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Sample records for acid sequence encoding

  1. Amino acid sequence heterogeneity of the chromosomal encoded Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato major antigen P100.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, W; Farencena, A; Redl, B; Sambri, V; Cevenini, R; Stöffler, G

    1995-04-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the chromosomal encoded major antigen p100 of the European Borrelia garinii isolate B29 was determined and the deduced amino acid sequence was compared to the homologous antigen p83 of the North American Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31 and the p100 of the European Borrelia afzelii (group VS461) strain PKo. p100 of strain B29 shows 87% amino acid sequence identity to strain B31 and 79.2% to strain PKo, p100 of strain B31 and PKo shows 62.5% identity to each other. In addition, partial nucleotide sequences of the most heterogeneous region of the p100 gene of two other Borrelia garinii isolates (PBi and VS286) have been determined and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with all p100 of Borrelia garinii published so far. We found an amino acid sequence identity between 88.6 and 100% within the same genospecies. The N-terminal part of the p100 proteins is highly conserved whereas a striking heterogeneous region within the C-terminal part of the proteins was observed.

  2. Visible sensing of nucleic acid sequences using a genetically encodable unmodified mRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Narita, Atsushi; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sando, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported a molecular beacon-mRNA (MB-mRNA) strategy for nucleic acid detection/sensing in a cell-free translation system using unmodified RNA as a probe. Here in this presentation, we report that a combination with RNase H activity, which induces an additional process of irreversible cleavage of MB-domain, achieves an improved sequence selectivity (one nucleotide selectivity) and an enhanced sensitivity. This improved system finally enabled visible sensing of target nucleic acid sequence at a single nucleotide resolution under isothermal conditions.

  3. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  4. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-12-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses.

  5. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  6. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of complementary DNA encoding rat mammary gland medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Safford, R.; de Silva, J.; Lucas, C.; Windust, J.H.C.; Shedden, J.; James, C.M.; Sidebottom, C.M.; Slabas, A.R.; Tombs, M.P.; Hughes, S.G.

    1987-03-10

    Poly(A) + RNA from pregnant rat mammary glands was size-fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and fractions enriched in medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase (MCH) were identified by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. A cDNA library was constructed, in pBR322, from enriched poly(A) + RNA and screened with two oligonucleotide probes deduced from rat MCH amino acid sequence data. Cross-hybridizing clones were isolated and found to contain cDNA inserts ranging from approx. 1100 to 1550 base pairs (bp). A 1550-bp cDNA insert, from clone 43H09, was confirmed to encode MCH by hybrid-select translation/immunoprecipitation studies and by comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence of the clone to the amino acid sequence of the MCH peptides. Northern blot analysis revealed the size of the MCH mRNA to be 1500 nucleotides, and it is therefore concluded that the 1550-bp insert (including G x C tails) of clone 43H09 represents a full- or near-full-length copy of the MCH gene. The rat MCH sequence is the first reported sequence of a thioesterase from a mammalian source, but comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of MCH and the recently published mallard duck medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioesterase reveals significant homology. In particular, a seven amino acid sequence containing the proposed active serine of the duck thioesterase is found to be perfectly conserved in rat MCH.

  7. Molecular duplexes with encoded sequences and stabilities.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing

    2012-12-18

    Through specific molecular shapes and repeating polymeric sequences, biomacromolecules encode information about both structure and function. Inspired by DNA molecules, we have conceived a strategy to encode linear molecular strands with sequences that specify intermolecular association, and we and our collaborators have supported this idea through our experimental work. This Account summarizes the design and development of a class of molecular duplexes with programmable hydrogen-bonding sequences and adjustable stabilities. The specific system involves oligoamide strands synthesized from readily available monomeric modules based on standard amide (peptide) chemistry. By covalently linking three types of basic building blocks in different orders, we create oligoamide strands with various arrangements of amide O and H atoms that provide arrays of hydrogen bonding sequences. Because one of the two edges of these molecules presents the sequences of hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors, these oligoamide strands associate via their hydrogen-bonding edges into double-stranded pairs or duplexes. Systematic studies have demonstrated the strict sequence specificity and tunable stability of this system. These structurally simple duplexes exhibit many features associated with DNA sequences such as programmable sequence specificity, shape and hydrogen-bonding complementarity, and cooperativity of multipoint interactions. Capable of specifying intermolecular associations, these duplexes have formed supramolecular structures such as β-sheets and non-covalent block copolymers and have templated chemical reactions. The incorporation of dynamic covalent interactions into these H-bonded duplexes has created association units that undergo sequence-specific association and covalent ligation in both nonpolar solvents and polar media including water. These new association units may facilitate the development of new dynamic covalent structures, and new properties are emerging from these

  8. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  9. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  10. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  11. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  12. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2014-02-25

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2012-02-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-05

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. EGVIII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-23

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl8, and the corresponding EGVIII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVIII, recombinant EGVIII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-06-06

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  18. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-12

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  20. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-11-11

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2009-05-05

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. Identification, cloning, sequencing, and overexpression of the gene encoding proclavaminate amidino hydrolase and characterization of protein function in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T K; Busby, R W; Houston, T A; McIlwaine, D B; Egan, L A; Townsend, C A

    1995-01-01

    Proclavaminate amidino hydrolase (PAH) catalyzes the reaction of guanidinoproclavaminic acid to proclavaminic acid and urea, a central step in the biosynthesis of the beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid. The gene encoding this enzyme (pah) was tentatively identified within the clavulanic acid biosynthetic cluster in Streptomyces clavuligerus by translation to a protein of the correct molecular mass (33 kDa) and appreciable sequence homology to agmatine ureohydrolase (M.B.W. Szumanski and S.M. Boyle, J. Bacteriol. 172:538-547, 1990) and several arginases, a correlation similarly recognized by Aidoo et al. (K. A. Aidoo, A. Wong, D. C. Alexander, R. A. R. Rittammer, and S. E. Jensen, Gene 147:41-46, 1994). Overexpression of the putative open reading frame as a 76-kDa fusion to the maltose-binding protein gave a protein having the catalytic activity sought. Cleavage of this protein with factor Xa gave PAH whose N terminus was slightly modified by the addition of four amino acids but exhibited unchanged substrate specificity and kinetic properties. Directly downstream of pah lies the gene encoding clavaminate synthase 2, an enzyme that carries out three distinct oxidative transformations in the in vivo formation of clavulanic acid. After the first of these oxidations, however, no further reaction was found to occur in vitro without the intervention of PAH. We have demonstrated that concurrent use of recombinant clavaminate synthase 2 and PAH results in the successful conversion of deoxyguanidinoproclavaminic acid to clavaminic acid, a four-step transformation. PAH has a divalent metal requirement, pH activity profile, and kinetic properties similar to those of other proteins of the broader arginase class. PMID:7601835

  3. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  4. Amino acid sequence of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase and cDNA sequence encoding Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. A new family of fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Baunsgaard, L; Dalbøge, H; Houen, G; Rasmussen, E M; Welinder, K G

    1993-04-01

    Sequence analysis and cDNA cloning of Coprinus peroxidase (CIP) were undertaken to expand the understanding of the relationships of structure, function and molecular genetics of the secretory heme peroxidases from fungi and plants. Amino acid sequencing of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, and cDNA sequencing of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase showed that the mature proteins are identical in amino acid sequence, 343 residues in size and preceded by a 20-residue signal peptide. Their likely identity to peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus is discussed. CIP has an 8-residue, glycine-rich N-terminal extension blocked with a pyroglutamate residue which is absent in other fungal peroxidases. The presence of pyroglutamate, formed by cyclization of glutamine, and the finding of a minor fraction of a variant form lacking the N-terminal residue, indicate that signal peptidase cleavage is followed by further enzymic processing. CIP is 40-45% identical in amino-acid sequence to 11 lignin peroxidases from four fungal species, and 42-43% identical to the two known Mn-peroxidases. Like these white-rot fungal peroxidases, CIP has an additional segment of approximately 40 residues at the C-terminus which is absent in plant peroxidases. Although CIP is much more similar to horseradish peroxidase (HRP C) in substrate specificity, specific activity and pH optimum than to white-rot fungal peroxidases, the sequences of CIP and HRP C showed only 18% identity. Hence, CIP qualifies as the first member of a new family of fungal peroxidases. The nine invariant residues present in all plant, fungal and bacterial heme peroxidases are also found in CIP. The present data support the hypothesis that only one chromosomal CIP gene exists. In contrast, a large number of secretory plant and fungal peroxidases are expressed from several peroxidase gene clusters. Analyses of three batches of CIP protein and of 49 CIP clones revealed the existence of only two highly similar alleles indicating less

  5. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  6. Directed forgetting benefits motor sequence encoding.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Tobias; Frings, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments investigated directed forgetting of newly learned motor sequences. Concurrently with the list method of directed forgetting, participants successively learned two lists of motor sequences. Each sequence consisted of four consecutive finger movements. After a short distractor task, a recall test was given. Both experiments compared a forget group that was instructed to forget list-1 items with a remember group not receiving a forget instruction. We found that the instruction to forget list 1 enhanced recall of subsequently learned motor sequences. This benefit of directed forgetting occurred independently of costs for list 1. A mediation analysis showed that the encoding accuracy of list 2 was a mediator of the recall benefit, that is, the more accurate execution of motor sequences of list 2 after receiving a forget instruction for list 1 accounted for better recall of list 2. Thus, the adaptation of the list method to motor action provided more direct evidence on the effect of directed forgetting on subsequent learning. The results corroborate the assumption of a reset of encoding as a consequence of directed forgetting. PMID:26471189

  7. Nucleic acids encoding antifungal polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, I. A.; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-11-02

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include an amino acid sequence, and variants and fragments thereof, for an antipathogenic polypeptide that was isolated from a fungal fermentation broth. Nucleic acid molecules that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides of the invention, and antipathogenic domains thereof, are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  8. Isolated nucleic acids encoding antipathogenic polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Crane, Virginia C.; Ellanskaya, Irina; Ellanskaya, Natalia; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K.; Schepers, Eric J.; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-04-20

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include amino acid sequences, and variants and fragments thereof, for antipathogenic polypeptides that were isolated from fungal fermentation broths. Nucleic acids that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  10. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-09-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. PMID:6127673

  11. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed Central

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. Images PMID:6127673

  12. Structure and sequence of the gene encoding human keratocan.

    PubMed

    Tasheva, E S; Funderburgh, J L; Funderburgh, M L; Corpuz, L M; Conrad, G W

    1999-01-01

    Keratocan is one of the three major keratan sulfate proteoglycans characteristically expressed in cornea. We have isolated cDNA and genomic clones and determined the sequence of the entire human keratocan (Kera) gene. The gene is spread over 7.65 kb of DNA and contains three exons. An open reading frame starting at the beginning of the second exon encodes a protein of 352 aa. The amino acid sequence of keratocan shows high identity among mammalian species. This evolutionary conservation between the keratocan proteins as well as the restricted expression of Kera gene in cornea suggests that this molecule might be important in developing and maintaining corneal transparency.

  13. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  14. Neural encoding and retrieval of sound sequences.

    PubMed

    Rauschecker, Josef P

    2005-12-01

    Although considerable progress has been made recently in our understanding of the coding of complex sounds in the cerebral cortex, the processing and storage of tone sequences is still poorly understood. We have used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify brain mechanisms involved in the encoding and retrieval of melodies by studying the anticipation of familiar music. The results suggest a specific role for each of the following brain structures: the anterior part of the right superior temporal cortex, the right inferior frontal cortex and anterior insula, the left anterior prefrontal cortex, the lateral cerebellum, and the anterior cingulate. In a separate study, we investigated single-neuron responses in the auditory cortex of awake behaving monkeys to alternating tone sequences that in humans evoke the perception of "streaming." Depending on the frequency separation between the tones, an initial single stream may segregate into two streams after a build-up period of several seconds. The neural responses in the monkeys' primary auditory cortex (A1) mirror the psychophysical time course extremely well, suggesting that habituation within A1 may be one reason for stream segregation. However, the higher auditory and prefrontal areas found to be activated by musical melodies are expected to interact with primary areas in both bottom-up and top-down fashion to bring about the perceptual organization of sound sequences. PMID:16597759

  15. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  16. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp. PMID:7665074

  17. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  18. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  19. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  20. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  1. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  2. Cloning and sequencing the genes encoding goldfish and carp ependymin.

    PubMed

    Adams, D S; Shashoua, V E

    1994-04-20

    Ependymins (EPNs) are brain glycoproteins thought to function in optic nerve regeneration and long-term memory consolidation. To date, epn genes have been characterized in two orders of teleost fish. In this study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were used to amplify the complete 1.6-kb epn genes, gf-I and cc-I, from genomic DNA of Cypriniformes, goldfish and carp, respectively. Amplified bands were cloned and sequenced. Each gene consists of six exons and five introns. The exon portion of gf-I encodes a predicted 215-amino-acid (aa) protein previously characterized as GF-I, while cc-I encodes a predicted 215-aa protein 95% homologous to GF-I.

  3. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Erin R.; Howe, Christopher J.; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  4. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Erin R; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, R Ellen R

    2016-01-21

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events.

  5. Thermal and acid tolerant beta xylosidases, arabinofuranosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Schaller, Kastli D; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-30

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose, xylobiose, and/or arabinofuranose-substituted xylan using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  6. Thermal and acid tolerant beta-xylosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Schaller, Kastli D.; Apel, William A.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Reed, David W.

    2011-04-12

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose and/or xylobiose using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  7. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2013-01-29

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  8. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2011-06-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  9. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  10. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2012-10-30

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  11. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  12. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-08-11

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. BGL6 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2012-10-02

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. BGL4 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-16

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-01-22

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  18. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-02-28

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2011-12-06

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  20. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2008-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2007-09-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2008-08-05

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. DNA sequence of a gene encoding a BALB/c mouse Ld transplantation antigen.

    PubMed

    Moore, K W; Sher, B T; Sun, Y H; Eakle, K A; Hood, L

    1982-02-01

    The sequence of a gene, denoted 27.5, encoding a transplantation antigen for the BALB/c mouse has been determined. Gene transfer studies and comparison of the translated sequence with the partial amino acid sequence of the Ld transplantation antigen establish that gene 27.5 encodes an Ld polypeptide. A comparison of the gene 27.5 sequence with several complementary DNA sequences suggests that the BALB/c mouse may contain a number of closely related L-like genes. Gene 27.5 has eight exons that correlate with the structural domains of the transplantation antigen. PMID:7058332

  5. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  6. Local alignment of two-base encoded DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Nils; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA sequence comparison is based on optimal local alignment of two sequences using a similarity score. However, some new DNA sequencing technologies do not directly measure the base sequence, but rather an encoded form, such as the two-base encoding considered here. In order to compare such data to a reference sequence, the data must be decoded into sequence. The decoding is deterministic, but the possibility of measurement errors requires searching among all possible error modes and resulting alignments to achieve an optimal balance of fewer errors versus greater sequence similarity. Results We present an extension of the standard dynamic programming method for local alignment, which simultaneously decodes the data and performs the alignment, maximizing a similarity score based on a weighted combination of errors and edits, and allowing an affine gap penalty. We also present simulations that demonstrate the performance characteristics of our two base encoded alignment method and contrast those with standard DNA sequence alignment under the same conditions. Conclusion The new local alignment algorithm for two-base encoded data has substantial power to properly detect and correct measurement errors while identifying underlying sequence variants, and facilitating genome re-sequencing efforts based on this form of sequence data. PMID:19508732

  7. Translational control by lysine-encoding A-rich sequences

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Laura L.; Pavlovic-Djuranovic, Slavica; Koutmou, Kristin S.; Green, Rachel; Szczesny, Pawel; Djuranovic, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves a wide array of cellular mechanisms that control the abundance of the RNA or protein products of that gene. We describe a gene regulatory mechanism that is based on polyadenylate [poly(A)] tracks that stall the translation apparatus. We show that creating longer or shorter runs of adenosine nucleotides, without changes in the amino acid sequence, alters the protein output and the stability of mRNA. Sometimes, these changes result in the production of an alternative “frameshifted” protein product. These observations are corroborated using reporter constructs and in the context of recombinant gene sequences. About 2% of genes in the human genome may be subject to this uncharacterized yet fundamental form of gene regulation. The potential pool of regulated genes encodes many proteins involved in nucleic acid binding. We hypothesize that the genes we identify are part of a large network whose expression is fine-tuned by poly(A) tracks, and we provide a mechanism through which synonymous mutations may influence gene expression in pathological states. PMID:26322332

  8. Protein sequences encode safeguards against aggregation.

    PubMed

    Reumers, Joke; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Fréderic

    2009-03-01

    Functional requirements shaped proteins into globular structures. Under these structural constraints, which require both regular secondary structure and a hydrophobic core, protein aggregation is an unavoidable corollary to protein structure. However, as aggregation results in reduced fitness, natural selection will tend to eliminate strongly aggregating sequences. The analysis of distribution and variation of aggregation patterns in the human proteome using the TANGO algorithm confirms the findings of a previous study on several proteomes: the flanks of aggregation-prone regions are enriched with charged residues and proline, the so-called gatekeeper-residues. Moreover, in this study, we observed a widespread redundancy in gatekeeper usage. Interestingly, aggregating regions from key proteins such as p53 or huntingtin are among the most extensive "gatekept" sequences. As a consequence, mutations that remove gatekeepers could therefore result in a strong increase in disease-susceptibility. In a set of disease-associated mutations from the UniProt database, we find a strong enrichment of mutations that disrupt gatekeeper motifs. Closer inspection of a number of case studies indicates clearly that removing gatekeepers may play a determining role in widely varying disorders, such as van der Woude syndrome (VWS), X-linked Fabry disease (FD), and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. PMID:19156839

  9. The pea gene NA encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sandra E; Elliott, Robert C; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T; Reid, James B

    2003-01-01

    The gibberellin (GA)-deficient dwarf na mutant in pea (Pisum sativum) has severely reduced internode elongation, reduced root growth, and decreased leaflet size. However, the seeds develop normally. Two genes, PsKAO1 and PsKAO2, encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of the subfamily CYP88A were isolated. Both PsKAO1 and PsKAO2 had ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO) activity, catalyzing the three steps of the GA biosynthetic pathway from ent-kaurenoic acid to GA(12) when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In addition to the intermediates ent-7alpha-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA(12)-aldehyde, some additional products of the pea KAO activity were detected, including ent-6alpha,7alpha-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and 7beta-hydroxykaurenolide. The NA gene encodes PsKAO1, because in two independent mutant alleles, na-1 and na-2, PsKAO1 had altered sequences and the five-base deletion in PsKAO1 associated with the na-1 allele cosegregated with the dwarf na phenotype. PsKAO1 was expressed in the stem, apical bud, leaf, pod, and root, organs in which GA levels have previously been shown to be reduced in na plants. PsKAO2 was expressed only in seeds and this may explain the normal seed development and normal GA biosynthesis in seeds of na plants.

  10. Cis-regulatory hairpin-shaped mRNA encoding a reporter protein: catalytic sensing of nucleic acid sequence at single nucleotide resolution.

    PubMed

    Narita, Atsushi; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sando, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    DNA sensing at a single nucleotide resolution is achieved using a hairpin-shaped, unmodified (unlabeled) RNA probe or the precursor double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in a prokaryotic cell-free translation medium. The molecular-beacon-like probe consists of a loop region that is complementary to the target sequence and a stem composed of a ribosome-binding site (RBS) and its docking domain; the RBS is followed by the gene for a reporter protein such as luciferase or beta-galactosidase. Target binding at the loop opens the hairpin to make RBS accessible by the ribosome to start translation of the reporter protein. This sensing system is signal amplifying by virtue of catalytic DNA-to-RNA transcription when using a dsDNA probe, catalytic RNA-to-protein translation, catalytic signal transduction by the enzymatic reaction of the translated reporter protein and, in the presence of RNase H, catalytic or even irreversible translation-activation of the target-probe heteroduplex. Preparation of a probe takes 1-3 d and gene sensing using the probe takes 1-3 h.

  11. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  12. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level.

  13. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  14. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication-data encoding, data transfer & data extraction-and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system-Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)-that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  15. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication—data encoding, data transfer & data extraction—and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system—Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)—that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  16. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  17. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA encoding urotensin I precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, I; Ichikawa, T; Deguchi, T

    1986-01-01

    The primary structure of the precursor of urotensin I, a neuropeptide hormone from the caudal neurosecretory system of the carp Cyprinus carpio, has been determined by analyzing the nucleotide sequence of cloned DNA complementary to the mRNA encoding it. The precursor consists of 145 amino acid residues and the carboxyl terminus represents the 41-amino acid sequence of urotensin I, preceded by Lys-Arg and followed by Gly-Lys. Sequence homology as well as similar organization of the precursors of urotensin I and mammalian corticotropin-releasing factors suggest that they are evolutionarily related. RNA transfer blot analysis indicates that mRNA encoding the precursor of urotensin I is present only in the spinal cord and not in the brain, intestine, liver, or kidney of the carp. Images PMID:3484550

  18. Purification of two chitinases from Rhizopus oligosporus and isolation and sequencing of the encoding genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, K; Takaya, N; Kojima, N; Horiuchi, H; Ohta, A; Takagi, M

    1992-01-01

    Two chitinases were purified from Rhizopus oligosporus, a filamentous fungus belonging to the class Zygomycetes, and designated chitinase I and chitinase II. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined, and two synthetic oligonucleotide probes corresponding to these amino acid sequences were synthesized. Southern blot analyses of the total genomic DNA from R. oligosporus with these oligonucleotides as probes indicated that one of the two genes encoding these two chitinases was contained in a 2.9-kb EcoRI fragment and in a 3.6-kb HindIII fragment and that the other one was contained in a 2.9-kb EcoRI fragment and in a 11.5-kb HindIII fragment. Two DNA fragments were isolated from the phage bank of R. oligosporus genomic DNA with the synthetic oligonucleotides as probes. The restriction enzyme analyses of these fragments coincided with the Southern blot analyses described above and the amino acid sequences deduced from their nucleotide sequences contained those identical to the determined N-terminal amino acid sequences of the purified chitinases, indicating that each of these fragments contained a gene encoding chitinase (designated chi 1 and chi 2, encoding chitinase I and II, respectively). The deduced amino acid sequences of these two genes had domain structures similar to that of the published sequence of chitinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, except that they had an additional C-terminal domain. Furthermore, there were significant differences between the molecular weights experimentally determined with the two purified enzymes and those deduced from the nucleotide sequences for both genes. Analysis of the N- and C-terminal amino acid sequences of both chitinases and comparison of them with the amino acid sequences deduced from the nucleotide sequences revealed posttranslational processing not only at the N-terminal signal sequences but also at the C-terminal domains. It is concluded that these chitinases are synthesized with pre- and prosequences in

  19. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein sequence had no marked similarity to known fimbrial sequences, and no homologous sequences could be found in other black-pigmented Bacteroides species, suggesting that fimbrillin represents a class of fimbrial subunit protein of limited distribution. Images PMID:2895100

  20. Dynamic encoding of speech sequence probability in human temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Matthew K; Bouchard, Kristofer E; Tang, Claire; Chang, Edward F

    2015-05-01

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning.

  1. Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional aromatic amino acid hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, Stephanie; Hefty, P Scott; Stephens, Richard S

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a community-acquired respiratory pathogen that has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Analysis of the C. pneumoniae genome identified a gene (Cpn1046) homologous to eukaryotic aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AroAA-Hs). AroAA-Hs hydroxylate phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan into tyrosine, dihydroxyphenylalanine, and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. Sequence analysis of Cpn1046 demonstrated that residues essential for AroAA-H enzymatic function are conserved and that a subset of Chlamydia species contain an AroAA-H homolog. The chlamydial AroAA-Hs are transcriptionally linked to a putative bacterial membrane transport protein. We determined that recombinant Cpn1046 is able to hydroxylate phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan with roughly equivalent activity for all three substrates. Cpn1046 is expressed within 24 h of infection, allowing C. pneumoniae to hydroxylate host stores of aromatic amino acids during the period of logarithmic bacterial growth. From these results we can conclude that C. pneumoniae, as well as a subset of other Chlamydia species, encode an AroAA-H that is able to use all three aromatic amino acids as substrates. The maintenance of this gene within a number of Chlamydia suggests that the enzyme may have an important role in shaping the metabolism or overall pathogenesis of these bacteria. PMID:19141112

  2. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  3. Isolation and sequence of complementary DNA encoding human extracellular superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarsson, K.; Marklund, S.L.; Engstroem, A.; Edlund, T.

    1987-09-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) clone from a human placenta cDNA library encoding extracellular superoxide dismutase has been isolated and the nucleotide sequence determined. The cDNA has a very high G + C content. EC-SOD is synthesized with a putative 18-amino acid signal peptide, preceding the 222 amino acids in the mature enzyme, indicating that the enzyme is a secretory protein. The first 95 amino acids of the mature enzyme show no sequence homology with other sequenced proteins and there is one possible N-glycosylation site (Asn-89). The amino acid sequence from residues 96-193 shows strong homology (approx. 50%) with the final two-thirds of the sequences of all know eukaryotic CuZn SODs, whereas the homology with the P. leiognathi CuZn SOD is clearly lower. The ligands to Cu and Zn, the cysteines forming the intrasubunit disulfide bridge in the CuZn SODs, and the arginine found in all CuZn SODs in the entrance to the active site can all be identified in EC-SOD. A comparison with bovine CuZn SOD, the three-dimensional structure of which is known, reveals that the homologies occur in the active site and the divergencies are in the part constituting the subunit contact area in CuZn SOD. Amino acid sequence 194-222 in the carboxyl-terminal end of EC-SOD is strongly hydrophilic and contains nine amino acids with a positive charge. This sequence probably confers the affinity of EC-SOD for heparin and heparan sulfate. An analysis of the amino acid sequence homologies with CuZn SODs from various species indicates that the EC-SODs may have evolved form the CuZn SODs before the evolution of fungi and plants.

  4. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence of wound tumor virus genomic segments encoding nonstructural polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Anzola, J V; Dall, D J; Xu, Z K; Nuss, D L

    1989-07-01

    Sequence analysis of the genomic segments which encode the five wound tumor virus nonstructural polypeptides has been completed. The complete nucleotide sequence of segments S4 (2565 bp), S6 (1700 bp), S9 (1182 bp), and S10 (1172 bp) are presented in this report while the sequence of segment S12 (851 bp) has been described previously (T. Asamizu, D. Summers, M. B. Motika, J. V. Anzola, and D. L. Nuss, 1985, Virology 144, 398-409). Comparison of the only published sequence for another member of the genus Phytoreovirus, that of rice dwarf virus segment S10, with the combined available wound tumor virus sequence data revealed similarity with WTV segment S10: 54.9 and 30.6% at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Although wound tumor virus and rice dwarf virus differ in plant host range, tissue specificity, vector range, and disease symptom expression, the level of sequence similarity shared by the two segments suggests a common origin for these viruses. The potential use of a phytoreovirus sequence database for predicting functions of viral encoded gene products is considered.

  6. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence and expression of a Sulfolobus solfataricus gene encoding a class II fumarase.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Grisa, M; Tortora, P; Vanoni, M

    1994-01-01

    Fumarase catalyzes the interconversion of L-malate and fumarate. A Sulfolobus solfataricus fumarase gene (fumC) was cloned and sequenced. Typical archaebacterial regulatory sites were identified in the region flanking the fumC open reading frame. The fumC gene encodes a protein of 438 amino acids (47,899 Da) which shows several significant similarities with class II fumarases from both eubacterial and eukariotic sources as well as with aspartases. S. solfataricus fumarase expressed in Escherichia coli retains enzymatic activity and its thermostability is comparable to that of S. solfataricus purified enzyme despite a 11 amino acid C-terminal deletion.

  7. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  8. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  9. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  10. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  11. Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Antosiewicz, Danuta M.; Schachtman, Daniel P.; Clemens, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

  12. Sequence Analysis of the Gene Encoding Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea and Characterization of the Recombinant Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Potocki De Montalk, G.; Remaud-Simeon, M.; Willemot, R. M.; Planchot, V.; Monsan, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Neisseria polysaccharea gene encoding amylosucrase was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequencing revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence differs significantly from that previously published. Comparison of the sequence with that of enzymes of the α-amylase family predicted a (β/α)8-barrel domain. Six of the eight highly conserved regions in amylolytic enzymes are present in amylosucrase. Among them, four constitute the active site in α-amylases. These sites were also conserved in the sequence of glucosyltransferases and dextransucrases. Nevertheless, the evolutionary tree does not show strong homology between them. The amylosucrase was purified by affinity chromatography between fusion protein glutathione S-transferase–amylosucrase and glutathione-Sepharose 4B. The pure enzyme linearly elongated some branched chains of glycogen, to an average degree of polymerization of 75. PMID:9882648

  13. Identification and characterization of the cDNA sequence encoding amelogenin in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunyan; Li, Yumei; Yan, Shouqing; Fang, Hengtong; Sun, Boxing; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhao, Zhihui

    2016-02-01

    Amelogenins, the most abundant proteins in tooth enamel extracellular matrix (ECM), are essential for tooth amelogenesis. The nucleotide sequence of amelogenin gene (AMEL) for rabbit, as an important member of mammals and good continuously growing incisor model, is important for comparative and evolutional study. Previous studies about rabbit amelogenin proteins got no consensus yet even as to their existence or size. In this study, with combined usage of in silico and molecular cloning technologies, we identified sequences of two transcripts of rabbit amelogenin, resulting from the alternative splicing of the 45-bp exon 4. The coding regions of the two transcripts are of 567- and 522-bp, encoding 188 and 173 amino acids including a 17-residue signal peptide, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that rabbit amelogenin features in extremely high GC-content in nucleotide sequence and Alanine content in protein sequence. Detailed comparison of amino acid sequence with other mammals showed that the rabbit amelogenin protein is conserved in the sites and regions important for protein functions. Overall, our results uncovered the mysteries about rabbit amelogenin and revealed its sequence peculiarities. PMID:26551300

  14. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  15. Nucleic Acid Encoding A Lectin-Derived Progenitor Cell Preservation Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, M. Gabriella; Chrispeels, Maarten J.; Moore, Jeffrey G.

    2001-10-30

    The invention relates to an isolated nucleic acid molecule that encodes a protein that is effective to preserve progenitor cells, such as hematopoietic progenitor cells. The nucleic acid comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:1, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof. The encoded protein has an amino acid sequence that comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:2, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof that contains an amino acid sequence TNNVLQVT. Methods of using the encoded protein for preserving progenitor cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo are also described. The invention, therefore, include methods such as myeloablation therapies for cancer treatment wherein myeloid reconstitution is facilitated by means of the specified protein. Other therapeutic utilities are also enabled through the invention, for example, expanding progenitor cell populations ex vivo to increase chances of engraftation, improving conditions for transporting and storing progenitor cells, and facilitating gene therapy to treat and cure a broad range of life-threatening hematologic diseases.

  16. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding rat liver cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD).

    PubMed

    Reymond, I; Sergeant, A; Tappaz, M

    1996-06-01

    The taurine biosynthesis enzyme, cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD), was purified to homogeneity from rat liver. Three CSD peptides generated by tryptic cleavage were isolated and partially sequenced. Two of them showed a marked homology with glutamate decarboxylase and their respective position on the CSD amino acid sequence was postulated accordingly. Using appropriate degenerated primers derived from these two peptides, a PCR amplified DNA fragment was generated from liver poly(A)+ mRNA, cloned and used as a probe to screen a rat liver cDNA library. Three cDNAs, length around 1800 bp, were isolated which all contained an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 493 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 55.2 kDa close to the experimental values for CSD. The encoded protein contained the sequence of the three peptides isolated from homogenous liver CSD. Our data confirm and significantly extend those recently published (Kaisaki et al. (1995) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1262, 79-82). Indeed, an additional base pair found 1371 bp downstream from the initiation codon led to a shift in the open reading frame which extended the carboxy-terminal end by 15 amino acid residues and altogether modified 36 amino acids. The validity of this correction is supported by the finding that the corrected reading frame encoded a peptide issued from CSD tryptic cleavage that was not encoded anywhere in the CSD sequence previously reported. PMID:8679699

  17. Comparative sequence analysis of double stranded RNA binding protein encoding gene of parapoxviruses from Indian camels.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, G; Swami, Shelesh Kumar; Dahiya, Shyam Singh; Sivakumar, G; Tuteja, F C; Narnaware, S D; Mehta, S C; Singh, Raghvendar; Patil, N V

    2014-03-01

    The dsRNA binding protein (RBP) encoding gene of parapoxviruses (PPVs) from the Dromedary camels, inhabitating different geographical region of Rajasthan, India were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using the primers of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV) from Finnish reindeer and cloned into pGEM-T for sequence analysis. Analysis of RBP encoding gene revealed that PPV DNA from Bikaner shared 98.3% and 76.6% sequence identity at the amino acid level, with Pali and Udaipur PPV DNA, respectively. Reference strains of Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and PCPV (reindeer PCPV and human PCPV) shared 52.8% and 86.9% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner, respectively. But different strains of orf virus (ORFV) from different geographical areas of the world shared 69.5-71.7% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner. These findings indicate that the camel PPVs described are closely related to bovine PPV (PCPV) in comparison to caprine and ovine PPV (ORFV). PMID:25685494

  18. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E; Brandon, S E; Smale, G; Lloyd, D; Weber, L A

    1989-01-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89 alpha and hsp89 beta) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89 alpha, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product (M. C. Simon, K. Kitchener, H. T. Kao, E. Hickey, L. Weber, R. Voellmy, N. Heintz, and J. R. Nevins, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:2884-2890, 1987). We have isolated a human hsp89 alpha gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression on a beta-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89 alpha protein sequence differed from the human hsp89 beta sequence reported elsewhere (N. F. Rebbe, J. Ware, R. M. Bertina, P. Modrich, and D. W. Stafford (Gene 53:235-245, 1987) in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89 alpha gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycle. hsp89 alpha mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells. Images PMID:2527334

  19. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Method for Enzyme Design with Genetically Encoded Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    We describe the methodologies for the design of artificial enzymes with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. Genetically encoded unnatural amino acids offer great promise for constructing artificial enzymes with novel activities. In our studies, the designs of artificial enzyme were divided into two steps. First, we considered the unnatural amino acids and the protein scaffold separately. The scaffold is designed by traditional protein design methods. The unnatural amino acids are inspired by natural structure and organic chemistry methods, and synthesized by either organic chemistry methods or enzymatic conversion. With the increasing number of published unnatural amino acids with various functions, we described an unnatural amino acids toolkit containing metal chelators, redox mediators, and click chemistry reagents. These efforts enable a researcher to search the toolkit for appropriate unnatural amino acids for the study, rather than design and synthesize the unnatural amino acids from the beginning. After the first step, the model enzyme was optimized by computational methods and directed evolution. Lastly, we describe a general method for evolving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and expressing unnatural amino acids incorporated into a protein. PMID:27586330

  2. Method for Enzyme Design with Genetically Encoded Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    We describe the methodologies for the design of artificial enzymes with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. Genetically encoded unnatural amino acids offer great promise for constructing artificial enzymes with novel activities. In our studies, the designs of artificial enzyme were divided into two steps. First, we considered the unnatural amino acids and the protein scaffold separately. The scaffold is designed by traditional protein design methods. The unnatural amino acids are inspired by natural structure and organic chemistry methods, and synthesized by either organic chemistry methods or enzymatic conversion. With the increasing number of published unnatural amino acids with various functions, we described an unnatural amino acids toolkit containing metal chelators, redox mediators, and click chemistry reagents. These efforts enable a researcher to search the toolkit for appropriate unnatural amino acids for the study, rather than design and synthesize the unnatural amino acids from the beginning. After the first step, the model enzyme was optimized by computational methods and directed evolution. Lastly, we describe a general method for evolving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and expressing unnatural amino acids incorporated into a protein.

  3. Cloning, characterization, and DNA sequence of a human cDNA encoding neuropeptide tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Minth, C D; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    In vitro translation of the RNA isolated from a human pheochromocytoma demonstrated that this tumor contained a mRNA encoding a 10.5-kDa protein, which was immunoprecipitated with antiserum raised against porcine neuropeptide Y. Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from total RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pUC8. Transformants containing the neuropeptide Y cDNA were identified using the mixed hybridization probe d[A-(A,G)-(A,G)-T-T-(A,G,T)-A-T-(A,G)-T-A-(A,G)-T-G]. The probe sequences were based on the known amino acid sequence, His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu, found in porcine neuropeptide Y. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was determined and contained 86 and 174 bases in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. The coding sequence consisted of 291 bases, suggesting a precursor to neuropeptide Y that was 97 amino acids long (10,839 Da). The deduced amino acid sequence of the precursor suggested that there were at least two sites of proteolytic processing, which would generate three peptides having 28 (signal peptide), 36 (human neuropeptide Y), and 30 (COOH-terminal peptide) amino acid residues. A partial NH2-terminal sequence obtained by Edman degradation of the immunoprecipitated in vitro translation product identified the positions of methionine and leucine in the first 30 residues of the prepropeptide. A highly sensitive single-stranded complementary mRNA hybridization probe specific for neuropeptide Y mRNA was prepared using the bacteriophage SP6 promoter. This probe was used to identify a mRNA corresponding to neuropeptide Y of approximately 800 bases. Images PMID:6589611

  4. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding methylmalonyl-coenzyme A mutase from Streptomyces cinnamonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, A; Leiser, A; Robinson, J A

    1993-01-01

    In streptomycetes, the conversion of succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) into methylmalonyl-CoA, catalyzed by methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, most likely represents an important source of building blocks for polyketide antibiotic biosynthesis. In this work, the structural gene for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from Streptomyces cinnamonensis was cloned by using a heterologous gene probe encoding the mutase from Propionibacterium shermanii. A 5,732-bp fragment was sequenced, within which four open reading frames were identified on one DNA strand. The two largest (mutA and mutB) overlap by 1 nucleotide and encode proteins of 616 and 733 residues showing high amino acid sequence similarities to each other and to methylmalonyl-CoA mutases from P. shermanii and mammalian sources. The transcriptional start of the mutA-mutB message, determined by S1 mapping, coincides with the first nucleotide of the translational start codon. Evidence that these two open reading frames encode a functional mutase in S. cinnamonensis was obtained by subcloning and expression in Streptomyces lividans TK64. The mutA and mutB gene products were detected in Western blots (immunoblots) with mutase-specific antibodies and by direct detection of mutase activity with a newly developed assay method. The methylmalonyl-CoA mutase was unable to catalyze the conversion of isobutyryl-CoA into n-butyryl-CoA, another closely related adenosylcobalamin-dependent rearrangement known to occur in S. cinnamonensis. Images PMID:8099072

  5. Characterization of Mapuera virus: structure, proteins and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Henderson, G W; Laird, C; Dermott, E; Rima, B K

    1995-10-01

    The molecular biology of Mapuera virus was studied at both the protein and nucleic acid levels. Seven virus-encoded proteins were detected in infected Vero cells. The sizes and characteristics of each of the proteins determined from various radiolabelling experiments allowed preliminary identification of the proteins as the large (L; 190 kDa), haemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN; 74 kDa), nucleocapsid (N; 66 kDa), fusion (F0; 63 kDa), phosphoprotein (P; 49 kDa), matrix (M; 43 kDa) and non-structural (V; 35 kDa) proteins. Western blot analysis showed that the HN, N and P proteins were major antigens recognized in the mouse. A cDNA library of total virus-infected cellular mRNA was created and screening of the library resulted in the detection of cDNA sequences representing the N mRNA transcript of Mapuera virus. The N mRNA sequence determined from the clones was 1731 nt in length and contained an ORF that encoded 537 amino acids, the complete 3' untranslated region and part of the 5' non-coding region. The calculated M(r) of the N protein was 59 kDa, which is close to the 66 kDa protein observed by SDS-PAGE. PMID:7595354

  6. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F.; Gao, Feng; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Kothe, Denise; Li, Ying Ying; Decker, Julie; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  7. Isolation, hyperexpression, and sequencing of the aceA gene encoding isocitrate lyase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, M; McFadden, B A

    1988-01-01

    A structural gene for isocitrate lyase was isolated from a cosmid containing an ace locus of the Escherichia coli chromosome. Cloning and expression under control of the tac promoter in a multicopy plasmid showed that a 1.7-kilobase-pair DNA segment was sufficient for complementation of an aceA deletion mutation and overproduction of isocitrate lyase. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned gene and N-terminal protein sequencing of the cloned and wild-type enzymes revealed an entire aceA gene which encodes a 429-amino-acid residue polypeptide whose C-terminus is histidine. The deduced amino acid sequence for the 47.2-kilodalton subunit of E. coli isocitrate lyase could be aligned with that for the 64.8-kilodalton subunit of the castor bean enzyme with 39% identity except for limited N- and C-terminal regions and a 103-residue stretch that was unique for the plant enzyme and started approximately in the middle of that peptide. Images PMID:3049537

  8. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  9. Nucleotide sequence of dengue 2 RNA and comparison of the encoded proteins with those of other flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Y S; Galler, R; Hunkapiller, T; Dalrymple, J M; Strauss, J H; Strauss, E G

    1988-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the RNA of dengue 2 virus (S1 candidate vaccine strain derived from the PR-159 isolate) with the exception of about 15 nucleotides at the 5' end. The genome organization is the same as that deduced earlier for other flaviviruses and the amino acid sequences of the encoded dengue 2 proteins show striking homology to those of other flaviviruses. The overall amino acid sequence similarity between dengue 2 and yellow fever virus is 44.7%, whereas that between dengue 2 and West Nile virus is 50.7%. These viruses represent three different serological subgroups of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Comparison of the amino acid sequences shows that amino acid sequence homology is not uniformly distributed among the proteins; highest homology is found in some domains of nonstructural protein NS5 and lowest homology in the hydrophobic polypeptides ns2a and 2b. In general the structural proteins are less well conserved than the nonstructural proteins. Hydrophobicity profiles, however, are remarkably similar throughout the translated region. Comparison of the dengue 2 PR-159 sequence to partial sequence data from dengue 4 and another strain of dengue 2 virus reveals amino acid sequence homologies of about 64 and 96%, respectively, in the structural protein region. Thus as a general rule for flaviviruses examined to date, members of different serological subgroups demonstrate 50% or less amino acid sequence homology, members of the same subgroup average 65-75% homology, and strains of the same virus demonstrate greater than 95% amino acid sequence similarity.

  10. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding a calcium-dependent exoproteinase from Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Fortnagel, P

    1993-01-01

    The gene nprM encoding the calcium-dependent extracellular proteinase from Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 was cloned in the vector pBR322 and expressed in Escherichia coli HB101. The DNA sequence of the cloned 3.7 kb fragment revealed only one open reading frame consisting of 1686 bp with a coding capacity of 562 amino acid residues. A predicted Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence was observed 9 bp upstream from the presumptive translation start site (ATG). A possible promoter sequence (TAGACG for the -35 region and TATAAT for the -10 region) was found about 69 bp upstream of the ATG start site. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited a 24 amino acid residue signal peptide and an additional polypeptide 'pro' sequence of 221 amino acids preceding the putative mature protein of 317 amino acid residues. Amino acid sequence comparison revealed 84.5% homology between the mature protein and that of a thermolabile neutral protease from B. cereus. It also shares 73% homology with the thermostable neutral proteases of B. thermoproteolyticus and B. stearothermophilus. The zinc-binding sites and the catalytic residues are completely conserved in all four proteases. NprM has a temperature optimum of 58 degrees C, a pH optimum of between 6.4 and 7.2, and is stimulated by calcium ions and inhibited by EDTA. These results indicate that the enzyme is a neutral (metallo-) protease. PMID:8450307

  11. On the edge of language acquisition: inherent constraints on encoding multisyllabic sequences in the neonate brain.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Alissa L; Fló, Ana; Brusini, Perrine; Cattarossi, Luigi; Macagno, Francesco; Nespor, Marina; Mehler, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    To understand language, humans must encode information from rapid, sequential streams of syllables - tracking their order and organizing them into words, phrases, and sentences. We used Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine whether human neonates are born with the capacity to track the positions of syllables in multisyllabic sequences. After familiarization with a six-syllable sequence, the neonate brain responded to the change (as shown by an increase in oxy-hemoglobin) when the two edge syllables switched positions but not when two middle syllables switched positions (Experiment 1), indicating that they encoded the syllables at the edges of sequences better than those in the middle. Moreover, when a 25 ms pause was inserted between the middle syllables as a segmentation cue, neonates' brains were sensitive to the change (Experiment 2), indicating that subtle cues in speech can signal a boundary, with enhanced encoding of the syllables located at the edges of that boundary. These findings suggest that neonates' brains can encode information from multisyllabic sequences and that this encoding is constrained. Moreover, subtle segmentation cues in a sequence of syllables provide a mechanism with which to accurately encode positional information from longer sequences. Tracking the order of syllables is necessary to understand language and our results suggest that the foundations for this encoding are present at birth.

  12. [Leu5]enkephalin-encoding sequences are targets for a specific DNA-binding factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bakalkin, G; Telkov, M; Yakovleva, T; Terenius, L

    1995-01-01

    A DNA-binding factor with high affinity and specificity for the [Leu5]enkephalin-encoding sequences in the prodynorphin and proenkephalin genes has been characterized. The factor has the highest affinity for the [Leu5]-enkephalin-encoding sequence in the dynorphin B-encoding region of the prodynorphin gene, has relatively high affinity for other [Leu5]enkephalin-encoding sequences in the prodynorphin and proenkephalin genes, but has no apparent affinity for similar DNA sequences coding for [Met5]-enkephalin in the prodynorphin or proopiomelanocortin genes. The factor has been named [Leu5]enkephalin-encoding sequence DNA-binding factor (LEF). LEF has a nuclear localization and is composed of three subunits of about 60, 70, and 95 kDa, respectively. The highest levels were observed in rat testis, cerebellum, and spleen and were generally higher in late embryonal compared to newborn or adult animals. LEF activity was also recorded in human clonal tumor cell lines. LEF inhibited the transcription of reporter genes in artificial gene constructs where a [Leu5]enkephalin-encoding DNA fragment had been inserted between the transcription initiation site and the coding region of the reporter genes. These observations suggest that the [Leu5]enkephalin-encoding sequences in the prodynorphin and proenkephalin genes also have regulatory functions realized through interaction with a specific DNA-binding factor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568065

  13. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding partial putative molt-inhibiting hormone from Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Total RNA was extracted from eyestalks of shrimp Penaeus chinensis. Eyestalk cDNA was obtained from total RNA by reverse transcription. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated using eyestalk cDNA and degenerate primers designed from the amino acid sequence of molt-inhibiting hormone from shrimp Penaeus japonicus. A specific cDNA was obtained and cloned into a T vector for sequencing. The cDNA consisted of 201 base pairs and encoding for a peptide of 67 amino acid residues. The peptide of P. chinensis had the highest identity with molt-inhibiting hormones of P. japonicus. The cDNA could be a partial gene of molt-inhibiting hormones from P. chinensis. This paper reports for the first time cDNA encoding for neuropeptide of P. chinensis.

  14. Sequence analysis of genes encoding ribosomal proteins of amitochondriate protists: L1 of Trichomonas vaginalis and L29 of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Hashimoto, T

    1999-08-01

    Two genes encoding the ribosomal proteins were cloned and sequenced from amitochondriate protists, L1 (L10a in mammalian nomenclature) from Trichomonas vaginalis and L29 (L35 in mammalian nomenclature) from Giardia lamblia. The deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed by sequence alignments and phylogenetic reconstructions. Both the T. vaginalis L1 and the G. lamblia L29 displayed eukaryotic sequence features, when compared with all the homologs from the three primary kingdoms.

  15. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  16. Cloning and Sequencing of the cDNA Encoding the Rubber Elongation Factor of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Elisabeth; Dennis, Mark; Light, David; Chua, Nam-Hai

    1991-01-01

    In Hevea brasiliensis, the rubber particle in the laticiferous vessel is the site of rubber (cis-1-4-polyisoprene) biosynthesis. A 14 kilodalton protein, rubber elongation factor (REF), is associated with the rubber particle in a ratio of one REF to one rubber molecule (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628; Dennis M, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18608-18617). To obtain more information concerning the function of REF and its synthesis and assembly in the rubber particle, we isolated cDNA clones encoding REF. We used antibodies to REF to screen a Hevea leaf γgt11 cDNA expression library and obtained several positive clones. Sequence analysis of the REF cDNA clones showed that the REF mRNA contains 121 nucleotides of 5′-nontranslated sequences and a 205 nucleotide 3′-nontranslated region. The open reading frame encodes the entire 14 kilodalton REF protein without any extra amino acids (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628). The REF cDNA was subcloned in pGEM-3Z/-4Z and expressed in vitro. The translation product is a 14 kilodalton protein that can be immunoprecipitated with antibodies to REF. Addition of microsomal membranes to the in vitro translation product did not alter the mobility of the REF protein. This, and the sequence data, indicate that REF is not made as a preprotein. Our results suggest that REF is synthesized on free polysomes in the laticifer cytoplasm and that assembly of the rubber particles is likely to occur in the cytosol. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668388

  17. Molecular cloning of the Clostridium botulinum structural gene encoding the type B neurotoxin and determination of its entire nucleotide sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, S M; Elmore, M J; Bodsworth, N J; Brehm, J K; Atkinson, T; Minton, N P

    1992-01-01

    DNA fragments derived from the Clostridium botulinum type A neurotoxin (BoNT/A) gene (botA) were used in DNA-DNA hybridization reactions to derive a restriction map of the region of the C. botulinum type B strain Danish chromosome encoding botB. As the one probe encoded part of the BoNT/A heavy (H) chain and the other encoded part of the light (L) chain, the position and orientation of botB relative to this map were established. The temperature at which hybridization occurred indicated that a higher degree of DNA homology occurred between the two genes in the H-chain-encoding region. By using the derived restriction map data, a 2.1-kb BglII-XbaI fragment encoding the entire BoNT/B L chain and 108 amino acids of the H chain was cloned and characterized by nucleotide sequencing. A contiguous 1.8-kb XbaI fragment encoding a further 623 amino acids of the H chain was also cloned. The 3' end of the gene was obtained by cloning a 1.6-kb fragment amplified from genomic DNA by inverse polymerase chain reaction. Translation of the nucleotide sequence derived from all three clones demonstrated that BoNT/B was composed of 1,291 amino acids. Comparative alignment of its sequence with all currently characterized BoNTs (A, C, D, and E) and tetanus toxin (TeTx) showed that a wide variation in percent homology occurred dependent on which component of the dichain was compared. Thus, the L chain of BoNT/B exhibits the greatest degree of homology (50% identity) with the TeTx L chain, whereas its H chain is most homologous (48% identity) with the BoNT/A H chain. Overall, the six neurotoxins were shown to be composed of highly conserved amino acid domains interceded with amino acid tracts exhibiting little overall similarity. In total, 68 amino acids of an average of 442 are absolutely conserved between L chains and 110 of 845 amino acids are conserved between H chains. Conservation of Trp residues (one in the L chain and nine in the H chain) was particularly striking. The most

  18. Isolation and sequencing of cDNA clones encoding ethylene-induced putative peroxidases from cucumber cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Morgens, P H; Callahan, A M; Dunn, L J; Abeles, F B

    1990-05-01

    A cDNA library from ethephon-treated cucumber cotyledons (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Poinsett 76) was constructed. Two cDNA clones encoding putative peroxidases were isolated by means of a synthetic probe based on a partial amino acid sequence of a 33 kDa cationic peroxidase that had been previously shown to be induced by ethylene. DNA sequencing indicates that the two clones were derived from two closely related RNA species that are related to published plant peroxidase sequences. Southern analysis indicates that there are 1-5 copies in a haploid genome of a gene homologous to the cDNA clones. The deduced amino acid sequences are homologous with a tobacco (55% sequence identity), a horseradish (53%), a turnip (45%), and a potato (41%) peroxidase. The cloned sequences do not encode the 33 kDa peroxidase from which the original synthetic probe was been derived, but rather other putative peroxidases. An increase in the level of mRNA is evident by 3 hours after ethephon or ethylene treatment and plateaus by 15 hours. PMID:2102850

  19. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  20. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  1. A putative peroxidase cDNA from turnip and analysis of the encoded protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gómez, S; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Mayorga-Martínez, L; Cervantes-Avilés, O; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    A putative peroxidase cDNA was isolated from turnip roots (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Total RNA extracted from mature turnip roots was used as a template for RT-PCR, using a degenerated primer designed to amplify the highly conserved distal motif of plant peroxidases. The resulting partial sequence was used to design the rest of the specific primers for 5' and 3' RACE. Two cDNA fragments were purified, sequenced, and aligned with the partial sequence from RT-PCR, and a complete overlapping sequence was obtained and labeled as BbPA (Genbank Accession No. AY423440, named as podC). The full length cDNA is 1167bp long and contains a 1077bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 deduced amino acid peroxidase polypeptide. The putative peroxidase (BnPA) showed a calculated Mr of 34kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5, with no significant identity with other reported turnip peroxidases. Sequence alignment showed that only three peroxidases have a significant identity with BnPA namely AtP29a (84%), and AtPA2 (81%) from Arabidopsis thaliana, and HRPA2 (82%) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Work is in progress to clone this gene into an adequate host to study the specific role and possible biotechnological applications of this alternative peroxidase source. PMID:18686036

  2. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, Bernd M.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  3. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of sakP encoding sakacin P, the bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus sake LTH 673.

    PubMed

    Tichaczek, P S; Vogel, R F; Hammes, W P

    1994-02-01

    Sakacin P is a heat-stable, unmodified peptide bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus sake LTH 673. The strain was isolated from fermented dry sausages and is well adapted to this habitat. The bacteriocin inhibits the growth of the opportunistic food pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes and therefore, it may improve the hygienic status of fermented food, i.e. meat products. Oligonucleotide probes were designed from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of sakacin P and used to identify sakP, the structural gene of sakacin P, on the chromosome of L. sake LTH 673. SakP was cloned into Escherichia coli NM554 and the nucleotide sequence of the gene and its adjacent regions were determined. Sakacin P appears to be synthesized as a prepeptide of 61 amino acids which is proteolytically processed to the mature bacteriocin consisting of 43 amino acids. Sequencing of the cloned fragment also revealed the presence of two other open reading frames orfX and orfY, which are located upstream and downstream of sakP, respectively, putatively encoding proteins of 52 and 98 amino acids, respectively. The functions of both ORFs remain unknown. Primer extension analysis revealed a promoter upstream of sakP. Two transcripts of approximately 0.35 and 1.0 kb were detected by Northern hybridization encoding either only sakP, or both sakP and orfY, respectively. PMID:8180701

  5. High-throughput sequencing for the identification of binding molecules from DNA-encoded chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Buller, Fabian; Steiner, Martina; Scheuermann, Jörg; Mannocci, Luca; Nissen, Ina; Kohler, Manuel; Beisel, Christian; Neri, Dario

    2010-07-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries are large collections of small organic molecules, individually coupled to DNA fragments that serve as amplifiable identification bar codes. The isolation of specific binders requires a quantitative analysis of the distribution of DNA fragments in the library before and after capture on an immobilized target protein of interest. Here, we show how Illumina sequencing can be applied to the analysis of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, yielding over 10 million DNA sequence tags per flow-lane. The technology can be used in a multiplex format, allowing the encoding and subsequent sequencing of multiple selections in the same experiment. The sequence distributions in DNA-encoded chemical library selections were found to be similar to the ones obtained using 454 technology, thus reinforcing the concept that DNA sequencing is an appropriate avenue for the decoding of library selections. The large number of sequences obtained with the Illumina method now enables the study of very large DNA-encoded chemical libraries (>500,000 compounds) and reduces decoding costs.

  6. Cloning and sequence determination of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe rpb1 gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Y; Yamagishi, M; Ueshima, R; Ishihama, A

    1991-01-01

    The gene, rpb1, encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II has been cloned from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the corresponding gene, RPB1, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a cross-hybridization probe. We have determined the complete sequence of this gene, and parts of PCR-amplified rpb1 cDNA. The predicted coding sequence, interrupted by six introns, encodes a polypeptide of 1,752 amino acid residues in length with a molecular weight of 194 kilodaltons. This polypeptide contains eight conserved structural domains characteristic of the largest subunit of RNA polymerases from other eukaryotes and, in addition, 29 repetitions of the C-terminal heptapeptide found in all the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II largest subunits so far examined. Images PMID:2011520

  7. Cloning, sequencing, and phenotypic analysis of laf1, encoding the flagellin of the lateral flagella of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed Central

    Moens, S; Michiels, K; Keijers, V; Van Leuven, F; Vanderleyden, J

    1995-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense can display a single polar flagellum and several lateral flagella. The A. brasilense Sp7 gene laf1, encoding the flagellin of the lateral flagella, was isolated and sequenced. The derived protein sequence is extensively similar to those of the flagellins of Rhizobium meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bartonella bacilliformis, and Caulobacter crescentus. An amino acid alignment shows that the flagellins of these bacteria are clustered and are clearly different from other known flagellins. A laf1 mutant, FAJ0201, was constructed by replacing an internal part of the laf1 gene by a kanamycin resistance-encoding gene cassette. The mutant is devoid of lateral flagella but still forms the polar flagellum. This phenotype is further characterized by the abolishment of the capacities to swarm on a semisolid surface and to spread from a stab inoculation in a semisolid medium. FAJ0201 shows a normal wheat root colonization pattern in the initial stage of plant root interaction. PMID:7559324

  8. Nucleic acid encoding DS-CAM proteins and products related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, Julie R.

    2005-11-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there are provided Down Syndrome-Cell Adhesion Molecule (DS-CAM) proteins. Nucleic acid sequences encoding such proteins and assays employing same are also disclosed. The invention DS-CAM proteins can be employed in a variety of ways, for example, for the production of anti-DS-CAM antibodies thereto, in therapeutic compositions and methods employing such proteins and/or antibodies. DS-CAM proteins are also useful in bioassays to identify agonists and antagonists thereto.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding plant glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-03-29

    Glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) proteins, nucleic acid molecules encoding GPT proteins, and uses thereof are disclosed. Provided herein are various GPT proteins and GPT gene coding sequences isolated from a number of plant species. As disclosed herein, GPT proteins share remarkable structural similarity within plant species, and are active in catalyzing the synthesis of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (2-oxoglutaramate), a powerful signal metabolite which regulates the function of a large number of genes involved in the photosynthesis apparatus, carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolism.

  10. Cloning and characterisation of cDNA sequences encoding for anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) in Brazilian palaemonid and penaeid shrimps.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rafael Diego; Stoco, Patricia Hermes; Barracco, Margherita Anna

    2008-11-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are antimicrobial peptides found in limulids and crustaceans that have a potent and broad range of antimicrobial activity. We report here the identification and molecular characterisation of new sequences encoding for ALFs in the haemocytes of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersi and also in two Brazilian penaeid species, Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Litopenaeus schmitti. All obtained sequences encoded for highly cationic peptides containing two conserved cysteine residues flanking a putative LPS-binding domain. They exhibited a significant amino acid similarity with crustacean and limulid ALF sequences, especially with those of penaeid shrimps. This is the first identification of ALF in a freshwater prawn. PMID:18778778

  11. Cloning and characterisation of cDNA sequences encoding for anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) in Brazilian palaemonid and penaeid shrimps.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rafael Diego; Stoco, Patricia Hermes; Barracco, Margherita Anna

    2008-11-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are antimicrobial peptides found in limulids and crustaceans that have a potent and broad range of antimicrobial activity. We report here the identification and molecular characterisation of new sequences encoding for ALFs in the haemocytes of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersi and also in two Brazilian penaeid species, Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Litopenaeus schmitti. All obtained sequences encoded for highly cationic peptides containing two conserved cysteine residues flanking a putative LPS-binding domain. They exhibited a significant amino acid similarity with crustacean and limulid ALF sequences, especially with those of penaeid shrimps. This is the first identification of ALF in a freshwater prawn.

  12. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  13. Identification of an Amino Acid Domain Encoded by the Capsid Protein Gene of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 that Modulates Viral Protein Distribution During Replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work showed that distinct amino acid motifs are encoded by the Rep, Cap and ORF3 genes of two subgroups of porcine circoviruses (PCV), PCV2a and PCV2b. At a specific location of the gene, a certain amino acid residue or sequence is preferred. Specifically, two amino acid domains located in ...

  14. Complementation cloning and sequence analysis of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hemL gene encoding glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Matters, G.L.; Beale, S.I. )

    1993-05-01

    Glutamate-1-semialdehyde amino-transferase (GSAT) catalyzes formation of the tetrapyrrole precursor, [delta]-aminolevulinic acid. GSAT is encoded by the hemL gene. A Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hemL cDNA was selected from a vegetative stage expression library by complementation of Escherichia coli hemL mutant GE 1377. In vitro GSAT activity was ten-fold higher in an extract of the complemented hemL cells than in an extract of uncomplemented mutant cells. The complementing cDNA is 2010 bp long and includes 591 bp of 3' noncoding DNA and an estimated 27 bp of 5' noncoding DNA. The coding region includes the sequence for a putative 30-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide and a 433-amino acid mature protein. The mature protein deduced from the Chlamydomonas cDNA sequence has a molecular weight of 45,880, compared to the value of 43,000 reported for purified Chlamydomonas GSAT (d. Jahn et al., 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266:161-167). The deduced peptide is 74% identical to Synechococcus GSAT, 70% identical to barley GSAT and 66% identical to tobacco GSAT. The putative pyridoxal binding region has the sequence TTMGKVIGG, which differs somewhat from those reported for other aminotransferases. The deduced putative chloroplast transit peptide has recognizable similarity to barley GSAT transit peptide. Southern analysis of genomic DNA from Chlamydomonas strain CC124, using the cDNA as a probe, indicates that GSAT is probably encoded by a single gene.

  15. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs. PMID:21334357

  16. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs.

  17. Molecular cloning and sequence determination of the genomic regions encoding protease and genome-linked protein of three picornaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, G; Rosenwirth, B; Bauer, E; Seifert, J M; Werner, F J; Besemer, J

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the degree of similarity between picornavirus proteases, we cloned the genomic cDNAs of an enterovirus, echovirus 9 (strain Barty), and two rhinoviruses, serotypes 1A and 14LP, and determined the nucleotide sequence of the region which, by analogy to poliovirus, encodes the protease. The nucleotide sequence of the region encoding the genome-linked protein VPg, immediately adjacent to the protease, was also determined. Comparison of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences with other available picornavirus sequences showed remarkable homology in proteases and among VPgs. Three highly conserved peptide regions were identified in the protease; one of these is specific for human picornaviruses and has no obvious counterpart in encephalomyocarditis virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, or cowpea mosaic virus proteases. Within the other two peptide regions two conserved amino acids, Cys 147 and His 161, could be the reactive residues of the active site. We used a statistical method to predict certain features of the secondary structures, such as alpha helices, beta sheets, and turns, and found many of these conformations to be conserved. The hydropathy profiles of the compared proteases were also strikingly similar. Thus, the proteases of human picornaviruses very probably have a similar three-dimensional structure. Images PMID:3512851

  18. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  19. Isolation of an osmotic stress- and abscisic acid-induced gene encoding an acidic endochitinase from Lycopersicon chilense.

    PubMed

    Chen, R D; Yu, L X; Greer, A F; Cheriti, H; Tabaeizadeh, Z

    1994-10-28

    We have identified one osmotic stress- and abscisic acid-responsive member of the endochitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) gene family from leaves of drought-stressed Lycopersicon chilense plants, a natural inhabitant of extremely arid regions in South America. The 966-bp full-length cDNA (designated pcht28) encodes an acidic chitinase precursor with an amino-terminal signal peptide. The mature protein is predicted to have 229 amino acid residues with a relative molecular mass of 24,943 and pI value of 6.2. Sequence analysis revealed that pcht28 has a high degree of homology with class II chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) from tomato and tobacco. Expression of the pcht28 protein in Escherichia coli verified that it is indeed a chitinase. Northern blot analysis indicated that this gene has evolved a different pattern of expression from that of other family members reported thus far. It is highly induced by both osmotic stress and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA suggested that the pcht28-related genes may form a small multigene family in this species. The efficiency of induction of the gene by drought stress, in leaves and stems, is significantly higher in L. chilense than in the cultivated tomato. It is speculated that, besides its general defensive function, the pcht28-encoded chitinase may play a particular role in plant development or in protecting plants from pathogen attack during water stress. PMID:7816027

  20. HFA1 encoding an organelle-specific acetyl-CoA carboxylase controls mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Ursula; Marthol, Sandra; Hofmann, Jörg; Stegner, Sabine; Schulz, Rainer; Meier, Sandra; Greiner, Eva; Schweizer, Eckhart

    2004-05-21

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, HFA1, encodes a >250-kDa protein, which is required for mitochondrial function. Hfa1p exhibits 72% overall sequence similarity (54% identity) to ACC1-encoded yeast cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Nevertheless, HFA1 and ACC1 functions are not overlapping because mutants of the two genes have different phenotypes and do not complement each other. Whereas ACC1 is involved in cytoplasmic fatty acid synthesis, the phenotype of hfa1Delta disruptants resembles that of mitochondrial fatty-acid synthase mutants. They fail to grow on lactate or glycerol, and the mitochondrial cofactor, lipoic acid, is reduced to <10% of its normal cellular concentration. Other than Acc1p, the N-terminal sequence of Hfa1p comprises a canonical mitochondrial targeting signal together with a matrix protease cleavage site. Accordingly, the HFA1-encoded protein was specifically assigned by Western blotting of appropriate cell fractions to the mitochondrial compartment. Removal of the mitochondrial targeting sequence abolished the competence of HFA1 DNA to complement hfal null mutants. Conversely and in contrast to the intact HFA1 sequence, the signal sequence-free HFA1 gene complemented the mutational loss of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Expression of HFA1 under the control of the ACC1 promoter restored cellular ACC activity in ACC1-defective yeast mutants to wild type levels. From this finding, it is concluded that HFA1 encodes a specific mitochondrial acetyl-CoA carboxylase providing malonyl-CoA for intraorganellar fatty acid and, in particular, lipoic acid synthesis. PMID:14761959

  1. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of the gene encoding Sphingomonas paucimobilis FP2001 alpha-L -rhamnosidase.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Takeshi; Kashige, Nobuhiro; Satho, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Tadatoshi; Aso, Yoichi; Miake, Fumio

    2005-08-01

    The gene (rhaM) encoding the alpha-L-rhamnosidase of Sphingomonas paucimobilis FP2001 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The rhaM consisted of 3,354 nucleotides and had a promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequences typical in bacteria. The rhaM encoding a protein (Rham) deducted from the sequence consisted of 1,117 amino acids and had a putative signal peptide of 25 amino acids. Rham has no similarity to other known rhamnosidases. Rham has a sugar-binding domain of glycoside hydrolase family 2, which has been well conserved in beta-glucuronidase, beta-mannosidase, and beta-galactosidase, in its C-terminal region. Rham is possibly a member of a new bacterial subfamily in glycoside hydrolase family 78 (alpha-L-rhamnosidase). RT-PCR analysis of rhaM mRNA indicated that the induction of alpha-L-rhamnosidase by the addition of L-rhamnose occurred on the transcriptional level.

  2. On the Edge of Language Acquisition: Inherent Constraints on Encoding Multisyllabic Sequences in the Neonate Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferry, Alissa L.; Fló, Ana; Brusini, Perrine; Cattarossi, Luigi; Macagno, Francesco; Nespor, Marina; Mehler, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    To understand language, humans must encode information from rapid, sequential streams of syllables--tracking their order and organizing them into words, phrases, and sentences. We used Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine whether human neonates are born with the capacity to track the positions of syllables in multisyllabic sequences.…

  3. Relating sequence encoded information to form and function of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Ruff, Kiersten M.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) showcase the importance of conformational plasticity and heterogeneity in protein function. We summarize recent advances that connect information encoded in IDP sequences to their conformational properties and functions. We focus on insights obtained through a combination of atomistic simulations and biophysical measurements that are synthesized into a coherent framework using polymer physics theories. PMID:25863585

  4. Reference-based compression of short-read sequences using path encoding

    PubMed Central

    Kingsford, Carl; Patro, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Storing, transmitting and archiving data produced by next-generation sequencing is a significant computational burden. New compression techniques tailored to short-read sequence data are needed. Results: We present here an approach to compression that reduces the difficulty of managing large-scale sequencing data. Our novel approach sits between pure reference-based compression and reference-free compression and combines much of the benefit of reference-based approaches with the flexibility of de novo encoding. Our method, called path encoding, draws a connection between storing paths in de Bruijn graphs and context-dependent arithmetic coding. Supporting this method is a system to compactly store sets of kmers that is of independent interest. We are able to encode RNA-seq reads using 3–11% of the space of the sequence in raw FASTA files, which is on average more than 34% smaller than competing approaches. We also show that even if the reference is very poorly matched to the reads that are being encoded, good compression can still be achieved. Availability and implementation: Source code and binaries freely available for download at http://www.cs.cmu.edu/∼ckingsf/software/pathenc/, implemented in Go and supported on Linux and Mac OS X. Contact: carlk@cs.cmu.edu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25649622

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding glutamine synthetase I from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei: anomalous phylogenies inferred from analysis of archaeal and bacterial glutamine synthetase I sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tiboni, O; Cammarano, P; Sanangelantoni, A M

    1993-01-01

    The gene glnA encoding glutamine synthetase I (GSI) from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced with the Sulfolobus solfataricus glnA gene as the probe. An operon reading frame of 448 amino acids was identified within a DNA segment of 1,528 bp. The encoded protein was 49% identical with the GSI of Methanococcus voltae and exhibited conserved regions characteristic of the GSI family. The P. woesei GSI was aligned with available homologs from other archaea (S. solfataricus, M. voltae) and with representative sequences from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and gram-positive bacteria. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from both the amino acid and the nucleotide sequence alignments. In accordance with the sequence similarities, archaeal and bacterial sequences did not segregate on a phylogeny. On the basis of sequence signatures, the GSI trees could be subdivided into two ensembles. One encompassed the GSI of cyanobacteria and proteobacteria, but also that of the high-G + C gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor (all of which are regulated by the reversible adenylylation of the enzyme subunits); the other embraced the GSI of the three archaea as well as that of the low-G + C gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium acetobutilycum, Bacillus subtilis) and Thermotoga maritima (none of which are regulated by subunit adenylylation). The GSIs of the Thermotoga and the Bacillus-Clostridium lineages shared a direct common ancestor with that of P. woesei and the methanogens and were unrelated to their homologs from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and S. coelicolor. The possibility is presented that the GSI gene arose among the archaea and was then laterally transferred from some early methanogen to a Thermotoga-like organism. However, the relationship of the cyanobacterial-proteobacterial GSIs to the Thermotoga GSI and the GSI of low-G+C gram-positive bacteria remains unexplained. PMID:8098326

  6. Nucleotide sequence of the cDNA encoding the proenzyme of phenol oxidase A1 of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, K; Okino, N; Kawabata, S; Iwanaga, S; Ohnishi, E

    1995-01-01

    Clones encoding pro-phenol oxidase [pro-PO; zymogen of phenol oxidase (monophenol, L-dopa:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1)] A1 were isolated from a lambda gt10 library that originated from Drosophila melanogaster strain Oregon-R male adults. The 2294 bp of the cDNA included a 13-bp 5'-noncoding region, a 2070-bp encoding open reading frame of 690 amino acids, and a 211-bp 3'-noncoding region. A hydrophobic NH2-terminal sequence for a signal peptide is absent in the protein. Furthermore, there are six potential N-glycosylation sites in the sequence, but no amino sugar was detected in the purified protein by amino acid analysis, indicating the lack of an N-linked sugar chain. The potential copper-binding sites, amino acids 200-248 and 359-414, are highly homologous to the corresponding sites of hemocyanin of the tarantula Eurypelma californicum, the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus, and the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus. On the basis of the phylogenetic tree constructed by the neighbor-joining method, vertebrate tyrosinases and molluscan hemocyanins constitute one family, whereas pro-POs and arthropod hemocyanins group with another family. It seems, therefore, likely that pro-PO originates from a common ancestor with arthropod hemocyanins, independently to the vertebrate and microbial tyrosinases. PMID:7644493

  7. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and transcriptional analyses of the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, A P; Ferry, J G

    1992-01-01

    A mixed 17-mer oligonucleotide deduced from the N terminus of a ferredoxin isolated from Methanosarcina thermophila was used to probe a lambda gt11 library prepared from M. thermophila genomic DNA; positive clones contained either a 5.7- or 2.1-kbp EcoRI insert. An open reading frame (fdxA) located within the 5.7-kbp insert had a deduced amino acid sequence that was identical to the first 26 N-terminal residues reported for the ferredoxin isolated from M. thermophila, with the exception of the initiator methionine. fdxA had the coding capacity for a 6,230-Da protein which contained eight cysteines with spacings typical of 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins. An open reading frame (ORF1) located within the 2.1-kbp EcoRI fragment also had the potential to encode a 2[4Fe-4S] bacterial-type ferredoxin (5,850 Da). fdxA and ORF1 were present as single copies in the genome, and each was transcribed on a monocistronic mRNA. While the fdxA- and ORF1-specific mRNAs were detected in cells grown on methanol and trimethylamine, only the fdxA-specific transcript was present in acetate-grown cells. The apparent transcriptional start sites of fdxA and ORF1, as determined by primer extension analyses, lay 21 to 28 bases downstream of sequences with high identity to the consensus methanogen promoter. Images PMID:1379583

  8. Multi-modulus algorithm based on global artificial fish swarm intelligent optimization of DNA encoding sequences.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y C; Wang, H; Wu, H P; Zhang, M Q

    2015-12-21

    Aimed to address the defects of the large mean square error (MSE), and the slow convergence speed in equalizing the multi-modulus signals of the constant modulus algorithm (CMA), a multi-modulus algorithm (MMA) based on global artificial fish swarm (GAFS) intelligent optimization of DNA encoding sequences (GAFS-DNA-MMA) was proposed. To improve the convergence rate and reduce the MSE, this proposed algorithm adopted an encoding method based on DNA nucleotide chains to provide a possible solution to the problem. Furthermore, the GAFS algorithm, with its fast convergence and global search ability, was used to find the best sequence. The real and imaginary parts of the initial optimal weight vector of MMA were obtained through DNA coding of the best sequence. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a faster convergence speed and smaller MSE in comparison with the CMA, the MMA, and the AFS-DNA-MMA.

  9. Sequence of a probable potassium channel component encoded at shaker locus of drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, B.L.; Papazian, D.M.; Schwarz, T.L.; Jan, Y.N.; Jan, L.Y.

    1987-08-24

    Potassium currents are crucial for the repolarization of electrically excitable membranes, a role that makes potassium channels a target for physiological modifications that alter synaptic efficacy. The Shaker locus of Drosophila is thought to encode a K/sup +/ channel. The sequence of two complementary DNA clones from the Shaker locus is reported here. The sequence predicts an integral membrane protein of 70,200 daltons containing seven potential membrane-spanning sequences. In addition, the predicted protein is homologous to the vertebrate sodium channel in a region previously proposed to be involved in the voltage-dependent activation of the Na/sup +/ channel. These results support the hypothesis that Shaker encodes a structural component of a voltage-dependent K/sup +/ channel and suggest a conserved mechanism for voltage activation.

  10. Serine protease variants encoded by Echis ocellatus venom gland cDNA: cloning and sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasson, S S; Mothana, R A; Sallam, T A; Al-balushi, M S; Rahman, M T; Al-Jabri, A A

    2010-01-01

    Envenoming by Echis saw-scaled viper is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite its medical importance, there have been few investigations into the toxin composition of the venom of this viper. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding four groups or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive Serine protease proteins (SPs) from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus. All these SP sequences encoded the cysteine residues scaffold that form the 6-disulphide bonds responsible for the characteristic tertiary structure of venom serine proteases. All the Echis ocellatus EoSP groups showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom SPs. However, these groups also showed marked intercluster sequence conservation across them which were significantly different from that of previously published viper SPs. Because viper venom SPs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis ocellatus EoSPs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of interspecific and intergeneric sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis ocellatus EoSPs and analogous serine proteases from other viper species leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise (that we will exploit, by epidermal DNA immunization) the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. PMID:20936075

  11. Sequence analysis of the Alcaligenes eutrophus chromosomally encoded ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large and small subunit genes and their gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, K; Caton, J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the chromosomally encoded ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) large (rbcL) and small (rbcS) subunit genes of the hydrogen bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus ATCC 17707 was determined. We found that the two coding regions are separated by a 47-base-pair intergenic region, and both genes are preceded by plausible ribosome-binding sites. Cotranscription of the rbcL and rbcS genes has been demonstrated previously. The rbcL and rbcS genes encode polypeptides of 487 and 135 amino acids, respectively. Both genes exhibited similar codon usage which was highly biased and different from that of other organisms. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of both subunit proteins was determined by Edman degradation. No processing of the rbcS protein was detected, while the rbcL protein underwent a posttranslational loss of formylmethionyl. The A. eutrophus rbcL and rbcS proteins exhibited 56.8 to 58.3% and 35.6 to 38.5% amino acid sequence homology, respectively, with the corresponding proteins from cyanobacteria, eucaryotic algae, and plants. The A. eutrophus and Rhodospirillum rubrum rbcL proteins were only about 32% homologous. The N- and C-terminal sequences of both the rbcL and the rbcS proteins were among the most divergent regions. Known or proposed active site residues in other rbcL proteins, including Lys, His, Arg, and Asp residues, were conserved in the A. eutrophus enzyme. The A. eutrophus rbcS protein, like those of cyanobacteria, lacks a 12-residue internal sequence that is found in plant RuBPCase. Comparison of hydropathy profiles and secondary structure predictions by the method described by Chou and Fasman (P. Y. Chou and G. D. Fasman, Adv. Enzymol. 47:45-148, 1978) revealed striking similarities between A. eutrophus RuBPCase and other hexadecameric enzymes. This suggests that folding of the polypeptide chains is similar. The observed sequence homologies were consistent with the notion that both the rbcL and rbcS genes of the

  12. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt7 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein Important for Transcription in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, L. J.; Dollard, C.; Tan, P.; Winston, F.

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally were identified as suppressors of Ty and {delta small} insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Other genes that have been identified in mutant hunts of this type have been shown to play a role in transcription. In this work we show that SPT7 is also important for proper transcription in vivo. We have cloned and sequenced the SPT7 gene and have shown that it encodes a large, acidic protein that is localized to the nucleus. The SPT7 protein contains a bromodomain sequence; a deletion that removes the bromodomain from the SPT7 protein causes no detectable mutant phenotype. Strains that contain an spt7 null mutation are viable but grow very slowly and have transcriptional defects at many loci including insertion mutations, Ty elements, the INO1 gene and the MFA1 gene. These transcriptional defects and other mutant phenotypes are similar to those caused by certain mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA binding protein (TBP). The similarity of the phenotypes of spt7 and spt15 mutants, including effects of spt7 mutations on the transcription start site of certain genes, suggests that SPT7 plays an important role in transcription initiation in vivo. PMID:7713415

  13. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA sequence encoding the precursor of a chlorotoxin-like peptide from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X C; Li, W X; Zhu, S Y; Peng, F; Zhu, Z H; Wu, K L; Yiang, F H

    2000-08-01

    A full-length cDNA sequence encoding the precursor of a venom peptide with homology to chlorotoxin (named BmKCT) was isolated from a cDNA library made from the venom glands of the Chinese Scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. The encoded precursor of BmKCT was 59 amino acid residues long including a signal peptide of 24 residues and a mature toxin of 35 residues with four disulfide bridges. The sequence of BmKCT is similar (68% identities) to that of chlorotoxin isolated from Leiurus quinguestriatus quinquestriatus. BmKCT is the first report of the cDNA sequences encoding four-disulfide-bridged short-chain toxins from Buthus martensuii Karsch so far.

  14. Expressed sequence tags and molecular cloning and characterization of gene encoding pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase from Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Wankhede, Dhammaprakash Pandhari; Biswas, Dipul Kumar; Rajkumar, Subramani; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2013-12-01

    Podophyllotoxin, an aryltetralin lignan, is the source of important anticancer drugs etoposide, teniposide, and etopophos. Roots/rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum form one of the most important sources of podophyllotoxin. In order to understand genes involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis, two suppression subtractive hybridization libraries were synthesized, one each from root/rhizome and leaves using high and low podophyllotoxin-producing plants of P. hexandrum. Sequencing of clones identified a total of 1,141 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) resulting in 354 unique ESTs. Several unique ESTs showed sequence similarity to the genes involved in metabolism, stress/defense responses, and signalling pathways. A few ESTs also showed high sequence similarity with genes which were shown to be involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis in other plant species such as pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. A full length coding sequence of pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR) has been cloned from P. hexandrum which was found to encode protein with 311 amino acids and show sequence similarity with PLR from Forsythia intermedia and Linum spp. Spatial and stress-inducible expression pattern of PhPLR and other known genes of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis, secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase (PhSDH), and dirigent protein oxidase (PhDPO) have been studied. All the three genes showed wounding and methyl jasmonate-inducible expression pattern. The present work would form a basis for further studies to understand genomics of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis in P. hexandrum.

  15. Protein sequence comparisons show that the 'pseudoproteases' encoded by poxviruses and certain retroviruses belong to the deoxyuridine triphosphatase family.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D J

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid sequence comparisons show extensive similarities among the deoxyuridine triphosphatases (dUTPases) of Escherichia coli and of herpesviruses, and the 'protease-like' or 'pseudoprotease' sequences encoded by certain retroviruses in the oncovirus and lentivirus families and by poxviruses. These relationships suggest strongly that the 'pseudoproteases' actually are dUTPases, and have not arisen by duplication of an oncovirus protease gene as had been suggested. The herpesvirus dUTPase sequences differ from the others in that they are longer (about 370 residues, against around 140) and one conserved element ('Motif 3') is displaced relative to its position in the other sequences; a model involving internal duplication of the herpesvirus gene can account effectively for these observations. Sequences closely similar to Motif 3 are also found in phosphofructokinases, where they form part of the active site and fructose phosphate binding structure; thus these sequences may represent a class of structural element generally involved in phosphate transfer to and from glycosides. PMID:2165588

  16. Isolation and sequence analysis of the gene (cpdB) encoding periplasmic 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Burns, D M; Beacham, I R

    1986-01-01

    The cpdB gene encodes a periplasmic 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase (3'-nucleotidase). This enzyme has been purified previously and the gene is located at 96 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. In this study the cpdB gene was cloned from ClaI-cleaved DNA, and the gene product was identified. DNA blotting experiments showed that the recombinant plasmid contains a deletion with respect to the expected genomic fragment of approximately 4 kilobases, which extends into the vector. Furthermore, the gene was absent from three other recombinant libraries. Together, these findings suggest the presence in the genome of an adjacent gene whose product is lethal when it is present on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the cpdB gene was also determined. The 5' and 3' untranslated sequences contain characteristic sequences that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription, including two possible promoters, one of which may contain two overlapping -10 sequences. A strong Shine-Dalgarno sequence is followed by an open reading frame which corresponds to a protein having a molecular weight of 70,954. The first 19 amino acid residues have the characteristics of a signal peptide. The 3' untranslated sequence contains two putative rho-independent transcription terminators having low thermodynamic stability. Images PMID:3005231

  17. Identification and Analysis of a Gene from Calendula officinalis Encoding a Fatty Acid Conjugase

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiao; Reed, Darwin W.; Hong, Haiping; MacKenzie, Samuel L.; Covello, Patrick S.

    2001-01-01

    Two homologous cDNAs, CoFad2 and CoFac2, were isolated from a Calendula officinalis developing seed by a polymerase chain reaction-based cloning strategy. Both sequences share similarity to FAD2 desaturases and FAD2-related enzymes. In C. officinalis plants CoFad2 was expressed in all tissues tested, whereas CoFac2 expression was specific to developing seeds. Expression of CoFad2 cDNA in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) indicated it encodes a Δ12 desaturase that introduces a double bond at the 12 position of 16:1(9Z) and 18:1(9Z). Expression of CoFac2 in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme acts as a fatty acid conjugase converting 18:2(9Z, 12Z) to calendic acid 18:3(8E, 10E, 12Z). The enzyme also has weak activity on the mono-unsaturates 16:1(9Z) and 18:1(9Z) producing compounds with the properties of 8,10 conjugated dienes. PMID:11161042

  18. Nucleotide sequence analysis of genes encoding a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase from pseudomonas sp. strain JS150

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Olsen, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 metabolizes benzene and alkyl- and chloro-substituted benzenes by using dioxygenase-initiated pathways coupled with multiple downstream metabolic pathways to accommodate catechol metabolism. By cloning genes encoding benzene-degradative enzymes, strain JS150 was also found to carry genes for a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase. The gene cluster encoding a 2-monooxygenase and its cognate regulator was cloned from a plasmid carried by strain JS150. Oxygen ({sup 18}O{sub 2}) incorporation experiments using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains carrying the cloned genes confirmed toluene hydroxylation was catalyzed through an authentic monooxygenase reaction to yield ortho-cresol. Encoding the toluene-2-monooxygenase and regulatory gene product was localized in two regions of the cloned fragment. The nucleotide sequence of the toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase locus was determined, revealing six open reading frames that were then designated tbmA, tbmB, tbmC, tbmD, tbmE, and tbmF. The deduced amino acid sequences for these genes showed the presence of motifs similar to well-conserved functional domains of multicomponent oxygenases. This analysis allowed the tentative identification of two terminal oxygenase subunits (TbmB and TbmD) and an electron transport protein (TbmF) for the monooxygenase enzyme. All the tbm polypeptides shared significant homology with protein components from other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. Overall, the tbm gene products shared greater similarity with polypeptides from the phenol hydroxylases of Pseudomo-KR1 and Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) picketti PKO1. The relationship found between the phenol hydroxlases and a toluene-2-monooxygenase, characterized in this study for the first time at the nucleotide sequence level, suggested DNA probes used for surveys of environmental populations should be carefully selected to reflect DNA sequences corresponding to the metabolic pathway of interest. 58 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  20. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  1. mRNA sequence of three respiratory syncytial virus genes encoding two nonstructural proteins and a 22K structural protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    An mRNA sequence of two human respiratory syncytial viral nonstructural protein genes and of a gene for a 22,000-molecular-weight (22K) protein was obtained by cDNA cloning and DNA sequencing. Sequences corresponding to the 5' ends of the respective transcripts were deduced directly by primer extension and dideoxy nucleotide sequencing of the mRNAs. The availability of a bicistronic clone (pRSC6) confirmed the gene order for this portion of the genome. Contrary to other unsegmented negative-stranded RNA viruses, a 19-nucleotide intercistronic sequence was present between the NS1 and NS2 genes. The translation of cloned viral sequences in the bicistronic and monocistronic clones (pRSNS1 and pRSNS2) revealed two moderately hydrophobic proteins of 15,568 and 14,703 daltons. Their similarity in molecular size explained our earlier inability to resolve these proteins. A DNA sequence of an additional recombinant plasmid (pRSA2) revealed a long open reading frame encoding a 22,156-dalton protein containing 194 amino acids. It was relatively basic and moderately hydrophobic. A protein of this size was readily translated in vitro from a viral mRNA hybrid selected by this plasmid and corresponded to an unglycosylated 22K protein seen in purified extracellular virus but not associated with detergent- and salt-resistant cores. A second open reading frame of 90 amino acids partially overlapping with the C terminus of the 22K protein was also present within this sequence. This was reminiscent of the viral matrix protein gene which was previously shown by us to contain two overlapping reading frames. The finding of three additional viral transcripts encoding at least three identifiable proteins in human respiratory syncytial virus was a novel departure from the usual genetic organization of paramyxoviruses. The 5' ends of all three transcripts had a 5'NGGGCAAAU sequence that is common to all viral transcripts analyzed so far. Although there was no obvious homology immediately

  2. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding the Clostridium stercorarium alpha-galactosidase Aga36A in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Suryani; Kimura, Tetsuya; Sakka, Kazuo; Ohmiya, Kunio

    2003-10-01

    The alpha-galactosidase gene aga36A of Clostridium stercorarium F-9 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The aga36A gene consists of 2,208 nucleotides encoding a protein of 736 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 84,786. Aga36A is an enzyme classified in family 36 of the glycoside hydrolases and showed sequence similarity with some enzymes of family 36 such as Geobacillus (formerly Bacillus) stearothermophilus GalA (57%) and AgaN (52%). The enzyme purified from a recombinant E. coli is optimally active at 70 degrees C and pH 6.0. The enzyme hydrolyzed raffinose and guar gum with specific activities of 3.0 U/mg and 0.46 U/mg for the respective substrates.

  3. Sequence and nitrate regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA encoding nitrate reductase, a metalloflavoprotein with three functional domains

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, N.M.; Smith, M.; Bellissimo, D.; Davis, R.W. )

    1988-07-01

    The sequence of nitrate reductase mRNA from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been determined. A 3.0-kilobase-long cDNA was isolated from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library of Arabidopsis leaf poly(A){sup +} RNA. The cDNA hybridized to a 3.2-kilobase mRNA whose level increased 15-fold in response to treatment of the plant with nitrate. An open reading frame encoding a 917 amino acid protein was found in the sequence. This protein is very similar to tobacco nitrate reductase, being >80% identical within a section of 450 amino acids. By comparing the Arabidopsis protein sequence with other protein sequences, three functional domains were deduced: (i) a molybdenum-pterin-binding domain that is similar to the molybdenum-pterin-binding domain of rat liver sulfite oxidase, (ii) a heme-binding domain that is similar to proteins in the cytochrome b{sub 5} superfamily, and (iii) an FAD-binding domain that is similar to NADH-cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase.

  4. Sequence and nitrate regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA encoding nitrate reductase, a metalloflavoprotein with three functional domains.

    PubMed

    Crawford, N M; Smith, M; Bellissimo, D; Davis, R W

    1988-07-01

    The sequence of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) mRNA from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been determined. A 3.0-kilobase-long cDNA was isolated from a lambda gt10 cDNA library of Arabidopsis leaf poly(A)+ RNA. The cDNA hybridized to a 3.2-kilobase mRNA whose level increased 15-fold in response to treatment of the plant with nitrate. An open reading frame encoding a 917 amino acid protein was found in the sequence. This protein is very similar to tobacco nitrate reductase, being greater than 80% identical within a section of 450 amino acids. By comparing the Arabidopsis protein sequence with other protein sequences, three functional domains were deduced: (i) a molybdenum-pterin-binding domain that is similar to the molybdenum-pterin-binding domain of rat liver sulfite oxidase, (ii) a heme-binding domain that is similar to proteins in the cytochrome b5 superfamily, and (iii) an FAD-binding domain that is similar to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. PMID:3393528

  5. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szymański, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  6. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  7. Cloning and sequencing of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus, Coryphaenidae) growth hormone-encoding cDNA.

    PubMed

    Peduel, A D; Elizur, A; Knibb, W

    1994-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the preprotein growth hormone from the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) has been cloned and sequenced. The cDNA was derived by reverse transcription of RNA from the pituitary of a young fish using the method known as Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). An oligonucleotide primer corresponding to the 5' region of Pagrus major and the universal RACE primer enabled amplification using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The dolphinfish and yellow-tail, Seriola quineqeradiata, are both members of the sub-order Percoidei (Perciforme) and their GH sequences show a high level of homology. PMID:7703505

  8. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, S.; Doi, S.; Yorifuji, T.; Takagi, M.; Yano, K.

    1987-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed.

  9. Complete sequence of three alpha-tubulin cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary cells: each encodes a distinct alpha-tubulin isoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, E M; Henderson, G; Sarangi, F; Ling, V

    1986-01-01

    The genome of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells contains a complex family of approximately 16 alpha-tubulin genes, many of which may be pseudogenes. We present here the complete cDNA sequences of three expressed alpha-tubulin genes; one of these genes has been identified only in CHO cells. The noncoding regions of these three CHO alpha-tubulin genes differed significantly, but their coding regions were highly conserved. Nevertheless, we observed differences in the predicted amino acid sequences for the three genes. A comparison of the CHO alpha-tubulin sequences with all of the sequences available for mammals allowed assignment of the alpha-tubulin genes to three classes. The proteins encoded by the members of two of these classes showed no class-specific amino acids among the mammalian species examined. The gene belonging to the third class encoded an isoprotein which was clearly distinct, and members of this class may play a unique role in vivo. Sequencing of the three alpha-tubulin genes was also undertaken in CMR795, a colcemid-resistant clonal CHO cell line which has previously been shown to have structural and functional alterations in its tubulin proteins. We found differences in the tubulin nucleotide sequence compared with the parental line; however, no differences in the alpha-tubulin proteins encoded in the two cell lines were observed. PMID:3773896

  10. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  11. Constant time tensor correlation experiments by non-gamma-encoded recoupling pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yun; Tsai, Tim W. T.; Chan, Jerry C. C.

    2012-10-01

    Constant-time tensor correlation under magic-angle spinning conditions is an important technique in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the measurements of backbone or side-chain torsion angles of polypeptides and proteins. We introduce a general method for the design of constant-time tensor correlation experiments under magic-angle spinning. Our method requires that the amplitude of the average Hamiltonian must depend on all the three Euler angles bringing the principal axis system to the rotor-fixed frame, which is commonly referred to as non-gamma encoding. We abbreviate this novel approach as COrrelation of Non-Gamma-Encoded Experiment (CONGEE), which exploits the orientation-dependence of non-gamma-encoded sequences with respect to the magic-angle rotation axis. By manipulating the relative orientation of the average Hamiltonians created by two non-gamma-encoded sequences, one can obtain a modulation of the detected signal, from which the structural information can be extracted when the tensor orientations relative to the molecular frame are known. CONGEE has a prominent feature that the number of rf pulses and the total pulse sequence duration can be maintained to be constant so that for torsion angle determination the effects of systematic errors owing to the experimental imperfections and/or T2 effects could be minimized. As a proof of concept, we illustrate the utility of CONGEE in the correlation between the C' chemical shift tensor and the Cα-Hα dipolar tensor for the backbone psi angle determination. In addition to a detailed theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experiments measured for [U-13C, 15N]-L-alanine and N-acetyl-[U-13C, 15N]-D,L-valine are used to validate our approach at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz.

  12. Phylogeny of Algal Sequences Encoding Carbohydrate Sulfotransferases, Formylglycine-Dependent Sulfatases, and Putative Sulfatase Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Many algae are rich sources of sulfated polysaccharides with biological activities. The physicochemical/rheological properties and biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are affected by the pattern and number of sulfate moieties. Sulfation of carbohydrates is catalyzed by carbohydrate sulfotransferases (CHSTs) while modification of sulfate moieties on sulfated polysaccharides was presumably catalyzed by sulfatases including formylglycine-dependent sulfatases (FGly-SULFs). Post-translationally modification of Cys to FGly in FGly-SULFs by sulfatase modifiying factors (SUMFs) is necessary for the activity of this enzyme. The aims of this study are to mine for sequences encoding algal CHSTs, FGly-SULFs and putative SUMFs from the fully sequenced algal genomes and to infer their phylogenetic relationships to their well characterized counterparts from other organisms. Algal sequences encoding CHSTs, FGly-SULFs, SUMFs, and SUMF-like proteins were successfully identified from green and brown algae. However, red algal FGly-SULFs and SUMFs were not identified. In addition, a group of SUMF-like sequences with different gene structure and possibly different functions were identified for green, brown and red algae. The phylogeny of these putative genes contributes to the corpus of knowledge of an unexplored area. The analyses of these putative genes contribute toward future production of existing and new sulfated carbohydrate polymers through enzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering. PMID:26635861

  13. O-demethylase from Acetobacterium dehalogenans--cloning, sequencing, and active expression of the gene encoding the corrinoid protein.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, F; Wohlfarth, G; Diekert, G

    1998-10-15

    The ether-cleaving O-demethylase from the strictly anaerobic homoacetogen Acetobacterium dehalogenans catalyses the methyltransfer from 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzoate (vanillate) to tetrahydrofolate. In the first step a vanillate :corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I) mediates the methylation of a 25-kDa corrinoid protein with the cofactor reduced to cob(I)alamin. The methyl group is then transferred to tetrahydrofolate by the action of a methylcorrinoid protein:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase (methyltransferase II). Using primers derived from the amino-terminal sequences of the corrinoid protein and the vanillate:corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I), a 723-bp fragment was amplified by PCR, which contained the gene odmA encoding the corrinoid protein of O-demethylase. Downstream of odmA, part of the odmB gene encoding methyltransferase I was identified. The amino acid sequence deduced from odmA showed about 60% similarity to the cobalamin-binding domain of methionine synthase from Escherichia coli (MetH) and to corrinoid proteins of methyltransferase systems involved in methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines. The sequence contained the DXHXXG consensus sequence typical for displacement of the dimethylbenzimidazole base of the corrinoid cofactor by a histidine from the protein. Heterologous expression of odmA in E. coli yielded a colourless, oxygen-insensitive apoprotein, which was able to bind one mol cobalamin or methylcobalamin/mol protein. Both of these reconstituted forms of the protein were active in the overall O-demethylation reaction. OdmA reconstituted with hydroxocobalamin and reduced by titanium(III) citrate to the cob(I)alamin form was methylated with vanillate by methyltransferase I in an irreversible reaction. Methylcobalamin carrying OdmA served as methyl group donor for the methylation of tetrahydrofolate by methyltransferase II. This reaction was found to be reversible, since methyltranSferase II

  14. On combining protein sequences and nucleic acid sequences in phylogenetic analysis: the homeobox protein case.

    PubMed

    Agosti, D; Jacobs, D; DeSalle, R

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid encoding genes contain character state information that may be useful for phylogenetic analysis on at least two levels. The nucleotide sequence and the translated amino acid sequences have both been employed separately as character states for cladistic studies of various taxa, including studies of the genealogy of genes in multigene families. In essence, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences are two different ways of character coding the information in a gene. Silent positions in the nucleotide sequence (first or third positions in codons that can accrue change without changing the identity of the amino acid that the triplet codes for) may accrue change relatively rapidly and become saturated, losing the pattern of historical divergence. On the other hand, non-silent nucleotide alterations and their accompanying amino acid changes may evolve too slowly to reveal relationships among closely related taxa. In general, the dynamics of sequence change in silent and non-silent positions in protein coding genes result in homoplasy and lack of resolution, respectively. We suggest that the combination of nucleic acid and the translated amino acid coded character states into the same data matrix for phylogenetic analysis addresses some of the problems caused by the rapid change of silent nucleotide positions and overall slow rate of change of non-silent nucleotide positions and slowly changing amino acid positions. One major theoretical problem with this approach is the apparent non-independence of the two sources of characters. However, there are at least three possible outcomes when comparing protein coding nucleic acid sequences with their translated amino acids in a phylogenetic context on a codon by codon basis. First, the two character sets for a codon may be entirely congruent with respect to the information they convey about the relationships of a certain set of taxa. Second, one character set may display no information concerning a phylogenetic

  15. Co-expression and co-localization of hub proteins and their partners are encoded in protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Feiglin, Ariel; Ashkenazi, Shaul; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard; Ofran, Yanay

    2014-04-01

    Spatiotemporal coordination is a critical factor in biological processes. Some hubs in protein-protein interaction networks tend to be co-expressed and co-localized with their partners more strongly than others, a difference which is arguably related to functional differences between the hubs. Based on numerous analyses of yeast hubs, it has been suggested that differences in co-expression and co-localization are reflected in the structural and molecular characteristics of the hubs. We hypothesized that if indeed differences in co-expression and co-localization are encoded in the molecular characteristics of the protein, it may be possible to predict the tendency for co-expression and co-localization of human hubs based on features learned from systematically characterized yeast hubs. Thus, we trained a prediction algorithm on hubs from yeast that were classified as either strongly or weakly co-expressed and co-localized with their partners, and applied the trained model to 800 human hub proteins. We found that the algorithm significantly distinguishes between human hubs that are co-expressed and co-localized with their partners and hubs that are not. The prediction is based on sequence derived features such as "stickiness", i.e. the existence of multiple putative binding sites that enable multiple simultaneous interactions, "plasticity", i.e. the existence of predicted structural disorder which conjecturally allows for multiple consecutive interactions with the same binding site and predicted subcellular localization. These results suggest that spatiotemporal dynamics is encoded, at least in part, in the amino acid sequence of the protein and that this encoding is similar in yeast and in human.

  16. Cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding rat preprocholecystokinin.

    PubMed Central

    Deschenes, R J; Lorenz, L J; Haun, R S; Roos, B A; Collier, K J; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    Poly(A) RNA was isolated from a rat medullary thyroid carcinoma that exhibited high levels of immunoreactive cholecystokinin (CCK). Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from the poly(A) RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pBR322. Bacterial colonies containing CCK cDNA were identified using the hybridization probe d(T-C-C-A-T-C-C-A-N-C-C-C-A-T-G-T-A-G-T-C). The sequence of the probe was deduced from the known amino acid sequence of porcine CCK-8, Asp-Tyr-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA complementary to the mRNA of rat preprocholecystokinin was determined. The cDNA contains 33 nucleotides in the 5'-noncoding region, 199 nucleotides in the 3'-noncoding region, and 345 nucleotides coding for a precursor to CCK, which is 115 amino acids (Mr, 12,826). Examination of the rat CCK gene revealed a suggested transcriptional control sequence analogous to the "TATA" sequence located 33 nucleotides upstream from a proposed transcriptional start site. The amino acid sequence of CCK-39 is flanked by both amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal extensions. Analysis of CCK mRNA showed that it is approximately equal to 750 nucleotides long. CCK mRNA of the rat brain and intestine appeared to be identical in size to the CCK mRNA of the carcinoma. Images PMID:6199787

  17. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  18. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  19. Optically encoded multifunctional nanospheres for one-pot separation and detection of multiplex DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Wen, Cong-Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Min; Hu, Jiao; Wu, Min; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2013-12-17

    In this study, we report a simple method for simultaneous detection of multiplex DNA sequences, including complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences of HIV and HCV, DNA sequence of HBV, with QDs-encoded fluorescent nanospheres and nano-γ-Fe2O3-coated magnetic nanospheres. Detection was achieved on a fluorescence spectrophotometer without additional auxiliary instruments, and the detection limit was about 100 pM. Here, QDs-encoded fluorescent nanospheres (FNS) with different photoluminescent properties, and magnetic nanospheres (MNS) were separately fabricated by stepwise assembly of hydrophobic QDs or nano-γ-Fe2O3 on the surface of branched poly(ethylene imine) (PEI)-coated nanospheres in precisely controlled amounts, finally followed by silica encapsulation. FNS-labeled probe DNAs and MNS-labeled capture DNAs were used to hybridize with the corresponding targets at the same time. After magnetic separation, the sandwich-structured adducts were measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The results indicated that the targets could be detected with high sensitivity. This method is convenient, fast enough, and capable of high anti-interference. Therefore, it is expected to be used for simultaneous detection and separation of multiple targets at high levels of purity and throughput.

  20. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  1. A WRKY gene from creosote bush encodes an activator of the abscisic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaolu; Seemann, Jeffrey R; Neuman, Dawn; Shen, Qingxi J

    2004-12-31

    The creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) is a xerophytic evergreen C3 shrub thriving in vast arid areas of North America. As the first step toward understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling the drought tolerance of this desert plant, we have isolated a dozen genes encoding transcription factors, including LtWRKY21 that encodes a protein of 314 amino acid residues. Transient expression studies with the GFP-LtWRKY21 fusion construct indicate that the LtWRKY21 protein is localized in the nucleus and is able to activate the promoter of an abscisic acid (ABA)-inducible gene, HVA22, in a dosage-dependent manner. The transactivating activity of LtWRKY21 relies on the C-terminal sequence containing the WRKY domain and a N-terminal motif that is essential for the repression activity of some regulators in ethylene signaling. LtWRKY21 interacts synergistically with ABA and transcriptional activators VP1 and ABI5 to control the expression of the HVA22 promoter. Co-expression of VP1, ABI5, and LtWRKY21 leads to a much higher expression of the HVA22 promoter than does the ABA treatment alone. In contrast, the Lt-WRKY21-mediated transactivation is inhibited by two known negative regulators of ABA signaling: 1-butanol, an inhibitor of phospholipase D, and abi1-1, a dominant negative mutant protein phosphatase. Interestingly, abi1-1 does not block the synergistic effect of LtWRKY21, VP1, and ABI5 co-expression, indicating that LtWRKY21, VP1, and ABI5 may form a complex that functions downstream of ABI1 to control ABA-regulated expression of genes.

  2. Cloning and sequence of the gene encoding a cefotaxime-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamase isolated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Ohno, A; Taguchi, H; Imajo, S; Ishiguro, M; Matsuzawa, H

    1995-01-01

    Escherichia coli TUH12191, which is resistant to piperacillin, cefazolin, cefotiam, ceftizoxime, cefuzonam, and aztreonam but is susceptible to cefoxitin, latamoxef, flomoxef, and imipenem, was isolated from the urine of a patient treated with beta-lactam antibiotics. The beta-lactamase (Toho-1) purified from the bacteria had a pI of 7.8, had a molecular weight of about 29,000, and hydrolyzed beta-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin G, ampicillin, oxacillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and aztreonam. Toho-1 was markedly inhibited by beta-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanic acid and tazobactam. Resistance to beta-lactams, streptomycin, spectinomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim was transferred by conjugational transfer from E. coli TUH12191 to E. coli ML4903, and the transferred plasmid was about 58 kbp, belonging to incompatibility group M. The cefotaxime resistance gene for Toho-1 was subcloned from the 58-kbp plasmid by transformation of E. coli MV1184. The sequence of the gene for Toho-1 was determined, and the open reading frame of the gene consisted of 873 or 876 bases (initial sequence, ATGATG). The nucleotide sequence of the gene (DDBJ accession number D37830) was found to be about 73% homologous to the sequence of the gene encoding a class A beta-lactamase produced by Klebsiella oxytoca E23004. According to the amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence, the precursor consisted of 290 or 291 amino acid residues, which contained amino acid motifs common to class A beta-lactamases (70SXXK, 130SDN, and 234KTG). Toho-1 was about 83% homologous to the beta-lactamase mediated by the chromosome of K. oxytoca D488 and the beta-lactamase mediated by the plasmid of E. coli MEN-1. Therefore, the newly isolated beta-lactamase Toho-1 produced by E. coli TUH12191 is similar to beta-lactamases produced by K. oxytoca D488, K. oxytoca E23004, and E. coli MEN-1 rather than to mutants of TEM or SHV enzymes

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nitrogenase iron protein of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pretorius, I.M.; Rawlings, D.E.; O'Neill, E.G.; Jones, W.A.; Kirby, R.; Woods, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA sequence was determined for the cloned Thiobacillus ferrooxidans nifH and part of the nifD genes. The DNA chains were radiolabeled with (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dCTP (3000 Ci/mmol) or (..cap alpha..-/sup 35/S)dCTP (400 Ci/mmol). A putative T. ferrooxidans nifH promoter was identified whose sequences showed perfect consensus with those of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif promoter. Two putative consensus upstream activator sequences were also identified. The amino acid sequence was deduced from the DNA sequence. In a comparison of nifH DNA sequences from T. ferrooxidans and eight other nitrogen-fixing microbes, a Rhizobium sp. isolated from Parasponia andersonii showed the greatest homology (74%) and Clostridium pasteurianum (nifH1) showed the least homology (54%). In the comparison of the amino acid sequences of the Fe proteins, the Rhizobium sp. and Rhizobium japonicum showed the greatest homology (both 86%) and C. pasteurianum (nifH1 gene product) demonstrated the least homology (56%) to the T. ferrooxidans Fe protein.

  4. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2014-04-08

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  5. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2013-07-23

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  6. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2016-03-22

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  7. DNA sequencing of the gene encoding a bacterial superantigen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen (YPM), and characterization of the gene product, cloned YPM

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kato, Hidehito; Uchiyama, Takehiko

    1995-05-15

    Previously, we found a novel bacterial superantigen from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, designated Y. pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen (YPM). In the present study, we analyzed the DNA sequence of the gene encoding YPM. The YPM gene was cloned into a plasmid vector pMW119 and expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. Like the native YPM, the cloned YPM required the expression of MHC class II molecules on accessory cells in the induction of IL-2 production by human T cells. TCR-V{beta} repertoire of human T cells reactive with the cloned YPM was V{beta}3, V{beta}9, V{beta}13.1, and V{beta}13.2. This repertoire is the same as that of T cells reactive with the native YPM. These results indicate that the cloned YPM expressed in E. coli is identical to the native YPM. Sequencing of the YPM gene revealed that the gene contained an open reading frame of 456 base pairs encoding a precursor form of 151 amino acid residues with m.w. 16,679 that is processed into a mature form of 131 amino acid residues with m.w. 14,529. Homology analysis revealed that the homology of amino acid sequence is quite low among YPM and other well known bacterial superantigens. We designated the gene encoding YPM as ypm. 30 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Sequence and exon-intron organization of the DNA encoding the alpha I domain of human spectrin. Application to the study of mutations causing hereditary elliptocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sahr, K E; Tobe, T; Scarpa, A; Laughinghouse, K; Marchesi, S L; Agre, P; Linnenbach, A J; Marchesi, V T; Forget, B G

    1989-01-01

    We have determined the exon-intron organization and the nucleotide sequence of the exons and their flanking intronic DNA in cloned genomic DNA that encodes the first 526 amino acids of the alpha I domain of the human red cell spectrin polypeptide chain. From the gene sequence we designed oligonucleotide primers to use in the polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify the appropriate exons in DNA from individuals with three variants of hereditary elliptocytosis characterized by the presence of abnormal alpha I spectrin peptides, 46-50 and 65-68 kD in size, in partial tryptic digests of spectrin. The alpha I/68-kD abnormality resulted from a duplication of leucine codon 148 in exon 4: TTG-CTG to TTG-TTG-CTG. The alpha I/50a defect was associated in different individuals with two separate single base changes in exon 6: CTG to CCG (leucine to proline) encoding residue 254, and TCC to CCC (serine to proline) encoding residue 255. In another individual with the alpha I/50a polypeptide defect, the nucleotide sequence encoding amino acid residues 221 through 264 was normal. The alpha I/50b abnormality resulted from a single base change of CAG (glutamine) to CCG (proline) encoding residue 465 in exon 11 in two unrelated individuals. In a third individual with alpha I/50b-kD hereditary elliptocytosis, the entire exon encoding residues 445 through 490 was normal. The relationship of the alpha I domain polypeptide structure to these mutations and the organization of the gene is discussed. Images PMID:2794061

  9. Tetrachloroethene Dehalogenase from Dehalospirillum multivorans: Cloning, Sequencing of the Encoding Genes, and Expression of the pceA Gene in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Anke; Wohlfarth, Gert; Diekert, Gabriele

    1998-01-01

    The genes encoding tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase, a corrinoid-Fe/S protein, of Dehalospirillum multivorans were cloned and sequenced. The pceA gene is upstream of pceB and overlaps it by 4 bp. The presence of a ς70-like promoter sequence upstream of pceA and of a ρ-independent terminator downstream of pceB indicated that both genes are cotranscribed. This assumption is supported by reverse transcriptase PCR data. The pceA and pceB genes encode putative 501- and 74-amino-acid proteins, respectively, with calculated molecular masses of 55,887 and 8,354 Da, respectively. Four peptides obtained after trypsin treatment of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dehalogenase were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of pceA. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the PCE dehalogenase isolated from D. multivorans was found 30 amino acids downstream of the N terminus of the deduced pceA product. The pceA gene contained a nucleotide stretch highly similar to binding motifs for two Fe4S4 clusters or for one Fe4S4 cluster and one Fe3S4 cluster. A consensus sequence for the binding of a corrinoid was not found in pceA. No significant similarities to genes in the databases were detected in sequence comparisons. The pceB gene contained two membrane-spanning helices as indicated by two hydrophobic stretches in the hydropathic plot. Sequence comparisons of pceB revealed no sequence similarities to genes present in the databases. Only in the presence of pUBS 520 supplying the recombinant bacteria with high levels of the rare Escherichia coli tRNA4Arg was pceA expressed, albeit nonfunctionally, in recombinant E. coli BL21 (DE3). PMID:9696761

  10. Characterization of high-level expression and sequencing of the Escherichia coli K-12 cynS gene encoding cyanase.

    PubMed

    Sung, Y C; Anderson, P M; Fuchs, J A

    1987-11-01

    Restriction fragments containing the gene encoding cyanase, cynS, without its transcriptional regulatory sequences were placed downstream of lac and tac promoters in various pUC derivatives to maximize production of cyanase. Plasmid pSJ105, which contains the cynS gene and an upstream open reading frame, gave the highest expression of cyanase. Approximately 50% of the total soluble protein in stationary-phase cultures of a lac-deleted strain containing plasmid pSJ105 was cyanase. The inserted DNA fragment of pSJ105 was transferred into pUC18 derivatives that contain a hybrid tac promoter, instead of the lac promoter, and a strong terminator to generate pSJ124. Stationary-phase cultures of JM101 containing plasmid pSJ124 overexpressed a similar level of cyanase. In JM101(pSJ124), maximum production of cyanase could be obtained either by induction with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for 3 h or by growth without IPTG into late stationary phase. The latter conditions resulted in a 10- to 20-fold increase in plasmid content and presumably titration of the lac repressor. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cynS gene from Escherichia coli K-12 was determined. The predicted amino acid sequence differed from the known amino acid sequence of cyanase isolated from a B strain by four residues. However, overexpressed cyanase was purified to homogeneity, and a comparison of the enzymes from the two sources indicated that they did not differ with respect to physical and kinetic properties. The cynS gene was located next to the lac operon, and the direction of cynS transcription was opposite that of lac.

  11. Amino acid sequence of a new mitochondrially synthesized proteolipid of the ATP synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Velours, J; Esparza, M; Hoppe, J; Sebald, W; Guerin, B

    1984-01-01

    The purification and the amino acid sequence of a proteolipid translated on ribosomes in yeast mitochondria is reported. This protein, which is a subunit of the ATP synthase, was purified by extraction with chloroform/methanol (2/1) and subsequent chromatography on phosphocellulose and reverse phase h.p.l.c. A mol. wt. of 5500 was estimated by chromatography on Bio-Gel P-30 in 80% formic acid. The complete amino acid sequence of this protein was determined by automated solid phase Edman degradation of the whole protein and of fragments obtained after cleavage with cyanogen bromide. The sequence analysis indicates a length of 48 amino acid residues. The calculated mol. wt. of 5870 corresponds to the value found by gel chromatography. This polypeptide contains three basic residues and no negatively charged side chain. The three basic residues are clustered at the C terminus. The primary structure of this protein is in full agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the putative polypeptide encoded by the mitochondrial aap1 gene recently discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, this protein shows 50% homology with the amino acid sequence of a putative polypeptide encoded by an unidentified reading frame also discovered near the mitochondrial ATPase subunit 6 gene in Aspergillus nidulans. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6323165

  12. How are exons encoding transmembrane sequences distributed in the exon-intron structure of genes?

    PubMed

    Sawada, Ryusuke; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes raises a question about the distribution of transmembrane regions in membrane proteins. Were exons that encode transmembrane regions formed simply by inserting introns into preexisting genes or by some kind of exon shuffling? To answer this question, the exon-per-gene distribution was analyzed for all genes in 40 eukaryotic genomes with a particular focus on exons encoding transmembrane segments. In 21 higher multicellular eukaryotes, the percentage of multi-exon genes (those containing at least one intron) within all genes in a genome was high (>70%) and with a mean of 87%. When genes were grouped by the number of exons per gene in higher eukaryotes, good exponential distributions were obtained not only for all genes but also for the exons encoding transmembrane segments, leading to a constant ratio of membrane proteins independent of the exon-per-gene number. The positional distribution of transmembrane regions in single-pass membrane proteins showed that they are generally located in the amino or carboxyl terminal regions. This nonrandom distribution of transmembrane regions explains the constant ratio of membrane proteins to the exon-per-gene numbers because there are always two terminal (i.e., the amino and carboxyl) regions - independent of the length of sequences.

  13. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression of genome segment 7 (S7) of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) that encodes a viral structural protein.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2007-10-01

    The Genome segment 7 (S7) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) was converted to cDNA, cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence showed that segment 7 consisted of 1789 nucleotides with an ORF of 530 amino acids and could encode a protein of approximately 61 kDa, termed P61. The 5' terminal sequence, AGTAAT and the 3' terminal sequence, AGAGC of the plus strand was found to be the same as genome segment 10 of AmCPV encoding polyhedrin. No sequence similarity was found by searching nucleic acid and protein sequence databases using BLAST. The secondary structure prediction showed the presence of 17 alpha-helices, 18 extended beta-sheets along the entire length of P61. The ORF of segment 7 was expressed in E. coli as His-tagged fusion protein, purified through Ni-NTA chromatography, and polyclonal antibody was raised in rabbit indicating that P61 is immunogenic. Immunoblot analysis using this antibody on viral infected cells as well as purified polyhedra showed that P61 is a viral structural protein. Motif scan search showed some similarity of P61 with Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain at the C-terminus and it was hypothesized that by binding to single stranded viral RNA through its CBS domain P61 may help in virus replication or transcription.

  14. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  15. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the glpD gene encoding sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, H P; Po, C

    1994-01-01

    Nitrosoguanidine-induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants which were unable to utilize glycerol as a carbon source were isolated. By utilizing PAO104, a mutant defective in glycerol transport and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpD), the glpD gene was cloned by a phage mini-D3112-based in vivo cloning method. The cloned gene was able to complement an Escherichia coli glpD mutant. Restriction analysis and recloning of DNA fragments located the glpD gene to a 1.6-kb EcoRI-SphI DNA fragment. In E. coli, a single 56,000-Da protein was expressed from the cloned DNA fragments. An in-frame glpD'-'lacZ translational fusion was isolated and used to determine the reading frame of glpD by sequencing across the fusion junction. The nucleotide sequence of a 1,792-bp fragment containing the glpD region was determined. The glpD gene encodes a protein containing 510 amino acids and with a predicted molecular weight of 56,150. Compared with the aerobic sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from E. coli, P. aeruginosa GlpD is 56% identical and 69% similar. A similar comparison with GlpD from Bacillus subtilis reveals 21% identity and 40% similarity. A flavin-binding domain near the amino terminus which shared the consensus sequence reported for other bacterial flavoproteins was identified. Images PMID:8157588

  16. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  17. Transfection, expression, and DNA sequence of a gene encoding a BoLA-A11 antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sawhney, S.M.S.; Hasima, N.N.; Glass, E.J.; Al-Murrani, S.W.K.; Nichani, A.K.; Spooner, R.L.; Williams, J.L.; Russell, G.C.

    1995-02-01

    Cattle major histocompatibility complex [(MHC) (BoLA)] class I molecules are heterodimeric glycoproteins which present endogenous antigenic peptides to CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes, initiating a cellular immune response. The MHC-encoded heavy chains are highly polymorphic and, in cattle, have been characterized mainly by using allo-antisera raised by reciprocal calf/dam immunizations. This has enabled the identification of about 50 serlogical specificities, most of which behave as alleles of a single highly polymorphic class I locus. However, evidence from biochemical and molecular biological studies suggest that more than one BoLA class I locus is expressed. These loci are apparently in linkage disequilibrium, making them difficult to distinguish by conventional methods. In order to investigate the expression and function of individual class I locus products, we are correlating BoLA class I gene sequences with the expressed products by the transfection and characterization of genomic class I clones. Shotgun transfection and expression of BoLA class I molecules has been described previously, but the genes involved were not isolated. In this paper we report the isolation, DNA sequencing, transfection, and expression of a genomic clone encoding a BoLA-A11 determinant from an animal expressing A10 and A11 serological specificities. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Towards rationally redesigning bacterial signaling systems using information encoded in abundant sequence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ryan; Morcos, Faruck; Levine, Herbert; Onuchic, Jose

    2014-03-01

    An important challenge in biology is to distinguish the subset of residues that allow bacterial two-component signaling (TCS) proteins to preferentially interact with their correct TCS partner such that they can bind and transfer signal. Detailed knowledge of this information would allow one to search sequence-space for mutations that can systematically tune the signal transmission between TCS partners as well as re-encode a TCS protein to preferentially transfer signals to a non-partner. Motivated by the notion that this detailed information is found in sequence data, we explore the mutual sequence co-evolution between signaling partners to infer how mutations can positively or negatively alter their interaction. Using Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) for determining evolutionarily conserved interprotein interactions, we apply a DCA-based metric to quantify mutational changes in the interaction between TCS proteins and demonstrate that it accurately correlates with experimental mutagenesis studies probing the mutational change in the in vitro phosphotransfer. Our methodology serves as a potential framework for the rational design of TCS systems as well as a framework for the system-level study of protein-protein interactions in sequence-rich systems. This research has been supported by the NSF INSPIRE award MCB-1241332 and by the CTBP sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1308264).

  19. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  20. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  1. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  2. The cDNA sequences encoding two components of the polymeric fraction of the intracellular hemoglobin of Glycera dibranchiata.

    PubMed

    Zafar, R S; Chow, L H; Stern, M S; Scully, J S; Sharma, P R; Vinogradov, S N; Walz, D A

    1990-12-15

    The intracellular hemoglobin of the polychaete Glycera dibranchiata consists of several components, some of which self-associate into a "polymeric" fraction. The cDNA library constructed from the poly(A+) mRNA of Glycera erythrocytes (Simons, P. C., and Satterlee, J. D. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 8525-8530) was screened with two oligodeoxynucleotide probes corresponding to the amino acid sequences MEEKVP and AMNSKV. Each of the two probes identified a full-length positive insert; these were sequenced using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. One clone was 630 bases long and contained 36 bases of 5'-untranslated RNA, a reading frame of 441 bases coding for the 147 amino acids of globin P2 including the residues MEEKVP, and a 3'-untranslated region of 153 bases. The other clone was 540 bases long and contained 24 bases of 5'-untranslated RNA, an open reading frame of 441 bases coding for globin P3 including the residues AMNSKV, and a 3'-untranslated region of 75 bases. The inferred amino acid sequences of the two globins were in agreement with the partial amino acid sequences obtained by chemical methods. The P2 and P3 globin sequences, together with the previously determined P1 sequence of a complete insert and partial sequences P4, P5, and P6 obtained from partial inserts (Zafar, R. S., Chow, L. H., Stern, M. S., Vinogradov, S. N., and Walz, D. A. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta, in press) suggest that there are at least six components in the polymeric fraction of Glycera hemoglobin, which is in agreement with the results of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in Tris/glycine buffer, pH 8.3, 6 M urea. Nothern and dot blot analyses of Glycera erythrocyte poly(A+) mRNA using the foregoing two cDNA probes clearly demonstrated the presence of mature messages encoding both types of globins. Comparison of the polymeric sequences P1, P2, and P3 with the "monomeric" globins M-II and M-IV using the alignment and templates of Bashford et al. (Bashford, D., Chothia, C

  3. Sequence analysis of a Molluscum contagiosum virus DNA region which includes the gene encoding protein kinase 2 and other genes with unique organization.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gallardo, A; Moratilla, M; Funes, J M; Agromayor, M; Nuñez, A; Varas, A J; Collado, M; Valencia, A; Lopez-Estebaranz, J L; Esteban, M

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a near left-terminal region from the genome of Molluscum contagiosum virus subtype I (MCVI) was determined. This region was contained within three adjacent BamHI fragments, designated L (2.4 kilobases (kb)), M (1.8 kb), and N (1.6 kb). BamHI cleavage of MCVI DNA produced another 1.6-kb fragment (N'), which had been mapped 30-50 kb from the L,M region. The MCVI restriction fragments were cloned and end-sequenced. The N fragment that maps at the L,M region was identified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers devised from the sequence of each fragment. The results from this analysis led to establish the relative position of these fragments within the MCVI genome. The analysis of 3.6 kb of DNA sequence revealed the presence of ten open reading frames (ORFs). Comparison of the amino acid sequence of these ORFs to the amino acid sequence of vaccinia virus (VAC) proteins revealed that two complete MCVI ORFs, termed N1L and L1L, showed high degree of homology with VAC F9 and F10 genes, respectively. The F10 gene encodes a 52-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase (protein kinase 2), an essential protein involved in virus morphogenesis. The MCVI homologue (L1L) encoded a putative polypeptide of 443 aa, with a calculated molecular mass of 53 kDa, and 60.5/30.2% sequence identity/similarity to VAC F10. The MCV N1L (213 aa, 24 kDa) showed 42.6/40.6% amino acid sequence identity/similarity to VAC F9, a gene of unknown function encoding a 24-kDa protein with a hydrophobic C-terminal domain, which was conserved in MCVI. The genomic arrangement of MCVI N1L and L1L was equivalent to that of the vaccinia and variola virus homologues. However, the ORFs contained within MCVI fragment M (leftward) showed no homology, neither similarity in genetic organization, to the genes encoded by the corresponding regions of vaccinia and variola viruses.

  4. Deep sequencing of virus-infected cells reveals HIV-encoded small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Schopman, Nick C.T.; Willemsen, Marcel; Liu, Ying Poi; Bradley, Ted; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Berkhout, Ben; Haasnoot, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Small virus-derived interfering RNAs (viRNAs) play an important role in antiviral defence in plants, insects and nematodes by triggering the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The role of RNAi as an antiviral defence mechanism in mammalian cells has been obscure due to the lack of viRNA detection. Although viRNAs from different mammalian viruses have recently been identified, their functions and possible impact on viral replication remain unknown. To identify viRNAs derived from HIV-1, we used the extremely sensitive SOLiDTM 3 Plus System to analyse viRNA accumulation in HIV-1-infected T lymphocytes. We detected numerous small RNAs that correspond to the HIV-1 RNA genome. The majority of these sequences have a positive polarity (98.1%) and could be derived from miRNAs encoded by structured segments of the HIV-1 RNA genome (vmiRNAs). A small portion of the viRNAs is of negative polarity and most of them are encoded within the 3′-UTR, which may represent viral siRNAs (vsiRNAs). The identified vsiRNAs can potently repress HIV-1 production, whereas suppression of the vsiRNAs by antagomirs stimulate virus production. These results suggest that HIV-1 triggers the production of vsiRNAs and vmiRNAs to modulate cellular and/or viral gene expression. PMID:21911362

  5. Deep sequencing of virus-infected cells reveals HIV-encoded small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Willemsen, Marcel; Liu, Ying Poi; Bradley, Ted; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Berkhout, Ben; Haasnoot, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Small virus-derived interfering RNAs (viRNAs) play an important role in antiviral defence in plants, insects and nematodes by triggering the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The role of RNAi as an antiviral defence mechanism in mammalian cells has been obscure due to the lack of viRNA detection. Although viRNAs from different mammalian viruses have recently been identified, their functions and possible impact on viral replication remain unknown. To identify viRNAs derived from HIV-1, we used the extremely sensitive SOLiD(TM) 3 Plus System to analyse viRNA accumulation in HIV-1-infected T lymphocytes. We detected numerous small RNAs that correspond to the HIV-1 RNA genome. The majority of these sequences have a positive polarity (98.1%) and could be derived from miRNAs encoded by structured segments of the HIV-1 RNA genome (vmiRNAs). A small portion of the viRNAs is of negative polarity and most of them are encoded within the 3'-UTR, which may represent viral siRNAs (vsiRNAs). The identified vsiRNAs can potently repress HIV-1 production, whereas suppression of the vsiRNAs by antagomirs stimulate virus production. These results suggest that HIV-1 triggers the production of vsiRNAs and vmiRNAs to modulate cellular and/or viral gene expression. PMID:21911362

  6. Sequence and structure of the extrachromosomal palindrome encoding the ribosomal RNA genes in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Sucgang, Richard; Chen, Guokai; Liu, Wen; Lindsay, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Muzny, Donna; Shaulsky, Gad; Loomis, William; Gibbs, Richard; Kuspa, Adam

    2003-05-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are encoded by multicopy families of identical genes. In Dictyostelium and other protists, the rDNA is carried on extrachromosomal palindromic elements that comprise up to 20% of the nuclear DNA. We present the sequence of the 88 kb Dictyostelium rDNA element, noting that the rRNA genes are likely to be the only transcribed regions. By interrogating a library of ordered YAC clones, we provide evidence for a chromosomal copy of the rDNA on chromosome 4. This locus may provide master copies for the stable transmission of the extrachromosomal elements. The extrachromosomal elements were also found to form chromosome-sized clusters of DNA within nuclei of nocodazole-treated cells arrested in mitosis. These clusters resemble true chromosomes and may allow the efficient segregation of the rDNA during mitosis. These rDNA clusters may also explain the cytological observations of a seventh chromosome in this organism.

  7. Translating working memory into action: behavioral and neural evidence for using motor representations in encoding visuo-spatial sequences.

    PubMed

    Langner, Robert; Sternkopf, Melanie A; Kellermann, Tanja S; Grefkes, Christian; Kurth, Florian; Schneider, Frank; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2014-07-01

    The neurobiological organization of action-oriented working memory is not well understood. To elucidate the neural correlates of translating visuo-spatial stimulus sequences into delayed (memory-guided) sequential actions, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants encoded sequences of four to seven dots appearing on fingers of a left or right schematic hand. After variable delays, sequences were to be reproduced with the corresponding fingers. Recall became less accurate with longer sequences and was initiated faster after long delays. Across both hands, encoding and recall activated bilateral prefrontal, premotor, superior and inferior parietal regions as well as the basal ganglia, whereas hand-specific activity was found (albeit to a lesser degree during encoding) in contralateral premotor, sensorimotor, and superior parietal cortex. Activation differences after long versus short delays were restricted to motor-related regions, indicating that rehearsal during long delays might have facilitated the conversion of the memorandum into concrete motor programs at recall. Furthermore, basal ganglia activity during encoding selectively predicted correct recall. Taken together, the results suggest that to-be-reproduced visuo-spatial sequences are encoded as prospective action representations (motor intentions), possibly in addition to retrospective sensory codes. Overall, our study supports and extends multi-component models of working memory, highlighting the notion that sensory input can be coded in multiple ways depending on what the memorandum is to be used for.

  8. Striking similarities are exhibited by two small Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acids and the adenovirus-associated ribonucleic acids VAI and VAII

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M.D.; Gottlieb, E.; Lerner, M.R.; Steitz, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the region of the Epstein-Barr virus genome that specified two small ribonucleic acids (RNAs), EBER 1 and EBER 2, has been determined. Both of these RNAs are encoded by the right-hand 1,000 base pairs of the EcoRI J fragment of EBV deoxyribonucleic acid. EBER 1 is 166 (167) nucleotides long and EBER 2 is 172 +- 1 nucleotides long; the heterogeneity resides at the 3' termini. The EBER genes are separated by 161 base pairs and are transcribed from the same deoxyribonucleic acid strand. In vitro, both EBER genes can be transcribed by RNA polymerase III; sequences homologous to previously identified RNA polymerase III intragenic transcription control regions are present. Striking similarities are therefore apparent both between the EBERs and the two adenovirus-associated RNAs, VAI and VAII, and between the regions of the two viral genomes that specify these small RNAs. We have shown that VAII RNA as well as VAI RNA and the EBERs exist in ribonucleoprotein complexes which are precipitable by anti-La antibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally the authors have demonstrated that the binding of protein(s) from uninfected cells confers antigenicity on each of the four virus-encoded small RNAs.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  10. tax and rex Sequences of bovine leukaemia virus from globally diverse isolates: rex amino acid sequence more variable than tax.

    PubMed

    McGirr, K M; Buehring, G C

    2005-02-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is an important agricultural problem with high costs to the dairy industry. Here, we examine the variation of the tax and rex genes of BLV. The tax and rex genes share 420 bases and have overlapping reading frames. The tax gene encodes a protein that functions as a transactivator of the BLV promoter, is required for viral replication, acts on cellular promoters, and is responsible for oncogenesis. The rex facilitates the export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus and regulates transcription. We have sequenced five new isolates of the tax/rex gene. We examined the five new and three previously published tax/rex DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of BLV isolates from cattle in representative regions worldwide. The highest variation among nucleic acid sequences for tax and rex was 7% and 5%, respectively; among predicted amino acid sequences for Tax and Rex, 9% and 11%, respectively. Significantly more nucleotide changes resulted in predicted amino acid changes in the rex gene than in the tax gene (P < or = 0.0006). This variability is higher than previously reported for any region of the viral genome. This research may also have implications for the development of Tax-based vaccines. PMID:15702995

  11. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  13. Identification of the cleavage sites of the RNA2-encoded polyproteins for two members of the genus Torradovirus by N-terminal sequencing of the virion capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, I; Silva Junior, D M; Nigg, J C; Zamora-Macorra, E J; Falk, B W

    2016-11-01

    Torradoviruses, family Secoviridae, are emergent bipartite RNA plant viruses. RNA1 is ca. 7kb and has one open reading frame (ORF) encoding for the protease, helicase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). RNA2 is ca. 5kb and has two ORFs. RNA2-ORF1 encodes for a putative protein with unknown function(s). RNA2-ORF2 encodes for a putative movement protein and three capsid proteins. Little is known about the replication and polyprotein processing strategies of torradoviruses. Here, the cleavage sites in the RNA2-ORF2-encoded polyproteins of two torradoviruses, Tomato marchitez virus isolate M (ToMarV-M) and tomato chocolate spot virus, were determined by N-terminal sequencing, revealing that the amino acid (aa) at the -1 position of the cleavage sites is a glutamine. Multiple aa sequence comparison confirmed that this glutamine is conserved among other torradoviruses. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of conserved aas in the ToMarV-M RdRp and protease prevented substantial accumulation of viral coat proteins or RNAs.

  14. Distribution, gene sequence and expression in vivo of the plasmid encoded fimbrial antigen of Salmonella serotype Enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, M. J.; Allen-Vercoe, E.; Redstone, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The pefA gene which encoded the serotype associated plasmid (SAP) mediated fimbrial major subunit antigen of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium shared genetic identity with 128 of 706 salmonella isolates as demonstrated by dot (colony) hybridization. Seventy-seven of 113 isolates of Typhimurium and individual isolates of serotypes Bovis-morbificans, Cholerae-suis and Enteritidis phage type 9b hybridized pefA strongly, whereas 48 isolates of Enteritidis hybridized pefA weakly and one Enteritidis isolate of phage type 14b failed to hybridize. Individual isolates of 294 serotypes and 247 individual isolates of serotype Dublin did not hybridize pefA. Southern hybridization of plasmids extracted from Enteritidis demonstrated that the pefA gene probe hybridized strongly an atypical SAP of 80 kb in size harboured by one Enteritidis isolate of phage-type 9b, whereas the typical SAP of 58 kb in size harboured by 48 Enteritidis isolates hybridized weakly. One Enteritidis isolate of phage type 14b which failed to hybridize pefA in dot (colony) hybridization experiments was demonstrated to be plasmid free. A cosmid library of Enteritidis phage type 4 expressed in Escherichia coli K12 was screened by hybridization for the presence of pef sequences. Recombinant clones which were deduced to harbour the entire pef operon elaborated a PEF-like fimbrial structure at the cell surface. The PEF-like fimbrial antigen was purified from one cosmid clone and used in western blot experiments with sera from chickens infected with Enteritidis phage-type 4. Seroconversion to the fimbrial antigen was observed which indicated that the Enteritidis PEF-like fimbrial structure was expressed at some stage during infection. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the pefA alleles of Typhimurium and Enteritidis phage-type 4 shared 76% DNA nucleotide and 82% deduced amino acid sequence identity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8760946

  15. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  16. A human endogenous retroviral sequence encoding an antigen recognized on melanoma by cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schiavetti, Francesca; Thonnard, Joëlle; Colau, Didier; Boon, Thierry; Coulie, Pierre G

    2002-10-01

    We have identified a gene encoding an antigen recognized by cytolytic T lymphocytes on the autologous tumor cells of a melanoma patient, AVL3. The gene shows homologies with members of the HERV-K family of human endogenous retroviruses, and it was provisionally named HERV-K-MEL. It contains many mutations that disrupt the open reading frames coding for all of the viral proteins. The HERV-K-MEL gene is not expressed in normal tissues with the exception of testis and some skin samples. It is expressed in most samples of cutaneous and ocular melanoma. It is also expressed in a majority of naevi and in a minority of carcinomas and sarcomas. The antigenic peptide, presented by HLA-A2 molecules, is encoded by a very short open reading frame present in the env region of a spliced HERV-K-MEL transcript. Anti-HERV.A2 CTLp could not be detected in the blood of three individuals without cancer but were present at a frequency of 3 x 10(-5) among blood CD8 T cells in patient AVL3 and 6 x 10(-7) in another HLA-A2 melanoma patient whose tumor expressed HERV-K-MEL. Anti-HERV.A2 CTL clones derived from each patient lysed melanoma cells. Analysis of T-cell receptor beta chain sequences indicated that the anti-HERV.A2 CTL population was oligoclonal in patient AVL3 and probably monoclonal in the other patient. These results suggest that HERV-K-MEL is a source of antigens that are targeted by CTLs in melanoma patients and could therefore be used for vaccination.

  17. Cloning, expression, and sequence determination of a bacteriophage fragment encoding bacteriophage resistance in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Hill, C; Miller, L A; Klaenhammer, T R

    1990-11-01

    A number of host-encoded phage resistance mechanisms have been described in lactococci. However, the phage genome has not been exploited as a source of additional resistance determinants. A 4.5-kb BamHI-HindIII fragment of phage nck202.50 (phi 50) was subcloned in streptococcus-Escherichia coli shuttle plasmid pSA3 and introduced into Lactococcus lactis NCK203 and MG1363 by protoplast transformation. This cloned phage fragment directed a bacteriophage resistance phenotype designated Per (phage-encoded resistance). Both phi 50 and a distantly related phage, nck202.48 (phi 48), formed small plaques on strain NCK213 at a slightly reduced efficiency of plaquing on the Per+ host. The per locus was further reduced to a 1.4-kb fragment through in vitro deletion analysis. The 1.4-kb fragment was sequenced, and the Per phenotype was found to be associated with a ca. 500-bp region rich in direct and inverted repeats. We present evidence that the Per region contains a phage origin of replication which, in trans, may interfere with phage replication by titration of DNA polymerase or other essential replication factors. It was demonstrated that the Per+ phenotype is not a result of reduced adsorption or action of a restriction and modification system. Per+ activity was not detected against six independent phages which were previously shown to be sensitive to the Hsp+ mechanism. The mutually exclusive resistance mechanisms could be combined to confer resistance to both types of phages (Hsp resistant and Per resistant) in a single host. This is the first description in lactococci of a phage resistance phenotype, other than superinfection immunity, originating from a lactococcal phage genome.

  18. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding S-RNases from almond (Prunus dulcis): primary structural features and sequence diversity of the S-RNases in Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Ushijima, K; Sassa, H; Tao, R; Yamane, H; Dandekar, A M; Gradziel, T M; Hirano, H

    1998-11-01

    cDNAs encoding three S-RNases of almond (Prunus dulcis), which belongs to the family Rosaceae, were cloned and sequenced. The comparison of amino acid sequences between the S-RNases of almond and those of other rosaceous species showed that the amino acid sequences of the rosaceous S-RNases are highly divergent, and intra-subfamilial similarities are higher than inter-subfamilial similarities. Twelve amino acid sequences of the rosaceous S-RNases were aligned to characterize their primary structural features. In spite of their high level of diversification, the rosaceous S-RNases were found to have five conserved regions, C1, C2, C3, C5, and RC4 which is Rosaceae-specific conserved region. Many variable sites fall into one region, named RHV. RHV is located at a similar position to that of the hypervariable region a (HVa) of the solanaceous S-RNases, and is assumed to be involved in recognizing S-specificity of pollen. On the other hand, the region corresponding to another solanaceous hypervariable region (HVb) was not variable in the rosaceous S-RNases. In the phylogenetic tree of the T2/S type RNase, the rosaceous S-RNase fall into two subfamily-specific groups (Amygdaloideae and Maloideae). The results of sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis imply that the present S-RNases of Rosaceae have diverged again relatively recently, after the divergence of subfamilies. PMID:9862480

  19. Sequence analysis and expression of a cDNA clone encoding tropomysin in Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Song, Juanjuan; Li, Li; Liu, Zhigang; Li, Qiyuan; Ran, Pixin

    2009-02-01

    Shellfish can cause severe anaphylactic reactions. Tropomyosin has been assumed partly responsible for the cross-reactivity among shellfish and other invertebrates. In this study, cDNA of Sinonovacula constricta was amplified by RT-PCR and 3'-RACE from total RNA. The obtained tropomyosin cDNA included an open reading frame coding for 284 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein shared high identity with other allergenic tropomyosins. Expression of the recombinant tropomyosin was carried out in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) using vector PET28a and the purification of the recombinant protein was performed via affinity chromatography. IgE reactivity of recombinant tropomyosin was investigated by immunoblot and the sensized precentage was 36% which indicated that tropomyosin was the minor allergens in S. constricta. Moreover, the character of the purified protein was analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS.

  20. Rv0132c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Encodes a Coenzyme F420-Dependent Hydroxymycolic Acid Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to manipulate and evade human immune system is in part due to its extraordinarily complex cell wall. One of the key components of this cell wall is a family of lipids called mycolic acids. Oxygenation of mycolic acids generating methoxy- and ketomycolic acids enhances the pathogenic attributes of M. tuberculosis. Thus, the respective enzymes are of interest in the research on mycobacteria. The generation of methoxy- and ketomycolic acids proceeds through intermediary formation of hydroxymycolic acids. While the methyl transferase that generates methoxymycolic acids from hydroxymycolic acids is known, hydroxymycolic acids dehydrogenase that oxidizes hydroxymycolic acids to ketomycolic acids has been elusive. We found that hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase is encoded by the rv0132c gene and the enzyme utilizes F420, a deazaflavin coenzyme, as electron carrier, and accordingly we called it F420-dependent hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase. This is the first report on the involvement of F420 in the synthesis of a mycobacterial cell envelope. Also, F420-dependent hydroxymycolic acid dehydrogenase was inhibited by PA-824, and therefore, it is a previously unknown target for this new tuberculosis drug. PMID:24349169

  1. AIB1 gene amplification and the instability of polyQ encoding sequence in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lee-Jun C; Dai, Pu; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Lou, Mary Ann; Clarke, Robert; Nazarov, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Background The poly Q polymorphism in AIB1 (amplified in breast cancer) gene is usually assessed by fragment length analysis which does not reveal the actual sequence variation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the sequence variation of poly Q encoding region in breast cancer cell lines at single molecule level, and to determine if the sequence variation is related to AIB1 gene amplification. Methods The polymorphic poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene was investigated at the single molecule level by PCR cloning/sequencing. The amplification of AIB1 gene in various breast cancer cell lines were studied by real-time quantitative PCR. Results Significant amplifications (5–23 folds) of AIB1 gene were found in 2 out of 9 (22%) ER positive cell lines (in BT-474 and MCF-7 but not in BT-20, ZR-75-1, T47D, BT483, MDA-MB-361, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-330). The AIB1 gene was not amplified in any of the ER negative cell lines. Different passages of MCF-7 cell lines and their derivatives maintained the feature of AIB1 amplification. When the cells were selected for hormone independence (LCC1) and resistance to 4-hydroxy tamoxifen (4-OH TAM) (LCC2 and R27), ICI 182,780 (LCC9) or 4-OH TAM, KEO and LY 117018 (LY-2), AIB1 copy number decreased but still remained highly amplified. Sequencing analysis of poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene did not reveal specific patterns that could be correlated with AIB1 gene amplification. However, about 72% of the breast cancer cell lines had at least one under represented (<20%) extra poly Q encoding sequence patterns that were derived from the original allele, presumably due to somatic instability. Although all MCF-7 cells and their variants had the same predominant poly Q encoding sequence pattern of (CAG)3CAA(CAG)9(CAACAG)3(CAACAGCAG)2CAA of the original cell line, a number of altered poly Q encoding sequences were found in the derivatives of MCF-7 cell lines. Conclusion These data suggest that poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene is

  2. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  3. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  4. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  5. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  6. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  7. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  8. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  9. A new plasmid-encoded proteic killer gene system: cloning, sequencing, and analyzing hig locus of plasmid Rts1.

    PubMed

    Tian, Q B; Ohnishi, M; Tabuchi, A; Terawaki, Y

    1996-03-18

    A new proteic killer gene system, hig, was identified on the plasmid Rts1. The hig locus consisting of a higA and higB is directly related to the temperature sensitive host cell growth conferred by Rts1. We proved that higB encoding presumably a 92-amino-acid polypeptide inhibited segregation of plasmid free cells, and higA encoding a 104-amino-acid polypeptide suppressed the higB function both in cis and in trans.

  10. Sequencing and Modification of the Gene Encoding the 42-Kilodalton Protein in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Synechococcus PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Tatsuo; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ogawa, Teruo; Pierce, John

    1990-01-01

    A 42-kilodalton cytoplasmic membrane protein is synthesized when high CO2-grown cells of Synechococcus PCC 7942 (Anacystis nidulans R2) are exposed to low CO2. The structural gene for this protein (cmpA) has been cloned and sequenced and shown to encode a 450 amino acid polypeptide with a molecular mass of 49 kilodalton. A deletion mutant lacking the 42-kilodalton protein was obtained by transformation of Synechococcus PCC 7942 following in vitro mutagenesis of the cloned gene. There were no significant differences between the mutant and wild-type cells in their growth rates under either low or high CO2 conditions. The activity of inorganic carbon (Ci) transport in the mutant was as high as that in the wild-type strain. In both types of cells, CO2 was the main species of Ci transported and the activities of CO2 and HCO3− transport increased when high CO2-grown cells were exposed to low CO2. We conclude that the 42-kilodalton protein is not directly involved in the Ci-accumulating mechanism of Synechococcus PCC 7942. Images Figure 3 PMID:16667451

  11. A mutation of the yeast gene encoding PCNA destabilizes both microsatellite and minisatellite DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kokoska, R J; Stefanovic, L; Buermeyer, A B; Liskay, R M; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The POL30 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein required for processive DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase delta and epsilon. We examined the effects of the pol30-52 mutation on the stability of microsatellite (1- to 8-bp repeat units) and minisatellite (20-bp repeat units) DNA sequences. It had previously been shown that this mutation destabilizes dinucleotide repeats 150-fold and that this effect is primarily due to defects in DNA mismatch repair. From our analysis of the effects of pol30-52 on classes of repetitive DNA with longer repeat unit lengths, we conclude that this mutation may also elevate the rate of DNA polymerase slippage. The effect of pol30-52 on tracts of repetitive DNA with large repeat unit lengths was similar, but not identical, to that observed previously for pol3-t, a temperature-sensitive mutation affecting DNA polymerase delta. Strains with both pol30-52 and pol3-t mutations grew extremely slowly and had minisatellite mutation rates considerably greater than those observed in either single mutant strain. PMID:9927447

  12. [Differentiation among cutaneous Leishmania species upon amplification of a sequence of dipeptidyl peptidase III encoding gene].

    PubMed

    Kbaier-Hachemi, H; Barhoumi, M; Chakroun, A S; Ben Fadhel, M; Guizani, I

    2008-01-01

    Leishmaniasis are a group of vector-born, parasitic diseases caused by protozoan of the Leishmania genus, that includes visceral or cutaneous forms. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) refers to a group of diseases because of the variability of clinical manifestations, caused by a large number of Leishmania species. In Tunisia, three different forms of CL are encountered, having different causal agents L. infantum, L. major and L. tropica. For the purpose of this study, we assessed the potential of polymorphic sites in dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) encoding gene to differentiate among Leishmania species encountered in Tunisia. A pair of forward and reverse primers amplifying a 664 bp DPP III sequence were designed in regions including 2 mutations in the forward primer and 1 in the reverse, and were used to amplify DNA from diverse species of Leishmania parasites including L. infantum, L. major, L. tropica, L. donovani, L. chagasi, L. arabica, L. aethiopica and L. tarentolae. Amplification was positive for all tested Leishmania species except for L. infantum, L. chagasi, L. archibaldi, L. donovani and L. tarentolae. In case of cutaneous Leishmania species encountered in Tunisia, amplification was positive for both L. tropica and L. major and negative in case of L. infantum. This ability to differentiate L. infantum from L. tropica/L. major constitutes a first step in the taxonomy of cutaneous species prevalent in Tunisia.

  13. Identification, characterization, and analysis of cDNA and genomic sequences encoding two different small heat shock proteins in Hordeum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, N; Pavesi, A; Di Cola, G; Hartings, H; Raho, G; Conte, M R; Perrotta, C

    1993-12-01

    In vitro translation of mRNAs prepared from barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings (cv. Onice) exposed at 40 degrees C directed the synthesis of major heat shock proteins (HSPs) with molecular masses of 80-90, 70, 42 and 16-22 kDa. A cDNA library prepared from the 40 degrees C mRNAs and screened by differential hybridization led to the isolation of heat shock specific sequences. One of these (Hv hsp18) was confirmed by hybrid-arrested and hybrid-released translation as encoding for an 18-kDa HSP. The barley hsp18 sequence has an open reading frame encoding a 160 amino acid residue 18-kDa protein that is 63% identical to wheat 16.9-kDa HSP (clone C5-8), 54% identical to soybean (Glycine max) 17.5-kDa HSP, and 49% identical to Arabidopsis thaliana 17.6-kDa HSP. Lower similarities were found with class II plant small HSPs such as soybean 17.9-kDa HSP (27%), Pisum sativum 17.7-kDa HSP (30%), wheat (Triticum aestivum) 17.3-kDa HSP (clone Ta hsp 17.3) (30%), and with animal small HSPs and alpha-crystallins. The Hv hsp18 sequence was used to pick up Hv hsp17 genomic sequence encoding for another class I 17-kDa HSP. By computer analysis of the nucleotide sequence the TATA box, two heat shock promoter elements, a metal-ion response element, and the polyadenylation signals were identified. Barley HSP18 has an additional cysteine-rich region when compared with HSP17 mapping at the carboxy terminal end. PMID:8112573

  14. A cDNA clone encoding an IgE-binding protein from Brassica anther has significant sequence similarity to Ca(2+)-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, K; Okada, T; Watanabe, M; Ide, T; Ashida, T; Xu, H; Singh, M B

    1995-12-01

    Thirteen cDNA clones encoding IgE-binding proteins were isolated from expression libraries of anthers of Brassica rapa L. and B. napus L. using serum IgE from a patient who was specifically allergic to Brassica pollen. These clones were divided into two groups, I and II, based on the sequence similarity. All the group I cDNAs predicted the same protein of 79 amino acids, while the group II predicted a protein of 83 amino acids with microheterogeneity. Both of the deduced amino acid sequences contained two regions with sequence similarity to Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin. However flanking sequences were distinct from that of calmodulin or other Ca(2+)-binding proteins. RNA-gel blot analysis showed the genes of group I and II were preferentially expressed in anthers at the later developmental stage and in mature pollen. The recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli was recognized in immunoblot analysis by the IgE of a Brassica pollen allergic patient, but not by the Ige of a non-allergic patient. The cDNA clones reported here, therefore, represent pollen allergens of Brassica species.

  15. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase family

    PubMed Central

    González-Muñoz, Eliécer; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida-Odette; Montes, Ricardo A. Chávez; de Folter, Stefan; Andrés-Hernández, Liliana; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Sawers, Ruairidh J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members. PMID:26042133

  16. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase family.

    PubMed

    González-Muñoz, Eliécer; Avendaño-Vázquez, Aida-Odette; Montes, Ricardo A Chávez; de Folter, Stefan; Andrés-Hernández, Liliana; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Sawers, Ruairidh J H

    2015-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73) reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members. PMID:26042133

  17. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  18. Increased mRNA expression of a laminin-binding protein in human colon carcinoma: Complete sequence of a full-length cDNA encoding the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, Hsiukang; Wong, Jau Min; Chen, Hai Shiene; Lee, C.; Steele, G.D. Jr.; Chen, Lanbo

    1988-09-01

    Reliable markers to distinguish human colon carcinoma from normal colonic epithelium are needed particularly for poorly differentiated tumors where no useful marker is currently available. To search for markers the authors constructed cDNA libraries from human colon carcinoma cell lines and screened for clones that hybridize to a greater degree with mRNAs of colon carcinomas than with their normal counterparts. Here they report one such cDNA clone that hybridizes with a 1.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA, the level of which is /approx/9-fold greater in colon carcinoma than in adjacent normal colonic epithelium. Blot hybridization of total RNA from a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines shows that the level of this 1.2-kb mRNA in poorly differentiated colon carcinomas is as high as or higher than that in well-differentiated carcinomas. Molecular cloning and complete sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the full-length open reading frame of this 1.2-kb mRNA unexpectedly show it to contain all the partial cDNA sequence encoding 135 amino acid residues previously reported for a human laminin receptor. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that this putative laminin-binding protein from human colon carcinomas consists of 295 amino acid residues with interesting features. There is an unusual C-terminal 70-amino acid segment, which is trypsin-resistant and highly negatively charged.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid encoding haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Tsuchida, J; Tanaka, H; Koga, M; Nishina, Y; Nozaki, M; Yoshinaga, K; Toshimori, K; Matsumiya, K; Okuyama, A; Nishimune, Y

    2000-10-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a germ cell-specific protein from an expression cDNA library prepared from the mouse testis using testis-specific polyclonal antibodies. Northern blot analysis showed a transcript of 1.1 kilobases exclusively expressed in haploid germ cells of the testis. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed one long open reading frame consisting of 238 deduced amino acids, rich in basic amino acids in the N-terminal one-third that also contained the nuclear localization signal, and rich in acidic amino acids, including two type of acidic alanine-rich repeats, in the rest of the deduced protein. The protein having a molecular weight of approximately 55 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 4.3-4.7 was also exclusively detected in the testis by Western blot analysis. As the cDNA was located on chromosome-X, Halap-X (haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X) was proposed for the name of the protein encoded by the cDNA. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that the Halap-X protein was predominantly present in the nucleoplasm of round spermatids but gradually decreased as spermatids matured, followed by the subsequent appearance in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. Thus, the Halap-X protein was transferred from the nuclei to the cytoplasm during the spermatid maturation when the chromatin condensation and transformation of the nuclei occurred. The Halap-X may facilitate specific association of nuclear DNA with some basic chromosomal proteins and play important roles in the process of chromatin condensation. PMID:10993819

  20. Characterization and nucleotide sequence of a chicken gene encoding an opal suppressor tRNA and its flanking DNA segments.

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, D L; Dudock, B S; Eden, F C

    1983-01-01

    A naturally occurring opal suppressor serine tRNA has been purified from chicken liver and used as a probe to isolate the corresponding gene from a library of chicken DNA in bacteriophage lambda. This minor tRNA is encoded by a single-copy gene that is not part of a tRNA gene cluster. DNA sequence analysis of the gene and its flanking DNA segments shows that the gene is encoded in an 87-base-pair segment without intervening sequences and specifies a tRNA that reads the termination codon UGA. This gene has additional nucleotides in the 5' internal promoter region but has a normal 3' internal promoter sequence and the usual termination signal. Images PMID:6308662

  1. Characterization of the DNA binding protein encoded by the N-specific filamentous Escherichia coli phage IKe. Binding properties of the protein and nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed

    Peeters, B P; Konings, R N; Schoenmakers, J G

    1983-09-01

    A DNA binding protein encoded by the filamentous single-stranded DNA phage IKe has been isolated from IKe-infected Escherichia coli cells. Fluorescence and in vitro binding studies have shown that the protein binds co-operatively and with a high specificity to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. From titration of the protein to poly(dA) it has been calculated that approximately four bases of the DNA are covered by one monomer of protein. These binding characteristics closely resemble those of gene V protein encoded by the F-specific filamentous phages M13 and fd. The nucleotide sequence of the gene specifying the IKe DNA binding protein has been established. When compared to the nucleotide sequence of gene V of phage M13 it shows an homology of 58%, indicating that these two phages are evolutionarily related. The IKe DNA binding protein is 88 amino acids long which is one amino acid residue larger than the gene V protein sequence. When the IKe DNA binding protein sequence is compared with that of gene V protein it was found that 39 amino acid residues have identical positions in both proteins. The positions of all five tyrosine residues, a number of which are known to be involved in DNA binding, are conserved. Secondary structure predictions indicate that the two proteins contain similar structural domains. It is proposed that the tyrosine residues which are involved in DNA binding are the ones in or next to a beta-turn, at positions 26, 41 and 56 in gene V protein and at positions 27, 42 and 57 in the IKe DNA binding protein.

  2. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt8 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein That Is Functionally Related to Spt3 and Tata-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, D. M.; Chapon, C.; Roberts, S. M.; Dollard, C.; Winston, F.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPT8 gene were previously isolated as suppressors of retrotransposon insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Mutations in SPT8 confer phenotypes similar to those caused by particular mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA-binding protein (TBP). These phenotypes are also similar to those caused by mutations in the SPT3 gene, which encodes a protein that directly interacts with TBP. We have now cloned and sequenced the SPT8 gene and have shown that it encodes a predicted protein of 602 amino acids with an extremely acidic amino terminus. In addition, the predicted SPT8 amino acid sequence contains one copy of a sequence motif found in multiple copies in a number of other eukaryotic proteins, including the β subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. To investigate further the relationship between SPT8, SPT3 and TBP, we have analyzed the effect of an spt8 null mutation in combination with different spt3 and spt15 mutations. This genetic analysis has shown that an spt8 deletion mutation is suppressed by particular spt3 alleles. Taken together with previous results, these data suggest that the SPT8 protein is required, directly or indirectly, for TBP function at particular promoters and that the role of SPT8 may be to promote a functional interaction between SPT3 and TBP. PMID:8088510

  3. Nucleotide sequence of yst, the Yersinia enterocolitica gene encoding the heat-stable enterotoxin, and prevalence of the gene among pathogenic and nonpathogenic yersiniae.

    PubMed

    Delor, I; Kaeckenbeeck, A; Wauters, G; Cornelis, G R

    1990-09-01

    The gene encoding the heat-stable enterotoxin (yst) was cloned from the chromosome of Yersinia enterocolitica W1024 (serotype O:9), and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The yst gene encodes a 71-amino-acid polypeptide. The C-terminal 30 amino acids of the predicted protein exactly correspond to the amino acid sequence of the toxin extracted from culture supernatants (T. Takao, N. Tominaga, and Y. Shimonishi, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 125:845-851, 1984). The N-terminal 18 amino acids have the properties of a signal sequence. The central 22 residues are removed during or after the secretion process. This organization in three domains (Pre, Pro, and mature Yst) resembles that of the enterotoxin STa of Escherichia coli. The degree of conservation between the E. coli and Y. enterocolitica toxins is much lower in the Pre and the Pro domains than in the mature proteins. The mature toxin of Y. enterocolitica is much larger than that of E. coli, but the active domain appears to be highly conserved. The yst gene of Y. enterocolitica introduced in E. coli K-12 directed the secretion of an active toxin. The cloned yst gene was used as an epidemiological probe among a collection of 174 strains representative of all Yersinia species except Yersinia pestis and numerous Y. enterocolitica subgroups. In Y. enterocolitica, there was a clear-cut difference between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains: 89 of 89 pathogenic and none of 51 nonpathogenic strains contained yst-homologous DNA, suggesting that Yst is involved in pathogenesis. Among the other Yersinia species, only four strains of Yersinia kristensenii had DNA homologous to yst.

  4. Nucleotide sequence of yst, the Yersinia enterocolitica gene encoding the heat-stable enterotoxin, and prevalence of the gene among pathogenic and nonpathogenic yersiniae.

    PubMed Central

    Delor, I; Kaeckenbeeck, A; Wauters, G; Cornelis, G R

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding the heat-stable enterotoxin (yst) was cloned from the chromosome of Yersinia enterocolitica W1024 (serotype O:9), and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The yst gene encodes a 71-amino-acid polypeptide. The C-terminal 30 amino acids of the predicted protein exactly correspond to the amino acid sequence of the toxin extracted from culture supernatants (T. Takao, N. Tominaga, and Y. Shimonishi, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 125:845-851, 1984). The N-terminal 18 amino acids have the properties of a signal sequence. The central 22 residues are removed during or after the secretion process. This organization in three domains (Pre, Pro, and mature Yst) resembles that of the enterotoxin STa of Escherichia coli. The degree of conservation between the E. coli and Y. enterocolitica toxins is much lower in the Pre and the Pro domains than in the mature proteins. The mature toxin of Y. enterocolitica is much larger than that of E. coli, but the active domain appears to be highly conserved. The yst gene of Y. enterocolitica introduced in E. coli K-12 directed the secretion of an active toxin. The cloned yst gene was used as an epidemiological probe among a collection of 174 strains representative of all Yersinia species except Yersinia pestis and numerous Y. enterocolitica subgroups. In Y. enterocolitica, there was a clear-cut difference between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains: 89 of 89 pathogenic and none of 51 nonpathogenic strains contained yst-homologous DNA, suggesting that Yst is involved in pathogenesis. Among the other Yersinia species, only four strains of Yersinia kristensenii had DNA homologous to yst. Images PMID:2201642

  5. Cloning and sequencing of cDNAs encoding a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Rebmann, G; Hertig, C; Bull, J; Mauch, F; Dudler, R

    1991-02-01

    We report here the complete amino acid sequence of a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as deduced from cDNA clones representing mRNA from leaves infected with the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe graminis. The protein consists of 312 amino acids, of which the first 22 form a putative signal sequence, and has a calculated pI of 5.7. Sequence comparison revealed that the putative wheat peroxidase is most similar to the turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase, with which it shares 57% identical and 13% conserved amino acids.

  6. Cloning and sequencing of cDNAs encoding a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Rebmann, G; Hertig, C; Bull, J; Mauch, F; Dudler, R

    1991-02-01

    We report here the complete amino acid sequence of a pathogen-induced putative peroxidase from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as deduced from cDNA clones representing mRNA from leaves infected with the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe graminis. The protein consists of 312 amino acids, of which the first 22 form a putative signal sequence, and has a calculated pI of 5.7. Sequence comparison revealed that the putative wheat peroxidase is most similar to the turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase, with which it shares 57% identical and 13% conserved amino acids. PMID:1893103

  7. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  8. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is an acid-induced, chromosomally encoded virulence factor in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Wood, Derek; Nester, Eugene W

    2005-09-01

    The pckA gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, catalyzes the reversible decarboxylation and phosphorylation of oxaloacetate to form phosphoenolpyruvate. Located on the circular chromosome of Agrobacterium, this locus is adjacent to the loci chvG and chvI, encoding a two-component regulatory system that has been shown to be important in virulence. Using a reporter gene fusion, studies showed that the pckA gene is induced by acidic pH but not by acetosyringone. This acid induction is regulated by the chvG-chvI regulatory system, which controls acid-inducible genes. A pckA mutant had no demonstrable PckA enzyme activity and grew on AB minimal medium with glucose but did not grow on the same medium with succinate as the sole carbon source and was more inhibited in its growth than the wild-type strain by an acidic environment. A pckA mutant was highly attenuated in tumor-inducing ability on tobacco leaf disks and was severely attenuated in vir gene expression. Although vir gene induction was completely restored when a constitutive virG gene was introduced into the mutant strain, virulence was only partially restored. These results suggest that avirulence may be due to a combination of the inhibition of this mutant in the acidic plant wound environment and the poor induction of the vir genes. PMID:16109945

  9. Ribosomal Synthesis of Macrocyclic Peptides in Vitro and in Vivo Mediated by Genetically Encoded Amino-Thiol Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Frost, John R.; Jacob, Nicholas T.; Papa, Louis J.; Owens, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile method for orchestrating the formation of side-chain-to-tail cyclic peptides from ribosomally derived polypeptide precursors is reported. Upon ribosomal incorporation into intein-containing precursor proteins, designer unnatural amino acids bearing side-chain 1,3- or 1,2-aminothiol functionalities are able to promote the cyclization of a downstream target peptide sequence via a C-terminal ligation/ring contraction mechanism. Using this approach, peptide macrocycles of variable size and composition could be generated in a pH-triggered manner in vitro, or directly in living bacterial cells. This methodology furnishes a new platform for the creation and screening of genetically encoded libraries of conformationally constrained peptides. This strategy was applied to identify and isolate a low micromolar streptavidin binder (KD = 1.1 µM) from a library of cyclic peptides produced in E. coli, thereby illustrating its potential toward aiding the discovery of functional peptide macrocycles. PMID:25933125

  10. Fatty acid composition of beef is associated with exonic nucleotide variants of the gene encoding FASN.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyep; Lee, Yoonseok; La, Boomi; Yeo, Jungsou; Chung, Euiryong; Kim, Younyoung; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2012-04-01

    Genetic associations of fatty acid composition with exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding fatty acid synthase (FASN) were examined using 513 Korean cattle. All five individual SNPs of g.12870 T>C, g.13126 T>C, g.15532 C>A, g.16907 T>C and g.17924 G>A were associated with a variety of fatty acid compositions and further with marbling score (P < 0.05). Their genotypes of CC, TT, AA, TT, and GG were associated with increased monounsaturated fatty acids and with decreased saturated fatty acids (P < 0.05). The genotypes at all the SNPs also increased marbling score (P < 0.05). Further genetic associations with fatty acid composition suggested that homozygous genotype with the haplotype of ATG at g.15532, g.16907, and g.17924 in a linkage disequilibrium block increased monounsaturated fatty acids and marbling score (P < 0.05). We concluded that the five exonic SNPs of g.12870, g.13126, g.15532, g.16907, and g.17924 in the FASN gene could change fatty acid contents. Their genotypes of CC, TT, AA, TT, and GG and haplotype of ATG at g.15532, g.16907, and g.17924 were recommended for genetic improvement of beef quality.

  11. Escherichia coli gene purR encoding a repressor protein for purine nucleotide synthesis. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and interaction with the purF operator.

    PubMed

    Rolfes, R J; Zalkin, H

    1988-12-25

    The Escherichia coli gene purR, encoding a repressor protein, was cloned by complementation of a purR mutation. Gene purR on a multicopy plasmid repressed expression of purF and purF-lacZ and reduced the growth rate of host cells by limiting the rate of de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. The level of a 1.3-kilobase purR mRNA was higher in cells grown with excess adenine, suggesting that synthesis of the repressor may be regulated. The chromosomal locus of purR was mapped to coordinate 1755-kb on the E. coli restriction map (Kohara, Y., Akiyama, K., and Isono, K. (1987) Cell 50, 495-508). Pur repressor bound specifically to purF operator DNA as determined by gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays. The amino acid sequence of Pur repressor was derived from the nucleotide sequence. Pur repressor subunit contains 341 amino acids and has a calculated Mr of 38,179. Pur repressor is 31-35% identical with the galR and cytR repressors and 26% identical with the lacI repressor. These four repressors are likely homologous. Amino acid sequence similarity is greatest in an amino-terminal region presumed to contain a DNA-binding domain. A similarity is also noted in the operator sites for these repressors.

  12. Molecular cloning of complementary DNA to Newcastle disease virus, and nucleotide sequence analysis of the junction between the genes encoding the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase and the large protein.

    PubMed

    Chambers, P; Millar, N S; Bingham, R W; Emmerson, P T

    1986-03-01

    Complementary DNA clones to 90% of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) genome have been produced and mapped. These clones cover the entire HN, F and M genes, most if not all of the L gene and parts of the NP and P genes. The map of overlapping clones gives the gene order 3'-NP-P-M-F-HN-L-5' for NDV, identical to the gene order of Sendai virus, on the assumption that the NP gene of NDV is at the 3' end of the genome as previously suggested by inactivation of NDV transcription by u.v. light. The nucleotide sequence of 453 bases covering the junction between the HN and L genes has been determined. There is nucleotide sequence homology to the consensus polyadenylation and mRNA start sites of Sendai virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. The deduced amino acid sequence of the C terminus of the HN protein of NDV shows homology to the C-terminal amino acid sequences of the HN proteins of simian virus 5 and Sendai virus. An explanation for the presence of HN0, the precursor to HN in some strains of NDV, is suggested by the presence of a long non-coding region at the 3' terminus of the mRNA encoding the HN protein of NDV that could, by mutation, allow synthesis of a larger polypeptide.

  13. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  14. Nucleotide sequence of a complementary DNA encoding pea cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.A.; Zilinskas, B.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors now report the nucleotide sequence of the cytosolic Cu/Zn SOD cloned from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from mRNA extracted from leaves of 7- to 10-d pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.). The clone was isolated using a 22-base synthetic oligonucleotide complementary to the amino acid sequence CGIIGLQG. This sequence, found at the protein's carboxy terminus, is highly conserved among plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but not chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs. The 738-base pair sequence contains an open reading frame specifying 152 codons and a predicted M{sub r} of 18,024 D. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous (79-82% identity) with the sequences of other known plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but less highly conserved (63-65%) when compared with several chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs including pea (10).

  15. Molecular characterization and sequence diversity of genes encoding the large subunit of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Rose, Meghan K; Huang, Xiu-Qiang; Brûlé-Babel, Anita

    2016-02-01

    The large subunit of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the rate limiting enzyme in starch biosynthesis in Triticum aestivum L., is encoded by the ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit (AGP-L) gene. This was the first report on the development of three genome-specific primer sets for isolating the complete genomic sequence of all three homoeologous AGP-L genes on group 1 chromosomes. All three AGP-L genes consisted of 15 introns and 15 exons. The lengths of the structural genes from start to stop codon were 3334 bp for AGP-L-A1, 3351 bp for AGP-L-B1, and 3340 bp for AGP-L-D1. The coding region was 1569 bases long in all three genomes. All three AGP-L genes encoded 522 amino acid residues including the transit peptide sequences with 62 amino acid residues and the mature protein with 460 amino acid residues. The mature protein of three AGP-L genes was highly conserved. Three AGP-L genes were sequenced in 47 diverse spring and winter wheat genotypes. One and two haplotypes were found for AGP-L-D1 and AGP-L-A1, respectively. In total, 67 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and 13 indels (insertions or deletions) forming five haplotypes were identified for AGP-L-B1. All 13 indels and 58 of the 67 SNPs among the 47 genotypes were located in the non-coding regions, while the remaining nine SNPs were synonymous substitutions in the coding region. Significant LD was found among the 45 SNPs and ten indels located from intron 2 to intron 3. Association analysis indicated that four SNPs were strongly associated with seed number per spike and thousand kernel weight.

  16. Sequencing and expression of the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens xylB gene encoding a novel bifunctional protein with beta-D-xylosidase and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Utt, E A; Eddy, C K; Keshav, K F; Ingram, L O

    1991-01-01

    A single gene (xylB) encoding both beta-D-xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.37) and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase (EC 3.2.1.55) activities was identified and sequenced from the ruminal bacterium Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. The xylB gene consists of a 1.551-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 517 amino acids. A subclone containing a 1.843-bp DNA fragment retained both enzymatic activities. Insertion of a 10-bp NotI linker into the EcoRV site within the central region of this ORF abolished both activities. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cytoplasmic proteins from recombinant Escherichia coli confirmed the presence of a 60,000-molecular-weight protein in active subclones and the absence of this protein in subclones lacking activity. With p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside and p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside as substrates, the specific activity of arabinosidase was found to be approximately 1.6-fold higher than that of xylosidase. The deduced amino acid sequence of the xylB gene product did not exhibit a high degree of identity with other xylan-degrading enzymes or glycosidases. The xylB gene was located between two incomplete ORFs within the 4,200-bp region which was sequenced. No sequences resembling terminators were found within this region, and these three genes are proposed to be part of a single operon. Based on comparison with other glycosidases, a conserved region was identified in the carboxyl end of the translated xylB gene which is similar to that of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger. Images PMID:1905520

  17. Novel sequences encoding venom C-type lectins are conserved in phylogenetically and geographically distinct Echis and Bitis viper species.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R A; Oliver, J; Hasson, S S; Bharati, K; Theakston, R D G

    2003-10-01

    Envenoming by Echis saw scaled vipers and Bitis arietans puff adders is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite their medical importance, the composition and constituent functionality of venoms from these vipers remains poorly understood. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding seven clusters or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive C-type lectin (CTL) proteins from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus, E. pyramidum leakeyi, E. carinatus sochureki and B. arietans. All these CTL sequences encoded the cysteine scaffold that defines the carbohydrate-recognition domain of mammalian CTLs. All but one of the Echis and Bitis CTL sequences showed greater sequence similarity to the beta than alpha CTL subunits in venoms of related Asian and American vipers. Four of the new CTL clusters showed marked inter-cluster sequence conservation across all four viper species which were significantly different from that of previously published viper CTLs. The other three Echis and Bitis CTL clusters showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom CTLs. Because viper venom CTLs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis and Bitis CTLs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of inter-specific and inter-generic sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis and Bitis CTLs leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. PMID:14557069

  18. Sequencing of the gene encoding the major pilin of pilus colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and evidence that CFA/III is related to type IV pili.

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, T; Fujino, Y; Yamamoto, K; Miwatani, T; Honda, T

    1995-01-01

    The plasmid-encoded structural gene cofA necessary for the production of the major pilin subunit of pilus colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III) of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was identified, and the nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined. cofA consists of 714 nucleotides encoding a 238-amino-acid protein (molecular weight of 25,309). CofA seems to be a precursor of CFA/III pilin, because the first 23 residues of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified CFA/III pili coincided with the deduced amino acid sequence for residues 32 to 54 of CofA. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of CofA also indicated its processing to form mature pilin in the presence of the downstream region of cofA. These results suggest that the major pilin of CFA/III pili is produced as a precursor form which is posttranslationally modified to the mature pilin and forms morphological pili after cleavage of the Gly-30-Met-31 junction, probably by a protease encoded by an as-yet-unknown gene located downstream of cofA. Interestingly, the N-terminal 30-amino-acid sequence of mature CFA/III shows the highest identity (76.7%) to TcpA pilin of Vibrio cholerae, which is a type IV class B pilin. PMID:7822050

  19. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Raducha, M.; Edwards, Y.H.; Weiss, M.J.; Slaughter, C.; Lafferty, M.A.; Harris, H.

    1987-03-01

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1) was isolated from a lambdagt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed.

  20. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a carboxypeptidase-encoding gene from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Toietta, G; Zecca, L; Vanoni, M; Tortora, P

    1995-10-01

    Mammalian metallocarboxypeptidases play key roles in major biological processes, such as digestive-protein degradation and specific proteolytic processing. A Sulfolobus solfataricus gene (cpsA) encoding a recently described zinc carboxypeptidase with an unusually broad substrate specificity was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Despite the lack of overall sequence homology with known carboxypeptidases, seven homology blocks, including the Zn-coordinating and catalytic residues, were identified by multiple alignment with carboxypeptidases A, B, and T. S. solfataricus carboxypeptidase expressed in E. coli was found to be enzymatically active, and both its substrate specificity and thermostability were comparable to those of the purified S. solfataricus enzyme. PMID:7559343

  1. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a carboxypeptidase-encoding gene from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, S; Toietta, G; Zecca, L; Vanoni, M; Tortora, P

    1995-01-01

    Mammalian metallocarboxypeptidases play key roles in major biological processes, such as digestive-protein degradation and specific proteolytic processing. A Sulfolobus solfataricus gene (cpsA) encoding a recently described zinc carboxypeptidase with an unusually broad substrate specificity was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Despite the lack of overall sequence homology with known carboxypeptidases, seven homology blocks, including the Zn-coordinating and catalytic residues, were identified by multiple alignment with carboxypeptidases A, B, and T. S. solfataricus carboxypeptidase expressed in E. coli was found to be enzymatically active, and both its substrate specificity and thermostability were comparable to those of the purified S. solfataricus enzyme. PMID:7559343

  2. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a carboxypeptidase-encoding gene from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Toietta, G; Zecca, L; Vanoni, M; Tortora, P

    1995-10-01

    Mammalian metallocarboxypeptidases play key roles in major biological processes, such as digestive-protein degradation and specific proteolytic processing. A Sulfolobus solfataricus gene (cpsA) encoding a recently described zinc carboxypeptidase with an unusually broad substrate specificity was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Despite the lack of overall sequence homology with known carboxypeptidases, seven homology blocks, including the Zn-coordinating and catalytic residues, were identified by multiple alignment with carboxypeptidases A, B, and T. S. solfataricus carboxypeptidase expressed in E. coli was found to be enzymatically active, and both its substrate specificity and thermostability were comparable to those of the purified S. solfataricus enzyme.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a 21-kilodalton outer membrane protein from Bordetella avium and expression of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry-Weeks, C R; Hultsch, A L; Kelly, S M; Keith, J M; Curtiss, R

    1992-01-01

    Three gene libraries of Bordetella avium 197 DNA were prepared in Escherichia coli LE392 by using the cosmid vectors pCP13 and pYA2329, a derivative of pCP13 specifying spectinomycin resistance. The cosmid libraries were screened with convalescent-phase anti-B. avium turkey sera and polyclonal rabbit antisera against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. One E. coli recombinant clone produced a 56-kDa protein which reacted with convalescent-phase serum from a turkey infected with B. avium 197. In addition, five E. coli recombinant clones were identified which produced B. avium outer membrane proteins with molecular masses of 21, 38, 40, 43, and 48 kDa. At least one of these E. coli clones, which encoded the 21-kDa protein, reacted with both convalescent-phase turkey sera and antibody against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. The gene for the 21-kDa outer membrane protein was localized by Tn5seq1 mutagenesis, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by dideoxy sequencing. DNA sequence analysis of the 21-kDa protein revealed an open reading frame of 582 bases that resulted in a predicted protein of 194 amino acids. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the gene encoding the 21-kDa outer membrane protein with protein sequences in the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence data base indicated significant homology to the OmpA proteins of Shigella dysenteriae, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella typhimurium and to Neisseria gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein III, Haemophilus influenzae protein P6, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin protein F. The gene (ompA) encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein hybridized with 4.1-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and with 6.0- and 3.2-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of B. avium and B. avium-like DNA, respectively. A 6.75-kb DNA fragment encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein was subcloned into the

  4. Modified pseudomonas oleovorans phaC1 nucleic acids encoding bispecific polyhydroxyalkanoate polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Srienc, Friedrich; Jackson, John K.; Somers, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A genetically engineered Pseudomonas oleovorans phaC1 polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymerase having tailored substrate specificity is provided. The modified PHA polymerase is preferably a "bispecific" PHA polymerase capable of copolymerizing a short chain length monomer and a medium chain length monomer is provided. Methods for making the modified PHA polymerase and for making nucleic acids encoding the modified PHA polymerase are also disclosed, as are methods of producing PHA using the modified PHA polymerase. The invention further includes methods to assay for altered substrate specificity.

  5. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Pisum sativum. Properties, nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Mücke, U; Wohlfarth, T; Fiedler, U; Bäumlein, H; Rücknagel, K P; König, S

    1996-04-15

    To study the molecular structure and function of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) from plants the protein was isolated from pea seeds and partially characterised. The active enzyme which occurs in the form of higher oligomers consists of two different subunits appearing in SDS/PAGE and mass spectroscopy experiments. For further experiments, like X-ray crystallography, it was necessary to elucidate the protein sequence. Partial cDNA clones encoding pyruvate decarboxylase from seeds of Pisum sativum cv. Miko have been obtained by means of polymerase chain reaction techniques. The first sequences were found using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designated according to conserved amino acid sequences of known pyruvate decarboxylases. The missing parts of one cDNA were amplified applying the 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends systems. The amino acid sequence deduced from the entire cDNA sequence displays strong similarity to pyruvate decarboxylases from other organisms, especially from plants. A molecular mass of 64 kDa was calculated for this protein correlating with estimations for the smaller subunit of the oligomeric enzyme. The PCR experiments led to at least three different clones representing the middle part of the PDC cDNA indicating the existence of three isozymes. Two of these isoforms could be confirmed on the protein level by sequencing tryptic peptides. Only anaerobically treated roots showed a positive signal for PDC mRNA in Northern analysis although the cDNA from imbibed seeds was successfully used for PCR.

  6. Analysis of genes encoding the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading enzyme from Sphingomonas agrestis 58-1.

    PubMed

    Shimojo, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Mitsuyasu; Amada, Kei

    2009-07-01

    A 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacterium, strain 58-1, was newly isolated from soil samples collected in the Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan, and grown on an enrichment culture medium containing 2,4-D as the sole carbon source. Phylogenic analysis identified strain 58-1 as Sphingomonas agrestis. In 2,4-D degraders, classes I, II, and III inherit the tfdA, cadA, and tfdAalpha genes, respectively, and the results from degenerate-PCR indicated that this strain belongs to the class II degraders. A clone that includes the cadA gene homolog of S. agrestis 58-1 was screened from a library by using the PCR amplified fragment as a DNA probe. The cloned fragment was sequenced and found to consist of 5043 nucleotides and include 3 open reading frames (orfs). The orf1, orf2, and orf3 genes encode polypeptides consisting of 412, 448, and 177 amino acids, respectively. The Orf2 product shares a high degree of sequence similarity (92%) with the large subunit of 2,4-D oxygenase from the Bradyrhizobium sp. strain HW13, which belongs to the class III 2,4-D degraders, while the orf3 product shared 63% sequence similarity with the small subunit of 2,4-D oxygenase from the strain HW13. The results of the functional expression analysis using various deletion mutants in Escherichia coli revealed that the expression of both orf2 and orf3 genes, but not orf1, is essential for the conversion of 2,4-D to 2,4-DCP. From these results, we conclude the first isolation of 2,4-D oxygenase genes from a class II 2,4-D degrader.

  7. PCR Primers to Study the Diversity of Expressed Fungal Genes Encoding Lignocellulolytic Enzymes in Soils Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  8. PCR primers to study the diversity of expressed fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes in soils using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  9. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  10. Detection of sequence variants in the gene encoding the beta 3 chain of laminin 5 (LAMB3).

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, L; McGrath, J A; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J

    1995-01-01

    Laminin 5, a candidate gene/protein system for mutations in the junctional forms of epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), consists of three polypeptides encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 genes. In this study, primer pairs for the amplification of the complete cDNA as well as 22 exons of the LAMB3 gene encoding the entire beta 3 chain of laminin 5, were established. The primers for amplification of individual exons from genomic DNA were placed at least 50 bp away from the exon-intron borders in the flanking intronic sequences. For amplification of cDNA generated by RT-PCR, eight primer pairs covering overlapping segments of mRNA were used. The amplified sequences were used to study sequence variations of the LAMB3 gene in patients with JEB and unrelated individuals using heteroduplex analysis. Nine out of 13 JEB patients examined showed heteroduplexes in at least one of the PCR products, indicating the existence of two variable alleles in their DNA. Sequence analyses revealed putative pathogenetic mutations in seven of the JEB patients, while four of the heteroduplexes resulted from polymorphisms, reflecting a single basepair substitution. The results demonstrate that this method is useful in the detection of JEB mutations, as well as polymorphisms in the LAMB3 gene. PMID:7550237

  11. Enzymes Catalyzing the Early Steps of Clavulanic Acid Biosynthesis Are Encoded by Two Sets of Paralogous Genes in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Susan E.; Elder, Kenneth J.; Aidoo, Kwamena A.; Paradkar, Ashish S.

    2000-01-01

    Genes encoding the proteins required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis and for cephamycin biosynthesis are grouped into a “supercluster” in Streptomyces clavuligerus. Nine open reading frames (ORFs) associated with clavulanic acid biosynthesis were located in a 15-kb segment of the supercluster, including six ORFs encoding known biosynthetic enzymes or regulatory proteins, two ORFs that have been reported previously but whose involvement in clavulanic acid biosynthesis is unclear, and one ORF not previously reported. Evidence for the involvement of these ORFs in clavulanic acid production was obtained by generating mutants and showing that all were defective for clavulanic acid production when grown on starch asparagine medium. However, when five of the nine mutants, including mutants defective in known clavulanic acid biosynthetic enzymes, were grown in a soy-based medium, clavulanic acid-producing ability was restored. This ability to produce clavulanic acid when seemingly essential biosynthetic enzymes have been mutated suggests that paralogous genes encoding functionally equivalent proteins exist for each of the five genes but that these paralogues are expressed only in the soy-based medium. The five genes that have paralogues encode proteins involved in the early steps of the pathway common to the biosynthesis of both clavulanic acid and the other clavam metabolites produced by this organism. No evidence was seen for paralogues of the four remaining genes involved in late, clavulanic acid-specific steps in the pathway. PMID:10681345

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2016-06-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8].

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2016-06-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8]. PMID:27054161

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vitalini, F.; Noé, F.; Keller, B.G.

    2016-01-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8]. PMID:27054161

  15. Characterization and Expression of DNA Sequences Encoding Putative Type-II Metallothioneins in the Seagrass Posidonia oceanica1

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Tommaso; Natali, Lucia; Maserti, Bianca Elena; Taddei, Sonia; Cavallini, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica is a marine phanerogam, largely widespread in the Mediterranean sea, representing an important food substrate for many marine organisms. A progressive reduction of P. oceanica meadows has been reported, due to anthropogenic coastal activity. Studying mechanisms by which this species responds to environmental stresses, three DNA sequences putatively encoding metallothioneins (MTs) have been isolated, by PCR. Two sequences, Pomt2a (accession no. AJ249603) and Pomt2b (accession no. AJ249602), show high similarities with genes encoding type-II MTs and are interrupted by two and one intron, respectively. The third sequence, Pomt2c (accession no. AJ249604), is supposed to be a pseudogene, originated by retrotranscription of the Pomt2b mRNA. These sequences belong to a multigene family with at least five members. Northern hybridizations indicated that MT transcripts accumulation is constitutive and seasonally regulated. MT encoding RNAs increase after rhyzome harvesting and (at a lesser extent) after 15 d of cultivation in an aquarium. As for animal MTs, transcripts accumulation is observed also after exposure to trace metals such as copper and cadmium. In the case of copper, the effect depends on concentration. Finally, taking into consideration the great interest in studying the biogeochemical cycle of mercury in the Mediterranean basin and since P. oceanica is commonly considered a bioindicator of this metal, the effect of mercury treatments on the accumulation of MT transcripts has been analyzed: in only a few experiments a small increase in the level of transcripts was recorded, suggesting that MTs are not key elements in the mercury accumulation by this species. PMID:10938373

  16. Controlling enzyme inhibition using an expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shun; Kwon, Inchan

    2013-09-01

    Enzyme inhibition plays an important role in drug development, metabolic pathway regulation, and biocatalysis with product inhibition. When an inhibitor has high structural similarities to the substrate of an enzyme, controlling inhibitor binding without affecting enzyme substrate binding is often challenging and requires fine-tuning of the active site. We hypothesize that an extended set of genetically encoded amino acids can be used to design an enzyme active site that reduces enzyme inhibitor binding without compromising substrate binding. As a model case, we chose murine dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR), substrate dihydrofolate, and inhibitor methotrexate. Structural models of mDHFR variants containing non-natural amino acids complexed with each ligand were constructed to identify a key residue for inhibitor binding and non-natural amino acids to replace the key residue. Then, we discovered that replacing the key phenylalanine residue with two phenylalanine analogs (p-bromophenylalanine (pBrF) and L-2-naphthylalanine (2Nal)) enhances binding affinity toward the substrate dihydrofolate over the inhibitor by 4.0 and 5.8-fold, respectively. Such an enhanced selectivity is mainly due to a reduced inhibitor binding affinity by 2.1 and 4.3-fold, respectively. The catalytic efficiency of the mDHFR variant containing pBrF is comparable to that of wild-type mDHFR, whereas the mDHFR variant containing 2Nal exhibits a moderate decrease in the catalytic efficiency. The work described here clearly demonstrates the feasibility of selectively controlling enzyme inhibition using an expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

  17. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  18. The amino acid sequence of Staphylococcus aureus penicillinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the penicillinase (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) from Staphylococcus aureus strain PC1 was determined. The protein consists of a single polypeptide chain of 257 residues, and the sequence was determined by characterization of tryptic, chymotryptic, peptic and CNBr peptides, with some additional evidence from thermolysin and S. aureus proteinase peptides. A mistake in the preliminary report of the sequence is corrected; residues 113-116 are now thought to be -Lys-Lys-Val-Lys- rather than -Lys-Val-Lys-Lys-. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50056 (91 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1218078

  19. Identification of Human MicroRNA-Like Sequences Embedded within the Protein-Encoding Genes of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Bryan; Wong, Jonathan; Li, Meng; Rasheed, Suraiya

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved, short (18–22 nts), non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of mRNAs. While numerous cellular microRNAs have been associated with the progression of various diseases including cancer, miRNAs associated with retroviruses have not been well characterized. Herein we report identification of microRNA-like sequences in coding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Results Based on our earlier proteomics and bioinformatics studies, we have identified 8 cellular miRNAs that are predicted to bind to the mRNAs of multiple proteins that are dysregulated during HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells in vitro. In silico analysis of the full length and mature sequences of these 8 miRNAs and comparisons with all the genomic and subgenomic sequences of HIV-1 strains in global databases revealed that the first 18/18 sequences of the mature hsa-miR-195 sequence (including the short seed sequence), matched perfectly (100%), or with one nucleotide mismatch, within the envelope (env) genes of five HIV-1 genomes from Africa. In addition, we have identified 4 other miRNA-like sequences (hsa-miR-30d, hsa-miR-30e, hsa-miR-374a and hsa-miR-424) within the env and the gag-pol encoding regions of several HIV-1 strains, albeit with reduced homology. Mapping of the miRNA-homologues of env within HIV-1 genomes localized these sequence to the functionally significant variable regions of the env glycoprotein gp120 designated V1, V2, V4 and V5. Conclusions We conclude that microRNA-like sequences are embedded within the protein-encoding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Given that the V1 to V5 regions of HIV-1 envelopes contain specific, well-characterized domains that are critical for immune responses, virus neutralization and disease progression, we propose that the newly discovered miRNA-like sequences within the HIV-1 genomes may have evolved to self-regulate survival of the virus in

  20. Two Sets of Paralogous Genes Encode the Enzymes Involved in the Early Stages of Clavulanic Acid and Clavam Metabolite Biosynthesis in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Tahlan, Kapil; Park, Hyeon Ung; Wong, Annie; Beatty, Perrin H.; Jensen, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a second copy of a gene encoding proclavaminate amidinohydrolase (pah1), an enzyme involved in the early stages of clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces clavuligerus, was identified and isolated. Using Southern analysis, we have now isolated second copies of the genes encoding the carboxyethylarginine synthase (ceaS) and β-lactam synthetase (bls) enzymes. These new paralogues are given the gene designations ceaS1 and bls1 and are located immediately upstream of pah1 on the chromosome. Furthermore, sequence analysis of the region downstream of pah1 revealed a second copy of a gene encoding ornithine acetyltransferase (oat1), thus indicating the presence of a cluster of paralogue genes. ceaS1, bls1, and oat1 display 73, 60, and 63% identities, respectively, at the nucleotide level to the original ceaS2, bls2, and oat2 genes from the clavulanic acid gene cluster. Single mutants defective in ceaS1, bls1, or oat1 were prepared and characterized and were found to be affected to variable degrees in their ability to produce clavulanic acid and clavam metabolites. Double mutants defective in both copies of the genes were also prepared and tested. The ceaS1/ceaS2 and the bls1/bls2 mutant strains were completely blocked in clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis. On the other hand, oat1/oat2 double mutants still produced some clavulanic acid and clavam metabolites. This may be attributed to the presence of the argJ gene in S. clavuligerus, which encodes yet another ornithine acetyltransferase enzyme that may be able to compensate for the lack of OAT1 and -2 in the double mutants. PMID:14982786

  1. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found.

  2. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  3. Reduced randomness in quantum cryptography with sequences of qubits encoded in the same basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, L.-P.; Cerf, N. J.; Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.; Gisin, N.; Macchiavello, C.

    2006-03-15

    We consider the cloning of sequences of qubits prepared in the states used in the BB84 or six-state quantum cryptography protocol, and show that the single-qubit fidelity is unaffected even if entire sequences of qubits are prepared in the same basis. This result is only valid provided that the sequences are much shorter than the total key. It is of great importance for practical quantum cryptosystems because it reduces the need for high-speed random number generation without impairing on the security against finite-size cloning attacks.

  4. Evolution of an Enzyme from a Noncatalytic Nucleic Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gysbers, Rachel; Tram, Kha; Gu, Jimmy; Li, Yingfu

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which enzymes arose from both abiotic and biological worlds remains an unsolved natural mystery. We postulate that an enzyme can emerge from any sequence of any functional polymer under permissive evolutionary conditions. To support this premise, we have arbitrarily chosen a 50-nucleotide DNA fragment encoding for the Bos taurus (cattle) albumin mRNA and subjected it to test-tube evolution to derive a catalytic DNA (DNAzyme) with RNA-cleavage activity. After only a few weeks, a DNAzyme with significant catalytic activity has surfaced. Sequence comparison reveals that seven nucleotides are responsible for the conversion of the noncatalytic sequence into the enzyme. Deep sequencing analysis of DNA pools along the evolution trajectory has identified individual mutations as the progressive drivers of the molecular evolution. Our findings demonstrate that an enzyme can indeed arise from a sequence of a functional polymer via permissive molecular evolution, a mechanism that may have been exploited by nature for the creation of the enormous repertoire of enzymes in the biological world today. PMID:26091540

  5. 5' flanking sequence and genomic structure of Egr-1, a murine mitogen inducible zinc finger encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Tsai-Morris, C H; Cao, X M; Sukhatme, V P

    1988-09-26

    Egr-1 is a murine zinc finger encoding cDNA whose expression is modulated by a variety of ligand-receptor interactions and is often coregulated with c-fos (1). This study reports the isolation of a mouse Egr-1 genomic clone, its intron-exon structure, and 935 bp of 5' flanking sequence. The gene spans about 3.8 kb and consists of 2 exons and one 700 bp intron. S1 nuclease protection and primer extension analysis were used to define the transcription initiation site. "TATA" and "CCAAT" sequences were located at nucleotides -26 and -337 respectively. In addition, there exist five elements whose sequence is nearly identical to the inner core 10 nucleotide region (CCATATTAGG) of the c-fos serum response element, four Sp1 consensus sequences, two AP1 target sequence analogs, and two potential cAMP response elements. These results will ultimately lead to a detailed definition of the intracellular events regulating Egr-1 expression.

  6. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  7. Cloning, sequencing and overexpression in Escherichia coli of the alginatelyase-encoding aly gene of Pseudomonas alginovora: identification of three classes of alginate lyases.

    PubMed Central

    Chavagnat, F; Duez, C; Guinand, M; Potin, P; Barbeyron, T; Henrissat, B; Wallach, J; Ghuysen, J M

    1996-01-01

    A gene of Pseudomonas alginovora, called aly, has been cloned in Escherichia coli using a battery of PCR techniques and sequenced. It encodes a 210-amino-acid alginate lyase (EC 4.2.2.3), Aly, in the form of a 233-amino-acid precursor. P. alginovora Aly has been overproduced in E. coli with a His-tag sequence fused at the C-terminal end under conditions in which the formation of inclusion bodies is avoided. His-tagged P. alginovora Aly has the same enzymic properties as the wild-type enzyme and has the specificity of a mannuronate lyase. It can be purified in a one-step procedure by affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-nitriloacetate resin. The yield is of 5 mg of enzyme per litre of culture. The amplification factor is 12.5 compared with the level of production by wild-type P. alginovora. The six alginate lyases of known primary structure fall into three distinct classes, one of which comprises the pair P. alginovora Aly and Klebsiella pneumoniae Aly. PMID:8912697

  8. Development of an expert system for amino acid sequence identification.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Saulinskas, E F; Johnson, P; Harrington, P B

    1996-08-01

    An expert system for amino acid sequence identification has been developed. The algorithm uses heuristic rules developed by human experts in protein sequencing. The system is applied to the chromatographic data of phenylthiohydantoin-amino acids acquired from an automated sequencer. The peak intensities in the current cycle are compared with those in the previous cycle, while the calibration and succeeding cycles are used as ancillary identification criteria when necessary. The retention time for each chromatographic peak in each cycle is corrected by the corresponding peak in the calibration cycle at the same run. The main improvement of our system compared with the onboard software used by the Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer is that each peak in each cycle is assigned an identification name according to the corrected retention time to be used for the comparison with different cycles. The system was developed from analyses of ribonuclease A and evaluated by runs of four other protein samples that were not used in rule development. This paper demonstrates that rules developed by human experts can be automatically applied to sequence assignment. The expert system performed more accurately than the onboard software of the protein sequencer, in that the misidentification rates for the expert system were around 7%, whereas those for the onboard software were between 13 and 21%.

  9. High affinity of acid phosphatase encoded by PHO3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for thiamin phosphates.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, K

    1990-02-01

    The enzymatic properties of acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.2) encoded by PHO3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is repressed by thiamin and has thiamin-binding activity at pH 5.0, were investigated to study physiological functions. The following results led to the conclusion that thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase physiologically catalyzes the hydrolysis of thiamin phosphates in the periplasmic space of S. cerevisiae, thus participating in utilization of the thiamin moiety of the phosphates by yeast cells: (a) thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase showed Km values of 1.6 and 1.7 microM at pH 5.0 for thiamin monophosphate and thiamin pyrophosphate, respectively. These Km values were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than those (0.61 and 1.7 mM) for p-nitrophenyl phosphate; (b) thiamin exerted remarkable competitive inhibition in the hydrolysis of thiamin monophosphate (Ki 2.2 microM at pH 5.0), whereas the activity for p-nitrophenyl phosphate was slightly affected by thiamin; (c) the inhibitory effect of inorganic phosphate, which does not repress the thiamin-repressible enzyme, on the hydrolysis of thiamin monophosphate was much smaller than that of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Moreover, the modification of thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase of S. cerevisiae with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide resulted in the complete loss of thiamin-binding activity and the Km value of the modified enzyme for thiamin monophosphate increased nearly to the value of the native enzyme for p-nitrophenyl phosphate. These results also indicate that the high affinity of the thiamin-repressible acid phosphatase for thiamin phosphates is due to the thiamin-binding properties of this enzyme.

  10. pEVL: A Linear Plasmid for Generating mRNA IVT Templates With Extended Encoded Poly(A) Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Alexandra E; Burleigh, Stephen; Sahni, Jaya; Clough, Courtnee A; Cardot, Victoire; Choe, Dongwook C; Krutein, Michelle C; Rawlings, David J; Jensen, Michael C; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Jacoby, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Increasing demand for large-scale synthesis of in vitro transcribed (IVT) mRNA is being driven by the increasing use of mRNA for transient gene expression in cell engineering and therapeutic applications. An important determinant of IVT mRNA potency is the 3′ polyadenosine (poly(A)) tail, the length of which correlates with translational efficiency. However, present methods for generation of IVT mRNA rely on templates derived from circular plasmids or PCR products, in which homopolymeric tracts are unstable, thus limiting encoded poly(A) tail lengths to ~120 base pairs (bp). Here, we have developed a novel method for generation of extended poly(A) tracts using a previously described linear plasmid system, pJazz. We find that linear plasmids can successfully propagate poly(A) tracts up to ~500 bp in length for IVT mRNA production. We then modified pJazz by removing extraneous restriction sites, adding a T7 promoter sequence upstream from an extended multiple cloning site, and adding a unique type-IIS restriction site downstream from the encoded poly(A) tract to facilitate generation of IVT mRNA with precisely defined encoded poly(A) tracts and 3′ termini. The resulting plasmid, designated pEVL, can be used to generate IVT mRNA with consistent defined lengths and terminal residue(s). PMID:27093168

  11. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Lange, Bernd Markus; McCaskill, David G.

    2001-01-01

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  12. Identification, sequence and mRNA expression pattern during metamorphosis of a cDNA encoding a glycine-rich cuticular protein in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Mathelin, J; Bouhin, H; Quennedey, B; Courrent, A; Delachambre, J

    1995-04-24

    The study of insect cuticular proteins and their sequences is of interest because they are involved in protein-protein and protein-chitin interactions which confer the mechanical properties and fine architecture of the cuticle. Moreover, in the coleopteran Tenebrio molitor there is a dramatic change in cuticular architecture between pre- and postecdysial secretion. We report the isolation, by differential screening, and the sequence characterization of a cDNA clone encoding a cuticular protein of T. molitor, ACP17. After insertion in the expression vector pEX1, the recognition of the fusion protein by an anti-cuticular monoclonal antibody confirmed the cuticular nature of ACP17. Northern hybridization analysis showed that ACP17 mRNA expression begins weakly 3 days before adult ecdysis and strongly increases during the secretion of postecdysial adult cuticle, with a maximum just after ecdysis. In situ hybridization revealed that the ACP17 mRNA is only present in the epidermis which secretes hard cuticle. The deduced amino acid (aa) composition exhibits a high content of Gly (28%) and Ala (20%) and, particularly, two poly(Gx) stretches separated by repetitive motifs with proline AAPVA. A comparison is made with other cuticle aa sequences.

  13. Diverse and related 16S rRNA-encoding DNA sequences in prostate tissues of men with chronic prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Riley, D E; Berger, R E; Miner, D C; Krieger, J N

    1998-06-01

    Treatment of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is often empirical because clinical culture methods fail to detect prostate-associated pathogens in >90% of patients. Previously, we tested a variety of specific-microorganism PCRs and began a DNA sequence study after we found that 77% of prostatitis patients were PCR positive for prokaryotic rRNA-encoding DNA sequences (rDNAs) despite negative cultures using optimal techniques. In the present study, 36 rDNA clones from 23 rDNA-positive patients were sequenced. This study represents more than twice the total rDNA sequence and more than twice the number of patients in the previous study. The increased number of patients and clones sequenced allowed enhanced phylogenetic analyses and refinements in our view of rDNA species inhabiting the prostate. A continuum of related rDNAs that might be arbitrarily described as two major groups of rDNAs and several minor groups was found. Sequences termed Pros A, identified in 8 (35%) of 23 rDNA-positive patients, grouped with Aeromonas spp. in phylogenetic studies. Sequences termed Pros B, identified in 17 (74%) of 23 rDNA-positive patients, were distinct from previously reported sequences, although all were >90% similar to known gram-negative bacteria. Of the nine patients for whom multiple rDNAs were sequenced, six had biopsy specimens containing rDNAs from more than one species. Four (17%) patients had rDNAs different from those of the Pros A and Pros B groups. Of these four, one patient had rDNA similar to that of Flavobacterium spp., another had rDNA similar to that of Pseudomonas testosteroni, and two patients had rDNAs <70% similar to known rDNAs. These findings suggest that the prostate can harbor bacteria undetectable by traditional approaches. Most of these diverse sequences are not reported in environments outside the prostate. The sequence similarities suggest adaptation of limited groups of bacteria to the microenvironment of the prostate. Further studies

  14. Simultaneous Myocardial Strain and Dark-Blood Perfusion Imaging Using a Displacement-Encoded MRI Pulse Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E.; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd’Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H.; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in 2–3 myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 minutes, which covers a bolus infusion of Gd. The magnitudes of the images were T1 weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n=9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R2 = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 ml/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction(STEMI) patients (n=11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R2=0.72), and the pixel-wise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  15. Simultaneous myocardial strain and dark-blood perfusion imaging using a displacement-encoded MRI pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd'Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in two to three myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single-shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 min, which covers a bolus infusion of Gadolinium contrast. The magnitudes of the images were T(1) weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n = 9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R(2) = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 mL/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients (n = 11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.72), and the pixelwise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  16. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding amylopullulanase from Pyrococcus furiosus and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dong, G; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    1997-09-01

    The gene encoding the Pyrococcus furiosus hyperthermophilic amylopullulanase (APU) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a single 827-residue polypeptide with a 26-residue signal peptide. The protein sequence had very low homology (17 to 21% identity) with other APUs and enzymes of the alpha-amylase family. In particular, none of the consensus regions present in the alpha-amylase family could be identified. P. furiosus APU showed similarity to three proteins, including the P. furiosus intracellular alpha-amylase and Dictyoglomus thermophilum alpha-amylase A. The mature protein had a molecular weight of 89,000. The recombinant P. furiosus APU remained folded after denaturation at temperatures of < or = 70 degrees C and showed an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Denaturating temperatures of above 100 degrees C were required for complete unfolding. The enzyme was extremely thermostable, with an optimal activity at 105 degrees C and pH 5.5. Ca2+ increased the enzyme activity, thermostability, and substrate affinity. The enzyme was highly resistant to chemical denaturing reagents, and its activity increased up to twofold in the presence of surfactants.

  17. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  18. Identification of the DNA sequences encoding the large subunit of the mRNA-capping enzyme of vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.R.; Cohen, L.K.; Roberts, B.E.

    1984-10-01

    The DNA sequences encoding the large subunit of the mRNA-capping enzyme of vaccinia virus were located on the viral genome. The formation of an enzyme-guanylate covalent intermediate labeled with (alpha-/sup 32/P)GTP allowed the identification of the large subunit of the capping enzyme and was used to monitor the appearance of the enzyme during the infectious cycle. This assay confirmed that after vaccinia infection, a novel 84,000-molecular-weight polypeptide corresponding to the large subunit was rapidly synthesized before viral DNA replication. Hybrid-selected cell-free translation of early viral mRNA established that vaccinia virus encoded a polypeptide identical in molecular weight with the /sup 32/P-labeled 84,000-molecular-weight polypeptide found in vaccinia virions. Like the authentic capping enzyme, this virus-encoded cell-free translation product bound specifically to DNA-cellulose. A comparison of the partial proteolytic digestion fragments generated by V8 protease, chymotrypsin, and trypsin demonstrated that the /sup 32/P-labeled large subunit and the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cell-free translation product were identical. The mRNA encoding the large subunit of the capping enzyme was located 3.1 kilobase pairs to the left of the HindIII D restriction fragment of the vaccinia genome. Furthermore, the mRNA was determined to be 3.0 kilobases in size, and its 5 and 3 termini were precisely located by S1 nuclease analysis.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of an Endophytic Actinoplanes Species, Encoding Uncommon trans-Acyltransferase Polyketide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Centeno-Leija, Sara; Vinuesa, Pablo; Rodríguez-Peña, Karol; Trenado-Uribe, Miriam; Cárdenas-Conejo, Yair; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Actinoplanes is an endophytic actinobacterium isolated from the medicinal plant Amphipterygium adstringens. The strain draft genome sequence reveals a gene cluster involved in the biosynthesis of a hybrid trans-acyltransferase (AT) polyketide, an unconventional bioactive metabolite never reported before in the genus Actinoplanes. PMID:27013046

  20. Spatially encoded pulse sequences for the acquisition of high resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapira, Boaz; Frydman, Lucio

    2006-09-01

    We have recently proposed a protocol for retrieving nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra based on a spatially-dependent encoding of the MR interactions. It has also been shown that the spatial selectivity with which spins are manipulated during such encoding opens up new avenues towards the removal of magnetic field inhomogeneities; not by demanding extreme Bo field uniformities, but rather by compensating for the dephasing effects introduced by the field distribution at a radiofrequency excitation and/or refocusing level. The present study discusses in further detail a number of strategies deriving from this principle, geared at acquiring both uni- as well as multi-dimensional spectroscopic data at high resolution conditions. Different variants are presented, tailored according to the relative sensitivity and chemical nature of the spin system being explored. In particular a simple multi-scan experiment is discussed capable of affording substantial improvements in the spectral resolution, at nearly no sensitivity or scaling penalties. This new compensation scheme is therefore well-suited for the collection of high-resolution data in low-field systems possessing limited signal-to-noise ratios, where magnetic field heterogeneities might present a serious obstacle. Potential areas of applications of these techniques include high-field in vivo NMR studies in regions near tissue/air interfaces, clinical low field MR spectroscopy on relatively large off-center volumes difficult to shim, and ex situ NMR. The principles of the different compensation methods are reviewed and experimentally demonstrated for one-dimensional inhomogeneities; further improvements and extensions are briefly discussed.

  1. Transcriptional and translational mapping and nucleotide sequence analysis of a vaccinia virus gene encoding the precursor of the major core polypeptide 4b.

    PubMed

    Rosel, J; Moss, B

    1985-12-01

    We prepared antiserum that reacted with a major core polypeptide of approximately 62,000 daltons (62K polypeptide), designated 4b, and its 74K precursor, designated P4b. A cell-free translation product of vaccinia virus late mRNA that comigrated with P4b was specifically immunoprecipitated. The late mRNA encoding P4b hybridized to restriction fragments derived from the left end of the HindIII A fragment and to a lesser extent from the right side of the HindIII D fragment. A polypeptide that comigrated with P4a, the precursor of another major core polypeptide, was synthesized by mRNA that hybridized to DNA segments upstream of the P4b gene. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of the P4b gene revealed an open reading frame, entirely within the HindIII A fragment, that was sufficient to encode a 644-amino-acid polypeptide of 73K. The 5' end of the P4b mRNA was located at or just above the translational initiation site.

  2. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Fang, Haihong; Feng, Jiao; Yin, Zhe; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhu, Xueming; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Ruisheng; Du, Hong; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM respectively. bla KPC-2 is captured by a Tn1722-based unit transposon with a linear structure. ΔTn3-ISKpn27-bla KPC-2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1722 and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer) gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. bla KPC-2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region respectively) which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core -35/-10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT respectively. bla CTX-M-55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-bla CTX-M-55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. bla CTX-M-55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region) corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core -35/-10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of bla KPC and bla CTX-M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisting bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids. PMID:26347725

  3. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Fang, Haihong; Feng, Jiao; Yin, Zhe; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhu, Xueming; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Ruisheng; Du, Hong; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM respectively. blaKPC−2 is captured by a Tn1722-based unit transposon with a linear structure. ΔTn3-ISKpn27-blaKPC−2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1722 and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer) gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. blaKPC−2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region respectively) which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core −35/−10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT respectively. blaCTX−M−55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-blaCTX−M−55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. blaCTX−M−55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region) corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core −35/−10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of blaKPC and blaCTX−M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisting bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids. PMID:26347725

  4. The genome of RNA tumor viruses contains polyadenylic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Cartas, M

    1972-04-01

    The 70S genome of two RNA tumor viruses, murine sarcoma virus and avian myeloblastosis virus, binds to Millipore filters in buffer with high salt concentration and to glass fiber filters containing poly(U). These observations suggest that 70S RNA contains adenylic acid-rich sequences. When digested by pancreatic RNase, 70S RNA of murine sarcoma virus yielded poly(A) sequences that contain 91% adenylic acid. These poly(A) sequences sedimented as a relatively homogenous peak in sucrose gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 4-5 S, but had a mobility during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that corresponds to molecules that sediment at 6-7 S. If we estimate a molecular weight for each sequence of 30,000-60,000 (100-200 nucleotides) and a molecular weight for viral 70S RNA of 3-12 million, each viral genome could contain 1-8 poly(A) sequences. Possible functions of poly(A) in the infecting viral RNA may include a role in the initiation of viral DNA or RNA synthesis, in protein maturation, or in the assembly of the viral genome.

  5. Encoding and recall of finger sequences in experienced pianists compared with musically naïve controls: a combined behavioral and functional imaging study.

    PubMed

    Pau, S; Jahn, G; Sakreida, K; Domin, M; Lotze, M

    2013-01-01

    Long-term intensive sensorimotor training alters functional representation of the motor and sensory system and might even result in structural changes. However, there is not much knowledge about how previous training impacts learning transfer and functional representation. We tested 14 amateur pianists and 15 musically naïve participants in a short-term finger sequence training procedure, differing considerably from piano playing and measured associated functional representation with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The conditions consisted of encoding a finger sequence indicated by hand symbols ("sequence encoding") and subsequently replaying the sequence from memory, both with and without auditory feedback ("sequence retrieval"). Piano players activated motor areas and the mirror neuron system more strongly than musically naïve participants during encoding. When retrieving the sequence, musically naïve participants showed higher activation in similar brain areas. Thus, retrieval activations of naïve participants were comparable to encoding activations of piano players, who during retrieval performed the sequences more accurately despite lower motor activations. Interestingly, both groups showed primary auditory activation even during sequence retrieval without auditory feedback, supporting previous reports about coactivation of the auditory cortex after learned association with motor performance. When playing with auditory feedback, only pianists lateralized to the left auditory cortex. During encoding activation in left primary somatosensory cortex in the height of the finger representations had a predictive value for increased motor performance later on (error rates). Contrarily, decreased performance was associated with increased visual cortex activation during encoding. Our study extends previous reports about training transfer of motor knowledge resulting in superior training effects in musicians. Performance increase went along with activity in

  6. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  7. Molecular cloning and sequence of cDNA encoding polyoma medium tumor antigen-associated 61-kDa protein.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, G; Ferre, F; Espiritu, O; Carbone-Wiley, A

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus medium tumor antigen forms specific complexes with several cellular proteins; among these is a protein of approximately 61 kDa. With antibodies directed against medium tumor antigen, the 61-kDa protein was purified from human 293 cells that were infected with a hybrid adenovirus and overexpressed medium tumor antigen. The purified 61-kDa protein was partially digested with protease V8, and one of the protease V8 fragments was isolated and partially sequenced. The amino acid sequence information was used to design mixed oligonucleotide probes for screening a cDNA library from human placenta. A clone was isolated that hybridized with two separate probes; the clone contained an insert with an open reading frame for 589 amino acids. By in vitro translation of the transcript from this insert, a protein was generated that had the same size and yielded the same pattern of protease V8 fragments as the original 61-kDa protein. Its amino acid sequence reveals 15 repeats, the majority of which are 39 amino acids long. This protein bears no resemblance to proteins in the data bank that was searched. Images PMID:2554323

  8. [Detection of implicit memory for hard-to-encode tone sequences using an indirect recognition procedure].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Ayaka; Terasawa, Takafumi

    2010-10-01

    Two experiments, using an indirect recognition procedure (Terasawa & Ohta, 1993) as an implicit memory task, were conducted to examine implicit memory for random tone sequences. The indirect recognition procedure involved two sessions. The second session was a general recognition experiment consisting of learning and a recognition test phase. The effects of the learning during the first session were examined based on the recognition performance in the second session. The interval between the sessions was 10 weeks for experiment 1 and 8 weeks for experiment 2. In each session, participants were required to rate their liking for each of the sequences presented. In the second session, participants were required to respond to an old-new recognition test about the items just presented. The targets and distractors in the test consisted of stimuli presented or not presented in the first session. Analyses of the hits and false alarms showed an effect of the number of presentations in the first session. This result indicates an effect of long lasting implicit memory for tone sequences.

  9. Nucleic acid sequence design via efficient ensemble defect optimization.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Joseph N; Wolfe, Brian R; Pierce, Niles A

    2011-02-01

    We describe an algorithm for designing the sequence of one or more interacting nucleic acid strands intended to adopt a target secondary structure at equilibrium. Sequence design is formulated as an optimization problem with the goal of reducing the ensemble defect below a user-specified stop condition. For a candidate sequence and a given target secondary structure, the ensemble defect is the average number of incorrectly paired nucleotides at equilibrium evaluated over the ensemble of unpseudoknotted secondary structures. To reduce the computational cost of accepting or rejecting mutations to a random initial sequence, candidate mutations are evaluated on the leaf nodes of a tree-decomposition of the target structure. During leaf optimization, defect-weighted mutation sampling is used to select each candidate mutation position with probability proportional to its contribution to the ensemble defect of the leaf. As subsequences are merged moving up the tree, emergent structural defects resulting from crosstalk between sibling sequences are eliminated via reoptimization within the defective subtree starting from new random subsequences. Using a Θ(N(3) ) dynamic program to evaluate the ensemble defect of a target structure with N nucleotides, this hierarchical approach implies an asymptotic optimality bound on design time: for sufficiently large N, the cost of sequence design is bounded below by 4/3 the cost of a single evaluation of the ensemble defect for the full sequence. Hence, the design algorithm has time complexity Ω(N(3) ). For target structures containing N ∈{100,200,400,800,1600,3200} nucleotides and duplex stems ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, RNA sequence designs at 37°C typically succeed in satisfying a stop condition with ensemble defect less than N/100. Empirically, the sequence design algorithm exhibits asymptotic optimality and the exponent in the time complexity bound is sharp.

  10. Correlations Between Amino Acids at Different Sites in Local Sequences of Protein Fragments with Given Structural Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen; Liu, Hai-yan

    2007-02-01

    Ample evidence suggests that the local structures of peptide fragments in native proteins are to some extent encoded by their local sequences. Detecting such local correlations is important but it is still an open question what would be the most appropriate method. This is partly because conventional sequence analyses treat amino acid preferences at each site of a protein sequence independently, while it is often the inter-site interactions that bring about local sequence-structure correlations. Here a new scheme is introduced to capture the correlation between amino acid preferences at different sites for different local structure types. A library of nine-residue fragments is constructed, and the fragments are divided into clusters based on their local structures. For each local structure cluster or type, chi-square tests are used to identify correlated preferences of amino acid combinations at pairs of sites. A score function is constructed including both the single site amino acid preferences and the dual-site amino acid combination preferences, which can be used to identify whether a sequence fragment would have a strong tendency to form a particular local structure in native proteins. The results show that, given a local structure pattern, dual-site amino acid combinations contain different information from single site amino acid preferences. Representative examples show that many of the statistically identified correlations agree with previously-proposed heuristic rules about local sequence-structure correlations, or are consistent with physical-chemical interactions required to stabilize particular local structures. Results also show that such dual-site correlations in the score function significantly improves the Z-score matching a sequence fragment to its native local structure relative to non-native local structures, and certain local structure types are highly predictable from the local sequence alone if inter-site correlations are considered.

  11. Two Oligopeptide-Permease-Encoding Genes in the Clavulanic Acid Cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus Are Essential for Production of the β-Lactamase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzana, Luis M.; Pérez-Redondo, Rosario; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan F.; Liras, Paloma

    2004-01-01

    orf7 (oppA1) and orf15 (oppA2) are located 8 kb apart in the clavulanic acid gene cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus and encode proteins which are 48.0% identical. These proteins show sequence similarity to periplasmic oligopeptide-binding proteins. Mutant S. clavuligerus oppA1::acc, disrupted in oppA1, lacks clavulanic acid production. Clavulanic acid production is restored by transformation with plasmid pIJ699-oppA1, which carries oppA1, but not with the multicopy plasmid pIJ699-oppA2, which carries oppA2. The mutant S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph also lacks clavulanic acid production, shows a bald phenotype, and overproduces holomycin (5). Clavulanic acid production at low levels is restored in the oppA2-disrupted mutants by transformation with plasmid pIJ699-oppA2, but it is not complemented by the multicopy plasmid pIJ699-oppA1. Both genes encode oligopeptide permeases with different substrate specificities. The disrupted S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph is not able to grow on RPPGFSPFR (Arg-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Phe-Arg; bradykinin), but both mutants grow on VAPG (Val-Ala-Pro-Gly) as the only nitrogen source, indicating differences in the peptide bound by the proteins encoded by both genes. The null S. clavuligerus oppA1::acc and S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph mutants are more resistant to the toxic tripeptide phosphinothricyl-alanyl-alanine (also named bialaphos) than the wild-type strain, suggesting that this peptide might be transported by these peptide-binding proteins. PMID:15150229

  12. Characterization of the Streptomyces clavuligerus argC gene encoding N-acetylglutamyl-phosphate reductase: expression in Streptomyces lividans and effect on clavulanic acid production.

    PubMed Central

    Ludovice, M; Martin, J F; Carrachas, P; Liras, P

    1992-01-01

    The argC gene of Streptomyces clavuligerus encoding N-acetylglutamyl-phosphate reductase (AGPR) has been cloned by complementation of argC mutants Streptomyces lividans 1674 and Escherichia coli XC33. The gene is contained in an open reading frame of 1,023 nucleotides which encodes a protein of 340 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 35,224 Da. The argC gene is linked to argE, as shown by complementation of argE mutants of E. coli. Expression of argC from cloned DNA fragments carrying the gene leads to high levels of AGPR in wild-type S. lividans and in the argC mutant S. lividans 1674. Formation of AGPR is repressed by addition of arginine to the culture medium. The protein encoded by the argC gene is very similar to the AGPRs of Streptomyces coelicolor, Bacillus subtilis, and E. coli and, to a lesser degree, to the homologous enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Anabaena spp. A conserved PGCYPT domain present in all the AGPR sequences suggests that this may be the active center of the protein. Transformation of S. clavuligerus 328, an argC auxotroph deficient in clavulanic acid biosynthesis, with plasmid pULML30, carrying the cloned argC gene, restored both prototrophy and antibiotic production. Images PMID:1339424

  13. Genetic Structure Associated with blaOXA-18, Encoding a Clavulanic Acid-Inhibited Extended-Spectrum Oxacillinase▿

    PubMed Central

    Naas, Thierry; Namdari, Fatemeh; Bogaerts, Pierre; Huang, Te-Din; Glupczynski, Youri; Nordmann, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    The genetic environment of the blaOXA-18 gene encoding a peculiar clavulanic acid-inhibitable Ambler class D extended-spectrum β-lactamase was determined from the prototype OXA-18-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa MUS clinical isolate. An 8.2-kb genomic DNA fragment containing blaOXA-18 was cloned from P. aeruginosa MUS. Although most oxacillinases are located in integrons, blaOXA-18 lacked gene cassette-specific features. It was bracketed by two duplicated sequences containing ISCR19, a novel insertion sequence of the ISCR family of mobile elements; ΔintI1, a truncated integrase gene; and a truncated Δaac6′-Ib gene cassette. It is likely that ISCR19 was at the origin of the blaOXA-18 gene mobilization by a rolling-circle transposition event followed by homologous recombination. Furthermore, analysis of the cloned genomic DNA fragment revealed the presence of the integron-containing blaOXA-20 gene. Concomitantly, three P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, displaying a synergy image as determined by double-disk diffusion tests on cloxacillin-containing plates, were isolated from three patients hospitalized in different wards over a 9-month period at the Saint-Luc University hospital (Brussels, Belgium). These isolates were positive by PCR for blaOXA-18 and blaOXA-20 genes, genetically related to P. aeruginosa MUS as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and carried the same blaOXA-18/blaOXA-20-associated genetic structures. This report characterized the genetic elements likely at the origin of blaOXA-18 gene mobilization in P. aeruginosa and suggests the spread of oxacillin-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases in P. aeruginosa at the Saint-Luc University hospital of Brussels, Belgium. PMID:18663027

  14. Expression of ccaR, Encoding the Positive Activator of Cephamycin C and Clavulanic Acid Production in Streptomyces clavuligerus, Is Dependent on bldG

    PubMed Central

    Bignell, Dawn R. D.; Tahlan, Kapil; Colvin, Kimberley R.; Jensen, Susan E.; Leskiw, Brenda K.

    2005-01-01

    In Streptomyces coelicolor, bldG encodes a putative anti-anti-sigma factor that regulates both aerial hypha formation and antibiotic production, and a downstream transcriptionally linked open reading frame (orf3) encodes a putative anti-sigma factor protein. A cloned DNA fragment from Streptomyces clavuligerus contained an open reading frame that encoded a protein showing 92% identity to the S. coelicolor BldG protein and 91% identity to the BldG ortholog in Streptomyces avermitilis. Sequencing of the region downstream of bldG in S. clavuligerus revealed the presence of an open reading frame encoding a protein showing 72 and 69% identity to the ORF3 proteins in S. coelicolor and S. avermitilis, respectively. Northern analysis indicated that, as in S. coelicolor, the S. clavuligerus bldG gene is expressed as both a monocistronic and a polycistronic transcript, the latter including the downstream orf3 gene. High-resolution S1 nuclease mapping of S. clavuligerus bldG transcripts revealed the presence of three bldG-specific promoters, and analysis of expression of a bldGp-egfp reporter indicated that the bldG promoter is active at various stages of development and in both substrate and aerial hyphae. A bldG null mutant was defective in both morphological differentiation and in the production of secondary metabolites, such as cephamycin C, clavulanic acid, and the 5S clavams. This inability to produce cephamycin C and clavulanic acid was due to the absence of the CcaR transcriptional regulator, which controls the expression of biosynthetic genes for both secondary metabolites as well as the expression of a second regulator of clavulanic acid biosynthesis, ClaR. This makes bldG the first regulatory protein identified in S. clavuligerus that functions upstream of CcaR and ClaR in a regulatory cascade to control secondary metabolite production. PMID:15793135

  15. Application of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect DNA sequence differences encoding apolipoprotein E isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.; Angelico, M.C.; Laffel, L.; Krolewski, A.S. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1993-04-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in plasma lipid metabolism. Three common isoforms of this protein have been identified by the isoelectric focusing method. In this report the authors describe a new method for distinguishing these isoforms. Their method employs PCR amplification of the DNA sequence of exon 4 in the apoE gene followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to distinguish its different melting characteristics. Identification of the ApoE isoforms through DNA melting behavior rather than protein charge differences eliminates the problems associated with isoelectric focusing and facilitates screening for additional mutations at the apoE locus. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Identification and localization of amino acid substitutions between two phenobarbital-inducible rat hepatic microsomal cytochromes P-450 by micro sequence analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, P M; Ryan, D E; Levin, W; Shively, J E

    1983-01-01

    Two isozymes of rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450--P-450b and P-450e--were compared by micro sequence analyses of their NH2 termini and tryptic fragments. These two phenobarbital-inducible hemoproteins, which are immunochemically indistinguishable with antibody against cytochrome P-450b, have extensive sequence homology. Automated Edman degradation of the native proteins revealed identical amino acids for the first 35 residues. Sequence determinations of the tryptic peptides, which constitute approximately 75% of each protein molecule, have thus far shown 10 amino acid differences between the two isozymes. Results of our amino acid sequence analyses established that two of the cDNAs, pcP-450pb1 and pcP-450pb4, reported by Fujii-Kuriyama et al. [Fujii-Kuriyama, Y., Mizukami, Y., Kamajiri, K., Sogawa, K. & Muramatsu, M. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 2793-2797] encode cytochrome P-450b whereas pcP-450pb2, a third cDNA whose nucleotide sequence differed slightly from that of the other two (six amino acid substitutions), encodes cytochrome P-450e. In addition to establishing the identity of these cloned cDNAs we provide direct evidence for seven additional amino acid differences between cytochromes P-450b and P-450e that occur beyond the region (Arg358) encoded by the cloned cDNA for cytochrome P-450e. Together, the amino acid sequences determined by micro sequence analysis and recombinant DNA techniques reveal 13 amino acid differences between these two isozymes. This report highlights the complementary nature of two different molecular approaches to elucidation of the amino acid sequences of isozymes with extensive structural homology. PMID:6572377

  17. Analysis of the myosins encoded in the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Day, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three types of molecular motors play an important role in the organization, dynamics and transport processes associated with the cytoskeleton. The myosin family of molecular motors move cargo on actin filaments, whereas kinesin and dynein motors move cargo along microtubules. These motors have been highly characterized in non-plant systems and information is becoming available about plant motors. The actin cytoskeleton in plants has been shown to be involved in processes such as transportation, signaling, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming and morphogenesis. The role of myosin in these processes has been established in a few cases but many questions remain to be answered about the number, types and roles of myosins in plants. RESULTS: Using the motor domain of an Arabidopsis myosin we identified 17 myosin sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis myosins with non-plant and plant myosins revealed that all the Arabidopsis myosins and other plant myosins fall into two groups - class VIII and class XI. These groups contain exclusively plant or algal myosins with no animal or fungal myosins. Exon/intron data suggest that the myosins are highly conserved and that some may be a result of gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Plant myosins are unlike myosins from any other organisms except algae. As a percentage of the total gene number, the number of myosins is small overall in Arabidopsis compared with the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes. There are, however, a large number of class XI myosins. The function of each myosin has yet to be determined.

  18. Chromosomal Organization and Sequence Diversity of Genes Encoding Lachrymatory Factor Synthase in Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Masamura, Noriya; McCallum, John; Khrustaleva, Ludmila; Kenel, Fernand; Pither-Joyce, Meegham; Shono, Jinji; Suzuki, Go; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) catalyzes the formation of lachrymatory factor, one of the most distinctive traits of bulb onion (Allium cepa L.). Therefore, we used LFS as a model for a functional gene in a huge genome, and we examined the chromosomal organization of LFS in A. cepa by multiple approaches. The first-level analysis completed the chromosomal assignment of LFS gene to chromosome 5 of A. cepa via the use of a complete set of A. fistulosum-shallot (A. cepa L. Aggregatum group) monosomic addition lines. Subsequent use of an F(2) mapping population from the interspecific cross A. cepa × A. roylei confirmed the assignment of an LFS locus to this chromosome. Sequence comparison of two BAC clones bearing LFS genes, LFS amplicons from diverse germplasm, and expressed sequences from a doubled haploid line revealed variation consistent with duplicated LFS genes. Furthermore, the BAC-FISH study using the two BAC clones as a probe showed that LFS genes are localized in the proximal region of the long arm of the chromosome. These results suggested that LFS in A. cepa is transcribed from at least two loci and that they are localized on chromosome 5. PMID:22690373

  19. The amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli cyanase.

    PubMed

    Chin, C C; Anderson, P M; Wold, F

    1983-01-10

    The amino acid sequence of the enzyme cyanase (cyanate hydrolase) from Escherichia coli has been determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact protein and of its component peptides. The primary peptides used in the sequencing were produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage at the methionine residues, yielding 4 peptides plus free homoserine from the NH2-terminal methionine, and by trypsin cleavage at the 7 arginine residues after acetylation of the lysines. Secondary peptides required for overlaps and COOH-terminal sequences were produced by chymotrypsin or clostripain cleavage of some of the larger peptides. The complete sequence of the cyanase subunit consists of 156 amino acid residues (Mr 16,350). Based on the observation that the cysteine-containing peptide is obtained as a disulfide-linked dimer, it is proposed that the covalent structure of cyanase is made up of two subunits linked by a disulfide bond between the single cystine residue in each subunit. The native enzyme (Mr 150,000) then appears to be a complex of four or five such subunit dimers.

  20. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Sunagawa, M; Mori, A; Imai, C; Fukuda, M; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1989-06-01

    A genomic library of Acetobacter aceti DNA was constructed by using a broad-host-range cosmid vector. Complementation of a spontaneous alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient mutant resulted in the isolation of a plasmid designated pAA701. Subcloning and deletion analysis of pAA701 limited the region that complemented the deficiency in alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and showed that this region contained the full structural gene for the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme complex. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene showed homology with sequences of methanol dehydrogenase structural genes of Paracoccus denitrificans and Methylobacterium organophilum.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the yeast STE14 gene, which encodes farnesylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase, and demonstration of its essential role in a-factor export

    SciTech Connect

    Sapperstein, S.; Berkower, C.; Michaelis, S.

    1994-02-01

    Eukaryotic proteins initially synthesized with a C-terminal CAAX motif (C is Cys, A is aliphatic, and X can be one of several amino acids) undergo a series of modifications involving isoprenylation of the Cys residue, proteolysis of AAX, and {alpha}-carboxyl methyl esterification of the newly formed isoprenyl cysteine. We have previously demonstrated that STE14 encodes the enzyme which mediates carboxyl methylation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAAX proteins a-factor, RAS1, and RAS2. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of STE14, which indicates that STE14 encodes a protein of 239 amino acids, predicted to contain multiple membrane-spanning segments. Mapping data indicate that STE14 resides on chromosome IV, tightly linked to ADE8. By analysis of ste14 null alleles, we demonstrated that MATa ste14 mutants are unable to mate but are viable and exhibit no apparent growth defects. Additional analysis of ste14 ras1 and ste14 ras2 double mutants, which grow normally, reinforces our previous conclusion that RAS function is not significantly influenced by its methylation status. We examine a-factor biogenesis in an ste14 null mutant by metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation and demonstrate that although proteolytic processing and membrane localization of a-factor are normal, the ste14 null mutant exhibits a profound block in a-factor export. This observation suggests that the methyl group is likely to be a critical recognition determinant for the a-factor transporter, STE6, thus providing insight into the substrate specificity of STE6 and also supporting the hypothesis that carboxyl methylation can have a dramatic impact on protein-protein interactions. 60 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the yeast STE14 gene, which encodes farnesylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase, and demonstration of its essential role in a-factor export.

    PubMed Central

    Sapperstein, S; Berkower, C; Michaelis, S

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic proteins initially synthesized with a C-terminal CAAX motif (C is Cys, A is aliphatic, and X can be one of several amino acids) undergo a series of modifications involving isoprenylation of the Cys residue, proteolysis of AAX, and alpha-carboxyl methyl esterification of the newly formed isoprenyl cysteine. We have previously demonstrated that STE14 encodes the enzyme which mediates carboxyl methylation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAAX proteins a-factor, RAS1, and RAS2. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of STE14, which indicates that STE14 encodes a protein of 239 amino acids, predicted to contain multiple membrane-spanning segments. Mapping data indicate that STE14 resides on chromosome IV, tightly linked to ADE8. By analysis of ste14 null alleles, we demonstrated that MATa ste14 mutants are unable to mate but are viable and exhibit no apparent growth defects. Additional analysis of ste14 ras 1 and ste14 ras2 double mutants, which grow normally, reinforces our previous conclusion that RAS function is not significantly influenced by its methylation status. We examine a-factor biogenesis in a ste14 null mutant by metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation and demonstrate that although proteolytic processing and membrane localization of a-factor are normal, the ste14 null mutant exhibits a profound block in a-factor export. This observation suggests that the methyl group is likely to be a critical recognition determinant for the a-factor transporter, STE6, thus providing insight into the substrate specificity of STE6 and also supporting the hypothesis that carboxyl methylation can have a dramatic impact on protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:8289819

  3. Cloning and sequencing of curA encoding curvacin A, the bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH1174.

    PubMed

    Tichaczek, P S; Vogel, R F; Hammes, W P

    1993-01-01

    Curvacin A is a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH1174 which is a potential starter organism for the production of fermented dry sausages. This peptide inhibits the growth of the opportunistic food pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Enterococcus faecalis and thus, curvacin A may enable better performance of a starter and improvement of the hygienic status of meat products. Oligonucleotides were constructed deduced from the peptide sequence and used for the identification of the curvacin A structural gene curA on a 60 kb plasmid of L. curvatus LTH1174. Plasmid-cured derivatives of this strain were unable to produce curvacin A but were still resistant to the bacteriocin. CurA was cloned into Escherichia coli NM554 and its nucleotide sequence was determined. Sequencing revealed the presence of an additional open reading frame of 51 amino acids with unknown function. A promoter was detected upstream of curA by primer extension. Both reading frames form a single transcript. Curvacin A is synthesised as a prepeptide of 59 amino acids which is proteolytically processed to the mature bacteriocin of 41 amino acids. PMID:7694558

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the gene cluster encoding two subunits of membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter polyoxogenes.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, T; Fukaya, M; Takemura, H; Tayama, K; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y; Nishiyama, M; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1991-02-16

    The membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Acetobacter polyoxogenes NBI1028 is composed of a 72 kDa subunit and a 44 kDa cytochrome c subunit. The amino acid sequences of the two regions of the 72 kDa subunit were determined to prepare oligonucleotides for the purpose of amplification of a DNA fragment corresponding to the intermediate region by the polymerase chain reaction. A 0.5 kb DNA fragment thus amplified was used as the probe to clone a 7.0 kb PstI fragment coding for the whole 72 kDa subunit. Nucleotide sequencing and immunoblot analysis revealed that the cloned fragment contained the full structural genes for the 72 kDa and the 44 kDa subunits and they were clustered with the same transcription polarity. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene for the 72 kDa subunit showed homology with that of the 72 kDa subunit from ADH of A. aceti and those of methanol dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacteria. The 72 and 44 kDa subunits contained one and three typical haem binding sequences, respectively.

  5. Variable reproducibility in genome-scale public data: A case study using ENCODE ChIP sequencing resource

    PubMed Central

    Devailly, Guillaume; Mantsoki, Anna; Michoel, Tom; Joshi, Anagha

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide data is accumulating in an unprecedented way in the public domain. Re-mining this data shows great potential to generate novel hypotheses. However this approach is dependent on the quality (technical and biological) of the underlying data. Here we performed a systematic analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing data of transcription and epigenetic factors from the encyclopaedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) resource to demonstrate that about one third of conditions with replicates show low concordance between replicate peak lists. This serves as a case study to demonstrate a caveat concerning genome-wide analyses and highlights a need to validate the quality of each sample before performing further associative analyses. PMID:26619763

  6. Analysis of the myosins encoded in the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anireddy SN; Day, Irene S

    2001-01-01

    Background Three types of molecular motors play an important role in the organization, dynamics and transport processes associated with the cytoskeleton. The myosin family of molecular motors move cargo on actin filaments, whereas kinesin and dynein motors move cargo along microtubules. These motors have been highly characterized in non-plant systems and information is becoming available about plant motors. The actin cytoskeleton in plants has been shown to be involved in processes such as transportation, signaling, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming and morphogenesis. The role of myosin in these processes has been established in a few cases but many questions remain to be answered about the number, types and roles of myosins in plants. Results Using the motor domain of an Arabidopsis myosin we identified 17 myosin sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis myosins with non-plant and plant myosins revealed that all the Arabidopsis myosins and other plant myosins fall into two groups - class VIII and class XI. These groups contain exclusively plant or algal myosins with no animal or fungal myosins. Exon/intron data suggest that the myosins are highly conserved and that some may be a result of gene duplication. Conclusions Plant myosins are unlike myosins from any other organisms except algae. As a percentage of the total gene number, the number of myosins is small overall in Arabidopsis compared with the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes. There are, however, a large number of class XI myosins. The function of each myosin has yet to be determined. PMID:11516337

  7. YAC contig and cell hybrid mapping of six expressed sequences encoded by human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Cox, M.; Patterson, D.

    1994-09-01

    The candidate gene approach for positional cloning requires a sufficient number of expressed gene sequences from the chromosomal region of interest. Trisomy for human chromosome 21 results in Down syndrome (DS). However, only a limited number of genes on chromosome 21 have been identified and cloned. We used 1,000 single-copy microclones from a microdissection library of chromosome 21 to screen various cDNA libraries and isolated 9 cDNA clones, of which 6 contain unique sequences: 21E-C1, C3, C4, C5, C7, C10. Using a refined regional mapping panel of chromosome 21 which comprised 24 cell hybrids and divided the chromosome into 33 subregions, we assigned 21E-C1 and C7 to subregion No. 22 (distal q22.1), 21E-C3 to No. 25 (proximal q22.2), 21E-C4 to No. 23 (very distal q22.1), 21E-C5 to No. 31 (proximal q22.3), and 21E-C10 to No. 28 (middle q22.2). In addition, we identified YAC clones corresponding to these cDNA clones using the complete YAC contig spanning the entire chromosome 21q. On the average, 10 positive YAC clones were identified for each cDNA. The mapping positions for the 6 cDNAs determined by the STSs in the YAC contig agree well with the cytogenetic map constructed by the hybrid panel. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions on chromosome 21 should be useful as candidate genes for the specific component phenotypes of DS assigned to the region.

  8. Gramicidin S biosynthesis operon containing the structural genes grsA and grsB has an open reading frame encoding a protein homologous to fatty acid thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Krätzschmar, J; Krause, M; Marahiel, M A

    1989-01-01

    The DNA sequence of about 5.9 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the gramicidin S biosynthesis operon (grs) was determined. Three open reading frames were identified; the corresponding genes, called grsT, grsA, and grsB, were found to be organized in one transcriptional unit, not two as previously reported (M. Krause and M. A. Marahiel, J. Bacteriol. 170:4669-4674, 1988). The entire nucleotide sequence of grsA, coding for the 126.663-kilodalton gramicidin S synthetase 1, grsT, encoding a 29.191-kilodalton protein of unknown function, and 732 bp of the 5' end of grsB, encoding the gramicidin S synthetase 2, were determined. A single initiation site of transcription 81 bp upstream of the grsT initiation condon GTG was identified by high-resolution S1 mapping studies. The sequence of the grsA gene product showed a high degree of homology to the tyrocidine synthetase 1 (TycA protein), and that of grsT exhibited a significant degree of homology to vertebrate fatty acid thioesterases. Images PMID:2477357

  9. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  10. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding OmpL1, a transmembrane outer membrane protein of pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Haake, D A; Champion, C I; Martinich, C; Shang, E S; Blanco, D R; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1993-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are spirochetes that have a low transmembrane outer membrane protein content relative to that of enteric gram-negative bacteria. In a previous study we identified a 31-kDa surface protein that was present in strains of Leptospira alstoni in amounts which correlated with the outer membrane particle density observed by freeze fracture electron microscopy (D. A. Haake, E. M. Walker, D. R. Blanco, C. A. Bolin, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, Infect. Immun. 59:1131-1140, 1991). The N-terminal amino acid sequence was used to design a pair of oligonucleotides which were utilized to screen a lambda ZAP II library containing EcoRI fragments of L. alstoni DNA. A 2.5-kb DNA fragment which contained the entire structural ompL1 gene was identified. The structural gene deduced from the sequence of this DNA fragment would encode a 320-amino-acid polypeptide with a 24-amino-acid leader peptide and a leader peptidase I cleavage site. Processing of OmpL1 results in a mature protein with a predicted molecular mass of 31,113 Da. Secondary-structure prediction identified repeated stretches of amphipathic beta-sheets typical of outer membrane protein membrane-spanning sequences. A topological model of OmpL1 containing 10 transmembrane segments is suggested. A recombinant OmpL1 fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli in order to immunize rabbits with the purified protein. Upon Triton X-114 extraction of L. alstoni and phase separation, anti-OmpL1 antiserum recognized a single band on immunoblots of the hydrophobic detergent fraction which was not present in the hydrophilic aqueous fraction. Immunoelectron microscopy with anti-OmpL1 antiserum demonstrates binding to the surface of intact L. alstoni. DNA hybridization studies indicate that the ompL1 gene is present in a single copy in all pathogenic Leptospira species that have been tested and is absent in nonpathogenic Leptospira species. OmpL1 may be the first spirochetal transmembrane outer membrane

  11. Adenovirus carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin induces cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyan; Wu, Liqin; Duan, Xuemei; Cui, Lianzhen; Luo, Jingjing; Li, Gongchu

    2014-06-30

    Lectins exist widely in marine bioresources such as bacteria, algae, invertebrate animals and fishes. Some purified marine lectins have been found to elicit cytotoxicity to cancer cells. However, there are few reports describing the cytotoxic effect of marine lectins on cancer cells through virus-mediated gene delivery. We show here that a replication-deficient adenovirus-carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (Ad.FLAG-HddSBL) suppressed cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, as compared to the control virus Ad.FLAG. A down-regulated level of anti-apoptosis factor Bcl-2 was suggested to be responsible for the apoptosis induced by Ad.FLAG-HddSBL infection. Further subcellular localization studies revealed that HddSBL distributed in cell membrane, ER, and the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. In contrast, a previously reported mannose-binding lectin Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin entered the nucleus as well, but did not distribute in inner membrane systems, suggesting differed intracellular sialylation and mannosylation, which may provide different targets for lectin binding. Further cancer-specific controlling of HddSBL expression and animal studies may help to provide insights into a novel way of anti-cancer marine lectin gene therapy. Lectins may provide a reservoir of anti-cancer genes.

  12. Open chromatin encoded in DNA sequence is the signature of 'master' replication origins in human cells.

    PubMed

    Audit, Benjamin; Zaghloul, Lamia; Vaillant, Cédric; Chevereau, Guillaume; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain

    2009-10-01

    For years, progress in elucidating the mechanisms underlying replication initiation and its coupling to transcriptional activities and to local chromatin structure has been hampered by the small number (approximately 30) of well-established origins in the human genome and more generally in mammalian genomes. Recent in silico studies of compositional strand asymmetries revealed a high level of organization of human genes around 1000 putative replication origins. Here, by comparing with recently experimentally identified replication origins, we provide further support that these putative origins are active in vivo. We show that regions approximately 300-kb wide surrounding most of these putative replication origins that replicate early in the S phase are hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated and present a significant enrichment in genomic energy barriers that impair nucleosome formation (nucleosome-free regions). This suggests that these putative replication origins are specified by an open chromatin structure favored by the DNA sequence. We discuss how this distinctive attribute makes these origins, further qualified as 'master' replication origins, priviledged loci for future research to decipher the human spatio-temporal replication program. Finally, we argue that these 'master' origins are likely to play a key role in genome dynamics during evolution and in pathological situations.

  13. An approach to identify the novel miRNA encoded from H. Annuus EST sequences.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Hemant; Tiwari, Tanushree; Patel, Maulik; Mehta, Aditya; Ghosh, Arpita

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a newly discovered class of non-protein small RNAs with 22-24 nucleotides. They play multiple roles in biological processes including development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, stress responses and many other cell functions. In this research, several approaches were combined to make a computational prediction of potential miRNAs and their targets in Helianthus annuus (H. annuus). The already available information of the plant miRNAs present in miRBase v21 was used against expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of three miRNAs were detected from which one potential novel miRNA was identified following a range of strict filtering criteria. The target prediction was carried out for these three miRNAs having various targets. These targets were functionally annotated and GO terms were assigned. To study the conserved nature of the miRNAs, predicted phylogenetic analysis was carried out. These findings will significantly provide the broader picture for understanding the functions in H. annuus. PMID:26697356

  14. Cloning and Expression of a DNA Sequence Encoding a 41-Kilodalton Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Wall Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark C.; Trout, Jim; Murphy, Charles; Harp, James A.; Higgins, Jim; Wergin, William; Fayer, Ron

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to produce a recombinant species-specific oocyst wall protein of Cryptosporidium parvum. Antigens unique to C. parvum were identified by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of oocyst proteins from several different Cryptosporidium species. Antiserum was then prepared against a 41-kDa antigen unique to C. parvum and used to identify a recombinant DNA clone, designated rCP41. Expression of CP41 mRNA in C. parvum oocysts was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Although the CP41 sequence was shown by PCR to be present in the genome of C. baileyi, CP41 mRNA was not detected in this species by RT-PCR. Immunofluorescence staining with antiserum against recombinant CP41 detected native CP41 antigen on the surface of C. parvum oocysts but failed to detect CP41 on C. baileyi oocysts. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that native CP41 was distributed unevenly on the C. parvum oocyst surface and was associated with amorphous oocyst wall material. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, purified rCP41 performed as well as native C. parvum oocyst protein in measuring the serological responses of young calves and adult cows to experimental and natural C. parvum infections. These results indicate that recombinant CP41 antigen may have potential in the immunodiagnosis of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10548585

  15. Insight into Shiga toxin genes encoded by Escherichia coli O157 from whole genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Philip M.; Perry, Neil; Ellis, Richard; Petrovska, Liljana; Wain, John; Grant, Kathie A.; Jenkins, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) to cause severe illness in humans is determined by multiple host factors and bacterial characteristics, including Shiga toxin (Stx) subtype. Given the link between Stx2a subtype and disease severity, we sought to identify the stx subtypes present in whole genome sequences (WGS) of 444 isolates of STEC O157. Difficulties in assembling the stx genes in some strains were overcome by using two complementary bioinformatics methods: mapping and de novo assembly. We compared the WGS analysis with the results obtained using a PCR approach and investigated the diversity within and between the subtypes. All strains of STEC O157 in this study had stx1a, stx2a or stx2c or a combination of these three genes. There was over 99% (442/444) concordance between PCR and WGS. When common source strains were excluded, 236/349 strains of STEC O157 had multiple copies of different Stx subtypes and 54 had multiple copies of the same Stx subtype. Of those strains harbouring multiple copies of the same Stx subtype, 33 had variants between the alleles while 21 had identical copies. Strains harbouring Stx2a only were most commonly found to have multiple alleles of the same subtype (42%). Both the PCR and WGS approach to stx subtyping provided a good level of sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the WGS data also showed there were a significant proportion of strains harbouring multiple alleles of the same Stx subtype associated with clinical disease in England. PMID:25737808

  16. Insight into Shiga toxin genes encoded by Escherichia coli O157 from whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Philip M; Perry, Neil; Ellis, Richard; Petrovska, Liljana; Wain, John; Grant, Kathie A; Jenkins, Claire; Dallman, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) to cause severe illness in humans is determined by multiple host factors and bacterial characteristics, including Shiga toxin (Stx) subtype. Given the link between Stx2a subtype and disease severity, we sought to identify the stx subtypes present in whole genome sequences (WGS) of 444 isolates of STEC O157. Difficulties in assembling the stx genes in some strains were overcome by using two complementary bioinformatics methods: mapping and de novo assembly. We compared the WGS analysis with the results obtained using a PCR approach and investigated the diversity within and between the subtypes. All strains of STEC O157 in this study had stx1a, stx2a or stx2c or a combination of these three genes. There was over 99% (442/444) concordance between PCR and WGS. When common source strains were excluded, 236/349 strains of STEC O157 had multiple copies of different Stx subtypes and 54 had multiple copies of the same Stx subtype. Of those strains harbouring multiple copies of the same Stx subtype, 33 had variants between the alleles while 21 had identical copies. Strains harbouring Stx2a only were most commonly found to have multiple alleles of the same subtype (42%). Both the PCR and WGS approach to stx subtyping provided a good level of sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the WGS data also showed there were a significant proportion of strains harbouring multiple alleles of the same Stx subtype associated with clinical disease in England.

  17. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  18. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  19. The hppA gene of Helicobacter pylori encodes the class C acid phosphatase precursor.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Renata; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2002-08-14

    Screening of the Helicobacter pylori genomic library with sera from infected humans and from immunized rabbits resulted in identification of the 25 kDa protein cell envelope (HppA) which exhibits acid phosphatase activity. Enzyme activity was demonstrated by specific enzymatic assays with whole-cell protein preparations of H. pylori strain N6 and from Escherichia coli carrying the hppA gene (pUWM192). HppA showed optimum activity at pH 5.6 and was resistant to inhibition by EDTA. Bioinformatics analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of two putative active site residues (D73 and D192) provide further insight into the sequence-structure-function relationships of HppA as a member of the DDDD phosphohydrolase superfamily.

  20. Molecular cloning, coding nucleotides and the deduced amino acid sequence of P-450BM-1 from Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    He, J S; Ruettinger, R T; Liu, H M; Fulco, A J

    1989-12-22

    The gene encoding barbiturate-inducible cytochrome P-450BM-1 from Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 has been cloned and sequenced. An open reading frame in the 1.9 kb of cloned DNA correctly predicted the NH2-terminal sequence of P-450BM-1 previously determined by protein sequencing, and, in toto, predicted a polypeptide of 410 amino acid residues with an Mr of 47,439. The sequence is most, but less than 27%, similar to that of P-450CAM from Pseudomonas putida, so that P-450BM-1 clearly belongs to a new P-450-gene family, distinct especially from that of the P-450 domain of P-450BM-3, a barbiturate-inducible single polypeptide cytochrome P-450:NADPH-P-450 reductase from the same strain of B. megaterium (Ruettinger, R.T., Wen, L.-P. and Fulco, A.J. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 10987-10995). PMID:2597681

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the afimbrial-adhesin-encoding afa-3 gene cluster and its translocation via flanking IS1 insertion sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, M I; Labigne, A; Le Bouguenec, C

    1994-01-01

    The afa gene clusters encode afimbrial adhesins (AFAs) that are expressed by uropathogenic and diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli strains. The plasmid-borne afa-3 gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of the AFA-III adhesin that belongs to the Dr family of hemagglutinins. Reported in this work is the nucleotide sequence of the 9.2-kb insert of the recombinant plasmid pILL61, which contains the afa-3 gene cluster cloned from a cystitis-associated E. coli strain (A30). The afa-3 gene cluster was shown to contain six open reading frames, designated afaA to afaF. It was organized in two divergent transcriptional units. Five of the six Afa products showed marked homologies with proteins encoded by previously described adhesion systems that allowed us to attribute to each of them a putative function in the biogenesis of the AFA-III adhesin. AfaE was identified as the structural adhesin product, whereas AfaB and AfaC were recognized as periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane anchor proteins, respectively. The AfaA and AfaF products were shown to be homologous to the PapI-PapB transcriptional regulatory proteins. No function could be attributed to the AfaD product, the gene of which was previously shown to be dispensable for the synthesis of a functional adhesin. Upstream of the afa-3 gene cluster, a 1.2-kb region was found to be 96% identical to the RepFIB sequence of one of the enterotoxigenic E. coli plasmids (P307), suggesting a common ancestor plasmid. This region contains an integrase-like gene (int). Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an IS1 element between the int gene and the afa-3 gene cluster. Two other IS1 elements were detected and located in the vicinity of the afa-3 gene cluster by hybridization experiments. The afa-3 gene cluster was therefore found to be flanked by two IS1 elements in direct orientation and two in opposite orientations. The afa-3 gene cluster, flanked by two directly oriented IS1 elements, was shown to translocate

  2. Amino acid sequence homology between Piv, an essential protein in site-specific DNA inversion in Moraxella lacunata, and transposases of an unusual family of insertion elements.

    PubMed Central

    Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1994-01-01

    Deletion analysis of the subcloned DNA inversion region of Moraxella lacunata indicates that Piv is the only M. lacunata-encoded factor required for site-specific inversion of the tfpQ/tfpI pilin segment. The predicted amino acid sequence of Piv shows significant homology solely with the transposases/integrases of a family of insertion sequence elements, suggesting that Piv is a novel site-specific recombinase. Images PMID:8021196

  3. New approaches for computer analysis of nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Ghandour, G; Ost, F; Tavare, S; Korn, L J

    1983-09-01

    A new high-speed computer algorithm is outlined that ascertains within and between nucleic acid and protein sequences all direct repeats, dyad symmetries, and other structural relationships. Large repeats, repeats of high frequency, dyad symmetries of specified stem length and loop distance, and their distributions are determined. Significance of homologies is assessed by a hierarchy of permutation procedures. Applications are made to papovaviruses, the human papillomavirus HPV, lambda phage, the human and mouse mitochondrial genomes, and the human and mouse immunoglobulin kappa-chain genes. PMID:6577449

  4. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  5. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  6. Amino acid sequence and structural properties of protein p12, an African swine fever virus attachment protein.

    PubMed Central

    Alcamí, A; Angulo, A; López-Otín, C; Muñoz, M; Freije, J M; Carrascosa, A L; Viñuela, E

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding the African swine fever virus protein p12, which is involved in virus attachment to the host cell, has been mapped and sequenced in the genome of the Vero-adapted virus strain BA71V. The determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence and the hybridization of oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence to cloned restriction fragments allowed the mapping of the gene in fragment EcoRI-O, located in the central region of the viral genome. The DNA sequence of an EcoRI-XbaI fragment showed an open reading frame which is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 61 amino acids. The expression of this open reading frame in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and in Escherichia coli gave rise to a 12-kDa polypeptide that was immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for protein p12. The hydrophilicity profile indicated the existence of a stretch of 22 hydrophobic residues in the central part that may anchor the protein in the virus envelope. Three forms of the protein with apparent molecular masses of 17, 12, and 10 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been observed, depending on the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine, indicating that disulfide bonds are responsible for the multimerization of the protein. This result was in agreement with the existence of a cysteine-rich domain in the C-terminal region of the predicted amino acid sequence. The protein was synthesized at late times of infection, and no posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation, phosphorylation, or fatty acid acylation were detected. Images PMID:1583732

  7. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered.

  8. Genome Sequence of Avian Escherichia coli Strain IHIT25637, an Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli Strain of ST131 Encoding Colistin Resistance Determinant MCR-1

    PubMed Central

    Göttig, Stephan; Bülte, Maria; Fiedler, Sophie; Tietgen, Manuela; Leidner, Ursula; Heydel, Carsten; Bauerfeind, Rolf; Semmler, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Sequence type 131 (ST131) is one of the predominant Escherichia coli lineages among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) that causes a variety of diseases in humans and animals and frequently shows multidrug resistance. Here, we report the first genome sequence of an ST131-ExPEC strain from poultry carrying the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance gene mcr-1. PMID:27587807

  9. Genome Sequence of Avian Escherichia coli Strain IHIT25637, an Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli Strain of ST131 Encoding Colistin Resistance Determinant MCR-1.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Christa; Göttig, Stephan; Bülte, Maria; Fiedler, Sophie; Tietgen, Manuela; Leidner, Ursula; Heydel, Carsten; Bauerfeind, Rolf; Semmler, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Sequence type 131 (ST131) is one of the predominant Escherichia coli lineages among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) that causes a variety of diseases in humans and animals and frequently shows multidrug resistance. Here, we report the first genome sequence of an ST131-ExPEC strain from poultry carrying the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance gene mcr-1. PMID:27587807

  10. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-02-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP.

  11. a Sensor Aided H.264/AVC Video Encoder for Aerial Video Sequences with in the Loop Metadata Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicala, L.; Angelino, C. V.; Ruatta, G.; Baccaglini, E.; Raimondo, N.

    2015-08-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are often employed to collect high resolution images in order to perform image mosaicking and/or 3D reconstruction. Images are usually stored on board and then processed with on-ground desktop software. In such a way the computational load, and hence the power consumption, is moved on ground, leaving on board only the task of storing data. Such an approach is important in the case of small multi-rotorcraft UAVs because of their low endurance due to the short battery life. Images can be stored on board with either still image or video data compression. Still image system are preferred when low frame rates are involved, because video coding systems are based on motion estimation and compensation algorithms which fail when the motion vectors are significantly long and when the overlapping between subsequent frames is very small. In this scenario, UAVs attitude and position metadata from the Inertial Navigation System (INS) can be employed to estimate global motion parameters without video analysis. A low complexity image analysis can be still performed in order to refine the motion field estimated using only the metadata. In this work, we propose to use this refinement step in order to improve the position and attitude estimation produced by the navigation system in order to maximize the encoder performance. Experiments are performed on both simulated and real world video sequences.

  12. Multiple Amino Acid Sequence Alignment Nitrogenase Component 1: Insights into Phylogenetics and Structure-Function Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Howard, James B.; Kechris, Katerina J.; Rees, Douglas C.; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as “core” for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf) yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification provides the bases

  13. NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCING AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL MAPPING OF THE GENES ENCODING BIPHENYL DIOXYGENASE, A MULTICOM- PONENT POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYL-DEGRADING ENZYME IN PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA region encoding biphenyl dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the biphenyl-polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Pseudomonas species strain LB400, was sequenced. Six open reading frames were identified, four of which are homologous to the components of toluene dioxy...

  14. Codon usage bias in prokaryotic pyrimidine-ending codons is associated with the degeneracy of the encoded amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Naama; Alroy, Maya; Botzman, Maya; Margalit, Hanah

    2012-01-01

    Synonymous codons are unevenly distributed among genes, a phenomenon termed codon usage bias. Understanding the patterns of codon bias and the forces shaping them is a major step towards elucidating the adaptive advantage codon choice can confer at the level of individual genes and organisms. Here, we perform a large-scale analysis to assess codon usage bias pattern of pyrimidine-ending codons in highly expressed genes in prokaryotes. We find a bias pattern linked to the degeneracy of the encoded amino acid. Specifically, we show that codon-pairs that encode two- and three-fold degenerate amino acids are biased towards the C-ending codon while codons encoding four-fold degenerate amino acids are biased towards the U-ending codon. This codon usage pattern is widespread in prokaryotes, and its strength is correlated with translational selection both within and between organisms. We show that this bias is associated with an improved correspondence with the tRNA pool, avoidance of mis-incorporation errors during translation and moderate stability of codon–anticodon interaction, all consistent with more efficient translation. PMID:22581775

  15. Amino acid sequence analysis and characterization of a ribonuclease from starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Itagaki, Tadashi; Inokuchi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to phylogenetically characterize the location of the RNase T2 enzyme in the starfish (Asterias amurensis). We isolated an RNase T2 ribonuclease (RNase Aa) from the ovaries of starfish and determined its amino acid sequence by protein chemistry and cloning cDNA encoding RNase Aa. The isolated protein had 231 amino acid residues, a predicted molecular mass of 25,906 Da, and an optimal pH of 5.0. RNase Aa preferentially released guanylic acid from the RNA. The catalytic sites of the RNase T2 family are conserved in RNase Aa; furthermore, the distribution of the cysteine residues in RNase Aa is similar to that in other animal and plant T2 RNases. RNase Aa is cleaved at two points: 21 residues from the N-terminus and 29 residues from the C-terminus; however, both fragments may remain attached to the protein via disulfide bridges, leading to the maintenance of its conformation, as suggested by circular dichroism spectrum analysis. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that starfish RNase Aa is evolutionarily an intermediate between protozoan and oyster RNases. PMID:26920046

  16. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  17. A possible role for acid phosphatase with thiamin-binding activity encoded by PHO3 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, K; Kaneko, Y; Nishimura, H; Iwashima, A

    1989-07-01

    Periplasmic soluble thiamin-binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Iwashima, A. et al. (1979) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 577, 217-220) was demonstrated to be encoded by PHO3 gene that codes for thiamin repressible acid phosphatase (Schweingruber, M.E. et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 15877-15882) by genetic analysis. The pho3 mutant cells of S. cerevisiae in contrast to the parent cells have markedly reduced activity of the uptake of [14C]thiamin phosphates, suggesting that thiamin repressible acid phosphatase plays a role in the hydrolysis of thiamin phosphates in the periplasmic space prior to the uptake of their thiamin moieties by S. cerevisiae.

  18. aguA, the gene encoding an extracellular alpha-glucuronidase from Aspergillus tubingensis, is specifically induced on xylose and not on glucuronic acid.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R P; Poulsen, C H; Madrid, S; Visser, J

    1998-01-01

    An extracellular alpha-glucuronidase was purified and characterized from a commercial Aspergillus preparation and from culture filtrate of Aspergillus tubingensis. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 107 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 112 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry, has a determined pI just below 5.2, and is stable at pH 6.0 for prolonged times. The pH optimum for the enzyme is between 4.5 and 6.0, and the temperature optimum is 70 degrees C. The alpha-glucuronidase is active mainly on small substituted xylo-oligomers but is also able to release a small amount of 4-O-methylglucuronic acid from birchwood xylan. The enzyme acts synergistically with endoxylanases and beta-xylosidase in the hydrolysis of xylan. The enzyme is N glycosylated and contains 14 putative N-glycosylation sites. The gene encoding this alpha-glucuronidase (aguA) was cloned from A. tubingensis. It consists of an open reading frame of 2,523 bp and contains no introns. The gene codes for a protein of 841 amino acids, containing a eukaryotic signal sequence of 20 amino acids. The mature protein has a predicted molecular mass of 91,790 Da and a calculated pI of 5.13. Multiple copies of the gene were introduced in A. tubingensis, and expression was studied in a highly overproducing transformant. The aguA gene was expressed on xylose, xylobiose, and xylan, similarly to genes encoding endoxylanases, suggesting a coordinate regulation of expression of xylanases and alpha-glucuronidase. Glucuronic acid did not induce the expression of aguA and also did not modulate the expression on xylose. Addition of glucose prevented expression of aguA on xylan but only reduced the expression on xylose.

  19. Organization and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the mouse acid labile subunit of the insulin-like growth factor binding complex.

    PubMed Central

    Boisclair, Y R; Seto, D; Hsieh, S; Hurst, K R; Ooi, G T

    1996-01-01

    After birth, most of insulin-like growth factor I and II (IGFs) circulate as a ternary complex formed by the association of IGF binding protein 3-IGF complexes with a serum protein called acid-labile subunit (ALS). ALS retains the IGF binding protein-3-IGF complexes in the vascular compartment and extends the t1/2 of IGFs in the circulation. Synthesis of ALS occurs mainly in liver after birth and is stimulated by growth hormone. To study the basis for this regulation, we cloned and characterized the mouse ALS gene. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences indicated that the gene is composed of two exons separated by a 1126-bp intron. Exon 1 encodes the first 5 amino acids of the signal peptide and contributes the first nucleotide of codon 6. Exon 2 contributes the last 2 nt of codon 6 and encodes the remaining 17 amino acids of the signal peptide as well as the 580 amino acids of the mature protein. The polyadenylylation signal, ATTAAA, is located 241 bp from the termination codon. The cDNA and genomic DNA diverge 16 bp downstream from this signal. Transcription initiation was mapped to 11 sites over a 140-bp TATA-less region. The DNA fragment extending from nt -805 to -11 (ATG, +1) directed basal and growth hormone-regulated expression of a luciferase reporter plasmid in the rat liver cell line H4-II-E. Finally, the ALS gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 17 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8816745

  20. Deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO8 gene, encoding an aromatic amino acid transaminase, enhances phenylethanol production from glucose.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Liti, Gianni; Louis, Edward J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Phenylethanol has a characteristic rose-like aroma that makes it a popular ingredient in foods, beverages and cosmetics. Microbial production of phenylethanol currently relies on whole-cell bioconversion of phenylalanine with yeasts that harbour an Ehrlich pathway for phenylalanine catabolism. Complete biosynthesis of phenylethanol from a cheap carbon source, such as glucose, provides an economically attractive alternative for phenylalanine bioconversion. In this study, synthetic genetic array (SGA) screening was applied to identify genes involved in regulation of phenylethanol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen focused on transcriptional regulation of ARO10, which encodes the major decarboxylase involved in conversion of phenylpyruvate to phenylethanol. A deletion in ARO8, which encodes an aromatic amino acid transaminase, was found to underlie the transcriptional upregulation of ARO10 during growth, with ammonium sulphate as the sole nitrogen source. Physiological characterization revealed that the aro8Δ mutation led to substantial changes in the absolute and relative intracellular concentrations of amino acids. Moreover, deletion of ARO8 led to de novo production of phenylethanol during growth on a glucose synthetic medium with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. The aro8Δ mutation also stimulated phenylethanol production when combined with other, previously documented, mutations that deregulate aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The resulting engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced >3 mm phenylethanol from glucose during growth on a simple synthetic medium. The strong impact of a transaminase deletion on intracellular amino acid concentrations opens new possibilities for yeast-based production of amino acid-derived products.

  1. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA encoding the Jerusalem artichoke cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, a major plant cytochrome P450 involved in the general phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Teutsch, H G; Hasenfratz, M P; Lesot, A; Stoltz, C; Garnier, J M; Jeltsch, J M; Durst, F; Werck-Reichhart, D

    1993-01-01

    Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase [CA4H; trans-cinnamate,NADPH:oxygen oxidoreductase (4-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.13.11] is a cytochrome P450 that catalyzes the first oxygenation step of the general phenylpropanoid metabolism in higher plants. The compounds formed are essential for lignification and defense against predators and pathogens. We recently reported the purification of this enzyme from Mn(2+)-induced Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber tissues. Highly selective polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified protein were used to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library from wound-induced Jerusalem artichoke, allowing isolation of a 1130-base-pair insert. Typical P450 domains were identified in this incomplete sequence, which was used as a probe for the isolation of a 1.7-kilobase clone in a lambda gt10 library. A full-length open reading frame of 1515 base pairs, encoding a P450 protein of 505 residues (M(r) = 57,927), was sequenced. The N terminus, essentially composed of hydrophobic residues, matches perfectly the microsequenced N terminus of the purified protein. The calculated pI is 9.78, in agreement with the chromatographic behavior and two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of CA4H. Synthesis of the corresponding mRNA is induced in wounded plant tissues, in correlation with CA4H enzymatic activity. This P450 protein exhibits the most similarity (28% amino acid identity) with avocado CYP71, but also good similarity with CYP17 and CYP21, or with CYP1 and CYP2 families. According to current criteria, it qualifies as a member of a new P450 family. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8097885

  2. Sequence Comparison and Phylogeny of Nucleotide Sequence of Coat Protein and Nucleic Acid Binding Protein of a Distinct Isolate of Shallot virus X from India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, S; Baranwal, V K

    2011-06-01

    Shallot virus X (ShVX), a type species in the genus Allexivirus of the family Alfaflexiviridae has been associated with shallot plants in India and other shallot growing countries like Russia, Germany, Netherland, and New Zealand. Coat protein (CP) and nucleic acid binding protein (NB) region of the virus was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from scales leaves of shallot bulbs. The partial cDNA contained two open reading frames encoding proteins of molecular weights of 28.66 and 14.18 kDa belonging to Flexi_CP super-family and viral NB super-family, respectively. The percent identity and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of CP and NB region of the virus associated with shallot indicated that it was a distinct isolate of ShVX.

  3. Sequence Comparison and Phylogeny of Nucleotide Sequence of Coat Protein and Nucleic Acid Binding Protein of a Distinct Isolate of Shallot virus X from India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, S; Baranwal, V K

    2011-06-01

    Shallot virus X (ShVX), a type species in the genus Allexivirus of the family Alfaflexiviridae has been associated with shallot plants in India and other shallot growing countries like Russia, Germany, Netherland, and New Zealand. Coat protein (CP) and nucleic acid binding protein (NB) region of the virus was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from scales leaves of shallot bulbs. The partial cDNA contained two open reading frames encoding proteins of molecular weights of 28.66 and 14.18 kDa belonging to Flexi_CP super-family and viral NB super-family, respectively. The percent identity and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of CP and NB region of the virus associated with shallot indicated that it was a distinct isolate of ShVX. PMID:23637504

  4. Diversity of acid stress resistant variants of Listeria monocytogenes and the potential role of ribosomal protein S21 encoded by rpsU

    PubMed Central

    Metselaar, Karin I.; den Besten, Heidy M. W.; Boekhorst, Jos; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Zwietering, Marcel H.; Abee, Tjakko

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic response of microorganisms to environmental conditions depends on the behavior of individual cells within the population. Adverse environments can select for stable stress resistant subpopulations. In this study, we aimed to get more insight in the diversity within Listeria monocytogenes LO28 populations, and the genetic basis for the increased resistance of stable resistant fractions isolated after acid exposure. Phenotypic cluster analysis of 23 variants resulted in three clusters and four individual variants and revealed multiple-stress resistance, with both unique and overlapping features related to stress resistance, growth, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence indicators. A higher glutamate decarboxylase activity correlated with increased acid resistance. Whole genome sequencing revealed mutations in rpsU, encoding ribosomal protein S21 in the largest phenotypic cluster, while mutations in ctsR, which were previously shown to be responsible for increased resistance of heat and high hydrostatic pressure resistant variants, were not found in the acid resistant variants. This underlined that large population diversity exists within one L. monocytogenes strain and that different adverse conditions drive selection for different variants. The finding that acid stress selects for rpsU variants provides potential insights in the mechanisms underlying population diversity of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26005439

  5. Parameters of proteome evolution from histograms of amino-acid sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, Jacob Bock; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Maslov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    Background The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is mostly driven by gene duplications, deletions, and sequence modifications of existing proteins. Indirect information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the proteome-wide distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. Results We introduce a simple mathematical framework based on a stochastic birth-and-death model that allows one to extract some of this information and apply it to the set of all pairs of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and H. sapiens. It was found that the histogram of sequence identities p generated by an all-to-all alignment of all protein sequences encoded in a genome is well fitted with a power-law form ~ p-γ with the value of the exponent γ around 4 for the majority of organisms used in this study. This implies that the intra-protein variability of substitution rates is best described by the Gamma-distribution with the exponent α ≈ 0.33. Different features of the shape of such histograms allow us to quantify the ratio between the genome-wide average deletion/duplication rates and the amino-acid substitution rate. Conclusion We separately measure the short-term ("raw") duplication and deletion rates rdup∗, rdel∗ which include gene copies that will be removed soon after the duplication event and their dramatically reduced long-term counterparts rdup, rdel. High deletion rate among recently duplicated proteins is consistent with a scenario in which they didn't have enough time to significantly change their functional roles and thus are to a large degree disposable. Systematic trends of each of the four duplication/deletion rates with the total number of genes in the genome were analyzed. All but the deletion rate of recent duplicates rdel∗ were shown to systematically increase with Ngenes. Abnormally flat shapes

  6. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  7. Entire sequence of the colonization factor coli surface antigen 6-encoding plasmid pCss165 from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Sabui, Subrata; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Hamabata, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) is one of the most prevalent colonization factors among enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolated in developing countries. Although it is known that CS6 is encoded by a plasmid, there are no reports on the sequence analysis of the CS6-encoding plasmid or genes exhibiting similar behavior to CS6. Here, we report the isolation of the CS6-encoding plasmid, pCss165Kan, from 4266 ΔcssB::kanamycin (Km) and its complete nucleotide sequence. This plasmid consisted of 165,311bp and 222 predicted coding sequences. Remarkably, there were many insertion sequence (IS) elements, which comprised 24.4% of the entire sequence. Virulence-associated genes such as heat-stable enterotoxin, homologues of ATP-binding cassette transporter in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and ETEC autotransporter A were also present, although the ETEC autotransporter A gene was disrupted by the integration of IS629. We found that 2 transcriptional regulators belonging to the AraC family were not involved in CS6 expression. Interestingly, pCss165 had conjugative transfer genes, as well as 3 toxin-antitoxin systems that potentially exclude other plasmid-free host bacteria. These genes might be involved in the prevalence of CS6 among ETEC isolates. PMID:23933356

  8. Cellulases, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David; Gemsch Cuenca, Joslin; Dycaico, Mark

    2013-04-23

    This invention relates to molecular and cellular biology and biochemistry. In one aspect, the invention provides polypeptides having cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, mannanase and/or .beta.-glucosidase activity, polynucleotides encoding these polypeptides, and methods of making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention is directed to polypeptides cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, mannanase and/or .beta.-glucosidase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts.

  9. Chlorophenol hydroxylase activity encoded by TfdB from 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading Bradyrhizobium sp. strain RD5-C2.

    PubMed

    Huong, Nguyen L; Itoh, Kazuhito; Miyamoto, Masao; Suyama, Kousuke; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2007-07-01

    The tfdB gene encoding chlorophenol hydroxylase and its homolog were found in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading strain RD5-C2, which belongs to Bradyrhizobium sp. of alpha-Proteobacteria. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence identities of the two genes, designated tfdBa and tfdBb, were 60% and 57% respectively. Their nucleotide sequences most closely matched those of previously reported tfdB, which consisted of those from 2,4-D-degrading beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria and Sphingomonas sp. in alpha-Proteobacteria, with 61-67% identity. The TfdBa expressed in Escherichia coli showed the highest activity for 2,4-dichlorophenol but a narrower range of activity for the other chlorophenols than previously reported TfdBs. In the case of TfdBb, however, no observable activity for any chlorophenols or phenol was detected, although production of a protein with an appropriate molecular size was observed. Based on codon usage patterns and the GC content of the genes, it probable that the tfdBa genes in the 2,4-D-degrading Bradyrhizobium sp. were obtained through horizontal gene transfer.

  10. Development of generic Taqman PCR and RT-PCR assays for the detection of DNA and mRNA of β-actin-encoding sequences in a wide range of animal species.

    PubMed

    Piorkowski, Géraldine; Baronti, Cécile; de Lamballerie, Xavier; de Fabritus, Lauriane; Bichaud, Laurence; Pastorino, Boris A; Bessaud, Maël

    2014-06-01

    As a member of the European Virus Archive (EVA) consortium, our laboratory is developing and maintaining a large collection of viruses. This collection implies the use of a panel of cell lines originating from various animal species. In order to make easier the handling of such a large panel of cell lines, wide spectrum real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays were developed to allow the detection and the quantification of DNA and mRNA of β-actin, one of the most commonly used eukaryotic housekeeping genes. By using two degenerated primers and a unique probe, these two assays were shown to detect nucleic acids of a panel of vertebrate and invertebrate cell lines commonly used in animal virology. This panel included human, monkey, rodent, dog, pig, fish, batrachian, mosquito and tick cell lines. Additionally, the two assays amplified successfully β-actin-encoding sequences of sandflies. Sensitivity evaluation performed on synthetic DNA and RNA sequences showed that the two assays were very sensitive and suitable for accurate quantification. The two assays constitute together a convenient method suitable for multiple purposes. They can be used for instance to estimate the amount of contaminating cellular genetic material prior to sequence-independent amplification of viral genomes achieved before high-throughput sequencing, to evaluate the efficiency of DNase and/or RNase treatments performed on cellular extract and to check nucleic acid extraction by using β-actin-encoding sequences as endogenous control. This assay will constitute a precious tool for virologists working with multiple cell lines or animal models.

  11. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, 5 BAC clone sequencing, including two encoding Cytochrome P450s and one encoding CzEst9 carboxylesterase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. BAC clones give insight into the genome struct...

  12. Heterogeneity of amino acid sequence in hippopotamus cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Borden, D; Tarr, G E; Margoliash, E

    1978-12-25

    The amino acid sequences of chymotryptic and tryptic peptides of Hippopotamus amphibius cytochrome c were determined by a recent modification of the manual Edman sequential degradation procedure. They were ordered by comparison with the structure of the hog protein. The hippopotamus protein differs in three positions: serine, alanine, and glutamine replace alanine, glutamic acid, and lysine in positions 43, 92, and 100, respectively. Since the artiodactyl suborders diverged in the mid-Eocene some 50 million years ago, the fact that representatives of some of them show no differences in their cytochromes c (cow, sheep, and hog), while another exhibits as many as three such differences, verifies that even in relatively closely related lines of descent the rate at which cytochrome c changes in the course of evolution is not constant. Furthermore, 10.6% of the hippopotamus cytochrome c preparation was shown to contain isoleucine instead of valine at position 3, indicating that one of the four animals from which the protein was obtained was heterozygous in the cytochrome c gene. Such heterogeneity is a necessary condition of evolutionary variation and has not been previously observed in the cytochrome c of a wild mammalian population.

  13. Sequence analysis and molecular characterization of larval midgut cDNA transcripts encoding peptidases from the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, S; Chen, M-S; Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Smith, C M; Marshall, J; Oppert, B

    2007-08-01

    Peptidase sequences were analysed in randomly picked clones from cDNA libraries of the anterior or posterior midgut or whole larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus. Of a total of 1528 sequences, 92 encoded potential peptidases, from which 50 full-length cDNA sequences were obtained, including serine and cysteine proteinases and metallopeptidases. Serine proteinase transcripts were predominant in the posterior midgut, whereas transcripts encoding cysteine and metallopeptidases were mainly found in the anterior midgut. Alignments with other proteinases indicated that 40% of the serine proteinase sequences were serine proteinase homologues, and the remaining ones were identified as either trypsin, chymotrypsin or other serine proteinases. Cysteine proteinase sequences included cathepsin B- and L-like proteinases, and metallopeptidase transcripts were similar to carboxypeptidase A. Northern blot analysis of representative sequences demonstrated the differential expression profile of selected transcripts across five developmental stages of Te. molitor. These sequences provide insights into peptidases in coleopteran insects as a basis to study the response of coleopteran larvae to external stimuli and to evaluate regulatory features of the response.

  14. Cross-species conservation of complementary amino acid-ribonucleobase interactions and their potential for ribosome-free encoding

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, John G. D.; Sherman, Rachel M.; Wang, Victoria M. Y.; Newman, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of amino acid-RNA nucleobase interactions in the evolution of RNA translation and protein-mRNA autoregulation remains an open area of research. We describe the inference of pairwise amino acid-RNA nucleobase interaction preferences using structural data from known RNA-protein complexes. We observed significant matching between an amino acid’s nucleobase affinity and corresponding codon content in both the standard genetic code and mitochondrial variants. Furthermore, we showed that knowledge of nucleobase preferences allows statistically significant prediction of protein primary sequence from mRNA using purely physiochemical information. Interestingly, ribosomal primary sequences were more accurately predicted than non-ribosomal sequences, suggesting a potential role for direct amino acid-nucleobase interactions in the genesis of amino acid-based ribosomal components. Finally, we observed matching between amino acid-nucleobase affinities and corresponding mRNA sequences in 35 evolutionarily diverse proteomes. We believe these results have important implications for the study of the evolutionary origins of the genetic code and protein-mRNA cross-regulation. PMID:26656258

  15. Functional analysis of the gene encoding the clavaminate synthase 2 isoenzyme involved in clavulanic acid biosynthesis in Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed Central

    Paradkar, A S; Jensen, S E

    1995-01-01

    A Streptomyces clavuligerus mutant disrupted in cas2, encoding the clavaminate synthase (CAS2) isoenzyme, was constructed by a gene replacement procedure. The resulting cas2 mutant showed no clavulanic acid production when grown in starch-asparagine medium. However, in soy medium, the cas2 mutant did produce clavulanic acid, although in amounts less than those produced by wild-type cultures. This medium-dependent leaky phenotype correlated well with the presence of the cas1 transcript, encoding the CAS1 isoenzyme, in cultures grown in soy medium and with its absence from those grown in starch-asparagine medium. This suggested that CAS1 and CAS2 both contribute to clavulanic acid production but that their production is regulated differently. Under nutritional conditions in which cas1 expression is blocked, cas2 becomes essential for clavulanic acid production. Northern (RNA) analysis revealed that while cas1 is transcribed as a 1.4-kb monocistronic transcript only, cas2 is transcribed both as a 1.2-kb monocistronic transcript and as part of a 5.3-kb polycistronic transcript. High-resolution S1 nuclease analysis located the transcription start point of the monocistronic cas2 transcript at a C residue 103 nucleotides upstream from the cas2 start codon. PMID:7868606

  16. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  17. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an efficient L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified-one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution among enterococci.

  18. Sequence of cDNA for rat cystathionine gamma-lyase and comparison of deduced amino acid sequence with related Escherichia coli enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, P F; Maxwell, I H; Su, L J; Baumann, M; Glode, L M

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone for cystathionine gamma-lyase was isolated from a rat cDNA library in lambda gt11 by screening with a monospecific antiserum. The identity of this clone, containing 600 bp proximal to the 3'-end of the gene, was confirmed by positive hybridization selection. Northern-blot hybridization showed the expected higher abundance of the corresponding mRNA in liver than in brain. Two further cDNA clones from a plasmid pcD library were isolated by colony hybridization with the first clone and were found to contain inserts of 1600 and 1850 bp. One of these was confirmed as encoding cystathionine gamma-lyase by hybridization with two independent pools of oligodeoxynucleotides corresponding to partial amino acid sequence information for cystathionine gamma-lyase. The other clone (estimated to represent all but 8% of the 5'-end of the mRNA) was sequenced and its deduced amino acid sequence showed similarity to those of the Escherichia coli enzymes cystathionine beta-lyase and cystathionine gamma-synthase throughout its length, especially to that of the latter. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2201285

  19. Sequence and expression of the mRNA encoding HSP22, the mitochondrial small heat-shock protein in pea leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Lenne, C; Block, M A; Garin, J; Douce, R

    1995-01-01

    A 3 h treatment at 40 degrees C of pea (Pisum sativum var. Douce Provence) plants induces production and accumulation of a small heat-shock protein of 22 kDa apparent molecular mass, designated HSP22, in the matrix compartment of mitochondria [Lenne and Douce (1994) Plant Physiol. 105, 1255-1261]. We show here that the HSP22 precursor (i.e. the mature protein plus the transit peptide) has an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa after in vitro translation of mRNA extracted from heat-stressed pea plants and immunodetection. We have isolated, cloned and sequenced the full-length cDNA encoding the precursor of the mitochondrial HSP22. An analysis of the amino acid sequence of the mitochondrial HSP22 reveals that this protein is a representative member of the low-molecular-mass heat shock protein (HSP) superfamily, exhibiting the specific consensus regions that are typical of the small HSPs. Most importantly, comparison of the mitochondrial HSP22 sequence with that of chloroplast small HSPs indicates that HSP22 does not contain the typical chloroplast consensus region III. We have also analysed the kinetics of HSP22 induction, and report results on the temporal expression of HSP22 at the transcriptional level. HSP22 mRNA was detected as soon as 10 min after the temperature was raised to a high temperature of 40 degrees C. Then the amount of HSP22 mRNA declined considerably even though pea plants were still submitted to the heat treatment. These results are discussed in light of the translation data previously published [Lenne and Douce (1994) Plant Physiol. 105, 1255-1261], particularly concerning the physiological behaviour of mitochondria when plants are heat-stressed. Furthermore, we have studied the dependence of HSP22 accumulation with temperature and demonstrate that the pea mitochondrial heat-shock response is only developed under extreme environmental growth conditions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7487935

  20. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a novel fatty acid-binding protein from rat skin.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, R; Fujii, H; Odani, S; Sakakibara, J; Yamamoto, A; Ito, M; Ono, T

    1994-04-15

    A novel skin-type fatty acid-binding protein, termed cutaneous(C)-FABP, has been purified from rat skin and a cDNA clone for this protein has been identified. The purified protein had the ability to bind long chain fatty acids like other rat FABPs. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA clone comprises residues yielding a molecular mass for the polypeptide of 15.1 kDa and exhibits around 50% identity to myelin P2 protein, adipocyte FABP and heart FABP. Our results propose that C-FABP is a new member of the FABP family.

  1. Sequence, expression and tissue localization of a gene encoding a makorin RING zinc-finger protein in germinating rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Thangavelu U; Davies, Eric; Morita, Eugene Hayato; Abe, Shunnosuke

    2007-01-01

    The makorin (MKRN) RING finger protein gene family encodes proteins (makorins) with a characteristic array of zinc-finger motifs and which are present in a wide array of eukaryotes. In the present study, we analyzed the structure and expression of a putative makorin RING finger protein gene in rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare). From the analysis of the genomic (AP003543), mRNA (AK120250) and deduced protein (BAD61603) sequences of the putative MKRN gene of rice, obtained from GenBank, we found that it was indeed a bona fide member of the MKRN gene family. The rice MKRN cDNA encoded a protein with four C3H zinc-finger-motifs, one putative Cys-His zinc-finger motif, and one RING zinc-finger motif. The presence of this distinct motif organization and overall amino acid identity clearly indicate that this gene is indeed a true MKRN ortholog. We isolated RNA from embryonic axes of rice seeds at various stages of imbibition and germination and studied the temporal expression profile of MKRN by RT-PCR. This analysis revealed that MKRN transcripts were present at all the time points studied. It was at very low levels in dry seeds, increased slowly during imbibition and germination, and slightly declined in the seedling growth stage. After 6days of germination, an organ-dependent expression pattern of MKRN was observed: highest in roots and moderate in leaves. Similarly to MKRN transcripts, transcripts of cytoskeletal actin and tubulin were also detected in dry embryos, steadily increased during imbibition and germination and leveled off after 24h of germination. We studied the spatial expression profile of MKRN in rice tissues, by using a relatively fast, simple and effective non-radioactive mRNA in situ hybridization (NRISH) technique, which provided the first spatial experimental data that hints at the function of a plant makorin. This analysis revealed that MKRN transcripts were expressed in young plumules, lateral root primordia, leaf primordia

  2. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  3. Detection of Vibrio cholerae by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Fykse, Else M; Skogan, Gunnar; Davies, William; Olsen, Jaran Strand; Blatny, Janet M

    2007-03-01

    A multitarget molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay for the specific detection of Vibrio cholerae has been developed. The genes encoding the cholera toxin (ctxA), the toxin-coregulated pilus (tcpA; colonization factor), the ctxA toxin regulator (toxR), hemolysin (hlyA), and the 60-kDa chaperonin product (groEL) were selected as target sequences for detection. The beacons for the five different genetic targets were evaluated by serial dilution of RNA from V. cholerae cells. RNase treatment of the nucleic acids eliminated all NASBA, whereas DNase treatment had no effect, showing that RNA and not DNA was amplified. The specificity of the assay was investigated by testing several isolates of V. cholerae, other Vibrio species, and Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli strains. The toxR, groEL, and hlyA beacons identified all V. cholerae isolates, whereas the ctxA and tcpA beacons identified the O1 toxigenic clinical isolates. The NASBA assay detected V. cholerae at 50 CFU/ml by using the general marker groEL and tcpA that specifically indicates toxigenic strains. A correlation between cell viability and NASBA was demonstrated for the ctxA, toxR, and hlyA targets. RNA isolated from different environmental water samples spiked with V. cholerae was specifically detected by NASBA. These results indicate that NASBA can be used in the rapid detection of V. cholerae from various environmental water samples. This method has a strong potential for detecting toxigenic strains by using the tcpA and ctxA markers. The entire assay including RNA extraction and NASBA was completed within 3 h.

  4. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  5. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  6. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones.

  7. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  8. Oxalic acid biosynthesis is encoded by an operon in Burkholderia glumae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the biosynthesis of oxalic acid is known to occur in a number of bacteria, the mechanism(s) regulating its production remains largely unknown. To date, there is no report on the identification of an oxalic acid biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria. In an attempt to identify such a gene...

  9. TaOPR2 encodes a 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yukun; Yuan, Guoliang; Yuan, Shaohua; Duan, Wenjing; Wang, Peng; Bai, Jianfang; Zhang, Fengting; Gao, Shiqing; Zhang, Liping; Zhao, Changping

    2016-01-29

    The 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductases (OPRs) are involved in the various processes of growth and development in plants, and classified into the OPRⅠ and OPRⅡ subgroups. In higher plants, only OPRⅡ subgroup genes take part in the biosynthesis of endogenous jasmonic acid. In this study, we isolated a novel OPRⅡ subgroup gene named TaOPR2 (GeneBank accession: KM216389) from the thermo-sensitive genic male sterile (TGMS) wheat cultivar BS366. TaOPR2 was predicted to encode a protein with 390 amino acids. The encoded protein contained the typical oxidored_FMN domain, the C-terminus peroxisomal-targeting signal peptide, and conserved FMN-binding sites. TaOPR2 was mapped to wheat chromosome 7B and located on peroxisome. Protein evolution analysis revealed that TaOPR2 belongs to the OPRⅡ subgroup and shares a high degree of identity with other higher plant OPR proteins. The quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that the expression of TaOPR2 is inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA), gibberellic acid (GA3), low temperatures and high salinity. In contrast, the expression of TaOPR2 can be induced by wounding, drought and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Furthermore, the transcription level of TaOPR2 increased after infection with Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici and Puccinia recondite f. sp. tritici. TaOPR2 has NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase activity. In addition, the constitutive expression of TaOPR2 can rescue the male sterility phenotype of Arabidopsis mutant opr3. These results suggest that TaOPR2 is involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) in wheat.

  10. Predicting backbone Cα angles and dihedrals from protein sequences by stacked sparse auto-encoder deep neural network.

    PubMed

    Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Heffernan, Rhys; Sharma, Alok; Paliwal, Kuldip; Sattar, Abdul; Zhou, Yaoqi; Yang, Yuedong

    2014-10-30

    Because a nearly constant distance between two neighbouring Cα atoms, local backbone structure of proteins can be represented accurately by the angle between C(αi-1)-C(αi)-C(αi+1) (θ) and a dihedral angle rotated about the C(αi)-C(αi+1) bond (τ). θ and τ angles, as the representative of structural properties of three to four amino-acid residues, offer a description of backbone conformations that is complementary to φ and ψ angles (single residue) and secondary structures (>3 residues). Here, we report the first machine-learning technique for sequence-based prediction of θ and τ angles. Predicted angles based on an independent test have a mean absolute error of 9° for θ and 34° for τ with a distribution on the θ-τ plane close to that of native values. The average root-mean-square distance of 10-residue fragment structures constructed from predicted θ and τ angles is only 1.9Å from their corresponding native structures. Predicted θ and τ angles are expected to be complementary to predicted ϕ and ψ angles and secondary structures for using in model validation and template-based as well as template-free structure prediction. The deep neural network learning technique is available as an on-line server called Structural Property prediction with Integrated DEep neuRal network (SPIDER) at http://sparks-lab.org.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new cDNA sequence encoding a venom peptide from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanhong; Luo, Feng; He, Jing; Cao, Zhijian; Miao, Lixia

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on venomous peptides derived from animals. However, little of this research has focused on peptides from centipede venoms. Here, a venom gland cDNA library was successfully constructed for the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. A new cDNA encoding the precursor of a venom peptide, named SsmTx, was cloned from the venomous gland cDNA library of the centipede S. subspinipes mutilans. The full-length SsmTx cDNA sequence is 465 nt, including a 249 nt ORF, a 45 nt 5' UTR and a 171 nt 3' UTR. There is a signal tail AATAAA 31 nt upstream of the poly (A) tail. The precursor nucleotide sequence of SsmTx encodes a signal peptide of 25 residues and a mature peptide of 57 residues, which is bridged by two pairs of disulfide bonds. SsmTx displays a unique cysteine motif that is completely different from that of other venomous animal toxins. This is the first reported cDNA sequence encoding a venom peptide from the centipede S. subspinipes mutilans.

  12. Celluloytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Kevin A.; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  13. Celluloytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Kevin A; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H

    2015-11-04

    The invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  14. Deletion of genes encoding fatty acid desaturases leads to alterations in stress sensitivity in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Zhe; Yu, Qilin; Mao, Jiwei; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2015-06-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) are key compounds which have important roles in maintaining cell membrane physiological functions and the adaption to tough conditions. Defects of fatty acid desaturases will change cellular UFA constitution. Pichia pastoris GS115 has four fatty acid desaturase genes, namely FAD9A, FAD9B, FAD12 and FAD15. Their products catalyze the synthesis of three kinds of UFAs, oleic acid (catalyzed by Fad9A and Fad9B), linoleic acid (catalyzed by Fad12) and α-linolenic acid (catalyzed by Fad15), respectively. In this study, we found that deletion of FAD12 led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Cellular lipid peroxidation levels declined in the fad12Δ mutant upon H2O2 treatment. Cellular fatty acids compositions were changed with the increased expression of FAD9A. On the other hand, deletion of FAD9A resulted in increased tolerance to the plasma membrane (PM) damage agent SDS, and PM deformation was not detected in the fad9AΔ mutant under this stress. Our results showed that UFAs are related to cell adaption to adverse environmental changes.

  15. Amino acid sequence and domain structure of entactin. Homology with epidermal growth factor precursor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Entactin (nidogen), a 150-kD sulfated glycoprotein, is a major component of basement membranes and forms a highly stable noncovalent complex with laminin. The complete amino acid sequence of mouse entactin has been derived from sequencing of cDNA clones. The 5.9-kb cDNA contains a 3,735-bp open reading frame followed by a 3'- untranslated region of 2.2 kb. The open reading frame encodes a 1,245- residue polypeptide with an unglycosylated Mr of 136,500, a 28-residue signal peptide, two Asn-linked glycosylation sites, and two potential Ca2+-binding sites. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicts that the molecule consists of two globular domains of 70 and 36 kD separated by a cysteine-rich domain of 28 kD. The COOH-terminal globular domain shows homology to the EGF precursor and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Entactin contains six EGF-type cysteine-rich repeat units and one copy of a cysteine-repeat motif found in thyroglobulin. The Arg-Gly-Asp cell recognition sequence is present in one of the EGF-type repeats, and a synthetic peptide from the putative cell-binding site of entactin was found to promote the attachment of mouse mammary tumor cells. PMID:3264556

  16. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  17. Cellulolytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kevin A.; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H.

    2012-01-24

    The invention provides polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, a endoglucanase, a cellobiohydrolase, a beta-glucosidase, a xylanase, a mannanse, a .beta.-xylosidase, an arabinofuranosidase, and/or an oligomerase activity, polynucleotides encoding these polypeptides, and methods of making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention provides polypeptides having an oligomerase activity, e.g., enzymes that convert recalcitrant soluble oligomers to fermentable sugars in the saccharification of biomass. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  18. Molecular cloning of the. alpha. -subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase: The complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence and evidence for alternative splicing of RNA transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Helaakoski, T.; Vuori, K.; Myllylae, R.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Pihlajaniemi, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} tetramer, catalyzes the formation of 4-hydroxyproline in collagens by the hydroxylation of proline residues in peptide linkages. The authors report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the {alpha}-subunit of the enzyme from human tumor HT-1080, placenta, and fibroblast cDNA libraries. Eight overlapping clones covering almost all of the corresponding 3,000-nucleotide mRNA, including all the coding sequences, were characterized. These clones encode a polypeptide of 517 amino acid residues and a signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Previous characterization of cDNA clones for the {beta}-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase has indicated that its C terminus has the amino acid sequence Lys-Asp-Gly-Leu, which, it has been suggested, is necessary for the retention of a polypeptide within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The {alpha}-subunit does not have this C-terminal sequence, and thus one function of the {beta}-subunit in the prolyl 4-hydroxylase tetramer appears to be to retain the enzyme within this cell organelle. Southern blot analyses of human genomic DNA with a cDNA probe for the {alpha}-subunit suggested the presence of only one gene encoding the two types of mRNA, which appear to result from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of primary transcripts of one gene.

  19. Reduced expression of kan-1 (encoding putative bile acid-CoA-amino acid N-acyltransferase) mRNA in livers of rats after partial hepatectomy and during sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, M; Arii, S; Higashitsuji, H; Mise, M; Fukumoto, M; Takano, S; Nakayama, H; Imamura, M; Fujita, J

    1995-01-01

    We isolated a cDNA clone, kan-1, from a rat liver cDNA library using a reverse transcriptase PCR cloning method. The kan-1 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 420 amino acids, and was 70 and 69% identical in nucleotide and amino acid sequences respectively with human liver bile acid-CoA-amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAT). Thus Kan-1 is probably a rat homologue of human BAT (rBAT). Kan-1/rBAT mRNA was mainly expressed in the livers of adult rats and rats immediately after, but not before, birth. It was expressed in the hepatocytes, the sinusoidal endothelial cells and the Kupffer cells of the liver. An anti-Kan-1/rBAT polyclonal antibody detected a protein of molecular mass 46 kDa in the liver. After partial hepatectomy, the levels of Kan-1/rBAT mRNA decreased at 6 and 12 h in the regenerating liver. In a sepsis model, hepatic expression of Kan-1/rBAT mRNA decreased at 6 and 12 h after caecal ligation and puncture. The kinetics of Kan-1/rBAT mRNA expression suggests that it may play a role in acute-phase reactions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7575455

  20. Transcription factor IID in the Archaea: sequences in the Thermococcus celer genome would encode a product closely related to the TATA-binding protein of eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, T. L.; Reich, C. I.; Whitelock, R. B.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The first step in transcription initiation in eukaryotes is mediated by the TATA-binding protein, a subunit of the transcription factor IID complex. We have cloned and sequenced the gene for a presumptive homolog of this eukaryotic protein from Thermococcus celer, a member of the Archaea (formerly archaebacteria). The protein encoded by the archaeal gene is a tandem repeat of a conserved domain, corresponding to the repeated domain in its eukaryotic counterparts. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the two halves of the repeat are consistent with the duplication occurring before the divergence of the archael and eukaryotic domains. In conjunction with previous observations of similarity in RNA polymerase subunit composition and sequences and the finding of a transcription factor IIB-like sequence in Pyrococcus woesei (a relative of T. celer) it appears that major features of the eukaryotic transcription apparatus were well-established before the origin of eukaryotic cellular organization. The divergence between the two halves of the archael protein is less than that between the halves of the individual eukaryotic sequences, indicating that the average rate of sequence change in the archael protein has been less than in its eukaryotic counterparts. To the extent that this lower rate applies to the genome as a whole, a clearer picture of the early genes (and gene families) that gave rise to present-day genomes is more apt to emerge from the study of sequences from the Archaea than from the corresponding sequences from eukaryotes.

  1. Identification of cDNAs encoding viper venom hyaluronidases: cross-generic sequence conservation of full-length and unusually short variant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert A; Ibison, Frances; Wilbraham, Davina; Wagstaff, Simon C

    2007-05-01

    The immobilisation of prey by snakes is most efficiently achieved by the rapid dissemination of venom from its site of injection into the blood stream. Hyaluronidase is a common component of snake venoms and has been termed the "venom spreading factor". In the absence of nucleotide or protein sequence data to confirm the functional identity of this venom component, we interrogated a venom gland EST database for the saw-scaled viper, Echis ocellatus (Nigeria), using the gene ontology (GO) term "carbohydrate metabolism". A single hyalurononglucosaminadase-activity matching sequence (EOC00242) was found and used to design PCR primers to acquire the full-length cDNA sequence. Although very different from the bee venom and mammalian hyaluronidase sequences, the E. ocellatus sequence retained all the catalytic, positional and structural residues that characterise this class of carbohydrate metabolising hydrolases. An extraordinarily high level of sequence identity (>95%) was observed in analogous venom gland cDNA sequences isolated (by PCR) from another saw-scaled viper species, E. pyramidum leakeyi (Kenya), and from the sahara horned viper, Cerastes cerastes cerastes (Egypt) and the puff adder, Bitis arietans (Nigeria). Smaller amplicons, lacking hyaluronidase catalytic residues because of 768 bp or 855 bp central deletions, appear to encode either truncated peptides without hyaluronidase activity, or are non-translated transcripts because they lack consensus translation initiating motifs. PMID:17210232

  2. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  3. Amino acid sequence of horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle troponin C.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kagami, O; Takagi, T; Konishi, K

    1989-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of troponin C obtained from horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle was determined by sequence analysis and alignments of chemically and enzymatically cleaved peptides. Troponin C is composed of 153 amino acid residues with a blocked N-terminus and contains no tryptophan or cysteine residue. The site I, one of the four Ca2+-binding sites, is considered to have lost its ability to bind Ca2+ owing to the replacements of certain amino acid residues.

  4. Typing of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Encoding Phages and lukSF-PV Gene Sequence Variation in Staphylococcus aureus from China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huanqiang; Hu, Fupin; Jin, Shu; Xu, Xiaogang; Zou, Yuhan; Ding, Baixing; He, Chunyan; Gong, Fang; Liu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, encoded by lukSF-PV genes), a bi-component and pore-forming toxin, is carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. The prevalence of PVL in Staphylococcus aureus has been reported around the globe. However, the data on PVL-encoding phage types, lukSF-PV gene variation and chromosomal phage insertion sites for PVL-positive S. aureus are limited, especially in China. In order to obtain a more complete understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PVL-positive S. aureus, an integrated and modified PCR-based scheme was applied to detect the PVL-encoding phage types. Phage insertion locus and the lukSF-PV variant were determined by PCR and sequencing. Meanwhile, the genetic background was characterized by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa) gene polymorphisms typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, accessory gene regulator (agr) locus typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seventy eight (78/1175, 6.6%) isolates possessed the lukSF-PV genes and 59.0% (46/78) of PVL-positive strains belonged to CC59 lineage. Eight known different PVL-encoding phage types were detected, and Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL (n = 13) and ΦPVL (n = 12) were the most prevalent among them. While 25 (25/78, 32.1%) isolates, belonging to ST30, and ST59 clones, were unable to be typed by the modified PCR-based scheme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at five locations in the lukSF-PV genes, two of which were non-synonymous. Maximum-likelihood tree analysis of attachment sites sequences detected six SNP profiles for attR and eight for attL, respectively. In conclusion, the PVL-positive S. aureus mainly harbored Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL and ΦPVL in the regions studied. lukSF-PV gene sequences, PVL-encoding phages, and phage insertion locus generally varied with lineages. Moreover, PVL-positive clones that have emerged worldwide likely carry distinct phages. PMID:27536288

  5. Typing of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Encoding Phages and lukSF-PV Gene Sequence Variation in Staphylococcus aureus from China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanqiang; Hu, Fupin; Jin, Shu; Xu, Xiaogang; Zou, Yuhan; Ding, Baixing; He, Chunyan; Gong, Fang; Liu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, encoded by lukSF-PV genes), a bi-component and pore-forming toxin, is carried by different staphylococcal bacteriophages. The prevalence of PVL in Staphylococcus aureus has been reported around the globe. However, the data on PVL-encoding phage types, lukSF-PV gene variation and chromosomal phage insertion sites for PVL-positive S. aureus are limited, especially in China. In order to obtain a more complete understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PVL-positive S. aureus, an integrated and modified PCR-based scheme was applied to detect the PVL-encoding phage types. Phage insertion locus and the lukSF-PV variant were determined by PCR and sequencing. Meanwhile, the genetic background was characterized by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, staphylococcal protein A (spa) gene polymorphisms typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing, accessory gene regulator (agr) locus typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Seventy eight (78/1175, 6.6%) isolates possessed the lukSF-PV genes and 59.0% (46/78) of PVL-positive strains belonged to CC59 lineage. Eight known different PVL-encoding phage types were detected, and Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL (n = 13) and ΦPVL (n = 12) were the most prevalent among them. While 25 (25/78, 32.1%) isolates, belonging to ST30, and ST59 clones, were unable to be typed by the modified PCR-based scheme. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at five locations in the lukSF-PV genes, two of which were non-synonymous. Maximum-likelihood tree analysis of attachment sites sequences detected six SNP profiles for attR and eight for attL, respectively. In conclusion, the PVL-positive S. aureus mainly harbored Φ7247PVL/ΦST5967PVL and ΦPVL in the regions studied. lukSF-PV gene sequences, PVL-encoding phages, and phage insertion locus generally varied with lineages. Moreover, PVL-positive clones that have emerged worldwide likely carry distinct phages. PMID:27536288

  6. Selective Enrichment and Sequencing of Whole Mitochondrial Genomes in the Presence of Nuclear Encoded Mitochondrial Pseudogenes (Numts)

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jonci N.; Shearman, Deborah C. A.; Brooks, Rob C.; Ballard, John W. O.

    2012-01-01

    Numts are an integral component of many eukaryote genomes offering a snapshot of the evolutionary process that led from the incorporation of an α-proteobacterium into a larger eukaryotic cell some 1.8 billion years ago. Although numt sequence can be harnessed as molecular marker, these sequences often remain unidentified and are mistaken for genuine mtDNA leading to erroneous interpretation of mtDNA data sets. It is therefore indispensable that during the process of amplifying and sequencing mitochondrial genes, preventive measures are taken to ensure the exclusion of numts to guarantee the recovery of genuine mtDNA. This applies to mtDNA analyses in general but especially to studies where mtDNAs are sequenced de novo as the launch pad for subsequent mtDNA-based research. By using a combination of dilution series and nested rolling circle amplification (RCA), we present a novel strategy to selectively amplify mtDNA and exclude the amplification of numt sequence. We have successfully applied this strategy to de novo sequence the mtDNA of the Black Field Cricket Teleogryllus commodus, a species known to contain numts. Aligning our assembled sequence to the reference genome of Teleogryllus emma (GenBank EU557269.1) led to the identification of a numt sequence in the reference sequence. This unexpected result further highlights the need of a reliable and accessible strategy to eliminate this source of error. PMID:22606342

  7. The IBO germination quantitative trait locus encodes a phosphatase 2C-related variant with a nonsynonymous amino acid change that interferes with abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Amiguet-Vercher, Amélia; Santuari, Luca; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Depuydt, Stephen; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Hardtke, Christian S

    2015-02-01

    Natural genetic variation is crucial for adaptability of plants to different environments. Seed dormancy prevents precocious germination in unsuitable conditions and is an adaptation to a major macro-environmental parameter, the seasonal variation in temperature and day length. Here we report the isolation of IBO, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that governs c. 30% of germination rate variance in an Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from the parental accessions Eilenburg-0 (Eil-0) and Loch Ness-0 (Lc-0). IBO encodes an uncharacterized phosphatase 2C-related protein, but neither the Eil-0 nor the Lc-0 variant, which differ in a single amino acid, have any appreciable phosphatase activity in in vitro assays. However, we found that the amino acid change in the Lc-0 variant of the IBO protein confers reduced germination rate. Moreover, unlike the Eil-0 variant of the protein, the Lc-0 variant can interfere with the activity of the phosphatase 2C ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 1 in vitro. This suggests that the Lc-0 variant possibly interferes with abscisic acid signaling, a notion that is supported by physiological assays. Thus, we isolated an example of a QTL allele with a nonsynonymous amino acid change that might mediate local adaptation of seed germination timing. PMID:25490966

  8. The thermostability of two kinds of recombinant ∆6-fatty acid desaturase with different N-terminal sequence lengths in low temperature.

    PubMed

    Lu, He; Zhu, Yu

    2013-09-01

    Two recombinant Rhizopus stolonifer ∆6-fatty acid desaturase enzymes with different-length N-termini were cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain INVScl: LRsD6D begins with the sequence of the N-terminal of the R. stolonifer ∆6-fatty acid desaturase native, encoding a deduced polypeptide of 459 amino acids (M-S-T-L-D-R-Q-S-I-F-T-I-K-E-L-E-S-I-S-Q-R-I-H-D-G-D-E-E-A-M-K-F), whereas SRsD6D begins with the amino acid sequence of the predicted ORF, encoding a deduced polypeptide of 430 amino acids (M-K-F) and LRsD6D is longer than SRsD6D by 29 amino acids (M-S-T-L-D-R-Q-S-I-F-T-I-K-E-L-E-S-I-S-Q-R-I-H-D-G-D-E-E-A). Bioinformatic analysis characterized the two recombinant ∆6-fatty acid desaturase enzymes with different-length N-termini, including three conserved histidine-rich motifs, hydropathy profile, and a cytochrome b5-like domain in the N-terminus. When the coding sequence was expressed in S. cerevisiae strain INVScl, the coding produced ∆6-fatty acid desaturase activity exhibited by RsD6D, leading to a novel peak corresponding to γ-linolenic acid methyl ester standards, which was detected with the same retention time. The residual activity of LRsD6D was 74 % at 15 °C for 4 h and that of SRsD6D was 43 %. Purified recombinant LRsD6D was more stable than SRsD6D, indicating that the N-terminal extension, containing mostly hydrophobic residues, affected the overall stability of recombinant LRsD6D.

  9. Comparative nucleotide sequences encoding the immunity proteins and the carboxyl-terminal peptides of colicins E2 and E3.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, P C; Rowsome, R W; Zuker, M; Visentin, L P

    1984-01-01

    Using the M13 dideoxy sequencing technique, we have established the DNA sequences of colicins E2 and E3 which encompass the receptor-binding and the catalytic domains of each of the nucleases, and their immunity (imm) genes. The imm gene of plasmid ColE2-P9 is 255 bp long and is separated from the end of the col gene by a dinucleotide. This gene pair is arranged similarly in plasmid ColE3-CA38 except that the intergenic space is 9 bp and the E3 imm gene is one codon shorter than its E2 counterpart. Comparisons of the E2 and E3 imm sequences indicate considerable divergence whereas the receptor-binding domains of both colicins are highly conserved. The two nuclease domains appear to share some sequence homology. A possible evolutionary relationship between colicin E3 and other microbial extracellular ribonucleases is also suggested from the sequence alignment analysis. PMID:6095211

  10. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W; Ehigiator, Humphrey N; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2011-11-15

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response.

  11. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology. PMID:26548558

  12. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-11-09

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology.

  13. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology. PMID:26548558

  14. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Motoko; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Manabu; Shimamoto, Chie; Hisano, Yasuko; Toyota, Tomoko; Balan, Shabeesh; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Yasuhide; Takagai, Shu; Yamada, Kohei; Ota, Motonori; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Owada, Yuji; Okano, Hideyuki; Mori, Norio; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in human neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, which suggested their involvement in the developmental stage of the central nervous system. Additionally, we resequenced the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 genes using 267 ASD patient and 1140 control samples and detected 47 (44 novel and 29 nonsynonymous) and 30 (17 novel and 14 nonsynonymous) variants for the SLC27A3 and SLC27A4, respectively, revealing that they are highly polymorphic with multiple rare variants. The SLC27A4 Ser209 allele was more frequently represented in ASD samples. Furthermore, we showed that a SLC27A4 Ser209 mutant resulted in significantly higher fluorescently-labeled fatty acid uptake into bEnd3 cells, a mouse brain capillary-derived endothelial cell line, compared with SLC27A4 Gly209, suggesting that the functional change may contribute to ASD pathophysiology. PMID:26548558

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Stephan, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. PMID:27491979

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. PMID:27491979

  17. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene encoding the pyoverdin biosynthetic enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Visca, P; Ciervo, A; Orsi, N

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme L-ornithine N5-oxygenase catalyzes the hydroxylation of L-ornithine (L-Orn), which represents an early step in the biosynthesis of the peptidic moiety of the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A gene bank of DNA from P. aeruginosa PAO1 (ATCC 15692) was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR3 and mobilized into the L-Orn N5-oxygenase-defective (pvdA) P. aeruginosa mutant PALS124. Screening for fluorescent transconjugants made it possible to identify the trans-complementing cosmid pPV4, which was able to restore pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity in the pvdA mutant PALS124. The 17-kb PAO1 DNA insert of pPV4 contained at least two genetic determinants involved in pyoverdin synthesis, i.e., pvdA and pvdC4, as shown by complementation analysis of a set of mutants blocked in different steps of the pyoverdin biosynthetic pathway. Deletion analysis, subcloning, and transposon mutagenesis enabled us to locate the pvdA gene in a minimum DNA fragment of 1.7 kb flanked by two SphI restriction sites. Complementation of the pvdA mutation was under stringent iron control; both pyoverdin synthesis and L-Orn N5-oxygenase activity were undetectable in cells of the trans-complemented mutant which had been grown in the presence of 100 microM FeCl3. The entire nucleotide sequence of the pvdA gene, from which the primary structure of the encoded polypeptide was deduced, was determined. The pvdA structural gene is 1,278 bp; the cloned DNA fragment contains at the 5' end of the gene a putative ribosome-binding site but apparently lacks known promoterlike sequences. The P. aeruginosa L-Orn N5-oxygenase gene codes for a 426-amino-acid peptide with a predicted molecular mass of 47.7 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.1. The enzyme shows approximately 50% homology with functional analogs, i.e., L-lysine N6-hydroxylase of aerobactin-producing Escherichia coli and L-Orn N5-oxygenase of ferrichrome-producing Ustilago maydis. The pvd

  18. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of a gene cluster from Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase and NADH:flavin mononucleotide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Mortimer, M W; Fisher, T S; Kahn, M L; Brockman, F J; Xun, L

    1997-01-01

    Nitrilotriacetate (NTA) is an important chelating agent in detergents and has also been used extensively in processing radionuclides. In Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600, biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase that oxidizes NTA to iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. The NTA monooxygenase activity requires two component proteins, component A and component B, but the function of each component is unclear. We have cloned and sequenced a gene cluster encoding components A and B (nmoA and nmoB) and two additional open reading frames, nmoR and nmoT, downstream of nmoA. Based on sequence similarities, nmoR and nmoT probably encode a regulatory protein and a transposase, respectively. The NmoA sequence was similar to a monooxygenase that uses reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) as reductant; NmoB was similar to an NADH:flavin mononucleotide (FMN) oxidoreductase. On the basis of this information, we tested the function of each component. Purified component B was shown to be an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase, and its activity could be separated from that of component A. When the Photobacterium fischeri NADH:FMN oxidoreductase was substituted for component B in the complete reaction, NTA was oxidized, showing that the substrate specificity of the reaction resides in component A. Component A is therefore an NTA monooxygenase that uses FMNH2 and O2 to oxidize NTA, and component B is an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase that provides FMNH2 for NTA oxidation. PMID:9023192

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor. PMID:24338313

  20. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor.

  1. A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes hlyA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, B W; Turner, G; Sooknanan, R; Malek, L T

    1997-01-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system primarily targeting mRNA from the Listeria monocytogenes hlyA gene was developed. This system enabled the detection of low numbers (< 10 CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes cells inoculated into a variety of dairy and egg products after 48 h of enrichment in modified listeria enrichment broth. PMID:8979357

  2. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  3. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  4. Nucleotide sequence and transcript organization of a region of the vaccinia virus genome which encodes a constitutively expressed gene required for DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Roseman, N A; Hruby, D E

    1987-05-01

    A vaccinia virus (VV) gene required for DNA replication has been mapped to the left side of the 16-kilobase (kb) VV HindIII D DNA fragment by marker rescue of a DNA- temperature-sensitive mutant, ts17, using cloned fragments of the viral genome. The region of VV DNA containing the ts17 locus (3.6 kb) was sequenced. This nucleotide sequence contains one complete open reading frame (ORF) and two incomplete ORFs reading from left to right. Analysis of this region at early times revealed that transcription from the incomplete upstream ORF terminates coincidentally with the complete ORF encoding the ts17 gene product, which is directly downstream. The predicted proteins encoded by this region correlate well with polypeptides mapped by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected early mRNA. The nucleotide sequences of a 1.3-kb BglII fragment derived from ts17 and from two ts17 revertants were also determined, and the nature of the ts17 mutation was identified. S1 nuclease protection studies were carried out to determine the 5' and 3' ends of the transcripts and to examine the kinetics of expression of the ts17 gene during viral infection. The ts17 transcript is present at both early and late times postinfection, indicating that this gene is constitutively expressed. Surprisingly, the transcriptional start throughout infection occurs at the proposed late regulatory element TAA, which immediately precedes the putative initiation codon ATG. Although the biological activity of the ts17-encoded polypeptide was not identified, it was noted that in ts17-infected cells, expression of a nonlinked VV immediate-early gene (thymidine kinase) was deregulated at the nonpermissive temperature. This result may indicate that the ts17 gene product is functionally required at an early step of the VV replicative cycle.

  5. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The amino acid sequence of elephant (Elephas maximus) myoglobin and the phylogeny of Proboscidea.

    PubMed

    Dene, H; Goodman, M; Romero-Herrera, A E

    1980-02-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of skeletal myoglobin from the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is reported. The functional significance of variations seen when this sequence is compared with that of sperm whale myoglobin is explored in the light of the crystallographic model available for the latter molecule. The phylogenetic implications of the elephant myoglobin amino acid sequence are evaluated by using the maximum parsimony technique. A similar analysis is also presented which incorporates all of the proteins sequenced from the elephant. These results are discussed with respect to current views on proboscidean phylogeny.

  7. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression analysis of cDNA encoding metalloprotein II (MP II) induced by single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) in polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazuo; Zhou, Yibing; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Na; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-11-01

    We amplified and analyzed the complete cDNA of metalloprotein II (MP II) from the somatic muscle of the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, the full length cDNA is 904 bp encoding 119 amino acids. The MP II cDNA sequence was subjected to BLAST searching in NCBI and was found to share high homology with hemerythrin of other worms. MP II expression of P. aibuhitensis exposed to single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) was analyzed using real time-PCR. MP II mRNA expression increased at the start of Cu(II) exposure, then decreased and finally return to the normal level. Expression pattern of MP II under Cd(II) exposure was time- and dose-dependent. MP II expression induced by a combination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) was similar to that induced by Cd(II) alone.

  8. Sequence Analysis of Staphylococcus hyicus ATCC 11249T, an Etiological Agent of Exudative Epidermitis in Swine, Reveals a Type VII Secretion System Locus and a Novel 116-Kilobase Genomic Island Harboring Toxin-Encoding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Foecking, Mark F.; Hsieh, Hsin-Yeh; Adkins, Pamela R. F.; Stewart, George C.; Middleton, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus hyicus is the primary etiological agent of exudative epidermitis in swine. Analysis of the complete genome sequence of the type strain revealed a locus encoding a type VII secretion system and a large chromosomal island harboring the genes encoding exfoliative toxin ExhA and an EDIN toxin homolog. PMID:25700402

  9. DNA sequence polymorphisms within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha (Gsα)-encoding (GNAS) genomic imprinting domain are associated with performance traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genes which are epigenetically regulated via genomic imprinting can be potential targets for artificial selection during animal breeding. Indeed, imprinted loci have been shown to underlie some important quantitative traits in domestic mammals, most notably muscle mass and fat deposition. In this candidate gene study, we have identified novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS) domain on bovine chromosome 13 and genetic merit for a range of performance traits in 848 progeny-tested Holstein-Friesian sires. The mammalian GNAS domain consists of a number of reciprocally-imprinted, alternatively-spliced genes which can play a major role in growth, development and disease in mice and humans. Based on the current annotation of the bovine GNAS domain, four of the SNPs analysed (rs43101491, rs43101493, rs43101485 and rs43101486) were located upstream of the GNAS gene, while one SNP (rs41694646) was located in the second intron of the GNAS gene. The final SNP (rs41694656) was located in the first exon of transcripts encoding the putative bovine neuroendocrine-specific protein NESP55, resulting in an aspartic acid-to-asparagine amino acid substitution at amino acid position 192. Results SNP genotype-phenotype association analyses indicate that the single intronic GNAS SNP (rs41694646) is associated (P ≤ 0.05) with a range of performance traits including milk yield, milk protein yield, the content of fat and protein in milk, culled cow carcass weight and progeny carcass conformation, measures of animal body size, direct calving difficulty (i.e. difficulty in calving due to the size of the calf) and gestation length. Association (P ≤ 0.01) with direct calving difficulty (i.e. due to calf size) and maternal calving difficulty (i.e. due to the maternal pelvic width size) was also observed at the rs43101491 SNP. Following

  10. Bovine thrombospondin-2: complete complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequence and immunolocalization in the external zones of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Danik, M; Chinn, A M; Lafeuillade, B; Keramidas, M; Aguesse-Germon, S; Penhoat, A; Chen, H; Mosher, D F; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1999-06-01

    Given the variety of biological functions in the adrenal cortex that are controlled by ACTH, we hypothesized that some extracellular proteins act as biological relays for this systemic hormone. One candidate protein [corticotropin-induced secreted protein (CISP)] was purified from the conditioned medium of bovine adrenocortical cells on the basis of a 5- to 14-fold increase in its synthesis after the addition of ACTH. We report here the cloning of overlapping complementary DNAs that span the sequence encoding the full-length protein (1170 amino acids). The deduced CISP protein sequence is 89% identical to that of human thrombospondin-2 (TSP2), but only 61% identical to that of bovine TSP1, confirming that CISP is the bovine ortholog of TSP2. The bovine TSP2 sequence aligned perfectly with human, mouse, and chicken TSP2 sequences, except for a gap of 2 amino acids located in a linker region. All 58 cysteine residues that are conserved in other species were present in the bovine sequence as well as most of the functional domains. Most endocrine tissues (adrenal cortex, testis, ovary, and placenta) appeared to express TSP2, as determined by Western blot analysis. The highest levels of TSP2 protein were found in the adrenal cortex, followed by the heart, spleen, brain, and kidney. A differential extent of N-glycosylation or tissular proteolytic maturation may be responsible for the mol wt differences observed between bovine TSP2 detected in the medium from primary cultures and that in fresh tissue extracts. The immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of TSP2 in the bovine adrenal gland revealed that the protein is much more abundant in the external zones (zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata) than in the internal reticularis zone, a pattern similar to that reported for ACTH receptors. This distribution clearly suggests that TSP2 is a candidate relay protein for a subset of ACTH actions in the adrenal cortex. PMID:10342868

  11. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  12. The Arabidopsis abscisic acid response locus ABI4 encodes an APETALA 2 domain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, R R; Wang, M L; Lynch, T J; Rao, S; Goodman, H M

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive abi4 mutants have pleiotropic defects in seed development, including decreased sensitivity to ABA inhibition of germination and altered seed-specific gene expression. This phenotype is consistent with a role for ABI4 in regulating seed responses to ABA and/or seed-specific signals. We isolated the ABI4 gene by positional cloning and confirmed its identity by complementation analysis. The predicted protein product shows homology to a plant-specific family of transcriptional regulators characterized by a conserved DNA binding domain, the APETALA 2 domain. The single mutant allele identified has a single base pair deletion, resulting in a frameshift that should disrupt the C-terminal half of the protein but leave the presumed DNA binding domain intact. Expression analyses showed that despite the seed-specific nature of the mutant phenotype, ABI4 expression is not seed specific. PMID:9634591

  13. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  14. Sequence heterogeneities of genes encoding 16S rRNAs in Paenibacillus polymyxa detected by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nübel, U; Engelen, B; Felske, A; Snaidr, J; Wieshuber, A; Amann, R I; Ludwig, W; Backhaus, H

    1996-10-01

    Sequence heterogeneities in 16S rRNA genes from individual strains of Paenibacillus polymyxa were detected by sequence-dependent separation of PCR products by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). A fragment of the 16S rRNA genes, comprising variable regions V6 to V8, was used as a target sequence for amplifications. PCR products from P. polymyxa (type strain) emerged as a well-defined pattern of bands in the gradient gel. Six plasmids with different inserts, individually demonstrating the migration characteristics of single bands of the pattern, were obtained by cloning the PCR products. Their sequences were analyzed as a representative sample of the total heterogeneity. An amount of 10 variant nucleotide positions in the fragment of 347 bp was observed, with all substitutions conserving the relevant secondary structures of the V6 and V8 regions in the RNA molecules. Hybridizations with specifically designed probes demonstrated different chromosomal locations of the respective rRNA genes. Amplifications of reverse-transcribed rRNA from ribosome preparations, as well as whole-cell hybridizations, revealed a predominant representation of particular sequences in ribosomes of exponentially growing laboratory cultures. Different strains of P. polymyxa showed not only remarkably differing patterns of PCR products in TGGE analysis but also discriminative whole-cell labeling with the designed oligonucleotide probes, indicating the different representation of individual sequences in active ribosomes. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of TGGE for the structural analysis of heterogeneous rRNA genes together with their expression, stress problems of the generation of meaningful data for 16S rRNA sequences and probe designs, and might have consequences for evolutionary concepts.

  15. Sequence heterogeneities of genes encoding 16S rRNAs in Paenibacillus polymyxa detected by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Nübel, U; Engelen, B; Felske, A; Snaidr, J; Wieshuber, A; Amann, R I; Ludwig, W; Backhaus, H

    1996-01-01

    Sequence heterogeneities in 16S rRNA genes from individual strains of Paenibacillus polymyxa were detected by sequence-dependent separation of PCR products by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). A fragment of the 16S rRNA genes, comprising variable regions V6 to V8, was used as a target sequence for amplifications. PCR products from P. polymyxa (type strain) emerged as a well-defined pattern of bands in the gradient gel. Six plasmids with different inserts, individually demonstrating the migration characteristics of single bands of the pattern, were obtained by cloning the PCR products. Their sequences were analyzed as a representative sample of the total heterogeneity. An amount of 10 variant nucleotide positions in the fragment of 347 bp was observed, with all substitutions conserving the relevant secondary structures of the V6 and V8 regions in the RNA molecules. Hybridizations with specifically designed probes demonstrated different chromosomal locations of the respective rRNA genes. Amplifications of reverse-transcribed rRNA from ribosome preparations, as well as whole-cell hybridizations, revealed a predominant representation of particular sequences in ribosomes of exponentially growing laboratory cultures. Different strains of P. polymyxa showed not only remarkably differing patterns of PCR products in TGGE analysis but also discriminative whole-cell labeling with the designed oligonucleotide probes, indicating the different representation of individual sequences in active ribosomes. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of TGGE for the structural analysis of heterogeneous rRNA genes together with their expression, stress problems of the generation of meaningful data for 16S rRNA sequences and probe designs, and might have consequences for evolutionary concepts. PMID:8824607

  16. Method of increasing conversion of a fatty acid to its corresponding dicarboxylic acid

    DOEpatents

    Craft, David L.; Wilson, C. Ron; Eirich, Dudley; Zhang, Yeyan

    2004-09-14

    A nucleic acid sequence including a CYP promoter operably linked to nucleic acid encoding a heterologous protein is provided to increase transcription of the nucleic acid. Expression vectors and host cells containing the nucleic acid sequence are also provided. The methods and compositions described herein are especially useful in the production of polycarboxylic acids by yeast cells.

  17. Comparative DNA sequence analysis of the host shutoff genes of different strains of herpes simplex virus: type 2 strain HG52 encodes a truncated UL41 product.

    PubMed

    Everett, R D; Fenwick, M L

    1990-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles contain a factor which can shut off host protein synthesis during the earliest stages of infection. The efficiency of shutoff varies between different strains of virus, type 2 strains being generally more active than type 1 strains. However, HSV-2 strain HG52 is deficient in host cell shutoff. We have investigated the basis of the different shutoff phenotypes of a strong shutoff strain (HSV-2 strain G), a weak shutoff virus (HSV-1 strain 17 syn+) and HG52 by comparative DNA sequence analysis of gene UL41, which encodes the virion-associated host shutoff factor. The results show that the UL41 genes of strains G and 17 are 86% homologous and that the lack of shutoff by HG52 is likely to be explained by a frameshift mutation within its UL41 coding sequence.

  18. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  19. Protein sequences insight into heavy metal tolerance in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 encoded by plasmid pESA3.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Kajsik, Michal; Forsythe, Stephen; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2015-12-01

    The recently annotated genome of the bacterium Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 suggests that the organism has the ability to bind heavy metals. This study demonstrates heavy metal tolerance in C. sakazakii, in which proteins with the heavy metal interaction were recognized by computational and experimental study. As the result, approximately one-fourth of proteins encoded on the plasmid pESA3 are proposed to have potential interaction with heavy metals. Interaction between heavy metals and predicted proteins was further corroborated using protein crystal structures from protein data bank database and comparison of metal-binding ligands. In addition, a phylogenetic study was undertaken for the toxic heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which generated relatedness clustering for lead, cadmium and arsenic. Laboratory studies confirmed the organism's tolerance to tellurite, copper and silver. These experimental and computational study data extend our understanding of the genes encoding for proteins of this important neonatal pathogen and provide further insights into the genotypes associated with features that can contribute to its persistence in the environment. The information will be of value for future environmental protection from heavy toxic metals. PMID:26384977

  20. Protein sequences insight into heavy metal tolerance in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 encoded by plasmid pESA3.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Kajsik, Michal; Forsythe, Stephen; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2015-12-01

    The recently annotated genome of the bacterium Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 suggests that the organism has the ability to bind heavy metals. This study demonstrates heavy metal tolerance in C. sakazakii, in which proteins with the heavy metal interaction were recognized by computational and experimental study. As the result, approximately one-fourth of proteins encoded on the plasmid pESA3 are proposed to have potential interaction with heavy metals. Interaction between heavy metals and predicted proteins was further corroborated using protein crystal structures from protein data bank database and comparison of metal-binding ligands. In addition, a phylogenetic study was undertaken for the toxic heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which generated relatedness clustering for lead, cadmium and arsenic. Laboratory studies confirmed the organism's tolerance to tellurite, copper and silver. These experimental and computational study data extend our understanding of the genes encoding for proteins of this important neonatal pathogen and provide further insights into the genotypes associated with features that can contribute to its persistence in the environment. The information will be of value for future environmental protection from heavy toxic metals.

  1. Non-Hebbian properties of long-term potentiation enable high-capacity encoding of temporal sequences.

    PubMed

    Granger, R; Whitson, J; Larson, J; Lynch, G

    1994-10-11

    A hypothesis commonly found in biological and computational studies of synaptic plasticity embodies a version of the 1949 postulate of Hebb that coactivity of pre- and postsynaptic elements results in increased efficacy of their synaptic contacts. This general proposal presaged the identification of the first and still only known long-lasting synaptic plasticity mechanism, long-term potentiation (LTP). Yet the detailed physiology of LTP induction and expression differs in many specifics from Hebb's rule. Incorporation of these physiological LTP constraints into a simple non-Hebbian network model enabled development of "sequence detectors" that respond preferentially to the sequences on which they were trained. The network was found to have unexpected capacity (e.g., 50 x 10(6) random sequences in a network of 10(5) cells), which scales linearly with network size, thereby addressing the question of memory capacity in brain circuitry of realistic size.

  2. Sequence analysis of four acidic beta-crystallin subunits of amphibian lenses: phylogenetic comparison between beta- and gamma-crystallins.

    PubMed

    Lu, S F; Pan, F M; Chiou, S H

    1996-04-16

    beta-Crystallins composed of the most heterogeneous group of subunit chains among the three major crystallin families of vertebrates, i.e. alpha-, beta- and gamma-crystallins, are less well understood at the structural and functional levels than the other two. They comprise a multigene family with at least three basic (betaB1-3) and four acidic (betaA1-4) subunit polypeptides. In order to facilitate the determination of the primary sequences of all these ubiquitous crystallin subunits present in all vertebrate species, cDNA mixture was synthesized from the poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from bullfrog eye lenses. We report here a protocol of Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was used to amplify cDNAs encoding beta-crystallin acidic subunit polypeptides by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Four complete full-length reading frames with two each of 597 and 648 base pairs, which cover four deduced protein sequences of 198 (betaA1-1 and betaA1-2) and 215 (betaA3-1 and betaA3-2) amino acids including the universal initiating methionine, were revealed by nucleotide sequencing. They show about 96-98% sequence similarity among themselves and 76-80%, 80-83% to the homologous betaA1/A3 crystallins of bovine and human species respectively, revealing the close structural relationship among acidic subunits of all beta-crystallins even from remotely related species. In this study a phylogenetic comparison based on amino-acid sequences of various betaA1/A3 crystallins plus the major basic beta-crystallin (betaBp) and gamma-crystallin from different vertebrate species is made using a combination of distance matrix and approximate parsimony methods, which correctly groups these betaA crystallin chains together as one family distinct from basic beta-crystallins and gamma-crystallin and further corroborates the supposition that beta- and gamma-crystallins form a superfamily with a common ancestry.

  3. The structures of four bombesins and their cloned precursor-encoding cDNAs from acid-solvated skin secretion of the European yellow-bellied toad, Bombina variegata.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Wang, Hui; Xue, Yilu; Wu, Youjia; Zhou, Mei; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Tianbao; Wang, Lei; Shaw, Chris

    2012-08-01

    Four different bombesins (bombesin, His(6)-bombesin, Phe(13)-bombesin and Asp(2)-, Phe(4)-SAP-bombesin) have been identified by a systematic sequencing study of peptides in reverse phase HPLC fractions of the skin secretion of the European yellow-bellied toad, Bombina variegata, that had been solvated in 0.1% (v/v) aqueous trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and stored frozen at -20°C for 12 years. By using a 3'- and 5'-RACE PCR strategy, the corresponding biosynthetic precursor-encoding cDNAs of all four peptides were cloned from a cDNA library made from the same long-term frozen, acid-solvated skin secretion sample following thawing and lyophilization. Canonical bombesin and His(6)-bombesin are classical bombesin sub-family members, whereas Phe(13)-bombesin and Asp(2)-, Phe(4)-SAP-bombesin, belong to the litorin/ranatensin sub-family of bombesin-like peptides (BLPs). Assignment of these peptides to respective sub-families, was based upon both their primary structural similarities and their comparative pharmacological activities. An interesting observation in this study, was that the nucleotide sequences of the open-reading frames of cloned cDNAs encoding bombesin and its His(6)-substituted analog, were identical except for a single base that was responsible for the change observed at the position 6 residue in the mature peptide from Asn to His. In contrast, the precursor cDNA nucleotide sequences encoding the Phe(13)-bombesins, exhibited 53 base differences. The pharmacological activities of synthetic replicates of each bombesin were compared using two different mammalian smooth muscle preparations and all four peptides were found to be active. However, there were significant differences in their relative potencies. PMID:22687368

  4. Characterization of DNA-binding sequences for CcaR in the cephamycin-clavulanic acid supercluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed

    Santamarta, I; López-García, M T; Kurt, A; Nárdiz, N; Alvarez-Álvarez, R; Pérez-Redondo, R; Martín, J F; Liras, P

    2011-08-01

    RT-PCR analysis of the genes in the clavulanic acid cluster revealed three transcriptional polycistronic units that comprised the ceaS2-bls2-pah2-cas2, cyp-fd-orf12-orf13 and oppA2-orf16 genes, whereas oat2, car, oppA1, claR, orf14, gcaS and pbpA were expressed as monocistronic transcripts. Quantitative RT-PCR of Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 and the mutant S. clavuligerus ccaR::aph showed that, in the mutant, there was a 1000- to 10,000-fold lower transcript level for the ceaS2 to cas2 polycistronic transcript that encoded CeaS2, the first enzyme of the clavulanic acid pathway that commits arginine to clavulanic acid biosynthesis. Smaller decreases in expression were observed in the ccaR mutant for other genes in the cluster. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF analysis confirmed the absence in the mutant strain of proteins CeaS2, Bls2, Pah2 and Car that are required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis, and CefF and IPNS that are required for cephamycin biosynthesis. Gel shift electrophoresis using recombinant r-CcaR protein showed that it bound to the ceaS2 and claR promoter regions in the clavulanic acid cluster, and to the lat, cefF, cefD-cmcI and ccaR promoter regions in the cephamycin C gene cluster. Footprinting experiments indicated that triple heptameric conserved sequences were protected by r-CcaR, and allowed identification of heptameric sequences as CcaR binding sites.

  5. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  6. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  7. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  8. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  9. Genome sequence of the deep-sea gamma-proteobacterium Idiomarina loihiensis reveals amino acid fermentation as a source of carbon and energy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaobin; Saw, Jimmy H; Lee, Kit Shan; Freitas, Tracey A; Belisle, Claude; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Donachie, Stuart P; Pikina, Alla; Galperin, Michael Y; Koonin, Eugene V; Makarova, Kira S; Omelchenko, Marina V; Sorokin, Alexander; Wolf, Yuri I; Li, Qing X; Keum, Young Soo; Campbell, Sonia; Denery, Judith; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Shibata, Satoshi; Malahoff, Alexander; Alam, Maqsudul

    2004-12-28

    We report the complete genome sequence of the deep-sea gamma-proteobacterium, Idiomarina loihiensis, isolated recently from a hydrothermal vent at 1,300-m depth on the Loihi submarine volcano, Hawaii. The I. loihiensis genome comprises a single chromosome of 2,839,318 base pairs, encoding 2,640 proteins, four rRNA operons, and 56 tRNA genes. A comparison of I. loihiensis to the genomes of other gamma-proteobacteria reveals abundance of amino acid transport and degradation enzymes, but a loss of sugar transport systems and certain enzymes of sugar metabolism. This finding suggests that I. loihiensis relies primarily on amino acid catabolism, rather than on sugar fermentation, for carbon and energy. Enzymes for biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, the majority of amino acids, and coenzymes are encoded in the genome, but biosynthetic pathways for Leu, Ile, Val, Thr, and Met are incomplete. Auxotrophy for Val and Thr was confirmed by in vivo experiments. The I. loihiensis genome contains a cluster of 32 genes encoding enzymes for exopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide synthesis. It also encodes diverse peptidases, a variety of peptide and amino acid uptake systems, and versatile signal transduction machinery. We propose that the source of amino acids for I. loihiensis growth are the proteinaceous particles present in the deep sea hydrothermal vent waters. I. loihiensis would colonize these particles by using the secreted exopolysaccharide, digest these proteins, and metabolize the resulting peptides and amino acids. In summary, the I. loihiensis genome reveals an integrated mechanism of metabolic adaptation to the constantly changing deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystem. PMID:15596722

  10. Prediction of G protein-coupled receptor encoding sequences from the synganglion transcriptome of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is a pest which causes multiple health complications in cattle. The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) super-family presents an interesting target for developing novel tick control methods. However, GPCRs share limited sequence similarity among or...

  11. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  12. A conserved predicted pseudoknot in the NS2A-encoding sequence of West Nile and Japanese encephalitis flaviviruses suggests NS1' may derive from ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F

    2009-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses form a tight subgroup within the larger Flavivirus genus. These viruses utilize a single-polyprotein expression strategy, resulting in ~10 mature proteins. Plotting the conservation at synonymous sites along the polyprotein coding sequence reveals strong conservation peaks at the very 5' end of the coding sequence, and also at the 5' end of the sequence encoding the NS2A protein. Such peaks are generally indicative of functionally important non-coding sequence elements. The second peak corresponds to a predicted stable pseudoknot structure whose biological importance is supported by compensatory mutations that preserve the structure. The pseudoknot is preceded by a conserved slippery heptanucleotide (Y CCU UUU), thus forming a classical stimulatory motif for -1 ribosomal frameshifting. We hypothesize, therefore, that the functional importance of the pseudoknot is to stimulate a portion of ribosomes to shift -1 nt into a short (45 codon), conserved, overlapping open reading frame, termed foo. Since cleavage at the NS1-NS2A boundary is known to require synthesis of NS2A in cis, the resulting transframe fusion protein is predicted to be NS1-NS2AN-term-FOO. We hypothesize that this may explain the origin of the previously identified NS1 'extension' protein in JEV-group flaviviruses, known as NS1'. PMID:19196463

  13. Two beta-glycanase genes are clustered in Bacillus polymyxa: molecular cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of genes encoding a xylanase and an endo-beta-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucanase.

    PubMed

    Gosalbes, M J; Pérez-González, J A; González, R; Navarro, A

    1991-12-01

    Two genes, xynD and gluB, encoding a xylanase and an endo-beta-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucanase (lichenase) from Bacillus polymyxa have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. A sequenced DNA fragment of 4,466 bp contains both genes, which are separated by 155 bp. The xynD and gluB genes encode proteins of 67.8 kDa (XYND) and 27 kDa (GLUB). Two peptides with molecular masses of 62 and 53 kDa appear in cell extracts of E. coli and culture supernatants of B. subtilis clones containing the xynD gene. Both peptides show xylanase activity in zymogram analysis. The XYND enzyme also shows alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase activity. The XYND peptide and the xylanase XYNZ from Clostridium thermocellum (O. Grépinet, M. C. Chebrou, and P. Béguin, J. Bacteriol. 170:4582-4588, 1988) show 64% homology in a stretch of about 280 amino acids. PMID:1938968

  14. Two beta-glycanase genes are clustered in Bacillus polymyxa: molecular cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of genes encoding a xylanase and an endo-beta-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucanase.

    PubMed

    Gosalbes, M J; Pérez-González, J A; González, R; Navarro, A

    1991-12-01

    Two genes, xynD and gluB, encoding a xylanase and an endo-beta-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucanase (lichenase) from Bacillus polymyxa have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. A sequenced DNA fragment of 4,466 bp contains both genes, which are separated by 155 bp. The xynD and gluB genes encode proteins of 67.8 kDa (XYND) and 27 kDa (GLUB). Two peptides with molecular masses of 62 and 53 kDa appear in cell extracts of E. coli and culture supernatants of B. subtilis clones containing the xynD gene. Both peptides show xylanase activity in zymogram analysis. The XYND enzyme also shows alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase activity. The XYND peptide and the xylanase XYNZ from Clostridium thermocellum (O. Grépinet, M. C. Chebrou, and P. Béguin, J. Bacteriol. 170:4582-4588, 1988) show 64% homology in a stretch of about 280 amino acids.

  15. Two beta-glycanase genes are clustered in Bacillus polymyxa: molecular cloning, expression, and sequence analysis of genes encoding a xylanase and an endo-beta-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucanase.

    PubMed Central

    Gosalbes, M J; Pérez-González, J A; González, R; Navarro, A

    1991-01-01

    Two genes, xynD and gluB, encoding a xylanase and an endo-beta-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucanase (lichenase) from Bacillus polymyxa have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. A sequenced DNA fragment of 4,466 bp contains both genes, which are separated by 155 bp. The xynD and gluB genes encode proteins of 67.8 kDa (XYND) and 27 kDa (GLUB). Two peptides with molecular masses of 62 and 53 kDa appear in cell extracts of E. coli and culture supernatants of B. subtilis clones containing the xynD gene. Both peptides show xylanase activity in zymogram analysis. The XYND enzyme also shows alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase activity. The XYND peptide and the xylanase XYNZ from Clostridium thermocellum (O. Grépinet, M. C. Chebrou, and P. Béguin, J. Bacteriol. 170:4582-4588, 1988) show 64% homology in a stretch of about 280 amino acids. Images FIG. 3 PMID:1938968

  16. Congruence of chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded DNA sequence variations used to assess species boundaries in the soil microalga Heterococcus (Stramenopiles, Xanthophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterococcus is a microalgal genus of Xanthophyceae (Stramenopiles) that is common and widespread in soils, especially from cold regions. Species are characterized by extensively branched filaments produced when grown on agarized culture medium. Despite the large number of species described exclusively using light microscopic morphology, the assessment of species diversity is hampered by extensive morphological plasticity. Results Two independent types of molecular data, the chloroplast-encoded psbA/rbcL spacer complemented by rbcL gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 of the nuclear rDNA cistron (ITS2), congruently recovered a robust phylogenetic structure. With ITS2 considerable sequence and secondary structure divergence existed among the eight species, but a combined sequence and secondary structure phylogenetic analysis confined to helix II of ITS2 corroborated relationships as inferred from the rbcL gene phylogeny. Intra-genomic divergence of ITS2 sequences was revealed in many strains. The ‘monophyletic species concept’, appropriate for microalgae without known sexual reproduction, revealed eight different species. Species boundaries established using the molecular-based monophyletic species concept were more conservative than the traditional morphological species concept. Within a species, almost identical chloroplast marker sequences (genotypes) were repeatedly recovered from strains of different origins. At least two species had widespread geographical distributions; however, within a given species, genotypes recovered from Antarctic strains were distinct from those in temperate habitats. Furthermore, the sequence diversity may correspond to adaptation to different types of habitats or climates. Conclusions We established a method and a reference data base for the unambiguous identification of species of the common soil microalgal genus Heterococcus which uses DNA sequence variation in markers from plastid and nuclear genomes. The

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of dicyemid mesozoans (phylum Dicyemida) from innexin amino acid sequences: dicyemids are not related to Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito G; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-06-01

    Dicyemid mesozoans are endoparasites, or endosymbionts, found only in the renal sac of benthic cephalopod molluscs. The body organization of dicyemids is very simple, consisting of usually 10 to 40 cells, with neither body cavities nor differentiated organs. Dicyemids were considered as primitive animals, and the out-group of all metazoans, or as occupying a basal position of lophotrochozoans close to flatworms. We cloned cDNAs encoding for the gap junction component proteins, innexin, from the dicyemids. Its expression pattern was observed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In adult individuals, the innexin was expressed in calottes, infusorigens, and infusoriform embryos. The unique temporal pattern was observed in the developing infusoriform embryos. Innexin amino acid sequences had taxon-specific indels which enabled identification of the 3 major protostome lineages, i.e., 2 ecdysozoans (arthropods and nematodes) and the lophotrochozoans. The dicyemids show typical, lophotrochozoan-type indels. In addition, the Bayesian and maximum likelihood trees based on the innexin amino acid sequences suggested dicyemids to be more closely related to the higher lophotrochozoans than to the flatworms. Flatworms were the sister group, or consistently basal, to the other lophotrochozoan clade that included dicyemids, annelids, molluscs, and brachiopods.

  18. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197442

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  3. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding the human ribosomal protein L11 mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V.P.; Filipenko, M.L.; Muravlev, A.I.

    1995-02-01

    To clone the RPL11 cDNA, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the single-stranded cDNA synthesized on the total placentary poly(A){sup +}mRNA with the use of primer M245 containing a 3{prime}-terminal oligo(dT)-tract, the 5{prime}terminal hexadecanucleotide sequence of the M13 universal primer, and a NotiI restriction site between them. On the basis of the known sequence of the 5{prime}-end of the human ribosomal protein L11 mRNA, we chose two partially overlapping deoxyribooligonucleotides as 5{prime}-terminal primers in the amplification of the RPL11 cDNA. A pair of partially overlapping oligonucleotides complementary to the oligo(dT)-containing primer were used as 3{prime}-terminal primers.

  4. The brown midrib3 (bm3) mutation in maize occurs in the gene encoding caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Vignols, F; Rigau, J; Torres, M A; Capellades, M; Puigdomènech, P

    1995-01-01

    The brown midrib mutations are among the earliest described in maize. Plants containing a brown midrib mutation exhibit a reddish brown pigmentation of the leaf midrib starting when there are four to six leaves. These mutations are known to alter lignin composition and digestibility of plants and therefore constitute prime candidates in the breeding of silage maize. Here, we show that two independent brown midrib3 (bm3) mutations have resulted from structural changes in the COMT gene, which encodes the enzyme O-methyltransferase (COMT; EC 2.1.1.6), involved in lignin biosynthesis. Our results indicate that the bm3-1 allele (the reference mutant allele) has arisen from an insertional event producing a COMT mRNA altered in both size and amount. By sequencing a COMT cDNA clone obtained from bm3-1 maize, a retrotransposon with homology to the B5 element has been found to be inserted near the junction of the 3' coding region of the COMT gene intron. The second bm3 allele, bm3-2, has resulted from a deletion of part of the COMT gene. These alterations of the COMT gene were confirmed by DNA gel blot and polymerase chain reaction amplification analyses. These results clearly demonstrate that mutations at the COMT gene give a brown midrib3 phenotype. Thus, the gene genetically recognized as bm3 is the same as the one coding for COMT. PMID:7773015

  5. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  6. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  7. TranslatorX: multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences guided by amino acid translations.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Zardoya, Rafael; Telford, Maximilian J

    2010-07-01

    We present TranslatorX, a web server designed to align protein-coding nucleotide sequences based on their corresponding amino acid translations. Many comparisons between biological sequences (nucleic acids and proteins) involve the construction of multiple alignments. Alignments represent a statement regarding the homology between individual nucleotides or amino acids within homologous genes. As protein-coding DNA sequences evolve as triplets of nucleotides (codons) and it is known that sequence similarity degrades more rapidly at the DNA than at the amino acid level, alignments are generally more accurate when based on amino acids than on their corresponding nucleotides. TranslatorX novelties include: (i) use of all documented genetic codes and the possibility of assigning different genetic codes for each sequence; (ii) a battery of different multiple alignment programs; (iii) translation of ambiguous codons when possible; (iv) an innovative criterion to clean nucleotide alignments with GBlocks based on protein information; and (v) a rich output, including Jalview-powered graphical visualization of the alignments, codon-based alignments coloured according to the corresponding amino acids, measures of compositional bias and first, second and third codon position specific alignments. The TranslatorX server is freely available at http://translatorx.co.uk.

  8. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  9. Evolution of phosphagen kinase V. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of two molluscan arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ban, T; Furukohri, T

    1997-06-20

    The cDNAs of arginine kinases from the chiton Liolophura japonica (Polyplacophora) and the turbanshell Battilus cornutus (Gastropoda) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the complete nucleotide sequences of 1669 and 1624 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Liolophura arginine kinase is 1050 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 349 amino acid residues, and that for Battilus is 1077 nucleotides and 358 residues. The validity of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequence was supported by chemical sequencing of internal tryptic peptides. The molecular masses were calculated to be 39,057 and 39,795 Da, respectively. The amino acid sequence of Liolophura arginine kinase showed 65-68% identity with those of Battilus and Nordotis (abalone) arginine kinases, and the homology between Battilus and Nordotis was 79%. Molluscan arginine kinases also show lower, but significant homology (38-43%) with rabbit creatine kinase. The sequences of arginine kinases could be used as a molecular clock to elucidate the phylogeny of Mollusca, one of the most diverse animal phyla.

  10. Homology of amino acid sequences of rat liver cathepsins B and H with that of papain.

    PubMed Central

    Takio, K; Towatari, T; Katunuma, N; Teller, D C; Titani, K

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of rat liver lysosomal thiol endopeptidases, cathepsins B and H, are presented and compared with that of the plant thiol protease papain. The 252-residue sequence of cathepsin B and the 220-residue sequence of cathepsin H were determined largely by automated Edman degradation of their intact polypeptide chains and of the two chains of each enzyme generated by limited proteolysis. Subfragments of the chains were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl and tryptophanyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of cathepsins B and H with each other and with that of papain demonstrates a striking homology among their primary structures. Sequence identity is extremely high in regions which, according to the three-dimensional structure of papain, constitute the catalytic site. The results not only reveal the first structural features of mammalian thiol endopeptidases but also provide insight into the evolutionary relationships among plant and mammalian thiol proteases. PMID:6574504

  11. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a PVGOX gene encoding glucose oxidase in Penicillium viticola F1 strain and it's expression quantitation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ibrar; Qayyum, Sadia; Ahmed, Shehzad; Niaz, Zeeshan; Fatima, Nighat; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-11-01

    The PVGOX gene (accession number: KT452630) was isolated from genomic DNA of the marine fungi Penicillium viticola F1 by Genome Walking and their expression analysis was done by Fluorescent RT-PCR. An open reading frame of 1806bp encoding a 601 amino acid protein (isoelectric point: 5.01) with a calculated molecular weight of 65,535.4 was characterized. The deduced protein showed 75%, 71%, 69% and 64% identity to those deduced from the glucose oxidase (GOX) genes from different fungal strains including; Talaromyces variabilis, Beauveria bassiana, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus niger, respectively. The promoter of the gene (intronless) had two TATA boxes around the base pair number -88 and -94 and as well as a CAAT box at -100. However, the terminator of the PVGOX gene does not contain any polyadenylation site (AATAAA). The protein deduced from the PVGOX gene had a signal peptide containing 17 amino acids, three cysteine residues and six potential N-linked glycosylation sites, among them, -N-K-T-Y- at 41 amino acid, -N-R-S-L- at 113 amino acid, -N-G-T-I- at 192 amino acid, -N-T-T-A at 215 amino acid, -N-F-T-E at 373 amino acid and -N-V-T-A- at 408 amino acid were the most possible N-glycosylation sites. Furthermore, the relative transcription level of the PVGOX gene was also stimulated in the presence of 4% (w/v) of calcium carbonate and 0.5 % (v/v) of CSL in the production medium compared with that of the PVGOX gene when the fungal strain F1 was grown in the absence of calcium carbonate and CSL in the production medium, suggesting that under the optimal conditions, the expression of the PVGOX gene responsible for gluconic acid biosynthesis was enhanced, leading to increased gluconic acid production. Therefore, the highly glycosylated oxidase enzyme produced by P. viticola F1 strain might be a good producer in the fermentation process for the industrial level production of gluconic acid.

  12. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a PVGOX gene encoding glucose oxidase in Penicillium viticola F1 strain and it's expression quantitation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ibrar; Qayyum, Sadia; Ahmed, Shehzad; Niaz, Zeeshan; Fatima, Nighat; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-11-01

    The PVGOX gene (accession number: KT452630) was isolated from genomic DNA of the marine fungi Penicillium viticola F1 by Genome Walking and their expression analysis was done by Fluorescent RT-PCR. An open reading frame of 1806bp encoding a 601 amino acid protein (isoelectric point: 5.01) with a calculated molecular weight of 65,535.4 was characterized. The deduced protein showed 75%, 71%, 69% and 64% identity to those deduced from the glucose oxidase (GOX) genes from different fungal strains including; Talaromyces variabilis, Beauveria bassiana, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus niger, respectively. The promoter of the gene (intronless) had two TATA boxes around the base pair number -88 and -94 and as well as a CAAT box at -100. However, the terminator of the PVGOX gene does not contain any polyadenylation site (AATAAA). The protein deduced from the PVGOX gene had a signal peptide containing 17 amino acids, three cysteine residues and six potential N-linked glycosylation sites, among them, -N-K-T-Y- at 41 amino acid, -N-R-S-L- at 113 amino acid, -N-G-T-I- at 192 amino acid, -N-T-T-A at 215 amino acid, -N-F-T-E at 373 amino acid and -N-V-T-A- at 408 amino acid were the most possible N-glycosylation sites. Furthermore, the relative transcription level of the PVGOX gene was also stimulated in the presence of 4% (w/v) of calcium carbonate and 0.5 % (v/v) of CSL in the production medium compared with that of the PVGOX gene when the fungal strain F1 was grown in the absence of calcium carbonate and CSL in the production medium, suggesting that under the optimal conditions, the expression of the PVGOX gene responsible for gluconic acid biosynthesis was enhanced, leading to increased gluconic acid production. Therefore, the highly glycosylated oxidase enzyme produced by P. viticola F1 strain might be a good producer in the fermentation process for the industrial level production of gluconic acid. PMID:27425865

  13. [Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein to identify DNA sequences to control its expression]: Annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1993-12-31

    The {beta}-conglycinins are soybean storage proteins encoded by genes that are tightly regulated both spatially and temporally. The author has studied the Soybean Embryo Factors that bind to the cis elements that are presumably involved in regulating the expression of these gene promoters using both in vitro binding assays and in vivo expression assays in transgenic plants. The results obtained to date have made it evident that there are no clear correlations between the in vivo and the in vitro results, i.e., changes in single nucleotides that alter protein:DNA interactions can have little or no impact on expression of the promoters in vivo. In contrast, the CATGCAT (RY element) sequence, for which no binding proteins have been identified, appear to be very important for controlling gene expression. Although the author has been attempting to isolate and characterize the SEF 3 and SEF 4 proteins he has to date not been successful using protein expression libraries derived from embryo cDNAs. He is continuing experiments of this type, as well as more standard protein purification procedures. He has constructed a number of chimeric promoters with different upstream and downstream regulatory sequences in an attempt to identify, by expression assays in transgenic plants, those sequences that are uniquely responsible for the temporal and spatially regulated expression of the {beta}-conglycinin genes. Because of the results of previously published work from this laboratory, the author concluded that the core promoters themselves may be responsible for the regulation. Therefore, he has focused his efforts on these sequences, the RY element, and the SEF 3 binding sequences. In a follow-up to the studies to modify the expression of genes in seeds, he will express several types of human and other animal genes in seeds of transgenic plants.

  14. The stripe rust resistance gene Yr10 encodes an evolutionary-conserved and unique CC-NBS-LRR sequence in wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Frick, Michele; Huel, Réné; Nykiforuk, Cory L; Wang, Xiaomin; Gaudet, Denis A; Eudes, François; Conner, Robert L; Kuzyk, Alan; Chen, Qin; Kang, Zhensheng; Laroche, André

    2014-12-01

    The first seedling or all-stage resistance (R) R gene against stripe rust isolated from Moro wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) using a map-based cloning approach was identified as Yr10. Clone 4B of this gene encodes a highly evolutionary-conserved and unique CC-NBS-LRR sequence. Clone 4E, a homolog of Yr10, but lacking transcription start site (TSS) and putative TATA-box and CAAT-box, is likely a non-expressed pseudogene. Clones 4B and 4E are 84% identical and divergent in the intron and the LRR domain. Gene silencing and transgenesis were used in conjunction with inoculation with differentially avirulent and virulent stripe rust strains to demonstrate Yr10 functionality. The Yr10 CC-NBS-LRR sequence is unique among known CC-NBS-LRR R genes in wheat but highly conserved homologs (E = 0.0) were identified in Aegilops tauschii and other monocots including Hordeum vulgare and Brachypodium distachyon. Related sequences were also identified in genomic databases of maize, rice, and in sorghum. This is the first report of a CC-NBS-LRR resistance gene in plants with limited homologies in its native host, but with numerous homologous R genes in related monocots that are either host or non-hosts for stripe rust. These results represent a unique example of gene evolution and dispersion across species.

  15. Genome Sequencing of Xanthomonas vasicola Pathovar vasculorum Reveals Variation in Plasmids and Genes Encoding Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Type-IV Pilus and Type-III Secretion Effectors.

    PubMed

    Wasukira, Arthur; Coulter, Max; Al-Sowayeh, Noorah; Thwaites, Richard; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kubiriba, Jerome; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas vasicola pathovar vasculorum (Xvv) is the bacterial agent causing gumming disease in sugarcane. Here, we compare complete genome sequences for five isolates of Xvv originating from sugarcane and one from maize. This identified two distinct types of lipopolysaccharide synthesis gene clusters among Xvv isolates: one is similar to that of Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri (Xac) and is probably the ancestral type, while the other is similar to those of the sugarcane-inhabiting species, Xanthomonas sacchari. Four of six Xvv isolates harboured sequences similar to the Xac plasmid, pXAC47, and showed a distinct Type-IV pilus (T4P) sequence type, whereas the T4P locus of the other two isolates resembled that of the closely related banana pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm). The Xvv isolate from maize has lost a gene encoding a homologue of the virulence effector, xopAF, which was present in all five of the sugarcane isolates, while xopL contained a premature stop codon in four out of six isolates. These findings shed new light on evolutionary events since the divergence of Xvv and Xcm, as well as further elucidating the relationships between the two closely related pathogens. PMID:25437615

  16. A simple and rapid procedure for the detection of genes encoding Shiga toxins and other specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-11-01

    A novel procedure for the detection of specific DNA sequences has been developed. This procedure is based on the already known method employing PCR with appropriate primers and a sequence-specific DNA probe labeled with the fluorescent agent 6-carboxylfluorescein (FAM) at the 5' end and the fluorescence quencher BHQ-1 (black hole quencher) at the 3' end. However, instead of the detection of the fluorescence signal with the use of real-time PCR cyclers, fluorescence/luminescence spectrometers or fluorescence polarization readers, as in all previously-reported procedures, we propose visual observation of the fluorescence under UV light directly in the reaction tube. An example for the specific detection of the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, by detecting Shiga toxin genes, is demonstrated. This method appears to be specific, simple, rapid and cost effective. It may be suitable for use in research laboratories, as well as in diagnostic units of medical institutions, even those equipped only with a thermocycler and a UV transilluminator, particularly if rapid identification of a pathogen is required. PMID:26580652

  17. cDNA sequence and mapping of the mouse Copb gene encoding the beta subunit of the COPI coatomer complex.

    PubMed

    LI, W; Elliott, R W; Novak, E K; Swank, R T

    1999-05-01

    COPI-coated vesicles are involved in retrograde-directed selective transport of proteins from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as mediate anterograde transport of cargo proteins within the Golgi or in endosomal trafficking. The COPI protein complex contains an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF1) and seven coatamer subunits (alpha, beta, beta', gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta-COP). The localization and function of human beta subunit of coatamer (COPB) suggests it is likely a candidate gene of ruby-eye-2 (ru2), which is a mouse model of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome characterized by the dysfunction of several subcellular organelles. In this study, we determined the entire coding sequence of mouse (Copb) cDNA by combining an overlapping mouse EST contig with EST walking. beta-COP was found highly conserved in mouse, rat, and human, and it is ubiquitously expressed in mouse. The Copb gene was mapped to mouse Chr 7 at a position of 53.3 cM by radiation hybrid mapping. Our RH mapping data, sequencing of RT-PCR products, and Western blotting exclude the Copb gene as a candidate for ru2.

  18. A Simple and Rapid Procedure for the Detection of Genes Encoding Shiga Toxins and Other Specific DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure for the detection of specific DNA sequences has been developed. This procedure is based on the already known method employing PCR with appropriate primers and a sequence-specific DNA probe labeled with the fluorescent agent 6-carboxylfluorescein (FAM) at the 5′ end and the fluorescence quencher BHQ-1 (black hole quencher) at the 3′ end. However, instead of the detection of the fluorescence signal with the use of real-time PCR cyclers, fluorescence/luminescence spectrometers or fluorescence polarization readers, as in all previously-reported procedures, we propose visual observation of the fluorescence under UV light directly in the reaction tube. An example for the specific detection of the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, by detecting Shiga toxin genes, is demonstrated. This method appears to be specific, simple, rapid and cost effective. It may be suitable for use in research laboratories, as well as in diagnostic units of medical institutions, even those equipped only with a thermocycler and a UV transilluminator, particularly if rapid identification of a pathogen is required. PMID:26580652

  19. Cloning, sequencing, and use as a molecular probe of a gene encoding an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase of broad substrate profile.

    PubMed Central

    Terán, F J; Suárez, J E; Mendoza, M C

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for an aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase that was able to modify amikacin was cloned from a plasmid isolated from a clinical strain of Enterobacter cloacae. Sequencing of a 955-bp segment which mediates the modifying activity revealed a single open reading frame of 432 nucleotides that predicted a polypeptide of 144 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 16,021. Putative ribosomal binding sites and -10 and -35 sequences were located at the 5' end of the gene. The size of the polypeptide was confirmed through minicell analysis of the expression products of plasmids containing the sequence. The use of the gene as a molecular probe revealed its specificity toward strains harboring genes coding for related enzymes. This probe is therefore useful for epidemiological studies. Images PMID:2069376

  20. Characterization of cDNAs encoding the chick retinoic acid receptor gamma 2 and preferential distribution of retinoic acid receptor gamma transcripts during chick skin development.

    PubMed

    Michaille, J J; Blanchet, S; Kanzler, B; Garnier, J M; Dhouailly, D

    1994-12-01

    Retinoic acid receptors alpha, beta and gamma (RAR alpha, beta and gamma) are ligand-inductible transcriptional activators which belong to the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. At least two major isoforms (1 and 2) of each RAR arise by differential use of two promoters and alternative splicing. In mouse, the three RAR genes are expressed in stage- and tissue-specific patterns during embryonic development. In order to understand the role of the different RARs in chick, RAR gamma 2 cDNAs were isolated from an 8.5-day (stage 35 of Hamburger and Hamilton) chick embryo skin library. The deduced chick RAR gamma 2 amino acid sequence displays uncommon features such as 21 specific amino acid replacements, 12 of them being clustered in the amino-terminal region (domains A2 and B), and a truncated acidic carboxy-terminal region (F domain). However, the pattern of RAR gamma expression in chick embryo resembles that reported in mouse, particularly in skin where RAR gamma expression occurs in both the dermal and epidermal layers at the beginning of feather formation, and is subsequently restricted to the differentiating epidermal cells. Northern blot analysis suggests that different RAR gamma isoforms could be successively required during chick development.

  1. Virulence Factors Encoded by Legionella longbeachae Identified on the Basis of the Genome Sequence Analysis of Clinical Isolate D-4968▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Natalia A.; Buss, Meghan; Lucas, Claressa E.; Frace, Michael; Govil, Dhwani; Travis, Tatiana; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Benson, Robert F.; Fields, Barry S.

    2010-01-01

    Legionella longbeachae causes most cases of legionellosis in Australia and may be underreported worldwide due to the lack of L. longbeachae-specific diagnostic tests. L. longbeachae displays distinctive differences in intracellular trafficking, caspase 1 activation, and infection in mouse models compared to Legionella pneumophila, yet these two species have indistinguishable clinical presentations in humans. Unlike other legionellae, which inhabit freshwater systems, L. longbeachae is found predominantly in moist soil. In this study, we sequenced and annotated the genome of an L. longbeachae clinical isolate from Oregon, isolate D-4968, and compared it to the previously published genomes of L. pneumophila. The results revealed that the D-4968 genome is larger than the L. pneumophila genome and has a gene order that is different from that of the L. pneumophila genome. Genes encoding structural components of type II, type IV Lvh, and type IV Icm/Dot secretion systems are conserved. In contrast, only 42/140 homologs of genes encoding L. pneumophila Icm/Dot substrates have been found in the D-4968 genome. L. longbeachae encodes numerous proteins with eukaryotic motifs and eukaryote-like proteins unique to this species, including 16 ankyrin repeat-containing proteins and a novel U-box protein. We predict that these proteins are secreted by the L. longbeachae Icm/Dot secretion system. In contrast to the L. pneumophila genome, the L. longbeachae D-4968 genome does not contain flagellar biosynthesis genes, yet it contains a chemotaxis operon. The lack of a flagellum explains the failure of L. longbeachae to activate caspase 1 and trigger pyroptosis in murine macrophages. These unique features of L. longbeachae may reflect adaptation of this species to life in soil. PMID:20008069

  2. Phosphocholine-binding antibody activities are hierarchically encoded in the sequence of the heavy-chain variable region: dominance of self-association activity in the T15 idiotype.

    PubMed

    Srdiċ-Rajiċ, Tatjana; Kekoviċ, Goran; Davidoviċ, Dragomir M; Metlas, Radmila

    2013-06-01

    A methodology based on the representation of each amino acid of a protein sequence by the electron-ion interaction potential and subsequent analysis by signal processing was used to determine the characteristic or common frequency (in Hz) that reflects the biological activity shared among phosphocholine (PC)-binding antibodies. The common frequency for the variable portion of the heavy chain (VH) of the PC-specific antibodies is found to be at f = 0.37 Hz. The VH sequences of the PC-binding antibodies exhibit three subsites for the PC moiety where hypervariable region 2 (CDR2) plays a role in the interaction with the phosphate group. Mutations in this VH region have an impact on the ability of mutant variants to bind PC and its carrier molecule, as well as on the characteristic frequency shift toward f = 0.12 Hz for mutants failing to bind both hapten and carrier. The VH sequence of mutants that retain the ability to bind PC still shows f = 0.37 Hz, suggesting that this frequency determines PC binding. However, this statement was not confirmed as mutation in another PC subsite impairs PC binding but retains both the phosphate-group recognition and the frequency at f = 0.37 Hz. Herein, this finding is discussed to promote the idea that the VH sequence of the PC-binding antibodies encodes the subsite for phosphate-group binding as a dominant functional activity and that only CDR2 of the T15-idiotype antibodies together with FR3 region form an autonomous self-association function represented by the T15VH50-73 peptide with f = 0.37±0.05 Hz. Thus, these data confirmed that T15VH50-73 peptide might be used in superantibody technology. PMID:23382353

  3. Nucleotide sequence of a Dictyostelium discoideum gene encoding a protein homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31.

    PubMed

    Hoja, U; Hofmann, J; Marschalek, R; Dingermann, T

    1993-01-15

    A cDNA clone has been isolated whose coding potential is significantly homologous to the yeast ribosomal protein S31. The single copy genomic gene contains a 271 bp intron immediately downstream from the ATG translation initiation codon and is flanked by cannonical exon/intron junctions. The intron carries a CAATCAAT motif which has been described as inducer element for discoidin I gamma expression and which has also been found within the intron of the rp29 gene form D. discoideum. The deduced protein contains 110 amino acids and is slightly basic. PMID:7916591

  4. Intraepithelial DNA immunisation with a plasmid encoding a codon optimised COPV E1 gene sequence, but not the wild-type gene sequence completely protects against mucosal challenge with infectious COPV in beagles.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard A; Santos, Elmer B; Nicholls, Philip K; White, Kate L; Anderson, Davina M; Lloyd, Andrew; Topley, Peter; Romanos, Michael; Thomsen, Lindy; Parmar, Vanita; Walcott, Sarah; Gough, Gerald W; Stanley, Margaret A

    2002-12-20

    DNA plasmids encoding the open reading frames of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) nonstructural early genes E1, E2, or E7 protein were delivered into both oral mucosal and cutaneous epithelial sites in beagle dogs using particle-mediated immunotherapeutic delivery (PMID) technology. Control dogs were vaccinated with plasmid encoding either hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBVs) or COPV L1. Using a prophylactic immunisation protocol, a priming dose of plasmid DNA was followed by a booster dose 6 weeks later. Four weeks after boost, all dogs were challenged with infectious COPV particles. Following viral challenge, as shown previously (M. A. Stanley et al., 2001, Vaccine 19, 2783-2792), mucosal papillomas developed in the negative-control HBVs vaccinated dogs, but all animals in the COPV L1 group were fully protected from disease development. In the early gene-vaccinated groups five of six in the E1-vaccinated dogs, two of six in E2-vaccinated dogs, and three of six in the E7-vaccinated beagles developed oral papillomas. Compared to the HBVs negative-control group the oral papillomas that did develop in the early-gene vaccinated beagles were significantly smaller, shorter in duration, and fewer in number. Taken together the disease burden was markedly reduced and this was statistically significant. In a second experiment one group of animals was vaccinated with plasmid encoding the wild-type COPV E1 gene, and a separate group was vaccinated with plasmid encoding a synthetic codon-optimised COPV E1 gene sequence. None of the codon-optimised E1-vaccinated animals developed papillomas at any challenge site. However, all animals vaccinated with wild-type E1 had papillomas. These data suggest that immunisation by PMID with papillomavirus early genes can significantly impact upon subsequent disease development and that full protection can be achieved using improved vectors encoding codon-optimised gene sequences perhaps emphasizing the importance of antigen load in the

  5. Regulation of the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR by RNAs encoded by a repeated sequence in the Epstein-Barr virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Elia, A; Laing, K G; Schofield, A; Tilleray, V J; Clemens, M J

    1996-01-01

    During the initial infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) only a few viral genes are expressed, six of which encode the EBV nuclear antigens, EBNAs 1-6. The majority of EBNA mRNAs share common 5'-ends containing a variable number of two alternating and repeated exons transcribed from the BamHI W major internal repeats of the viral DNA. These sequences can also exist as independent small RNA species in some EBV-infected cell types. We present evidence that transcripts from these W repeat regions can exert a trans-acting effect on protein synthesis, through their ability to activate the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR. UV cross-linking and filter binding assays have demonstrated that the W transcripts bind specifically to PKR and can compete with another EBV-encoded small RNA, EBER-1, which was shown previously to bind this kinase. In the reticulocyte lysate system the W RNAs shut off protein synthesis through an ability to activate PKR. In contrast to EBER-1, the W RNAs are unable to block the dsRNA-dependent activation of PKR. Using a purified preparation of the protein kinase we have shown that the W transcripts directly activate PKR in vitro. The results suggest that EBV has the ability both to activate and to inhibit PKR through the actions of different products of viral transcription. PMID:8948637

  6. Diversity of endophytic bacteria in Malaysian plants as revealed by 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence based method of bacterial identification☆

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Chye Ying; Tan, Yin Yin; Rohani, Rahim; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial endophytes do have several potential applications in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotech industry. The main objective of this study was to understand types of bacterial endophytes associated with dicotyledonous (dicot) and monocotyledonous (monocot) plant species. Isolation of the endophytic bacteria was performed using surface-sterilized various tissue samples, and identification of the endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) was completed using 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence similarity based method. In total, 996 EBIs were isolated and identified from 1055 samples of 31 monocot and 65 dicot plant species from Peninsular Malaysia. The 996 EBIs represented 71 different types of bacterial species. Twelve (12) out of 71 species are reported as endophytes for the first time. We conclude that diverse types of bacterial endophytes are associated with dicot and monocot plants, and could be useful in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotechnology for various potential applications. PMID:24396249

  7. Bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase: complete amino acid sequence and localization of phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, J; Uyeda, K

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (EC 2.7.1.105/3.1.3.46) is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C; phosphorylation results in activation of kinase. This activation of heart enzyme is in contrast to results with the liver isozyme, in which phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the kinase activity. As an initial step toward understanding this difference between the isozymes we have determined the DNA sequence of the heart enzyme and analyzed the amino acid sequence with special emphasis on the location of the phosphorylation site. We isolated and sequenced two overlapping cDNA fragments, which together could encode the complete amino acid sequence of bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, a protein of 530 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 60,679. Since the deduced protein contained amino acid sequences identical to the sequences of four known tryptic peptides from this enzyme we concluded that the deduced protein sequence did represent bovine heart enzyme. In addition, a cDNA fragment hybridized to a 4-kilobase mRNA from bovine heart. The phosphorylation sites of the heart enzyme were located near the C terminus, whereas the phosphorylation site of the liver isozyme is known to be located near the N terminus. These opposite locations of the phosphorylation sites may explain the contrasting effect of the covalent modification on the enzymes' activities. Images PMID:2164212

  8. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  9. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  10. Complete sequence of pOZ176, a 500-kilobase IncP-2 plasmid encoding IMP-9-mediated carbapenem resistance, from outbreak isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianhui; Alexander, David C; Ma, Jennifer H; Déraspe, Maxime; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Roy, Paul H

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96 (PA96) was isolated during a multicenter surveillance study in Guangzhou, China, in 2000. Whole-genome sequencing of this outbreak strain facilitated analysis of its IncP-2 carbapenem-resistant plasmid, pOZ176. The plasmid had a length of 500,839 bp and an average percent G+C content of 57%. Of the 618 predicted open reading frames, 65% encode hypothetical proteins. The pOZ176 backbone is not closely related to any plasmids thus far sequenced, but some similarity to pQBR103 of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 was observed. Two multiresistant class 1 integrons and several insertion sequences were identified. The blaIMP-9-carrying integron contained aacA4 → bla(IMP-9) → aacA4, flanked upstream by Tn21 tnpMRA and downstream by a complete tni operon of Tn402 and a mer module, named Tn6016. The second integron carried aacA4 → catB8a → bla(OXA-10) and was flanked by Tn1403-like tnpRA and a sul1-type 3' conserved sequence (3'-CS), named Tn6217. Other features include three resistance genes similar to those of Tn5, a tellurite resistance operon, and two pil operons. The replication and maintenance systems exhibit similarity to a genomic island of Ralstonia solanacearum GM1000. Codon usage analysis suggests the recent acquisition of bla(IMP-9). The origins of the integrons on pOZ176 indicated separate horizontal gene transfer events driven by antibiotic selection. The novel mosaic structure of pOZ176 suggests that it is derived from environmental bacteria.

  11. Cloning and sequencing of the low-affinity penicillin-binding protein 3r-encoding gene of Enterococcus hirae S185: modular design and structural organization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Piras, G; Raze, D; el Kharroubi, A; Hastir, D; Englebert, S; Coyette, J; Ghuysen, J M

    1993-05-01

    The clinical isolate Enterococcus hirae S185 has a peculiar mode of resistance to penicillin in that it possesses two low-affinity penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs): the 71-kDa PBP5, also found in other enterococci, and the 77-kDa PBP3r. The two PBPs have the same low affinity for the drug and are immunochemically related to each other. The PBP3r-encoding gene has been cloned and sequenced, and the derived amino acid sequence has been compared by computer-assisted hydrophobic cluster analysis with that of the low-affinity PBP5 of E. hirae R40, the low-affinity PBP2' of Staphylococcus aureus, and the PBP2 of Escherichia coli used as the standard of reference of the high-M(r) PBPs of class B. On the basis of the shapes, sizes, and distributions of the hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic clusters along the sequences and the linear amino acid alignments derived from this analysis, the dyad PBP3r-PBP5 has an identity index of 78.5%, the triad PBP3r-PBP5-PBP2' has an identity index of 29%, and the tetrad PBP3r-PBP5-PBP2'-PBP2 (of E. coli) has an identity index of 13%. In spite of this divergence, the low-affinity PBPs are of identical modular design and possess the nine amino acid groupings (boxes) typical of the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of the high-M(r) PBPs of class B. At variance with the latter PBPs, however, the low-affinity PBPs have an additional approximately 110-amino-acid polypeptide stretch that is inserted between the amino end of the N-terminal domain and the carboxy end of the membrane anchor. While the enterococcal PBP5 gene is chromosome borne, the PBP3r gene appears to be physically linked to the erm gene, which confers resistance to erythromycin and is known to be plasmid borne in almost all the Streptococcus spp. examined. PMID:8491705

  12. Crown gall oncogenesis: evidence that a T-DNA gene from the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid pTiA6 encodes an enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of indoleacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Thomashow, L S; Reeves, S; Thomashow, M F

    1984-01-01

    Stable incorporation of tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid sequences, the T-DNA, into the genomes of dicotyledonous plants results in the formation of crown gall tumors. Previous genetic studies have suggested that the products of the genes encoding transcripts 1 and 2, which are encoded by the TL-DNA region of pTiA6, are responsible for inducing the auxin-independent phenotype of crown gall tissues. Here we report the construction of a plasmid, pMTlacT2, which directs the synthesis of the Mr 49,800 polypeptide encoded by the transcript 2 gene. Cell-free extracts prepared from Escherichia coli harboring this plasmid converted indoleacetamide to indoleacetic acid, the natural auxin of plants; extracts prepared from plasmidless strains of E. coli or strains harboring the cloning vehicle pBR322 did not carry out this reaction. We conclude that the transcript 2 gene of pTiA6 codes for an enzyme that participates in auxin biosynthesis, probably an indoleacetamide hydrolase. Images PMID:6089175

  13. Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum Harbor Distinct, Independently Acquired Integrative and Conjugative Elements Encoding Coronafacic Acid that Enhance Virulence on Potato Stems

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Preetinanda; Vanga, Bhanupratap R.; Lu, Ashley; Fiers, Mark; Fineran, Peter C.; Butler, Ruth; Armstrong, Karen; Ronson, Clive W.; Pitman, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) play a central role in the evolution of bacterial virulence, their transmission between bacteria often leading to the acquisition of virulence factors that alter host range or aggressiveness. Much is known about the functions of the virulence determinants that ICEs harbor, but little is understood about the cryptic effects of ICEs on their host cell. In this study, the importance of horizontally acquired island 2 (HAI2), an ICE in the genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043, was studied using a strain in which the entire ICE had been removed by CRISPR-Cas-mediated genome editing. HAI2 encodes coronafacic acid, a virulence factor that enhances blackleg disease of potato stems caused by P. atrosepticum SCRI1043. As expected, deletion of HAI2 resulted in reduced blackleg symptoms in potato stems. A subsequent screen for HAI2-related ICEs in other strains of the Pectobacterium genus revealed their ubiquitous nature in P. atrosepticum. Yet, HAI2-related ICEs were only detected in the genomes of a few P. carotovorum strains. These strains were notable as blackleg causing strains belonging to two different subspecies of P. carotovorum. Sequence analysis of the ICEs in different strains of both P. atrosepticum and P. carotovorum confirmed that they were diverse and were present in different locations on the genomes of their bacterial host, suggesting that the cfa cluster was probably acquired independently on a number of occasions via chromosomal insertion of related ICEs. Excision assays also demonstrated that the ICEs in both P. atrosepticum and P. carotovorum are mobilized from the host chromosome. Thus, the future spread of these ICEs via lateral gene transfer might contribute to an increase in the prevalence of blackleg-causing strains of P. carotovorum. PMID:27065965

  14. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  15. The amino acid sequence of mitogenic lectin-B from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yurino, N; Kino, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1997-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-B (PL-B) has been analyzed by first sequencing seven lysylendopeptidase peptides derived from the reduced and S-pyridylethylated PL-B and then connecting them by analyzing the arginylendopeptidase peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated PL-B. PL-B consists of 295 amino acid residues and two oligosaccharides linked to Asn96 and Asn139, and has a molecular mass of 34,493 Da. PL-B is composed of seven repetitive chitin-binding domains having 48-79% sequence homology with each other. Twelve amino acid residues including eight cysteine residues in these domains are absolutely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains of plant lectins and class I chitinases. Also, it was strongly suggested that the extremely high hemagglutinating and mitogenic activities of PL-B may be ascribed to its seven-domain structure.

  16. ConSurf 2010: calculating evolutionary conservation in sequence and structure of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Erez, Elana; Martz, Eric; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2010-07-01

    It is informative to detect highly conserved positions in proteins and nucleic acid sequence/structure since they are often indicative of structural and/or functional importance. ConSurf (http://consurf.tau.ac.il) and ConSeq (http://conseq.tau.ac.il) are two well-established web servers for calculating the evolutionary conservation of amino acid positions in proteins using an empirical Bayesian inference, starting from protein structure and sequence, respectively. Here, we present the new version of the ConSurf web server that combines the two independent servers, providing an easier and more intuitive step-by-step interface, while offering the user more flexibility during the process. In addition, the new version of ConSurf calculates the evolutionary rates for nucleic acid sequences. The new version is freely available at: http://consurf.tau.ac.il/.

  17. Amino acid repeats cause extraordinary coding sequence variation in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Scala, Clea; Tian, Xiangjun; Mehdiabadi, Natasha J; Smith, Margaret H; Saxer, Gerda; Stephens, Katie; Buzombo, Prince; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Protein sequences are normally the most conserved elements of genomes owing to purifying selection to maintain their functions. We document an extraordinary amount of within-species protein sequence variation in the model eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum stemming from triplet DNA repeats coding for long strings of single amino acids. D. discoideum has a very large number of such strings, many of which are polyglutamine repeats, the same sequence that causes various human neurological disorders in humans, like Huntington's disease. We show here that D. discoideum coding repeat loci are highly variable among individuals, making D. discoideum a candidate for the most variable proteome. The coding repeat loci are not significantly less variable than similar non-coding triplet repeats. This pattern is consistent with these amino-acid repeats being largely non-functional sequences evolving primarily by mutation and drift. PMID:23029418

  18. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  19. Shark myoglobins. II. Isolation, characterization and amino acid sequence of myoglobin from Galeorhinus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Suzuki, T; Yata, T

    1985-01-01

    Native oxymyoglobin (MbO2) was isolated from red muscle of G. japonicus by chromatographic separation from metmyoglobin (metMb) on DEAE-cellulose and the amino acid sequence of the major chain was determined with the aid of sequence homology with that of G. australis. It was shown to differ in amino acid sequence from that of G. australis by 10 replacements, to be acetylated at the amino terminus and to contain glutamine at the distal (E7) residue. It was also shown to have a spectrum very similar to that of mammalian MbO2. However, the pH-dependence for the autoxidation of MbO2 was seen to be quite different from that of sperm whale (Physeter catodon) MbO2. Although the sequence homology between sperm whale and G. japonicus myoglobins is about 40%, their hydropathy profiles were very similar, indicating that they have a similar geometry in their globin folding.

  20. Ventricular zone gene-1 (vzg-1) encodes a lysophosphatidic acid receptor expressed in neurogenic regions of the developing cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Neocortical neuroblast cell lines were used to clone G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes to study signaling mechanisms regulating cortical neurogenesis. One putative GPCR gene displayed an in situ expression pattern enriched in cortical neurogenic regions and was therefore named ventricular zone gene-1 (vzg-1). The vzg-1 cDNA hybridized to a 3.8-kb mRNA transcript and encoded a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 41-42 kD, confirmed by Western blot analysis. To assess its function, vzg-1 was overexpressed in a cell line from which it was cloned, inducing serum-dependent "cell rounding." Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid present in high concentrations in serum, reproduced the effect seen with serum alone. Morphological responses to other related phospholipids or to thrombin, another agent that induces cell rounding through a GPCR, were not observed in vzg-1 overexpressing cells. Vzg-1 overexpression decreased the EC50 of both cell rounding and Gi activation in response to LPA. Pertussis toxin treatment inhibited vzg-1-dependent LPA-mediated Gi activation, but had no effect on cell rounding. Membrane binding studies indicated that vzg-1 overexpression increased specific LPA binding. These analyses identify the vzg-1 gene product as a receptor for LPA, suggesting the operation of LPA signaling mechanisms in cortical neurogenesis. Vzg-1 therefore provides a link between extracellular LPA and the activation of LPA- mediated signaling pathways through a single receptor and will allow new investigations into LPA signaling both in neural and nonneural systems. PMID:8922387