine yields were significantly less than the alanine yields in the tag portion of each analysis. The polyhistidine and polyalanine protein-R.Y. calculations were found to be equivalent. These calculations showed that the nontagged portion from each protein was equivalent. The terminal histidines from the tagged portion of the protein

  3. The Design and Analysis of Transposon-Insertion Sequencing Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Michael C.; Abel, Sören; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Preface Transposon-insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful approach that can be widely applied to genome-wide definition of loci that are required for growth in diverse conditions. However, experimental design choices and stochastic biological processes can heavily influence the results of TIS experiments and affect downstream statistical analysis. Here, we discuss TIS experimental parameters and how these factors relate to the benefits and limitations of the various statistical frameworks that can be applied to computational analysis of TIS data. PMID:26775926

  4. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays.

  5. Railway network design with multiple project stages and time sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuby, Michael; Xu, Zhongyi; Xie, Xiaodong

    This paper presents a spatial decision support system for network design problems in which different kinds of projects can be built in stages over time. It was developed by the World Bank and China's Ministry of Railways to plan investment strategies for China's overburdened railway system. We first present a mixed-integer program for the single-period network design problem with project choices such as single or multiple tracks and/or electrification with economies of scale. Then, because such projects can be built all at once or in stages, we developed a heuristic backwards time sequencing procedure with a cost adjustment factor to solve the ``project staging'' problem. Other innovations include a preloading routine; coordinated modeling of arcs, paths, and corridors; and a custom-built GIS.

  6. AbDesign: an algorithm for combinatorial backbone design guided by natural conformations and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lapidoth, Gideon D.; Baran, Dror; Pszolla, Gabriele M.; Norn, Christoffer; Alon, Assaf; Tyka, Michael D.; Fleishman, Sarel J.

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of protein function has made substantial progress, generating new enzymes, binders, inhibitors, and nanomaterials not previously seen in nature. However, the ability to design new protein backbones for function – essential to exert control over all polypeptide degrees of freedom – remains a critical challenge. Most previous attempts to design new backbones computed the mainchain from scratch. Here, instead, we describe a combinatorial backbone and sequence optimization algorithm called AbDesign, which leverages the large number of sequences and experimentally determined molecular structures of antibodies to construct new antibody models, dock them against target surfaces and optimize their sequence and backbone conformation for high stability and binding affinity. We used the algorithm to produce antibody designs that target the same molecular surfaces as nine natural, high-affinity antibodies; in six the backbone conformation at the core of the antibody binding surface is similar to the natural antibody targets, and in several cases sequence and sidechain conformations recapitulate those seen in the natural antibodies. In the case of an anti-lysozyme antibody, designed antibody CDRs at the periphery of the interface, such as L1 and H2, show a greater backbone conformation diversity than the CDRs at the core of the interface, and increase the binding surface area compared to the natural antibody, which could enhance affinity and specificity. PMID:25670500

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C molecular phylogeny: consensus sequence for an AIDS vaccine design?

    PubMed

    Novitsky, V; Smith, U R; Gilbert, P; McLane, M F; Chigwedere, P; Williamson, C; Ndung'u, T; Klein, I; Chang, S Y; Peter, T; Thior, I; Foley, B T; Gaolekwe, S; Rybak, N; Gaseitsiwe, S; Vannberg, F; Marlink, R; Lee, T H; Essex, M

    2002-06-01

    An evolving dominance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C (HIV-1C) in the AIDS epidemic has been associated with a high prevalence of HIV-1C infection in the southern African countries and with an expanding epidemic in India and China. Understanding the molecular phylogeny and genetic diversity of HIV-1C viruses may be important for the design and evaluation of an HIV vaccine for ultimate use in the developing world. In this study we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships (i) between 73 non-recombinant HIV-1C near-full-length genome sequences, including 51 isolates from Botswana; (ii) between HIV-1C consensus sequences that represent different geographic subsets; and (iii) between specific isolates and consensus sequences. Based on the phylogenetic analyses of 73 near-full-length genomes, 16 "lineages" (a term that is used hereafter for discussion purposes and does not imply taxonomic standing) were identified within HIV-1C. The lineages were supported by high bootstrap values in maximum-parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses and were confirmed by the maximum-likelihood method. The nucleotide diversity between the 73 HIV-1C isolates (mean value of 8.93%; range, 2.9 to 11.7%) was significantly higher than the diversity of the samples to the consensus sequence (mean value of 4.86%; range, 3.3 to 7.2%, P < 0.0001). The translated amino acid distances to the consensus sequence were significantly lower than distances between samples within all HIV-1C proteins. The consensus sequences of HIV-1C proteins accompanied by amino acid frequencies were presented (that of Gag is presented in this work; those of Pol, Vif, Vpr, Tat, Rev, Vpu, Env, and Nef are presented elsewhere [http://www.aids.harvard.edu/lab_research/concensus_sequence.htm]). Additionally, in the promoter region three NF-kappa B sites (GGGRNNYYCC) were identified within the consensus sequences of the entire set or any subset of HIV-1C isolates. This study suggests that the consensus sequence

  8. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor.

  9. Design of Protein Multi-specificity Using an Independent Sequence Search Reduces the Barrier to Low Energy Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Sevy, Alexander M.; Jacobs, Tim M.; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Computational protein design has found great success in engineering proteins for thermodynamic stability, binding specificity, or enzymatic activity in a ‘single state’ design (SSD) paradigm. Multi-specificity design (MSD), on the other hand, involves considering the stability of multiple protein states simultaneously. We have developed a novel MSD algorithm, which we refer to as REstrained CONvergence in multi-specificity design (RECON). The algorithm allows each state to adopt its own sequence throughout the design process rather than enforcing a single sequence on all states. Convergence to a single sequence is encouraged through an incrementally increasing convergence restraint for corresponding positions. Compared to MSD algorithms that enforce (constrain) an identical sequence on all states the energy landscape is simplified, which accelerates the search drastically. As a result, RECON can readily be used in simulations with a flexible protein backbone. We have benchmarked RECON on two design tasks. First, we designed antibodies derived from a common germline gene against their diverse targets to assess recovery of the germline, polyspecific sequence. Second, we design “promiscuous”, polyspecific proteins against all binding partners and measure recovery of the native sequence. We show that RECON is able to efficiently recover native-like, biologically relevant sequences in this diverse set of protein complexes. PMID:26147100

  10. Design of Protein Multi-specificity Using an Independent Sequence Search Reduces the Barrier to Low Energy Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sevy, Alexander M; Jacobs, Tim M; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2015-07-01

    Computational protein design has found great success in engineering proteins for thermodynamic stability, binding specificity, or enzymatic activity in a 'single state' design (SSD) paradigm. Multi-specificity design (MSD), on the other hand, involves considering the stability of multiple protein states simultaneously. We have developed a novel MSD algorithm, which we refer to as REstrained CONvergence in multi-specificity design (RECON). The algorithm allows each state to adopt its own sequence throughout the design process rather than enforcing a single sequence on all states. Convergence to a single sequence is encouraged through an incrementally increasing convergence restraint for corresponding positions. Compared to MSD algorithms that enforce (constrain) an identical sequence on all states the energy landscape is simplified, which accelerates the search drastically. As a result, RECON can readily be used in simulations with a flexible protein backbone. We have benchmarked RECON on two design tasks. First, we designed antibodies derived from a common germline gene against their diverse targets to assess recovery of the germline, polyspecific sequence. Second, we design "promiscuous", polyspecific proteins against all binding partners and measure recovery of the native sequence. We show that RECON is able to efficiently recover native-like, biologically relevant sequences in this diverse set of protein complexes.

  11. The Sequence-Specific Cellular Uptake of Spherical Nucleic Acid Nanoparticle Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Suguna P.; Choi, Chung Hang J.; Hao, Liangliang; Calabrese, Colin M.; Auyeung, Evelyn; Zhang, Chuan; Goor, Olga J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the sequence-dependent cellular uptake of spherical nucleic acid nanoparticle conjugates (SNAs). This process occurs by interaction with class A scavenger receptors (SR-A) and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. It is known that linear poly(guanine) (poly G) is a natural ligand for SR-A, and it has been proposed that interaction of poly G with SR-A is dependent on the formation of G-quadruplexes. Since G-rich oligonucleotides are known to interact strongly with SR-A, we hypothesized that SNAs with higher G contents would be able to enter cells in larger amounts than SNAs composed of other nucleotides, and as such we measured cellular internalization of SNAs as a function of constituent oligonucleotide sequence. Indeed, SNAs with enriched G content show the highest cellular uptake. Using this hypothesis, we chemically conjugated a small molecule (camptothecin) with SNAs to create drug-SNA conjugates and observed that poly G SNAs deliver the most camptothecin to cells and have the highest cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Our data elucidate important design considerations for enhancing the intracellular delivery of spherical nucleic acids. PMID:26097111

  12. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  13. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  14. The amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J

    1985-01-01

    Protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. It comprises 65 amino acids including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 has been elucidated. The sequence (residues 1-50) resembles that of the N-terminal sequence of the subunits of a synergistic type protein and residues 51-65 that of the C-terminal sequence of an angusticeps type protein. Mixtures of protein CM-3 and angusticeps type proteins showed no apparent synergistic effect, in that their toxicity in combination was no greater than the sum of their individual toxicities.

  15. The amino acid sequences of the Fd fragments of two human γ heavy chains

    PubMed Central

    Press, E. M.; Hogg, N. M.

    1970-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the Fd fragments of two human pathological immunoglobulins of the immunoglobulin G1 class are reported. Comparison of the two sequences shows that the heavy-chain variable regions are similar in length to those of the light chains. The existence of heavy chain variable region subgroups is also deduced, from a comparison of these two sequences with those of another γ 1 chain, Eu, a μ chain, Ou, and the partial sequence of a fourth γ 1 chain, Ste. Carbohydrate has been found to be linked to an aspartic acid residue in the variable region of one of the γ 1 chains, Cor. PMID:5449120

  16. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure–function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability. PMID:27523252

  17. Design Considerations for RNA Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs).

    PubMed

    Barnaby, Stacey N; Perelman, Grant A; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Chinen, Alyssa B; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-09-21

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are key components in many cellular processes such as cell division, differentiation, growth, aging, and death. RNA spherical nucleic acids (RNA-SNAs), which consist of dense shells of double-stranded RNA on nanoparticle surfaces, are powerful and promising therapeutic modalities because they confer advantages over linear RNA such as high cellular uptake and enhanced stability. Due to their three-dimensional shell of oligonucleotides, SNAs, in comparison to linear nucleic acids, interact with the biological environment in unique ways. Herein, the modularity of the RNA-SNA is used to systematically study structure-function relationships in order to understand how the oligonucleotide shell affects interactions with a specific type of biological environment, namely, one that contains serum nucleases. We use a combination of experiment and theory to determine the key architectural properties (i.e., sequence, density, spacer moiety, and backfill molecule) that affect how RNA-SNAs interact with serum nucleases. These data establish a set of design parameters for SNA architectures that are optimized in terms of stability.

  18. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  19. The amino acid sequence of goat beta-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Préaux, G; Braunitzer, G; Schrank, B; Stangl, A

    1979-11-01

    The isolation of beta-lactoglobulin from milk of the goat is described. The purified protein was checked for purity and has been characterized by its gross composition and end groups. The native or the modified protein was then degraded by tryptic and cyanogen bromide cleavage. The cleavage products were isolated and sequenced in the sequenator using a Quadrol and propyne program. These data provide the complete sequence of beta-lactoglobulin of the goat. The results are discussed and compared particularly with bovine beta-lactoglobulin components AB. Some biological aspects are described.

  20. Layered materials with coexisting acidic and basic sites for catalytic one-pot reaction sequences.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-17

    Acidic montmorillonite-immobilized primary amines (H-mont-NH(2)) were found to be excellent acid-base bifunctional catalysts for one-pot reaction sequences, which are the first materials with coexisting acid and base sites active for acid-base tamdem reactions. For example, tandem deacetalization-Knoevenagel condensation proceeded successfully with the H-mont-NH(2), affording the corresponding condensation product in a quantitative yield. The acidity of the H-mont-NH(2) was strongly influenced by the preparation solvent, and the base-catalyzed reactions were enhanced by interlayer acid sites.

  1. Synthesis of gamma,delta-unsaturated glycolic acids via sequenced brook and Ireland--claisen rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Daniel C; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2010-03-05

    Organozinc, -magnesium, and -lithium nucleophiles initiate a Brook/Ireland-Claisen rearrangement sequence of allylic silyl glyoxylates resulting in the formation of gamma,delta-unsaturated alpha-silyloxy acids.

  2. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  3. Design of electrochemical biosensor systems for the detection of specific DNA sequences in PCR-amplified nucleic acids related to the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val108/158Met polymorphism based on intrinsic guanine signal.

    PubMed

    Ozkan-Ariksoysal, Dilsat; Tezcanli, Burcin; Kosova, Buket; Ozsoz, Mehmet

    2008-02-01

    . The Val108/158Met COMT genotype detection were performed with real samples containing wild-type (healthy controls), polymorphic (mutant type), and heterozygous PCR products. The detection limit (S/N = 3) of the biosensor was 2.44 pmol of target sequence in the 30-muL samples. Analytical performance of the sensor is described, along with future prospects.

  4. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes.

  5. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant strain Rhizobium sp. LPU83.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Tejerizo, Gonzalo Torres; Del Papa, María Florencia; Martini, Carla; Pühler, Alfred; Lagares, Antonio; Schlüter, Andreas; Pistorio, Mariano

    2014-04-20

    Rhizobia are important members of the soil microbiome since they enter into nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with different legume host plants. Rhizobium sp. LPU83 is an acid-tolerant Rhizobium strain featuring a broad-host-range. However, it is ineffective in nitrogen fixation. Here, the improved draft genome sequence of this strain is reported. Genome sequence information provides the basis for analysis of its acid tolerance, symbiotic properties and taxonomic classification.

  6. Amino acid sequence of rabbit kidney neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) deduced from a complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Devault, A; Lazure, C; Nault, C; Le Moual, H; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M; Kahn, P; Powell, J; Mallet, J; Beaumont, A

    1987-01-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) is a major constituent of kidney brush border membranes. It is also present in the brain where it has been shown to be involved in the inactivation of opioid peptides, methionine- and leucine-enkephalins. For this reason this enzyme is often called 'enkephalinase'. In order to characterize the primary structure of the enzyme, oligonucleotide probes were designed from partial amino acid sequences and used to isolate clones from kidney cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA inserts revealed the complete primary structure of the enzyme. Neutral endopeptidase consists of 750 amino acids. It contains a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (27 amino acids), a single membrane-spanning segment (23 amino acids) and an extracellular domain that comprises most of the protein mass. The comparison of the primary structure of neutral endopeptidase with that of thermolysin, a bacterial Zn-metallopeptidase, indicates that most of the amino acid residues involved in Zn coordination and catalytic activity in thermolysin are found within highly honmologous sequences in neutral endopeptidase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2440677

  7. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  8. Single-chain structure of human ceruloplasmin: the complete amino acid sequence of the whole molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, N; Ortel, T L; Putnam, F W

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal 67,000-dalton (67-kDa) fragment of human ceruloplasmin and have established overlapping sequences between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments and between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. The 67-kDa fragment contains 480 amino acid residues and three glucosamine oligosaccharides. These results together with our previous sequence data for the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments complete the amino acid sequence of human ceruloplasmin. The polypeptide chain has a total of 1,046 amino acid residues (Mr 120,085) and has attachment sites for four glucosamine oligosaccharides; together these account for the total molecular mass of human ceruloplasmin (132 kDa). The sequence analysis of the peptides overlapping the fragments showed that one additional amino acid, arginine, is present between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments, and another, lysine, is between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. Only two apparent sites of amino acid interchange have been identified in the polypeptide chain. Both involve a single-point interchange of glycine and lysine that would result in a difference in charge. The results of the complete sequence analysis verified that human ceruloplasmin is composed of a single polypeptide chain and that the subunit-like fragments are produced by proteolytic cleavage during purification (and possibly also in vivo). PMID:6582496

  9. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  10. Fast Gap-Free Enumeration of Conformations and Sequences for Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Hallen, Mark A.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant successes in structure-based computational protein design in recent years, protein design algorithms must be improved to increase the biological accuracy of new designs. Protein design algorithms search through an exponential number of protein conformations, protein ensembles, and amino acid sequences in an attempt to find globally optimal structures with a desired biological function. To improve the biological accuracy of protein designs, it is necessary to increase both the amount of protein flexibility allowed during the search and the overall size of the design, while guaranteeing that the lowest-energy structures and sequences are found. DEE/A*-based algorithms are the most prevalent provable algorithms in the field of protein design and can provably enumerate a gap-free list of low-energy protein conformations, which is necessary for ensemble-based algorithms that predict protein binding. We present two classes of algorithmic improvements to the A* algorithm that greatly increase the efficiency of A*. First, we analyze the effect of ordering the expansion of mutable residue positions within the A* tree and present a dynamic residue ordering that reduces the number of A* nodes that must be visited during the search. Second, we propose new methods to improve the conformational bounds used to estimate the energies of partial conformations during the A* search. The residue ordering techniques and improved bounds can be combined for additional increases in A* efficiency. Our enhancements enable all A*-based methods to more fully search protein conformation space, which will ultimately improve the accuracy of complex biomedically-relevant designs. PMID:26235965

  11. PASTA: Ultra-Large Multiple Sequence Alignment for Nucleotide and Amino-Acid Sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirarab, Siavash; Nguyen, Nam; Guo, Sheng; Wang, Li-San; Kim, Junhyong; Warnow, Tandy

    2015-05-01

    We introduce PASTA, a new multiple sequence alignment algorithm. PASTA uses a new technique to produce an alignment given a guide tree that enables it to be both highly scalable and very accurate. We present a study on biological and simulated data with up to 200,000 sequences, showing that PASTA produces highly accurate alignments, improving on the accuracy and scalability of the leading alignment methods (including SATé). We also show that trees estimated on PASTA alignments are highly accurate--slightly better than SATé trees, but with substantial improvements relative to other methods. Finally, PASTA is faster than SATé, highly parallelizable, and requires relatively little memory.

  12. SETG: Nucleic Acid Extraction and Sequencing for In Situ Life Detection on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojarro, A.; Hachey, J.; Tani, J.; Smith, A.; Bhattaru, S. A.; Pontefract, A.; Doebler, R.; Brown, M.; Ruvkun, G.; Zuber, M. T.; Carr, C. E.

    2016-10-01

    We are developing an integrated nucleic acid extraction and sequencing instrument: the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Genomes (SETG) for in situ life detection on Mars. Our goals are to identify related or unrelated nucleic acid-based life on Mars.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterium sp. Strain IPPAS B-1200 with a Unique Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Starikov, Alexander Y.; Usserbaeva, Aizhan A.; Sinetova, Maria A.; Sarsekeyeva, Fariza K.; Zayadan, Bolatkhan K.; Ustinova, Vera V.; Kupriyanova, Elena V.; Los, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome of Cyanobacterium sp. IPPAS strain B-1200, isolated from Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan, and characterized by the unique fatty acid composition of its membrane lipids, which are enriched with myristic and myristoleic acids. The approximate genome size is 3.4 Mb, and the predicted number of coding sequences is 3,119. PMID:27856596

  14. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  15. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  16. Analysis of cloned cDNA and genomic sequences for phytochrome: complete amino acid sequences for two gene products expressed in etiolated Avena.

    PubMed Central

    Hershey, H P; Barker, R F; Idler, K B; Lissemore, J L; Quail, P H

    1985-01-01

    Cloned cDNA and genomic sequences have been analyzed to deduce the amino acid sequence of phytochrome from etiolated Avena. Restriction endonuclease site polymorphism between clones indicates that at least four phytochrome genes are expressed in this tissue. Sequence analysis of two complete and one partial coding region shows approximately 98% homology at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels, with the majority of amino acid changes being conservative. High sequence homology is also found in the 5'-untranslated region but significant divergence occurs in the 3'-untranslated region. The phytochrome polypeptides are 1128 amino acid residues long corresponding to a molecular mass of 125 kdaltons. The known protein sequence at the chromophore attachment site occurs only once in the polypeptide, establishing that phytochrome has a single chromophore per monomer covalently linked to Cys-321. Computer analyses of the amino acid sequences have provided predictions regarding a number of structural features of the phytochrome molecule. PMID:3001642

  17. Designer, acidic biochar influences calcareous soil characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, J A; Ducey, T F; Cantrell, K B; Novak, J M; Lentz, R D

    2016-01-01

    In a proof-of-concept study, an acidic (pH 5.8) biochar was created using a low pyrolysis temperature (350 °C) and steam activation (800 °C) to potentially improve the soil physicochemical status of an eroded calcareous soil. Biochar was added at 0%, 1%, 2%, and 10% (by wt.) and soils were destructively sampled at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 month intervals. Soil was analyzed for gravimetric water content, pH, NO3-N, plant-available Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, and P, organic C, CO2 respiration, and microbial enumeration via extractable DNA and 16S rRNA gene copies. Gravimetric soil water content increased with biochar application regardless of rate, as compared to the control. Soil pH decreased between 0.2 and 0.4 units, while plant-available Zn, Mn, and P increased with increasing biochar application rate. Micronutrient availability decreased over time likely due to insoluble mineral species precipitation. Increasing biochar application raised the soil organic C content and remained elevated over time. Increasing biochar application rate also increased respired CO2, yet the CO2 released decreased over time. Soil NO3-N concentrations significantly decreased with increasing biochar application rate likely due to microbial immobilization or denitrification. Depending on application rate, biochar produced a 1.4 to 2.1-fold increase in soil DNA extracted and 1.4- to 2.4-fold increase in 16S rRNA gene abundance over control soils, suggesting microbial stimulation and a subsequent burst of activity upon biochar addition. Our results showed that there is promise in designing a biochar to improve the quality and water relations of eroded calcareous soils.

  18. Purification, characterization and partial amino acid sequence of glycogen synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Carabaza, A; Arino, J; Fox, J W; Villar-Palasi, C; Guinovart, J J

    1990-01-01

    Glycogen synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme showed a subunit molecular mass of 80 kDa. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer. Antibodies developed against purified yeast glycogen synthase inactivated the enzyme in yeast extracts and allowed the detection of the protein in Western blots. Amino acid analysis showed that the enzyme is very rich in glutamate and/or glutamine residues. The N-terminal sequence (11 amino acid residues) was determined. In addition, selected tryptic-digest peptides were purified by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and submitted to gas-phase sequencing. Up to eight sequences (79 amino acid residues) could be aligned with the human muscle enzyme sequence. Levels of identity range between 37 and 100%, indicating that, although human and yeast glycogen synthases probably share some conserved regions, significant differences in their primary structure should be expected. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2114092

  19. Amino acid sequence of homologous rat atrial peptides: natriuretic activity of native and synthetic forms.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Thibault, G; Garcia, R; Cantin, M; Genest, J; Nutt, R F; Brady, S F; Lyle, T A

    1984-01-01

    A substance called atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), localized in secretory granules of atrial cardiocytes, was isolated as four homologous natriuretic peptides from homogenates of rat atria. The complete sequence of the longest form showed that it is composed of 33 amino acids. The three other shorter forms (2-33, 3-33, and 8-33) represent amino-terminally truncated versions of the 33 amino acid parent molecule as shown by analysis of sequence, amino acid composition, or both. The proposed primary structure agrees entirely with the amino acid composition and reveals no significant sequence homology with any known protein or segment of protein. The short form ANF-(8-33) was synthesized by a multi-fragment condensation approach and the synthetic product was shown to exhibit specific activity comparable to that of the natural ANF-(3-33). PMID:6232612

  20. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of a new subtilisin from an alkaliphilic Bacillus isolate.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Magallones, Marietta V; Takimura, Yasushi; Hatada, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kawai, Shuji; Ito, Susumu

    2003-10-01

    The gene for a new subtilisin from the alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. KSM-LD1 was cloned and sequenced. The open reading frame of the gene encoded a 97 amino-acid prepro-peptide plus a 307 amino-acid mature enzyme that contained a possible catalytic triad of residues, Asp32, His66, and Ser224. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature enzyme (LD1) showed approximately 65% identity to those of subtilisins SprC and SprD from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. LG12. The amino acid sequence identities of LD1 to those of previously reported true subtilisins and high-alkaline proteases were below 60%. LD1 was characteristically stable during incubation with surfactants and chemical oxidants. Interestingly, an oxidizable Met residue is located next to the catalytic Ser224 of the enzyme as in the cases of the oxidation-susceptible subtilisins reported to date.

  1. SP-Designer: a user-friendly program for designing species-specific primer pairs from DNA sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Villard, Pierre; Malausa, Thibaut

    2013-07-01

    SP-Designer is an open-source program providing a user-friendly tool for the design of specific PCR primer pairs from a DNA sequence alignment containing sequences from various taxa. SP-Designer selects PCR primer pairs for the amplification of DNA from a target species on the basis of several criteria: (i) primer specificity, as assessed by interspecific sequence polymorphism in the annealing regions, (ii) the biochemical characteristics of the primers and (iii) the intended PCR conditions. SP-Designer generates tables, detailing the primer pair and PCR characteristics, and a FASTA file locating the primer sequences in the original sequence alignment. SP-Designer is Windows-compatible and freely available from http://www2.sophia.inra.fr/urih/sophia_mart/sp_designer/info_sp_designer.php.

  2. Amino acid sequence homology between rat and human C-reactive protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J A; Bruton, C J; Anderson, J K; Mole, J E; De Beer, F C; Baltz, M L; Pepys, M B

    1984-01-01

    The rat serum protein that undergoes Ca2+-dependent binding to pneumococcal C-polysaccharide and to phosphocholine residues, and that is evidently a member of the pentraxin family of proteins by virtue of its appearance under the electron microscope, has been variously designated as rat C-reactive protein (CRP) [de Beer, Baltz, Munn, Feinstein, Taylor, Bruton, Clamp & Pepys (1982) Immunology 45, 55-70], 'phosphoryl choline-binding protein' [Nagpurkar & Mookerjea (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 7440-7448] and rat serum amyloid P component (SAP) [Pontet, D'Asnieres, Gache, Escaig & Engler (1981) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 671, 202-210]. The partial amino acid sequence (45 residues) towards the C-terminus of this protein was determined, and it showed 71.7% identity with the known sequence of human CRP but only 54.3% identity with human SAP. Since human CRP and SAP are themselves approximately 50% homologous, the level of identity between the rat protein and human SAP is evidence only of membership of the pentraxin family. In contrast, the much greater resemblance to human CRP confirms that the rat C-polysaccharide-binding/phosphocholine-binding protein is in fact rat CRP. PMID:6477504

  3. Shark myelin basic protein: amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and self-association.

    PubMed

    Milne, T J; Atkins, A R; Warren, J A; Auton, W P; Smith, R

    1990-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) from the Whaler shark (Carcharhinus obscurus) has been purified from acid extracts of a chloroform/methanol pellet from whole brains. The amino acid sequence of the majority of the protein has been determined and compared with the sequences of other MBPs. The shark protein has only 44% homology with the bovine protein, but, in common with other MBPs, it has basic residues distributed throughout the sequence and no extensive segments that are predicted to have an ordered secondary structure in solution. Shark MBP lacks the triproline sequence previously postulated to form a hairpin bend in the molecule. The region containing the putative consensus sequence for encephalitogenicity in the guinea pig contains several substitutions, thus accounting for the lack of activity of the shark protein. Studies of the secondary structure and self-association have shown that shark MBP possesses solution properties similar to those of the bovine protein, despite the extensive differences in primary structure.

  4. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  5. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2007-05-01

    Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  6. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  7. Evolutionary bridges to new protein folds: design of C-terminal Cro protein chameleon sequences.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William J; Van Dorn, Laura O; Ingram, Wendy M; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2011-09-01

    Regions of amino-acid sequence that are compatible with multiple folds may facilitate evolutionary transitions in protein structure. In a previous study, we described a heuristically designed chameleon sequence (SASF1, structurally ambivalent sequence fragment 1) that could adopt either of two naturally occurring conformations (α-helical or β-sheet) when incorporated as part of the C-terminal dimerization subdomain of two structurally divergent transcription factors, P22 Cro and λ Cro. Here we describe longer chameleon designs (SASF2 and SASF3) that in the case of SASF3 correspond to the full C-terminal half of the ordered region of a P22 Cro/λ Cro sequence alignment (residues 34-57). P22-SASF2 and λ(WDD)-SASF2 show moderate thermal stability in denaturation curves monitored by circular dichroism (T(m) values of 46 and 55°C, respectively), while P22-SASF3 and λ(WDD)-SASF3 have somewhat reduced stability (T(m) values of 33 and 49°C, respectively). (13)C and (1)H NMR secondary chemical shift analysis confirms two C-terminal α-helices for P22-SASF2 (residues 36-45 and 54-57) and two C-terminal β-strands for λ(WDD)-SASF2 (residues 40-45 and 50-52), corresponding to secondary structure locations in the two parent sequences. Backbone relaxation data show that both chameleon sequences have a relatively well-ordered structure. Comparisons of (15)N-(1)H correlation spectra for SASF2 and SASF3-containing proteins strongly suggest that SASF3 retains the chameleonism of SASF2. Both Cro C-terminal conformations can be encoded in a single sequence, showing the plausibility of linking different Cro folds by smooth evolutionary transitions. The N-terminal subdomain, though largely conserved in structure, also exerts an important contextual influence on the structure of the C-terminal region.

  8. Nucleic and Amino Acid Sequences Support Structure-Based Viral Classification

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert M.; Ravantti, Janne J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viral capsids ensure viral genome integrity by protecting the enclosed nucleic acids. Interactions between the genome and capsid and between individual capsid proteins (i.e., capsid architecture) are intimate and are expected to be characterized by strong evolutionary conservation. For this reason, a capsid structure-based viral classification has been proposed as a way to bring order to the viral universe. The seeming lack of sufficient sequence similarity to reproduce this classification has made it difficult to reject structural convergence as the basis for the classification. We reinvestigate whether the structure-based classification for viral coat proteins making icosahedral virus capsids is in fact supported by previously undetected sequence similarity. Since codon choices can influence nascent protein folding cotranslationally, we searched for both amino acid and nucleotide sequence similarity. To demonstrate the sensitivity of the approach, we identify a candidate gene for the pandoravirus capsid protein. We show that the structure-based classification is strongly supported by amino acid and also nucleotide sequence similarities, suggesting that the similarities are due to common descent. The correspondence between structure-based and sequence-based analyses of the same proteins shown here allow them to be used in future analyses of the relationship between linear sequence information and macromolecular function, as well as between linear sequence and protein folds. IMPORTANCE Viral capsids protect nucleic acid genomes, which in turn encode capsid proteins. This tight coupling of protein shell and nucleic acids, together with strong functional constraints on capsid protein folding and architecture, leads to the hypothesis that capsid protein-coding nucleotide sequences may retain signatures of ancient viral evolution. We have been able to show that this is indeed the case, using the major capsid proteins of viruses forming icosahedral capsids

  9. Classification of mouse VK groups based on the partial amino acid sequence to the first invariant tryptophan: impact of 14 new sequences from IgG myeloma proteins.

    PubMed

    Potter, M; Newell, J B; Rudikoff, S; Haber, E

    1982-12-01

    Fourteen new VK sequences derived from BALB/c IgG myeloma proteins were determined to the first invariant tryptophan (Trp 35). These partial sequences were compared with 65 other published VK sequences using a computer program. The 79 sequences were organized according to the length of the sequence from the amino terminus to the first invariant tryptophan (Trp 35), into seven groups (33, 34, 35, 36, 39, 40 and 41aa). A distance matrix of all 79 sequences was then computed, i.e. the number of amino acid substitutions necessary to convert one sequence to another was determined. From these data a dendrogram was constructed. Most of the VK sequences fell into clusters or closely related groups. The definition of a sequence group is arbitrary but facilitates the classification of VK proteins. We used 12 substitutions as the basis for defining a sequence group based on the known number of substitutions that are found in the VK21 proteins. By this criterion there were 18 groups in the Trp 35 dendrogram. Twelve of the 14 new sequences fell into one of these sequence groups; two formed new sequence groups. Collective amino acid sequencing is still encountering new VK structures indicating more sequences will be required to attain an accurate estimate of the total number of VK groups. Updated dendrograms can be quickly generated to include newly generated sequences.

  10. The shikimate pathway: review of amino acid sequence, function and three-dimensional structures of the enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Jallu, Shais; Singh, T P

    2015-06-01

    The aromatic compounds such as aromatic amino acids, vitamin K and ubiquinone are important prerequisites for the metabolism of an organism. All organisms can synthesize these aromatic metabolites through shikimate pathway, except for mammals which are dependent on their diet for these compounds. The pathway converts phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate to chorismate through seven enzymatically catalyzed steps and chorismate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of variety of aromatic compounds. These enzymes have shown to play a vital role for the viability of microorganisms and thus are suggested to present attractive molecular targets for the design of novel antimicrobial drugs. This review focuses on the seven enzymes of the shikimate pathway, highlighting their primary sequences, functions and three-dimensional structures. The understanding of their active site amino acid maps, functions and three-dimensional structures will provide a framework on which the rational design of antimicrobial drugs would be based. Comparing the full length amino acid sequences and the X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes from bacteria, fungi and plant sources would contribute in designing a specific drug and/or in developing broad-spectrum compounds with efficacy against a variety of pathogens.

  11. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  12. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  13. Design Pattern Mining Using Distributed Learning Automata and DNA Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilpour, Mansour; Naderifar, Vahideh; Shukur, Zarina

    2014-01-01

    Context Over the last decade, design patterns have been used extensively to generate reusable solutions to frequently encountered problems in software engineering and object oriented programming. A design pattern is a repeatable software design solution that provides a template for solving various instances of a general problem. Objective This paper describes a new method for pattern mining, isolating design patterns and relationship between them; and a related tool, DLA-DNA for all implemented pattern and all projects used for evaluation. DLA-DNA achieves acceptable precision and recall instead of other evaluated tools based on distributed learning automata (DLA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences alignment. Method The proposed method mines structural design patterns in the object oriented source code and extracts the strong and weak relationships between them, enabling analyzers and programmers to determine the dependency rate of each object, component, and other section of the code for parameter passing and modular programming. The proposed model can detect design patterns better that available other tools those are Pinot, PTIDEJ and DPJF; and the strengths of their relationships. Results The result demonstrate that whenever the source code is build standard and non-standard, based on the design patterns, then the result of the proposed method is near to DPJF and better that Pinot and PTIDEJ. The proposed model is tested on the several source codes and is compared with other related models and available tools those the results show the precision and recall of the proposed method, averagely 20% and 9.6% are more than Pinot, 27% and 31% are more than PTIDEJ and 3.3% and 2% are more than DPJF respectively. Conclusion The primary idea of the proposed method is organized in two following steps: the first step, elemental design patterns are identified, while at the second step, is composed to recognize actual design patterns. PMID:25243670

  14. Amino acid sequence around the active-site serine residue in the acyltransferase domain of goat mammary fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, J; Højrup, P; Rasmussen, M M; Roepstorff, P; Knudsen, J

    1985-01-01

    Goat mammary fatty acid synthetase was labelled in the acyltransferase domain by formation of O-ester intermediates by incubation with [1-14C]acetyl-CoA and [2-14C]malonyl-CoA. Tryptic-digest and CNBr-cleavage peptides were isolated and purified by high-performance reverse-phase and ion-exchange liquid chromatography. The sequences of the malonyl- and acetyl-labelled peptides were shown to be identical. The results confirm the hypothesis that both acetyl and malonyl groups are transferred to the mammalian fatty acid synthetase complex by the same transferase. The sequence is compared with those of other fatty acid synthetase transferases. PMID:3922356

  15. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence comparisons of structural proteins from retrovirus-D/Washington and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L E; Sowder, R; Smythers, G; Benveniste, R E; Oroszlan, S

    1985-01-01

    A new D-type retrovirus originally designated SAIDS-D/Washington and here referred to as retrovirus-D/Washington (R-D/W) was recently isolated at the University of Washington Primate Center, Seattle, Wash., from a rhesus monkey with an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and retroperitoneal fibromatosis. To better establish the relationship of this new D-type virus to the prototype D-type virus, Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), we have purified and compared six structural proteins from each virus. The proteins purified from each D-type retrovirus include p4, p10, p12, p14, p27, and a phosphoprotein designated pp18 for MPMV and pp20 for R-D/W. Amino acid analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis show that the p4, p12, p14, and p27 proteins of R-D/W are distinct from the homologous proteins of MPMV but that these proteins from the two different viruses share a high degree of amino acid sequence homology. The p10 proteins from the two viruses have similar amino acid compositions, and both are blocked to N-terminal Edman degradation. The phosphoproteins from the two viruses each contain phosphoserine but are different from each other in amino acid composition, molecular weight, and N-terminal amino acid sequence. The data thus show that each of the R-D/W proteins examined is distinguishable from its MPMV homolog and that a major difference between these two D-type retroviruses is found in the viral phosphoproteins. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of D-type retroviral proteins were used to search for sequence homologies between D-type and other retroviral amino acid sequences. An unexpected amino acid sequence homology was found between R-D/W pp20 (a gag protein) and a 28-residue segment of the env precursor polyprotein of Rous sarcoma virus. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the D-type major gag protein (p27) and the nucleic acid-binding protein (p14) show only limited amino acid sequence homology to functionally homologous proteins of C

  16. Designer nucleic acids to probe and program the cell.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Yamuna; Bathe, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in nucleic acid sequencing, structural, and computational technologies have resulted in dramatic progress in our understanding of nucleic acid structure and function in the cell. This knowledge, together with the predictable base-pairing of nucleic acids and powerful synthesis and expression capabilities now offers the unique ability to program nucleic acids to form precise 3D architectures with diverse applications in synthetic and cell biology. The unique modularity of structural motifs that include aptamers, DNAzymes, and ribozymes, together with their well-defined construction rules, enables the synthesis of functional higher-order nucleic acid complexes from these subcomponents. As we illustrate here, these highly programmable, smart complexes are increasingly enabling researchers to probe and program the cell in a sophisticated manner that moves well beyond the use of nucleic acids for conventional genetic manipulation alone.

  17. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression in Escherichia coli of the gene encoding an alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase from Acetobacter turbidans.

    PubMed

    Polderman-Tijmes, Jolanda J; Jekel, Peter A; de Vries, Erik J; van Merode, Annet E J; Floris, René; van der Laan, Jan-Metske; Sonke, Theo; Janssen, Dick B

    2002-01-01

    The alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase from Acetobacter turbidans ATCC 9325 is capable of hydrolyzing and synthesizing beta-lactam antibiotics, such as cephalexin and ampicillin. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the purified alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase allowed cloning and genetic characterization of the corresponding gene from an A. turbidans genomic library. The gene, designated aehA, encodes a polypeptide with a molecular weight of 72,000. Comparison of the determined N-terminal sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence indicated the presence of an N-terminal leader sequence of 40 amino acids. The aehA gene was subcloned in the pET9 expression plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and found to be dimeric with subunits of 70 kDa. A sequence similarity search revealed 26% identity with a glutaryl 7-ACA acylase precursor from Bacillus laterosporus, but no homology was found with other known penicillin or cephalosporin acylases. There was some similarity to serine proteases, including the conservation of the active site motif, GXSYXG. Together with database searches, this suggested that the alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase is a beta-lactam antibiotic acylase that belongs to a class of hydrolases that is different from the Ntn hydrolase superfamily to which the well-characterized penicillin acylase from E. coli belongs. The alpha-amino acid ester hydrolase of A. turbidans represents a subclass of this new class of beta-lactam antibiotic acylases.

  18. Effects of the amino acid sequence on thermal conduction through β-sheet crystals of natural silk protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Bai, Zhitong; Ban, Heng; Liu, Ling

    2015-11-21

    Recent experiments have discovered very different thermal conductivities between the spider silk and the silkworm silk. Decoding the molecular mechanisms underpinning the distinct thermal properties may guide the rational design of synthetic silk materials and other biomaterials for multifunctionality and tunable properties. However, such an understanding is lacking, mainly due to the complex structure and phonon physics associated with the silk materials. Here, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that the amino acid sequence plays a key role in the thermal conduction process through β-sheets, essential building blocks of natural silks and a variety of other biomaterials. Three representative β-sheet types, i.e. poly-A, poly-(GA), and poly-G, are shown to have distinct structural features and phonon dynamics leading to different thermal conductivities. A fundamental understanding of the sequence effects may stimulate the design and engineering of polymers and biopolymers for desired thermal properties.

  19. Exploring the sequence space for (tri-)peptide self-assembly to design and discover new hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Scott, Gary G.; Abul-Haija, Yousef M.; Kalafatovic, Daniela; Pappas, Charalampos G.; Javid, Nadeem; Hunt, Neil T.; Ulijn, Rein V.; Tuttle, Tell

    2015-01-01

    Peptides that self-assemble into nanostructures are of tremendous interest for biological, medical, photonic and nanotechnological applications. The enormous sequence space that is available from 20 amino acids probably harbours many interesting candidates, but it is currently not possible to predict supramolecular behaviour from sequence alone. Here, we demonstrate computational tools to screen for the aqueous self-assembly propensity in all of the 8,000 possible tripeptides and evaluate these by comparison with known examples. We applied filters to select for candidates that simultaneously optimize the apparently contradicting requirements of aggregation propensity and hydrophilicity, which resulted in a set of design rules for self-assembling sequences. A number of peptides were subsequently synthesized and characterized, including the first reported tripeptides that are able to form a hydrogel at neutral pH. These tools, which enable the peptide sequence space to be searched for supramolecular properties, enable minimalistic peptide nanotechnology to deliver on its promise.

  20. Thin-film technology for direct visual detection of nucleic acid sequences: applications in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Jenison, Robert D; Bucala, Richard; Maul, Diana; Ward, David C

    2006-01-01

    Certain optical conditions permit the unaided eye to detect thickness changes on surfaces on the order of 20 A, which are of similar dimensions to monomolecular interactions between proteins or hybridization of complementary nucleic acid sequences. Such detection exploits specific interference of reflected white light, wherein thickness changes are perceived as surface color changes. This technology, termed thin-film detection, allows for the visualization of subattomole amounts of nucleic acid targets, even in complex clinical samples. Thin-film technology has been applied to a broad range of clinically relevant indications, including the detection of pathogenic bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences and the discrimination of sequence variations in human genes causally related to susceptibility or severity of disease.

  1. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  2. RNA internal standard synthesis by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification for competitive quantitative amplification reactions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wan-Yu; Baeumner, Antje J

    2007-02-15

    Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reactions have been demonstrated to successfully synthesize new sequences based on deletion and insertion reactions. Two RNA internal standards were synthesized for use in competitive amplification reactions in which quantitative analysis can be achieved by coamplifying the internal standard with the wild type sample. The sequences were created in two consecutive NASBA reactions using the E. coli clpB mRNA sequence as model analyte. The primer sequences of the wild type sequence were maintained, and a 20-nt-long segment inside the amplicon region was exchanged for a new segment of similar GC content and melting temperature. The new RNA sequence was thus amplifiable using the wild type primers and detectable via a new inserted sequence. In the first reaction, the forwarding primer and an additional 20-nt-long sequence was deleted and replaced by a new 20-nt-long sequence. In the second reaction, a forwarding primer containing as 5' overhang sequence the wild type primer sequence was used. The presence of pure internal standard was verified using electrochemiluminescence and RNA lateral-flow biosensor analysis. Additional sequence deletion in order to shorten the internal standard amplicons and thus generate higher detection signals was found not to be required. Finally, a competitive NASBA reaction between one internal standard and the wild type sequence was carried out proving its functionality. This new rapid construction method via NASBA provides advantages over the traditional techniques since it requires no traditional cloning procedures, no thermocyclers, and can be completed in less than 4 h.

  3. Designer, acidic biochar influences calcareous soil characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An acidic (pH 5.8) biochar was created using a low pyrolysis temperature (350 degrees celsius) and steam activation to potentially improve the soil physicochemical status of an eroded calcareous soil. Biochar was added at 0, 1, 2, and 10 percent (by weight) to an eroded Portneuf soil (coarse-silty,...

  4. Amino acid sequences of two nonspecific lipid-transfer proteins from germinated castor bean.

    PubMed

    Takishima, K; Watanabe, S; Yamada, M; Suga, T; Mamiya, G

    1988-11-01

    The amino acid sequence of two nonspecific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTP) B and C from germinated castor bean seeds have been determined. Both the proteins consist of 92 residues, as for nsLTP previously reported, and their calculated Mr values are 9847 and 9593 for nsLTP-B and nsLTP-C, respectively. The sequences of nsLTP-B and nsLTP-C, compared to the known sequence of nsLTP-A from the same source, are 68% and 35% similar, respectively. No variation was found at the positions of the cysteine residues, indicating that they might be involved in disulfide bridges.

  5. A classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of 301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes have been compared. A total of 291 sequences corresponding to 39 EC entries could be classified into 35 families. Only ten sequences (less than 5% of the sample) could not be assigned to any family. With the sequences available for this analysis, 18 families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number) and 17 were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). Implications on the folding characteristics and mechanism of action of these enzymes and on the evolution of carbohydrate metabolism are discussed. With the steady increase in sequence and structural data, it is suggested that the enzyme classification system should perhaps be revised. PMID:1747104

  6. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences.

  7. Complete amino acid sequence of the N-terminal extension of calf skin type III procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, A; Glanville, R W; Hörlein, D; Bruckner, P; Timpl, R; Fietzek, P P; Kühn, K

    1984-01-01

    The N-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen, isolated from foetal-calf skin, contains 130 amino acid residues. To determine its amino acid sequence, the peptide was reduced and carboxymethylated or aminoethylated and fragmented with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and bacterial collagenase. Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase was used to deblock the N-terminal collagenase fragment to enable amino acid sequencing. The type III collagen extension peptide is homologous to that of the alpha 1 chain of type I procollagen with respect to a three-domain structure. The N-terminal 79 amino acids, which contain ten of the 12 cysteine residues, form a compact globular domain. The next 39 amino acids are in a collagenase triplet sequence (Gly- Xaa - Yaa )n with a high hydroxyproline content. Finally, another short non-collagenous domain of 12 amino acids ends at the cleavage site for procollagen aminopeptidase, which cleaves a proline-glutamine bond. In contrast with type I procollagen, the type III procollagen extension peptides contain interchain disulphide bridges located at the C-terminus of the triple-helical domain. PMID:6331392

  8. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.824 Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... readable form may be created by any means, such as word processors, nucleotide/amino acid sequence...

  9. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.824 Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... readable form may be created by any means, such as word processors, nucleotide/amino acid sequence...

  10. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... And/or Amino Acid Sequences § 1.824 Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence... readable form may be created by any means, such as word processors, nucleotide/amino acid sequence...

  11. Content, Structure, and Sequence of the Detailing Discipline at Kendall College of Art and Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Bruce E.

    A study identified the appropriate general content, structure, and sequence for a detailing discipline that promoted student achievement to professional levels. Its focus was the detailing discipline, a sequence of studio courses within the furniture design program at Kendall College of Art and Design, Grand Rapids, Michigan. (Detailing, an…

  12. Complete amino acid sequence of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (transaminase B) of Salmonella typhimurium, identification of the coenzyme-binding site and sequence comparison analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Feild, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the subunit of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase of Salmonella typhimurium was determined by automated Edman degradation of peptide fragments generated by chemical and enzymatic digestion of S-carboxymethylated and S-pyridylethylated transaminase B. Peptide fragments of transaminase B were generated by treatment of the enzyme with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, endoproteinase Lys-C, and cyanogen bromide. Protocols were developed for separation of the peptide fragments by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ion-exchange HPLC, and SDS-urea gel electrophoresis. The enzyme subunit contains 308 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 33,920 daltons. The coenzyme-binding site was determined by treatment of the enzyme, containing bound pyridoxal 5-phosphate, with tritiated sodium borohydride prior to trypsin digestion. Monitoring radioactivity incorporation and peptide map comparisons with an apoenzyme tryptic digest, allowed identification of the pyridoxylated-peptide which was isolated by reverse-phase HPLC and sequenced. The coenzyme-binding site is a lysyl residue at position 159. Some peptides were further characterized by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

  13. Expert systems help design cementing and acidizing jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Onan, D.D.; Kulakofsky, D.; Van Domelen, M.S.; Ford, W.G.F. )

    1993-04-19

    Knowledge-based expert information systems can help train less-experienced designers and orient seasoned designers at new locations. These systems are playing an increased role in completion and production operations. Expert systems help: design treatments based on an accumulation of knowledge from experts; provide technical information and guidelines on the proper use of additives; and serve as a training tool for less-experienced personnel. The paper describes expert systems design; practical applications; and details about a cement job and acidizing.

  14. The amino acid sequence of cytochromes c-551 from three species of Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R. P.; Wynn, Margaret

    1973-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the cytochromes c-551 from three species of Pseudomonas have been determined. Each resembles the protein from Pseudomonas strain P6009 (now known to be Pseudomonas aeruginosa, not Pseudomonas fluorescens) in containing 82 amino acids in a single peptide chain, with a haem group covalently attached to cysteine residues 12 and 15. In all four sequences 43 residues are identical. Although by bacteriological criteria the organisms are closely related, the differences between pairs of sequences range from 22% to 39%. These values should be compared with the differences in the sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c between mammals and amphibians (about 18%) or between mammals and insects (about 33%). Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the proteins has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50015 at the National Lending Library for Science and Technology, Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1973), 131, 5. PMID:4352718

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Sorghum Grain Mold Fungus Epicoccum sorghinum, a Producer of Tenuazonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rodrigo C.; Davenport, Karen W.; Hovde, Blake; Silva, Danielle; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Correa, Benedito

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The facultative plant pathogen Epicoccum sorghinum is associated with grain mold of sorghum and produces the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid. This fungus can have serious economic impact on sorghum production. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of E. sorghinum (USPMTOX48). PMID:28126937

  16. Snake venom. The amino acid sequence of protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, D J

    1980-12-01

    Protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom comprises 81 amino acids, including ten half-cystine residues. The complete primary structures of protein A and its variant A' were elucidated. The sequences of proteins A and A', which differ in a single position, show no homology with various neurotoxins and non-neurotoxic proteins and represent a new type of elapid venom protein.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus coagulans NL01, a Wonderful l-Lactic Acid Producer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Jiang, Ting; Lin, Xi; Zhou, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Bacillus coagulans NL01, which could produce high optically pure l-lactic acid using xylose as a sole carbon source. The draft genome is 3,505,081 bp, with 144 contigs. About 3,903 protein-coding genes and 92 rRNAs are predicted from this assembly. PMID:26089419

  18. ICRPfinder: a fast pattern design algorithm for coding sequences and its application in finding potential restriction enzyme recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Xiangmin; Stafford, Phillip; Dinu, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    Background Restriction enzymes can produce easily definable segments from DNA sequences by using a variety of cut patterns. There are, however, no software tools that can aid in gene building -- that is, modifying wild-type DNA sequences to express the same wild-type amino acid sequences but with enhanced codons, specific cut sites, unique post-translational modifications, and other engineered-in components for recombinant applications. A fast DNA pattern design algorithm, ICRPfinder, is provided in this paper and applied to find or create potential recognition sites in target coding sequences. Results ICRPfinder is applied to find or create restriction enzyme recognition sites by introducing silent mutations. The algorithm is shown capable of mapping existing cut-sites but importantly it also can generate specified new unique cut-sites within a specified region that are guaranteed not to be present elsewhere in the DNA sequence. Conclusion ICRPfinder is a powerful tool for finding or creating specific DNA patterns in a given target coding sequence. ICRPfinder finds or creates patterns, which can include restriction enzyme recognition sites, without changing the translated protein sequence. ICRPfinder is a browser-based JavaScript application and it can run on any platform, in on-line or off-line mode. PMID:19747395

  19. Solubility Challenges in High Concentration Monoclonal Antibody Formulations: Relationship with Amino Acid Sequence and Intermolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pindrus, Mariya; Shire, Steven J; Kelley, Robert F; Demeule, Barthélemy; Wong, Rita; Xu, Yiren; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    The purpose of this work was to elucidate the molecular interactions leading to monoclonal antibody self-association and precipitation and utilize biophysical measurements to predict solubility behavior at high protein concentration. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb-G and mAb-R) binding to overlapping epitopes were investigated. Precipitation of mAb-G solutions was most prominent at high ionic strength conditions and demonstrated strong dependence on ionic strength, as well as slight dependence on solution pH. At similar conditions no precipitation was observed for mAb-R solutions. Intermolecular interactions (interaction parameter, kD) related well with high concentration solubility behavior of both antibodies. Upon increasing buffer ionic strength, interactions of mAb-R tended to weaken, while those of mAb-G became more attractive. To investigate the role of amino acid sequence on precipitation behavior, mutants were designed by substituting the CDR of mAb-R into the mAb-G framework (GM-1) or deleting two hydrophobic residues in the CDR of mAb-G (GM-2). No precipitation was observed at high ionic strength for either mutant. The molecular interactions of mutants were similar in magnitude to those of mAb-R. The results suggest that presence of hydrophobic groups in the CDR of mAb-G may be responsible for compromising its solubility at high ionic strength conditions since deleting these residues mitigated the solubility issue.

  20. Amino acid sequences of heterotrophic and photosynthetic ferredoxins from the tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Kamide, K; Sakai, H; Aoki, K; Sanada, Y; Wada, K; Green, L S; Yee, B C; Buchanan, B B

    1995-11-01

    Several forms (isoproteins) of ferredoxin in roots, leaves, and green and red pericarps in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were earlier identified on the basis of N-terminal amino acid sequence and chromatographic behavior (Green et al. 1991). In the present study, a large scale preparation made possible determination of the full length amino acid sequence of the two ferredoxins from leaves. The ferredoxins characteristic of fruit and root were sequenced from the amino terminus to the 30th residue or beyond. The leaf ferredoxins were confirmed to be expressed in pericarp of both green and red fruit. The ferredoxins characteristic of fruit and root appeared to be restricted to those tissue. The results extend earlier findings in demonstrating that ferredoxin occurs in the major organs of the tomato plant where it appears to function irrespective of photosynthetic competence.

  1. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Joseph, Poulson; Suman, Surendranath P; Li, Shuting; Fontaine, Michele; Steinke, Laurey

    2012-10-01

    Our objective was to determine the primary structure of white-tailed deer myoglobin (Mb). White-tailed deer Mb was isolated from cardiac muscles employing ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel-filtration chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by Edman degradation. Sequence analyses of intact Mb as well as tryptic- and cyanogen bromide-peptides yielded the complete primary structure of white-tailed deer Mb, which shared 100% similarity with red deer Mb. White-tailed deer Mb consists of 153 amino acid residues and shares more than 96% sequence similarity with myoglobins from meat-producing ruminants, such as cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat. Similar to sheep and goat myoglobins, white-tailed deer Mb contains 12 histidine residues. Proximal (position 93) and distal (position 64) histidine residues responsible for maintaining the stability of heme are conserved in white-tailed deer Mb.

  2. Nucleotide sequence and the encoded amino acids of human apolipoprotein A-I mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Brewer, H B

    1984-01-01

    The cDNA clones encoding the precursor form of human liver apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), preproapoA-I, have been isolated from a cDNA library. A 17-base synthetic oligonucleotide based on residues 108-113 of apoA-I and a 26-base primer-extended, dideoxynucleotide-terminated cDNA were used as hybridization probes to select for recombinant plasmids bearing the apoA-I sequence. The complete nucleic acid sequence of human liver preproapoA-I has been determined by analysis of the cloned cDNA. The sequence is composed of 801 nucleotides encoding 267 amino acid residues. PreproapoA-I contains an 18-amino-acid prepeptide and a 6-amino-acid propeptide connected to the amino terminus of the 243-amino acid mature apoA-I. Southern blotting analysis of chromosomal DNA obtained from peripheral blood indicated the apoA-I gene is contained in a 2.1-kilobase-pair Pst I fragment and there is no gross difference in structural organization between the normal apoA-I gene and the Tangier disease apoA-I gene. Images PMID:6198645

  3. Experimental design, preprocessing, normalization and differential expression analysis of small RNA sequencing experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the advent of new, deep sequencing methods, small RNA (sRNA) discovery was dependent on Sanger sequencing, which was time-consuming and limited knowledge to only the most abundant sRNA. The innovation of large-scale, next-generation sequencing has exponentially increased knowledge of the biology, diversity and abundance of sRNA populations. In this review, we discuss issues involved in the design of sRNA sequencing experiments, including choosing a sequencing platform, inherent biases that affect sRNA measurements and replication. We outline the steps involved in preprocessing sRNA sequencing data and review both the principles behind and the current options for normalization. Finally, we discuss differential expression analysis in the absence and presence of biological replicates. While our focus is on sRNA sequencing experiments, many of the principles discussed are applicable to the sequencing of other RNA populations. PMID:21356093

  4. Modulation of anti-endotoxin property of Temporin L by minor amino acid substitution in identified phenylalanine zipper sequence.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Tandon, Anshika; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2016-11-01

    A 13-residue frog antimicrobial peptide Temporin L (TempL) possesses versatile antimicrobial activities and is considered a lead molecule for the development of new antimicrobial agents. To find out the amino acid sequences that influence the anti-microbial property of TempL, a phenylalanine zipper-like sequence was identified in it which was not reported earlier. Several alanine-substituted analogs and a scrambled peptide having the same composition of TempL were designed for evaluating the role of this motif. To investigate whether leucine residues instead of phenylalanine residues at 'a' and/or 'd' position(s) of the heptad repeat sequence could alter its antimicrobial property, several TempL analogs were synthesized after replacing these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues. Replacing phenylalanine residues with alanine residues in the phenylalanine zipper sequence significantly compromised the anti-endotoxin property of TempL. This is evident from the higher production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rat bone-marrow-derived macrophage cells in the presence of its alanine-substituted analogs than TempL itself. However, replacement of these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues significantly augmented anti-endotoxin property of TempL. A single alanine-substituted TempL analog (F8A-TempL) showed significantly reduced cytotoxicity but retained the antibacterial activity of TempL, while the two single leucine-substituted analogs (F5L-TempL and F8L-TempL), although exhibiting lower cytotoxicity, were able to retain the antibacterial activity of the parent peptide. The results demonstrate how minor amino acid substitutions in the identified phenylalanine zipper sequence in TempL could yield analogs with better antibacterial and/or anti-endotoxin properties with their plausible mechanism of action.

  5. Optimal control design of turbo spin‐echo sequences with applications to parallel‐transmit systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoogduin, Hans; Hajnal, Joseph V.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Luijten, Peter R.; Malik, Shaihan J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The design of turbo spin‐echo sequences is modeled as a dynamic optimization problem which includes the case of inhomogeneous transmit radiofrequency fields. This problem is efficiently solved by optimal control techniques making it possible to design patient‐specific sequences online. Theory and Methods The extended phase graph formalism is employed to model the signal evolution. The design problem is cast as an optimal control problem and an efficient numerical procedure for its solution is given. The numerical and experimental tests address standard multiecho sequences and pTx configurations. Results Standard, analytically derived flip angle trains are recovered by the numerical optimal control approach. New sequences are designed where constraints on radiofrequency total and peak power are included. In the case of parallel transmit application, the method is able to calculate the optimal echo train for two‐dimensional and three‐dimensional turbo spin echo sequences in the order of 10 s with a single central processing unit (CPU) implementation. The image contrast is maintained through the whole field of view despite inhomogeneities of the radiofrequency fields. Conclusion The optimal control design sheds new light on the sequence design process and makes it possible to design sequences in an online, patient‐specific fashion. Magn Reson Med 77:361–373, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine PMID:26800383

  6. Amino acid sequence of band-3 protein from rainbow trout erythrocytes derived from cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, S; Michel, F; Rudloff, V; Appelhans, H

    1992-01-01

    In this report we present the first complete band-3 cDNA sequence of a poikilothermic lower vertebrate. The primary structure of the anion-exchange protein band 3 (AE1) from rainbow trout erythrocytes was determined by nucleotide sequencing of cDNA clones. The overlapping clones have a total length of 3827 bp with a 5'-terminal untranslated region of 150 bp, a 2754 bp open reading frame and a 3'-untranslated region of 924 bp. Band-3 protein from trout erythrocytes consists of 918 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 101 827 Da. Comparison of its amino acid sequence revealed a 60-65% identity within the transmembrane spanning sequence of band-3 proteins published so far. An additional insertion of 24 amino acid residues within the membrane-associated domain of trout band-3 protein was identified, which until now was thought to be a general feature only of mammalian band-3-related proteins. PMID:1637296

  7. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken; SNL,

    2016-07-12

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. Role of the two-component leader sequence and mature amino acid sequences in extracellular export of endoglucanase EGL from Pseudomonas solanacearum.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J Z; Schell, M A

    1992-01-01

    The egl gene of Pseudomonas solanacearum encodes a 43-kDa extracellular endoglucanase (mEGL) involved in wilt disease caused by this phytopathogen. Egl is initially translated with a 45-residue, two-part leader sequence. The first 19 residues are apparently removed by signal peptidase II during export of Egl across the inner membrane (IM); the remaining residues of the leader sequence (modified with palmitate) are removed during export across the outer membrane (OM). Localization of Egl-PhoA fusion proteins showed that the first 26 residues of the Egl leader sequence are required and sufficient to direct lipid modification, processing, and export of Egl or PhoA across the IM but not the OM. Fusions of the complete 45-residue leader sequence or of the leader and increasing portions of mEgl sequences to PhoA did not cause its export across the OM. In-frame deletion of portions of mEGL-coding sequences blocked export of the truncated polypeptides across the OM without affecting export across the IM. These results indicate that the first part of the leader sequence functions independently to direct export of Egl across the IM while the second part and sequences and structures in mEGL are involved in export across the OM. Computer analysis of the mEgl amino acid sequence obtained from its nucleotide sequence identified a region of mEGL similar in amino acid sequence to regions in other prokaryotic endoglucanases. Images PMID:1735723

  9. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Genomic resources for Myzus persicae: EST sequencing, SNP identification, and microarray design

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, John S; Wilson, Alex CC; de Vos, Martin; Sun, Qi; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; Winfield, Agnese; Malloch, Gaynor; Smith, Dawn M; Fenton, Brian; Gray, Stewart M; Jander, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Background The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), is a world-wide insect pest capable of infesting more than 40 plant families, including many crop species. However, despite the significant damage inflicted by M. persicae in agricultural systems through direct feeding damage and by its ability to transmit plant viruses, limited genomic information is available for this species. Results Sequencing of 16 M. persicae cDNA libraries generated 26,669 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Aphids for library construction were raised on Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana, Brassica oleracea, B. napus, and Physalis floridana (with and without Potato leafroll virus infection). The M. persicae cDNA libraries include ones made from sexual and asexual whole aphids, guts, heads, and salivary glands. In silico comparison of cDNA libraries identified aphid genes with tissue-specific expression patterns, and gene expression that is induced by feeding on Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, 2423 genes that are novel to science and potentially aphid-specific were identified. Comparison of cDNA data from three aphid lineages identified single nucleotide polymorphisms that can be used as genetic markers and, in some cases, may represent functional differences in the protein products. In particular, non-conservative amino acid substitutions in a highly expressed gut protease may be of adaptive significance for M. persicae feeding on different host plants. The Agilent eArray platform was used to design an M. persicae oligonucleotide microarray representing over 10,000 unique genes. Conclusion New genomic resources have been developed for M. persicae, an agriculturally important insect pest. These include previously unknown sequence data, a collection of expressed genes, molecular markers, and a DNA microarray that can be used to study aphid gene expression. These resources will help elucidate the adaptations that allow M. persicae to develop compatible interactions with its

  11. The complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from Bauhinia variegata var. candida seeds.

    PubMed

    Di Ciero, L; Oliva, M L; Torquato, R; Köhler, P; Weder, J K; Camillo Novello, J; Sampaio, C A; Oliveira, B; Marangoni, S

    1998-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitors of two varieties of Bauhinia variegata seeds have been isolated and characterized. Bauhinia variegata candida trypsin inhibitor (BvcTI) and B. variegata lilac trypsin inhibitor (BvlTI) are proteins with Mr of about 20,000 without free sulfhydryl groups. Amino acid analysis shows a high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and glycine, and a low content of histidine, tyrosine, methionine, and lysine in both inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing for both varieties detected three isoforms (pI 4.85, 5.00, and 5.15), which were resolved by HPLC procedure. The trypsin inhibitors show Ki values of 6.9 and 1.2 nM for BvcTI and BvlTI, respectively. The N-terminal sequences of the three trypsin inhibitor isoforms from both varieties of Bauhinia variegata and the complete amino acid sequence of B. variegata var. candida L. trypsin inhibitor isoform 3 (BvcTI-3) are presented. The sequences have been determined by automated Edman degradation of the reduced and carboxymethylated proteins of the peptides resulting from Staphylococcus aureus protease and trypsin digestion. BvcTI-3 is composed of 167 residues and has a calculated molecular mass of 18,529. Homology studies with other trypsin inhibitors show that BvcTI-3 belongs to the Kunitz family. The putative active site encompasses Arg (63)-Ile (64).

  12. Multiple site-selective insertions of non-canonical amino acids into sequence-repetitive polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I-Lin; Patterson, Melissa A.; Carpenter Desai, Holly E.; Mehl, Ryan A.; Giorgi, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    A simple and efficient method is described for introduction of non-canonical amino acids at multiple, structurally defined sites within recombinant polypeptide sequences. E. coli MRA30, a bacterial host strain with attenuated activity for release factor 1 (RF1), is assessed for its ability to support the incorporation of a diverse range of non-canonical amino acids in response to multiple encoded amber (TAG) codons within genetic templates derived from superfolder GFP and an elastin-mimetic protein polymer. Suppression efficiency and isolated protein yield were observed to depend on the identity of the orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and the non-canonical amino acid substrate. This approach afforded elastin-mimetic protein polymers containing non-canonical amino acid derivatives at up to twenty-two positions within the repeat sequence with high levels of substitution. The identity and position of the variant residues was confirmed by mass spectrometric analysis of the full-length polypeptides and proteolytic cleavage fragments resulting from thermolysin digestion. The accumulated data suggest that this multi-site suppression approach permits the preparation of protein-based materials in which novel chemical functionality can be introduced at precisely defined positions within the polypeptide sequence. PMID:23625817

  13. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  14. SUBGROUPS OF AMINO ACID SEQUENCES IN THE VARIABLE REGIONS OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS*

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bruce A.; Pflumm, Mollie N.; User, Urs Rutisha; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1969-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the first 133 residues of the heavy (γ) chain from a human γG immunoglobulin (He) has been determined. This γ-chain is identical in Gm type to that of protein Eu, the complete sequence of which has been reported. Comparison of the two sequences substantiates the previous suggestion that there are subgroups of variable regions of heavy chains. The variable region of Eu has been assigned to subgroup I and that of He to subgroup II; on the other hand, the constant regions of the two proteins appear to be identical. Comparison of the sequence of the heavy chain of He with the heavy chain sequences determined in other laboratories suggests that the variable region of subgroup II is at least 118 residues long. The nature and distribution of amino acid variations in this heavy chain subgroup resemble those observed in light chain subgroups. These studies provide evidence that the translocation hypothesis applies to heavy as well as to light chains, viz., genes for variable regions (V) are somatically translocated to genes for constant regions (C) to form complete VC structural genes. Images PMID:5264153

  15. Complete nucleic acid sequence of Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV) from India.

    PubMed

    Rai, Praveen; Safeena, Muhammed P; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2011-06-01

    Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) of shrimp, recently been classified as Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV). The complete nucleic acid sequence of PstDNV from India was obtained by cloning and sequencing of different DNA fragment of the virus. The genome organisation of PstDNV revealed that there were three major coding domains: a left ORF (NS1) of 2001 bp, a mid ORF (NS2) of 1092 bp and a right ORF (VP) of 990 bp. The complete genome and amino acid sequences of three proteins viz., NS1, NS2 and VP were compared with the genomes of the virus reported from Hawaii, China and Mexico and with partial sequence available from isolates from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis of shrimp, insect and vertebrate parvovirus sequences showed that the Indian PstDNV isolate is phylogenetically more closely related to one of the three isolates from Taiwan (AY355307), and two isolates (AY362547 and AY102034) from Thailand.

  16. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  17. Amino-Acid Sequence of NADP-Specific Glutamate Dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, John C.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Holder, Anthony A.; Baron, Andrew J.; Taylor, John G.; Fincham, John R. S.; Blumenthal, Kenneth M.; Moon, Kenneth; Smith, Emil L.

    1974-01-01

    A tentative primary structure of the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase [L-glutamate: NADP oxidoreductase (deaminating), EC 1.4.1.4] from Neurospora crassa has been determined. The proposed sequence contains 452 amino-acid residues in each of the identical subunits of the hexameric enzyme. Comparison of the sequence with that of the bovine liver enzyme reveals considerable homology in the amino-terminal portion of the chain, including the vicinity of the reactive lysine, with only shorter stretches of homology within the carboxyl-terminal regions. The significance of this distribution of homologous regions is discussed. PMID:4155068

  18. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed). PMID:22638583

  19. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-07-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed).

  20. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  1. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  2. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  3. Sequence-specific thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids influence both transcriptional pausing and backtracking in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    RNA Polymerase II pauses and backtracks during transcription, with many consequences for gene expression and cellular physiology. Here, we show that the energy required to melt double-stranded nucleic acids in the transcription bubble predicts pausing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae far more accurately than nucleosome roadblocks do. In addition, the same energy difference also determines when the RNA polymerase backtracks instead of continuing to move forward. This data-driven model corroborates—in a genome wide and quantitative manner—previous evidence that sequence-dependent thermodynamic features of nucleic acids influence both transcriptional pausing and backtracking. PMID:28301878

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  5. Analysis of protein function and its prediction from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Clark, Wyatt T; Radivojac, Predrag

    2011-07-01

    Understanding protein function is one of the keys to understanding life at the molecular level. It is also important in the context of human disease because many conditions arise as a consequence of alterations of protein function. The recent availability of relatively inexpensive sequencing technology has resulted in thousands of complete or partially sequenced genomes with millions of functionally uncharacterized proteins. Such a large volume of data, combined with the lack of high-throughput experimental assays to functionally annotate proteins, attributes to the growing importance of automated function prediction. Here, we study proteins annotated by Gene Ontology (GO) terms and estimate the accuracy of functional transfer from protein sequence only. We find that the transfer of GO terms by pairwise sequence alignments is only moderately accurate, showing a surprisingly small influence of sequence identity (SID) in a broad range (30-100%). We developed and evaluated a new predictor of protein function, functional annotator (FANN), from amino acid sequence. The predictor exploits a multioutput neural network framework which is well suited to simultaneously modeling dependencies between functional terms. Experiments provide evidence that FANN-GO (predictor of GO terms; available from http://www.informatics.indiana.edu/predrag) outperforms standard methods such as transfer by global or local SID as well as GOtcha, a method that incorporates the structure of GO.

  6. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  7. Broomhead-King Hydrophobic Modes in Receptor-Targeted Peptide Design: How to Find Modes in a Short Data Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Arnold J.; Selz, Karen A.; Owens, Michael J.; Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2003-05-01

    Broomhead-King modes are a lagged vector version of the Karhunen-Loeve orthogonal mode decomposition. We employ the Broomhead-King method to seek modes in short but evolutionarily stationary, protein and peptide, hydrophobically transformed, amino acid data sequences. We then use these modes to design 12-20 mer peptides whose amino acid series possess hydrophobic modes that match the leading modes of the targeted G-protein coupled, seven transmembrane, receptor proteins and act as indirect agonists and/or modulators of their in vitro and in vivo physiological activity. An example is briefly described involving peptide design targeting the human brain D2 dopamine receptor, thought to be involved in Parkinson's disease and the action of some antipsychotic drugs.

  8. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Suman, S P; Joseph, P; Li, S; Beach, C M; Fontaine, M; Steinke, L

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the primary structure of emu myoglobin (Mb). Emu Mb was isolated from Iliofibularis muscle employing gel-filtration chromatography. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry was employed to determine the exact molecular mass of emu Mb in comparison with horse Mb, and Edman degradation was utilized to characterize the amino acid sequence. The molecular mass of emu Mb was 17,380 Da and was close to those reported for ratite and poultry myoglobins. Similar to myoglobins from meat-producing livestock and birds, emu Mb has 153 amino acids. Emu Mb contains 9 histidines. Proximal and distal histidines, responsible for coordinating oxygen-binding property of Mb, are conserved in emu. Emu Mb shared more than 90% homology with ratite and chicken myoglobins, whereas it demonstrated only less than 70% sequence similarity with ruminant myoglobins.

  9. Designing and Evaluating Research-Based Instructional Sequences for Introducing Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guisasola, Jenaro; Almudi, Jose Manuel; Ceberio, Mikel; Zubimendi, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the didactic suitability of introducing a teaching sequence when teaching the concept of magnetic fields within introductory physics courses at the university level. This instructional sequence was designed taking into account students' common conceptions, an analysis of the course content, and the history of the development of…

  10. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  11. Comprehensive Primer Design for Analysis of Population Genetics in Non-Sequenced Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Ayumi; Matsushima, Noe; Nemoto, Yoriko; Akashi, Hiroshi D.; Kawata, Masakado; Makino, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear sequence markers are useful tool for the study of the history of populations and adaptation. However, it is not easy to obtain multiple nuclear primers for organisms with poor or no genomic sequence information. Here we used the genomes of organisms that have been fully sequenced to design comprehensive sets of primers to amplify polymorphic genomic fragments of multiple nuclear genes in non-sequenced organisms. First, we identified a large number of candidate polymorphic regions that were flanked on each side by conserved regions in the reference genomes. We then designed primers based on these conserved sequences and examined whether the primers could be used to amplify sequences in target species, montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris), anole lizard (Anolis sagrei), guppy (Poecilia reticulata), and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), for population genetic analysis. We successfully obtained polymorphic markers for all target species studied. In addition, we found that sequence identities of the regions between the primer sites in the reference genomes affected the experimental success of DNA amplification and identification of polymorphic loci in the target genomes, and that exonic primers had a higher success rate than intronic primers in amplifying readable sequences. We conclude that this comparative genomic approach is a time- and cost-effective way to obtain polymorphic markers for non-sequenced organisms, and that it will contribute to the further development of evolutionary ecology and population genetics for non-sequenced organisms, aiding in the understanding of the genetic basis of adaptation. PMID:22393396

  12. EPSE Project 2: Designing and Evaluating Short Teaching Sequences, Informed by Research Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, John; Hind, Andy; Lewis, Jenny; Scott, Phil

    2002-01-01

    Reports on Project 2 from the Evidence-based Practice in Science Education (EPSE) Research Network. In this project, teachers and researchers worked collaboratively on the design of three short teaching sequences on electric circuits. (DDR)

  13. Self-sequencing of amino acids and origins of polyfunctional protocells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    The role of proteins in the origin of living things is discussed. It has been experimentally established that amino acids can sequence themselves under simulated geological conditions with highly nonrandom products which accordingly contain diverse information. Multiple copies of each type of macromolecule are formed, resulting in greater power for any protoenzymic molecule than would accrue from a single copy of each type. Thermal proteins are readily incorporated into laboratory protocells. The experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells is discussed.

  14. Amino acid sequence of atrial natriuretic peptides in human coronary sinus plasma.

    PubMed

    Yandle, T; Crozier, I; Nicholls, G; Espiner, E; Carne, A; Brennan, S

    1987-07-31

    Two atrial natriuretic peptides were purified from pooled human coronary sinus plasma by Sep-Pak extraction, immunoaffinity chromatography and reverse phase HPLC. The amino acid sequences of the two peptides were homologous with 99-126 human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP) and 106-126 hANP, the latter being most probably linked to 99-105 ANP by the disulphide bond. The molar ratio of the peptides in plasma, as assessed by radioimmunoassay was 10:3.

  15. Amino Acid Sequences Mediating Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding to Integrin Alpha 4: Homologous DSP Sequence Found for JC Polyoma VP1 Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michael Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4) to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3). For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer. PMID:24147211

  16. Amino Acid Sequences Mediating Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding to Integrin Alpha 4: Homologous DSP Sequence Found for JC Polyoma VP1 Coat Protein.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4) to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3). For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  17. Amino acid sequence similarity between rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Wilson, P T; Hawrot, E; Speicher, D W

    1984-11-16

    Evidence was presented earlier that a host-cell receptor for the highly neurotropic rabies virus might be the acetylcholine receptor. The amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein of rabies virus was compared by computer analysis with that of snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins, potent ligands of the acetylcholine receptor. A statistically significant sequence relation was found between a segment of the rabies glycoprotein and the entire sequence of long neurotoxins. The greatest identity occurs with residues considered most important in neurotoxicity, including those interacting with the acetylcholine binding site of the acetylcholine receptor. Because of the similarity between the glycoprotein and the receptor-binding region of the neurotoxins, this region of the viral glycoprotein may function as a recognition site for the acetylcholine receptor. Direct binding of the rabies virus glycoprotein to the acetylcholine receptor could contribute to the neurotropism of this virus.

  18. Partial amino acid sequence of human pancreatic stone protein, a novel pancreatic secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, G; Bonicel, J; Multigner, L; Rovery, M; Sarles, H; De Caro, A

    1986-01-01

    Pancreatic stone protein (PSP) is the major organic component of human pancreatic stones. With the use of monoclonal antibody immunoadsorbents, five immunoreactive forms (PSP-S) with close Mr values (14,000-19,000) were isolated from normal pancreatic juice. By CM-Trisacryl M chromatography the lowest-Mr form (PSP-S1) was separated from the others and some of its molecular characteristics were investigated. The Mr of the PSP-S1 polypeptide chain calculated from the amino acid composition was about 16,100. The N-terminal sequences (40 residues) of PSP and PSP-S1 are identical, which suggests that the peptide backbone is the same for both of these polypeptides. The PSP-S1 sequence was determined up to residue 65 and was found to be different from all other known protein sequences. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3541906

  19. Complete genome sequence of the probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    PubMed Central

    Altermann, Eric; Russell, W. Michael; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Buck, B. Logan; McAuliffe, Olivia; Souther, Nicole; Dobson, Alleson; Duong, Tri; Callanan, Michael; Lick, Sonja; Hamrick, Alice; Cano, Raul; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic bacterium that has been produced commercially since 1972. The complete genome is 1,993,564 nt and devoid of plasmids. The average GC content is 34.71% with 1,864 predicted ORFs, of which 72.5% were functionally classified. Nine phage-related integrases were predicted, but no complete prophages were found. However, three unique regions designated as potential autonomous units (PAUs) were identified. These units resemble a unique structure and bear characteristics of both plasmids and phages. Analysis of the three PAUs revealed the presence of two R/M systems and a prophage maintenance system killer protein. A spacers interspersed direct repeat locus containing 32 nearly perfect 29-bp repeats was discovered and may provide a unique molecular signature for this organism. In silico analyses predicted 17 transposase genes and a chromosomal locus for lactacin B, a class II bacteriocin. Several mucus- and fibronectin-binding proteins, implicated in adhesion to human intestinal cells, were also identified. Gene clusters for transport of a diverse group of carbohydrates, including fructooligosaccharides and raffinose, were present and often accompanied by transcriptional regulators of the lacI family. For protein degradation and peptide utilization, the organism encoded 20 putative peptidases, homologs for PrtP and PrtM, and two complete oligopeptide transport systems. Nine two-component regulatory systems were predicted, some associated with determinants implicated in bacteriocin production and acid tolerance. Collectively, these features within the genome sequence of L. acidophilus are likely to contribute to the organisms' gastric survival and promote interactions with the intestinal mucosa and microbiota. PMID:15671160

  20. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment.

  1. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  2. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  3. Analysis of amino acid sequence variations and immunoglobulin E-binding epitopes of German cockroach tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Lee, Jongweon; Lee, In-Yong; Ree, Han-Il; Hong, Chein-Soo; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2004-09-01

    The allergenicities of tropomyosins from different organisms have been reported to vary. The cDNA encoding German cockroach tropomyosin (Bla g 7) was isolated, expressed, and characterized previously. In the present study, the amino acid sequence variations in German cockroach tropomyosin were analyzed in order to investigate its influence on allergenicity. We also undertook the identification of immunodominant peptides containing immunoglobulin E (IgE) epitopes which may facilitate the development of diagnostic and immunotherapeutic strategies based on the recombinant proteins. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis with mouse anti-recombinant German cockroach tropomyosin serum was performed to investigate the isoforms at the protein level. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was applied to examine the sequence diversity. Eleven different variants of the deduced amino acid sequences were identified by RT-PCR. German cockroach tropomyosin has only minor sequence variations that did not seem to affect its allergenicity significantly. These results support the molecular basis underlying the cross-reactivities of arthropod tropomyosins. Recombinant fragments were also generated by PCR, and IgE-binding epitopes were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sera from seven patients revealed heterogeneous IgE-binding responses. This study demonstrates multiple IgE-binding epitope regions in a single molecule, suggesting that full-length tropomyosin should be used for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents.

  4. In Silico Analysis of L1/L2 Sequences of Human Papillomaviruses: Implication for Universal Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Ghorban Hosseini, Nazila; Tebianian, Majid; Farhadi, Ayoub; Hossein Khani, Ali; Rahimi, Arian; Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Hosseini, Seyed Younes; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Rezaei, Mahsa; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to design a multiepitope universal vaccine for major human papillomavirus (HPV) structural proteins, L1/L2, by bioinformatics models. For this purpose, we predicted the most probable immunogenic epitopes of L1 and L2 from common high-risk HPV 16, 18, 31, and 45 beside high prevalent type 6 and 11 based on BCPREDS defaulted model, while solvent accessibility of structure was extrapolated. The three-dimensional molecular model of L1 protein was constructed by Swiss Model server, whereas sequence alignment provided model for prediction of L2 protein epitopes. After that, N-glycosylation sites were excluded from estimated epitope regions. Then, by other bioinformatics analyses, 20 epitopes were selected and fused in tandem repeats, reverse translated, and codon optimized to relevant sequence. The final protein parameters such as antigenicity were analyzed by protean program. Evaluation of new recombinant protein sequence indicated a molecular weight of 41.8 kDa with 400 amino acids beside positive charge. The computed isoelectric point (pI) value indicated the acidic nature of final product. The aliphatic index showed low thermal stability of this construct and the Grand Average Hydropathicity value was negative (-0.494). Analyzed plot showed that major parts of new protein construct had hydrophilic property, thus harboring antigenic potency. After all, sequence of final construct reverse translated to DNA and this codon-optimized sequence showed Codon Adaptation Index (CAI) of >0.8 for expression in Escherichia coli. Finally, this sequence ligated into pET28a bacterial expression vector. The new recombinant proteins harboring 20 B cell epitope seem to be suitable antigens based on computational methods as a universal vaccine candidate for HPVs.

  5. Terminal sequence importance of de novo proteins from binary-patterned library: stable artificial proteins with 11- or 12-amino acid alphabet.

    PubMed

    Okura, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2012-06-01

    Successful approaches of de novo protein design suggest a great potential to create novel structural folds and to understand natural rules of protein folding. For these purposes, smaller and simpler de novo proteins have been developed. Here, we constructed smaller proteins by removing the terminal sequences from stable de novo vTAJ proteins and compared stabilities between mutant and original proteins. vTAJ proteins were screened from an α3β3 binary-patterned library which was designed with polar/ nonpolar periodicities of α-helix and β-sheet. vTAJ proteins have the additional terminal sequences due to the method of constructing the genetically repeated library sequences. By removing the parts of the sequences, we successfully obtained the stable smaller de novo protein mutants with fewer amino acid alphabets than the originals. However, these mutants showed the differences on ANS binding properties and stabilities against denaturant and pH change. The terminal sequences, which were designed just as flexible linkers not as secondary structure units, sufficiently affected these physicochemical details. This study showed implications for adjusting protein stabilities by designing N- and C-terminal sequences.

  6. Processing and amino acid sequence analysis of the mouse mammary tumor virus env gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, L O; Copeland, T D; Oroszlan, S; Schochetman, G

    1982-01-01

    The envelope proteins of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) are synthesized from a subgenomic 24S mRNA as a 75,000-dalton glycosylated precursor polyprotein which is eventually processed to the mature glycoproteins gp52 and gp36. In vivo synthesis of this env precursor in the presence of the core glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin yielded a precursor of approximately 61,000 daltons (P61env). However, a 67,000-dalton protein (P67env) was obtained from cell-free translation with the MMTV 24S mRNA as the template. To determine whether the portion of the protein cleaved from P67env to give P61env was removed from the NH2-terminal end of P67env and as such would represent a leader sequence, the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of the terminal peptide gp52 was determined. Glutamic acid, and not methionine, was found to be the amino-terminal residue of gp52, indicating that the cleaved portion was derived from the NH2-terminal end of P67env. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of gp52's from endogenous and exogenous C3H MMTVs were determined though 46 residues and found to be identical. However, amino acid composition and type-specific gp52 radioimmunoassays from MMTVs grown in heterologous cells indicated primary structure differences between gp52's of the two viruses. The nucleic acid sequence of cloned MMTV DNA fragments (J. Majors and H. E. Varmus, personal communication) in conjunction with the NH2-terminal sequence of gp52 allowed localization of the env gene in the MMTV genome. Nucleotides coding for the NH2 terminus of gp52 begin approximately 0.8 kilobase to the 3' side of the single EcoRI cleavage site. Localization of the env gene at that point agrees with the proposed gene order -gag-pol-env- and also allows sufficient coding potential for the glycoprotein precursor without extending into the long terminal repeat. Images PMID:6281457

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  8. Measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a sequence-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peter Z; Haworth, Ian S; Cai, Qi; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Grant, Gian Paola G; Price, Eric A; Sowa, Glenna Z; Popova, Anna; Herreros, Bruno; He, Honghang

    2008-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedures for measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a nitroxide probe that can be attached to any nucleotide within a given sequence. Two nitroxides are attached to phosphorothioates that are chemically substituted at specific sites of DNA or RNA. Inter-nitroxide distances are measured using a four-pulse double electron–electron resonance technique, and the measured distances are correlated to the parent structures using a Web-accessible computer program. Four to five days are needed for sample labeling, purification and distance measurement. The procedures described herein provide a method for probing global structures and studying conformational changes of nucleic acids and protein/nucleic acid complexes. PMID:17947978

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, T; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Bruce, D; Goodwin, L; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Han, C; Detter, C; Pitluck, S; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-12-31

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  10. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group.

  11. Protein design by optimization of a sequence-structure quality function

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, S.E. |; Berry, A. |

    1994-12-31

    An automated procedure for protein design by optimization of a sequence-structure quality has been developed. The method selects a statistically optimal sequence for a particular structure, on the assumption that such a protein will adopt the desired structure. We present two optimization algorithms: one provides an exact optimization while the other uses a combinatorial technique for comparatively rapid results. Both are suitable for massively parallel computers. A prototype system was used to design sequences which should adopt the four-helix bundle conformation of myohemerythrin. These appear satisfactory to secondary structure and profile analysis. Detailed inspection reveals that the sequences are generally plausible but, as expected, lack some specific structural features. The design parameters provide some insight into the general determinants of protein structure.

  12. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/ PMID:26424080

  13. JRC GMO-Amplicons: a collection of nucleic acid sequences related to genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Mauro; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Henriksson, Peter; Bonfini, Laura; Patak, Alex; Kreysa, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The DNA target sequence is the key element in designing detection methods for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Unfortunately this information is frequently lacking, especially for unauthorized GMOs. In addition, patent sequences are generally poorly annotated, buried in complex and extensive documentation and hard to link to the corresponding GM event. Here, we present the JRC GMO-Amplicons, a database of amplicons collected by screening public nucleotide sequence databanks by in silico determination of PCR amplification with reference methods for GMO analysis. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Genetically Modified Food and Feed (EU-RL GMFF) provides these methods in the GMOMETHODS database to support enforcement of EU legislation and GM food/feed control. The JRC GMO-Amplicons database is composed of more than 240 000 amplicons, which can be easily accessed and screened through a web interface. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at pooling and collecting publicly available sequences related to GMOs in food and feed. The JRC GMO-Amplicons supports control laboratories in the design and assessment of GMO methods, providing inter-alia in silico prediction of primers specificity and GM targets coverage. The new tool can assist the laboratories in the analysis of complex issues, such as the detection and identification of unauthorized GMOs. Notably, the JRC GMO-Amplicons database allows the retrieval and characterization of GMO-related sequences included in patents documentation. Finally, it can help annotating poorly described GM sequences and identifying new relevant GMO-related sequences in public databases. The JRC GMO-Amplicons is freely accessible through a web-based portal that is hosted on the EU-RL GMFF website. Database URL: http://gmo-crl.jrc.ec.europa.eu/jrcgmoamplicons/.

  14. A 25-Amino Acid Sequence of the Arabidopsis TGD2 Protein Is Sufficient for Specific Binding of Phosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Binbin; Benning, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Genetic analysis suggests that the TGD2 protein of Arabidopsis is required for the biosynthesis of endoplasmic reticulum derived thylakoid lipids. TGD2 is proposed to be the substrate-binding protein of a presumed lipid transporter consisting of the TGD1 (permease) and TGD3 (ATPase) proteins. The TGD1, -2, and -3 proteins are localized in the inner chloroplast envelope membrane. TGD2 appears to be anchored with an N-terminal membrane-spanning domain into the inner envelope membrane, whereas the C-terminal domain faces the intermembrane space. It was previously shown that the C-terminal domain of TGD2 binds phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). To investigate the PtdOH binding site of TGD2 in detail, the C-terminal domain of the TGD2 sequence lacking the transit peptide and transmembrane sequences was fused to the C terminus of the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DR). This greatly improved the solubility of the resulting DR-TGD2C fusion protein following production in Escherichia coli. The DR-TGD2C protein bound PtdOH with high specificity, as demonstrated by membrane lipid-protein overlay and liposome association assays. Internal deletion and truncation mutagenesis identified a previously undescribed minimal 25-amino acid fragment in the C-terminal domain of TGD2 that is sufficient for PtdOH binding. Binding characteristics of this 25-mer were distinctly different from those of TGD2C, suggesting that additional sequences of TGD2 providing the proper context for this 25-mer are needed for wild type-like PtdOH binding. PMID:19416982

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the luxC gene encoding fatty acid reductase of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Chao, Y F; Weng, S F

    1993-02-26

    The nucleotide sequence of the luxC gene (EMBL Accession No. 65156) encoding fatty acid reductase (FAR) of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi PL741 was determined and the encoded amino acid sequence deduced. The fatty acid reductase is a component of the fatty acid reductase complex. The complex is responsible for converting fatty acid to aldehyde which serves as the substrate in the luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescent reaction. The protein comprises 478 amino acid residues and has a calculated M(r) of 53,858. Alignment and comparison of the fatty acid reductase of P. leiognathi with that of Vibrio harveyi B392 and Vibrio fischeri ATCC 7744 shows that there is 70% and 59% amino acid residues identity, respectively.

  16. Purification, properties and amino acid sequence of a low-Mr abundant seed protein from pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, J A; Gilroy, J; Hoque, M S; Croy, R R

    1985-01-01

    The seeds of pea (Pisum sativum L.) contain several proteins in the albumin solubility fraction that are significant components of total cotyledonary protein (5-10%) and are accumulated in developing seeds concurrently with storage-protein synthesis. One of these proteins, of low Mr and designated 'Psa LA', has been purified, characterized and sequenced. Psa LA has an Mr of 11000 and contains polypeptides of Mr 6000, suggesting that the protein molecules are dimeric. The amino acid sequence contains 54 residues, with a high content (10/54) of asparagine/aspartate. It has no inhibitory action towards trypsin or chymotrypsin, and is distinct from the inhibitors of those enzymes found in pea seeds, nor does it inhibit hog pancreatic alpha-amylase. The protein contains no methionine, but significant amounts of cysteine (four residues per polypeptide), suggesting a possible role as a sulphur storage protein. However, its sequence is not homologous with low-Mr (2S) storage proteins from castor bean (Ricinus communis) or rape (Brassica napus). Psa LA therefore represents a new type of low-Mr seed protein.

  17. Computational Design of Multinuclear Metalloproteins Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hansen, William A; Mills, Jeremy H; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    Multinuclear metal ion clusters, coordinated by proteins, catalyze various critical biological redox reactions, including water oxidation in photosynthesis, and nitrogen fixation. Designed metalloproteins featuring synthetic metal clusters would aid in the design of bio-inspired catalysts for various applications in synthetic biology. The design of metal ion-binding sites in a protein chain requires geometrically constrained and accurate placement of several (between three and six) polar and/or charged amino acid side chains for every metal ion, making the design problem very challenging to address. Here, we describe a general computational method to redesign oligomeric interfaces of symmetric proteins for the purpose of creating novel multinuclear metalloproteins with tunable geometries, electrochemical environments, and metal cofactor stability via first and second-shell interactions. The method requires a target symmetric organometallic cofactor whose coordinating ligands resemble the side chains of a natural or unnatural amino acid and a library of oligomeric protein structures featuring the same symmetry as the target cofactor. Geometric interface matches between target cofactor and scaffold are determined using a program that we call symmetric protein recursive ion-cofactor sampler (SyPRIS). First, the amino acid-bound organometallic cofactor model is built and symmetrically aligned to the axes of symmetry of each scaffold. Depending on the symmetry, rigid body and inverse rotameric degrees of freedom of the cofactor model are then simultaneously sampled to locate scaffold backbone constellations that are geometrically poised to incorporate the cofactor. Optionally, backbone remodeling of loops can be performed if no perfect matches are identified. Finally, the identities of spatially proximal neighbor residues of the cofactor are optimized using Rosetta Design. Selected designs can then be produced in the laboratory using genetically incorporated unnatural

  18. Nucleotide sequence of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifD gene and predicted amino acid sequence of the alpha-subunit of nitrogenase MoFe protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, I; Buck, M

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifD gene is presented and together with the accompanying paper [Holland, Zilberstein, Zamir & Sussman (1987) Biochem. J. 247, 277-285] completes the sequence of the nifHDK genes encoding the nitrogenase polypeptides. The K. pneumoniae nifD gene encodes the 483-amino acid-residue nitrogenase alpha-subunit polypeptide of Mr 54156. The alpha-subunit has five strongly conserved cysteine residues at positions 63, 89, 155, 184 and 275, some occurring in a region showing both primary sequence and potential structural homology to the K. pneumoniae nitrogenase beta-subunit. A comparison with six other alpha-subunit amino acid sequences has been made, which indicates a number of potentially important domains within alpha-subunits. PMID:3322262

  19. Complete amino acid sequence of the A chain of human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r.

    PubMed Central

    Arlaud, G J; Willis, A C; Gagnon, J

    1987-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of human C1r A chain was determined, from sequence analysis performed on fragments obtained from C1r autolytic cleavage, cleavage of methionyl bonds, tryptic cleavages at arginine and lysine residues, and cleavages by staphylococcal proteinase. The polypeptide chain has an N-terminal serine residue and contains 446 amino acid residues (Mr 51,200). The sequence data allow chemical characterization of fragments alpha (positions 1-211), beta (positions 212-279) and gamma (positions 280-446) yielded from C1r autolytic cleavage, and identification of the two major cleavage sites generating these fragments. Position 150 of C1r A chain is occupied by a modified amino acid residue that, upon acid hydrolysis, yields erythro-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid, and that is located in a sequence homologous to the beta-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing regions of Factor IX, Factor X, protein C and protein Z. Sequence comparison reveals internal homology between two segments (positions 10-78 and 186-257). Two carbohydrate moieties are attached to the polypeptide chain, both via asparagine residues at positions 108 and 204. Combined with the previously determined sequence of C1r B chain [Arlaud & Gagnon (1983) Biochemistry 22, 1758-1764], these data give the complete sequence of human C1r. PMID:3036070

  20. Nucleotide sequences of the Pseudomonas savastanoi indoleacetic acid genes show homology with Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tetsuji; Palm, Curtis J.; Brooks, Bob; Kosuge, Tsune

    1985-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequences of iaaM and iaaH, the genetic determinants for, respectively, tryptophan 2-monooxygenase and indoleacetamide hydrolase, the enzymes that catalyze the conversion of L-tryptophan to indoleacetic acid in the tumor-forming bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi. The sequence analysis indicates that the iaaM locus contains an open reading frame encoding 557 amino acids that would comprise a protein with a molecular weight of 61,783; the iaaH locus contains an open reading frame of 455 amino acids that would comprise a protein with a molecular weight of 48,515. Significant amino acid sequence homology was found between the predicted sequence of the tryptophan monooxygenase of P. savastanoi and the deduced product of the T-DNA tms-1 gene of the octopine-type plasmid pTiA6NC from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Strong homology was found in the 25 amino acid sequence in the putative FAD-binding region of tryptophan monooxygenase. Homology was also found in the amino acid sequences representing the central regions of the putative products of iaaH and tms-2 T-DNA. The results suggest a strong similarity in the pathways for indoleacetic acid synthesis encoded by genes in P. savastanoi and in A. tumefaciens T-DNA. Images PMID:16593610

  1. Multifunctional combinatorial-designed nanoparticles for nucleic acid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in biomedical sciences, especially in the field of human genetics, is increasingly considered to facilitate a new frontier in development of novel disease-modifying therapeutics. One of major challenges in the development of nucleic acid therapeutics is efficient and specific delivery of the molecules to the target tissue and cell upon systemic administration. In this report, I discuss our strategy to develop combinatorial-designed multifunctional nanoparticle assemblies based on natural biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for nucleic acid delivery in: (1) overcoming tumor drug resistance and (2) genetic modulation of macrophage functional phenotype from M1 to M2 in treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  2. Prediction of flexible/rigid regions from protein sequences using k-spaced amino acid pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Kurgan, Lukasz A; Ruan, Jishou

    2007-01-01

    Background Traditionally, it is believed that the native structure of a protein corresponds to a global minimum of its free energy. However, with the growing number of known tertiary (3D) protein structures, researchers have discovered that some proteins can alter their structures in response to a change in their surroundings or with the help of other proteins or ligands. Such structural shifts play a crucial role with respect to the protein function. To this end, we propose a machine learning method for the prediction of the flexible/rigid regions of proteins (referred to as FlexRP); the method is based on a novel sequence representation and feature selection. Knowledge of the flexible/rigid regions may provide insights into the protein folding process and the 3D structure prediction. Results The flexible/rigid regions were defined based on a dataset, which includes protein sequences that have multiple experimental structures, and which was previously used to study the structural conservation of proteins. Sequences drawn from this dataset were represented based on feature sets that were proposed in prior research, such as PSI-BLAST profiles, composition vector and binary sequence encoding, and a newly proposed representation based on frequencies of k-spaced amino acid pairs. These representations were processed by feature selection to reduce the dimensionality. Several machine learning methods for the prediction of flexible/rigid regions and two recently proposed methods for the prediction of conformational changes and unstructured regions were compared with the proposed method. The FlexRP method, which applies Logistic Regression and collocation-based representation with 95 features, obtained 79.5% accuracy. The two runner-up methods, which apply the same sequence representation and Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Naïve Bayes classifiers, obtained 79.2% and 78.4% accuracy, respectively. The remaining considered methods are characterized by accuracies below 70

  3. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Lange, Bernd Markus; McCaskill, David G.

    2001-01-01

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  4. Carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres in drug design.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, Carlo; Huryn, Donna M; Smith, Amos B

    2013-03-01

    The carboxylic acid functional group can be an important constituent of a pharmacophore, however, the presence of this moiety can also be responsible for significant drawbacks, including metabolic instability, toxicity, as well as limited passive diffusion across biological membranes. To avoid some of these shortcomings while retaining the desired attributes of the carboxylic acid moiety, medicinal chemists often investigate the use of carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres. The same type of strategy can also be effective for a variety other purposes, for example, to increase the selectivity of a biologically active compound or to create new intellectual property. Several carboxylic acid isosteres have been reported, however, the outcome of any isosteric replacement cannot be readily predicted as this strategy is generally found to be dependent upon the particular context (i.e., the characteristic properties of the drug and the drug-target). As a result, screening of a panel of isosteres is typically required. In this context, the discovery and development of novel carboxylic acid surrogates that could complement the existing palette of isosteres remains an important area of research. The goal of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the most commonly employed carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres and to present representative examples demonstrating the use and utility of each isostere in drug design.

  5. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  6. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals.

  7. Computational design of nucleic acid feedback control circuits.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Boyan; Kim, Jongmin; Petersen, Rasmus L; Shudy, Angelina; Kulkarni, Vishwesh V; Phillips, Andrew

    2014-08-15

    The design of synthetic circuits for controlling molecular-scale processes is an important goal of synthetic biology, with potential applications in future in vitro and in vivo biotechnology. In this paper, we present a computational approach for designing feedback control circuits constructed from nucleic acids. Our approach relies on an existing methodology for expressing signal processing and control circuits as biomolecular reactions. We first extend the methodology so that circuits can be expressed using just two classes of reactions: catalysis and annihilation. We then propose implementations of these reactions in three distinct classes of nucleic acid circuits, which rely on DNA strand displacement, DNA enzyme and RNA enzyme mechanisms, respectively. We use these implementations to design a Proportional Integral controller, capable of regulating the output of a system according to a given reference signal, and discuss the trade-offs between the different approaches. As a proof of principle, we implement our methodology as an extension to a DNA strand displacement software tool, thus allowing a broad range of nucleic acid circuits to be designed and analyzed within a common modeling framework.

  8. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  9. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  10. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of ananain and a comparison with stem bromelain and other plant cysteine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K L; Albee, K L; Bernasconi, R J; Edmunds, T

    1997-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of ananain (EC3.4.22.31) and stem bromelain (3.4.22.32), two cysteine proteases from pineapple stem, are similar yet ananain and stem bromelain possess distinct specificities towards synthetic peptide substrates and different reactivities towards the cysteine protease inhibitors E-64 and chicken egg white cystatin. We present here the complete amino acid sequence of ananain and compare it with the reported sequences of pineapple stem bromelain, papain and chymopapain from papaya and actinidin from kiwifruit. Ananain is comprised of 216 residues with a theoretical mass of 23464 Da. This primary structure includes a sequence insert between residues 170 and 174 not present in stem bromelain or papain and a hydrophobic series of amino acids adjacent to His-157. It is possible that these sequence differences contribute to the different substrate and inhibitor specificities exhibited by ananain and stem bromelain. PMID:9355753

  12. Microbial community dynamics in bioaugmented sequencing batch reactors for bromoamine acid removal.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Fu, Xiang; Xing, Linlin

    2005-05-01

    Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY with the ability to degrade bromoamine acid (BAA) was previously isolated from sludge samples. The enhancement of BAA removal by strain QYY in sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was investigated in this study. The results showed that augmented SBRs exhibited stronger abilities to degrade BAA than the non-augmented control one. In order to estimate the relationship between community dynamics and function of augmented SBRs, a combined method based on fingerprints (ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, RISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used. The results indicated that the microbial community dynamics were substantially changed, and the introduced strain QYY was persistent in the augmented systems. This study suggests that it is feasible and potentially useful to enhance BAA removal using BAA-degrading bacteria, such as S. xenophaga QYY.

  13. [Measurement of the amino acid sequence for the fusion protein FP3 with LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Gao, Xiang-Dong; Tao, Lei; Pei, De-Ning; Guo, Ying; Rao, Chun-Ming; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2012-02-01

    The amino acid sequence of the fusion protein FP3 was measured by two types of LC-MS/MS and its primary structure was confirmed. After reduction and alkylation, the protein was digested with trypsin and glycosyl groups in glycopeptide were removed by PNGase F. The mixed peptides were separated by LC, then Q-TOF and Ion trap tandem mass spectrometry were used to measure b, y fragment ions of each peptide to analyze the amino acid sequence of fusion protein FP3. Seventy-six percent of full amino acid sequence of the fusion protein FP3 was measured by LC-ESI-Q-TOF with the remaining 24% completed by LC-ESI-Trap. As LC-MS and tandem mass spectrometry are rapid, sensitive, accurate to measure the protein amino acid sequence, they are important approach to structure analysis and identification of recombinant protein.

  14. NullSeq: A Tool for Generating Random Coding Sequences with Desired Amino Acid and GC Contents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sophia S.; Hockenberry, Adam J.; Lancichinetti, Andrea; Jewett, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of over- and under-represented sequence motifs in genomes provides evidence of selective evolutionary pressures on biological mechanisms such as transcription, translation, ligand-substrate binding, and host immunity. In order to accurately identify motifs and other genome-scale patterns of interest, it is essential to be able to generate accurate null models that are appropriate for the sequences under study. While many tools have been developed to create random nucleotide sequences, protein coding sequences are subject to a unique set of constraints that complicates the process of generating appropriate null models. There are currently no tools available that allow users to create random coding sequences with specified amino acid composition and GC content for the purpose of hypothesis testing. Using the principle of maximum entropy, we developed a method that generates unbiased random sequences with pre-specified amino acid and GC content, which we have developed into a python package. Our method is the simplest way to obtain maximally unbiased random sequences that are subject to GC usage and primary amino acid sequence constraints. Furthermore, this approach can easily be expanded to create unbiased random sequences that incorporate more complicated constraints such as individual nucleotide usage or even di-nucleotide frequencies. The ability to generate correctly specified null models will allow researchers to accurately identify sequence motifs which will lead to a better understanding of biological processes as well as more effective engineering of biological systems. PMID:27835644

  15. Morphological tranformation of calcite crystal growth by prismatic "acidic" polypeptide sequences.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I; Giocondi, J L; Orme, C A; Collino, J; Evans, J S

    2007-02-13

    Many of the interesting mechanical and materials properties of the mollusk shell are thought to stem from the prismatic calcite crystal assemblies within this composite structure. It is now evident that proteins play a major role in the formation of these assemblies. Recently, a superfamily of 7 conserved prismatic layer-specific mollusk shell proteins, Asprich, were sequenced, and the 42 AA C-terminal sequence region of this protein superfamily was found to introduce surface voids or porosities on calcite crystals in vitro. Using AFM imaging techniques, we further investigate the effect that this 42 AA domain (Fragment-2) and its constituent subdomains, DEAD-17 and Acidic-2, have on the morphology and growth kinetics of calcite dislocation hillocks. We find that Fragment-2 adsorbs on terrace surfaces and pins acute steps, accelerates then decelerates the growth of obtuse steps, forms clusters and voids on terrace surfaces, and transforms calcite hillock morphology from a rhombohedral form to a rounded one. These results mirror yet are distinct from some of the earlier findings obtained for nacreous polypeptides. The subdomains Acidic-2 and DEAD-17 were found to accelerate then decelerate obtuse steps and induce oval rather than rounded hillock morphologies. Unlike DEAD-17, Acidic-2 does form clusters on terrace surfaces and exhibits stronger obtuse velocity inhibition effects than either DEAD-17 or Fragment-2. Interestingly, a 1:1 mixture of both subdomains induces an irregular polygonal morphology to hillocks, and exhibits the highest degree of acute step pinning and obtuse step velocity inhibition. This suggests that there is some interplay between subdomains within an intra (Fragment-2) or intermolecular (1:1 mixture) context, and sequence interplay phenomena may be employed by biomineralization proteins to exert net effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  16. Analys. DNA: a computer program for nucleic acid sequence data processing.

    PubMed

    Amthauer, R; Araya, A

    1984-09-01

    A computer program written in BASIC language is described. The program allows processing and analysis of DNA data and has been designed to be used by persons with little or no computer experience. The operator using different options can search for direct homologies with varying degrees of matching, generate complementary strands, find restriction sites, invert the polarity of the sequence and edit a print-out.

  17. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA using triple helix-forming peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are attractive targets for molecular recognition because of the central role they play in gene expression. Since most noncoding RNAs are in a double-helical conformation, recognition of such structures is a formidable problem. Herein, we describe a method for sequence-selective recognition of biologically relevant double-helical RNA (illustrated on ribosomal A-site RNA) using peptide nucleic acids (PNA) that form a triple helix in the major grove of RNA under physiologically relevant conditions. Protocols for PNA preparation and binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry are described in detail.

  18. Fluorescence energy transfer as a probe for nucleic acid structures and sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mergny, J L; Boutorine, A S; Garestier, T; Belloc, F; Rougée, M; Bulychev, N V; Koshkin, A A; Bourson, J; Lebedev, A V; Valeur, B

    1994-01-01

    The primary or secondary structure of single-stranded nucleic acids has been investigated with fluorescent oligonucleotides, i.e., oligonucleotides covalently linked to a fluorescent dye. Five different chromophores were used: 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-amino-acridine, coumarin 500, fluorescein, rhodamine and ethidium. The chemical synthesis of derivatized oligonucleotides is described. Hybridization of two fluorescent oligonucleotides to adjacent nucleic acid sequences led to fluorescence excitation energy transfer between the donor and the acceptor dyes. This phenomenon was used to probe primary and secondary structures of DNA fragments and the orientation of oligodeoxynucleotides synthesized with the alpha-anomers of nucleoside units. Fluorescence energy transfer can be used to reveal the formation of hairpin structures and the translocation of genes between two chromosomes. PMID:8152922

  19. Amino acid sequence of two neurotoxins from the venom of the Egyptian black snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia).

    PubMed

    Samejima, Y; Aoki-Tomomatsu, Y; Yanagisawa, M; Mebs, D

    1997-02-01

    The venom of the Egyptian black snake Walterinnesia aegyptia contains at least three toxins, which act postsynaptically to block the neuromuscular transmission of isolated rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm and chicken biventer cervicis muscle. The complete amino acid sequence of the two toxins, W-III and W-IV, consisting of 62 amino acid residues, was elucidated by Edman degradation of fragments obtained after Staphylococcus aureus protease and prolylpeptidase digestion. Although the toxins exhibit close structural homology to other short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxins from Elapidae venoms, toxin IV is unique by having a free SH-group (cysteine) at position 16. In position 35 of W-III, which is located at the tip of the central loop, threonine is replaced by lysine, which may alter the interaction of the toxin with the acetylcholine receptor, since the toxin is seven times less lethal than toxin W-IV.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly L-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3, which exhibits glutamic acid-independent production of poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Geng, Weitao; Cao, Mingfeng; Song, Cunjiang; Xie, Hui; Liu, Li; Yang, Chao; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Yinghong; Du, Yang; Wang, Shufang

    2011-07-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is one of most prevalent Gram-positive aerobic spore-forming bacteria with the ability to synthesize polysaccharides and polypeptides. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of B. amyloliquefaciens LL3, which was isolated from fermented food and presents the glutamic acid-independent production of poly-γ-glutamic acid.

  2. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae UW5, a Rhizobacterium Capable of High Levels of Indole-3-Acetic Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Thomas J D; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-08-06

    We report the complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae UW5, an indole-3-acetic acid-producing rhizobacterium originally isolated from the rhizosphere of grass. The 4.9-Mbp genome has a G+C content of 54% and contains 4,496 protein-coding sequences.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae UW5, a Rhizobacterium Capable of High Levels of Indole-3-Acetic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Thomas J. D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae UW5, an indole-3-acetic acid-producing rhizobacterium originally isolated from the rhizosphere of grass. The 4.9-Mbp genome has a G+C content of 54% and contains 4,496 protein-coding sequences. PMID:26251488

  5. Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Velly, H.; Abraham, A.-L.; Loux, V.; Delacroix-Buchet, A.; Fonseca, F.; Bouix, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

  6. Case-Only Exome Sequencing and Complex Disease Susceptibility Gene Discovery: Study Design Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lang; Schaid, Daniel J.; Sicotte, Hugues; Wieben, Eric D.; Li, Hu; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify the potential etiologic role of rare functional variants in human complex diseases. Large-scale collaborations have generated germline WES data on patients with a number of diseases, especially cancer, but less often on healthy controls under the same sequencing procedures. These data can be a valuable resource for identifying new disease susceptibility loci, if study designs are appropriately applied. This review describes suggested strategies and technical considerations when focusing on case-only study designs that use WES data in complex disease scenarios. These include variant filtering based on frequency and functionality, gene prioritization, interrogation of different data types, and targeted sequencing validation. We propose that if case-only WES designs were applied in an appropriate manner, new susceptibility genes containing rare variants for human complex diseases can be detected. PMID:25371537

  7. Deoxyribonucleic acid sequence of araBAD promoter mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, A H; Morandi, C; Wilcox, G

    1980-05-01

    The controlling site region for the araBAD operon is defined, in part, by two classes of cis-acting constitutive mutations. The aralc mutations allow low-level constitutive expression of ara-BAD in the absence of the positive regulatory protein coded for by the araC gene, whereas the araXc mutations allow expression of araBAD in the absence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein. Six independently isolated aralc mutations and three independently isolated araXc mutations were cloned onto the plasmid pBR322 using in vitro recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques and in vivo recombination between plasmid and chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid. The location of these mutations was determined by deoxyribonucleic acid sequence analysis. All of the aralc mutations occurred at position -35 within the araBAD promoter (+1 = messenger ribonucleic acid start for araBAD) and resulted from an AT leads to GC transition. All of the araXc mutations occurred at position -10 within the araBAD promoter and resulted from a GC leads to AT transition. Models are presented to explain the mode of action of the aralc and araXc mutations.

  8. In the TTF-1 homeodomain the contribution of several amino acids to DNA recognition depends on the bound sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Leonardi, A; Pellizzari, L; Pucillo, C; Lonigro, R; Formisano, S; Damante, G

    1996-01-01

    The thyroid transcription factor-1 homeodomain (TTF-1HD) shows a peculiar DNA binding specificity, preferentially recognizing sequences containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif. Most other homeodomains instead recognize sites containing the 5'-TAAT-3' core motif. Here, we show that TTF-1HD efficiently recognizes another sequence, called D1, devoid of the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif. Different experimental approaches indicate that TTF-1HD contacts the D1 sequence in a manner which is different to that used to interact with sequences containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif. The binding activities that mutants of TTF-1HD display with the D1 sequence or with the sequence containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif indicate that the role of several DNA-contacting amino acids is different. In particular, during recognition of the D1 sequence, backbone-interacting amino acids not relevant in binding to sequences containing the 5'-CAAG-3' core motif play an important role. In the TTF-1HD, therefore, the contribution of several amino acids to DNA recognition depends on the bound sequence. These data indicate that although a common bonding network exists in all of the HD/DNA complexes, peculiarities important for DNA recognition may occur in single cases. PMID:8811078

  9. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  10. The amino acid sequences and activities of synergistic hemolysins from Staphylococcus cohnii.

    PubMed

    Mak, Pawel; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rozalska, Malgorzata

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. cohnii and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus are a coagulase-negative staphylococci considered for a long time as unable to cause infections. This situation changed recently and pathogenic strains of these bacteria were isolated from hospital environments, patients and medical staff. Most of the isolated strains were resistant to many antibiotics. The present work describes isolation and characterization of several synergistic peptide hemolysins produced by these bacteria and acting as virulence factors responsible for hemolytic and cytotoxic activities. Amino acid sequences of respective hemolysins from S. cohnii ssp. cohnii (named as H1C, H2C and H3C) and S. cohnii ssp. urealyticus (H1U, H2U and H3U) were identical. Peptides H1 and H3 possessed significant amino acid homology to three synergistic hemolysins secreted by Staphylococcus lugdunensis and to putative antibacterial peptide produced by Staphylococcus saprophyticus ssp. saprophyticus. On the other hand, hemolysin H2 had a unique sequence. All isolated peptides lysed red cells from different mammalian species and exerted a cytotoxic effect on human fibroblasts.

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Shenbagamurthi, P; Marsh, D G

    1989-07-05

    The complete amino acid sequence of a Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen, Lol p II was determined by automated Edman degradation of the protein and selected fragments. Cleavage of the protein by enzymatic and chemical techniques established an unambiguous sequence for the protein. Lol p II contains 97 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular weight of 10,882. The protein lacks cysteine and glutamine and shows no evidence of glycosylation. Theoretical predictions by Fraga's (Fraga, S. (1982) Can. J. Chem. 60, 2606-2610) and Hopp and Woods' (Hopp, T. P., and Woods, K. R. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 3824-3828) methods indicate the presence of four hydrophilic regions, which may contribute to sequential or parts of conformational B-cell epitopes. Analysis of amphipathic regions by Berzofsky's method indicates the presence of a highly amphipathic region, which may contain, or contribute to, an Ia/T-cell epitope. This latter segment of Lol p II was found to be highly homologous with an antibody-binding segment of the major rye allergen Lol p I and may explain why immune responsiveness to both the allergens is associated with HLA-DR3.

  12. Partial amino acid sequences around sulfhydryl groups of soybean beta-amylase.

    PubMed

    Nomura, K; Mikami, B; Morita, Y

    1987-08-01

    Sulfhydryl (SH) groups of soybean beta-amylase were modified with 5-(iodoaceto-amidoethyl)aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (IAEDANS) and the SH-containing peptides exhibiting fluorescence were purified after chymotryptic digestion of the modified enzyme. The sequence analysis of the peptides derived from the modification of all SH groups in the denatured enzyme revealed the existence of six SH groups, in contrast to five reported previously. One of them was found to have extremely low reactivity toward SH-reagents without reduction. In the native state, IAEDANS reacted with 2 mol of SH groups per mol of the enzyme (SH1 and SH2) accompanied with inactivation of the enzyme owing to the modification of SH2 located near the active site of this enzyme. The selective modification of SH2 with IAEDANS was attained after the blocking of SH1 with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). The amino acid sequences of the peptides containing SH1 and SH2 were determined to be Cys-Ala-Asn-Pro-Gln and His-Gln-Cys-Gly-Gly-Asn-Val-Gly-Asp-Ile-Val-Asn-Ile-Pro-Ile-Pro-Gln-Trp, respectively.

  13. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain CASL, an Efficient l-Lactic Acid Producer from Cheap Substrate Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bo; Su, Fei; Wang, Limin; Zhao, Bo; Qin, Jiayang; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping; Ma, Yanhe

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a type of probiotic bacteria with industrial potential for l-lactic acid production. We announce the draft genome sequence of L. rhamnosus CASL (2,855,156 bp with a G+C content of 46.6%), which is an efficient producer of l-lactic acid from cheap, nonfood substrate cassava with a high production titer. PMID:22123765

  14. Amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxin from the venom of the funnel-web spider Atrax versutus.

    PubMed

    Brown, M R; Sheumack, D D; Tyler, M I; Howden, M E

    1988-03-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxic polypeptide isolated from the venom of male and female funnel-web spiders of the species Atrax versutus, was determined. Sequencing was performed in a gas-phase protein sequencer by automated Edman degradation of the S-carboxymethylated toxin and fragments of it produced by reaction with CNBr. Versutoxin consisted of a single chain of 42 amino acid residues. It was found to have a high proportion of basic residues and of cystine. The primary structure showed marked homology with that of robustoxin, a novel neurotoxin recently isolated from the venom of another funnel-web-spider species, Atrax robustus.

  15. Amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxin from the venom of the funnel-web spider Atrax versutus.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M R; Sheumack, D D; Tyler, M I; Howden, M E

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of versutoxin, a lethal neurotoxic polypeptide isolated from the venom of male and female funnel-web spiders of the species Atrax versutus, was determined. Sequencing was performed in a gas-phase protein sequencer by automated Edman degradation of the S-carboxymethylated toxin and fragments of it produced by reaction with CNBr. Versutoxin consisted of a single chain of 42 amino acid residues. It was found to have a high proportion of basic residues and of cystine. The primary structure showed marked homology with that of robustoxin, a novel neurotoxin recently isolated from the venom of another funnel-web-spider species, Atrax robustus. PMID:3355530

  16. Protein evolution analysis of S-hydroxynitrile lyase by complete sequence design utilizing the INTMSAlign software.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shogo; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-02-03

    Development of software and methods for design of complete sequences of functional proteins could contribute to studies of protein engineering and protein evolution. To this end, we developed the INTMSAlign software, and used it to design functional proteins and evaluate their usefulness. The software could assign both consensus and correlation residues of target proteins. We generated three protein sequences with S-selective hydroxynitrile lyase (S-HNL) activity, which we call designed S-HNLs; these proteins folded as efficiently as the native S-HNL. Sequence and biochemical analysis of the designed S-HNLs suggested that accumulation of neutral mutations occurs during the process of S-HNLs evolution from a low-activity form to a high-activity (native) form. Taken together, our results demonstrate that our software and the associated methods could be applied not only to design of complete sequences, but also to predictions of protein evolution, especially within families such as esterases and S-HNLs.

  17. incaRNAfbinv: a web server for the fragment-based design of RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Drory Retwitzer, Matan; Reinharz, Vladimir; Ponty, Yann; Waldispühl, Jérôme; Barash, Danny

    2016-07-08

    In recent years, new methods for computational RNA design have been developed and applied to various problems in synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Lately, there is considerable interest in incorporating essential biological information when solving the inverse RNA folding problem. Correspondingly, RNAfbinv aims at including biologically meaningful constraints and is the only program to-date that performs a fragment-based design of RNA sequences. In doing so it allows the design of sequences that do not necessarily exactly fold into the target, as long as the overall coarse-grained tree graph shape is preserved. Augmented by the weighted sampling algorithm of incaRNAtion, our web server called incaRNAfbinv implements the method devised in RNAfbinv and offers an interactive environment for the inverse folding of RNA using a fragment-based design approach. It takes as input: a target RNA secondary structure; optional sequence and motif constraints; optional target minimum free energy, neutrality and GC content. In addition to the design of synthetic regulatory sequences, it can be used as a pre-processing step for the detection of novel natural occurring RNAs. The two complementary methodologies RNAfbinv and incaRNAtion are merged together and fully implemented in our web server incaRNAfbinv, available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/incaRNAfbinv.

  18. Novel computational methods for increasing PCR primer design effectiveness in directed sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin; Brownley, Anushka; Stockwell, Timothy B; Beeson, Karen; McIntosh, Tina C; Busam, Dana; Ferriera, Steve; Murphy, Sean; Levy, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used in directed sequencing for the discovery of novel polymorphisms. As the first step in PCR directed sequencing, effective PCR primer design is crucial for obtaining high-quality sequence data for target regions. Since current computational primer design tools are not fully tuned with stable underlying laboratory protocols, researchers may still be forced to iteratively optimize protocols for failed amplifications after the primers have been ordered. Furthermore, potentially identifiable factors which contribute to PCR failures have yet to be elucidated. This inefficient approach to primer design is further intensified in a high-throughput laboratory, where hundreds of genes may be targeted in one experiment. Results We have developed a fully integrated computational PCR primer design pipeline that plays a key role in our high-throughput directed sequencing pipeline. Investigators may specify target regions defined through a rich set of descriptors, such as Ensembl accessions and arbitrary genomic coordinates. Primer pairs are then selected computationally to produce a minimal amplicon set capable of tiling across the specified target regions. As part of the tiling process, primer pairs are computationally screened to meet the criteria for success with one of two PCR amplification protocols. In the process of improving our sequencing success rate, which currently exceeds 95% for exons, we have discovered novel and accurate computational methods capable of identifying primers that may lead to PCR failures. We reveal the laboratory protocols and their associated, empirically determined computational parameters, as well as describe the novel computational methods which may benefit others in future primer design research. Conclusion The high-throughput PCR primer design pipeline has been very successful in providing the basis for high-quality directed sequencing results and for minimizing costs associated with labor and

  19. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Results C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Conclusions Analysis of the C. sticklandii genome and

  20. Amino acid sequence of neurotoxin III of the scorpion Androctonus austrialis Hector.

    PubMed

    Kopeyan, C; Martinez, G; Rochat, H

    1979-03-01

    The amino acid sequence of neurotoxin III, purified from the venom of the North African scorpion Androctonus australis Hector, has been determined by Edman degradation using a liquid-phase sequencer. Carboxypeptidase A hydrolyses confirmed not only the sequence of the five last residues but also the presence of a free alpha-carboxylic group at the C-terminus. Edman degradation was conducted on one hand with the Quadrol [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)ethylene diamine] program and S-alkylated protein before or after coupling with sulfophenylisothiocynate (the first 34 residues were thus identified), on the other hand on tryptic and chymotryptic peptides with a dimethylbenzylamine program (residues 1--23 and 31--34 were confirmed, the positions of residues 35-64 were established). Neurotoxin III was found to belong to the same group of scorpion toxins active on mammals as neurotoxin I purified from the same venom (50 homologous positions exist in the two proteins).

  1. Isolation and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) insulin and glucagon

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jinghua ); Eng, J.; Yalow, R.S. City Univ. of New York, NY )

    1990-12-01

    It was reported two decades ago that insulin was not detectable in the glucose-stimulated state in Saimiri sciurea, the New World squirrel monkey, by a radioimmunoassay system developed with guinea pig anti-pork insulin antibody and labeled park insulin. With the same system, reasonable levels were observed in rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees. This suggested that New World monkeys, like the New World hystricomorph rodents such as the guinea pig and the coypu, might have insulins whose sequences differ markedly from those of Old World mammals. In this report the authors describe the purification and amino acid sequences of squirrel monkey insulin and glucagon. They demonstrate that the substitutions at B29, B27, A2, A4, and A17 of squirrel monkey insulin are identical with those previously found in another New World primate, the owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus). The immunologic cross-reactivity of this insulin in their immunoassay system is only a few percent of that of human insulin. It appears that the peptides of the New World monkeys have diverged less from those of the Old World mammals than have those of the New World hystricomorph rodents. The striking improvements in peptide purification and sequencing have the potential for adding new information concerning the evolutionary divergence of species.

  2. Purification, amino acid sequence and characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II have been purified to homogeneity from kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum, thus this represents the first report of the purification, sequencing and characterisation of marsupial IGFs. N-Terminal protein sequencing reveals that there are six amino acid differences between kangaroo and human IGF-I. Kangaroo IGF-II has been partially sequenced and no differences were found between human and kangaroo IGF-II in the 53 residues identified. Thus the IGFs appear to be remarkably structurally conserved during mammalian radiation. In addition, in vitro characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I demonstrated that the functional properties of human, kangaroo and chicken IGF-I are very similar. In an assay measuring the ability of the proteins to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts, all IGF-I proteins were found to be equally potent. The ability of all three proteins to compete for binding with radiolabelled human IGF-I to type-1 IGF receptors in L6 myoblasts and in Sminthopsis crassicaudata transformed lung fibroblasts, a marsupial cell line, was comparable. Furthermore, kangaroo and human IGF-I react equally in a human IGF-I RIA using a human reference standard, radiolabelled human IGF-I and a polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human IGF-I. This study indicates that not only is the primary structure of eutherian and metatherian IGF-I conserved, but also the proteins appear to be functionally similar.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Prototype Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363▿

    PubMed Central

    Wegmann, Udo; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Zomer, Aldert; Buist, Girbe; Shearman, Claire; Canchaya, Carlos; Ventura, Marco; Goesmann, Alexander; Gasson, Michael J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Kok, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is of great importance for the nutrition of hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This paper describes the genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363, the lactococcal strain most intensively studied throughout the world. The 2,529,478-bp genome contains 81 pseudogenes and encodes 2,436 proteins. Of the 530 unique proteins, 47 belong to the COG (clusters of orthologous groups) functional category “carbohydrate metabolism and transport,” by far the largest category of novel proteins in comparison with L. lactis subsp. lactis IL1403. Nearly one-fifth of the 71 insertion elements are concentrated in a specific 56-kb region. This integration hot-spot region carries genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids and a repeat sequence specifically found on plasmids and in the “lateral gene transfer hot spot” in the genome of Streptococcus thermophilus. Although the parent of L. lactis MG1363 was used to demonstrate lysogeny in Lactococcus, L. lactis MG1363 carries four remnant/satellite phages and two apparently complete prophages. The availability of the L. lactis MG1363 genome sequence will reinforce its status as the prototype among lactic acid bacteria through facilitation of further applied and fundamental research. PMID:17307855

  4. The amino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues, and the buried cysteine residue in ficin.

    PubMed

    Husain, S S; Lowe, G

    1970-04-01

    Ficin that had been prepared from the latex of Ficus glabrata by salt fractionation and chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose was completely and irreversibly inhibited with 1,3-dibromo[2-(14)C]acetone and then treated with N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl)maleimide in 6m-guanidinium chloride. After reduction and carboxymethylation of the labelled protein, it was digested with trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Two radioactive peptides and two coloured peptides were isolated chromatographically and their sequences determined. The radioactive peptides revealed the amino acid sequences around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues and showed a high degree of homology with the omino acid sequence around the active-site cysteine and histidine residues in papain. The coloured peptides allowed the amino acid sequence around the buried cysteine residue in ficin to be determined.

  5. The `heavy' subunit of the photosynthetic reaction centre from Rhodopseudomonas viridis: isolation of the gene, nucleotide and amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Michel, H.; Weyer, K. A.; Gruenberg, H.; Lottspeich, F.

    1985-01-01

    The gene coding for the `heavy' subunit of the photosynthetic reaction centre from Rhodopseudomonas viridis was isolated in an expression vector. Expression of the heavy subunit in Escherichia coli was detected with antibodies raised against crystalline reaction centres. The entire subunit, and not a fusion protein, was expressed in E. coli. The protein coding region of the gene was sequenced and the amino acid sequence derived. Part of the amino acid sequence was confirmed by chemical sequence analysis of the protein. The heavy subunit consists of 258 amino acids and its mol. wt. is 28 345. It possesses one membrane-spanning α-helical segment, as was revealed by the concomitant X-ray structure analysis. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:16453623

  6. Nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences of the major porin of Comamonas acidovorans and comparison of porin primary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Gerbl-Rieger, S; Peters, J; Kellermann, J; Lottspeich, F; Baumeister, W

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene which codes for the major outer membrane porin (Omp32) of Comamonas acidovorans has been determined. The structural gene encodes a precursor consisting of 351 amino acid residues with a signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues. Comparisons with amino acid sequences of outer membrane proteins and porins from several other members of the class Proteobacteria and of the Chlamydia trachomatis porin and the Neurospora crassa mitochondrial porin revealed a motif of eight regions of local homology. The results of this analysis are discussed with regard to common structural features of porins. PMID:1848840

  7. The evolution of proteins from random amino acid sequences: II. Evidence from the statistical distributions of the lengths of modern protein sequences.

    PubMed

    White, S H

    1994-04-01

    This paper continues an examination of the hypothesis that modern proteins evolved from random heteropeptide sequences. In support of the hypothesis, White and Jacobs (1993, J Mol Evol 36:79-95) have shown that any sequence chosen randomly from a large collection of nonhomologous proteins has a 90% or better chance of having a lengthwise distribution of amino acids that is indistinguishable from the random expectation regardless of amino acid type. The goal of the present study was to investigate the possibility that the random-origin hypothesis could explain the lengths of modern protein sequences without invoking specific mechanisms such as gene duplication or exon splicing. The sets of sequences examined were taken from the 1989 PIR database and consisted of 1,792 "super-family" proteins selected to have little sequence identity, 623 E. coli sequences, and 398 human sequences. The length distributions of the proteins could be described with high significance by either of two closely related probability density functions: The gamma distribution with parameter 2 or the distribution for the sum of two exponential random independent variables. A simple theory for the distributions was developed which assumes that (1) protoprotein sequences had exponentially distributed random independent lengths, (2) the length dependence of protein stability determined which of these protoproteins could fold into compact primitive proteins and thereby attain the potential for biochemical activity, (3) the useful protein sequences were preserved by the primitive genome, and (4) the resulting distribution of sequence lengths is reflected by modern proteins. The theory successfully predicts the two observed distributions which can be distinguished by the functional form of the dependence of protein stability on length. The theory leads to three interesting conclusions. First, it predicts that a tetra-nucleotide was the signal for primitive translation termination. This prediction is

  8. Design of multiple sequence alignment algorithms on parallel, distributed memory supercomputers.

    PubMed

    Church, Philip C; Goscinski, Andrzej; Holt, Kathryn; Inouye, Michael; Ghoting, Amol; Makarychev, Konstantin; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The challenge of comparing two or more genomes that have undergone recombination and substantial amounts of segmental loss and gain has recently been addressed for small numbers of genomes. However, datasets of hundreds of genomes are now common and their sizes will only increase in the future. Multiple sequence alignment of hundreds of genomes remains an intractable problem due to quadratic increases in compute time and memory footprint. To date, most alignment algorithms are designed for commodity clusters without parallelism. Hence, we propose the design of a multiple sequence alignment algorithm on massively parallel, distributed memory supercomputers to enable research into comparative genomics on large data sets. Following the methodology of the sequential progressiveMauve algorithm, we design data structures including sequences and sorted k-mer lists on the IBM Blue Gene/P supercomputer (BG/P). Preliminary results show that we can reduce the memory footprint so that we can potentially align over 250 bacterial genomes on a single BG/P compute node. We verify our results on a dataset of E.coli, Shigella and S.pneumoniae genomes. Our implementation returns results matching those of the original algorithm but in 1/2 the time and with 1/4 the memory footprint for scaffold building. In this study, we have laid the basis for multiple sequence alignment of large-scale datasets on a massively parallel, distributed memory supercomputer, thus enabling comparison of hundreds instead of a few genome sequences within reasonable time.

  9. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for DNA in gel electrophoresis: sequences binding to the immobilized DNA are delayed in their migration. Such a system has been used for example to construct complex DNA filters facilitating DNA computations. However, these gels are formed irreversibly and the choice of immobilized sequences is made once off during fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the reversible self-assembly of gels combined with amphiphilic DNA molecules, which exhibit hydrophobic hydrocarbon chains attached to the nucleobase. This amphiphilic DNA, which we term lipid-DNA, is synthesized in advance and is blended into a block copolymer gel to induce sequence-dependent DNA retention during electrophoresis. Furthermore, we demonstrate and characterize the programmable mobility shift of matching DNA in such reversible gels both in thin films and microchannels using microelectrode arrays. Such sequence selective separation may be employed to select nucleic acid sequences of similar length from a mixture via local electronics, a basic functionality that can be employed in novel electronic chemical cell designs and other DNA information-processing systems.

  10. Sequence of a cDNA clone encoding the polysialic acid-rich and cytoplasmic domains of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM.

    PubMed Central

    Hemperly, J J; Murray, B A; Edelman, G M; Cunningham, B A

    1986-01-01

    Purified fractions of the neural cell-adhesion molecule N-CAM from embryonic chicken brain contain two similar polypeptides (Mr, 160,000 and 130,000), each containing an amino-terminal external binding region, a carbohydrate-rich central region, and a carboxyl-terminal region that is associated with the cell. Previous studies indicate that the two polypeptides arise by alternative splicing of mRNAs transcribed from a single gene. We report here the 3556-nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone (pEC208) that encodes 964 amino acids from the carbohydrate and cell-associated domains of the larger N-CAM polypeptide followed by 664 nucleotides of 3' untranslated sequence. The predicted protein sequence contains attachment sites for polysialic acid-containing oligosaccharides, four tandem homologous regions of polypeptide resembling those seen in the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a single hydrophobic sequence that appears to be the membrane-spanning segment. The cytoplasmic domain carboxyl terminal to this segment includes a block of approximately equal to 250 amino acids present in the larger but not in the smaller N-CAM polypeptide. We designate these the ld (large domain) polypeptide and the sd (small domain) polypeptide. The intracellular domains of the ld and sd polypeptides are likely to be critical for cell-surface modulation of N-CAM by interacting in a differential fashion with other intrinsic proteins or with the cytoskeleton. PMID:3458261

  11. Can natural proteins designed with 'inverted' peptide sequences adopt native-like protein folds?

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic computational analysis on a representative dataset of proteins of known three-dimensional structure, in order to evaluate whether it would possible to 'swap' certain short peptide sequences in naturally occurring proteins with their corresponding 'inverted' peptides and generate 'artificial' proteins that are predicted to retain native-like protein fold. The analysis of 3,967 representative proteins from the Protein Data Bank revealed 102,677 unique identical inverted peptide sequence pairs that vary in sequence length between 5-12 and 18 amino acid residues. Our analysis illustrates with examples that such 'artificial' proteins may be generated by identifying peptides with 'similar structural environment' and by using comparative protein modeling and validation studies. Our analysis suggests that natural proteins may be tolerant to accommodating such peptides.

  12. Fragmentation Characteristics of Deprotonated N-linked Glycopeptides: Influences of Amino Acid Composition and Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaze, Takashi; Kawabata, Shin-ichirou; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Glycopeptide structural analysis using tandem mass spectrometry is becoming a common approach for elucidating site-specific N-glycosylation. The analysis is generally performed in positive-ion mode. Therefore, fragmentation of protonated glycopeptides has been extensively investigated; however, few studies are available on deprotonated glycopeptides, despite the usefulness of negative-ion mode analysis in detecting glycopeptide signals. Here, large sets of glycopeptides derived from well-characterized glycoproteins were investigated to understand the fragmentation behavior of deprotonated N-linked glycopeptides under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. The fragment ion species were found to be significantly variable depending on their amino acid sequence and could be classified into three types: (i) glycan fragment ions, (ii) glycan-lost fragment ions and their secondary cleavage products, and (iii) fragment ions with intact glycan moiety. The CID spectra of glycopeptides having a short peptide sequence were dominated by type (i) glycan fragments (e.g., 2,4AR, 2,4AR-1, D, and E ions). These fragments define detailed structural features of the glycan moiety such as branching. For glycopeptides with medium or long peptide sequences, the major fragments were type (ii) ions (e.g., [peptide + 0,2X0-H]- and [peptide-NH3-H]-). The appearance of type (iii) ions strongly depended on the peptide sequence, and especially on the presence of Asp, Asn, and Glu. When a glycosylated Asn is located on the C-terminus, an interesting fragment having an Asn residue with intact glycan moiety, [glycan + Asn-36]-, was abundantly formed. Observed fragments are reasonably explained by a combination of existing fragmentation rules suggested for N-glycans and peptides.

  13. An amino acid sequence motif sufficient for subnuclear localization of an arginine/serine-rich splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Hedley, M L; Amrein, H; Maniatis, T

    1995-12-05

    We have identified an amino acid sequence in the Drosophila Transformer (Tra) protein that is capable of directing a heterologous protein to nuclear speckles, regions of the nucleus previously shown to contain high concentrations of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs and splicing factors. This sequence contains a nucleoplasmin-like bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a repeating arginine/serine (RS) dipeptide sequence adjacent to a short stretch of basic amino acids. Sequence comparisons from a number of other splicing factors that colocalize to nuclear speckles reveal the presence of one or more copies of this motif. We propose a two-step subnuclear localization mechanism for splicing factors. The first step is transport across the nuclear envelope via the nucleoplasmin-like NLS, while the second step is association with components in the speckled domain via the RS dipeptide sequence.

  14. Purification and partial amino acid sequence of the chloroplast cytochrome b-559.

    PubMed

    Widger, W R; Cramer, W A; Hermodson, M; Meyer, D; Gullifor, M

    1984-03-25

    The hydrophobic cytochrome b-559, purified from unstacked, ethanol-washed spinach thylakoid membranes, using extraction with 2% Triton X-100 in 4 M urea and three chromatographic steps in the presence of protease inhibitors, has a dominant band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea gels corresponding to Mr = 10,000. The yield of this preparation is 30-50% (5-10 mg) starting with 600 mg of chlorophyll. The heme content yields a calculated molecular weight of no more than 17,500/heme, and perhaps somewhat smaller after correction for impurities. The Mr = 10,000 band is stained by the tetramethylbenzidine-H2O2 heme reagent on lithium dodecyl sulfate gels run at 0 degrees C. The Mr = 10,000 protein, further separated by high performance liquid chromatography, contains a unique NH2 terminus that is not blocked, and the amino acid sequence for the first 27 residues is NH2-Ser-Gly-Ser-Thr-Gly-Glu-Arg-Ser-Phe-Ala-Asp-Ile-Ile-Thr-Ser-Ile-Arg-Tyr-Trp -Val-Ile-X-Ser-Ile-Thr-Ile-Pro. . . COOH. Approximately 55% of the amino acids are hydrophobic, based on amino acid analysis of the Mr = 10,000 peptide, which also indicated the presence of at least one histidine. Only one cytochrome b-559 component could be identified, whose yield indicated that it arises from a single b-559 protein in chloroplasts corresponding to the in situ high potential cytochrome of the chloroplast photosystem II.

  15. Predicting the tolerated sequences for proteins and protein interfaces using RosettaBackrub flexible backbone design.

    PubMed

    Smith, Colin A; Kortemme, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the set of sequences that are tolerated by a protein or protein interface, while maintaining a desired function, is useful for characterizing protein interaction specificity and for computationally designing sequence libraries to engineer proteins with new functions. Here we provide a general method, a detailed set of protocols, and several benchmarks and analyses for estimating tolerated sequences using flexible backbone protein design implemented in the Rosetta molecular modeling software suite. The input to the method is at least one experimentally determined three-dimensional protein structure or high-quality model. The starting structure(s) are expanded or refined into a conformational ensemble using Monte Carlo simulations consisting of backrub backbone and side chain moves in Rosetta. The method then uses a combination of simulated annealing and genetic algorithm optimization methods to enrich for low-energy sequences for the individual members of the ensemble. To emphasize certain functional requirements (e.g. forming a binding interface), interactions between and within parts of the structure (e.g. domains) can be reweighted in the scoring function. Results from each backbone structure are merged together to create a single estimate for the tolerated sequence space. We provide an extensive description of the protocol and its parameters, all source code, example analysis scripts and three tests applying this method to finding sequences predicted to stabilize proteins or protein interfaces. The generality of this method makes many other applications possible, for example stabilizing interactions with small molecules, DNA, or RNA. Through the use of within-domain reweighting and/or multistate design, it may also be possible to use this method to find sequences that stabilize particular protein conformations or binding interactions over others.

  16. On the failure indices of quadratic failure criteria for optimal stacking sequence design of laminated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. W.; Song, S. R.; Hwang, W.; Park, H. C.; Han, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    The quadratic failure criterion, which is intended to predict fracture, may be used as an object function for optimal stacking sequence design of laminated plate. However, calculations using a symmetric laminated plate demonstrate that Tsai-Wu theory may give incorrect optimum predictions under uniaxial loading.

  17. An Approach to the Design of Mathematical Task Sequences: Conceptual Learning as Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an emerging approach to the design of task sequences and the theory that undergirds it. The approach aims at promoting particular mathematical concepts, understood as the result of reflective abstraction. Central to this approach is the identification of available student activities from which students can abstract the…

  18. Rationale-Based, De Novo Design of Dehydrophenylalanine-Containing Antibiotic Peptides and Systematic Modification in Sequence for Enhanced Potency▿

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Sarika; Chauhan, Virander Singh

    2011-01-01

    Increased microbial drug resistance has generated a global requirement for new anti-infective agents. As part of an effort to develop new, low-molecular-mass peptide antibiotics, we used a rationale-based minimalist approach to design short, nonhemolytic, potent, and broad-spectrum antibiotic peptides with increased serum stability. These peptides were designed to attain an amphipathic structure in helical conformations. VS1 was used as the lead compound, and its properties were compared with three series of derivates obtained by (i) N-terminal amino acid addition, (ii) systematic Trp substitution, and (iii) peptide dendrimerization. The Trp substitution approach underlined the optimized sequence of VS2 in terms of potency, faster membrane permeation, and cost-effectiveness. VS2 (a variant of VS1 with two Trp substitutions) was found to exhibit good antimicrobial activity against both the Gram-negative Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. It was also found to have noncytolytic activity and the ability to permeate and depolarize the bacterial membrane. Lysis of the bacterial cell wall and inner membrane by the peptide was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. A combination of small size, the presence of unnatural amino acids, high antimicrobial activity, insignificant hemolysis, and proteolytic resistance provides fundamental information for the de novo design of an antimicrobial peptide useful for the management of infectious disease. PMID:21321136

  19. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ohrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-11-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes.

  20. Alignment of 700 globin sequences: extent of amino acid substitution and its correlation with variation in volume.

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, O. H.; Moens, L.; Vanfleteren, J.; Trotman, C. N.; Suzuki, T.; Vinogradov, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Seven-hundred globin sequences, including 146 nonvertebrate sequences, were aligned on the basis of conservation of secondary structure and the avoidance of gap penalties. Of the 182 positions needed to accommodate all the globin sequences, only 84 are common to all, including the absolutely conserved PheCD1 and HisF8. The mean number of amino acid substitutions per position ranges from 8 to 13 for all globins and 5 to 9 for internal positions. Although the total sequence volumes have a variation approximately 2-3%, the variation in volume per position ranges from approximately 13% for the internal to approximately 21% for the surface positions. Plausible correlations exist between amino acid substitution and the variation in volume per position for the 84 common and the internal but not the surface positions. The amino acid substitution matrix derived from the 84 common positions was used to evaluate sequence similarity within the globins and between the globins and phycocyanins C and colicins A, via calculation of pairwise similarity scores. The scores for globin-globin comparisons over the 84 common positions overlap the globin-phycocyanin and globin-colicin scores, with the former being intermediate. For the subset of internal positions, overlap is minimal between the three groups of scores. These results imply a continuum of amino acid sequences able to assume the common three-on-three alpha-helical structure and suggest that the determinants of the latter include sites other than those inaccessible to solvent. PMID:8535255

  1. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Blumberg, B.S.; Putnam, F.W.

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  2. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Javier; Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  3. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/. PMID:26987123

  4. [A method using long primers for cloning the upstream sequence of delta-6 fatty acid desaturases gene of Thamnidium elegans by nested inverse PCR].

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Pei; Sun, Wei; Li, Ming-Chun; Wei, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Xing, Lai-Jun

    2006-07-01

    Thamnidium elegans is a kind of phycomycete that produces essential unsaturated fatty acids, particularly y-linolenic acid. In this process, delta6-Fatty acid desaturase (D6D) plays a key role due to its enzymatic properties that catalyze the delta6 site dehydrogenation of precursor linoleic acid (18:2delta(9, 12) n-6) and a-linolenic acid (18:3delta(9, 12, 15) n-3). This reaction is the first and rate-limiting step of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) synthesis pathways. After we have isolated and cloned the gene coding delta6-fatty acid desaturase from Thamnidium elegans As3.2806 (GenBank accession number DQ099380), our interest focuses on the promotion and regulation of the gene transcription. To achieve this aim, we designed long primers and used nested inverse PCR to amplify DNA flanking sequences. First, genome of Thamnidium elegans was extracted and digested with restriction enzymes EcoR I and Kpn I , respectively. Then we ligated the digested DNA with T4 ligase at low concentration which is propitious for linear DNA to joint intromolecule. According to the sequence of delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene of Thamnidium elegans, we designed a couple of 35nt long inverse primers and two couples of shorter inverse primers for inverse PCR. Three rounds of PCR reactions were performed. In the primary reaction, the ligated DNA was used as a template, and the product was used as the template of the secondary reaction, the tertiary reaction was achieved in the same way. After all the three rounds of reactions, we got a nice product about 4 kb from the EcoR I digested sample, in which a 1.3kb 5' upstream sequence (GenBank accession number DQ309425) of delta6-fatty acid desaturase gene containing several putative regulatory elements including TATA. box, FSE-2, AP-1 sites, CCAAT cis-element site and STRE-binding site was derived after sequencing. All of these implied intensely that this 1.3kb fragment is a condition-regulated promoter. It is the first report about

  5. Real-Time Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification Assay for Detection of Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Galil, Khaled H.; El Sokkary, M. A.; Kheira, S. M.; Salazar, Andre M.; Yates, Marylynn V.; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2005-01-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay in combination with a molecular beacon was developed for the real-time detection and quantification of hepatitis A virus (HAV). A 202-bp, highly conserved 5′ noncoding region of HAV was targeted. The sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was tested with 10-fold dilutions of viral RNA, and a detection limit of 1 PFU was obtained. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by testing with other environmental pathogens and indicator microorganisms, with only HAV positively identified. When combined with immunomagnetic separation, the NASBA assay successfully detected as few as 10 PFU from seeded lake water samples. Due to its isothermal nature, its speed, and its similar sensitivity compared to the real-time RT-PCR assay, this newly reported real-time NASBA method will have broad applications for the rapid detection of HAV in contaminated food or water. PMID:16269748

  6. Evolutionary connections of biological kingdoms based on protein and nucleic acid sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolutionary trees are developed from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the methods of numerical taxonomy. Trees are presented for bacterial ferredoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes , cytochromes c2 and c', and 5.8S ribosomal RNA; the implications for early evolution are discussed; and a composite tree showing the branching of the anaerobes, aerobes, archaebacteria, and eukaryotes is shown. Single lines are found for all oxygen-evolving photosynthetic forms and for the salt-loving and high-temperature forms of archaebacteria. It is argued that the eukaryote mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytoplasmic host material are descended from free-living prokaryotes that formed symbiotic associations, with more than one symbiotic event involved in the evolution of each organelle.

  7. Identification of amino acid sequences in the polyomavirus capsid proteins that serve as nuclear localization signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. Jr; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The molecular mechanism participating in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Recently, the nuclear localization signal sequences (NLS) of many nuclear proteins have been identified, and most have been found to be composed of a highly basic amino acid stretch. A genetic "subtractive" and a biochemical "additive" approach were used in our studies to identify the NLS's of the polyomavirus structural capsid proteins. An NLS was identified at the N-terminus (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) of the major capsid protein VP1 and at the C-terminus (Glu307 -Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Glu-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) of the VP2/VP3 minor capsid proteins.

  8. The amino acid sequence of a carbohydrate-containing fragment of hen ovotransferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, I B; Williams, J

    1975-01-01

    1. Hen ovotransferrin was treated with CNBr and fractionated by gel filtration. 2. After further treatment by reduction and carboxymethylation a carbohydrate-containing fragment of molecular weight 11990 was obtained (fragment BCd). 3. The amino acid sequence of this fragment was determined. It consists of a single chain of 94 residues. 4. The structure of a tryptic glycopeptide derived from whole ovotransferrin permitted a further eight residues to be assigned at the N-terminus of fragment BCd. 5. Heterogeneity was found at two positions. 6. Further evidence has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50045 (19 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1975), 145, 5. PMID:1172663

  9. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the Lactobacillus casei gene for the D-alanine-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, M P; Neuhaus, F C

    1992-01-01

    The D-alanine-activating enzyme (Dae; EC 6.3.2.4) encoded by the dae gene from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 is a cytosolic protein essential for the formation of the D-alanyl esters of membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. The gene has been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli, an organism which does not possess Dae activity. The open reading frame is 1,518 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 55.867 kDa, a value in agreement with the 56 kDa obtained by electrophoresis. A putative promoter and ribosome-binding site immediately precede the dae gene. A second open reading frame contiguous with the dae gene has also been partially sequenced. The organization of these genetic elements suggests that more than one enzyme necessary for the biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid may be present in this operon. Analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from the dae gene identified three regions with significant homology to proteins in the following groups of ATP-utilizing enzymes: (i) the acid-thiol ligases, (ii) the activating enzymes for the biosynthesis of enterobactin, and (iii) the synthetases for tyrocidine, gramicidin S, and penicillin. From these comparisons, a common motif (GXXGXPK) has been identified that is conserved in the 19 protein domains analyzed. This motif may represent the phosphate-binding loop of an ATP-binding site for this class of enzymes. A DNA fragment (1,568 nucleotides) containing the dae gene and its putative ribosome-binding site has been subcloned and expressed in E. coli. Approximately 0.5% of the total cell protein is active Dae, whereas 21% is in the form of inclusion bodies. The isolation of this minimal fragment without a native promoter sequence provides the basis for designing a genetic system for modulating the D-alanine ester content of lipoteichoic acid. PMID:1385594

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of beta-papillomaviruses as inferred from nucleotide and amino acid sequence data.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Marc; Köhler, Anja; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the beta-group seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. Papillomaviruses are host specific and are considered closely co-evolving with their hosts. Evolutionary incongruence between early genes and late genes has been reported among oncogenic genital alpha-papillomaviruses and considerably challenge phylogenetic reconstructions. We investigated the relationships of 29 beta-HPV (25 types plus four putative new types, subtypes, or variants) as inferred from codon aligned and amino acid sequence data of the genes E1, E2, E6, E7, L1, and L2 using likelihood, distance, and parsimony approaches. An analysis of a L1 fragment included additional nucleotide and amino acid sequences from seven non-human beta-papillomaviruses. Early genes and late genes evolution did not conflict significantly in beta-papillomaviruses based on partition homogeneity tests (p > or = 0.001). As inferred from the complete genome analyses, beta-papillomaviruses were monophyletic and segregated into four highly supported monophyletic assemblages corresponding to the species 1, 2, 3, and fused 4/5. They basically split into the species 1 and the remainder of beta-papillomaviruses, whose species 3, 4, and 5 constituted the sistergroup of species 2. beta-Papillomaviruses have been isolated from humans, apes, and monkeys, and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment showed non-human papillomaviruses highly polyphyletic nesting within the HPV species. Thus, host and virus phylogenies were not congruent in beta-papillomaviruses, and multiple invasions across species borders may contribute (additionally to host-linked evolution) to their diversification.

  11. Amino acid sequences of alpha-helical segments from S-carbosymethylkerateine-A. Complete sequence of a type-I segment.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, K H; Inglis, A S; Crewther, W G

    1978-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of a type-I helical segment from the low-sulphur protein (S-carboxymethylkerateine-A) of wool was determined by combining automatic and manual-sequencing data. Whereas in the type-II helical segment most of the cationic groups occur in pairs, 11 of the 22 anionic residues in the sequence of the type-I segment were situated next to a second anionic residue. This suggests possible interactions between type-I and type-II helical segments in alpha-keratin. As observed with the sequence of a type-II helical segment a model constructed on 3.6 residues per turn of helix shows a line of hydrophobic residues along the helix, thereby supporting the physicochemical evidence that the molecule is predominantly helical and forms part of a coiled-coil structure. Examination of the sequence data by predictive methods indicates the possibilty of extensive sections of alpha-helix interspersed with discontinuities. The molecule contains a number of regions with peptide sequences identical with those found by other workers after enzymic digestion of fractions from oxidized wool. Images Fig. 1. PMID:697725

  12. Recent Advances in Nucleic Acid Binding Aspects of Berberine Analogs and Implications for Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Debipreeta; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is one of the most widely known alkaloids belonging to the protoberberine group exhibiting myriad therapeutic properties. The anticancer potency of berberine appears to derive from its multiple actions including strong interaction with nucleic acids exhibiting adenine-thymine base pair specificity, inhibition of the enzymes topoisomerases and telomerases, and stabilizing the quadruplex structures. It was realized that the development of berberine as a potential anticancer agent necessitates enhancing its nucleic acid binding efficacy through appropriate structural modifications. More recently a number of such approaches have been attempted in various laboratories with great success. Several derivatives have been synthesized mostly with substitutions at the 8, 9 and 13 positions of the isoquinoline chromophore, and studied for enhanced nucleic acid binding activity. In this article, we present an up to date review of the details of the interaction of berberine and several of its important synthetic 8, 9 and 13 substituted derivatives with various nucleic acid structures reported recently. These studies provide interesting knowledge on the mode, mechanism, sequence and structural specificity of the binding of berberine derivatives and correlate structural and energetic aspects of the interaction providing better understanding of the structure- activity relations for designing and development of berberine based therapeutic agents with higher efficacy and therapeutic potential.

  13. Spermatogenesis of the lizard Lacerta vivipara: histological studies and amino acid sequence of a protamine lacertine 1.

    PubMed

    Martinage, A; Depeiges, A; Wouters, D; Morel, L; Sautière, P

    1996-06-01

    The lizard Lacerta vivipara is a seasonal breeder with a well characterized reproductive cycle. An histological study of the lizard testis has been performed at different stages of spermatogenesis and the nuclear basic proteins content was assessed by electrophoretical analysis. Two protamines, lacertines 1 and 2, are present in spermatozoa in April and May. We have isolated lacertine1 and characterized a protamine with a mass of 4,963.7 Da. Amino acid sequence of this protamine (41 residues) was established from data provided by automated Edman degradation. It is characterized by a basic amino acid stretch in the N- and C-terminal regions and by a central part which only consists of 3 different intermingled amino acids. This protamine presents 62% homology with scylliorhinine Z3 from dog-fish Scylliorhinus caniculus and 58% homology with quail protamine. The reported lizard protamine sequence is the first reptilian protamine sequence available so far.

  14. The amino acid sequence of the cytochrome c-554(547) from the chemolithotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus neapolitanus.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P; Meyer, T E; Trudinger, P A; Kamen, M D

    1985-01-01

    An amino acid sequence is proposed for the cytochrome c-554(547) from the bacterium Thiobacillus neapolitanus N.C.I.B. 8539). It consists of a polypeptide chain of 91 residues, with a pair of haem-attachment cysteine residues at positions 15 and 18. There is similarity in sequence with each of the halves of the sequence of the dihaem cytochromes c4 and with a cytochrome c-554(548) from a halophilic strain of Paracoccus. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence of the protein has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50127 (11 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1985) 225, 5. PMID:2988504

  15. in silico Whole Genome Sequencer & Analyzer (iWGS): A Computational Pipeline to Guide the Design and Analysis of de novo Genome Sequencing Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Peris, David; Kominek, Jacek; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-09-16

    The availability of genomes across the tree of life is highly biased toward vertebrates, pathogens, human disease models, and organisms with relatively small and simple genomes. Recent progress in genomics has enabled the de novo decoding of the genome of virtually any organism, greatly expanding its potential for understanding the biology and evolution of the full spectrum of biodiversity. The increasing diversity of sequencing technologies, assays, and de novo assembly algorithms have augmented the complexity of de novo genome sequencing projects in non-model organisms. To reduce the costs and challenges in de novo genome sequencing projects and streamline their experimental design and analysis, we developed iWGS (in silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer), an automated pipeline for guiding the choice of appropriate sequencing strategy and assembly protocols. iWGS seamlessly integrates the four key steps of a de novo genome sequencing project: data generation (through simulation), data quality control, de novo assembly, and assembly evaluation and validation. The last three steps can also be applied to the analysis of real data. iWGS is designed to enable the user to have great flexibility in testing the range of experimental designs available for genome sequencing projects, and supports all major sequencing technologies and popular assembly tools. Three case studies illustrate how iWGS can guide the design of de novo genome sequencing projects and evaluate the performance of a wide variety of user-specified sequencing strategies and assembly protocols on genomes of differing architectures. iWGS, along with a detailed documentation, is freely available at https://github.com/zhouxiaofan1983/iWGS.

  16. In Silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer (iWGS): a Computational Pipeline to Guide the Design and Analysis of de novo Genome Sequencing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Peris, David; Kominek, Jacek; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis

    2016-01-01

    The availability of genomes across the tree of life is highly biased toward vertebrates, pathogens, human disease models, and organisms with relatively small and simple genomes. Recent progress in genomics has enabled the de novo decoding of the genome of virtually any organism, greatly expanding its potential for understanding the biology and evolution of the full spectrum of biodiversity. The increasing diversity of sequencing technologies, assays, and de novo assembly algorithms have augmented the complexity of de novo genome sequencing projects in nonmodel organisms. To reduce the costs and challenges in de novo genome sequencing projects and streamline their experimental design and analysis, we developed iWGS (in silico Whole Genome Sequencer and Analyzer), an automated pipeline for guiding the choice of appropriate sequencing strategy and assembly protocols. iWGS seamlessly integrates the four key steps of a de novo genome sequencing project: data generation (through simulation), data quality control, de novo assembly, and assembly evaluation and validation. The last three steps can also be applied to the analysis of real data. iWGS is designed to enable the user to have great flexibility in testing the range of experimental designs available for genome sequencing projects, and supports all major sequencing technologies and popular assembly tools. Three case studies illustrate how iWGS can guide the design of de novo genome sequencing projects, and evaluate the performance of a wide variety of user-specified sequencing strategies and assembly protocols on genomes of differing architectures. iWGS, along with a detailed documentation, is freely available at https://github.com/zhouxiaofan1983/iWGS. PMID:27638685

  17. Design and evaluation of locked nucleic acid-based splice-switching oligonucleotides in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Takenori; Tachibana, Keisuke; Saito, Kiwamu; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tomita, Erisa; Waki, Reiko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Takefumi; Inoue, Takao; Kawakami, Junji; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Antisense-mediated modulation of pre-mRNA splicing is an attractive therapeutic strategy for genetic diseases. Currently, there are few examples of modulation of pre-mRNA splicing using locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides, and, in particular, no systematic study has addressed the optimal design of LNA-based splice-switching oligonucleotides (LNA SSOs). Here, we designed a series of LNA SSOs complementary to the human dystrophin exon 58 sequence and evaluated their ability to induce exon skipping in vitro using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We demonstrated that the number of LNAs in the SSO sequence and the melting temperature of the SSOs play important roles in inducing exon skipping and seem to be key factors for designing efficient LNA SSOs. LNA SSO length was an important determinant of activity: a 13-mer with six LNA modifications had the highest efficacy, and a 7-mer was the minimal length required to induce exon skipping. Evaluation of exon skipping activity using mismatched LNA/DNA mixmers revealed that 9-mer LNA SSO allowed a better mismatch discrimination. LNA SSOs also induced exon skipping of endogenous human dystrophin in primary human skeletal muscle cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that LNA SSOs are powerful tools for modulating pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24935206

  18. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Smith, R.F.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  19. Mariner Mars 1971 television picture catalog. Volume 2: Sequence design and picture coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskela, P. E.; Helton, M. R.; Seeley, L. N.; Zawacki, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A collection of data relating to the Mariner 9 TV picture is presented. The data are arranged to offer speedy identification of what took place during entire science cycles, on individual revolutions, and during individual science links or sequences. Summary tables present the nominal design for each of the major picture-taking cycles, along with the sequences actually taken on each revolution. These tables permit identification at a glance, all TV sequences and the corresponding individual pictures for the first 262 revolutions (primary mission). A list of TV pictures, categorized according to their latitude and longitude, is also provided. Orthographic and/or mercator plots for all pictures, along with pertinent numerical data for their center points are presented. Other tables and plots of interest are also included. This document is based upon data contained in the Supplementary Experiment Data Record (SEDR) files as of 21 August 1972.

  20. Nucleic acid sequence of an internal image-bearing monoclonal anti-idiotype and its comparison to the sequence of the external antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, C; Co, M S; Slaoui, M; Gaulton, G N; Smith, T; Fields, B N; Mullins, J I; Greene, M I

    1986-01-01

    The monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (mAb2) 87.92.6 directed against the 9B.G5 antibody specific for the virus neutralizing epitope on the mammalian reovirus type 3 hemagglutinin was previously demonstrated to express an internal image of the receptor binding epitope of the reovirus type 3. Furthermore, this mAb2 has autoimmune reactivity to the cell surface receptor of the reovirus. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the 87.92.6 mAb2 heavy and light chains are described in this report. The sequence analysis reveals that the same heavy chain variable and joining (VH and JH) gene segments are used by the 87.92.6 anti-idiotypic mAb2 and by the dominant idiotypes of the BALB/c anti-GAT (cGAT) and anti-NP (NPa) responses. [GAT; random polymer that is 60% glutamic acid, 30% alanine, and 10% tyrosine. NP; (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)-acetyl.] Despite extensive homology at the level of the heavy chain variable regions, the NPa positive BALB/c anti-NP monoclonal antibody 17.2.25 binds neither 9B.G5 nor the cellular receptor for the hemagglutinin. Amino acid sequence comparison between the viral hemagglutinin and the 87.92.6 mAb2 light chain "internal image," reveals an area of significant homology indicating that antigen mimicry by antibodies may be achieved by sharing primary structure. PMID:2428036

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 35150 and a Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Mutant Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Markell, James A.; Koziol, Adam G.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains, occasionally isolated from food, are of public health importance. Here, we report on the 5.30-Mbp draft genome sequence of E. coli O157:H7 EDL931 (strain ATCC 35150) and the 5.32-Mbp draft genome sequence of a nalidixic acid-resistant mutant derivative used as a distinguishable control strain in food-testing laboratories. PMID:26205873

  2. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  3. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  4. Systematic optimization model and algorithm for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Han, Kehang; Zhu, Yushan

    2013-01-01

    A systematic optimization model for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design was developed based on the transition state theory of enzyme catalysis and graph-theoretical modeling. The saddle point on the free energy surface of the reaction system was represented by catalytic geometrical constraints, and the binding energy between the active site and transition state was minimized to reduce the activation energy barrier. The resulting hyperscale combinatorial optimization problem was tackled using a novel heuristic global optimization algorithm, which was inspired and tested by the protein core sequence selection problem. The sequence recapitulation tests on native active sites for two enzyme catalyzed hydrolytic reactions were applied to evaluate the predictive power of the design methodology. The results of the calculation show that most of the native binding sites can be successfully identified if the catalytic geometrical constraints and the structural motifs of the substrate are taken into account. Reliably predicting active site sequences may have significant implications for the creation of novel enzymes that are capable of catalyzing targeted chemical reactions. PMID:23649589

  5. Systematic optimization model and algorithm for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Han, Kehang; Zhu, Yushan

    2013-07-01

    A systematic optimization model for binding sequence selection in computational enzyme design was developed based on the transition state theory of enzyme catalysis and graph-theoretical modeling. The saddle point on the free energy surface of the reaction system was represented by catalytic geometrical constraints, and the binding energy between the active site and transition state was minimized to reduce the activation energy barrier. The resulting hyperscale combinatorial optimization problem was tackled using a novel heuristic global optimization algorithm, which was inspired and tested by the protein core sequence selection problem. The sequence recapitulation tests on native active sites for two enzyme catalyzed hydrolytic reactions were applied to evaluate the predictive power of the design methodology. The results of the calculation show that most of the native binding sites can be successfully identified if the catalytic geometrical constraints and the structural motifs of the substrate are taken into account. Reliably predicting active site sequences may have significant implications for the creation of novel enzymes that are capable of catalyzing targeted chemical reactions.

  6. Design of Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Molecules for DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The CpG dyad, an important genomic feature in DNA methylation and transcriptional regulation, is an attractive target for small molecules. To assess the utility of minor groove binding oligomers for CpG recognition, we screened a small library of hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides targeting the sequence 5′-CGCG-3′ and assessed their sequence specificity using an unbiased next-generation sequencing assay. Our findings indicate that hairpin polyamide of sequence PyImβIm-γ-PyImβIm (1), previously identified as a high affinity 5′-CGCG-3′ binder, favors 5′-GCGC-3′ in an unanticipated reverse binding orientation. Replacement of one β alanine with Py to afford PyImPyIm-γ-PyImβIm (3) restores the preference for 5′-CGCG-3′ binding in a forward orientation. The minor groove binding hairpin 3 inhibits DNA methyltransferase activity in the major groove at its target site more effectively than 1, providing a molecular basis for design of sequence-specific antagonists of CpG methylation. PMID:24502234

  7. Task analysis in curriculum design: a hierarchically sequenced introductory mathematics curriculum1

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Lauren B.; Wang, Margaret C.; Kaplan, Jerome

    1973-01-01

    A method of systematic task analysis is applied to the problem of designing a sequence of learning objectives that will provide an optimal match for the child's natural sequence of acquisition of mathematical skills and concepts. The authors begin by proposing an operational definition of the number concept in the form of a set of behaviors which, taken together, permit the inference that the child has an abstract concept of “number”. These are the “objectives” of the curriculum. Each behavior in the defining set is then subjected to an analysis that identifies hypothesized components of skilled performance and prerequisites for learning these components. On the basis of these analyses, specific sequences of learning objectives are proposed. The proposed sequences are hypothesized to be those that will best facilitate learning, by maximizing transfer from earlier to later objectives. Relevant literature on early learning and cognitive development is considered in conjunction with the analyses and the resulting sequences. The paper concludes with a discussion of the ways in which the curriculum can be implemented and studied in schools. Examples of data on individual children are presented, and the use of such data for improving the curriculum itself, as well as for examining the effects of other treatment variables, is considered. PMID:16795452

  8. Wide-field imaging design for a multiple-capillary DNA-sequencing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nay, Lyle M.; Sinclair, Robert; Swerdlow, Harold

    1997-05-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence detection system compatible with a capillary electrophoresis array was developed. The design incorporates fiber-optic excitation and a detection system including a diffraction grating and a CCD camera. The system employs no moving parts and is capable of producing data comparable to commercially available systems. It is based on a spectrally-resolved four-dye sequencing scheme. The conceptual design was proven, however, refinements must be made to optimize performance for high-throughput capillary-array DNA sequencing. Automated sample preparation and loading in combination with a refillable separation- matrix capillary-array system could prove to be an invaluable tool for completion of the Human Genome Project.

  9. Optimization of affinity, specificity and function of designed influenza inhibitors using deep sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Timothy A.; Chevalier, Aaron; Song, Yifan; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Fleishman, Sarel J.; De Mattos, Cecilia; Myers, Chris A.; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Blair, Patrick; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    We show that comprehensive sequence-function maps obtained by deep sequencing can be used to reprogram interaction specificity and to leapfrog over bottlenecks in affinity maturation by combining many individually small contributions not detectable in conventional approaches. We use this approach to optimize two computationally designed inhibitors against H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin and, in both cases, obtain variants with subnanomolar binding affinity. The most potent of these, a 51-residue protein, is broadly cross-reactive against all influenza group 1 hemagglutinins, including human H2, and neutralizes H1N1 viruses with a potency that rivals that of several human monoclonal antibodies, demonstrating that computational design followed by comprehensive energy landscape mapping can generate proteins with potential therapeutic utility.

  10. Purification, characterization, gene cloning and nucleotide sequencing of D: -stereospecific amino acid amidase from soil bacterium: Delftia acidovorans.

    PubMed

    Hongpattarakere, Tipparat; Komeda, Hidenobu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2005-12-01

    The D-amino acid amidase-producing bacterium was isolated from soil samples using an enrichment culture technique in medium broth containing D-phenylalanine amide as a sole source of nitrogen. The strain exhibiting the strongest activity was identified as Delftia acidovorans strain 16. This strain produced intracellular D-amino acid amidase constitutively. The enzyme was purified about 380-fold to homogeneity and its molecular mass was estimated to be about 50 kDa, on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was active preferentially toward D-amino acid amides rather than their L-counterparts. It exhibited strong amino acid amidase activity toward aromatic amino acid amides including D-phenylalanine amide, D-tryptophan amide and D-tyrosine amide, yet it was not specifically active toward low-molecular-weight D-amino acid amides such as D-alanine amide, L-alanine amide and L-serine amide. Moreover, it was not specifically active toward oligopeptides. The enzyme showed maximum activity at 40 degrees C and pH 8.5 and appeared to be very stable, with 92.5% remaining activity after the reaction was performed at 45 degrees C for 30 min. However, it was mostly inactivated in the presence of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride or Cd2+, Ag+, Zn2+, Hg2+ and As3+ . The NH2 terminal and internal amino acid sequences of the enzyme were determined; and the gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme gene damA encodes a 466-amino-acid protein (molecular mass 49,860.46 Da); and the deduced amino acid sequence exhibits homology to the D-amino acid amidase from Variovorax paradoxus (67.9% identity), the amidotransferase A subunit from Burkholderia fungorum (50% identity) and other enantioselective amidases.

  11. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  12. Effects of Acidic Peptide Size and Sequence on Trivalent Praseodymium Adduction and Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Commodore, Juliette J; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2017-02-07

    Using the lanthanide ion praseodymium, Pr(III), metallated ion formation and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) were studied for 25 biological and model acidic peptides. For chain lengths of seven or more residues, even highly acidic peptides that can be difficult to protonate by electrospray ionization will metallate and undergo abundant ETD fragmentation. Peptides composed of predominantly acidic residues form only the deprotonated ion, [M + Pr - H](2+) ; this ion yields near complete ETD sequence coverage for larger peptides. Peptides with a mixture of acidic and neutral residues, generate [M + Pr](3+) , which cleaves between every residue for many peptides. Acidic peptides that contain at least one residue with a basic side chain also produce the protonated ion, [M + Pr + H](4+) ; this ion undergoes the most extensive sequence coverage by ETD. Primarily metallated and non-metallated c- and z-ions form for all peptides investigated. Metal adducted product ions are only present when at least half of the peptide sequence can be incorporated into the ion; this suggests that the metal ion simultaneously attaches to more than one acidic site. The only site consistently lacking dissociation is at the N-terminal side of a proline residue. Increasing peptide chain length generates more backbone cleavage for metal-peptide complexes with the same charge state. For acidic peptides with the same length, increasing the precursor ion charge state from 2+ to 3+ also leads to more cleavage. The results of this study indicate that highly acidic peptides can be sequenced by ETD of complexes formed with Pr(III).

  13. Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation

    DOEpatents

    Castro, Alonso

    2004-06-01

    A method for rapid and efficient detection of a target DNA or RNA sequence is provided. A primer having a 3'-hydroxyl group at one end and having a sequence of nucleotides sufficiently homologous with an identifying sequence of nucleotides in the target DNA is selected. The primer is hybridized to the identifying sequence of nucleotides on the DNA or RNA sequence and a reporter molecule is synthesized on the target sequence by progressively binding complementary nucleotides to the primer, where the complementary nucleotides include nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. Fluorescence emitted by fluorophores on single reporter molecules is detected to identify the target DNA or RNA sequence.

  14. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  15. Experimental design-based functional mining and characterization of high-throughput sequencing data in the sequence read archive.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Takeru; Ohta, Tazro; Bono, Hidemasa

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology, also called next-generation sequencing (NGS), has the potential to revolutionize the whole process of genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and epigenetics. Sequencing data is captured in a public primary data archive, the Sequence Read Archive (SRA). As of January 2013, data from more than 14,000 projects have been submitted to SRA, which is double that of the previous year. Researchers can download raw sequence data from SRA website to perform further analyses and to compare with their own data. However, it is extremely difficult to search entries and download raw sequences of interests with SRA because the data structure is complicated, and experimental conditions along with raw sequences are partly described in natural language. Additionally, some sequences are of inconsistent quality because anyone can submit sequencing data to SRA with no quality check. Therefore, as a criterion of data quality, we focused on SRA entries that were cited in journal articles. We extracted SRA IDs and PubMed IDs (PMIDs) from SRA and full-text versions of journal articles and retrieved 2748 SRA ID-PMID pairs. We constructed a publication list referring to SRA entries. Since, one of the main themes of -omics analyses is clarification of disease mechanisms, we also characterized SRA entries by disease keywords, according to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) extracted from articles assigned to each SRA entry. We obtained 989 SRA ID-MeSH disease term pairs, and constructed a disease list referring to SRA data. We previously developed feature profiles of diseases in a system called "Gendoo". We generated hyperlinks between diseases extracted from SRA and the feature profiles of it. The developed project, publication and disease lists resulting from this study are available at our web service, called "DBCLS SRA" (http://sra.dbcls.jp/). This service will improve accessibility to high-quality data from SRA.

  16. Detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in chicken meat samples by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Churruca, E; Girbau, C; Martínez, I; Mateo, E; Alonso, R; Fernández-Astorga, A

    2007-06-10

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay based on molecular beacons was used for real-time detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in samples of chicken meat. A set of specific primers and beacon probe were designed to target the 16S rRNA of both species. The real-time NASBA protocol including the RNA isolation was valid for both of the cell suspensions in buffered saline and the artificially contaminated chicken meat samples. The presence of rRNA could be correlated with cellular viability, following inactivation of the bacteria by heating, in inoculated chicken meat samples but not in RNase-free cell suspensions.

  17. Identification of tropomyosins as major allergens in antarctic krill and mantis shrimp and their amino acid sequence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Kanna; Suma, Yota; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Lu, Ying; Ushio, Hideki; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Tropomyosin represents a major allergen of decapod crustaceans such as shrimps and crabs, and its highly conserved amino acid sequence (>90% identity) is a molecular basis of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity among decapods. At present, however, little information is available about allergens in edible crustaceans other than decapods. In this study, the major allergen in two species of edible crustaceans, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba and mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria that are taxonomically distinct from decapods, was demonstrated to be tropomyosin by IgE-immunoblotting using patient sera. The cross-reactivity of the tropomyosins from both species with decapod tropomyosins was also confirmed by inhibition IgE immunoblotting. Sequences of the tropomyosins from both species were determined by complementary deoxyribonucleic acid cloning. The mantis shrimp tropomyosin has high sequence identity (>90% identity) with decapod tropomyosins, especially with fast-type tropomyosins. On the other hand, the Antarctic krill tropomyosin is characterized by diverse alterations in region 13-42, the amino acid sequence of which is highly conserved for decapod tropomyosins, and hence, it shares somewhat lower sequence identity (82.4-89.8% identity) with decapod tropomyosins than the mantis shrimp tropomyosin. Quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that Antarctic krill contains tropomyosin at almost the same level as decapods, suggesting that its allergenicity is equivalent to decapods. However, mantis shrimp was assumed to be substantially not allergenic because of the extremely low content of tropomyosin.

  18. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the thioesterase domain of the rat fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Naggert, J; Witkowski, A; Mikkelsen, J; Smith, S

    1988-01-25

    A cloned cDNA containing the entire coding sequence for the long-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase (thioesterase I) component as well as the 3'-noncoding region of the fatty acid synthetase has been isolated using an expression vector and domain-specific antibodies. The coding region was assigned to the thioesterase I domain by identification of sequences coding for characterized peptide fragments, amino-terminal analysis of the isolated thioesterase I domain and the presence of the serine esterase active-site sequence motif. The thioesterase I domain is 306 amino acids long with a calculated molecular mass of 33,476 daltons; its DNA is flanked at the 5'-end by a region coding for the acyl carrier protein domain and at the 3'-end by a 1,537-base pairs-long noncoding sequence with a poly(A) tail. The thioesterase I domain exhibits a low, albeit discernible, homology with the discrete medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolases (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland and duck uropygial gland, suggesting a distant but common evolutionary ancestry for these proteins.

  19. Human parainfluenza type 3 virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA and limited amino acid sequence of the purified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Coligan, J E; Jambou, R C; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of mRNA for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of human parainfluenza type 3 virus obtained from the corresponding cDNA clone had a single long open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 64,254 daltons consisting of 572 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence was confirmed by limited N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of CNBr cleavage fragments of native HN that was purified by immunoprecipitation. The HN protein is moderately hydrophobic and has four potential sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) of N-glycosylation in the C-terminal half of the molecule. It is devoid of both the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal membrane anchorage domain characteristic of the hemagglutinin of influenza virus and the fusion (F0) protein of the paramyxoviruses. Instead, it has a single prominent hydrophobic region capable of membrane insertion beginning at 32 residues from the N terminus. This N-terminal membrane insertion is similar to that of influenza virus neuraminidase and the recently reported structures of HN proteins of Sendai virus and simian virus 5. Images PMID:3003381

  20. Sequence dependent N-terminal rearrangement and degradation of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, M.; Christensen, L.; Schmidt, J.; Haaima, G.; Orgel, L.; Nielsen, P. E.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of the PNA (peptide nucleic acid) thymine monomer inverted question markN-[2-(thymin-1-ylacetyl)]-N-(2-aminoaminoethyl)glycine inverted question mark and those of various PNA oligomers (5-8-mers) have been measured at room temperature (20 degrees C) as a function of pH. The thymine monomer undergoes N-acyl transfer rearrangement with a half-life of 34 days at pH 11 as analyzed by 1H NMR; and two reactions, the N-acyl transfer and a sequential degradation, are found by HPLC analysis to occur at measurable rates for the oligomers at pH 9 or above. Dependent on the amino-terminal sequence, half-lives of 350 h to 163 days were found at pH 9. At pH 12 the half-lives ranged from 1.5 h to 21 days. The results are discussed in terms of PNA as a gene therapeutic drug as well as a possible prebiotic genetic material.

  1. Beyond the bucket: testing the effect of experimental design on rate and sequence of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Experimental decay has revealed the potential for profound biases in our interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils, with non-random sequences of character loss distorting the position of fossil taxa in phylogenetic trees. By characterising these sequences we can rewind this distortion and make better-informed interpretations of the affinity of enigmatic fossil taxa. Equally, rate of character loss is crucial for estimating the preservation potential of phylogentically informative characters, and revealing the mechanisms of preservation themselves. However, experimental decay has been criticised for poorly modeling 'real' conditions, and dismissed as unsophisticated 'bucket science'. Here we test the effect of a differing experimental parameters on the rate and sequence of decay. By doing so, we can test the assumption that the results of decay experiments are applicable to informing interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils from diverse preservational settings. The results of our experiments demonstrate the validity of using the sequence of character loss as a phylogenetic tool, and sheds light on the extent to which environment must be considered before making decay-informed interpretations, or reconstructing taphonomic pathways. With careful consideration of experimental design, driven by testable hypotheses, decay experiments are robust and informative - experimental taphonomy needn't kick the bucket just yet.

  2. Optimum designs for next-generation sequencing to discover rare variants for common complex disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gang; Rao, D C

    2011-09-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies make it affordable to search for rare and functional variants for common complex diseases systematically. We investigated strategies for enriching rare variants in the samples selected for sequencing so as to optimize the power for their discovery. In particular, we investigated the roles of alternative sources of enrichment in families through computer simulations. We showed that linkage information, extreme phenotype, and nonrandom ascertainment, such as multiply affected families, constitute different sources for enriching rare and functional variants in a sequencing study design. Linkage is well known to have limited power for detecting small genetic effects, and hence not considered to be a powerful tool for discovering variants for common complex diseases. However, those families with some degree of family-specific linkage evidence provide an effective sampling strategy to sub-select the most linkage-informative families for sequencing. Compared with selecting subjects with extreme phenotypes, linkage evidence performs better with larger families, while extreme-phenotype method is more efficient with smaller families. Families with multiple affected siblings were found to provide the largest enrichment of rare variants. Finally, we showed that combined strategies, such as selecting linkage-informative families from multiply affected families, provide much higher enrichment of rare functional variants than either strategy alone.

  3. Frequencies of amino acid strings in globular protein sequences indicate suppression of blocks of consecutive hydrophobic residues

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Russell; Istrail, Sorin; King, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Patterns of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues play a major role in protein folding and function. Long, predominantly hydrophobic strings of 20–22 amino acids each are associated with transmembrane helices and have been used to identify such sequences. Much less attention has been paid to hydrophobic sequences within globular proteins. In prior work on computer simulations of the competition between on-pathway folding and off-pathway aggregate formation, we found that long sequences of consecutive hydrophobic residues promoted aggregation within the model, even controlling for overall hydrophobic content. We report here on an analysis of the frequencies of different lengths of contiguous blocks of hydrophobic residues in a database of amino acid sequences of proteins of known structure. Sequences of three or more consecutive hydrophobic residues are found to be significantly less common in actual globular proteins than would be predicted if residues were selected independently. The result may reflect selection against long blocks of hydrophobic residues within globular proteins relative to what would be expected if residue hydrophobicities were independent of those of nearby residues in the sequence. PMID:11316883

  4. Modulating semiconductor surface electronic properties by inorganic peptide-binders sequence design.

    PubMed

    Matmor, Maayan; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2012-12-19

    The use of proteins and peptides as part of biosensors and electronic devices has been the focus of intense research in recent years. However, despite the fact that the interface between the bioorganic molecules and the inorganic matter plays a significant role in determining the properties of such devices, information on the electronic properties of such interfaces is sparse. In this work, we demonstrate that the identity and position of single amino acid in short inorganic binding protein-segments can significantly modulate the electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces on which they are bound. Specifically, we show that the introduction of tyrosine or tryptophan, both possessing an aromatic side chain which higher occupied molecular orbitals are positioned in proximity to the edge of GaAs valence band, to the sequence of a peptide that binds to GaAs (100) results in changes of both the electron affinity and surface potential of the semiconductor. These effects were found to be more pronounced than the effects induced by the same amino acids once bound on the surface in a head-tail configuration. Furthermore, the relative magnitude of each effect was found to depend on the position of the modification in the sequence. This sequence dependent behavior is induced both indirectly by changes in the peptide surface coverage, and directly, probably, due to changes in the orientation and proximity of the tyrosine/tryptophan side group with respect to the surface due to the preferred conformation the peptide adopts on the surface. These studies reveal that despite the use of short protein oligomers and aiming at a non-natural-electronic task, the well-known relations between the proteins' structure and function is preserved. Combining the ability to tune the electronic properties at the interface with the ability to direct the growth of inorganic materials makes peptides promising building blocks for the construction of novel hybrid electronic devices and biosensors.

  5. Structure-based design of conformation- and sequence-specific antibodies against amyloid β

    PubMed Central

    Perchiacca, Joseph M.; Ladiwala, Ali Reza A.; Bhattacharya, Moumita; Tessier, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Conformation-specific antibodies that recognize aggregated proteins associated with several conformational disorders (e.g., Parkinson and prion diseases) are invaluable for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, no systematic strategy exists for generating conformation-specific antibodies that target linear sequence epitopes within misfolded proteins. Here we report a strategy for designing conformation- and sequence-specific antibodies against misfolded proteins that is inspired by the molecular interactions governing protein aggregation. We find that grafting small amyloidogenic peptides (6–10 residues) from the Aβ42 peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease into the complementarity determining regions of a domain (VH) antibody generates antibody variants that recognize Aβ soluble oligomers and amyloid fibrils with nanomolar affinity. We refer to these antibodies as gammabodies for grafted amyloid-motif antibodies. Gammabodies displaying the central amyloidogenic Aβ motif () are reactive with Aβ fibrils, whereas those displaying the amyloidogenic C terminus () are reactive with Aβ fibrils and oligomers (and weakly reactive with Aβ monomers). Importantly, we find that the grafted motifs target the corresponding peptide segments within misfolded Aβ conformers. Aβ gammabodies fail to cross-react with other amyloidogenic proteins and scrambling their grafted sequences eliminates antibody reactivity. Finally, gammabodies that recognize Aβ soluble oligomers and fibrils also neutralize the toxicity of each Aβ conformer. We expect that our antibody design strategy is not limited to Aβ and can be used to readily generate gammabodies against other toxic misfolded proteins. PMID:22171009

  6. Structure-based design of conformation- and sequence-specific antibodies against amyloid β.

    PubMed

    Perchiacca, Joseph M; Ladiwala, Ali Reza A; Bhattacharya, Moumita; Tessier, Peter M

    2012-01-03

    Conformation-specific antibodies that recognize aggregated proteins associated with several conformational disorders (e.g., Parkinson and prion diseases) are invaluable for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, no systematic strategy exists for generating conformation-specific antibodies that target linear sequence epitopes within misfolded proteins. Here we report a strategy for designing conformation- and sequence-specific antibodies against misfolded proteins that is inspired by the molecular interactions governing protein aggregation. We find that grafting small amyloidogenic peptides (6-10 residues) from the Aβ42 peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease into the complementarity determining regions of a domain (V(H)) antibody generates antibody variants that recognize Aβ soluble oligomers and amyloid fibrils with nanomolar affinity. We refer to these antibodies as gammabodies for grafted amyloid-motif antibodies. Gammabodies displaying the central amyloidogenic Aβ motif (18VFFA21) are reactive with Aβ fibrils, whereas those displaying the amyloidogenic C terminus (34LMVGGVVIA42) are reactive with Aβ fibrils and oligomers (and weakly reactive with Aβ monomers). Importantly, we find that the grafted motifs target the corresponding peptide segments within misfolded Aβ conformers. Aβ gammabodies fail to cross-react with other amyloidogenic proteins and scrambling their grafted sequences eliminates antibody reactivity. Finally, gammabodies that recognize Aβ soluble oligomers and fibrils also neutralize the toxicity of each Aβ conformer. We expect that our antibody design strategy is not limited to Aβ and can be used to readily generate gammabodies against other toxic misfolded proteins.

  7. Low-, high-coverage, and two-stage DNA sequencing in the design of the genetic association study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wu, Kehao; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing-based genetic association study (GAS) is a powerful tool to identify candidate disease variants and genomic regions. Although low-coverage sequencing offers low cost but inadequacy in calling rare variants, high coverage is able to detect essentially every variant but at a high cost. Two-stage sequencing may be an economical way to conduct GAS without losing power. In two-stage sequencing, an affordable number of samples are sequenced at high coverage as the reference panel, then to impute in a larger sample is sequenced at low coverage. As unit sequencing costs continue to decrease, investigators can now conduct GAS with more flexible sequencing depths. Here, we systematically evaluate the effect of the read depth and sample size on the variant discovery power and association power for study designs using low-coverage, high-coverage, and two-stage sequencing. We consider 12 low-coverage, 12 high-coverage, and 51 two-stage design scenarios with the read depth varying from 0.5× to 80×. With state-of-the-art simulation and analysis packages and in-house scripts, we simulate the complete study process from DNA sequencing to SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) calling and association testing. Our results show that with appropriate allocation of sequencing effort, two-stage sequencing is an effective approach for conducting GAS. We provide practical guidelines for investigators to plan the optimum sequencing-based GAS including two-stage sequencing design given their specific constraints of sequencing investment.

  8. Rationalization and Design of the Complementarity Determining Region Sequences in an Antibody-Antigen Recognition Interface

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jun-Bo; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Hung-Ju; Chang, Hung-Ju; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Huang, Kai-Fa; Ma, Alex Che; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical determinants in biological systems. Engineered proteins binding to specific areas on protein surfaces could lead to therapeutics or diagnostics for treating diseases in humans. But designing epitope-specific protein-protein interactions with computational atomistic interaction free energy remains a difficult challenge. Here we show that, with the antibody-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) interaction as a model system, the experimentally observed amino acid preferences in the antibody-antigen interface can be rationalized with 3-dimensional distributions of interacting atoms derived from the database of protein structures. Machine learning models established on the rationalization can be generalized to design amino acid preferences in antibody-antigen interfaces, for which the experimental validations are tractable with current high throughput synthetic antibody display technologies. Leave-one-out cross validation on the benchmark system yielded the accuracy, precision, recall (sensitivity) and specificity of the overall binary predictions to be 0.69, 0.45, 0.63, and 0.71 respectively, and the overall Matthews correlation coefficient of the 20 amino acid types in the 24 interface CDR positions was 0.312. The structure-based computational antibody design methodology was further tested with other antibodies binding to VEGF. The results indicate that the methodology could provide alternatives to the current antibody technologies based on animal immune systems in engineering therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies against predetermined antigen epitopes. PMID:22457753

  9. Design of targeted, capture-based, next generation sequencing tests for precision cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Ian S; Cottrell, Catherine E; Lockwood, Christina M

    2013-12-01

    In cancer medicine, next generation sequencing (NGS) has emerged as a practical method to generate patient- and tumor-specific genetic data for optimal selection of targeted therapies. Targeted sequencing allows clinical testing to focus on cancer-related genes, thus maximizing the test's sensitivity and specificity for actionable variants. In this review, we summarize the current regulatory environment surrounding clinical NGS, including regulations and professional opinions established by the College of American Pathologists, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, the Association for Molecular Pathology, the New York State Department of Health, and the American College of Medical Genetics. We outline practical considerations for the design of targeted NGS assays, with an emphasis on capture-based methods. Finally, we discuss components of the validation process for clinical NGS assays as well as challenges that still remain for clinical NGS.

  10. Classifying nucleic acid sub-sequences as introns or exons using genetic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, S.

    1995-12-31

    An evolutionary computation technique, genetic programming, created programs that classify messenger RNA sequences into one of two classes: (1) the sequence is expressed as (part of) a protein (an exon), or (2) not expressed as protein (an intron).

  11. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  12. Clickable Nucleic Acids: Sequence-Controlled Periodic Copolymer/Oligomer Synthesis by Orthogonal Thiol-X Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xi, Weixian; Pattanayak, Sankha; Wang, Chen; Fairbanks, Benjamin; Gong, Tao; Wagner, Justine; Kloxin, Christopher J; Bowman, Christopher N

    2015-11-23

    Synthetic polymer approaches generally lack the ability to control the primary sequence, with sequence control referred to as the holy grail. Two click chemistry reactions were now combined to form nucleobase-containing sequence-controlled polymers in simple polymerization reactions. Two distinct approaches are used to form these click nucleic acid (CNA) polymers. These approaches employ thiol-ene and thiol-Michael reactions to form homopolymers of a single nucleobase (e.g., poly(A)n ) or homopolymers of specific repeating nucleobase sequences (e.g., poly(ATC)n). Furthermore, the incorporation of monofunctional thiol-terminated polymers into the polymerization system enables the preparation of multiblock copolymers in a single reaction vessel; the length of the diblock copolymer can be tuned by the stoichiometric ratio and/or the monomer functionality. These polymers are also used for organogel formation where complementary CNA-based polymers form reversible crosslinks.

  13. Generalized min-max bound-based MRI pulse sequence design framework for wide-range T1 relaxometry: A case study on the tissue specific imaging sequence

    PubMed Central

    Buck, John R.; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new design strategy for optimizing MRI pulse sequences for T1 relaxometry. The design strategy optimizes the pulse sequence parameters to minimize the maximum variance of unbiased T1 estimates over a range of T1 values using the Cramér-Rao bound. In contrast to prior sequences optimized for a single nominal T1 value, the optimized sequence using our bound-based strategy achieves improved precision and accuracy for a broad range of T1 estimates within a clinically feasible scan time. The optimization combines the downhill simplex method with a simulated annealing process. To show the effectiveness of the proposed strategy, we optimize the tissue specific imaging (TSI) sequence. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the optimized TSI sequence yields improved precision and accuracy over the popular driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation of T1 (DESPOT1) approach for normal brain tissues (estimated T1 700–2000 ms at 3.0T). The relative mean estimation error (MSE) for T1 estimation is less than 1.7% using the optimized TSI sequence, as opposed to less than 7.0% using DESPOT1 for normal brain tissues. The optimized TSI sequence achieves good stability by keeping the MSE under 7.0% over larger T1 values corresponding to different lesion tissues and the cerebrospinal fluid (up to 5000 ms). The T1 estimation accuracy using the new pulse sequence also shows improvement, which is more pronounced in low SNR scenarios. PMID:28222197

  14. Assignment of fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria to Syntrophomonadaceae fam. nov. on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, H.; Yang, D.; Woese, C. R.; Bryant, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    After enrichment from Chinese rural anaerobic digestor sludge, anaerobic, sporing and nonsporing, saturated fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria were isolated as cocultures with H2- and formate-utilizing Methanospirillum hungatei or Desulfovibrio sp. strain G-11. The syntrophs degraded C4 to C8 saturated fatty acids, including isobutyrate and 2-methylbutyrate. They were adapted to grow on crotonate and were isolated as pure cultures. The crotonate-grown pure cultures alone did not grow on butyrate in either the presence or the absence of some common electron acceptors. However, when they were reconstituted with M. hungatei, growth on butyrate again occurred. In contrast, crotonate-grown Clostridium kluyveri and Clostridium sticklandii, as well as Clostridium sporogenes, failed to grow on butyrate when these organisms were cocultured with M. hungatei. The crotonate-grown pure subcultures of the syntrophs described above were subjected to 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Several previously documented fatty acid-beta-oxidizing syntrophs grown in pure cultures with crotonate were also subjected to comparative sequence analyses. The sequence analyses revealed that the new sporing and nonsporing isolates and other syntrophs that we sequenced, which had either gram-negative or gram-positive cell wall ultrastructure, all belonged to the phylogenetically gram-positive phylum. They were not closely related to any of the previously known subdivisions in the gram-positive phylum with which they were compared, but were closely related to each other, forming a new subdivision in the phylum. We recommend that this group be designated Syntrophomonadaceae fam. nov.; a description is given.

  15. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5' end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5' end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique's simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis.

  16. Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Novel Technique for Rapid, Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Machao; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Hu, Shoukui; Jin, Dong; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    The article reported a novel methodology for real-time PCR analysis of nucleic acids, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (ET-PCR). Just like PCR, ET-PCR only required one pair of primers. A short sequence, which was recognized by restriction enzyme BstUI, was attached to the 5′ end of the forward (F) or reverse (R) PCR primer, and the new F or R primer was named EF or ER. EF/ER was labeled at the 5′ end with a reporter dye and in the middle with a quenching dye. BstUI cleaves the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end recognition sequences and their complementary sequences) during the extension phase, which separates the reporter molecule from the quenching dye, leading to a gain of fluorescence signal. This process is repeated in each amplification cycle and unaffected the exponential synthesis of the PCR amplification. ET-PCR allowed real-time analysis of single or multiple targets in a single vessel, and provided the reproducible quantitation of nucleic acids. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of ET-PCR were successfully evaluated, detecting down to 250 fg of genomic DNA per tube of target pathogen DNA examined, and the positive results were generated in a relatively short period. Moreover, the practical application of ET-PCR for simultaneous detection of multiple target pathogens was also demonstrated in artificially contaminated blood samples. In conclusion, due to the technique’s simplicity of design, reproducible data and low contamination risk, ET-PCR assay is an appealing alternative to conventional approaches currently used for real-time nucleic acid analysis. PMID:27468284

  17. Iterative design of a helically folded aromatic oligoamide sequence for the selective encapsulation of fructose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramouli, Nagula; Ferrand, Yann; Lautrette, Guillaume; Kauffmann, Brice; Mackereth, Cameron David; Laguerre, Michel; Dubreuil, Didier; Huc, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The ab initio design of synthetic molecular receptors for a specific biomolecular guest remains an elusive objective, particularly for targets such as monosaccharides, which have very close structural analogues. Here we report a powerful approach to produce receptors with very high selectivity for specific monosaccharides and, as a demonstration, we develop a foldamer that selectively encapsulates fructose. The approach uses an iterative design process that exploits the modular structure of folded synthetic oligomer sequences in conjunction with molecular modelling and structural characterization to inform subsequent refinements. Starting from a first-principles design taking size, shape and hydrogen-bonding ability into account and using the high predictability of aromatic oligoamide foldamer conformations and their propensity to crystallize, a sequence that binds to β-D-fructopyranose in organic solvents with atomic-scale complementarity was obtained in just a few iterative modifications. This scheme, which mimics the adaptable construction of biopolymers from a limited number of monomer units, provides a general protocol for the development of selective receptors.

  18. Sequence-based design of bioactive small molecules that target precursor microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Gallo, Steven M; Disney, Matthew D

    2014-04-01

    Oligonucleotides are designed to target RNA using base pairing rules, but they can be hampered by poor cellular delivery and nonspecific stimulation of the immune system. Small molecules are preferred as lead drugs or probes but cannot be designed from sequence. Herein, we describe an approach termed Inforna that designs lead small molecules for RNA from solely sequence. Inforna was applied to all human microRNA hairpin precursors, and it identified bioactive small molecules that inhibit biogenesis by binding nuclease-processing sites (44% hit rate). Among 27 lead interactions, the most avid interaction is between a benzimidazole (1) and precursor microRNA-96. Compound 1 selectively inhibits biogenesis of microRNA-96, upregulating a protein target (FOXO1) and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Apoptosis is ablated when FOXO1 mRNA expression is knocked down by an siRNA, validating compound selectivity. Markedly, microRNA profiling shows that 1 only affects microRNA-96 biogenesis and is at least as selective as an oligonucleotide.

  19. Sequence Comparison and Phylogeny of Nucleotide Sequence of Coat Protein and Nucleic Acid Binding Protein of a Distinct Isolate of Shallot virus X from India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, S; Baranwal, V K

    2011-06-01

    Shallot virus X (ShVX), a type species in the genus Allexivirus of the family Alfaflexiviridae has been associated with shallot plants in India and other shallot growing countries like Russia, Germany, Netherland, and New Zealand. Coat protein (CP) and nucleic acid binding protein (NB) region of the virus was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from scales leaves of shallot bulbs. The partial cDNA contained two open reading frames encoding proteins of molecular weights of 28.66 and 14.18 kDa belonging to Flexi_CP super-family and viral NB super-family, respectively. The percent identity and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of CP and NB region of the virus associated with shallot indicated that it was a distinct isolate of ShVX.

  20. STAMP: Extensions to the STADEN sequence analysis package for high throughput interactive microsatellite marker design

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Lars; Beszteri, Bánk; Gäbler-Schwarz, Steffi; Held, Christoph; Leese, Florian; Mayer, Christoph; Pöhlmann, Kevin; Frickenhaus, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Background Microsatellites (MSs) are DNA markers with high analytical power, which are widely used in population genetics, genetic mapping, and forensic studies. Currently available software solutions for high-throughput MS design (i) have shortcomings in detecting and distinguishing imperfect and perfect MSs, (ii) lack often necessary interactive design steps, and (iii) do not allow for the development of primers for multiplex amplifications. We present a set of new tools implemented as extensions to the STADEN package, which provides the backbone functionality for flexible sequence analysis workflows. The possibility to assemble overlapping reads into unique contigs (provided by the base functionality of the STADEN package) is important to avoid developing redundant markers, a feature missing from most other similar tools. Results Our extensions to the STADEN package provide the following functionality to facilitate microsatellite (and also minisatellite) marker design: The new modules (i) integrate the state-of-the-art tandem repeat detection and analysis software PHOBOS into workflows, (ii) provide two separate repeat detection steps – with different search criteria – one for masking repetitive regions during assembly of sequencing reads and the other for designing repeat-flanking primers for MS candidate loci, (iii) incorporate the widely used primer design program PRIMER3 into STADEN workflows, enabling the interactive design and visualization of flanking primers for microsatellites, and (iv) provide the functionality to find optimal locus- and primer pair combinations for multiplex primer design. Furthermore, our extensions include a module for storing analysis results in an SQLite database, providing a transparent solution for data access from within as well as from outside of the STADEN Package. Conclusion The STADEN package is enhanced by our modules into a highly flexible, high-throughput, interactive tool for conventional and multiplex

  1. A rapid method for manual or automated purification of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids for sequencing, genotyping, and microarrays.

    PubMed

    Springer, Amy L; Booth, Lisa R; Braid, Michael D; Houde, Christiane M; Hughes, Karin A; Kaiser, Robert J; Pedrak, Casandra; Spicer, Douglas A; Stolyar, Sergey

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescent dyes provide specific, sensitive, and multiplexed detection of nucleic acids. To maximize sensitivity, fluorescently labeled reaction products (e.g., cycle sequencing or primer extension products) must be purified away from residual dye-labeled precursors. Successful high-throughput analyses require that this purification be reliable, rapid, and amenable to automation. Common methods for purifying reaction products involve several steps and require processes that are not easily automated. Prolinx, Inc. has devel oped RapXtract superparamagnetic separation technology affording rapid and easy-to-perform methods that yield high-quality product and are easily automated. The technology uses superparamagnetic particles that specifically remove unincorporated dye-labeled precursors. These particles are efficiently pelleted in the presence of a magnetic field, making them ideal for purification because of the rapid separations that they allow. RapXtract-purified sequencing reactions yield data with good signal and high Phred quality scores, and they work with various sequencing dye chemistries, including BigDye and near-infrared fluorescence IRDyes. RapXtract technology can also be used to purify dye primer sequencing reactions, primer extension reactions for genotyping analysis, and nucleic acid labeling reactions for microarray hybridization. The ease of use and versatility of RapXtract technology makes it a good choice for manual or automated purification of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids.

  2. Gene structure and amino acid sequence of Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth) myelin DM20: phylogenetic relation of the fish.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Y; Kasama-Yoshida, H; Sakuma, M; Kobayashi, Y; Cao, Y; Hasegawa, M; Kojima, H; Tamai, Y; Tanokura, M; Kurihara, T

    1999-07-01

    The structure of Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth) proteolipid protein/DM20 gene excluding exon 1 was determined, and the amino acid sequence of Latimeria DM20 corresponding to exons 2-7 was deduced. The nucleotide sequence of exon 3 suggests that only DM20 isoform is expressed in Latimeria. The structure of proteolipid protein/DM20 gene is well preserved among human, dog, mouse, and Latimeria. Southern blot analysis indicates that Latimeria DM20 gene is a single-copy gene. When the amino acid sequences of DM20 were compared among various species, Latimeria was more similar to tetrapods than other fishes including lungfish, confirming the previous finding by immunoreactivity (Waehneldt and Malotka 1989 J. Neurochem. 52:1941-1943). However, when phylogenetic trees were constructed from the DM20 sequences, lungfish was clearly the closest to tetrapods. Latimeria was situated outside of lungfish by the maximum likelihood method. The apparent similarity of Latimeria DM20 to tetrapod proteolipid protein/DM20 is explained by the slow amino acid substitution rate of Latimeria DM20.

  3. Sequencing design for BFS engagement. [Backup Flight System for space shuttle computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurica, K. E.

    1981-01-01

    The Space Shuttle's avionics system is controlled by five onboard computers, four of which are loaded with the Primary Avionics Software System (PASS), and one of which is loaded with the Backup Flight System (BFS). The Shuttle is nominally controlled by the PASS computers. However, in the event of a PASS generic software failure, the BFS is engaged and assumes control of the Shuttle. The BFS Sequencing System problems presented by the engage requirement and the solutions chosen by the developers are discussed. These solutions constitute a technique which can be applied to the design of any real-time backup system.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the Bet v 1-homologous allergen Fra a 1 in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) shows the presence of an intron and little variability in amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Musidlowska-Persson, Anna; Alm, Rikard; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2007-02-01

    The Fra a 1 allergen in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) is homologous to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, which has numerous isoforms differing in terms of amino acid sequence and immunological impact. To map the extent of sequence differences in the Fra a 1 allergen, PCR cloning and sequencing was applied. Several genomic sequences of Fra a 1, with a length of either 584, 591 or 594 nucleotides, were obtained from three different strawberry varieties. All contained one intron, with the length of either 101 or 110 nucleotides. By sequencing 30 different clones, eight different DNA sequences were obtained, giving in total five potential Fra a 1 protein isoforms, with high sequence similarity (>97% sequence identity) and only seven positions of amino acid variability, which were largely confirmed by mass spectrometry of expressed proteins. We conclude that the sequence variability in the strawberry allergen Fra a 1 is small, within and between strawberry varieties, and that multiple spots, previously detected in 2DE, are presumably due to differences in post-translational modification rather than differences in amino acid sequence. The most abundant Fra a 1 isoform sequence, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli after removal of the intron, was recognized by IgE from strawberry allergic patients. It cross-reacted with antibodies to Bet v 1 and the homologous apple allergen Mal d 1 (61 and 78% sequence identity, respectively), and will be used in further analyses of variation in Fra a 1-expression.

  5. Purification of a marsupial insulin: amino-acid sequence of insulin from the eastern grey kangaroo Macropus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Treacy, G B; Shaw, D C; Griffiths, M E; Jeffrey, P D

    1989-03-24

    Insulin has been purified from kangaroo pancreas by acidic ethanol extraction, diethyl ether precipitation and gel filtration. The amino-acid sequence of this, the first marsupial insulin to be studied, is reported. It differs from human insulin by only four amino-acid substitutions, all in regions of the molecule previously known to be variable. However, it should be noted that one of these, asparagine for threonine at A8, has not been reported before. Computer comparisons of all 43 insulin sequences reported to date with kangaroo insulin show it to be most closely related to a group of mammalian insulins (dog, pig, cow, human) known to be of high biological potency. The measurement of blood glucose lowering in the rabbit by kangaroo insulin is consistent with this conclusion. Comparisons of amino-acid sequences of other proteins with their kangaroo counterparts show a greater difference, in line with the time of divergence of marsupials. The limited differences observed in insulin and cytochrome c suggest that their structures need to be closely conserved in order to maintain function.

  6. Unifying bacteria from decaying wood with various ubiquitous Gibbsiella species as G. acetica sp. nov. based on nucleotide sequence similarities and their acetic acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Geider, Klaus; Gernold, Marina; Jock, Susanne; Wensing, Annette; Völksch, Beate; Gross, Jürgen; Spiteller, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria were isolated from necrotic apple and pear tree tissue and from dead wood in Germany and Austria as well as from pear tree exudate in China. They were selected for growth at 37 °C, screened for levan production and then characterized as Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rods. Nucleotide sequences from 16S rRNA genes, the housekeeping genes dnaJ, gyrB, recA and rpoB alignments, BLAST searches and phenotypic data confirmed by MALDI-TOF analysis showed that these bacteria belong to the genus Gibbsiella and resembled strains isolated from diseased oaks in Britain and Spain. Gibbsiella-specific PCR primers were designed from the proline isomerase and the levansucrase genes. Acid secretion was investigated by screening for halo formation on calcium carbonate agar and the compound identified by NMR as acetic acid. Its production by Gibbsiella spp. strains was also determined in culture supernatants by GC/MS analysis after derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl bromide. Some strains were differentiated by the PFGE patterns of SpeI digests and by sequence analyses of the lsc and the ppiD genes, and the Chinese Gibbsiella strain was most divergent. The newly investigated bacteria as well as Gibbsiella querinecans, Gibbsiella dentisursi and Gibbsiella papilionis, isolated in Britain, Spain, Korea and Japan, are taxonomically related Enterobacteriaceae, tolerate and secrete acetic acid. We therefore propose to unify them in the species Gibbsiella acetica sp. nov.

  7. K-Pax2: Bayesian identification of cluster-defining amino acid positions in large sequence datasets

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Yonatan; Cobey, Sarah; Puranen, Juha Santeri; Corander, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth in publicly available sequence data has introduced new opportunities for studying microbial evolution and spread. Because the pace of sequence accumulation tends to exceed the pace of experimental studies of protein function and the roles of individual amino acids, statistical tools to identify meaningful patterns in protein diversity are essential. Large sequence alignments from fast-evolving micro-organisms are particularly challenging to dissect using standard tools from phylogenetics and multivariate statistics because biologically relevant functional signals are easily masked by neutral variation and noise. To meet this need, a novel computational method is introduced that is easily executed in parallel using a cluster environment and can handle thousands of sequences with minimal subjective input from the user. The usefulness of this kind of machine learning is demonstrated by applying it to nearly 5000 haemagglutinin sequences of influenza A/H3N2.Antigenic and 3D structural mapping of the results show that the method can recover the major jumps in antigenic phenotype that occurred between 1968 and 2013 and identify specific amino acids associated with these changes. The method is expected to provide a useful tool to uncover patterns of protein evolution. PMID:28348810

  8. The amino acid sequence of Ole e I, the major allergen from olive tree (Olea europaea) pollen.

    PubMed

    Villalba, M; Batanero, E; López-Otín, C; Sánchez, L M; Monsalve, R I; González de la Peña, M A; Lahoz, C; Rodríguez, R

    1993-09-15

    The complete primary structure of the major allergen from Olea europaea (olive tree) pollen, Ole e I (IUIS nomenclature), has been determined. The amino acid sequence was established by automated Edman degradation of the reduced and alkylated molecule as well as of selected fragments obtained by proteolytic digestions. Ole e I contains a single polypeptide chain of 145 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 16331 Da. No free sulfhydryl groups have been detected in the native protein. The molecule contains a putative glycosylation site. A high degree of microheterogeneity has been observed, mainly centered in the first 33% of the molecule. Comparison of Ole e I sequence with protein sequence databases showed no similarity with other known allergens. However, it has a 36% and 38% sequence identity with the putative polypeptide structures, deduced, respectively, from nucleotide sequences of genes isolated from tomato anthers and corn pollen, which have been suggested to be involved in the growing of the pollen tube. Therefore, the olive tree allergen may be a constitutive protein of the pollen involved in reproductive functions.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an efficient L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified-one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution among enterococci.

  10. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered.

  11. Isolation and a partial amino acid sequence of insulin from the islet tissue of cod (Gadus callarias)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P. T.; Reid, K. B. M.

    1968-01-01

    1. Insulin has been isolated by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography from extracts of the discrete islet tissue of cod. The final preparation yielded a single band on electrophoresis at two pH values. The biological potency was 11·5 international units/mg. in mouse-convulsion and other assay procedures. 2. Glycine and methionine were shown to be the N-terminal amino acids of the A and B chains respectively. An estimate of the molecular weight together with amino acid analyses indicated that cod insulin, like the bovine hormone, consists of 51 amino acid residues. In contrast, the amino acid composition differs markedly from bovine insulin. 3. Oxidation of insulin with performic acid yielded the A and B peptide chains, which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography. Sequence studies on smaller peptides isolated from enzymic digests or from dilute acetic acid hydrolysates of the two chains have established the sequential order of 14 of the 21 amino acid residues of the A chain and 25 of the 30 amino acid residues of the B chain. PMID:4866431

  12. Design and Functional Characterization of a Novel Abscisic Acid Analog

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoqiang; Jiang, Lun; Che, Chuanliang; Wan, Chuan; Lu, Huizhe; Xiao, Yumei; Xu, Yanjun; Chen, Zhongzhou; Qin, Zhaohai

    2017-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a crucial role in mediating plant growth and development by recruiting genetically redundant ABA receptors. To overcome its oxidation inactivation, we developed a novel ABA analog named 2′,3′-benzo-iso-ABA (iso-PhABA) and studied its function and structural characterization with A. thaliana ABA receptors. The (+)-iso-PhABA form showed much higher ABA-like activities than (+)-ABA including inhibitory effects on the seed germination of lettuce and A. thaliana, wheat embryo germination and rice seedling elongation. The PP2C (protein phosphatases 2C) activity assay showed that (+)-iso-PhABA acted as a potent and selective ABA receptor agonist, which is preferred to PYL10. In some cases, (−)-iso-PhABA showed moderate to high activity for the PYL protein inhibiting PP2C activity, suggesting different mechanisms of action of iso-PhABA and ABA. The complex crystal structure of iso-PhABA with PYL10 was determined and elucidated successfully, revealing that (+)-iso-PhABA was better coordinated in the same binding pocket compared to (+)-ABA. Moreover, the detailed interaction network of iso-PhABA/PYL10 was disclosed and involves hydrogen bonds and multiple hydrophobic interactions that provide a robust framework for the design of novel ABA receptor agonists/antagonists. PMID:28272449

  13. Oxygen affinity and amino acid sequence of myoglobins from endothermic and ectothermic fish.

    PubMed

    Marcinek, D J; Bonaventura, J; Wittenberg, J B; Block, B A

    2001-04-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) buffers intracellular O2 and facilitates diffusion of O2 through the cell. These functions of Mb will be most effective when intracellular PO2 is near the partial pressure of oxygen at which Mb is half saturated (P50) of the molecule. We test the hypothesis that Mb oxygen affinity has evolved such that it is conserved when adjusted for body temperature among closely related animals. We measure oxygen P50s tonometrically and oxygen dissociation rate constants with stopped flow and generate amino acid sequence from cDNA of Mbs from fish with different body temperatures. P50s for the endothermic bluefin tuna, skipjack tuna, and blue marlin at 20 degrees C were 0.62 +/- 0.02, 0.59 +/- 0.01, 0.58 +/- 0.04 mmHg, respectively, and were significantly lower than those for ectothermic bonito (1.03 +/- 0.07 mmHg) and mackerel (1.39 +/- 0.03 mmHg). Because the oxygen affinity of Mb decreases with increasing temperature, the above differences in oxygen affinity between endothermic and ectothermic fish are reduced when adjusted for the in vivo muscle temperature of the animal. Oxygen dissociation rate constants at 20 degrees C for the endothermic species ranged from 34.1 to 49.3 s(-1), whereas those for mackerel and bonito were 102 and 62 s(-1), respectively. Correlated with the low oxygen affinity and fast dissociation kinetics of mackerel Mb is a substitution of alanine for proline that would likely result in a more flexible mackerel protein.

  14. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and abscisic acid induction of a suberization-associated highly anionic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Kolattukudy, P E

    1989-06-01

    A highly anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing cells was suggested to be the key enzyme involved in polymerization of phenolic monomers to generate the aromatic matrix of suberin. The enzyme encoded by a potato cDNA was found to be highly homologous to the anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing tomato fruit. A tomato genomic library was screened using the potato anionic peroxidase cDNA and one genomic clone was isolated that contained two tandemly oriented anionic peroxidase genes. These genes were sequenced and were 96% and 87% identical to the mRNA for potato anionic peroxidase. Both genes consist of three exons with the relative positions of their two introns being conserved between the two genes. Primer extension analysis showed that only one of the genes is expressed in the periderm of 3 day wound-healed tomato fruits. Southern blot analyses suggested that there are two copies each of the two highly homologous genes per haploid genome in both potato and tomato. Abscisic acid (ABA) induced the accumulation of the anionic peroxidase transcripts in potato and tomato callus tissues. Northern blots showed that peroxidase mRNA was detectable at 2 days and was maximal at 8 days after transfer of potato callus to solid agar media containing 10(-4) M ABA. The transcripts induced by ABA in both potato and tomato callus were identical in size to those induced in wound-healing potato tuber and tomato fruit. The anionic peroxidase peptide was detected in extracts of potato callus grown on the ABA-containing media by western blot analysis. The results support the suggestion that stimulation of suberization by ABA involves the induction of the highly anionic peroxidase.

  15. Robust design of an optical router based on a tapered side-coupled integrated spaced sequence of optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Bettotti, P; Mancinelli, M; Guider, R; Masi, M; Vanacharla, M Rao; Pavesi, L

    2011-04-15

    A novel (to our knowledge) scheme of an optical router/switch element, composed of a tapered side-coupled integrated spaced sequence of optical resonators, is proposed. It is based on a modified design of the ring sequence in which the resonance conditions are set by the single ring resonance and by the coherent feedback of the sequence of rings. This double condition yields robustness against fabrication defects, dense routing capability, and high switching efficiency.

  16. Complete nucleotide and derived amino acid sequence of cDNA encoding the mitochondrial uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue: lack of a mitochondrial targeting presequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, R G; Patel, H V; Gerber, G E; Morton, R C; Freeman, K B

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone spanning the entire amino acid sequence of the nuclear-encoded uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue mitochondria has been isolated and sequenced. With the exception of the N-terminal methionine the deduced N-terminus of the newly synthesized uncoupling protein is identical to the N-terminal 30 amino acids of the native uncoupling protein as determined by protein sequencing. This proves that the protein contains no N-terminal mitochondrial targeting prepiece and that a targeting region must reside within the amino acid sequence of the mature protein. Images PMID:3012461

  17. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting and N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequencing of Glycosylated Cysteine Protease of Euphorbia nivulia Buch.-Ham.

    PubMed Central

    Badgujar, Shamkant B.; Mahajan, Raghunath T.

    2013-01-01

    A new cysteine protease named Nivulian-II has been purified from the latex of Euphorbia nivulia Buch.-Ham. The apparent molecular mass of Nivulian-II is 43670.846 Da (MALDI TOF/MS). Peptide mass fingerprint analysis revealed peptide matches to Maturase K (Q52ZV1_9MAGN) of Banksia quercifolia. The N-terminal sequence (DFPPNTCCCICC) showed partial homology with those of other cysteine proteinases of biological origin. This is the first paper to characterize a Nivulian-II of E. nivulia latex with respect to amino acid sequencing. PMID:23476742

  18. Putative and unique gene sequence utilization for the design of species specific probes as modeled by Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of utilizing putative and unique gene sequences for the design of species specific probes was tested. The abundance profile of assigned functions within the Lactobacillus plantarum genome was used for the identification of the putative and unique gene sequence, csh. The targeted gene (cs...

  19. DNA Sequence and Expression Variation of Hop (Humulus lupulus) Valerophenone Synthase (VPS), a Key Gene in Bitter Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Consuelo B.; Whittock, Lucy D.; Whittock, Simon P.; Leggett, Grey; Koutoulis, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Background The hop plant (Humulus lupulus) is a source of many secondary metabolites, with bitter acids essential in the beer brewing industry and others having potential applications for human health. This study investigated variation in DNA sequence and gene expression of valerophenone synthase (VPS), a key gene in the bitter acid biosynthesis pathway of hop. Methods Sequence variation was studied in 12 varieties, and expression was analysed in four of the 12 varieties in a series across the development of the hop cone. Results Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in VPS, seven of which were synonymous. The two non-synonymous polymorphisms did not appear to be related to typical bitter acid profiles of the varieties studied. However, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of VPS expression during hop cone development showed a clear link with the bitter acid content. The highest levels of VPS expression were observed in two triploid varieties, ‘Symphony’ and ‘Ember’, which typically have high bitter acid levels. Conclusions In all hop varieties studied, VPS expression was lowest in the leaves and an increase in expression was consistently observed during the early stages of cone development. PMID:18519445

  20. Insights into the role of protein molecule size and structure on interfacial properties using designed sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; He, Lizhong; James, Michael; Nelson, Andrew; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of a large, structured protein with a smaller, unstructured component are inherently complex and hard to characterize at interfaces, leading to difficulties in understanding their interfacial behaviours and, therefore, formulation optimization. Here, we investigated interfacial properties of such a mixed system. Simplicity was achieved using designed sequences in which chemical differences had been eliminated to isolate the effect of molecular size and structure, namely a short unstructured peptide (DAMP1) and its longer structured protein concatamer (DAMP4). Interfacial tension measurements suggested that the size and bulk structuring of the larger molecule led to much slower adsorption kinetics. Neutron reflectometry at equilibrium revealed that both molecules adsorbed as a monolayer to the air–water interface (indicating unfolding of DAMP4 to give a chain of four connected DAMP1 molecules), with a concentration ratio equal to that in the bulk. This suggests the overall free energy of adsorption is equal despite differences in size and bulk structure. At small interfacial extensional strains, only molecule packing influenced the stress response. At larger strains, the effect of size became apparent, with DAMP4 registering a higher stress response and interfacial elasticity. When both components were present at the interface, most stress-dissipating movement was achieved by DAMP1. This work thus provides insights into the role of proteins' molecular size and structure on their interfacial properties, and the designed sequences introduced here can serve as effective tools for interfacial studies of proteins and polymers. PMID:23303222

  1. A knowledge engineering approach to recognizing and extracting sequences of nucleic acids from scientific literature.

    PubMed

    García-Remesal, Miguel; Maojo, Victor; Crespo, José

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a knowledge engineering approach to automatically recognize and extract genetic sequences from scientific articles. To carry out this task, we use a preliminary recognizer based on a finite state machine to extract all candidate DNA/RNA sequences. The latter are then fed into a knowledge-based system that automatically discards false positives and refines noisy and incorrectly merged sequences. We created the knowledge base by manually analyzing different manuscripts containing genetic sequences. Our approach was evaluated using a test set of 211 full-text articles in PDF format containing 3134 genetic sequences. For such set, we achieved 87.76% precision and 97.70% recall respectively. This method can facilitate different research tasks. These include text mining, information extraction, and information retrieval research dealing with large collections of documents containing genetic sequences.

  2. Cloning, sequence, and developmental expression of a type 5, tartrate-resistant, acid phosphatase of rat bone.

    PubMed

    Ek-Rylander, B; Bill, P; Norgård, M; Nilsson, S; Andersson, G

    1991-12-25

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is a characteristic constituent of osteoclasts and some mononuclear preosteoclasts and, therefore, used as a histochemical and biochemical marker for osteoclasts and bone resorption. We now report the isolation of a 1397-base pair (bp) full-length TRAP/tartrate-resistant acid ATPase (TrATPase) cDNA clone from a neonatal rat calvaria lambda gt11 cDNA library. The cDNA clone consists of a 92-bp untranslated 5'-flank, an open reading frame of 981 bp and a 324-bp untranslated 3'-poly(A)-containing region. The deduced protein sequence of 327 amino acids contains a putative cleavable signal sequence of 21 amino acids. The mature polypeptide of 306 amino acids has a calculated Mr of 34,350 Da and a pI of 9.18, and it contains two potential N-glycosylation sites and the lysosomal targeting sequence DKRFQ. At the protein level, the sequence displays 89-94% homology to TRAP enzymes from human placenta, beef spleen, and uteroferrin and identity to the N terminus of purified rat bone TRAP/TrATPase. An N-terminal amino acid segment is strikingly homologous to the corresponding region in lysosomal and prostatic acid phosphatases. The cDNA recognized a 1.5-kilobase mRNA in long bones and calvaria, and in vitro translation using, as template, mRNA transcribed from the full-length insert yielded an immunoprecipitated product of 34 kDa. In neonatal rats, TRAP/TrATPase mRNA was highly expressed in skeletal tissues, with much lower (less than 10%) levels detected in spleen, thymus, liver, skin, brain, kidney, brain, lung, and heart. In situ hybridization demonstrated specific labeling of osteoclasts at endostal surfaces and bone trabeculae of long bones. Thus, despite the apparent similarity of this osteoclastic TRAP/TrATPase with type 5, tartrate-resistant and purple, acid phosphatases expressed in other mammalian tissues, this gene appears to be preferentially expressed at skeletal sites.

  3. Snake venoms. The amino-acid sequence of protein S5C4 from Dendroaspis jamesoni kaimosae (Jameson's mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, A J; Taljaard, N

    1978-06-01

    A major component (S5C4) was purified from Jameson's mamba by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and by ion-exchange chromotography on CM-cellulose. Protein S5C4 contains 60 amino acid residues and is cross-linked by four intrachain disulphide bridges. The complete primary structure of the protein has been elucidated. The toxicities, the immunochemical properties, the sequence and the invariant amino acid residues of protein S5C4 resemble subgroup II of the angusticeps-type proteins.

  4. Amino acid sequence diversity within the family of antibodies bearing the major antiarsonate cross-reactive idiotype of the A strain mouse

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    VH region amino acid sequences are described for five A/J anti-p- azophenylarsonate (anti-Ars) hybridoma antibodies for which the VL region sequences have previously been determined, thus completing the V domain sequences of these molecules. These antibodies all belong to the family designated Ars-A which bears the major anti-arsonate cross- reactive idiotype (CRI) of the A strain mouse. However, they differ in the degree to which they express the CRI in standard competition radioimmunoassays. Although the sequences are closely related, all are different from each other. Replacements are distributed throughout the VH region and occur in positions of the chain encoded by all three gene segments, VH, DH, and JH. It is likely that somatic diversification processes play a dominant role in producing the sequence variability in each of these segments. The number of differences from the sequence encoded by the germline is smallest for antibodies that express the CRI most strongly, suggesting that somatic diversification is responsible for loss of the CRI in members of the Ars-A antibody family. There is an unusual degree of clustering of differences in both CDR2 and CDR3 and many of the substitutions are located in "hot spots" of variation. The large number of differences between the chains prohibits the unambiguous identification of positions at which alterations play a major role in reducing the expression of the CRI. However, the data suggest that the loss of the CRI is associated with a definable repertoire of somatic changes at a restricted number of highly variable sites. PMID:6415209

  5. Identification of novel rice low phytic acid mutations via TILLING by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate or InsP6) accounts for 75-85% of the total phosphorus in seeds. Low phytic acid (lpa) mutants exhibit decreases in seed InsP6 with corresponding increases in inorganic P which, unlike phytic acid P, is readily utilized by humans and monogastric ...

  6. Amino acid sequence and structural comparison of BACE1 and BACE2 using evolutionary trace method.

    PubMed

    Mirsafian, Hoda; Mat Ripen, Adiratna; Merican, Amir Feisal; Bin Mohamad, Saharuddin

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE1) and beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 2 (BACE2), members of aspartyl protease family, are close homologues and have high similarity in their protein crystal structures. However, their enzymatic properties differ leading to disparate clinical consequences. In order to identify the residues that are responsible for such differences, we used evolutionary trace (ET) method to compare the amino acid conservation patterns of BACE1 and BACE2 in several mammalian species. We found that, in BACE1 and BACE2 structures, most of the ligand binding sites are conserved which indicate their enzymatic property of aspartyl protease family members. The other conserved residues are more or less randomly localized in other parts of the structures. Four group-specific residues were identified at the ligand binding site of BACE1 and BACE2. We postulated that these residues would be essential for selectivity of BACE1 and BACE2 biological functions and could be sites of interest for the design of selective inhibitors targeting either BACE1 or BACE2.

  7. Introduction of Ca(2+)-binding amino-acid sequence into the T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, V V; Uversky, V N; Permyakov, E A; Murzin, A G

    1993-03-05

    The 51-62 loop of T4 phage lysozyme was altered by site-directed mutagenesis to obtain maximal homology with the typical EF-hand motif. A Ca(2+)-binding site was designed and created by replacing both Gly-51 and Asn-53 with aspartic acid. The mutant T4 lysozyme (G51D/N53D) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The activity of the G51D/N53D-mutant was about 60% of that of the wild-type protein. This mutant can bind Ca2+ ions specifically, while the effective dissociation constant was essentially greater than that of the EF-hand proteins. Stability of the G51D/N53D-mutant apo-form to urea- or temperature-induced denaturation was the same as that of the wild-type protein. In the presence of Ca2+ ions in solution the stability of the mutant T4 phage lysozyme was less than that of the wild-type protein. It is suggested that the binding of Ca2+ by the mutant is accompanied by the considerable conformational changes in the 'corrected' loop, which can lead to the Ca(2+)-induced destabilization of the protein.

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of an acidic, cardiotoxic phospholipase A2 from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra): a novel cobra venom enzyme with "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Chung, M C; Kini, R M

    1997-02-15

    A phospholipase A2 (OHV A-PLA2) from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is an acidic protein exhibiting cardiotoxicity, myotoxicity, and antiplatelet activity. The complete amino acid sequence of OHV A-PLA2 has been determined using a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometric techniques. OHV A-PLA2 is composed of a single chain of 124 amino acid residues with 14 cysteines and a calculated molecular weight of 13719 Da. It contains the loop of residues (62-66) found in pancreatic PLA2s and hence belongs to class IB enzymes. This pancreatic loop is between two proline residues (Pro 59 and Pro 68) and contains several hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Asp). This region has high degree of conformational flexibility and is on the surface of the molecule, and hence it may be a potential protein-protein interaction site. A relatively low sequence homology is found between OHV A-PLA2 and other known cardiotoxic PLA2s, and hence a contiguous segment could not be identified as a site responsible for the cardiotoxic activity.

  9. Snake venoms. The amino-acid sequence of trypsin inhibitor E of Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (Black Mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, D J

    1978-06-01

    Trypsin inhibitor E from black mamba venom comprises 59 amino acid residues in a single polypeptide chain, cross-linked by three intrachain disulphide bridges. The complete primary structure of inhibitor E was elucidated. The sequence is homologous with trypsin inhibitors from different sources. Unique among this homologous series of proteinase inhibitors, inhibitor E has an affinity for transition metal ions, exemplified here by Cu2 and Co2+.

  10. The amino acid sequence of the zinc-requiring beta-lactamase II from the bacterium Bacillus cereus 569.

    PubMed

    Ambler, R P; Daniel, M; Fleming, J; Hermoso, J M; Pang, C; Waley, S G

    1985-09-23

    The amino acid sequence of the zinc-requiring beta-lactamase II from Bacillus cereus strain 569 has been determined. It consists of a single polypeptide chain of 227 residues. It is the only example so far fully characterized of a class B beta-lactamase, and is structurally and mechanistically distinct from both the widely distributed class A beta-lactamases (such as the Escherichia coli RTEM enzyme) and from the chromosomally encoded class C enzymes from Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. A simple ligation-based method to increase the information density in sequencing reactions used to deconvolute nucleic acid selections

    PubMed Central

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Herein, a method is described to increase the information density of sequencing experiments used to deconvolute nucleic acid selections. The method is facile and should be applicable to any selection experiment. A critical feature of this method is the use of biotinylated primers to amplify and encode a BamHI restriction site on both ends of a PCR product. After amplification, the PCR reaction is captured onto streptavidin resin, washed, and digested directly on the resin. Resin-based digestion affords clean product that is devoid of partially digested products and unincorporated PCR primers. The product's complementary ends are annealed and ligated together with T4 DNA ligase. Analysis of ligation products shows formation of concatemers of different length and little detectable monomer. Sequencing results produced data that routinely contained three to four copies of the library. This method allows for more efficient formulation of structure-activity relationships since multiple active sequences are identified from a single clone. PMID:18065718

  12. Isolation, characterization, and amino acid sequences of auracyanins, blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, J. D.; Brune, D. C.; Han, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Tollin, G.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three small blue copper proteins designated auracyanin A, auracyanin B-1, and auracyanin B-2 have been isolated from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. All three auracyanins are peripheral membrane proteins. Auracyanin A was described previously (Trost, J. T., McManus, J. D., Freeman, J. C., Ramakrishna, B. L., and Blankenship, R. E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7858-7863) and is not glycosylated. The two B forms are glycoproteins and have almost identical properties to each other, but are distinct from the A form. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparent monomer molecular masses are 14 (A), 18 (B-2), and 22 (B-1) kDa. The amino acid sequences of the B forms are presented. All three proteins have similar absorbance, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra, but the electron spin resonance signals are quite different. Laser flash photolysis kinetic analysis of the reactions of the three forms of auracyanin with lumiflavin and flavin mononucleotide semiquinones indicates that the site of electron transfer is negatively charged and has an accessibility similar to that found in other blue copper proteins. Copper analysis indicates that all three proteins contain 1 mol of copper per mol of protein. All three auracyanins exhibit a midpoint redox potential of +240 mV. Light-induced absorbance changes and electron spin resonance signals suggest that auracyanin A may play a role in photosynthetic electron transfer. Kinetic data indicate that all three proteins can donate electrons to cytochrome c-554, the electron donor to the photosynthetic reaction center.

  13. The isolation, purification and amino-acid sequence of insulin from the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin).

    PubMed

    Cutfield, J F; Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Emdin, S O; Falkmer, S

    1986-07-01

    Insulin from the principal islets of the teleost fish, Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin), has been isolated and sequenced. Purification involved acid/alcohol extraction, gel filtration, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to yield nearly 1 mg pure insulin/g wet weight islet tissue. Biological potency was estimated as 40% compared to porcine insulin. The sculpin insulin crystallised in the absence of zinc ions although zinc is known to be present in the islets in significant amounts. Two other hormones, glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide, were copurified with the insulin, and an N-terminal sequence for pancreatic polypeptide was determined. The primary structure of sculpin insulin shows a number of sequence changes unique so far amongst teleost fish. These changes occur at A14 (Arg), A15 (Val), and B2 (Asp). The B chain contains 29 amino acids and there is no N-terminal extension as seen with several other fish. Presumably as a result of the amino acid substitutions, sculpin insulin does not readily form crystals containing zinc-insulin hexamers, despite the presence of the coordinating B10 His.

  14. Sequence of the canine herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene: taxon-preferred amino acid residues in the alphaherpesviral thymidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M; Sheldrick, P; Lebreton, F; Foulon, T

    1995-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignments of evolutionarily related proteins are finding increasing use as indicators of critical amino acid residues necessary for structural stability or involved in functional domains responsible for catalytic activities. In the past, a number of alignments have provided such information for the herpesviral thymidine kinases, for which three-dimensional structures are not yet available. We have sequenced the thymidine kinase gene of a canine herpesvirus, and with a multiple alignment have identified amino acids preferentially conserved in either of two taxons, the genera Varicellovirus and Simplexvirus, of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. Since some regions of the thymidine kinases show otherwise elevated levels of substitutional tolerance, these conserved amino acids are candidates for critical residues which have become fixed through selection during the evolutionary divergence of these enzymes. Several pairs with distinctive patterns of distribution among the various viruses occur in or near highly conserved sequence motifs previously proposed to form the catalytic site, and we speculate that they may represent interacting, co-ordinately variable residues.

  15. The amino acid sequence of a carbohydrate-containing immunoglobulin-light-chain-type amyloid-fibril protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tveteraas, T; Sletten, K; Westermark, P

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of an amyloid-fibril protein Es492 of immunoglobulin-lambda-light-chain origin (AL) was elucidated. The amyloid fibrils were obtained from the spleen of a patient who died from systemic amyloidosis. The amino acid sequence was elucidated from structural studies of peptides derived from digestion of the protein with trypsin, thermolysin, chymotrypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and from cleavage of the protein with CNBr and BNPS-skatole. A heterogeneity in the length of the polypeptide was seen in the C-terminal region. The protein was by sequence homology to other lambda-chains shown to be of the V lambda II subgroup. Although an extensive homology was seen, some amino acid residues in positions 26, 31, 32, 40, 44, 93, 97, 98 and 99 have not previously been reported in these positions of V lambda II proteins. The significance of these residues in the fibril formation is unclear. The protein was found to contain carbohydrate, with glycosylation sites in two of the hypervariable regions. PMID:3936482

  16. Coronavirus genome: prediction of putative functional domains in the non-structural polyprotein by comparative amino acid sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gorbalenya, A E; Koonin, E V; Donchenko, A P; Blinov, V M

    1989-01-01

    Amino acid sequences of 2 giant non-structural polyproteins (F1 and F2) of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a member of Coronaviridae, were compared, by computer-assisted methods, to sequences of a number of other positive strand RNA viral and cellular proteins. By this approach, juxtaposed putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, nucleic acid binding ("finger"-like) and RNA helicase domains were identified in F2. Together, these domains might constitute the core of the protein complex involved in the primer-dependent transcription, replication and recombination of coronaviruses. In F1, two cysteine protease-like domains and a growth factor-like one were revealed. One of the putative proteases of IBV is similar to 3C proteases of picornaviruses and related enzymes of como- nepo- and potyviruses. Search of IBV F1 and F2 sequences for sites similar to those cleaved by the latter proteases and intercomparison of the surrounding sequence stretches revealed 13 dipeptides Q/S(G) which are probably cleaved by the coronavirus 3C-like protease. Based on these observations, a partial tentative scheme for the functional organization and expression strategy of the non-structural polyproteins of IBV was proposed. It implies that, despite the general similarity to other positive strand RNA viruses, and particularly to potyviruses, coronaviruses possess a number of unique structural and functional features. PMID:2526320

  17. Recognition of 5'-YpG-3' sequences by coupled stacking/hydrogen bonding interactions with amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Jason S; Maynes, Jason T; Glover, J N Mark

    2004-01-09

    The combined biochemical and structural study of hundreds of protein-DNA complexes has indicated that sequence-specific interactions are mediated by two mechanisms termed direct and indirect readout. Direct readout involves direct interactions between the protein and base-specific atoms exposed in the major and minor grooves of DNA. For indirect readout, the protein recognizes DNA by sensing conformational variations in the structure dependent on nucleotide sequence, typically through interactions with the phosphodiester backbone. Based on our recent structure of Ndt80 bound to DNA in conjunction with a search of the existing PDB database, we propose a new method of sequence-specific recognition that utilizes both direct and indirect readout. In this mode, a single amino acid side-chain recognizes two consecutive base-pairs. The 3'-base is recognized by canonical direct readout, while the 5'-base is recognized through a variation of indirect readout, whereby the conformational flexibility of the particular dinucleotide step, namely a 5'-pyrimidine-purine-3' step, facilitates its recognition by the amino acid via cation-pi interactions. In most cases, this mode of DNA recognition helps explain the sequence specificity of the protein for its target DNA.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains SRCC 1675 and 28RC, Which Vary in Acid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Reichenberger, Erin R.; Kim, Gwang-Hee; Breidt, Frederick; Kay, Kathryn; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The level of acid resistance among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains varies, and strains with higher resistance to acid may have a lower infectious dose. The complete genome sequences belonging to two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with different levels of acid resistance are presented here. PMID:27469964

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains SRCC 1675 and 28RC, Which Vary in Acid Resistance.

    PubMed

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Fratamico, Pina M; Reichenberger, Erin R; Kim, Gwang-Hee; Breidt, Frederick; Kay, Kathryn; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-07-28

    The level of acid resistance among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains varies, and strains with higher resistance to acid may have a lower infectious dose. The complete genome sequences belonging to two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with different levels of acid resistance are presented here.

  20. Complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains SRCC 1675 and 28RC that vary in acid resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The level of acid resistance among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains varies, and strains with higher resistance to acid may have a lower infectious dose. The complete genome sequences belonging to two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with different levels of acid resistance are presented....

  1. iCODEHOP: a new interactive program for designing COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers from multiply aligned protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Richard; Chilana, Parmit; Rose, Timothy M.

    2009-01-01

    PCR amplification using COnsensus DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers (CODEHOPs) has proven to be highly effective for identifying unknown pathogens and characterizing novel genes. We describe iCODEHOP; a new interactive web application that simplifies the process of designing and selecting CODEHOPs from multiply-aligned protein sequences. iCODEHOP intelligently guides the user through the degenerate primer design process including uploading sequences, creating a multiple alignment, deriving CODEHOPs and calculating their annealing temperatures. The user can quickly scan over an entire set of degenerate primers designed by the program to assess their relative quality and select individual primers for further analysis. The program displays phylogenetic information for input sequences and allows the user to easily design new primers from selected sequence sub-clades. It also allows the user to bias primer design to favor specific clades or sequences using sequence weights. iCODEHOP is freely available to all interested researchers at https://icodehop.cphi.washington.edu/i-codehop-context/Welcome. PMID:19443442

  2. Amino acid sequence and some properties of phytolacain G, a cysteine protease from growing fruit of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Uchikoba, T; Arima, K; Yonezawa, H; Shimada, M; Kaneda, M

    2000-10-18

    A protease, phytolacain G, has been found to appear on CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography of greenish small-size fruits of pokeweed, Phytolacca americana L, from ca. 2 weeks after flowering, and increases during fruit enlargement. Reddish ripe fruit of the pokeweed contained both phytolacain G and R. The molecular mass of phytolacain G was estimated to be 25.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Its amino acid sequence was reconstructed by automated sequence analysis of the peptides obtained after cleavage with Achromobacter protease I, chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme is composed of 216 amino acid residues, of which it shares 152 identical amino acid residues (70%) with phytolacain R, 126 (58%) with melain G, 108 (50%) with papain, 106 (49%) with actinidain, and 96 (44%) with stem bromelain. The amino acid residues forming the substrate binding S(2) pocket of papain, Tyr67, Pro68, Trp69, Val133, and Phe207, were predicted to be replaced by Trp, Met, His, Ala, and Ser in phytolacain G, respectively. As a consequence of these substitutions, the S(2) pocket is expected to be less hydrophobic in phytolacain G than in papain.

  3. User-centered design of multi-gene sequencing panel reports for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Cutting, Elizabeth; Banchero, Meghan; Beitelshees, Amber L; Cimino, James J; Fiol, Guilherme Del; Gurses, Ayse P; Hoffman, Mark A; Jeng, Linda Jo Bone; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Kelemen, Mark; Pincus, Harold Alan; Shuldiner, Alan R; Williams, Marc S; Pollin, Toni I; Overby, Casey Lynnette

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a high-fidelity prototype for delivering multi-gene sequencing panel (GS) reports to clinicians that simulates the user experience of a final application. The delivery and use of GS reports can occur within complex and high-paced healthcare environments. We employ a user-centered software design approach in a focus group setting in order to facilitate gathering rich contextual information from a diverse group of stakeholders potentially impacted by the delivery of GS reports relevant to two precision medicine programs at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Responses from focus group sessions were transcribed, coded and analyzed by two team members. Notification mechanisms and information resources preferred by participants from our first phase of focus groups were incorporated into scenarios and the design of a software prototype for delivering GS reports. The goal of our second phase of focus group, to gain input on the prototype software design, was accomplished through conducting task walkthroughs with GS reporting scenarios. Preferences for notification, content and consultation from genetics specialists appeared to depend upon familiarity with scenarios for ordering and delivering GS reports. Despite familiarity with some aspects of the scenarios we proposed, many of our participants agreed that they would likely seek consultation from a genetics specialist after viewing the test reports. In addition, participants offered design and content recommendations. Findings illustrated a need to support customized notification approaches, user-specific information, and access to genetics specialists with GS reports. These design principles can be incorporated into software applications that deliver GS reports. Our user-centered approach to conduct this assessment and the specific input we received from clinicians may also be relevant to others working on similar projects.

  4. Design and assembly sequence analysis of option 3 for CETF reference space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. Bernard; Andersen, Gregory C.; Hall, John B., Jr.; Allen, Cheryl L.; Scott, A. D., Jr.; So, Kenneth T.

    1987-01-01

    A design and assembly sequence was conducted on one option of the Dual Keel Space Station examined by a NASA Critical Evaluation Task Force to establish viability of several variations of that option. A goal of the study was to produce and analyze technical data to support Task Force decisions to either examine particular Option 3 variations in more depth or eliminate them from further consideration. An analysis of the phasing assembly showed that use of an Expendable Launch Vehicle in conjunction with the Space Transportation System (STS) can accelerate the buildup of the Station and ease the STS launch rate constraints. The study also showed that use of an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle on the first flight can significantly benefit Station assembly and, by performing Station subsystem functions, can alleviate the need for operational control and reboost systems during the early flights. In addition to launch and assembly sequencing, the study assessed stability and control, and analyzed node-packaging options and the effects of keel removal on the structural dynamics of the Station. Results of these analyses are presented and discussed.

  5. Sequence analysis of a gene cluster involved in metabolism of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid by Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Daubaras, D L; Hershberger, C D; Kitano, K; Chakrabarty, A M

    1995-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 utilizes 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) as a sole source of carbon and energy. PT88 is a chromosomal deletion mutant of B. cepacia AC1100 and is unable to grow on 2,4,5-T. The nucleotide sequence of a 5.5-kb chromosomal fragment from B. cepacia AC1100 which complemented PT88 for growth on 2,4,5-T was determined. The sequence revealed the presence of six open reading frames, designated ORF1 to ORF6. Five polypeptides were produced when this DNA region was under control of the T7 promoter in Escherichia coli; however, no polypeptide was produced from the fourth open reading frame, ORF4. Homology searches of protein sequence databases were performed to determine if the proteins involved in 2,4,5-T metabolism were similar to other biodegradative enzymes. In addition, complementation studies were used to determine which genes were essential for the metabolism of 2,4,5-T. The first gene of the cluster, ORF1, encoded a 37-kDa polypeptide which was essential for complementation of PT88 and showed significant homology to putative trans-chlorodienelactone isomerases. The next gene, ORF2, was necessary for complementation and encoded a 47-kDa protein which showed homology to glutathione reductases. ORF3 was not essential for complementation; however, both the 23-kDa protein encoded by ORF3 and the predicted amino acid sequence of ORF4 showed homology to glutathione S-transferases. ORF5, which encoded an 11-kDa polypeptide, was essential for growth on 2,4,5-T, but the amino acid sequence did not show homology to those of any known proteins. The last gene of the cluster, ORF6, was necessary for complementation of PT88, and the 32-kDa protein encoded by this gene showed homology to catechol and chlorocatechol-1,2-dioxygenases. PMID:7538273

  6. Probing linker design in citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Milner, Stephen J; Snelling, Anna M; Kerr, Kevin G; Abd-El-Aziz, Ahmad; Thomas, Gavin H; Hubbard, Roderick E; Routledge, Anne; Duhme-Klair, Anne-Kathrin

    2014-08-15

    A series of structurally related citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates was synthesised to investigate the influence of the linker between citric acid and ciprofloxacin on antibacterial activities. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined against a panel of reference strains and clinical isolates of bacteria associated with infection in humans and correlated with the DNA gyrase inhibitory activity. The observed trend was rationalised by computational modelling.

  7. Heterologous Protein Secretion Directed by a Repressible Acid Phosphatase System of Kluyveromyces lactis: Characterization of Upstream Region-Activating Sequences in the KIPHO5 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fermiñán, Encarnación; Domínguez, Angel

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the repressible acid phosphatase gene (KIPHO5) in Kluyveromyces lactis is strongly regulated in response to the level of inorganic phosphate (Pi) present in the growth medium. We have begun a study of the promoter region of this gene in order to identify sequences involved in the phosphate control of KIPHO5 expression and to design new expression-secretion systems in K. lactis. Deletion analysis and directed mutagenesis revealed two major identical upstream activating sequences (UAS) CACGTG at positions −430 (UAS1) and −192 (UAS2) relative to the ATG initiation codon. These sequences are identical to those described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the binding of Pho4p. Deletion or directed mutagenesis of either one or both UAS reduce KIPHO5 expression by the same amount (approximately 80%). When fused to the coding region of trout growth hormone cDNA (tGH-II), the promoter and signal peptide-encoding region of the phosphate-repressible KIPHO5 gene drives the expression of this gene and the secretion of the tGHII protein. Synthesis of tGHIIp in K. lactis transformants carrying this construct was found to be regulated by the Pi present in the medium; derepression of heterologous protein expression can therefore be achieved by lowering the Pi concentration. PMID:9647807

  8. Design of a shear-thinning recoverable peptide hydrogel from native sequences and application for influenza H1N1 vaccine adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hongzhou; Shi, Jishu; Laskin, Julia; Liu, Ziyan; McVey, David S.; Sun, Xiuzhi S.

    2011-10-07

    Peptide hydrogels are considered injectable materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Most published hydrogel-forming sequences contain either alternating-charged and noncharged residues or amphiphilic blocks. Here, we report a self-assembling peptide, h9e (FLIVIGSIIGPGGDGPGGD), designed by rationally combining two native sequences from an elastic segment of spider silk and a trans-membrane segment of human muscle L-type calcium channel. The turning segment GSII of h9e promoted hydrogel formation in both Ca2+ solution and acidic pH conditions at water content greater than 99.5%. Although h9e Ca2+ hydrogel and h9e acidic hydrogel have the same sequence, they have distinct physical properties. The shear-thinning, rapid-strengthrecovering h9e Ca2+ hydrogel was used as an H1N1 influenza vaccine adjuvant. The h9e adjuvant was biologically safe and improved immune response by 70% compared with an oil-based commercial adjuvant.

  9. The human erythrocyte anion-transport protein. Partial amino acid sequence, conformation and a possible molecular mechanism for anion exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, C J; Tanner, M J; Kempf, C

    1983-01-01

    The N-terminal 72 residues of an integral membrane fragment, P5, of the human erythrocyte anion-transport protein, which is known to be directly involved in the anion-exchange process, was shown to have the following amino acid sequence: Met-Val-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gly-Pro-Leu-Pro-Asn-Thr-Ala-Leu-Leu-Ser-Leu-Val-Leu-Met -Ala-Gly-Thr-Phe-Phe-Phe-Ala-Met-Met-Leu-Arg-Lys-Phe-Lys-Asn-Ser-Ser-Tyr-Phe-Pro-Gly-Lys-Leu-Arg-Arg-Val-Ile-Gly-Asp-Phe-Gly-Val-Pro-Ile-Ser-Ile-Leu-Ile-Met-Val-Leu-Val-Asp-Phe-Phe-Ile-Gln-Asp-Thr-Tyr-Thr-Gln- The structure of this fragment was analysed, with account being taken of the constraints that apply to the folding of integral membrane proteins and the topographical locations of various sites in the sequence. It was concluded that this sequence forms two transmembrane alpha-helices. These are probably part of a cluster of amphipathic transmembrane alpha-helices, which could comprise that part of the protein responsible for transport activity. The presently available evidence relating to the anion-exchange process was considered with the structural features noted in this study and a possible molecular mechanism is proposed. In this model the rearrangement of a network of intramembranous charged pairs mediates the translocation of an anion between anion-binding regions at each surface of the membrane, which are composed of clusters of positively charged amino acids. This model imposes a sequential exchange mechanism on the system. Supplementary material, including Tables and Figures describing the compositions of peptides determined by amino acid analysis and sequence studies, quantitative and qualitative data that provide a residue-by-residue justification for the sequence assignment and a description of modifications to and use of the solid-phase sequencer has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50123 (12 pages) with the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be

  10. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod isolated from acidic soil collected in 2001 from Karijini National Park, Western Australia, using Kennedia coccinea (Coral Vine) as a host. WSM2230 was initially effective in nitrogen-fixation with K. coccinea, but subsequently lost symbiotic competence. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,309,801 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 33 scaffolds of 33 contigs containing 5,590 protein-coding genes and 63 RNA-only encoding genes. The genome sequence of WSM2230 failed to identify nodulation genes and provides an explanation for the observed failure of the laboratory grown strain to nodulate. The genome of this strain is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197440

  11. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 from Karijini National Park, Australia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O'Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2014-06-15

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod isolated from acidic soil collected in 2001 from Karijini National Park, Western Australia, using Kennedia coccinea (Coral Vine) as a host. WSM2230 was initially effective in nitrogen-fixation with K. coccinea, but subsequently lost symbiotic competence. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,309,801 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 33 scaffolds of 33 contigs containing 5,590 protein-coding genes and 63 RNA-only encoding genes. The genome sequence of WSM2230 failed to identify nodulation genes and provides an explanation for the observed failure of the laboratory grown strain to nodulate. The genome of this strain is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  12. Cloning, sequence analysis and expression of the F1F0-ATPase beta-subunit from wine lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Martin; Uermösi, Christina; Fehlmann, Marc; Krieger, Sibylle

    2003-09-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding the F1F0-ATPase beta-subunit from Oenococcus oeni, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, Pediococcus damnosus, Pediococcus parvulus, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus hilgardii were determined. Their deduced amino acid sequences showed homology values of 79-98%. Data from the alignment and ATPase tree indicated that O. oeni and L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides formed a group well-separated from P. damnosus and P. parvulus and from the group comprises L. brevis and L. hilgardii. The N-terminus of the F1F0-ATPase beta-subunit of O. oeni contains a stretch of additional 38 amino acid residues. The catalytic site of the ATPase beta-subunit of the investigated strains is characterized by the two conserved motifs GGAGVGKT and GERTRE. The amplified atpD coding sequences were inserted into the pCRT7/CT-TOPO vector using TA-cloning strategy and transformed in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses confirmed that O. oeni has an ATPase beta-subunit protein which is larger in size than the corresponding molecules from the investigated strains.

  13. The amino acid sequence of protein SCMK-B2C from the high-sulphur fraction of wool keratin

    PubMed Central

    Elleman, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    1. The amino acid sequence of a protein from the reduced and carboxymethylated high-sulphur fraction of wool has been determined. 2. The sequence of this S-carboxymethylkerateine (SCMK-B2C) of 151 amino acid residues displays much internal homology and an unusual residue distribution. Thus a ten-residue sequence occurs four times near the N-terminus and five times near the C-terminus with few changes. These regions contain much of the molecule's half-cystine, whereas between them there is a region of 19 residues that are mainly small and devoid of cystine and proline. 3. Certain models of the wool fibre based on its mechanical and physical properties propose a matrix of small compact globular units linked together to form beaded chains. The unusual distribution of the component residues of protein SCMK-B2C suggests structures in the wool-fibre matrix compatible with certain features of the proposed models. PMID:4678578

  14. "De-novo" amino acid sequence elucidation of protein G'e by combined "Top-Down" and "Bottom-Up" mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Koy, Cornelia; Cui, Weidong; Yan, Yuetian; Gross, Michael L.; Glocker, Michael O.

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometric de-novo sequencing was applied to review the amino acid sequence of a commercially available recombinant protein Ǵ with great scientific and economic importance. Substantial deviations to the published amino acid sequence (Uniprot Q54181) were found by the presence of 46 additional amino acids at the N-terminus, including a so-called "His-tag" as well as an N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylation and α- N-phosphogluconoylation, respectively. The unexpected amino acid sequence of the commercial protein G' comprised 241 amino acids and resulted in a molecular mass of 25,998.9 ± 0.2 Da for the unmodified protein. Due to the higher mass that is caused by its extended amino acid sequence compared with the original protein G' (185 amino acids), we named this protein "protein G'e." By means of mass spectrometric peptide mapping, the suggested amino acid sequence, as well as the N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylations, was confirmed with 100% sequence coverage. After the protein G'e sequence was determined, we were able to determine the expression vector pET-28b from Novagen with the Xho I restriction enzyme cleavage site as the best option that was used for cloning and expressing the recombinant protein G'e in E. coli. A dissociation constant ( K d ) value of 9.4 nM for protein G'e was determined thermophoretically, showing that the N-terminal flanking sequence extension did not cause significant changes in the binding affinity to immunoglobulins.

  15. Defining sequence space and reaction products within the cyanuric acid hydrolase (AtzD)/barbiturase protein family.

    PubMed

    Seffernick, Jennifer L; Erickson, Jasmine S; Cameron, Stephan M; Cho, Seunghee; Dodge, Anthony G; Richman, Jack E; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2012-09-01

    Cyanuric acid hydrolases (AtzD) and barbiturases are homologous, found almost exclusively in bacteria, and comprise a rare protein family with no discernible linkage to other protein families or an X-ray structural class. There has been confusion in the literature and in genome projects regarding the reaction products, the assignment of individual sequences as either cyanuric acid hydrolases or barbiturases, and spurious connection of this family to another protein family. The present study has addressed those issues. First, the published enzyme reaction products of cyanuric acid hydrolase are incorrectly identified as biuret and carbon dioxide. The current study employed (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to show that cyanuric acid hydrolase releases carboxybiuret, which spontaneously decarboxylates to biuret. This is significant because it revealed that homologous cyanuric acid hydrolases and barbiturases catalyze completely analogous reactions. Second, enzymes that had been annotated incorrectly in genome projects have been reassigned here by bioinformatics, gene cloning, and protein characterization studies. Third, the AtzD/barbiturase family has previously been suggested to consist of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily, a large class of metallohydrolases. Bioinformatics and the lack of bound metals both argue against a connection to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Lastly, steady-state kinetic measurements and observations of protein stability suggested that the AtzD/barbiturase family might be an undistinguished protein family that has undergone some resurgence with the recent introduction of industrial s-triazine compounds such as atrazine and melamine into the environment.

  16. Molecular Design of Antifouling Polymer Brushes Using Sequence-Specific Peptoids

    DOE PAGES

    Lau, King Hang Aaron; Sileika, Tadas S.; Park, Sung Hyun; ...

    2014-11-26

    Material systems that can be used to flexibly and precisely define the chemical nature and molecular arrangement of a surface would be invaluable for the control of complex biointerfacial interactions. For example, progress in antifouling polymer biointerfaces that prevents nonspecific protein adsorption and cell attachment, which can significantly improve the performance of an array of biomedical and industrial applications, is hampered by a lack of chemical models to identify the molecular features conferring their properties. Poly(N-substituted glycine) “peptoids” are peptidomimetic polymers that can be conveniently synthesized with specific monomer sequences and chain lengths, and are presented as a versatile platformmore » for investigating the molecular design of antifouling polymer brushes. Zwitterionic antifouling polymer brushes have captured significant recent attention, and a targeted library of zwitterionic peptoid brushes with different charge densities, hydration, separations between charged groups, chain lengths, and grafted chain densities, is quantitatively evaluated for their antifouling properties through a range of protein adsorption and cell attachment assays. Specific zwitterionic brush designs are found to give rise to distinct but subtle differences in properties. In conclusion, the results also point to the dominant roles of the grafted chain density and chain length in determining the performance of antifouling polymer brushes.« less

  17. Molecular Design of Antifouling Polymer Brushes Using Sequence-Specific Peptoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, King Hang Aaron; Sileika, Tadas S.; Park, Sung Hyun; Sousa, Ana M. L.; Burch, Patrick; Szleifer, Igal; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2014-11-26

    Material systems that can be used to flexibly and precisely define the chemical nature and molecular arrangement of a surface would be invaluable for the control of complex biointerfacial interactions. For example, progress in antifouling polymer biointerfaces that prevents nonspecific protein adsorption and cell attachment, which can significantly improve the performance of an array of biomedical and industrial applications, is hampered by a lack of chemical models to identify the molecular features conferring their properties. Poly(N-substituted glycine) “peptoids” are peptidomimetic polymers that can be conveniently synthesized with specific monomer sequences and chain lengths, and are presented as a versatile platform for investigating the molecular design of antifouling polymer brushes. Zwitterionic antifouling polymer brushes have captured significant recent attention, and a targeted library of zwitterionic peptoid brushes with different charge densities, hydration, separations between charged groups, chain lengths, and grafted chain densities, is quantitatively evaluated for their antifouling properties through a range of protein adsorption and cell attachment assays. Specific zwitterionic brush designs are found to give rise to distinct but subtle differences in properties. In conclusion, the results also point to the dominant roles of the grafted chain density and chain length in determining the performance of antifouling polymer brushes.

  18. Yield Enhancement of a Double-Quantum Filter Sequence Designed for the Edited Detection of GABA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, Alan H.; Allen, Peter S.

    1995-11-01

    To overcome limitations in the signal to noise ratio (S/N) of previously proposed multiple-quantum filters (MQFs), designed for editing the GABA A2multiplet from the creatine (Cr) singlet in proton spectroscopy of brain, a new double-quantum filter is proposed which significantly enhancesS/N(thereby making it comparable with the spin-echo difference editing technique) while maintaining the superior Cr suppression and zero vulnerability to subtraction errors of previously proposed MQFs. TheS/Nenhancement results primarily from a significant reduction in transverse-relaxation losses, achieved by shortening the filter sequence by ∼70%, first by altering the criterion that determines the initial evolution period and, second, by effectively eliminating the refocusing time prior to the start of acquisition. The altered evolution time criterion also leads to an increase in the intrinsic yield of the filter from 25 to 39%. The analysis of the filter design was verifiedin vitroon phantoms of GABA in D2O, and the maintenance of editing capability, i.e., Cr suppression by more than 1600, was demonstrated on rat brain extracts.

  19. A molecular mechanism realizing sequence-specific recognition of nucleic acids by TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoh; Fukuoka, Mami; Nagasawa, Kenichi; Nakagome, Kenta; Shimizu, Hideaki; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Akiyama, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein containing two consecutive RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2) in tandem. Functional abnormality of TDP-43 has been proposed to cause neurodegeneration, but it remains obscure how the physiological functions of this protein are regulated. Here, we show distinct roles of RRM1 and RRM2 in the sequence-specific substrate recognition of TDP-43. RRM1 was found to bind a wide spectrum of ssDNA sequences, while no binding was observed between RRM2 and ssDNA. When two RRMs are fused in tandem as in native TDP-43, the fused construct almost exclusively binds ssDNA with a TG-repeat sequence. In contrast, such sequence-specificity was not observed in a simple mixture of RRM1 and RRM2. We thus propose that the spatial arrangement of multiple RRMs in DNA/RNA binding proteins provides steric effects on the substrate-binding site and thereby controls the specificity of its substrate nucleotide sequences. PMID:26838063

  20. Molecular characterization of high plant species using PCR with primers designed from consensus branch point signal sequences.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Faqian; Jiang, Jing; Han, Zhuqiang; Zhong, Ruichun; He, Liangqiong; Zhuang, Weijian; Tang, Ronghua

    2011-06-01

    A novel method is introduced for producing molecular markers in plants using single 15- to 18-mer PCR primers designed from the short conserved consensus branch point signal sequences and standard agarose gel electrophoresis. This method was tested on cultivated peanut and verified to give good fingerprinting results in other plant species (mango, banana, and longan). These single primers, designed from relatively conserved branch point signal sequences within gene introns, should be universal across other plant species. The method is rapid, simple, and efficient, and it requires no sequence information of the plant genome of interest. It could be used in conjunction with, or as a substitute for, conventional RAPD or ISSR techniques for applications including genetic diversity analysis, phylogenetic tree construction, and quantitative trait locus mapping. This technique provides a new way to develop molecular markers for assessing genetic diversity of germplasm in diverse species based on conserved branch point signal sequences.

  1. Nucleotide sequence and spatial expression pattern of a drought- and abscisic Acid-induced gene of tomato.

    PubMed

    Plant, A L; Cohen, A; Moses, M S; Bray, E A

    1991-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of le16, a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) gene induced by drought stress and regulated by abscisic acid specifically in aerial vegetative tissue, is presented. The single open reading frame contained within the gene has the capacity to encode a polypeptide of 12.7 kilodaltons and is interrupted by a small intron. The predicted polypeptide is rich in leucine, glycine, and alanine and has an isoelectric point of 8.7. The amino terminus is hydrophobic and characteristic of signal sequences that target polypeptides for export from the cytoplasm. There is homology (47.2% identity) between the amino terminus of the LE 16 polypeptide and the corresponding amino terminal domain of the maize phospholipid transfer protein. le16 was expressed in drought-stressed leaf, petiole, and stem tissue and to a much lower extent in the pericarp of mature green tomato fruit and developing seeds. No expression was detected in the pericarp of red fruit or in drought-stressed roots. Expression of le16 was also induced in leaf tissue by a variety of other abiotic stresses including polyethylene glycol-mediated water deficit, salinity, cold stress, and heat stress. None of these stresses or direct applications of abscisic acid induced the expression of le16 in the roots of the same plants. The unique expression characteristics of this gene indicates that novel regulatory mechanisms, in addition to endogenous abscisic acid, are involved in controlling gene expression.

  2. Characterization of fatty acid-producing wastewater microbial communities using next generation sequencing technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    While wastewater represents a viable source of bacterial biodiesel production, very little is known on the composition of these microbial communities. We studied the taxonomic diversity and succession of microbial communities in bioreactors accumulating fatty acids using 454-pyro...

  3. A reliable and sensitive bead-based fluorescence assay for identification of nucleic acid sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klamp, Tobias; Yahiatène, Idir; Lampe, André; Schüttpelz, Mark; Sauer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    The sensitive and rapid detection of pathogenic DNA is of tremendous importance in the field of diagnostics. We demonstrate the ability of detecting and quantifying single- and double-stranded pathogenic DNA with picomolar sensitivity in a bead-based fluorescence assay. Selecting appropriate capturing and detection sequences enables rapid (2 h) and reliable DNA quantification. We show that synthetic sequences of S. pneumoniae and M. luteus can be quantified in very small sample volumes (20 μL) across a linear detection range over four orders of magnitude from 1 nM to 1 pM, using a miniaturized wide-field fluorescence microscope without amplification steps. The method offers single molecule detection sensitivity without using complex setups and thus volunteers as simple, robust, and reliable method for the sensitive detection of DNA and RNA sequences.

  4. Molecular Design of a Chiral Brønsted Acid with Two Different Acidic Sites: Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Hetero-Diels-Alder Reaction of Azopyridinecarboxylate with Amidodienes Catalyzed by Chiral Carboxylic Acid-Monophosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, Norie; Tabuse, Hideaki; Noda, Hirofumi; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Katsunori; Izumiseki, Atsuto; Funayama, Kosuke; Egawa, Fuyuki; Okada, Shino; Adachi, Hiroaki; Terada, Masahiro

    2016-09-07

    A chiral Brønsted acid containing two different acidic sites, chiral carboxylic acid-monophosphoric acid 1a, was designed to be a new and effective concept in catalytic asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of azopyridinecarboxylate with amidodienes. The multipoint hydrogen-bonding interactions among the carboxylic acid, monophosphoric acid, azopyridinecarboxylate, and amidodiene achieved high catalytic and chiral efficiency, producing substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridazines with excellent stereocontrol in a single step. This constitutes the first example of regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective azo-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions by chiral Brønsted acid catalysis.

  5. Lactose synthesis in a monotreme, the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus): isolation and amino acid sequence of echidna alpha-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Messer, M; Griffiths, M; Rismiller, P D; Shaw, D C

    1997-10-01

    alpha-Lactalbumin and lysozyme were each isolated from echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) milk by gel permeation and ion exchange chromatography. The alpha-lactalbumin modified the action of echidna milk galactosyltransferase to promote the synthesis of lactose but had very little effect on bovine galactosyltransferase. Echidna alpha-lactalbumin is a glycosylated protein with an apparent molecular weight of 20,000 (SDS-PAGE) whose concentration in the milk is very low compared with the concentrations of alpha-lactalbumin in the milk of other species. Its amino acid sequence is more similar to that of another monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), than to the sequences of eutherian or marsupial alpha-lactalbumins. Echidna milk lysozyme, even at high concentrations, did not promote the synthesis of lactose by either echidna or bovine galactosyltransferase. We conclude that lactose synthesis in the echidna occurs by the same mechanism as that found in the platypus and other mammals.

  6. Relieving Mipafox Inhibition in Organophosphorus Acid Anhydrolase by Rational Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    variant proteins. For each, an Escherichia coli DH5 culture containing one of the plasmids was grown at 37C in 1L of Luria -Bertani (LB) broth...inhibition constant LB Luria -Bertani (broth) OPPA organophosphorus acid anhydrolase SDS-PAGE sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  7. The Role of HIV-1 gp41 Glycoprotein in Infectious Tropism Inferred from Physico-Chemical Properties of its Amino Acid Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, E.; Villarreal, C.; Huerta, L.; Cocho, G.

    2006-09-01

    We performed a statistical analysis of the amino acid sequence of the gp41 ectodomain of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. We found strong correlations between physicochemical properties of highly variable residues and the viral infectious tropism.

  8. Systems metabolic engineering design: Fatty acid production as an emerging case study

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Ting Wei; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2014-01-01

    Increasing demand for petroleum has stimulated industry to develop sustainable production of chemicals and biofuels using microbial cell factories. Fatty acids of chain lengths from C6 to C16 are propitious intermediates for the catalytic synthesis of industrial chemicals and diesel-like biofuels. The abundance of genetic information available for Escherichia coli and specifically, fatty acid metabolism in E. coli, supports this bacterium as a promising host for engineering a biocatalyst for the microbial production of fatty acids. Recent successes rooted in different features of systems metabolic engineering in the strain design of high-yielding medium chain fatty acid producing E. coli strains provide an emerging case study of design methods for effective strain design. Classical metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches enabled different and distinct design paths towards a high-yielding strain. Here we highlight a rational strain design process in systems biology, an integrated computational and experimental approach for carboxylic acid production, as an alternative method. Additional challenges inherent in achieving an optimal strain for commercialization of medium chain-length fatty acids will likely require a collection of strategies from systems metabolic engineering. Not only will the continued advancement in systems metabolic engineering result in these highly productive strains more quickly, this knowledge will extend more rapidly the carboxylic acid platform to the microbial production of carboxylic acids with alternate chain-lengths and functionalities. PMID:24481660

  9. New Insights into Poly(Lactic-co-glycolic acid) Microstructure: Using Repeating Sequence Copolymers to Decipher Complex NMR and Thermal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stayshich, Ryan M.; Meyer, Tara Y.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence, which Nature uses to spectacular advantage, has not been fully exploited in synthetic copolymers. To investigate the effect of sequence and stereosequence on the physical properties of copolymers a family of complex isotactic, syndiotactic and atactic repeating sequence poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) copolymers (RSC PLGAs) were prepared and their NMR and thermal behavior was studied. The unique suitability of polymers prepared from the bioassimilable lactic and glycolic acid monomers for biomedical applications makes them ideal candidates for this type of sequence engineering. Polymers with repeating units of LG, GLG and LLG (L = lactic, G = glycolic) with controlled and varied tacticities were synthesized by assembly of sequence specific, stereopure dimeric, trimeric and hexameric segmer units. Specifically labeled deuterated lactic and glycolic acid segmers were likewise prepared and polymerized. Molecular weights for the copolymers ranged from Mn = 12-40 kDa by size exclusion chromatography in THF. Although the effects of sequence-influenced solution conformation were visible in all resonances of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra, the diastereotopic methylene resonances in the 1H NMR (CDCl3) for the glycolic units of the copolymers proved most sensitive. An octad level of resolution, which corresponds to an astounding 31-atom distance between the most separated stereocenters, was observed in some mixed sequence polymers. Importantly, the level of sensitivity of a particular NMR resonance to small differences in sequence was found to depend on the sequence itself. Thermal properties were also correlated with sequence. PMID:20681726

  10. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the chiton Liolophura japonica and a phylogenetic tree for molluscan globins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Furukohri, T; Okamoto, S

    1993-02-01

    Myoglobin was isolated from the radular muscle of the chiton Liolophura japonica, a primitive archigastropodic mollusc. Liolophura contains three monomeric myoglobins (I, II, and III), and the complete amino acid sequence of myoglobin I has been determined. It is composed of 145 amino acid residues, and the molecular mass was calculated to be 16,070 D. The E7 distal histidine, which is replaced by valine or glutamine in several molluscan globins, is conserved in Liolophura myoglobin. The autoxidation rate at physiological conditions indicated that Liolophura oxymyoglobin is fairly stable when compared with other molluscan myoglobins. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura myoglobin shows low homology (11-21%) with molluscan dimeric myoglobins and hemoglobins, but shows higher homology (26-29%) with monomeric myoglobins from the gastropodic molluscs Aplysia, Dolabella, and Bursatella. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from 19 molluscan globin sequences. The tree separated them into two distinct clusters, a cluster for muscle myoglobins and a cluster for erythrocyte or gill hemoglobins. The myoglobin cluster is divided further into two subclusters, corresponding to monomeric and dimeric myoglobins, respectively. Liolophura myoglobin was placed on the branch of monomeric myoglobin lineage, showing that it diverged earlier from other monomeric myoglobins. The hemoglobin cluster is also divided into two subclusters. One cluster contains homodimeric, heterodimeric, tetrameric, and didomain chains of erythrocyte hemoglobins of the blood clams Anadara, Scapharca, and Barbatia. Of special interest is the other subcluster. It consists of three hemoglobin chains derived from the bacterial symbiontharboring clams Calyptogena and Lucina, in which hemoglobins are supposed to play an important role in maintaining the symbiosis with sulfide bacteria.

  11. Amino acid sequences of two novel long-chain neurotoxins from the venom of the sea snake Laticauda colubrina.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Tamiya, N

    1982-11-01

    From the venom of a population of the sea snake Laticauda colubrina from the Solomon Islands, a neurotoxic component, Laticauda colubrina a (toxin Lc a), was isolated in 16.6% (A280) yield. Similarly, from the venom of a population of L. colubrina from the Philippines, a neurotoxic component, Laticauda colubrina b (toxin Lc b), was obtained in 10.0% (A280) yield. The LD50 values of these toxins were 0.12 microgram/g body wt. on intramuscular injection in mice. Toxins Lc a and Lc b were each composed of molecules containing 69 amino acid residues with eight half-cystine residues. The complete amino acid sequences of these two toxins were elucidated. Toxins Lc a and Lc b are different from each other at five positions of their sequences, namely at positions 31 (Phe/Ser), 32 (Leu/Ile), 33 (Lys/Arg), 50 (Pro/Arg) and 53 (Asp/His) (residues in parentheses give the residues in toxins Lc a and Lc b respectively). Toxins Lc a and Lc b have a novel structure in that they have only four disulphide bridges, although the whole amino acid sequences are homologous to those of other known long-chain neurotoxins. It is remarkable that toxins Lc a and Lc b are not coexistent at the detection error of 6% of the other toxin. Populations of Laticauda colubrina from the Solomon Islands and from the Philippines have either toxin Lc a or toxin Lc b and not both of them.

  12. Rapid Nucleic Acid Sequencing Methods--Alternative Approaches to Facilitating Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Charles F. A.

    1982-01-01

    Because advanced students had difficulty in interpreting cleavage patterns obtained by gel electrophoresis related to rapid sequencing techniques for DNA and RNA, several formats were developed to aid in understanding this topic. Formats included print, print plus scrambled print, interactive computer-based instruction, and high-resolution…

  13. Nucleotide sequence of a lysine transfer ribonucleic Acid from bakers' yeast.

    PubMed

    Madison, J T; Boguslawski, S J; Teetor, G H

    1972-05-12

    The nucleotide sequence of one of the two major lysine transfer RNA's from bakers' yeast has been determined. Its structure is compared to that of a lysine tRNA from a haploid yeast. A total of 21 nucleotides differ in the two molecules. Only the T-psi-C-G (thymidine-pseudouridine-cytidine-guanosine) loop and its supporting stem are identical.

  14. Heavy-atom Database System: a tool for the preparation of heavy-atom derivatives of protein crystals based on amino-acid sequence and crystallization conditions.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Michihiro; Asada, Yukuhiko; Ayama, Haruhiko; Ukawa, Hisashi; Taka, Hideyuki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-09-01

    Heavy-atom Database System (HATODAS) is a WWW-based tool designed to assist the heavy-atom derivatization of proteins. The conventional procedure for the preparation of derivatives is usually a time-consuming 'trial-and-error' process. The present program provides a solution for this problem using a database of known heavy-atom derivatives. A database search suggests potential heavy-atom reagents for any target protein based on its amino-acid sequence and crystallization conditions. A mining of the database identified 93 preferred motifs for heavy-atom binding. The motifs are observed frequently at the actual heavy-atom-binding sites encountered in the process of structure determination.

  15. Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon biosensor for the specific identification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences using gold nanoparticle probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Rodrigo; Baptista, Pedro; Raniero, Leandro; Doria, Gonçalo; Silva, Leonardo; Franco, Ricardo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2007-01-01

    Amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon pi 'ii'n devices fabricated on micromachined glass substrates are integrated with oligonucleotide-derivatized gold nanoparticles for a colorimetric detection method. The method enables the specific detection and quantification of unamplified nucleic acid sequences (DNA and RNA) without the need to functionalize the glass surface, allowing for resolution of single nucleotide differences between DNA and RNA sequences—single nucleotide polymorphism and mutation detection. The detector's substrate is glass and the sample is directly applied on the back side of the biosensor, ensuring a direct optical coupling of the assays with a concomitant maximum photon capture and the possibility to reuse the sensor.

  16. Mutation-selection models of coding sequence evolution with site-heterogeneous amino acid fitness profiles

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Modeling the interplay between mutation and selection at the molecular level is key to evolutionary studies. To this end, codon-based evolutionary models have been proposed as pertinent means of studying long-range evolutionary patterns and are widely used. However, these approaches have not yet consolidated results from amino acid level phylogenetic studies showing that selection acting on proteins displays strong site-specific effects, which translate into heterogeneous amino acid propensities across the columns of alignments; related codon-level studies have instead focused on either modeling a single selective context for all codon columns, or a separate selective context for each codon column, with the former strategy deemed too simplistic and the latter deemed overparameterized. Here, we integrate recent developments in nonparametric statistical approaches to propose a probabilistic model that accounts for the heterogeneity of amino acid fitness profiles across the coding positions of a gene. We apply the model to a dozen real protein-coding gene alignments and find it to produce biologically plausible inferences, for instance, as pertaining to site-specific amino acid constraints, as well as distributions of scaled selection coefficients. In their account of mutational features as well as the heterogeneous regimes of selection at the amino acid level, the modeling approaches studied here can form a backdrop for several extensions, accounting for other selective features, for variable population size, or for subtleties of mutational features, all with parameterizations couched within population-genetic theory. PMID:20176949

  17. Amino acid sequence of a neurotoxic phospholipase A2 enzyme from common death adder (Acanthophis antracticus) venom.

    PubMed

    van der Weyden, L; Hains, P; Broady, K; Shaw, D; Milburn, P

    2001-02-01

    The amino acid sequence of the first neurotoxic phospholipase A2, acanthoxin A1, purified from the venom of the Common death adder (Acanthophis antarcticus) was determined. Acanthoxin A1 shows high homology with other Australian elapid PLA2 neurotoxins, in particular Acanthin-I and -II, also from Death adder, Pseudexin A from the Red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and Pa-12a and Pa-9c from the King brown snake (Pseudechis australis). Acanthoxin A1 is a single-chain 118 amino acid residue PLA2, including 14 half cystine residues and the essential residues forming the ubiquitous calcium binding pocket and catalytic site. Critical analysis of the residues hypothesized to be important for neurotoxicity is presented.

  18. An Interpretation of the Ancestral Codon from Miller’s Amino Acids and Nucleotide Correlations in Modern Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Nicolas; de Leon, Miguel Ponce

    2015-01-01

    Purine bias, which is usually referred to as an “ancestral codon”, is known to result in short-range correlations between nucleotides in coding sequences, and it is common in all species. We demonstrate that RWY is a more appropriate pattern than the classical RNY, and purine bias (Rrr) is the product of a network of nucleotide compensations induced by functional constraints on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Through deductions from universal correlation properties, we also demonstrate that amino acids from Miller’s spark discharge experiment are compatible with functional primeval proteins at the dawn of living cell radiation on earth. These amino acids match the hydropathy and secondary structures of modern proteins. PMID:25922573

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Gary; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Chertkov, Olga; Land, Miriam L

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brelan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  1. An amino acid packing code for α-helical structure and protein design.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun; Chavan, Archana G; Phan, Jamie; Day, Ryan; Tsai, Jerry

    2012-06-08

    This work demonstrates that all packing in α-helices can be simplified to repetitive patterns of a single motif: the knob-socket. Using the precision of Voronoi Polyhedra/Delauney Tessellations to identify contacts, the knob-socket is a four-residue tetrahedral motif: a knob residue on one α-helix packs into the three-residue socket on another α-helix. The principle of the knob-socket model relates the packing between levels of protein structure: the intra-helical packing arrangements within secondary structure that permit inter-helix tertiary packing interactions. Within an α-helix, the three-residue sockets arrange residues into a uniform packing lattice. Inter-helix packing results from a definable pattern of interdigitated knob-socket motifs between two α-helices. Furthermore, the knob-socket model classifies three types of sockets: (1) free, favoring only intra-helical packing; (2) filled, favoring inter-helical interactions; and (3) non, disfavoring α-helical structure. The amino acid propensities in these three socket classes essentially represent an amino acid code for structure in α-helical packing. Using this code, we used a novel yet straightforward approach for the design of α-helical structure to validate the knob-socket model. Unique sequences for three peptides were created to produce a predicted amount of α-helical structure: mostly helical, some helical, and no helix. These three peptides were synthesized, and helical content was assessed using CD spectroscopy. The measured α-helicity of each peptide was consistent with the expected predictions. These results and analysis demonstrate that the knob-socket motif functions as the basic unit of packing and presents an intuitive tool to decipher the rules governing packing in protein structure.

  2. 37 CFR 1.824 - Form and format for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence submissions in computer readable form. 1.824 Section 1.824 Patents... submissions in computer readable form. (a) The computer readable form required by § 1.821(e) shall meet the following requirements: (1) The computer readable form shall contain a single “Sequence Listing” as either...

  3. Protein ordered sequences are formed by random joining of amino acids in protein 0(th)-order structure, followed by evolutionary process.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Only random processes should occur on the primitive Earth. In contrast, many ordered sequences are synthesized according to genetic information on the present Earth. In this communication, I have proposed an idea that protein 0(th)-order structures or specific amino acid compositions would mediate the transfer from random process to formation of ordered sequences, after formation of double-stranded genes.

  4. From Amino Acid to Glucosinolate Biosynthesis: Protein Sequence Changes in the Evolution of Methylthioalkylmalate Synthase in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    de Kraker, Jan-Willem; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Methylthioalkylmalate synthase (MAM) catalyzes the committed step in the side chain elongation of Met, yielding important precursors for glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana and other Brassicaceae species. MAM is believed to have evolved from isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS), an enzyme involved in Leu biosynthesis, based on phylogenetic analyses and an overlap of catalytic abilities. Here, we investigated the changes in protein structure that have occurred during the recruitment of IPMS from amino acid to glucosinolate metabolism. The major sequence difference between IPMS and MAM is the absence of 120 amino acids at the C-terminal end of MAM that constitute a regulatory domain for Leu-mediated feedback inhibition. Truncation of this domain in Arabidopsis IPMS2 results in loss of Leu feedback inhibition and quaternary structure, two features common to MAM enzymes, plus an 8.4-fold increase in the kcat/Km for a MAM substrate. Additional exchange of two amino acids in the active site resulted in a MAM-like enzyme that had little residual IPMS activity. Hence, combination of the loss of the regulatory domain and a few additional amino acid exchanges can explain the evolution of MAM from IPMS during its recruitment from primary to secondary metabolism. PMID:21205930

  5. Expressed Sequence Tags Analysis and Design of Simple Sequence Repeats Markers from a Full-Length cDNA Library in Perilla frutescens (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Eun Soo; Yoo, Ji Hye; Choi, Jae Hoo; Kim, Chang Heum; Jeon, Mi Ran; Kang, Byeong Ju; Lee, Jae Geun; Choi, Seon Kang; Ghimire, Bimal Kumar; Yu, Chang Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Perilla frutescens is valuable as a medicinal plant as well as a natural medicine and functional food. However, comparative genomics analyses of P. frutescens are limited due to a lack of gene annotations and characterization. A full-length cDNA library from P. frutescens leaves was constructed to identify functional gene clusters and probable EST-SSR markers via analysis of 1,056 expressed sequence tags. Unigene assembly was performed using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) homology searches and annotated Gene Ontology (GO). A total of 18 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were designed as primer pairs. This study is the first to report comparative genomics and EST-SSR markers from P. frutescens will help gene discovery and provide an important source for functional genomics and molecular genetic research in this interesting medicinal plant. PMID:26664999

  6. Hybridization probe for femtomolar quantification of selected nucleic acid sequences on a disposable electrode.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Daniel M; Chami, Bilal; Kreuzer, Matthias; Presting, Gernot; Alvarez, Anne M; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2006-04-01

    Mixed monolayers of electroactive hybridization probes on gold surfaces of a disposable electrode were investigated as a technology for simple, sensitive, selective, and rapid gene identification. Hybridization to the ferrocene-labeled hairpin probes reproducibly diminished cyclic redox currents, presumably due to a displacement of the label from the electrode. Observed peak current densities were roughly 1000x greater than those observed in previous studies, such that results could easily be interpreted without the use of algorithms to correct for background polarization currents. Probes were sensitive to hybridization with a number of oligonucleotide sequences with varying homology, but target oligonucleotides could be distinguished from competing nontarget sequences based on unique "melting" profiles from the probe. Detection limits were demonstrated down to nearly 100 fM, which may be low enough to identify certain genetic conditions or infections without amplification. This technology has rich potential for use in field devices for gene identification as well as in gene microarrays.

  7. A Comparison of Different Teaching Designs of "Acids and Bases" Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ültay, Neslihan; Çalik, Muammer

    2016-01-01

    Inability to link the acid-base concepts with daily life phenomena (as contexts) highlights the need for further research on the context-based acid-base chemistry. In this vein, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different teaching designs (REACT strategy, 5Es learning model and traditional (existing) instruction) relevant with…

  8. The amino acid sequence of Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. The tryptic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, J C; Taylor, J G; Jackson, A A; Chambers, G K; Fincham, J R

    1975-01-01

    The NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa was digested with trypsin, and peptides accounting for 441 out of the 452 residues of the polypeptide chain were isolated and substantially sequenced. Additional experimental detail has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50052 (11 pages) with the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained under the terms given in Biochem J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1000

  9. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  10. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  11. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2014-02-25

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  12. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2012-02-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2009-05-05

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-05

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-11-11

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-12

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus methanolicus MGA3, a thermotolerant amino acid producing methylotroph.

    PubMed

    Irla, Marta; Neshat, Armin; Winkler, Anika; Albersmeier, Andreas; Heggeset, Tonje M B; Brautaset, Trygve; Kalinowski, Jörn; Wendisch, Volker F; Rückert, Christian

    2014-10-20

    Bacillus methanolicus MGA3 was isolated from freshwater marsh soil and characterised as a thermotolerant and methylotrophic L-glutamate producer. The complete genome consists of a circular chromosome and the two plasmids pBM19 and pBM69. It includes genomic information about C1 metabolism and amino acid biosynthetic pathways.

  19. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Block, Stephan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela; Hofacker, Ivo; Müller, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions.

  20. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions. PMID:25999318

  1. On designing and evaluating teaching sequences taking geometrical optics as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Björn; Bach, Frank

    2005-03-01

    National assessments and other investigations have drawn attention to the fact that there is considerable room for improvement in science teaching and learning. This article describes, exemplifies, and discusses a research program set up to address this unsatisfactory state of affairs. Briefly, the idea of the program is that researchers in science education and teachers in schools should work together to design teaching sequences and assess how they function in practice, including what the students learn. This work has two aims: first, to generate results of practical use, and second, to contribute to the development of educational science. Results of practical use are presented in the form of teacher's guides, written to be used as tools for generating further knowledge. As a contribution to educational science, attempts are made to formulate content-oriented theories of conditions that are likely to improve learning with understanding. This article describes and discusses how the research program has been implemented in the area of geometrical optics at the upper level (grades 8 and 9) of compulsory school. It is suggested that the idea of content-oriented theories is worth further examination and development and might contribute to strengthening science education as an autonomous discipline.

  2. Size and distribution of polyadenylic acid sequences in Drosophila polytene DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C; Pages, M; García, M L

    1977-12-02

    [3H]Poly(U) hybridizes very rapidly to polytene DNA from Drosophila hydei. When hybridization is performed at 30 degrees C in 2 X SSC to a large excess of DNA, 95% of the poly(U) becomes ribonuclease resistant. Also, complementary RNA transcribed in vitro from polytene DNA hybridizes to poly(U). 023--0.25% of the DNA is composed of (dA)-rich sequences and 0.23--0.31% of cRNA hybridizes to [3H]poly(U). The length of the (dA)-rich sequences on the DNA and cRNA is 40 nucleotides. The Tm values of these hybrids formed between DNA or cRNA-poly(U) is 45 degrees C. The poly(A) fragments from cytoplasmic RNA ranged from 80 to 170 nucleotides in lenght, and migrated in polyacrilamide gels as a broad peak. The average sizes of the poly(A) fragments from the poly(A)-containing RNA transcribed by nuclei isolated from salivary glands in vivo or in vitro were 40, 70, 170 and 70 nucleotides, respectively. Hybridization in situ of [3H]-poly(U) to chromosome squashes indicated that the (dA)-rich sequences are randomly distributed over the whole genome.

  3. Predicting Protein–Protein Interaction Sites Using Sequence Descriptors and Site Propensity of Neighboring Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu-Hao; Li, Kuo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Information about the interface sites of Protein–Protein Interactions (PPIs) is useful for many biological research works. However, despite the advancement of experimental techniques, the identification of PPI sites still remains as a challenging task. Using a statistical learning technique, we proposed a computational tool for predicting PPI interaction sites. As an alternative to similar approaches requiring structural information, the proposed method takes all of the input from protein sequences. In addition to typical sequence features, our method takes into consideration that interaction sites are not randomly distributed over the protein sequence. We characterized this positional preference using protein complexes with known structures, proposed a numerical index to estimate the propensity and then incorporated the index into a learning system. The resulting predictor, without using structural information, yields an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.675, recall of 0.597, precision of 0.311 and accuracy of 0.583 on a ten-fold cross-validation experiment. This performance is comparable to the previous approach in which structural information was used. Upon introducing the B-factor data to our predictor, we demonstrated that the AUC can be further improved to 0.750. The tool is accessible at http://bsaltools.ym.edu.tw/predppis. PMID:27792167

  4. Glutamic acid and its derivatives: candidates for rational design of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Wani, Waseem A; Haque, Ashanul; Saleem, Kishwar

    2013-05-01

    Throughout the history of human civilizations, cancer has been a major health problem. Its treatment has been interesting but challenging to scientists. Glutamic acid and its derivative glutamine are known to play interesting roles in cancer genesis, hence, it was realized that structurally variant glutamic acid derivatives may be designed and developed and, might be having antagonistic effects on cancer. The present article describes the state-of-art of glutamic acid and its derivatives as anticancer agents. Attempts have been made to explore the effectivity of drug-delivery systems based on glutamic acid for the delivery of anticancer drugs. Moreover, efforts have also been made to discuss the mechanism of action of glutamic acid derivatives as anticancer agents, clinical applications of glutamic acid derivatives, as well as recent developments and future perspectives of glutamic acid drug development have also been discussed.

  5. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197442

  6. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O'Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2014-06-15

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  7. L-Rhamnose-binding lectin from eggs of the Echinometra lucunter: Amino acid sequence and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; de Melo, Arthur Alves; de Almeida, Alexandra Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; da Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2015-01-01

    An L-rhamnose-binding lectin named ELEL was isolated from eggs of the rock boring sea urchin Echinometra lucunter by affinity chromatography on lactosyl-agarose. ELEL is a homodimer linked by a disulfide bond with subunits of 11 kDa each. The new lectin was inhibited by saccharides possessing the same configuration of hydroxyl groups at C-2 and C-4, such as L-rhamnose, melibiose, galactose and lactose. The amino acid sequence of ELEL was determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The ELEL subunit has 103 amino acids, including nine cysteine residues involved in four conserved intrachain disulfide bonds and one interchain disulfide bond. The full sequence of ELEL presents conserved motifs commonly found in rhamnose-binding lectins, including YGR, DPC and KYL. A three-dimensional model of ELEL was created, and molecular docking revealed favorable binding energies for interactions between ELEL and rhamnose, melibiose and Gb3 (Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer). Furthermore, ELEL was able to agglutinate Gram-positive bacterial cells, suggesting its ability to recognize pathogens.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of dicyemid mesozoans (phylum Dicyemida) from innexin amino acid sequences: dicyemids are not related to Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito G; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-06-01

    Dicyemid mesozoans are endoparasites, or endosymbionts, found only in the renal sac of benthic cephalopod molluscs. The body organization of dicyemids is very simple, consisting of usually 10 to 40 cells, with neither body cavities nor differentiated organs. Dicyemids were considered as primitive animals, and the out-group of all metazoans, or as occupying a basal position of lophotrochozoans close to flatworms. We cloned cDNAs encoding for the gap junction component proteins, innexin, from the dicyemids. Its expression pattern was observed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In adult individuals, the innexin was expressed in calottes, infusorigens, and infusoriform embryos. The unique temporal pattern was observed in the developing infusoriform embryos. Innexin amino acid sequences had taxon-specific indels which enabled identification of the 3 major protostome lineages, i.e., 2 ecdysozoans (arthropods and nematodes) and the lophotrochozoans. The dicyemids show typical, lophotrochozoan-type indels. In addition, the Bayesian and maximum likelihood trees based on the innexin amino acid sequences suggested dicyemids to be more closely related to the higher lophotrochozoans than to the flatworms. Flatworms were the sister group, or consistently basal, to the other lophotrochozoan clade that included dicyemids, annelids, molluscs, and brachiopods.

  9. An amphipathic trans-acting phosphorothioate DNA element delivers uncharged PNA and PMO nucleic acid sequences in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Harsh V.; Beaucage, Serge L.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative approach to the delivery of uncharged peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) oligomers in mammalian cells is described and consists of extending the sequence of those oligomers with a short PNA-polyA or PMO-polyA tail. Recognition of the polyA-tailed PNA or PMO oligomers by an amphipathic trans-acting polythymidylic thiophosphate triester element (dTtaPS) results in efficient internalization of those oligomers in several cell lines. Our findings indicate that cellular uptake of the oligomers occurs through an energy-dependent mechanism and macropinocytosis appears to be the predo-minant endocytic pathway used for internalization. The functionality of the internalized oligomers is demonstrated by alternate splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding luciferase in HeLa pLuc 705 cells. Amphipathic phosphorothioate DNA elements may represent a unique class of cellular transporters for robust delivery of uncharged nucleic acid sequences in live mammalian cells. PMID:27516815

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Moraxella osloensis Strain KMC41, a Producer of 4-Methyl-3-Hexenoic Acid, a Major Malodor Compound in Laundry

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Sato, Jun; Matsumura, Yuta; Mitani, Asako; Niwano, Yu; Takeuchi, Kohei; Kubota, Hiromi; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Moraxella osloensis strain KMC41, isolated from laundry with malodor. The KMC41 genome comprises a 2,445,556-bp chromosome and three plasmids. A fatty acid desaturase and at least four β-oxidation-related genes putatively associated with 4-methyl-3-hexenoic acid generation were detected in the KMC41 chromosome. PMID:27445387

  11. Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Strain Bacillus coagulans2-6, an Efficient Producer of High-Optical-Purity l-Lactic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Yu, Bo; Sun, Jibin; Ou, Hong-Yu; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Limin; Qin, Jiayang; Tang, Hongzhi; Tao, Fei; Jarek, Michael; Scharfe, Maren; Ma, Cuiqing; Ma, Yanhe; Xu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans2-6 is an efficient producer of lactic acid. The genome of B. coagulans2-6 has the smallest genome among the members of the genus Bacillusknown to date. The frameshift mutation at the start of the d-lactate dehydrogenase sequence might be responsible for the production of high-optical-purity l-lactic acid. PMID:21705584

  12. Genome sequence of the thermophilic strain Bacillus coagulans 2-6, an efficient producer of high-optical-purity L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Yu, Bo; Sun, Jibin; Ou, Hong-Yu; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Limin; Qin, Jiayang; Tang, Hongzhi; Tao, Fei; Jarek, Michael; Scharfe, Maren; Ma, Cuiqing; Ma, Yanhe; Xu, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Bacillus coagulans 2-6 is an efficient producer of lactic acid. The genome of B. coagulans 2-6 has the smallest genome among the members of the genus Bacillus known to date. The frameshift mutation at the start of the d-lactate dehydrogenase sequence might be responsible for the production of high-optical-purity l-lactic acid.

  13. Snake venom toxins. The amino acid sequence of toxin Vi2, a homologue of pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Strydom, D J

    1977-04-25

    The amino acid sequence of venom component Vi2, a protein of low toxicity from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was determined by automatic sequence analysis in combination with sequence studies on tryptic peptides. This protein, the most retarded fraction of this venom on a cation-exchange resin, is a homologue of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor consisting of a single chain of 57 amino acid residues containing six half-cystine residues. The active site lysyl residue of bovine trypsin inhibitor is conserved in Vi2 although large differences are found in the rest of the molecule.

  14. Developmental variation and amino acid sequences of cytochromes c of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the flesh fly Boettcherisca peregrina.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Inoue, H; Hiroyoshi, T; Matsubara, H; Yamanaka, T

    1986-10-01

    The amino acid sequences of cytochromes c purified from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the flesh fly Boettcherisca peregrina were determined. In contrast with the case of the housefly, isocytochromes c were not detected in these flies at any developmental stage. The sequence of fruit fly cytochrome c differed from that reported previously but was identical with that predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the fruit fly cytochrome c gene (DC4) (Limbach, K.J. & Wu, R. (1985) Nucl. Acids Res. 13, 631-644). Isocytochrome c of the fruit fly, reported to be encoded by the DC3 gene, was not detected as a functional cytochrome c molecule.

  15. Data structures for DNA sequence manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, C B

    1986-01-01

    Two data structures designated Fragment and Construct are described. The Fragment data structure defines a continuous nucleic acid sequence from a unique genetic origin. The Construct defines a continuous sequence composed of sequences from multiple genetic origins. These data structures are manipulated by a set of software tools to simulate the construction of mosaic recombinant DNA molecules. They are also used as an interface between sequence data banks and analytical programs. PMID:3753765

  16. Detection of DBD-carbamoyl amino acids in amino acid sequence and D/L configuration determination of peptides with fluorogenic Edman reagent 7-[(N,N-dimethylamino)sulfonyl]-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Matsunaga, H; Toriba, A; Santa, T; Fukushima, T; Imai, K

    1999-06-01

    A method for amino acid sequence and D/L configuration identification of peptides by using fluorogenic Edman reagent 7-[(N, N-dimethylamino)sulfonyl]-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl isothiocyanate (DBD-NCS) has been developed. This method was based on the Edman degradation principle with some modifications. A peptide or protein was coupled with DBD-NCS under basic conditions and then cyclized/cleaved to produce DBD-thiazolinone (TZ) derivative by BF3, a Lewis acid, which could significantly suppress the amino acid racemization. The liberated DBD-TZ amino acid was hydrolyzed to DBD-thiocarbamoyl (TC) amino acid under a weakly acidic condition and then oxidized by NaNO2/H+ to DBD-carbamoyl (CA) amino acid which was a stable and had a strong fluorescence intensity. The individual DBD-CA amino acids were separated on a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) for amino acid sequencing and their enantiomers were resolved on a chiral stationary-phase HPLC for identifying their D/L configurations. Combination of the two HPLC systems, the amino acid sequence and D/L configuration of peptides could be determined. This method will be useful for searching D-amino-acid-containing peptides in animals.

  17. The amino acid sequence of protein AA from a burro (Equus asinus).

    PubMed

    Sletten, Knut; Johnson, Kenneth H; Westermark, Per

    2003-09-01

    The primary structure of amyloid fibril protein AA of a burro has been determined by Edman degradation. The 80 amino acid residue long protein shows strong resemblance to that of other mammalian AA-proteins and differs from equine protein AA at 5 positions: Burro/horse positions 20 (Q/N), 44 (R,Q, K/K,Q), 59 (G,L/G,A), 61 (Q/E) and 65 (N/R).

  18. Complete genome sequence of probiotic Bacillus coagulans HM-08: A potential lactic acid producer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guoqiang; Gao, Pengfei; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-06-20

    Bacillus coagulans HM-08 is a commercialized probiotic strain in China. Its genome contains a 3.62Mb circular chromosome with an average GC content of 46.3%. In silico analysis revealed the presence of one xyl operon as well as several other genes that are correlated to xylose utilization. The genetic information provided here may help to expand its future biotechnology potential in lactic acid production.

  19. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  20. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of a novel 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid acylase gene of Bacillus laterosporus and its expression in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Aramori, I; Fukagawa, M; Tsumura, M; Iwami, M; Ono, H; Kojo, H; Kohsaka, M; Ueda, Y; Imanaka, H

    1991-12-01

    A strain of Bacillus species which produced an enzyme named glutaryl 7-ACA acylase which converts 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid (glutaryl 7-ACA) to 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) was isolated from soil. The gene for the glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was cloned with pHSG298 in Escherichia coli JM109, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the M13 dideoxy chain termination method. The DNA sequence revealed only one large open reading frame composed of 1,902 bp corresponding to 634 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a potential signal sequence in its amino-terminal region. Expression of the gene for glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was performed in both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme preparations purified from either recombinant strain of E. coli or B. subtilis were shown to be identical with each other as regards the profile of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were composed of a single peptide with the molecular size of 70 kDa. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the two enzyme preparations revealed that both amino-terminal sequences (the first nine amino acids) were identical and completely coincided with residues 28 to 36 of the open reading frame. Extracellular excretion of the enzyme was observed in a recombinant strain of B. subtilis.

  1. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of a novel 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid acylase gene of Bacillus laterosporus and its expression in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Aramori, I; Fukagawa, M; Tsumura, M; Iwami, M; Ono, H; Kojo, H; Kohsaka, M; Ueda, Y; Imanaka, H

    1991-01-01

    A strain of Bacillus species which produced an enzyme named glutaryl 7-ACA acylase which converts 7 beta-(4-carboxybutanamido)cephalosporanic acid (glutaryl 7-ACA) to 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) was isolated from soil. The gene for the glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was cloned with pHSG298 in Escherichia coli JM109, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the M13 dideoxy chain termination method. The DNA sequence revealed only one large open reading frame composed of 1,902 bp corresponding to 634 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a potential signal sequence in its amino-terminal region. Expression of the gene for glutaryl 7-ACA acylase was performed in both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme preparations purified from either recombinant strain of E. coli or B. subtilis were shown to be identical with each other as regards the profile of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were composed of a single peptide with the molecular size of 70 kDa. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the two enzyme preparations revealed that both amino-terminal sequences (the first nine amino acids) were identical and completely coincided with residues 28 to 36 of the open reading frame. Extracellular excretion of the enzyme was observed in a recombinant strain of B. subtilis. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1744041

  2. Conformations, energies, and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in dicarboxylic acids: implications for the design of synthetic dicarboxylic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Ha; Hibbs, David E; Howard, Siân T

    2005-09-01

    The various conformers of the dicarboxylic acids HO2C--(CH2)n--CO2H, n = 1-4, were obtained using density functional methods (DFT), both in the gas phase and in the aqueous phase using a polarized continuum model (PCM). Several new conformers were identified, particularly for the two larger molecules glutaric (n = 3) and adipic acid (n =4). The PCM results show that the stability of most conformers were affected, many becoming unstable in the aqueous phase; and the energy ordering of conformers is also different. The results suggest that conformational preferences could be important in determining the design and stability of appropriate synthetic receptors for glutaric and adipic acid. Geometry changes between gas and aqueous phases were most marked in those conformers containing an intramolecular hydrogen bond. Additional calculations have probed the strength of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in these dicarboxylic acids. In the cases of glutaric and adipic acid, the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bond were estimated to be around 28-29 kJ/mol, without any vibrational energy correction. The intramolecular hydrogen bond energies in malonic and succinic acid were also estimated from the calculated H-bond distances using an empirical relationship. Intramolecular H-bond redshifts of 170-250 cm(-1) have been estimated from the results of the harmonic frequency analyses.

  3. Preparing Teachers to Design Sequences of Instruction in Earth Systems Science: A Comparison of Three Professional Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Moorthy, Savitha

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined whether and how professional development can help teachers design sequences of instruction that lead to improved science learning. The efficacy of three professional development programs and a control condition was compared in a cluster randomized trial involving 53 middle school science teachers from a single school…

  4. De Novo Designed Proteins from a Library of Artificial Sequences Function in Escherichia Coli and Enable Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Michael A.; McKinley, Kara L.; Bradley, Luke H.; Viola, Sara R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >106 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains – ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes – were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions) can be sustained by sequences designed de novo. PMID:21245923

  5. A case of orthologous sequences of hemocyanin subunits for an evolutionary study of horseshoe crabs: amino acid sequence comparison of immunologically identical subunits of Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda and Tachypleus tridentatus.

    PubMed

    Sugita, H; Shishikura, F

    1995-10-01

    About 83% of the amino acid sequence of hemocyanin subunit HR6 from the Southeast Asian horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, has been determined. There is a difference of about 43% between HR6 and complete sequences of chelicerate hemocyanin subunits from the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, and a tarantula, Eurypelma californicum. However, the immunologically identical subunits HR6 and HT6 from Tachypleus tridentatus (Japanese horseshoe crab) show 2.7% sequence difference. Based on the amino acid sequences of HR6 and HT6, the divergence between C. rotundicauda and T. tridentatus occurred about 9.6 million years ago. In the case of horseshoe crab hemocyanin subunits, it seems that the orthologous homologues in many homologous subunits between species are immunologically detectable.

  6. Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing and Sequencing Combined with Acid-Fast Staining in Needle Biopsy Lung Tissues for the Diagnosis of Smear-Negative Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Panwen; Chen, Xuerong; Liang, Zongan

    2016-01-01

    Background Smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is common and difficult to diagnose. In this study, we investigated the diagnostic value of nucleic acid amplification testing and sequencing combined with acid-fast bacteria (AFB) staining of needle biopsy lung tissues for patients with suspected smear-negative PTB. Methods Patients with suspected smear-negative PTB who underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy between May 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients with AFB in sputum smears were excluded. All lung biopsy specimens were fixed in formalin, embedded in paraffin, and subjected to acid-fast staining and tuberculous polymerase chain reaction (TB-PCR). For patients with positive AFB and negative TB-PCR results in lung tissues, probe assays and 16S rRNA sequencing were used for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of PCR and AFB staining were calculated separately and in combination. Results Among the 220 eligible patients, 133 were diagnosed with TB (men/women: 76/57; age range: 17–80 years, confirmed TB: 9, probable TB: 124). Forty-eight patients who were diagnosed with other specific diseases were assigned as negative controls, and 39 patients with indeterminate final diagnosis were excluded from statistical analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of histological AFB (HAFB) for the diagnosis of smear-negative were 61.7% (82/133), 100% (48/48), 100% (82/82), 48.5% (48/181), and 71.8% (130/181), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of histological PCR were 89.5% (119/133), 95.8% (46/48), 98.3% (119/121), and 76.7% (46/60), respectively, demonstrating that histological PCR had significantly higher accuracy (91.2% [165/181]) than histological acid-fast staining (71.8% [130/181]), P < 0.001. Parallel testing of histological AFB

  7. Efficient sequence-directed psoralen targeting using pseudocomplementary Peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Fan, Xue-Jun; Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-01-01

    A pair of decameric pseudocomplementary PNAs which bind to their mixed purine-pyrimidine sequence target in duplex DNA by double duplex invasion has been synthesized with a derivative of 8-methoxypsoralen conjugated to one of the PNAs. It is shown that this pair of psoralen-conjugated pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers, which target a site in the pBluescriptKS+ vector, upon irradiation with long-wavelength UV light (UVA) with high efficiency and specificity form photoadducts to an adjacent 5'-TA site, and more than 50% of these adducts are DNA interstrand cross-links. Transcription elongation by T7 or T3 RNA polymerase is specifically arrested at the psoralen cross-linking site, yielding more than 90% arrested product. These results emphasize the potential of pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers for highly specific gene targeting, in particular, with respect to sequence-directed psoralen photomodification of double-stranded DNA. Thus, such psoralen-PNA conjugates could be very useful in a range of biology and drug discovery applications.

  8. Predicting subcellular localization of proteins based on their N-terminal amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, O; Nielsen, H; Brunak, S; von Heijne, G

    2000-07-21

    A neural network-based tool, TargetP, for large-scale subcellular location prediction of newly identified proteins has been developed. Using N-terminal sequence information only, it discriminates between proteins destined for the mitochondrion, the chloroplast, the secretory pathway, and "other" localizations with a success rate of 85% (plant) or 90% (non-plant) on redundancy-reduced test sets. From a TargetP analysis of the recently sequenced Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 2 and 4 and the Ensembl Homo sapiens protein set, we estimate that 10% of all plant proteins are mitochondrial and 14% chloroplastic, and that the abundance of secretory proteins, in both Arabidopsis and Homo, is around 10%. TargetP also predicts cleavage sites with levels of correctly predicted sites ranging from approximately 40% to 50% (chloroplastic and mitochondrial presequences) to above 70% (secretory signal peptides). TargetP is available as a web-server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TargetP/.

  9. Purification, properties, and partial amino acid sequences of thermostable xylanases from Streptomyces thermoviolaceus OPC-520

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujibo, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Katsushiro; Kuda, Takashi; Minami, Kazushi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Inamori, Yoshihiko ); Hasegawa, Toru )

    1992-01-01

    Two types of xylanases (1,4-{beta}-D-xylan xylanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.8) were isolated from the culture filtrate of a thermophilic actinomycete, Streptomyces thermoviolaceus OPC-520. The enzymes (STX-I and STX-II) were purified by chromatography with DEAE-Toyopearl 650 M, CM-Toyopearl 650 M, Sephadex G-75, Phenyl-Toyopearl 650 M, and Mono Q HR. The purified enzymes showed single bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weights of STX-I and STX-II were 54,000 and 33,000, respectively. The pIs were 4.2 (STX-I) and 8.0 (STX-II). The optimum pH levels for the activity of STX-I and STX-II were pH 7.0. The optimum temperature for the activity of STX-I was 70C, and that for the activity of STX-II was 60C. The enzymes were completely inhibited by N-bromosuccinimide. The enzymes degraded xylan, producing xylose and xylobiose as the predominant products, indicating that they were endoxylanases. STX-I showed high sequence homology with the exoglucanase from Cellulomonas fimi (47% homology), and STX-II showed high sequence homology with the xylanase from Bacillus pumilus (46% homology).

  10. Characterization, Genome Sequence, and Analysis of Escherichia Phage CICC 80001, a Bacteriophage Infecting an Efficient L-Aspartic Acid Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youqiang; Ma, Yuyue; Yao, Su; Jiang, Zengyan; Pei, Jiangsen; Cheng, Chi

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia phage CICC 80001 was isolated from the bacteriophage contaminated medium of an Escherichia coli strain HY-05C (CICC 11022S) which could produce L-aspartic acid. The phage had a head diameter of 45-50 nm and a tail of about 10 nm. The one-step growth curve showed a latent period of 10 min and a rise period of about 20 min. The average burst size was about 198 phage particles per infected cell. Tests were conducted on the plaques, multiplicity of infection, and host range. The genome of CICC 80001 was sequenced with a length of 38,810 bp, and annotated. The key proteins leading to host-cell lysis were phylogenetically analyzed. One protein belonged to class II holin, and the other two belonged to the endopeptidase family and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase family, respectively. The genome showed the sequence identity of 82.7% with that of Enterobacteria phage T7, and carried ten unique open reading frames. The bacteriophage resistant E. coli strain designated CICC 11021S was breeding and its L-aspartase activity was 84.4% of that of CICC 11022S.

  11. Triose phosphate isomerase from the coelacanth. An approach to the rapid determination of an amino acid sequence with small amounts of material.

    PubMed

    Kolb, E; Harris, J I; Bridgen, J

    1974-02-01

    The preparation and purification of cyanogen bromide fragments from [(14)C]carboxymethylated coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase is presented. The automated sequencing of these fragments, the lysine-blocked tryptic peptides derived from them, and also of the intact protein, is described. Combination with results from manual sequence analysis has given the 247-residue amino acid sequence of coelacanth triose phosphate isomerase in 4 months, by using 100mg of enzyme. (Two small adjacent peptides were placed by homology with the rabbit enzyme.) Comparison of this sequence with that of the rabbit muscle enzyme shows that 207 (84%) of the residues are identical. This slow rate of evolutionary change (corresponding to two amino acid substitutions per 100 residues per 100 million years) is similar to that found for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The reliability of sequence information obtained by automated methods is discussed.

  12. Inferences from protein and nucleic acid sequences - Early molecular evolution, divergence of kingdoms and rates of change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Mclaughlin, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Description of new sensitive, objective methods for establishing the probable common ancestry of very distantly related sequences and the quantitative evolutionary change which has taken place. These methods are applied to four families of proteins and nucleic acids and evolutionary trees will be derived where possible. Of the three families containing duplications of genetic material, two are nucleic acids: transfer RNA and 5S ribosomal RNA. Both of these structures are functional in the synthesis of coded proteins, and prototypes must have been present in the cell at the inception of the fundamental coding process that all living things share. There are many types of tRNA which recognize the various nucleotide triplets and the 20 amino acids. These types are thought to have arisen as a result of many gene duplications. Relationships among these types are discussed. The 5S ribosomal RNA, presently functional in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, is very likely descended from an early form incorporating almost a complete duplication of genetic material. The amount of evolution in the various lines can again be compared. The other two families containing duplications are proteins; ferredoxin and cytochrome c.

  13. Comparative RNA-Sequence Transcriptome Analysis of Phenolic Acid Metabolism in Salvia miltiorrhiza, a Traditional Chinese Medicine Model Plant

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenqiao; Guo, Linlin; Liu, Tian; Lin, Caicai; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is an important traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In this study, two S. miltiorrhiza genotypes (BH18 and ZH23) with different phenolic acid concentrations were used for de novo RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). A total of 170,787 transcripts and 56,216 unigenes were obtained. There were 670 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) identified between BH18 and ZH23, 250 of which were upregulated in ZH23, with genes involved in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway being the most upregulated genes. Nine genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway were upregulated in BH18 and thus result in higher lignin content in BH18. However, expression profiles of most genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway were higher in ZH23 than that in BH18. These results indicated that genes involved in the core common upstream phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway might play an important role in downstream secondary metabolism and demonstrated that lignin biosynthesis was a putative partially competing pathway with phenolic acid biosynthesis. The results of this study expanded our understanding of the regulation of phenolic acid biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:28194403

  14. Rational Design of Small Molecules Targeting Oncogenic Noncoding RNAs from Sequence.

    PubMed

    Disney, Matthew D; Angelbello, Alicia J

    2016-12-20

    The discovery of RNA catalysis in the 1980s and the dissemination of the human genome sequence at the start of this century inspired investigations of the regulatory roles of noncoding RNAs in biology. In fact, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has shown that only 1-2% of the human genome encodes protein, yet 75% is transcribed into RNA. Functional studies both preceding and following the ENCODE project have shown that these noncoding RNAs have important roles in regulating gene expression, developmental timing, and other critical functions. RNA's diverse roles are often a consequence of the various folds that it adopts. The single-stranded nature of the biopolymer enables it to adopt intramolecular folds with noncanonical pairings to lower its free energy. These folds can be scaffolds to bind proteins or to form frameworks to interact with other RNAs. Not surprisingly, dysregulation of certain noncoding RNAs has been shown to be causative of disease. Given this as the background, it is easy to see why it would be useful to develop methods that target RNA and manipulate its biology in rational and predictable ways. The antisense approach has afforded strategies to target RNAs via Watson-Crick base pairing and has typically focused on targeting partially unstructured regions of RNA. Small molecule strategies to target RNA would be desirable not only because compounds could be lead optimized via medicinal chemistry but also because structured regions within an RNA of interest could be targeted to directly interfere with RNA folds that contribute to disease. Additionally, small molecules have historically been the most successful drug candidates. Until recently, the ability to design small molecules that target non-ribosomal RNAs has been elusive, creating the perception that they are "undruggable". In this Account, approaches to demystify targeting RNA with small molecules are described. Rather than bulk screening for compounds that bind to singular

  15. Amino acid sequence diversity of the major human papillomavirus capsid protein: Implications for current and next generation vaccines☆

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Amina I.; Bissett, Sara L.; Beddows, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fidelity of host cell polymerases, the human papillomavirus (HPV) displays a degree of genomic polymorphism resulting in distinct genotypes and intra-type variants. The current HPV vaccines target the most prevalent genotypes associated with cervical cancer (HPV16/18) and genital warts (HPV6/11). Although these vaccines confer some measure of cross-protection, a multivalent HPV vaccine is in the pipeline that aims to broaden vaccine protection against other cervical cancer-associated genotypes including HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, HPV52 and HPV58. Both current and next generation vaccines comprise virus-like particles, based upon the major capsid protein, L1, and vaccine-induced, type-specific protection is likely mediated by neutralizing antibodies targeting L1 surface-exposed domains. The aim of this study was to perform an in silico analysis of existing full length L1 sequences representing vaccine-relevant HPV genotypes in order to address the degree of naturally-occurring, intra-type polymorphisms. In total, 1281 sequences from the Americas, Africa, Asia and Europe were assembled. Intra-type entropy was low and/or limited to non-surface-exposed residues for HPV6, HPV11 and HPV52 suggesting a minimal effect on vaccine antibodies for these genotypes. For HPV16, intra-type entropy was high but the present analysis did not reveal any significant polymorphisms not previously identified. For HPV31, HPV33, HPV58, however, intra-type entropy was high, mostly mapped to surface-exposed domains and in some cases within known neutralizing antibody epitopes. For HPV18 and HPV45 there were too few sequences for a definitive analysis, but HPV45 displayed some degree of surface-exposed residue diversity. In most cases, the reference sequence for each genotype represented a minority variant and the consensus L1 sequences for HPV18, HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 did not reflect the L1 sequence of the currently available HPV pseudoviruses. These data highlight a number of variant

  16. Design of embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acids that efficiently enter and accurately reactivate gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joy; Peterson, Kenneth R; Iancu-Rubin, Camelia; Bieker, James J

    2010-09-28

    Pharmacological treatments designed to reactivate fetal γ-globin can lead to an effective and successful clinical outcome in patients with hemoglobinopathies. However, new approaches remain highly desired because such treatments are not equally effective for all patients, and toxicity issues remain. We have taken a systematic approach to develop an embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that effectively enters the cell and the nucleus, binds to its target site at the human fetal γ-globin promoter, and reactivates this transcript in adult transgenic mouse bone marrow and human primary peripheral blood cells. In vitro and in vivo DNA-binding assays in conjunction with live-cell imaging have been used to establish and optimize chimeric PNA design parameters that lead to successful gene activation. Our final molecule contains a specific γ-promoter-binding PNA sequence embedded within two amino acid motifs: one leads to efficient cell/nuclear entry, and the other generates transcriptional reactivation of the target. These embedded PNAs overcome previous limitations and are generally applicable to the design of in vivo transcriptional activation reagents that can be directed to any promoter region of interest and are of direct relevance to clinical applications that would benefit from such a need.

  17. An approach to the design of molecular solids. The ureylenedicarboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xinqi; Chang, Yuhloo; Fowler, F.W.; Lauher, J.W. )

    1990-08-29

    The crystal structures of a series of ureylenedicarboxylic acids have been determined as part of a project directed toward the design of molecular solids. The ureylenedicarboxylic acids were chosen for study because they were predicted to form a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network. This two-dimensional network is the result of two orthogonal linear arrays of self-complementary hydrogen-bonded functionalities, the dicarboxylic acids and N,N{prime}-disubstituted ureas, being present in the same molecule. The simplest molecules of the series, 2,2{prime}-ureylenediacetic acid (1), 3,3{prime}-ureylenedipropionic acid (2), and 4,4{prime}-ureylenedibutyric acid (3) as well as the simplest ureylene derived from a dipeptide, N,N{prime}-carbonylbisglycylglycine (4) were synthesized and studied by using x-ray crystallographic techniques. Each molecule was found to crystallize to give the predicted solid-state structure.

  18. Materials study supporting thermochemical hydrogen cycle sulfuric acid decomposer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Michael S.

    Increasing global climate change has been driven by greenhouse gases emissions originating from the combustion of fossil fuels. Clean burning hydrogen has the potential to replace much of the fossil fuels used today reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The sulfur iodine and hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles coupled with high temperature heat from advanced nuclear reactors have shown promise for economical large-scale hydrogen fuel stock production. Both of these cycles employ a step to decompose sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide. This decomposition step occurs at high temperatures in the range of 825°C to 926°C dependent on the catalysis used. Successful commercial implementation of these technologies is dependent upon the development of suitable materials for use in the highly corrosive environments created by the decomposition products. Boron treated diamond film was a potential candidate for use in decomposer process equipment based on earlier studies concluding good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. However, little information was available relating the interactions of diamond and diamond films with sulfuric acid at temperatures greater than 350°C. A laboratory scale sulfuric acid decomposer simulator was constructed at the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The simulator was capable of producing the temperatures and corrosive environments that process equipment would be exposed to for industrialization of the sulfur iodide or hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles. A series of boron treated synthetic diamonds were tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances and suitability for use in thermochemical process equipment. These studies were performed at twenty four hour durations at temperatures between 600°C to 926°C. Other materials, including natural diamond, synthetic diamond treated with titanium, silicon carbide, quartz, aluminum nitride, and Inconel

  19. Evolution of early life inferred from protein and ribonucleic acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Schwartz, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical structures of ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochrome sequences have been employed to construct a phylogenetic tree which connects all major photosynthesizing organisms: the three types of bacteria, blue-green algae, and chloroplasts. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteria, eukaryotic cytoplasmic components and mitochondria are also included in the phylogenetic tree. Anaerobic nonphotosynthesizing bacteria similar to Clostridium were the earliest organisms, arising more than 3.2 billion years ago. Bacterial photosynthesis evolved nearly 3.0 billion years ago, while oxygen-evolving photosynthesis, originating in the blue-green algal line, came into being about 2.0 billion years ago. The phylogenetic tree supports the symbiotic theory of the origin of eukaryotes.

  20. Amino acid sequence of bacterial microbe-associated molecular pattern flg22 is required for virulence.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kana; Taguchi, Fumiko; Suzuki, Tomoko; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2008-09-01

    Flagellin proteins derived from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 and flg22Pa (QRLSTGSRINSAKDDAAGLQIA), one of the microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMP) in bacterial flagellin, induce cell death and growth inhibition in Arabidopsis thaliana. To examine the importance of aspartic acid (D) at position 43 from the N-terminus of a flagellin in its elicitor activity, D43 was replaced with valine (V) and alanine (A) in P. syringae pv. tabaci flagellin and flg22Pta. The abilities of flagellins from P. syringae pv. tabaci D43V and D43A to induce cell death and growth inhibition were reduced, whereas the abilities of flg22PtaD43V and flg22PtaD43A were abolished. These results indicate that D43 is important for elicitor activity in P. syringae pv. tabaci. When tobacco plants were inoculated with each bacterium by the spray method, both P. syringae pv. tabaci D43V and D43A mutants had remarkably reduced ability to cause disease symptoms. Both mutants had reduced or no swimming and swarming motilities and adhesion ability. In P. syringae pv. tabaci D43V, little flagellin protein was detected and few flagella were observed by electron microscopy. These results indicate that mutant flagella are unstable and that flagellar motility is impaired. Thus, the amino acid residue required for MAMP activity is important for the intrinsic flagellar function.