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Sample records for acid sequence identified

  1. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  2. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  3. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  5. TargetFreeze: Identifying Antifreeze Proteins via a Combination of Weights using Sequence Evolutionary Information and Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    He, Xue; Han, Ke; Hu, Jun; Yan, Hui; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are indispensable for living organisms to survive in an extremely cold environment and have a variety of potential biotechnological applications. The accurate prediction of antifreeze proteins has become an important issue and is urgently needed. Although considerable progress has been made, AFP prediction is still a challenging problem due to the diversity of species. In this study, we proposed a new sequence-based AFP predictor, called TargetFreeze. TargetFreeze utilizes an enhanced feature representation method that weightedly combines multiple protein features and takes the powerful support vector machine as the prediction engine. Computer experiments on benchmark datasets demonstrate the superiority of the proposed TargetFreeze over most recently released AFP predictors. We also implemented a user-friendly web server, which is openly accessible for academic use and is available at http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetFreeze. TargetFreeze supplements existing AFP predictors and will have potential applications in AFP-related biotechnology fields.

  6. De novo Sequencing and Transcriptome Analysis of Pinellia ternata Identify the Candidate Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Benzoic Acid and Ephedrine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang-hui; Jiang, Ni-hao; Song, Wan-ling; Ma, Chun-hua; Yang, Sheng-chao; Chen, Jun-wen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The medicinal herb, Pinellia ternata, is purported to be an anti-emetic with analgesic and sedative effects. Alkaloids are the main biologically active compounds in P. ternata, especially ephedrine that is a phenylpropylamino alkaloid specifically produced by Ephedra and Catha edulis. However, how ephedrine is synthesized in plants is uncertain. Only the phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and relevant genes in this pathway have been characterized. Genomic information of P. ternata is also unavailable. Results: We analyzed the transcriptome of the tuber of P. ternata with the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform. 66,813,052 high-quality reads were generated, and these reads were assembled de novo into 89,068 unigenes. Most known genes involved in benzoic acid biosynthesis were identified in the unigene dataset of P. ternata, and the expression patterns of some ephedrine biosynthesis-related genes were analyzed by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Also, 14,468 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified from 12,000 unigenes. Twenty primer pairs for SSRs were randomly selected for the validation of their amplification effect. Conclusion: RNA-seq data was used for the first time to provide a comprehensive gene information on P. ternata at the transcriptional level. These data will advance molecular genetics in this valuable medicinal plant. PMID:27579029

  7. RNA Sequencing Identifies Upregulated Kyphoscoliosis Peptidase and Phosphatidic Acid Signaling Pathways in Muscle Hypertrophy Generated by Transgenic Expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition. PMID:25860951

  8. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition. PMID:25860951

  9. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-04-09

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  10. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  11. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  12. Transcriptome sequencing revealed the transcriptional organization at ribosome-mediated attenuation sites in Corynebacterium glutamicum and identified a novel attenuator involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Neshat, Armin; Mentz, Almut; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2014-11-20

    The Gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum belongs to the order Corynebacteriales and is used as a producer of amino acids at industrial scales. Due to its economic importance, gene expression and particularly the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis has been investigated extensively. Applying the high-resolution technique of transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), recently a vast amount of data has been generated that was used to comprehensively analyze the C. glutamicum transcriptome. By analyzing RNA-seq data from a small RNA cDNA library of C. glutamicum, short transcripts in the known transcriptional attenuators sites of the trp operon, the ilvBNC operon and the leuA gene were verified. Furthermore, whole transcriptome RNA-seq data were used to elucidate the transcriptional organization of these three amino acid biosynthesis operons. In addition, we discovered and analyzed the novel attenuator aroR, located upstream of the aroF gene (cg1129). The DAHP synthase encoded by aroF catalyzes the first step in aromatic amino acid synthesis. The AroR leader peptide contains the amino acid sequence motif F-Y-F, indicating a regulatory effect by phenylalanine and tyrosine. Analysis by real-time RT-PCR suggests that the attenuator regulates the transcription of aroF in dependence of the cellular amount of tRNA loaded with phenylalanine when comparing a phenylalanine-auxotrophic C. glutamicum mutant fed with limiting and excess amounts of a phenylalanine-containing dipeptide. Additionally, the very interesting finding was made that all analyzed attenuators are leaderless transcripts. PMID:24910972

  13. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2005-02-08

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  14. Understanding and identifying amino acid repeats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Nijveen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    Amino acid repeats (AARs) are abundant in protein sequences. They have particular roles in protein function and evolution. Simple repeat patterns generated by DNA slippage tend to introduce length variations and point mutations in repeat regions. Loss of normal and gain of abnormal function owing to their variable length are potential risks leading to diseases. Repeats with complex patterns mostly refer to the functional domain repeats, such as the well-known leucine-rich repeat and WD repeat, which are frequently involved in protein–protein interaction. They are mainly derived from internal gene duplication events and stabilized by ‘gate-keeper’ residues, which play crucial roles in preventing inter-domain aggregation. AARs are widely distributed in different proteomes across a variety of taxonomic ranges, and especially abundant in eukaryotic proteins. However, their specific evolutionary and functional scenarios are still poorly understood. Identifying AARs in protein sequences is the first step for the further investigation of their biological function and evolutionary mechanism. In principle, this is an NP-hard problem, as most of the repeat fragments are shaped by a series of sophisticated evolutionary events and become latent periodical patterns. It is not possible to define a uniform criterion for detecting and verifying various repeat patterns. Instead, different algorithms based on different strategies have been developed to cope with different repeat patterns. In this review, we attempt to describe the amino acid repeat-detection algorithms currently available and compare their strategies based on an in-depth analysis of the biological significance of protein repeats. PMID:23418055

  15. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  16. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  17. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  18. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  19. Unconventional P-35S sequence identified in genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Al-Hmoud, Nisreen; Al-Husseini, Nawar; Ibrahim-Alobaide, Mohammed A; Kübler, Eric; Farfoura, Mahmoud; Alobydi, Hytham; Al-Rousan, Hiyam

    2014-01-01

    The Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter sequence, CaMV P-35S, is one of several commonly used genetic targets to detect genetically modified maize and is found in most GMOs. In this research we report the finding of an alternative P-35S sequence and its incidence in GM maize marketed in Jordan. The primer pair normally used to amplify a 123 bp DNA fragment of the CaMV P-35S promoter in GMOs also amplified a previously undetected alternative sequence of CaMV P-35S in GM maize samples which we term V3. The amplified V3 sequence comprises 386 base pairs and was not found in the standard wild-type maize, MON810 and MON 863 GM maize. The identified GM maize samples carrying the V3 sequence were found free of CaMV when compared with CaMV infected brown mustard sample. The data of sequence alignment analysis of the V3 genetic element showed 90% similarity with the matching P-35S sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus isolate CabbB-JI and 99% similarity with matching P-35S sequences found in several binary plant vectors, of which the binary vector locus JQ693018 is one example. The current study showed an increase of 44% in the incidence of the identified 386 bp sequence in GM maize sold in Jordan's markets during the period 2009 and 2012. PMID:24495911

  20. Unconventional P-35S sequence identified in genetically modified maize

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hmoud, Nisreen; Al-Husseini, Nawar; Ibrahim-Alobaide, Mohammed A; Kübler, Eric; Farfoura, Mahmoud; Alobydi, Hytham; Al-Rousan, Hiyam

    2014-01-01

    The Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter sequence, CaMV P-35S, is one of several commonly used genetic targets to detect genetically modified maize and is found in most GMOs. In this research we report the finding of an alternative P-35S sequence and its incidence in GM maize marketed in Jordan. The primer pair normally used to amplify a 123 bp DNA fragment of the CaMV P-35S promoter in GMOs also amplified a previously undetected alternative sequence of CaMV P-35S in GM maize samples which we term V3. The amplified V3 sequence comprises 386 base pairs and was not found in the standard wild-type maize, MON810 and MON 863 GM maize. The identified GM maize samples carrying the V3 sequence were found free of CaMV when compared with CaMV infected brown mustard sample. The data of sequence alignment analysis of the V3 genetic element showed 90% similarity with the matching P-35S sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus isolate CabbB-JI and 99% similarity with matching P-35S sequences found in several binary plant vectors, of which the binary vector locus JQ693018 is one example. The current study showed an increase of 44% in the incidence of the identified 386 bp sequence in GM maize sold in Jordan’s markets during the period 2009 and 2012. PMID:24495911

  1. Unconventional P-35S sequence identified in genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Al-Hmoud, Nisreen; Al-Husseini, Nawar; Ibrahim-Alobaide, Mohammed A; Kübler, Eric; Farfoura, Mahmoud; Alobydi, Hytham; Al-Rousan, Hiyam

    2014-01-01

    The Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter sequence, CaMV P-35S, is one of several commonly used genetic targets to detect genetically modified maize and is found in most GMOs. In this research we report the finding of an alternative P-35S sequence and its incidence in GM maize marketed in Jordan. The primer pair normally used to amplify a 123 bp DNA fragment of the CaMV P-35S promoter in GMOs also amplified a previously undetected alternative sequence of CaMV P-35S in GM maize samples which we term V3. The amplified V3 sequence comprises 386 base pairs and was not found in the standard wild-type maize, MON810 and MON 863 GM maize. The identified GM maize samples carrying the V3 sequence were found free of CaMV when compared with CaMV infected brown mustard sample. The data of sequence alignment analysis of the V3 genetic element showed 90% similarity with the matching P-35S sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus isolate CabbB-JI and 99% similarity with matching P-35S sequences found in several binary plant vectors, of which the binary vector locus JQ693018 is one example. The current study showed an increase of 44% in the incidence of the identified 386 bp sequence in GM maize sold in Jordan's markets during the period 2009 and 2012.

  2. Complete genome sequence of southern tomato virus identified from China using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, southern tomato virus (STV), on tomatoes in China, was elucidated using small RNAs deep sequencing. The identified STV_CN12 shares 99% sequence identity to other isolates from Mexico, France, Spain, and U.S. This is the first report ...

  3. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  4. Method of Identifying a Base in a Nucleic Acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    1999-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  5. Identifying features in biological sequences: Sixth workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, C.; Myers, E.; Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This report covers the sixth of an annual series of workshops held at the Aspen Center for Physics concentrating particularly on the identification of features in DNA sequence, and more broadly on related topics in computational molecular biology. The workshop series originally focused primarily on discussion of current needs and future strategies for identifying and predicting the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians.

  6. Whole exome sequencing to identify genetic causes of short stature

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Michael H.; Shen, Yiping; Walvoord, Emily C.; Miller, Timothy C.; Moon, Jennifer E.; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Dauber, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Short stature is a common reason for presentation to pediatric endocrinology clinics. However, for most patients, no cause for the short stature can be identified. As genetics plays a strong role in height, we sought to identify known and novel genetic causes of short stature. Methods We recruited 14 children with severe short stature of unknown etiology. We conducted whole exome sequencing of the patients and their family members. We used an analysis pipeline to identify rare nonsynonymous genetic variants that cause the short stature. Results We identified a genetic cause of short stature in 5 of the 14 patients. This included cases of Floating Harbor syndrome, Kenny-Caffey syndrome, the progeroid form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, as well as two cases of the 3-M syndrome. For remaining patients, we have generated lists of candidate variants. Conclusions Whole exome sequencing can help identify genetic causes of short stature in the context of defined genetic syndromes, but may be less effective in identifying novel genetic causes of short stature in individual families. Utilized in the clinic, whole exome sequencing can provide clinically relevant diagnoses for these patients. Rare syndromic causes of short stature may be under-recognized and under-diagnosed in pediatric endocrinology clinics. PMID:24970356

  7. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  8. Identifying and quantifying orphan protein sequences in fungi.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Diana; Elofsson, Arne

    2010-02-19

    For large regions of many proteins, and even entire proteins, no homology to known domains or proteins can be detected. These sequences are often referred to as orphans. Surprisingly, it has been reported that the large number of orphans is sustained in spite of a rapid increase of available genomic sequences. However, it is believed that de novo creation of coding sequences is rare in comparison to mechanisms such as domain shuffling and gene duplication; hence, most sequences should have homologs in other genomes. To investigate this, the sequences of 19 complete fungi genomes were compared. By using the phylogenetic relationship between these genomes, we could identify potentially de novo created orphans in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that only a small fraction, <2%, of the S. cerevisiae proteome is orphan, which confirms that de novo creation of coding sequences is indeed rare. Furthermore, we found it necessary to compare the most closely related species to distinguish between de novo created sequences and rapidly evolving sequences where homologs are present but cannot be detected. Next, the orphan proteins (OPs) and orphan domains (ODs) were characterized. First, it was observed that both OPs and ODs are short. In addition, at least some of the OPs have been shown to be functional in experimental assays, showing that they are not pseudogenes. Furthermore, in contrast to what has been reported before and what is seen for older orphans, S. cerevisiae specific ODs and proteins are not more disordered than other proteins. This might indicate that many of the older, and earlier classified, orphans indeed are fast-evolving sequences. Finally, >90% of the detected ODs are located at the protein termini, which suggests that these orphans could have been created by mutations that have affected the start or stop codons.

  9. A homozygous mutation in PEX16 identified by whole-exome sequencing ending a diagnostic odyssey

    PubMed Central

    Bacino, Carlos A.; Chao, Yu-Hsin; Seto, Elaine; Lotze, Tim; Xia, Fan; Jones, Richard O.; Moser, Ann; Wangler, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with a unique neurological phenotype with a progressive neurodegenerative. An 18-year diagnostic odyssey for the patient ended when exome sequencing identified a homozygous PEX16 mutation suggesting an atypical peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD). Interestingly, the patient's peroxisomal biochemical abnormalities were subtle, such that plasma very-long-chain fatty acids initially failed to provide a diagnosis. This case suggests that next-generation sequencing may be diagnostic in some atypical peroxisomal biogenesis disorders. PMID:26644994

  10. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  11. Protective variant for hippocampal atrophy identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nho, Kwangsik; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L; Shen, Li; Corneveaux, Jason J; Swaminathan, Shanker; Lin, Hai; Ramanan, Vijay K; Liu, Yunlong; Foroud, Tatiana M; Inlow, Mark H; Siniard, Ashley L; Reiman, Rebecca A; Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Green, Robert C; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Baldwin, Clinton T; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Furney, Simon J; Lovestone, Simon; Simmons, Andrew; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Tsolaki, Magda; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; McDonald, Brenna C; Farlow, Martin R; Ghetti, Bernardino; Huentelman, Matthew J; Saykin, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    We used whole-exome sequencing to identify variants other than APOE associated with the rate of hippocampal atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment. An in-silico predicted missense variant in REST (rs3796529) was found exclusively in subjects with slow hippocampal volume loss and validated using unbiased whole-brain analysis and meta-analysis across 5 independent cohorts. REST is a master regulator of neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation that has not been previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease. These findings nominate REST and its functional pathways as protective and illustrate the potential of combining next-generation sequencing with neuroimaging to discover novel disease mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25559091

  12. Myeloid neoplasm demonstrating a STAT5B-RARA rearrangement and genetic alterations associated with all-trans retinoic acid resistance identified by a custom next-generation sequencing assay.

    PubMed

    Kluk, Michael J; Abo, Ryan P; Brown, Ronald D; Kuo, Frank C; Dal Cin, Paola; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Lindeman, Neal I; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Aster, Jon C

    2015-10-01

    We describe the case of a patient presenting with several weeks of symptoms related to pancytopenia associated with a maturation arrest at the late promyelocyte/early myelocyte stage of granulocyte differentiation. A diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia was considered, but the morphologic features were atypical for this entity and conventional tests for the presence of a PML-RARA fusion gene were negative. Additional analysis using a custom next-generation sequencing assay revealed a rearrangement producing a STAT5B-RARA fusion gene, which was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and supplementary cytogenetic studies, allowing the diagnosis of a morphologically atypical form of acute promyelocytic leukemia to be made. Analysis of the sequencing data permitted characterization of both chromosomal breakpoints and revealed two additional alterations, a small deletion in RARA exon 9 and a RARA R276W substitution, that have been linked to resistance to all-trans retinoic acid. This case highlights how next-generation sequencing can augment currently standard testing to establish diagnoses in difficult cases, and in doing so help guide selection of therapy. PMID:27148563

  13. Optimization of short amino acid sequences classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcz, Aleksy; Szymański, Zbigniew

    This article describes processing methods used for short amino acid sequences classification. The data processed are 9-symbols string representations of amino acid sequences, divided into 49 data sets - each one containing samples labeled as reacting or not with given enzyme. The goal of the classification is to determine for a single enzyme, whether an amino acid sequence would react with it or not. Each data set is processed separately. Feature selection is performed to reduce the number of dimensions for each data set. The method used for feature selection consists of two phases. During the first phase, significant positions are selected using Classification and Regression Trees. Afterwards, symbols appearing at the selected positions are substituted with numeric values of amino acid properties taken from the AAindex database. In the second phase the new set of features is reduced using a correlation-based ranking formula and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization. Finally, the preprocessed data is used for training LS-SVM classifiers. SPDE, an evolutionary algorithm, is used to obtain optimal hyperparameters for the LS-SVM classifier, such as error penalty parameter C and kernel-specific hyperparameters. A simple score penalty is used to adapt the SPDE algorithm to the task of selecting classifiers with best performance measures values.

  14. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  15. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  16. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid...

  17. Identifying and calling insertions, deletions, and single-base mutations efficiently from sequence data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole genome sequencing studies can directly identify causative mutations for subsequent use in genomic evaluations, but sequence variant identification is a lengthy and sometimes inaccurate process. The speed and accuracy of identifying small insertions and deletions of sequence, collectively terme...

  18. Exome sequencing identifies PDE4D mutations in acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Lachman, Ralph S; Krejci, Pavel; Tompson, Stuart W; Nelson, Stanley F; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2012-04-01

    Acrodysostosis is a dominantly-inherited, multisystem disorder characterized by skeletal, endocrine, and neurological abnormalities. To identify the molecular basis of acrodysostosis, we performed exome sequencing on five genetically independent cases. Three different missense mutations in PDE4D, which encodes cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 4D, were found to be heterozygous in three of the cases. Two of the mutations were demonstrated to have occurred de novo, providing strong genetic evidence of causation. Two additional cases were heterozygous for de novo missense mutations in PRKAR1A, which encodes the cAMP-dependent regulatory subunit of protein kinase A and which has been recently reported to be the cause of a form of acrodysostosis resistant to multiple hormones. These findings demonstrate that acrodysostosis is genetically heterogeneous and underscore the exquisite sensitivity of many tissues to alterations in cAMP homeostasis. PMID:22464252

  19. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  20. Whole-exome sequencing identifies variants in invasive pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiaolei; Gao, Hua; Wang, Fei; Feng, Jie; Bai, Jiwei; Zhao, Peng; Cao, Lei; Gui, Songbai; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas exhibit a wide range of behaviors. The prediction of invasion or malignant behavior in pituitary adenomas remains challenging. The objective of the present study was to identify the genetic abnormalities associated with invasion in sporadic pituitary adenomas. In the present study, the exomes of six invasive pituitary adenomas (IPA) and six non-invasive pituitary adenomas (nIPA) were sequenced by whole-exome sequencing. Variants were confirmed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing, and candidate driver genes were assessed in an additional 28 pituitary adenomas. A total of 15 identified variants were mainly associated with angiogenesis, metabolism, cell cycle phase, cellular component organization, cytoskeleton and biogenesis immune at a cellular level, including 13 variants that occurred as single nucleotide variants and 2 that comprised of insertions. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of diffuse panbronchiolitis critical region 1 (DPCR1), KIAA0226, myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance, proline-rich protein BstNI subfamily 3, PR domain containing 2, with ZNF domain, RIZ1 (PRDM2), PR domain containing 8 (PRDM8), SPANX family member N2 (SPANXN2), TRIO and F-actin binding protein and zinc finger protein 717 in IPA specimens were 50% decreased compared with nIPA specimens. In particular, DPCR1, PRDM2, PRDM8 and SPANXN2 mRNA levels in IPA specimens were approximately four-fold lower compared with nIPA specimens (P=0.003, 0.007, 0.009 and 0.004, respectively). By contrast, the mRNA levels of dentin sialophospho protein, EGF like domain, multiple 7 (EGFL7), low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1B and dynein, axonemal, assembly factor 1 (LRRC50) were increased in IPA compared with nIPA specimens (P=0.041, 0.037, 0.022 and 0.013, respectively). Furthermore, decreased PRDM2 expression was associated with tumor recurrence. The findings of the present study indicate that DPCR1, EGFL7, the PRDM family and LRRC50 in pituitary adenomas are modifiers of

  1. Whole-exome sequencing identifies variants in invasive pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiaolei; Gao, Hua; Wang, Fei; Feng, Jie; Bai, Jiwei; Zhao, Peng; Cao, Lei; Gui, Songbai; Gong, Lei; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas exhibit a wide range of behaviors. The prediction of invasion or malignant behavior in pituitary adenomas remains challenging. The objective of the present study was to identify the genetic abnormalities associated with invasion in sporadic pituitary adenomas. In the present study, the exomes of six invasive pituitary adenomas (IPA) and six non-invasive pituitary adenomas (nIPA) were sequenced by whole-exome sequencing. Variants were confirmed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing, and candidate driver genes were assessed in an additional 28 pituitary adenomas. A total of 15 identified variants were mainly associated with angiogenesis, metabolism, cell cycle phase, cellular component organization, cytoskeleton and biogenesis immune at a cellular level, including 13 variants that occurred as single nucleotide variants and 2 that comprised of insertions. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of diffuse panbronchiolitis critical region 1 (DPCR1), KIAA0226, myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance, proline-rich protein BstNI subfamily 3, PR domain containing 2, with ZNF domain, RIZ1 (PRDM2), PR domain containing 8 (PRDM8), SPANX family member N2 (SPANXN2), TRIO and F-actin binding protein and zinc finger protein 717 in IPA specimens were 50% decreased compared with nIPA specimens. In particular, DPCR1, PRDM2, PRDM8 and SPANXN2 mRNA levels in IPA specimens were approximately four-fold lower compared with nIPA specimens (P=0.003, 0.007, 0.009 and 0.004, respectively). By contrast, the mRNA levels of dentin sialophospho protein, EGF like domain, multiple 7 (EGFL7), low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1B and dynein, axonemal, assembly factor 1 (LRRC50) were increased in IPA compared with nIPA specimens (P=0.041, 0.037, 0.022 and 0.013, respectively). Furthermore, decreased PRDM2 expression was associated with tumor recurrence. The findings of the present study indicate that DPCR1, EGFL7, the PRDM family and LRRC50 in pituitary adenomas are modifiers of

  2. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  3. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  4. MetaPhinder—Identifying Bacteriophage Sequences in Metagenomic Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Villarroel, Julia; Lund, Ole; Voldby Larsen, Mette; Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant biological entity on the planet, but at the same time do not account for much of the genetic material isolated from most environments due to their small genome sizes. They also show great genetic diversity and mosaic genomes making it challenging to analyze and understand them. Here we present MetaPhinder, a method to identify assembled genomic fragments (i.e.contigs) of phage origin in metagenomic data sets. The method is based on a comparison to a database of whole genome bacteriophage sequences, integrating hits to multiple genomes to accomodate for the mosaic genome structure of many bacteriophages. The method is demonstrated to out-perform both BLAST methods based on single hits and methods based on k-mer comparisons. MetaPhinder is available as a web service at the Center for Genomic Epidemiology https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MetaPhinder/, while the source code can be downloaded from https://bitbucket.org/genomicepidemiology/metaphinder or https://github.com/vanessajurtz/MetaPhinder. PMID:27684958

  5. Incorporating distant sequence features and radial basis function networks to identify ubiquitin conjugation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chen, Shu-An; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2011-03-09

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a small protein that consists of 76 amino acids about 8.5 kDa. In ubiquitin conjugation, the ubiquitin is majorly conjugated on the lysine residue of protein by Ub-ligating (E3) enzymes. Three major enzymes participate in ubiquitin conjugation. They are E1, E2 and E3 which are responsible for activating, conjugating and ligating ubiquitin, respectively. Ubiquitin conjugation in eukaryotes is an important mechanism of the proteasome-mediated degradation of a protein and regulating the activity of transcription factors. Motivated by the importance of ubiquitin conjugation in biological processes, this investigation develops a method, UbSite, which uses utilizes an efficient radial basis function (RBF) network to identify protein ubiquitin conjugation (ubiquitylation) sites. This work not only investigates the amino acid composition but also the structural characteristics, physicochemical properties, and evolutionary information of amino acids around ubiquitylation (Ub) sites. With reference to the pathway of ubiquitin conjugation, the substrate sites for E3 recognition, which are distant from ubiquitylation sites, are investigated. The measurement of F-score in a large window size (-20∼+20) revealed a statistically significant amino acid composition and position-specific scoring matrix (evolutionary information), which are mainly located distant from Ub sites. The distant information can be used effectively to differentiate Ub sites from non-Ub sites. As determined by five-fold cross-validation, the model that was trained using the combination of amino acid composition and evolutionary information performs best in identifying ubiquitin conjugation sites. The prediction sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy are 65.5%, 74.8%, and 74.5%, respectively. Although the amino acid sequences around the ubiquitin conjugation sites do not contain conserved motifs, the cross-validation result indicates that the integration of distant sequence features of Ub

  6. Incorporating Distant Sequence Features and Radial Basis Function Networks to Identify Ubiquitin Conjugation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Hsin-Yi; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a small protein that consists of 76 amino acids about 8.5 kDa. In ubiquitin conjugation, the ubiquitin is majorly conjugated on the lysine residue of protein by Ub-ligating (E3) enzymes. Three major enzymes participate in ubiquitin conjugation. They are – E1, E2 and E3 which are responsible for activating, conjugating and ligating ubiquitin, respectively. Ubiquitin conjugation in eukaryotes is an important mechanism of the proteasome-mediated degradation of a protein and regulating the activity of transcription factors. Motivated by the importance of ubiquitin conjugation in biological processes, this investigation develops a method, UbSite, which uses utilizes an efficient radial basis function (RBF) network to identify protein ubiquitin conjugation (ubiquitylation) sites. This work not only investigates the amino acid composition but also the structural characteristics, physicochemical properties, and evolutionary information of amino acids around ubiquitylation (Ub) sites. With reference to the pathway of ubiquitin conjugation, the substrate sites for E3 recognition, which are distant from ubiquitylation sites, are investigated. The measurement of F-score in a large window size (−20∼+20) revealed a statistically significant amino acid composition and position-specific scoring matrix (evolutionary information), which are mainly located distant from Ub sites. The distant information can be used effectively to differentiate Ub sites from non-Ub sites. As determined by five-fold cross-validation, the model that was trained using the combination of amino acid composition and evolutionary information performs best in identifying ubiquitin conjugation sites. The prediction sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy are 65.5%, 74.8%, and 74.5%, respectively. Although the amino acid sequences around the ubiquitin conjugation sites do not contain conserved motifs, the cross-validation result indicates that the integration of distant sequence features

  7. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  8. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the major immunogen from three serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Makoff, A J; Paynter, C A; Rowlands, D J; Boothroyd, J C

    1982-01-01

    Cloned cDNA molecules from three serotypes of FMDV have been sequenced around the VP1-coding region. The predicted amino acid sequences for VP1 were compared with the published sequences and variable regions identified. The amino acid sequences were also analysed for hydrophilic regions. Two of the variable regions, numbered 129-160 and 193-204 overlapped hydrophilic regions, and were therefore identified as potentially immunogenic. These regions overlap regions shown by others to be immunogenic. PMID:6298715

  9. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  10. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  11. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  12. Simple sequence repeat markers that identify Claviceps species and strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Claviceps purpurea is a pathogen that infects most members of the Pooideae subfamily and causes ergot, a floral disease in which the ovary is replaced with a sclerotium. This study was initiated to develop Simple Sequence Repeat (SSRs) markers for rapid identification of C. purpurea. SSRs were desi...

  13. Analysis of sequence diversity through internal transcribed spacers and simple sequence repeats to identify Dendrobium species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y T; Chen, R K; Lin, S J; Chen, Y C; Chin, S W; Chen, F C; Lee, C Y

    2014-04-08

    The Orchidaceae is one of the largest and most diverse families of flowering plants. The Dendrobium genus has high economic potential as ornamental plants and for medicinal purposes. In addition, the species of this genus are able to produce large crops. However, many Dendrobium varieties are very similar in outward appearance, making it difficult to distinguish one species from another. This study demonstrated that the 12 Dendrobium species used in this study may be divided into 2 groups by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. Red and yellow flowers may also be used to separate these species into 2 main groups. In particular, the deciduous characteristic is associated with the ITS genetic diversity of the A group. Of 53 designed simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs, 7 pairs were polymorphic for polymerase chain reaction products that were amplified from a specific band. The results of this study demonstrate that these 7 SSR primer pairs may potentially be used to identify Dendrobium species and their progeny in future studies.

  14. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  15. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  16. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  17. Description of a novel HLA-B allele, B*5613, identified during HLA-typing using sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization and sequence-specific amplification.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, B; Heymann, G A; Schoenemann, C; Nagy, M; Kiesewetter, H; Salama, A

    2004-11-01

    Here, we report on the characterization of a novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B allele, B*5613. The allele was identified in an adult male from North Africa who was suffering from sickle cell anemia. HLA-B*5613 most closely matches to B*5601 differing only by a substitution of three nucleotides of codon 180. Due to this substitution, low-resolution HLA-typing using sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization or amplification using sequence-specific primers gave inconclusive results. DNA sequencing confirmed a variation of codon 180 (CTG-->GAC) resulting in an amino acid substitution Leu156Asp. PMID:15496207

  18. Novel mutation in SUCLA2 identified on sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Olcay; Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Güngör, Gülay; Karaer, Kadri; Dilber, Cengiz; Aydin, Kürşad

    2016-07-01

    Succinate-CoA ligase, ADP-forming, beta subunit (SUCLA2)-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is caused by mutations affecting the ADP-using isoform of the beta subunit in succinyl-CoA synthase, which is involved in the Krebs cycle. The SUCLA2 protein is found mostly in heart, skeletal muscle, and brain tissues. SUCLA2 mutations result in a mitochondrial disorder that manifests as deafness, lesions in the basal ganglia, and encephalomyopathy accompanied by dystonia. Such mutations are generally associated with mildly increased plasma methylmalonic acid, increased plasma lactate, elevated plasma carnitine esters, and the presence of methylmalonic acid in urine. In this case report, we describe a new mutation in a patient with a succinyl-CoA synthase deficiency caused by an SUCLA2 defect. PMID:26952923

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Southern tomato virus Identified in China Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Zheng, Yi; Li, Rugang; Sun, Shu-E; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Southern tomato virus (STV), a double-stranded RNA virus that affects tomato in China, was determined using small RNA deep sequencing. This Chinese isolate shares 99% sequence identity to other isolates from Mexico, France, Spain, and the United States. This is the first report of STV infecting tomatoes in Asia. PMID:26494671

  20. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  1. Sequence and characteristics of IS900, an insertion element identified in a human Crohn's disease isolate of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Green, E P; Tizard, M L; Moss, M T; Thompson, J; Winterbourne, D J; McFadden, J J; Hermon-Taylor, J

    1989-01-01

    The complete sequence of an insertion element IS900 in Mycobacterium paratuberculosis is reported. This is the first characterised example of a mycobacterial insertion element. IS900 consists of 1451bp of which 66% is G + C. It lacks terminal inverted and direct repeats, characteristic of Escherichia coli insertion elements but shows a degree of target sequence specificity. A single open reading frame (ORF 1197) coding for 399 amino acids is predicted. This amino acid sequence, and to a lesser extent the nucleotide sequence, show significant homologies to IS110, an insertion element of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). It is proposed that IS900, IS110, and similar insertion elements recently identified in disease isolates of Mycobacterium avium are members of a phylogenetically related family. IS900 will provide highly specific markers for the precise identification of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, useful in defining its relationship to animal and human diseases. PMID:2555783

  2. Potential of DNA sequences to identify zoanthids (Cnidaria: Zoantharia).

    PubMed

    Sinniger, Frederic; Reimer, James D; Pawlowski, Jan

    2008-12-01

    The order Zoantharia is known for its chaotic taxonomy and difficult morphological identification. One method that potentially could help for examining such troublesome taxa is DNA barcoding, which identifies species using standard molecular markers. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) has been utilized to great success in groups such as birds and insects; however, its applicability in many other groups is controversial. Recently, some studies have suggested that barcoding is not applicable to anthozoans. Here, we examine the use of COI and mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA for zoanthid identification. Despite the absence of a clear barcoding gap, our results show that for most of 54 zoanthid samples, both markers could separate samples to the species, or species group, level, particularly when easily accessible ecological or distributional data were included. Additionally, we have used the short V5 region of mt 16S rDNA to identify eight old (13 to 50 years old) museum samples. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of COI and mt 16S rDNA as barcodes for Zoantharia, and recommend that either one or both of these markers be considered for zoanthid identification in the future.

  3. Genome sequence of a novel mitovirus identified in the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria arborescens.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Ken; Katayama, Yukie; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Fukuhara, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Motoichiro; Arie, Tsutomu; Teraoka, Tohru; Moriyama, Hiromitsu

    2016-09-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria spp. contains a variety of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) elements of different sizes. Detailed analysis of next-generation sequencing data obtained using dsRNA purified from Alternaria arborescens, from which we had previously found Alternaria arborescens victorivirus 1, revealed the presence of another mycoviral-like dsRNA of approximately 2.5 kbp in length. When using the fungal mitochondrial genetic code, this dsRNA has a single open reading frame that potentially encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) with significant to sequence similarity to those of viruses of the genus Mitovirus. Moreover, both the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions have the potential to fold into stable stem-loop structures, which is characteristic of mitoviruses. Pairwise comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of RdRp indicated that the virus we identified in A. arborescens is a distinct member of the genus Mitovirus in the family Narnaviridae, designated as "Alternaria arborescens mitovirus 1" (AaMV1). PMID:27368994

  4. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  5. Metadata-driven comparative analysis tool for sequences (meta-CATS): an automated process for identifying significant sequence variations that correlate with virus attributes.

    PubMed

    Pickett, B E; Liu, M; Sadat, E L; Squires, R B; Noronha, J M; He, S; Jen, W; Zaremba, S; Gu, Z; Zhou, L; Larsen, C N; Bosch, I; Gehrke, L; McGee, M; Klem, E B; Scheuermann, R H

    2013-12-01

    The Virus Pathogen Resource (ViPR; www.viprbrc.org) and Influenza Research Database (IRD; www.fludb.org) have developed a metadata-driven Comparative Analysis Tool for Sequences (meta-CATS), which performs statistical comparative analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequence data to identify correlations between sequence variations and virus attributes (metadata). Meta-CATS guides users through: selecting a set of nucleotide or protein sequences; dividing them into multiple groups based on any associated metadata attribute (e.g. isolation location, host species); performing a statistical test at each aligned position; and identifying all residues that significantly differ between the groups. As proofs of concept, we have used meta-CATS to identify sequence biomarkers associated with dengue viruses isolated from different hemispheres, and to identify variations in the NS1 protein that are unique to each of the 4 dengue serotypes. Meta-CATS is made freely available to virology researchers to identify genotype-phenotype correlations for development of improved vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics.

  6. Metadata-driven Comparative Analysis Tool for Sequences (meta-CATS): an Automated Process for Identifying Significant Sequence Variations that Correlate with Virus Attributes

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, BE; Liu, M; Sadat, EL; Squires, RB; Noronha, JM; He, S; Jen, W; Zaremba, S; Gu, Z; Zhou, L; Larsen, CN; Bosch, I; Gehrke, L; McGee, M; Klem, EB; Scheuermann, RH

    2016-01-01

    The Virus Pathogen Resource (ViPR; www.viprbrc.org) and Influenza Research Database (IRD; www.fludb.org) have developed a metadata-driven Comparative Analysis Tool for Sequences (meta-CATS), which performs statistical comparative analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequence data to identify correlations between sequence variations and virus attributes (metadata). Meta-CATS guides users through: selecting a set of nucleotide or protein sequences; dividing them into multiple groups based on any associated metadata attribute (e.g. isolation location, host species); performing a statistical test at each aligned position; and identifying all residues that significantly differ between the groups. As proofs of concept, we have used meta-CATS to identify sequence biomarkers associated with dengue viruses isolated from different hemispheres, and to identify variations in the NS1 protein that are unique to each of the 4 dengue serotypes. Meta-CATS is made freely available to virology researchers to identify genotype-phenotype correlations for development of improved vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:24210098

  7. Genomic full-length sequence of HLA-Cw*0103 and *0108, identified by cloning and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y-P; Yang, B-C; Gao, S-Q; Deng, Z-H; Xie, Z

    2010-02-01

    Genomic full-length sequences of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-Cw*0103 and *0108 were identified by cloning and sequencing from two Chinese donors. All introns, exons 4-8, 5'-promoter, and 3'-UTR were found to be identical between these two alleles.

  8. Analysis of the Campylobacter jejuni Genome by SMRT DNA Sequencing Identifies Restriction-Modification Motifs

    PubMed Central

    O’Loughlin, Jason L.; Eucker, Tyson P.; Chavez, Juan D.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Gourley, Christopher R.; Bruce, James E.; Konkel, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis. The goal of this study was to analyze the C. jejuni F38011 strain, recovered from an individual with severe enteritis, at a genomic and proteomic level to gain insight into microbial processes. The C. jejuni F38011 genome is comprised of 1,691,939 bp, with a mol.% (G+C) content of 30.5%. PacBio sequencing coupled with REBASE analysis was used to predict C. jejuni F38011 genomic sites and enzymes that may be involved in DNA restriction-modification. A total of five putative methylation motifs were identified as well as the C. jejuni enzymes that could be responsible for the modifications. Peptides corresponding to the deduced amino acid sequence of the C. jejuni enzymes were identified using proteomics. This work sets the stage for studies to dissect the precise functions of the C. jejuni putative restriction-modification enzymes. Taken together, the data generated in this study contributes to our knowledge of the genomic content, methylation profile, and encoding capacity of C. jejuni. PMID:25695747

  9. Fatal Psychrobacter sp. infection in a pediatric patient with meningitis identified by metagenomic next-generation sequencing in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Alcántara-Pérez, Patricia; Wong-Arámbula, Claudia; González-Villa, Maribel; León-Ávila, Gloria; García-Chéquer, Adda Jeanette; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    The genus Psychrobacter contains environmental, psychrophilic and halotolerant gram-negative bacteria considered rare opportunistic pathogens in humans. Metagenomics was performed on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a pediatric patient with meningitis. Nucleic acids were extracted, randomly amplified, and sequenced with the 454 GS FLX Titanium next-generation sequencing (NGS) system. Sequencing reads were assembled, and potential virulence genes were predicted. Phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies were performed. Psychrobacter sp. 310 was identified, and several virulence genes characteristic of pathogenic bacteria were found. The phylogenomic study and 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that the closest relative of Psychrobacter sp. 310 was Psychrobacter sanguinis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a meningitis case associated with Psychrobacter sp. identified by NGS metagenomics in CSF from a pediatric patient. The metagenomic strategy based on NGS was a powerful tool to identify a rare unknown pathogen in a clinical case.

  10. First Genome Sequences of Porcine Parvovirus 5 Strains Identified in Polish Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinghui; Cui, Jin; Gerber, Priscilla F.; Biernacka, Kinga; Stadejek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus type 5 (PPV5) has been recently identified. Here, we report the genome sequences of five PPV5 strains identified in serum samples from Polish pigs, which represent the first PPV5 sequences recovered from European pigs. The PPV5 strains isolated in Poland are most related to the Chinese strain HN01. PMID:27587805

  11. Identifiability of PBPK models with applications to dimethylarsinic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ramon I; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Wambaugh, John F; Kenyon, Elaina M; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2015-12-01

    Any statistical model should be identifiable in order for estimates and tests using it to be meaningful. We consider statistical analysis of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in which parameters cannot be estimated precisely from available data, and discuss different types of identifiability that occur in PBPK models and give reasons why they occur. We particularly focus on how the mathematical structure of a PBPK model and lack of appropriate data can lead to statistical models in which it is impossible to estimate at least some parameters precisely. Methods are reviewed which can determine whether a purely linear PBPK model is globally identifiable. We propose a theorem which determines when identifiability at a set of finite and specific values of the mathematical PBPK model (global discete identifiability) implies identifiability of the statistical model. However, we are unable to establish conditions that imply global discrete identifiability, and conclude that the only safe approach to analysis of PBPK models involves Bayesian analysis with truncated priors. Finally, computational issues regarding posterior simulations of PBPK models are discussed. The methodology is very general and can be applied to numerous PBPK models which can be expressed as linear time-invariant systems. A real data set of a PBPK model for exposure to dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA(V)) is presented to illustrate the proposed methodology. PMID:26194069

  12. Intervening sequence of DNA identified in the structural portion of a mouse beta-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tilghman, S M; Tiemeier, D C; Seidman, J G; Peterlin, B M; Sullivan, M; Maizel, J V; Leder, P

    1978-01-01

    The unusual electron microscopic appearance of a hybrid formed between 9S mouse beta-globin mRNA and its corresponding cloned gene segment is caused by at least one, and possibly two, intervening sequences of DNA that interrupt the mouse beta-globin gene. Such an interpretation is consistent with a paradoxical restriction site pattern previously noted in this gene and with the nucleotide sequence of that portion of the gene that spans both structural and intervening sequences. The large intervening sequence, approximately 550 base pairs in length, occurs in the structural globin sequence and immediately follows the beta-globin codon corresponding to amino acid 104. A smaller, putative intervening sequence is located close to the 5' end of the beta-globin-coding sequence but may reside beyond its initiation codon. The beta-globin gene thus appears to be encoded in two, and possibly three, discontinuous segments. Images PMID:273235

  13. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies RAI1 Mutation in a Morbidly Obese Child Diagnosed With ROHHAD Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Kristyn M.; Towne, Meghan C.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; James, Philip M.; Crowley, Laura; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Elsea, Sarah H.; Beggs, Alan H.; Picker, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Context: The current obesity epidemic is attributed to complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. However, a limited number of cases, especially those with early-onset severe obesity, are linked to single gene defects. Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is one of the syndromes that presents with abrupt-onset extreme weight gain with an unknown genetic basis. Objective: To identify the underlying genetic etiology in a child with morbid early-onset obesity, hypoventilation, and autonomic and behavioral disturbances who was clinically diagnosed with ROHHAD syndrome. Design/Setting/Intervention: The index patient was evaluated at an academic medical center. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband and his parents. Genetic variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results: We identified a novel de novo nonsense mutation, c.3265 C>T (p.R1089X), in the retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) gene in the proband. Mutations in the RAI1 gene are known to cause Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). On further evaluation, his clinical features were not typical of either SMS or ROHHAD syndrome. Conclusions: This study identifies a de novo RAI1 mutation in a child with morbid obesity and a clinical diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome. Although extreme early-onset obesity, autonomic disturbances, and hypoventilation are present in ROHHAD, several of the clinical findings are consistent with SMS. This case highlights the challenges in the diagnosis of ROHHAD syndrome and its potential overlap with SMS. We also propose RAI1 as a candidate gene for children with morbid obesity. PMID:25781356

  14. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API).

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  16. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  17. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  18. The amino acid sequence of Staphylococcus aureus penicillinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the penicillinase (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase, EC 3.5.2.6) from Staphylococcus aureus strain PC1 was determined. The protein consists of a single polypeptide chain of 257 residues, and the sequence was determined by characterization of tryptic, chymotryptic, peptic and CNBr peptides, with some additional evidence from thermolysin and S. aureus proteinase peptides. A mistake in the preliminary report of the sequence is corrected; residues 113-116 are now thought to be -Lys-Lys-Val-Lys- rather than -Lys-Val-Lys-Lys-. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50056 (91 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1218078

  19. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found.

  20. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  1. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  2. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies Transportin 3 as the Causative Gene for LGMD1F

    PubMed Central

    Mutarelli, Margherita; Peterle, Enrico; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Rispoli, Rossella; Savarese, Marco; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Piluso, Giulio; Morandi, Lucia; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Angelini, Corrado; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions. We investigated a large family with autosomal dominant transmission pattern, previously classified as LGMD1F and mapped to chromosome 7q32. Affected members are characterized by muscle weakness affecting earlier the pelvic girdle and the ileopsoas muscles. We sequenced the whole exome of four family members and identified a shared heterozygous frame-shift variant in the Transportin 3 (TNPO3) gene, encoding a member of the importin-β super-family. The TNPO3 gene is mapped within the LGMD1F critical interval and its 923-amino acid human gene product is also expressed in skeletal muscle. In addition, we identified an isolated case of LGMD with a new missense mutation in the same gene. We localized the mutant TNPO3 around the nucleus, but not inside. The involvement of gene related to the nuclear transport suggests a novel disease mechanism leading to muscular dystrophy. PMID:23667635

  3. Development of an expert system for amino acid sequence identification.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Saulinskas, E F; Johnson, P; Harrington, P B

    1996-08-01

    An expert system for amino acid sequence identification has been developed. The algorithm uses heuristic rules developed by human experts in protein sequencing. The system is applied to the chromatographic data of phenylthiohydantoin-amino acids acquired from an automated sequencer. The peak intensities in the current cycle are compared with those in the previous cycle, while the calibration and succeeding cycles are used as ancillary identification criteria when necessary. The retention time for each chromatographic peak in each cycle is corrected by the corresponding peak in the calibration cycle at the same run. The main improvement of our system compared with the onboard software used by the Applied Biosystems 477A Protein/Peptide Sequencer is that each peak in each cycle is assigned an identification name according to the corrected retention time to be used for the comparison with different cycles. The system was developed from analyses of ribonuclease A and evaluated by runs of four other protein samples that were not used in rule development. This paper demonstrates that rules developed by human experts can be automatically applied to sequence assignment. The expert system performed more accurately than the onboard software of the protein sequencer, in that the misidentification rates for the expert system were around 7%, whereas those for the onboard software were between 13 and 21%.

  4. Transcriptome Sequencing of Chemically Induced Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Genes Related to Agarwood Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wei; Wu, Hongqing; He, Xin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Haohua; Fan, Yunfei; Tan, Guohui; Liu, Taomei; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Background Agarwood is a traditional Chinese medicine used as a clinical sedative, carminative, and antiemetic drug. Agarwood is formed in Aquilaria sinensis when A. sinensis trees are threatened by external physical, chemical injury or endophytic fungal irritation. However, the mechanism of agarwood formation via chemical induction remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of different parts of a chemically induced A. sinensis trunk sample with agarwood. The Illumina sequencing platform was used to identify the genes involved in agarwood formation. Methodology/Principal Findings A five-year-old Aquilaria sinensis treated by formic acid was selected. The white wood part (B1 sample), the transition part between agarwood and white wood (W2 sample), the agarwood part (J3 sample), and the rotten wood part (F5 sample) were collected for transcriptome sequencing. Accordingly, 54,685,634 clean reads, which were assembled into 83,467 unigenes, were obtained with a Q20 value of 97.5%. A total of 50,565 unigenes were annotated using the Nr, Nt, SWISS-PROT, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. In particular, 171,331,352 unigenes were annotated by various pathways, including the sesquiterpenoid (ko00909) and plant–pathogen interaction (ko03040) pathways. These pathways were related to sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and defensive responses to chemical stimulation. Conclusions/Significance The transcriptome data of the different parts of the chemically induced A. sinensis trunk provide a rich source of materials for discovering and identifying the genes involved in sesquiterpenoid production and in defensive responses to chemical stimulation. This study is the first to use de novo sequencing and transcriptome assembly for different parts of chemically induced A. sinensis. Results demonstrate that the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway and WRKY transcription factor play important roles in agarwood formation via chemical induction. The comparative analysis of

  5. MinION nanopore sequencing identifies the position and structure of a bacterial antibiotic resistance island.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Philip M; Nair, Satheesh; Dallman, Tim; Rubino, Salvatore; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Wain, John; O'Grady, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Short-read, high-throughput sequencing technology cannot identify the chromosomal position of repetitive insertion sequences that typically flank horizontally acquired genes such as bacterial virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The MinION nanopore sequencer can produce long sequencing reads on a device similar in size to a USB memory stick. Here we apply a MinION sequencer to resolve the structure and chromosomal insertion site of a composite antibiotic resistance island in Salmonella Typhi Haplotype 58. Nanopore sequencing data from a single 18-h run was used to create a scaffold for an assembly generated from short-read Illumina data. Our results demonstrate the potential of the MinION device in clinical laboratories to fully characterize the epidemic spread of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25485618

  6. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  7. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Safer, B.; Cohen, R.B.; Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. /sup 32/P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of /sup 32/P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors.

  8. Functional Brain Activation Differences in Stuttering Identified with a Rapid fMRI Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucks, Torrey; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech…

  9. Exome sequencing identifies a novel SMCHD1 mutation in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Boyden, Steven E; Estrella, Elicia A; Jones, Takako I; Rahimov, Fedik; Yu, Timothy W; Darras, Basil T; Amato, Anthony A; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Jones, Peter L; Kunkel, Louis M; Kang, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    FSHD2 is a rare form of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) characterized by the absence of a contraction in the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat region on chromosome 4q35 that is the hallmark of FSHD1. However, hypomethylation of this region is common to both subtypes. Recently, mutations in SMCHD1 combined with a permissive 4q35 allele were reported to cause FSHD2. We identified a novel p.Lys275del SMCHD1 mutation in a family affected with FSHD2 using whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis. This mutation alters a highly conserved amino acid in the ATPase domain of SMCHD1. Subject III-11 is a male who developed asymmetrical muscle weakness characteristic of FSHD at 13 years. Physical examination revealed marked bilateral atrophy at biceps brachii, bilateral scapular winging, some asymmetrical weakness at tibialis anterior and peroneal muscles, and mild lower facial weakness. Biopsy of biceps brachii in subject II-5, the father of III-11, demonstrated lobulated fibers and dystrophic changes. Endomysial and perivascular inflammation was found, which has been reported in FSHD1 but not FSHD2. Given the previous report of SMCHD1 mutations in FSHD2 and the clinical presentations consistent with the FSHD phenotype, we conclude that the SMCHD1 mutation is the likely cause of the disease in this family. PMID:24128691

  10. The genome of RNA tumor viruses contains polyadenylic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Cartas, M

    1972-04-01

    The 70S genome of two RNA tumor viruses, murine sarcoma virus and avian myeloblastosis virus, binds to Millipore filters in buffer with high salt concentration and to glass fiber filters containing poly(U). These observations suggest that 70S RNA contains adenylic acid-rich sequences. When digested by pancreatic RNase, 70S RNA of murine sarcoma virus yielded poly(A) sequences that contain 91% adenylic acid. These poly(A) sequences sedimented as a relatively homogenous peak in sucrose gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 4-5 S, but had a mobility during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that corresponds to molecules that sediment at 6-7 S. If we estimate a molecular weight for each sequence of 30,000-60,000 (100-200 nucleotides) and a molecular weight for viral 70S RNA of 3-12 million, each viral genome could contain 1-8 poly(A) sequences. Possible functions of poly(A) in the infecting viral RNA may include a role in the initiation of viral DNA or RNA synthesis, in protein maturation, or in the assembly of the viral genome.

  11. kmer-SVM: a web server for identifying predictive regulatory sequence features in genomic data sets

    PubMed Central

    Fletez-Brant, Christopher; Lee, Dongwon; McCallion, Andrew S.; Beer, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have made the generation of genomic data sets a routine component of many biological investigations. For example, Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequence assays detect genomic regions bound (directly or indirectly) by specific factors, and DNase-seq identifies regions of open chromatin. A major bottleneck in the interpretation of these data is the identification of the underlying DNA sequence code that defines, and ultimately facilitates prediction of, these transcription factor (TF) bound or open chromatin regions. We have recently developed a novel computational methodology, which uses a support vector machine (SVM) with kmer sequence features (kmer-SVM) to identify predictive combinations of short transcription factor-binding sites, which determine the tissue specificity of these genomic assays (Lee, Karchin and Beer, Discriminative prediction of mammalian enhancers from DNA sequence. Genome Res. 2011; 21:2167–80). This regulatory information can (i) give confidence in genomic experiments by recovering previously known binding sites, and (ii) reveal novel sequence features for subsequent experimental testing of cooperative mechanisms. Here, we describe the development and implementation of a web server to allow the broader research community to independently apply our kmer-SVM to analyze and interpret their genomic datasets. We analyze five recently published data sets and demonstrate how this tool identifies accessory factors and repressive sequence elements. kmer-SVM is available at http://kmersvm.beerlab.org. PMID:23771147

  12. Amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from Hyalophora cecropia

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Å.; Xanthopoulos, K. G.; Boman, H. G.; Bennich, H.

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid and cDNA sequences of lysozyme from the giant silk moth Hyalophora cecropia have been determined. This enzyme is one of several immune proteins produced by the diapausing pupae after injection of bacteria. Cecropia lysozyme is composed of 120 amino acids, has a mol. wt. of 13.8 kd and shows great similarity with vertebrate lysozymes of the chicken type. The amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity and for the binding of substrate are essentially conserved. Three allelic variants of the Cecropia enzyme are identified. A comparison of the chicken and the Cecropia lysozymes shows that there is a 40% identity at both the amino acid and the nucleotide level. Some evolutionary aspects of the sequence data are discussed. PMID:16453632

  13. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  14. Plant RNA virus sequences identified in kimchi by microbial metatranscriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Seon; Jung, Ji Young; Wang, Yao; Oh, Hye Ji; Choi, Dongjin; Jeon, Che Ok; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2014-07-01

    Plant pathogenic RNA viruses are present in a variety of plant-based foods. When ingested by humans, these viruses can survive the passage through the digestive tract, and are frequently detected in human feces. Kimchi is a traditional fermented Korean food made from cabbage or vegetables, with a variety of other plant-based ingredients, including ground red pepper and garlic paste. We analyzed microbial metatranscriptome data from kimchi at five fermentation stages to identify plant RNA virus-derived sequences. We successfully identified a substantial amount of plant RNA virus sequences, especially during the early stages of fermentation: 23.47% and 16.45% of total clean reads on days 7 and 13, respectively. The most abundant plant RNA virus sequences were from pepper mild mottle virus, a major pathogen of red peppers; this constituted 95% of the total RNA virus sequences identified throughout the fermentation period. We observed distinct sequencing read-depth distributions for plant RNA virus genomes, possibly implying intrinsic and/or technical biases during the metatranscriptome generation procedure. We also identified RNA virus sequences in publicly available microbial metatranscriptome data sets. We propose that metatranscriptome data may serve as a valuable resource for RNA virus detection, and a systematic screening of the ingredients may help prevent the use of virus-infected low-quality materials for food production. PMID:24836186

  15. Plant RNA virus sequences identified in kimchi by microbial metatranscriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Seon; Jung, Ji Young; Wang, Yao; Oh, Hye Ji; Choi, Dongjin; Jeon, Che Ok; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2014-07-01

    Plant pathogenic RNA viruses are present in a variety of plant-based foods. When ingested by humans, these viruses can survive the passage through the digestive tract, and are frequently detected in human feces. Kimchi is a traditional fermented Korean food made from cabbage or vegetables, with a variety of other plant-based ingredients, including ground red pepper and garlic paste. We analyzed microbial metatranscriptome data from kimchi at five fermentation stages to identify plant RNA virus-derived sequences. We successfully identified a substantial amount of plant RNA virus sequences, especially during the early stages of fermentation: 23.47% and 16.45% of total clean reads on days 7 and 13, respectively. The most abundant plant RNA virus sequences were from pepper mild mottle virus, a major pathogen of red peppers; this constituted 95% of the total RNA virus sequences identified throughout the fermentation period. We observed distinct sequencing read-depth distributions for plant RNA virus genomes, possibly implying intrinsic and/or technical biases during the metatranscriptome generation procedure. We also identified RNA virus sequences in publicly available microbial metatranscriptome data sets. We propose that metatranscriptome data may serve as a valuable resource for RNA virus detection, and a systematic screening of the ingredients may help prevent the use of virus-infected low-quality materials for food production.

  16. Transitive Homology-Guided Structural Studies Lead to Discovery of Cro Proteins With 40% Sequence Identify But Different Folds

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, C.G.; Hall, B.M.; Anderson, W.J.; Ingram, W.M.; Roberts, S.A.; Montfort, W.R.; Cordes, M.H.J.

    2009-05-27

    Proteins that share common ancestry may differ in structure and function because of divergent evolution of their amino acid sequences. For a typical diverse protein superfamily, the properties of a few scattered members are known from experiment. A satisfying picture of functional and structural evolution in relation to sequence changes, however, may require characterization of a larger, well chosen subset. Here, we employ a 'stepping-stone' method, based on transitive homology, to target sequences intermediate between two related proteins with known divergent properties. We apply the approach to the question of how new protein folds can evolve from preexisting folds and, in particular, to an evolutionary change in secondary structure and oligomeric state in the Cro family of bacteriophage transcription factors, initially identified by sequence-structure comparison of distant homologs from phages P22 and {lambda}. We report crystal structures of two Cro proteins, Xfaso 1 and Pfl 6, with sequences intermediate between those of P22 and {lambda}. The domains show 40% sequence identity but differ by switching of {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet in a C-terminal region spanning {approx}25 residues. Sedimentation analysis also suggests a correlation between helix-to-sheet conversion and strengthened dimerization.

  17. Nucleic acid sequence design via efficient ensemble defect optimization.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Joseph N; Wolfe, Brian R; Pierce, Niles A

    2011-02-01

    We describe an algorithm for designing the sequence of one or more interacting nucleic acid strands intended to adopt a target secondary structure at equilibrium. Sequence design is formulated as an optimization problem with the goal of reducing the ensemble defect below a user-specified stop condition. For a candidate sequence and a given target secondary structure, the ensemble defect is the average number of incorrectly paired nucleotides at equilibrium evaluated over the ensemble of unpseudoknotted secondary structures. To reduce the computational cost of accepting or rejecting mutations to a random initial sequence, candidate mutations are evaluated on the leaf nodes of a tree-decomposition of the target structure. During leaf optimization, defect-weighted mutation sampling is used to select each candidate mutation position with probability proportional to its contribution to the ensemble defect of the leaf. As subsequences are merged moving up the tree, emergent structural defects resulting from crosstalk between sibling sequences are eliminated via reoptimization within the defective subtree starting from new random subsequences. Using a Θ(N(3) ) dynamic program to evaluate the ensemble defect of a target structure with N nucleotides, this hierarchical approach implies an asymptotic optimality bound on design time: for sufficiently large N, the cost of sequence design is bounded below by 4/3 the cost of a single evaluation of the ensemble defect for the full sequence. Hence, the design algorithm has time complexity Ω(N(3) ). For target structures containing N ∈{100,200,400,800,1600,3200} nucleotides and duplex stems ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, RNA sequence designs at 37°C typically succeed in satisfying a stop condition with ensemble defect less than N/100. Empirically, the sequence design algorithm exhibits asymptotic optimality and the exponent in the time complexity bound is sharp.

  18. On combining protein sequences and nucleic acid sequences in phylogenetic analysis: the homeobox protein case.

    PubMed

    Agosti, D; Jacobs, D; DeSalle, R

    1996-01-01

    Amino acid encoding genes contain character state information that may be useful for phylogenetic analysis on at least two levels. The nucleotide sequence and the translated amino acid sequences have both been employed separately as character states for cladistic studies of various taxa, including studies of the genealogy of genes in multigene families. In essence, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences are two different ways of character coding the information in a gene. Silent positions in the nucleotide sequence (first or third positions in codons that can accrue change without changing the identity of the amino acid that the triplet codes for) may accrue change relatively rapidly and become saturated, losing the pattern of historical divergence. On the other hand, non-silent nucleotide alterations and their accompanying amino acid changes may evolve too slowly to reveal relationships among closely related taxa. In general, the dynamics of sequence change in silent and non-silent positions in protein coding genes result in homoplasy and lack of resolution, respectively. We suggest that the combination of nucleic acid and the translated amino acid coded character states into the same data matrix for phylogenetic analysis addresses some of the problems caused by the rapid change of silent nucleotide positions and overall slow rate of change of non-silent nucleotide positions and slowly changing amino acid positions. One major theoretical problem with this approach is the apparent non-independence of the two sources of characters. However, there are at least three possible outcomes when comparing protein coding nucleic acid sequences with their translated amino acids in a phylogenetic context on a codon by codon basis. First, the two character sets for a codon may be entirely congruent with respect to the information they convey about the relationships of a certain set of taxa. Second, one character set may display no information concerning a phylogenetic

  19. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  20. Human and mouse ABCA1 comparative sequencing and transgenesis studies identify regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Yang; Cavelier, L.; Chiu, Sally; Rubin, Edward; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2000-08-01

    The expression of ABCA1, a major participant in apolipoprotein mediated cholesterol efflux is highly regulated by a variety of factors including intracellular cholesterol concentration. To analyze its genomic organization and identify those sequences involved in its regulation we sequenced and compared approximately 200 Kb of orthologous DNA from mice and humans containing the ABCA1 gene and significant flanking DNA. The comparison revealed a variety of mouse human conserved sequences including 50 conserved ABCA1 exons over 147Kb of human and 124Kb of mouse genomic DNA as well as multiple mouse human conserved noncoding sequences. Using as a criteria for identifying putative regulatory elements in non-coding sequence, human and mouse sequences that were &62;75% identical for over 120 bp were screened for resulting in the identification of 34 elements. The two most highly conserved human mouse noncoding elements (CNS1: 88% identity over 498 bp, CNS2: 81% identity over 214 bp)! were also highly conserved in the ABCA1 genes of rats, dogs, cows, rabbits and pigs. Two independent studies have demonstrated that the DNA segments containing CNS2 function in vitro as a sterol response promoter. Support for the inclusion of major ABCA1 regulatory elements in the human genomic sequence examined was the demonstration that mice containing a human BAC transgene containing sequences exclusively from the analyzed interval, expressed human ABCA1 in a tissue distribution mimicking expression of endogenous mouse ABC1. These studies using a comparative genomic approach has characterized the structure of the human and mouse ABCA1 genes and has helped identify sequences participating in its expression.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor. PMID:24338313

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis acidic phospholipase A2: isolation and partial amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda L; González-Salazar, Francisco; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Torres de la Cruz, Víctor M; Morales-Vallarta, Mario; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Garza-González, Jesús N; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major cause of acute disease worldwide, and trichomoniasis is the most common and curable disease, generating more than 170 million cases annually worldwide. Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy in vitro cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa, where the phospholipases A2 (PLA2) have been reported as potential virulence factors. These enzymes have been partially characterized from the subcellular fraction S30 of pathogenic T. vaginalis strains. The main objective of this study was to purify a phospholipase A2 from T. vaginalis, make a partial characterization, obtain a partial amino acid sequence, and determine its enzymatic participation as hemolytic factor causing lysis of erythrocytes. Trichomonas S30, RF30 and UFF30 sub-fractions from GT-15 strain have the capacity to hydrolyze [2-(14)C-PA]-PC at pH 6.0. Proteins from the UFF30 sub-fraction were separated by affinity chromatography into two eluted fractions with detectable PLA A2 activity. The EDTA-eluted fraction was analyzed by HPLC using on-line HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and two protein peaks were observed at 8.2 and 13 kDa. Peptide sequences were identified from the proteins present in the eluted EDTA UFF30 fraction; bioinformatic analysis using Protein Link Global Server charged with T. vaginalis protein database suggests that eluted peptides correspond a putative ubiquitin protein in the 8.2 kDa fraction and a phospholipase preserved in the 13 kDa fraction. The EDTA-eluted fraction hydrolyzed [2-(14)C-PA]-PC lyses erythrocytes from Sprague-Dawley in a time and dose-dependent manner. The acidic hemolytic activity decreased by 84% with the addition of 100 μM of Rosenthal's inhibitor.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing Demonstrates Limited Transmission within Identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clusters in New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Outhred, Alexander C.; Jelfs, Peter; McCallum, Nadine; Wang, Qinning; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Marais, Ben J.; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2016-01-01

    Australia has a low tuberculosis incidence rate with most cases occurring among recent immigrants. Given suboptimal cluster resolution achieved with 24-locus mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU-24) genotyping, the added value of whole genome sequencing was explored. MIRU-24 profiles of all Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-confirmed tuberculosis cases diagnosed between 2009 and 2013 in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, were examined and clusters identified. The relatedness of cases within the largest MIRU-24 clusters was assessed using whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Of 1841 culture-confirmed TB cases, 91.9% (1692/1841) had complete demographic and genotyping data. East-African Indian (474; 28.0%) and Beijing (470; 27.8%) lineage strains predominated. The overall rate of MIRU-24 clustering was 20.1% (340/1692) and was highest among Beijing lineage strains (35.7%; 168/470). One Beijing and three East-African Indian (EAI) clonal complexes were responsible for the majority of observed clusters. Whole genome sequencing of the 4 largest clusters (30 isolates) demonstrated diverse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within identified clusters. All sequenced EAI strains and 70% of Beijing lineage strains clustered by MIRU-24 typing demonstrated distinct SNP profiles. The superior resolution provided by whole genome sequencing demonstrated limited M. tuberculosis transmission within NSW, even within identified MIRU-24 clusters. Routine whole genome sequencing could provide valuable public health guidance in low burden settings. PMID:27737005

  4. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly L-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  5. The amino acid sequence of Escherichia coli cyanase.

    PubMed

    Chin, C C; Anderson, P M; Wold, F

    1983-01-10

    The amino acid sequence of the enzyme cyanase (cyanate hydrolase) from Escherichia coli has been determined by automatic Edman degradation of the intact protein and of its component peptides. The primary peptides used in the sequencing were produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage at the methionine residues, yielding 4 peptides plus free homoserine from the NH2-terminal methionine, and by trypsin cleavage at the 7 arginine residues after acetylation of the lysines. Secondary peptides required for overlaps and COOH-terminal sequences were produced by chymotrypsin or clostripain cleavage of some of the larger peptides. The complete sequence of the cyanase subunit consists of 156 amino acid residues (Mr 16,350). Based on the observation that the cysteine-containing peptide is obtained as a disulfide-linked dimer, it is proposed that the covalent structure of cyanase is made up of two subunits linked by a disulfide bond between the single cystine residue in each subunit. The native enzyme (Mr 150,000) then appears to be a complex of four or five such subunit dimers.

  6. New mutations in flagellar motors identified by whole genome sequencing in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The building of a cilium or flagellum requires molecular motors and associated proteins that allow the relocation of proteins from the cell body to the distal end and the return of proteins to the cell body in a process termed intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT trains are carried out by kinesin and back to the cell body by dynein. Methods We used whole genome sequencing to identify the causative mutations for two temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutants in Chlamydomonas and validated the changes using reversion analysis. We examined the effect of these mutations on the localization of IFT81, an IFT complex B protein, the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DHC1b), and the dynein light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Results The strains, fla18 and fla24, have mutations in kinesin-2 and cytoplasmic dynein, respectively. The fla18 mutation alters the same glutamic acid (E24G) mutated in the fla10-14 allele (E24K). The fla18 strain loses flagella at 32?C more rapidly than the E24K allele but less rapidly than the fla10-1 allele. The fla18 mutant loses its flagella by detachment rather than by shortening. The fla24 mutation falls in cytoplasmic dynein and changes a completely conserved amino acid (L3243P) in an alpha helix in the AAA5 domain. The fla24 mutant loses its flagella by shortening within 6 hours at 32?C. DHC1b protein is reduced by 18-fold and D1bLIC is reduced by 16-fold at 21?C compared to wild-type cells. We identified two pseudorevertants (L3243S and L3243R), which remain flagellated at 32?C. Although fla24 cells assemble full-length flagella at 21?C, IFT81 protein localization is dramatically altered. Instead of localizing at the basal body and along the flagella, IFT81 is concentrated at the proximal end of the flagella. The pseudorevertants show wild-type IFT81 localization at 21?C, but proximal end localization of IFT81 at 32?C. Conclusions The change in the AAA5 domain of the cytoplasmic dynein in fla24 may block the recycling of IFT

  7. Close Sequence Comparisons are Sufficient to Identify Humancis-Regulatory Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Couronne, Olivier; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2005-12-01

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary method used to identify functional noncoding elements in human and other large genomes. However, little is known about the relative merits of evolutionarily close and distant sequence comparisons, due to the lack of a universal metric for sequence conservation, and also the paucity of empirically defined benchmark sets of cis-regulatory elements. To address this problem, we developed a general-purpose algorithm (Gumby) that detects slowly-evolving regions in primate, mammalian and more distant comparisons without requiring adjustment of parameters, and ranks conserved elements by P-value using Karlin-Altschul statistics. We benchmarked Gumby predictions against previously identified cis-regulatory elements at diverse genomic loci, and also tested numerous extremely conserved human-rodent sequences for transcriptional enhancer activity using reporter-gene assays in transgenic mice. Human regulatory elements were identified with acceptable sensitivity and specificity by comparison with 1-5 other eutherian mammals or 6 other simian primates. More distant comparisons (marsupial, avian, amphibian and fish) failed to identify many of the empirically defined functional noncoding elements. We derived an intuitive relationship between ancient and recent noncoding sequence conservation from whole genome comparative analysis, which explains some of these findings. Lastly, we determined that, in addition to strength of conservation, genomic location and/or density of surrounding conserved elements must also be considered in selecting candidate enhancers for testing at embryonic time points.

  8. Internet-accessible DNA sequence database for identifying fusaria from human and animal infections.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A; Rinaldi, Michael G; Sarver, Brice A J; Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Summerbell, Richard C; Robert, Vincent A R G; Crous, Pedro W; Zhang, Ning; Aoki, Takayuki; Jung, Kyongyong; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Seogchan; Park, Bongsoo; Geiser, David M

    2010-10-01

    Because less than one-third of clinically relevant fusaria can be accurately identified to species level using phenotypic data (i.e., morphological species recognition), we constructed a three-locus DNA sequence database to facilitate molecular identification of the 69 Fusarium species associated with human or animal mycoses encountered in clinical microbiology laboratories. The database comprises partial sequences from three nuclear genes: translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB1), and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB2). These three gene fragments can be amplified by PCR and sequenced using primers that are conserved across the phylogenetic breadth of Fusarium. Phylogenetic analyses of the combined data set reveal that, with the exception of two monotypic lineages, all clinically relevant fusaria are nested in one of eight variously sized and strongly supported species complexes. The monophyletic lineages have been named informally to facilitate communication of an isolate's clade membership and genetic diversity. To identify isolates to the species included within the database, partial DNA sequence data from one or more of the three genes can be used as a BLAST query against the database which is Web accessible at FUSARIUM-ID (http://isolate.fusariumdb.org) and the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS-KNAW) Fungal Biodiversity Center (http://www.cbs.knaw.nl/fusarium). Alternatively, isolates can be identified via phylogenetic analysis by adding sequences of unknowns to the DNA sequence alignment, which can be downloaded from the two aforementioned websites. The utility of this database should increase significantly as members of the clinical microbiology community deposit in internationally accessible culture collections (e.g., CBS-KNAW or the Fusarium Research Center) cultures of novel mycosis-associated fusaria, along with associated, corrected sequence chromatograms and data, so that the

  9. Internet-accessible DNA sequence database for identifying fusaria from human and animal infections.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A; Rinaldi, Michael G; Sarver, Brice A J; Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Summerbell, Richard C; Robert, Vincent A R G; Crous, Pedro W; Zhang, Ning; Aoki, Takayuki; Jung, Kyongyong; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Seogchan; Park, Bongsoo; Geiser, David M

    2010-10-01

    Because less than one-third of clinically relevant fusaria can be accurately identified to species level using phenotypic data (i.e., morphological species recognition), we constructed a three-locus DNA sequence database to facilitate molecular identification of the 69 Fusarium species associated with human or animal mycoses encountered in clinical microbiology laboratories. The database comprises partial sequences from three nuclear genes: translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB1), and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB2). These three gene fragments can be amplified by PCR and sequenced using primers that are conserved across the phylogenetic breadth of Fusarium. Phylogenetic analyses of the combined data set reveal that, with the exception of two monotypic lineages, all clinically relevant fusaria are nested in one of eight variously sized and strongly supported species complexes. The monophyletic lineages have been named informally to facilitate communication of an isolate's clade membership and genetic diversity. To identify isolates to the species included within the database, partial DNA sequence data from one or more of the three genes can be used as a BLAST query against the database which is Web accessible at FUSARIUM-ID (http://isolate.fusariumdb.org) and the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS-KNAW) Fungal Biodiversity Center (http://www.cbs.knaw.nl/fusarium). Alternatively, isolates can be identified via phylogenetic analysis by adding sequences of unknowns to the DNA sequence alignment, which can be downloaded from the two aforementioned websites. The utility of this database should increase significantly as members of the clinical microbiology community deposit in internationally accessible culture collections (e.g., CBS-KNAW or the Fusarium Research Center) cultures of novel mycosis-associated fusaria, along with associated, corrected sequence chromatograms and data, so that the

  10. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences.

  11. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  12. An integrated system for identifying the hidden assassins in traditional medicines containing aristolochic acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Haiyu; Li, Yaoli; Cai, Shaoqing; Xiang, Li; Zhu, Yingjie; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicines adulterated and contaminated with plant materials from the Aristolochiaceae family, which contain aristolochic acids (AAs), cause aristolochic acid nephropathy. Approximately 256 traditional Chinese patent medicines, containing Aristolochiaceous materials, are still being sold in Chinese markets today. In order to protect consumers from health risks due to AAs, the hidden assassins, efficient methods to differentiate Aristolochiaceous herbs from their putative substitutes need to be established. In this study, 158 Aristolochiaceous samples representing 46 species and four genera as well as 131 non-Aristolochiaceous samples representing 33 species, 20 genera and 12 families were analyzed using DNA barcodes based on the ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences. Aristolochiaceous materials and their non-Aristolochiaceous substitutes were successfully identified using BLAST1, the nearest distance method and the neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. In addition, based on sequence information of ITS2, we developed a Real-Time PCR assay which successfully identified herbal material from the Aristolochiaceae family. Using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (UHPLC-HR-MS), we demonstrated that most representatives from the Aristolochiaceae family contain toxic AAs. Therefore, integrated DNA barcodes, Real-Time PCR assays using TaqMan probes and UHPLC-HR-MS system provides an efficient and reliable authentication system to protect consumers from health risks due to the hidden assassins (AAs). PMID:26270958

  13. An integrated system for identifying the hidden assassins in traditional medicines containing aristolochic acids

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Haiyu; Li, Yaoli; Cai, Shaoqing; Xiang, Li; Zhu, Yingjie; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicines adulterated and contaminated with plant materials from the Aristolochiaceae family, which contain aristolochic acids (AAs), cause aristolochic acid nephropathy. Approximately 256 traditional Chinese patent medicines, containing Aristolochiaceous materials, are still being sold in Chinese markets today. In order to protect consumers from health risks due to AAs, the hidden assassins, efficient methods to differentiate Aristolochiaceous herbs from their putative substitutes need to be established. In this study, 158 Aristolochiaceous samples representing 46 species and four genera as well as 131 non-Aristolochiaceous samples representing 33 species, 20 genera and 12 families were analyzed using DNA barcodes based on the ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences. Aristolochiaceous materials and their non-Aristolochiaceous substitutes were successfully identified using BLAST1, the nearest distance method and the neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. In addition, based on sequence information of ITS2, we developed a Real-Time PCR assay which successfully identified herbal material from the Aristolochiaceae family. Using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (UHPLC-HR-MS), we demonstrated that most representatives from the Aristolochiaceae family contain toxic AAs. Therefore, integrated DNA barcodes, Real-Time PCR assays using TaqMan probes and UHPLC-HR-MS system provides an efficient and reliable authentication system to protect consumers from health risks due to the hidden assassins (AAs). PMID:26270958

  14. An integrated system for identifying the hidden assassins in traditional medicines containing aristolochic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Zhao, Haiyu; Li, Yaoli; Cai, Shaoqing; Xiang, Li; Zhu, Yingjie; Yao, Hui; Song, Jingyuan; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chen, Shilin

    2015-08-01

    Traditional herbal medicines adulterated and contaminated with plant materials from the Aristolochiaceae family, which contain aristolochic acids (AAs), cause aristolochic acid nephropathy. Approximately 256 traditional Chinese patent medicines, containing Aristolochiaceous materials, are still being sold in Chinese markets today. In order to protect consumers from health risks due to AAs, the hidden assassins, efficient methods to differentiate Aristolochiaceous herbs from their putative substitutes need to be established. In this study, 158 Aristolochiaceous samples representing 46 species and four genera as well as 131 non-Aristolochiaceous samples representing 33 species, 20 genera and 12 families were analyzed using DNA barcodes based on the ITS2 and psbA-trnH sequences. Aristolochiaceous materials and their non-Aristolochiaceous substitutes were successfully identified using BLAST1, the nearest distance method and the neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. In addition, based on sequence information of ITS2, we developed a Real-Time PCR assay which successfully identified herbal material from the Aristolochiaceae family. Using Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (UHPLC-HR-MS), we demonstrated that most representatives from the Aristolochiaceae family contain toxic AAs. Therefore, integrated DNA barcodes, Real-Time PCR assays using TaqMan probes and UHPLC-HR-MS system provides an efficient and reliable authentication system to protect consumers from health risks due to the hidden assassins (AAs).

  15. Identifying the ligated amino acid of archaeal tRNAs based on positions outside the anticodon

    PubMed Central

    Galili, Tal; Gingold, Hila; Shaul, Shaul; Benjamini, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    Proper recognition of tRNAs by their aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase is essential for translation accuracy. Following evidence that the enzymes can recognize the correct tRNA even when anticodon information is masked, we search for additional nucleotide positions within the tRNA molecule that potentially contain information for amino acid identification. Analyzing 3936 sequences of tRNA genes from 86 archaeal species, we show that the tRNAs’ cognate amino acids can be identified by the information embedded in the tRNAs’ nucleotide positions without relying on the anticodon information. We present a small set of six to 10 informative positions along the tRNA, which allow for amino acid identification accuracy of 90.6% to 97.4%, respectively. We inspected tRNAs for each of the 20 amino acid types for such informative positions and found that tRNA genes for some amino acids are distinguishable from others by as few as one or two positions. The informative nucleotide positions are in agreement with nucleotide positions that were experimentally shown to affect the loaded amino acid identity. Interestingly, the knowledge gained from the tRNA genes of one archaeal phylum does not extrapolate well to another phylum. Furthermore, each species has a unique ensemble of nucleotides in the informative tRNA positions, and the similarity between the sets of positions of two distinct species reflects their evolutionary distance. Hence, we term this set of informative positions a “tRNA cipher.” It is tempting to suggest that the diverging code identified here might also serve the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase in the task of tRNA recognition. PMID:27516383

  16. Identifying wrong assemblies in de novo short read primary sequence assembly contigs.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Vandna; Kumar, Rajnish; Shankar, Ravi

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of short-reads-based genome sequencing approaches, large number of organisms are being sequenced all over the world. Most of these assemblies are done using some de novo short read assemblers and other related approaches. However, the contigs produced this way are prone to wrong assembly. So far, there is a conspicuous dearth of reliable tools to identify mis-assembled contigs. Mis-assemblies could result from incorrectly deleted or wrongly arranged genomic sequences. In the present work various factors related to sequence, sequencing and assembling have been assessed for their role in causing mis-assembly by using different genome sequencing data. Finally, some mis-assembly detecting tools have been evaluated for their ability to detect the wrongly assembled primary contigs, suggesting a lot of scope for improvement in this area. The present work also proposes a simple unsupervised learning-based novel approach to identify mis-assemblies in the contigs which was found performing reasonably well when compared to the already existing tools to report mis-assembled contigs. It was observed that the proposed methodology may work as a complementary system to the existing tools to enhance their accuracy. PMID:27581937

  17. RADcap: sequence capture of dual-digest RADseq libraries with identifiable duplicates and reduced missing data.

    PubMed

    Hoffberg, Sandra L; Kieran, Troy J; Catchen, Julian M; Devault, Alison; Faircloth, Brant C; Mauricio, Rodney; Glenn, Travis C

    2016-09-01

    Molecular ecologists seek to genotype hundreds to thousands of loci from hundreds to thousands of individuals at minimal cost per sample. Current methods, such as restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) and sequence capture, are constrained by costs associated with inefficient use of sequencing data and sample preparation. Here, we introduce RADcap, an approach that combines the major benefits of RADseq (low cost with specific start positions) with those of sequence capture (repeatable sequencing of specific loci) to significantly increase efficiency and reduce costs relative to current approaches. RADcap uses a new version of dual-digest RADseq (3RAD) to identify candidate SNP loci for capture bait design and subsequently uses custom sequence capture baits to consistently enrich candidate SNP loci across many individuals. We combined this approach with a new library preparation method for identifying and removing PCR duplicates from 3RAD libraries, which allows researchers to process RADseq data using traditional pipelines, and we tested the RADcap method by genotyping sets of 96-384 Wisteria plants. Our results demonstrate that our RADcap method: (i) methodologically reduces (to <5%) and allows computational removal of PCR duplicate reads from data, (ii) achieves 80-90% reads on target in 11 of 12 enrichments, (iii) returns consistent coverage (≥4×) across >90% of individuals at up to 99.8% of the targeted loci, (iv) produces consistently high occupancy matrices of genotypes across hundreds of individuals and (v) costs significantly less than current approaches. PMID:27416967

  18. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals. PMID:26610552

  19. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals. PMID:26610552

  20. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-11-24

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals.

  1. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  2. Identifying the Critical Time Period for Information Extraction when Recognizing Sequences of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Jamie S.; Williams, A. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The authors attempted to determine the critical time period for information extraction when recognizing play sequences in soccer. Although efforts have been made to identify the perceptual information underpinning such decisions, no researchers have attempted to determine "when" this information may be extracted from the display. The authors…

  3. An Internet-Accessible DNA Sequence Database for Identifying Fusaria from Human and Animal Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because less than one-third of clinically relevant fusaria can be accurately identified to species level using phenotypic data (i.e., morphological species recognition), we constructed a three-locus DNA sequence database to facilitate molecular identification of the 69 Fusarium species associated wi...

  4. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1-5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus DNA sequenci...

  5. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  6. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  7. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  8. Evolution of an Enzyme from a Noncatalytic Nucleic Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gysbers, Rachel; Tram, Kha; Gu, Jimmy; Li, Yingfu

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which enzymes arose from both abiotic and biological worlds remains an unsolved natural mystery. We postulate that an enzyme can emerge from any sequence of any functional polymer under permissive evolutionary conditions. To support this premise, we have arbitrarily chosen a 50-nucleotide DNA fragment encoding for the Bos taurus (cattle) albumin mRNA and subjected it to test-tube evolution to derive a catalytic DNA (DNAzyme) with RNA-cleavage activity. After only a few weeks, a DNAzyme with significant catalytic activity has surfaced. Sequence comparison reveals that seven nucleotides are responsible for the conversion of the noncatalytic sequence into the enzyme. Deep sequencing analysis of DNA pools along the evolution trajectory has identified individual mutations as the progressive drivers of the molecular evolution. Our findings demonstrate that an enzyme can indeed arise from a sequence of a functional polymer via permissive molecular evolution, a mechanism that may have been exploited by nature for the creation of the enormous repertoire of enzymes in the biological world today. PMID:26091540

  9. SoftSearch: Integration of Multiple Sequence Features to Identify Breakpoints of Structural Variations

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Steven N.; Sarangi, Vivekananda; Moore, Raymond; Baheti, Saurabh; Bhavsar, Jaysheel D.; Couch, Fergus J.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Structural variation (SV) represents a significant, yet poorly understood contribution to an individual’s genetic makeup. Advanced next-generation sequencing technologies are widely used to discover such variations, but there is no single detection tool that is considered a community standard. In an attempt to fulfil this need, we developed an algorithm, SoftSearch, for discovering structural variant breakpoints in Illumina paired-end next-generation sequencing data. SoftSearch combines multiple strategies for detecting SV including split-read, discordant read-pair, and unmated pairs. Co-localized split-reads and discordant read pairs are used to refine the breakpoints. Results We developed and validated SoftSearch using real and synthetic datasets. SoftSearch’s key features are 1) not requiring secondary (or exhaustive primary) alignment, 2) portability into established sequencing workflows, and 3) is applicable to any DNA-sequencing experiment (e.g. whole genome, exome, custom capture, etc.). SoftSearch identifies breakpoints from a small number of soft-clipped bases from split reads and a few discordant read-pairs which on their own would not be sufficient to make an SV call. Conclusions We show that SoftSearch can identify more true SVs by combining multiple sequence features. SoftSearch was able to call clinically relevant SVs in the BRCA2 gene not reported by other tools while offering significantly improved overall performance. PMID:24358278

  10. Accuracy of the high-throughput amplicon sequencing to identify species within the genus Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungeun; Yamamoto, Naomichi

    2015-12-01

    This study characterized the accuracy of high-throughput amplicon sequencing to identify species within the genus Aspergillus. To this end, we sequenced the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), β-tubulin (BenA), and calmodulin (CaM) gene encoding sequences as DNA markers from eight reference Aspergillus strains with known identities using 300-bp sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, and compared them with the BLASTn outputs. The identifications with the sequences longer than 250 bp were accurate at the section rank, with some ambiguities observed at the species rank due to mostly cross detection of sibling species. Additionally, in silico analysis was performed to predict the identification accuracy for all species in the genus Aspergillus, where 107, 210, and 187 species were predicted to be identifiable down to the species rank based on ITS1, BenA, and CaM, respectively. Finally, air filter samples were analysed to quantify the relative abundances of Aspergillus species in outdoor air. The results were reproducible across biological duplicates both at the species and section ranks, but not strongly correlated between ITS1 and BenA, suggesting the Aspergillus detection can be taxonomically biased depending on the selection of the DNA markers and/or primers.

  11. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Rare and Low-Frequency Coding Variants Associated with LDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Leslie A.; Hu, Youna; Zhang, He; Xue, Chenyi; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Bizon, Chris; Lange, Ethan M.; Smith, Joshua D.; Turner, Emily H.; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Peloso, Gina; Auer, Paul; Li, Kuo-ping; Flannick, Jason; Zhang, Ji; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle; Lindgren, Cecilia; Locke, Adam; Manning, Alisa; Sim, Xueling; Rivas, Manuel A.; Holmen, Oddgeir L.; Gottesman, Omri; Lu, Yingchang; Ruderfer, Douglas; Stahl, Eli A.; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Durda, Peter; Jiao, Shuo; Isaacs, Aaron; Hofman, Albert; Bis, Joshua C.; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E.; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Smith, Albert V.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Crosby, Jacy; Wassel, Christina L.; Do, Ron; Franceschini, Nora; Martin, Lisa W.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Crosslin, David R.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Tsai, Michael; Rieder, Mark J.; Farlow, Deborah N.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Lumley, Thomas; Fox, Ervin R.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Peters, Ulrike; Jackson, Rebecca D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Levy, Daniel; Rotter, Jerome I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S.; Fornage, Myriam; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Chen, Y. Eugene; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Sætrom, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Boehnke, Michael; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark; Meitinger, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Post, Wendy S.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar; Lin, Dan-Yu; Jarvik, Gail P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James G.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tracy, Russell P.; Willer, Cristen J.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Altshuler, David M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Allayee, Hooman; Cresci, Sharon; Daly, Mark J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; DePristo, Mark A.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Peter; Farlow, Deborah N.; Fennell, Tim; Garimella, Kiran; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hu, Youna; Jordan, Daniel M.; Jun, Goo; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kang, Hyun Min; Kiezun, Adam; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Bingshan; Li, Mingyao; Newton-Cheh, Christopher H.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peloso, Gina; Pulit, Sara; Rader, Daniel J.; Reich, David; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Schwartz, Steve; Scott, Laura; Siscovick, David S.; Spertus, John A.; Stitziel, Nathaniel O.; Stoletzki, Nina; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Willer, Cristen J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Akylbekova, Ermeg; Atwood, Larry D.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Barbalic, Maja; Barr, R. Graham; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bis, Joshua; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bowden, Donald W.; Brody, Jennifer; Budoff, Matthew; Burke, Greg; Buxbaum, Sarah; Carr, Jeff; Chen, Donna T.; Chen, Ida Y.; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Pat; Crosby, Jacy; Cupples, L. Adrienne; D’Agostino, Ralph; DeStefano, Anita L.; Dreisbach, Albert; Dupuis, Josée; Durda, J. Peter; Ellis, Jaclyn; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Caroline S.; Fox, Ervin; Funari, Vincent; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gardin, Julius; Goff, David; Gordon, Ora; Grody, Wayne; Gross, Myron; Guo, Xiuqing; Hall, Ira M.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Heintz, Nicholas; Herrington, David M.; Hickson, DeMarc; Huang, Jie; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Jacobs, David R.; Jenny, Nancy S.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Johnson, Craig W.; Kawut, Steven; Kronmal, Richard; Kurz, Raluca; Lange, Ethan M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Larson, Martin G.; Lawson, Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Dalin; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Chunyu; Liu, Jiankang; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Xiaoming; Liu, Yongmei; Longstreth, William T.; Loria, Cay; Lumley, Thomas; Lunetta, Kathryn; Mackey, Aaron J.; Mackey, Rachel; Manichaikul, Ani; Maxwell, Taylor; McKnight, Barbara; Meigs, James B.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Musani, Solomon K.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; North, Kari; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Leary, Daniel; Ong, Frank; Palmas, Walter; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan D.; Paul, Shom; Perez, Marco; Person, Sharina D.; Polak, Joseph; Post, Wendy S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rice, Kenneth; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sanders, Jill P.; Schreiner, Pamela; Seshadri, Sudha; Shea, Steve; Sidney, Stephen; Silverstein, Kevin; Smith, Nicholas L.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Srinivasan, Asoke; Taylor, Herman A.; Taylor, Kent; Thomas, Fridtjof; Tracy, Russell P.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Wassel, Chrstina L.; Watson, Karol; Wei, Gina; White, Wendy; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Williams, O. Dale; Wilson, Gregory; Wilson, James G.; Wolf, Phillip; Zakai, Neil A.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Singleton, Andrew; Worrall, Brad; Bamshad, Michael J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Accurso, Frank; Anbar, Ran; Beaty, Terri; Bigham, Abigail; Black, Phillip; Bleecker, Eugene; Buckingham, Kati; Cairns, Anne Marie; Caplan, Daniel; Chatfield, Barbara; Chidekel, Aaron; Cho, Michael; Christiani, David C.; Crapo, James D.; Crouch, Julia; Daley, Denise; Dang, Anthony; Dang, Hong; De Paula, Alicia; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Drumm, Allen DozorMitch; Dyson, Maynard; Emerson, Julia; Emond, Mary J.; Ferkol, Thomas; Fink, Robert; Foster, Cassandra; Froh, Deborah; Gao, Li; Gershan, William; Gibson, Ronald L.; Godwin, Elizabeth; Gondor, Magdalen; Gutierrez, Hector; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hassoun, Paul M.; Hiatt, Peter; Hokanson, John E.; Howenstine, Michelle; Hummer, Laura K.; Kanga, Jamshed; Kim, Yoonhee; Knowles, Michael R.; Konstan, Michael; Lahiri, Thomas; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Lin, Lin; Lin, Xihong; Louie, Tin L.; Lynch, David; Make, Barry; Martin, Thomas R.; Mathai, Steve C.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNamara, John; McNamara, Sharon; Meyers, Deborah; Millard, Susan; Mogayzel, Peter; Moss, Richard; Murray, Tanda; Nielson, Dennis; Noyes, Blakeslee; O’Neal, Wanda; Orenstein, David; O’Sullivan, Brian; Pace, Rhonda; Pare, Peter; Parker, H. Worth; Passero, Mary Ann; Perkett, Elizabeth; Prestridge, Adrienne; Rafaels, Nicholas M.; Ramsey, Bonnie; Regan, Elizabeth; Ren, Clement; Retsch-Bogart, George; Rock, Michael; Rosen, Antony; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ruczinski, Ingo; Sanford, Andrew; Schaeffer, David; Sell, Cindy; Sheehan, Daniel; Silverman, Edwin K.; Sin, Don; Spencer, Terry; Stonebraker, Jackie; Tabor, Holly K.; Varlotta, Laurie; Vergara, Candelaria I.; Weiss, Robert; Wigley, Fred; Wise, Robert A.; Wright, Fred A.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Zanni, Robert; Zou, Fei; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rieder, Mark J.; Green, Phil; Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Crosslin, David R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Fox, P. Keolu; Fu, Wenqing; Gordon, Adam; Gravel, Simon; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnsen, Jill M.; Kan, Mengyuan; Kenny, Eimear E.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Lara-Garduno, Fremiet; Leal, Suzanne M.; Liu, Dajiang J.; McGee, Sean; O’Connor, Timothy D.; Paeper, Bryan; Robertson, Peggy D.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Turner, Emily H.; Wang, Gao; Yi, Qian; Jackson, Rebecca; Peters, Ulrike; Carlson, Christopher S.; Anderson, Garnet; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Auer, Paul L.; Beresford, Shirley; Bizon, Chris; Black, Henry; Brunner, Robert; Brzyski, Robert; Burwen, Dale; Caan, Bette; Carty, Cara L.; Chlebowski, Rowan; Cummings, Steven; Curb, J. David; Eaton, Charles B.; Ford, Leslie; Franceschini, Nora; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Gass, Margery; Geller, Nancy; Heiss, Gerardo; Howard, Barbara V.; Hsu, Li; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Ioannidis, John; Jiao, Shuo; Johnson, Karen C.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kuller, Lewis; LaCroix, Andrea; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Lane, Dorothy; Lasser, Norman; LeBlanc, Erin; Li, Kuo-Ping; Limacher, Marian; Lin, Dan-Yu; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Ludlam, Shari; Manson, JoAnn E.; Margolis, Karen; Martin, Lisa; McGowan, Joan; Monda, Keri L.; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Nathan, Lauren; Ockene, Judith; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Prentice, Ross L.; Robbins, John; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Sarto, Gloria E.; Shumaker, Sally; Simon, Michael S.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Stein, Evan; Tang, Hua; Taylor, Kira C.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Thornton, Timothy A.; Van Horn, Linda; Vitolins, Mara; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wallace, Robert; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Zeng, Donglin; Applebaum-Bowden, Deborah; Feolo, Michael; Gan, Weiniu; Paltoo, Dina N.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Sturcke, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98th or <2nd percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments. PMID:24507775

  12. Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare and low-frequency coding variants associated with LDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Lange, Leslie A; Hu, Youna; Zhang, He; Xue, Chenyi; Schmidt, Ellen M; Tang, Zheng-Zheng; Bizon, Chris; Lange, Ethan M; Smith, Joshua D; Turner, Emily H; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Peloso, Gina; Auer, Paul; Li, Kuo-Ping; Flannick, Jason; Zhang, Ji; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle; Lindgren, Cecilia; Locke, Adam; Manning, Alisa; Sim, Xueling; Rivas, Manuel A; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Gottesman, Omri; Lu, Yingchang; Ruderfer, Douglas; Stahl, Eli A; Duan, Qing; Li, Yun; Durda, Peter; Jiao, Shuo; Isaacs, Aaron; Hofman, Albert; Bis, Joshua C; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Smith, Albert V; Schreiner, Pamela J; Feitosa, Mary F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Crosby, Jacy; Wassel, Christina L; Do, Ron; Franceschini, Nora; Martin, Lisa W; Robinson, Jennifer G; Assimes, Themistocles L; Crosslin, David R; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Tsai, Michael; Rieder, Mark J; Farlow, Deborah N; Folsom, Aaron R; Lumley, Thomas; Fox, Ervin R; Carlson, Christopher S; Peters, Ulrike; Jackson, Rebecca D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Uitterlinden, André G; Levy, Daniel; Rotter, Jerome I; Taylor, Herman A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Siscovick, David S; Fornage, Myriam; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Chen, Y Eugene; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Sætrom, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Boehnke, Michael; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark; Meitinger, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie M; Gabriel, Stacey B; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Post, Wendy S; North, Kari E; Reiner, Alexander P; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar; Lin, Dan-Yu; Jarvik, Gail P; Cupples, L Adrienne; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James G; Nickerson, Deborah A; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Rich, Stephen S; Tracy, Russell P; Willer, Cristen J

    2014-02-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a treatable, heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified 157 variants associated with lipid levels but are not well suited to assess the impact of rare and low-frequency variants. To determine whether rare or low-frequency coding variants are associated with LDL-C, we exome sequenced 2,005 individuals, including 554 individuals selected for extreme LDL-C (>98(th) or <2(nd) percentile). Follow-up analyses included sequencing of 1,302 additional individuals and genotype-based analysis of 52,221 individuals. We observed significant evidence of association between LDL-C and the burden of rare or low-frequency variants in PNPLA5, encoding a phospholipase-domain-containing protein, and both known and previously unidentified variants in PCSK9, LDLR and APOB, three known lipid-related genes. The effect sizes for the burden of rare variants for each associated gene were substantially higher than those observed for individual SNPs identified from GWASs. We replicated the PNPLA5 signal in an independent large-scale sequencing study of 2,084 individuals. In conclusion, this large whole-exome-sequencing study for LDL-C identified a gene not known to be implicated in LDL-C and provides unique insight into the design and analysis of similar experiments.

  13. RNA-ID, a Powerful Tool for Identifying and Characterizing Regulatory Sequences.

    PubMed

    Brule, C E; Dean, K M; Grayhack, E J

    2016-01-01

    The identification and analysis of sequences that regulate gene expression is critical because regulated gene expression underlies biology. RNA-ID is an efficient and sensitive method to discover and investigate regulatory sequences in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using fluorescence-based assays to detect green fluorescent protein (GFP) relative to a red fluorescent protein (RFP) control in individual cells. Putative regulatory sequences can be inserted either in-frame or upstream of a superfolder GFP fusion protein whose expression, like that of RFP, is driven by the bidirectional GAL1,10 promoter. In this chapter, we describe the methodology to identify and study cis-regulatory sequences in the RNA-ID system, explaining features and variations of the RNA-ID reporter, as well as some applications of this system. We describe in detail the methods to analyze a single regulatory sequence, from construction of a single GFP variant to assay of variants by flow cytometry, as well as modifications required to screen libraries of different strains simultaneously. We also describe subsequent analyses of regulatory sequences.

  14. New approaches for computer analysis of nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Ghandour, G; Ost, F; Tavare, S; Korn, L J

    1983-09-01

    A new high-speed computer algorithm is outlined that ascertains within and between nucleic acid and protein sequences all direct repeats, dyad symmetries, and other structural relationships. Large repeats, repeats of high frequency, dyad symmetries of specified stem length and loop distance, and their distributions are determined. Significance of homologies is assessed by a hierarchy of permutation procedures. Applications are made to papovaviruses, the human papillomavirus HPV, lambda phage, the human and mouse mitochondrial genomes, and the human and mouse immunoglobulin kappa-chain genes. PMID:6577449

  15. Targeted capture enrichment and sequencing identifies extensive nucleotide variation in the turkey MHC-B.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kent M; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Settlage, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is increasingly associated with disease susceptibility and resistance in avian species of agricultural importance. This variation includes sequence polymorphisms but also structural differences (gene rearrangement) and copy number variation (CNV). The MHC has now been described for multiple galliform species including the best defined assemblies of the chicken (Gallus gallus) and domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Using this sequence resource, this study applied high-throughput sequencing to investigate MHC variation in turkeys of North America (NA turkeys). An MHC-specific SureSelect (Agilent) capture array was developed, and libraries were created for 14 turkeys representing domestic (commercial bred), heritage breed, and wild turkeys. In addition, a representative of the Ocellated turkey (M. ocellata) and chicken (G. gallus) was included to test cross-species applicability of the capture array allowing for identification of new species-specific polymorphisms. Libraries were hybridized to ∼12 K cRNA baits and the resulting pools were sequenced. On average, 98% of processed reads mapped to the turkey whole genome sequence and 53% to the MHC target. In addition to the MHC, capture hybridization recovered sequences corresponding to other MHC regions. Sequence alignment and de novo assembly indicated the presence of several additional BG genes in the turkey with evidence for CNV. Variant detection identified an average of 2245 polymorphisms per individual for the NA turkeys, 3012 for the Ocellated turkey, and 462 variants in the chicken (RJF-256). This study provides an extensive sequence resource for examining MHC variation and its relation to health of this agriculturally important group of birds.

  16. Correlations Between Amino Acids at Different Sites in Local Sequences of Protein Fragments with Given Structural Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wen; Liu, Hai-yan

    2007-02-01

    Ample evidence suggests that the local structures of peptide fragments in native proteins are to some extent encoded by their local sequences. Detecting such local correlations is important but it is still an open question what would be the most appropriate method. This is partly because conventional sequence analyses treat amino acid preferences at each site of a protein sequence independently, while it is often the inter-site interactions that bring about local sequence-structure correlations. Here a new scheme is introduced to capture the correlation between amino acid preferences at different sites for different local structure types. A library of nine-residue fragments is constructed, and the fragments are divided into clusters based on their local structures. For each local structure cluster or type, chi-square tests are used to identify correlated preferences of amino acid combinations at pairs of sites. A score function is constructed including both the single site amino acid preferences and the dual-site amino acid combination preferences, which can be used to identify whether a sequence fragment would have a strong tendency to form a particular local structure in native proteins. The results show that, given a local structure pattern, dual-site amino acid combinations contain different information from single site amino acid preferences. Representative examples show that many of the statistically identified correlations agree with previously-proposed heuristic rules about local sequence-structure correlations, or are consistent with physical-chemical interactions required to stabilize particular local structures. Results also show that such dual-site correlations in the score function significantly improves the Z-score matching a sequence fragment to its native local structure relative to non-native local structures, and certain local structure types are highly predictable from the local sequence alone if inter-site correlations are considered.

  17. Population sequencing of two endocannabinoid metabolic genes identifies rare and common regulatory variants associated with extreme obesity and metabolite level

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Targeted re-sequencing of candidate genes in individuals at the extremes of a quantitative phenotype distribution is a method of choice to gain information on the contribution of rare variants to disease susceptibility. The endocannabinoid system mediates signaling in the brain and peripheral tissues involved in the regulation of energy balance, is highly active in obese patients, and represents a strong candidate pathway to examine for genetic association with body mass index (BMI). Results We sequenced two intervals (covering 188 kb) encoding the endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) in 147 normal controls and 142 extremely obese cases. After applying quality filters, we called 1,393 high quality single nucleotide variants, 55% of which are rare, and 143 indels. Using single marker tests and collapsed marker tests, we identified four intervals associated with BMI: the FAAH promoter, the MGLL promoter, MGLL intron 2, and MGLL intron 3. Two of these intervals are composed of rare variants and the majority of the associated variants are located in promoter sequences or in predicted transcriptional enhancers, suggesting a regulatory role. The set of rare variants in the FAAH promoter associated with BMI is also associated with increased level of FAAH substrate anandamide, further implicating a functional role in obesity. Conclusions Our study, which is one of the first reports of a sequence-based association study using next-generation sequencing of candidate genes, provides insights into study design and analysis approaches and demonstrates the importance of examining regulatory elements rather than exclusively focusing on exon sequences. PMID:21118518

  18. BLAT2DOLite: An Online System for Identifying Significant Relationships between Genetic Sequences and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Shuo; Hu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The significantly related diseases of sequences could play an important role in understanding the functions of these sequences. In this paper, we introduced BLAT2DOLite, an online system for annotating human genes and diseases and identifying the significant relationships between sequences and diseases. Currently, BLAT2DOLite integrates Entrez Gene database and Disease Ontology Lite (DOLite), which contain loci of gene and relationships between genes and diseases. It utilizes hypergeometric test to calculate P-values between genes and diseases of DOLite. The system can be accessed from: http://123.59.132.21:8080/BLAT2DOLite. The corresponding web service is described in: http://123.59.132.21:8080/BLAT2DOLite/BLAT2DOLiteIDMappingPort?wsdl. PMID:27315278

  19. BLAT2DOLite: An Online System for Identifying Significant Relationships between Genetic Sequences and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Shuo; Hu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The significantly related diseases of sequences could play an important role in understanding the functions of these sequences. In this paper, we introduced BLAT2DOLite, an online system for annotating human genes and diseases and identifying the significant relationships between sequences and diseases. Currently, BLAT2DOLite integrates Entrez Gene database and Disease Ontology Lite (DOLite), which contain loci of gene and relationships between genes and diseases. It utilizes hypergeometric test to calculate P-values between genes and diseases of DOLite. The system can be accessed from: http://123.59.132.21:8080/BLAT2DOLite. The corresponding web service is described in: http://123.59.132.21:8080/BLAT2DOLite/BLAT2DOLiteIDMappingPort?wsdl. PMID:27315278

  20. New Hosts of Simplicimonas similis and Trichomitus batrachorum Identified by 18S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B.; Lavilla, Orlie John Y.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonads are obligate anaerobes generally found in the digestive and genitourinary tract of domestic animals. In this study, four trichomonad isolates were obtained from carabao, dog, and pig hosts using rectal swab. Genomic DNA was extracted using Chelex method and the 18S rRNA gene was successfully amplified through novel sets of primers and undergone DNA sequencing. Aligned isolate sequences together with retrieved 18S rRNA gene sequences of known trichomonads were utilized to generate phylogenetic trees using maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining analyses. Two isolates from carabao were identified as Simplicimonas similis while each isolate from dog and pig was identified as Pentatrichomonas hominis and Trichomitus batrachorum, respectively. This is the first report of S. similis in carabao and the identification of T. batrachorum in pig using 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The generated phylogenetic tree yielded three distinct groups mostly with relatively moderate to high bootstrap support and in agreement with the most recent classification. Pathogenic potential of the trichomonads in these hosts still needs further investigation. PMID:23936631

  1. Mudi, a web tool for identifying mutations by bioinformatics analysis of whole-genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Iida, Naoko; Yamao, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Iida, Tetsushi

    2014-06-01

    In forward genetics, identification of mutations is a time-consuming and laborious process. Modern whole-genome sequencing, coupled with bioinformatics analysis, has enabled fast and cost-effective mutation identification. However, for many experimental researchers, bioinformatics analysis is still a difficult aspect of whole-genome sequencing. To address this issue, we developed a browser-accessible and easy-to-use bioinformatics tool called Mutation discovery (Mudi; http://naoii.nig.ac.jp/mudi_top.html), which enables 'one-click' identification of causative mutations from whole-genome sequence data. In this study, we optimized Mudi for pooled-linkage analysis aimed at identifying mutants in yeast model systems. After raw sequencing data are uploaded, Mudi performs sequential analysis, including mapping, detection of variant alleles, filtering and removal of background polymorphisms, prioritization, and annotation. In an example study of suppressor mutants of ptr1-1 in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, pooled-linkage analysis with Mudi identified mip1(+) , a component of Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1), as a novel component involved in RNA interference (RNAi)-related cell-cycle control. The accessibility of Mudi will accelerate systematic mutation analysis in forward genetics.

  2. Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Lasseigne, Brittany N.; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C.; Dion, Patrick A.; Leblond, Claire S.; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J.; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E.; Boone, Braden E.; Wimbish, Jack R.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Jones, Angela L.; Carulli, John P.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Staropoli, John F.; Xin, Winnie W.; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; de Jong, J.M.B. Vianney; Kenna, Kevin P.; Smith, Bradley N.; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E.; Baloh, Robert H.; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M.; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A.; Chung, Wendy K.; Ravits, John M.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Sims, Katherine B.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D.; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S.; Bedlack, Richard S.; Harper, J. Wade; Gitler, Aaron D.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M.; Goldstein, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. Here we report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at identifying new genes contributing to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole exome sequencing of 2,874 ALS patients and compared them to 6,405 controls. Several known ALS genes were found to be associated, and the non-canonical IκB kinase family TANK-Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) was identified as an ALS gene. TBK1 is known to bind to and phosphorylate a number of proteins involved in innate immunity and autophagy, including optineurin (OPTN) and p62 (SQSTM1/sequestosome), both of which have also been implicated in ALS. These observations reveal a key role of the autophagic pathway in ALS and suggest specific targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25700176

  3. Whole exome sequencing identifies genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia with secondary qualitative function defects

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C.; Futterer, Jane; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; MacDonald, David; Simpson, Michael A.; Sanchez-Guiú, Isabel; Drake, Sian; Bem, Danai; Leo, Vincenzo; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Allsup, David; Biss, Tina; Bolton-Maggs, Paula HB; Collins, Peter; Curry, Nicola; Grimley, Charlotte; James, Beki; Makris, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Pavord, Sue; Talks, Katherine; Thachil, Jecko; Wilde, Jonathan; Williams, Mike; Harrison, Paul; Gissen, Paul; Mundell, Stuart; Mumford, Andrew; Daly, Martina E.; Watson, Steve P.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormally low platelet counts which can be associated with abnormal bleeding. Next-generation sequencing has previously been employed in these disorders for the confirmation of suspected genetic abnormalities, and more recently in the discovery of novel disease-causing genes. However its full potential has not yet been exploited. Over the past 6 years we have sequenced the exomes from 55 patients, including 37 index cases and 18 additional family members, all of whom were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study. All patients had inherited or sustained thrombocytopenia of unknown etiology with platelet counts varying from 11×109/L to 186×109/L. Of the 51 patients phenotypically tested, 37 (73%), had an additional secondary qualitative platelet defect. Using whole exome sequencing analysis we have identified “pathogenic” or “likely pathogenic” variants in 46% (17/37) of our index patients with thrombocytopenia. In addition, we report variants of uncertain significance in 12 index cases, including novel candidate genetic variants in previously unreported genes in four index cases. These results demonstrate that whole exome sequencing is an efficient method for elucidating potential pathogenic genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia. Whole exome sequencing also has the added benefit of discovering potentially pathogenic genetic variants for further study in novel genes not previously implicated in inherited thrombocytopenia. PMID:27479822

  4. Identify sequence of events likely to result in severe crash outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun-Feng; Thor, Craig P; Ardiansyah, Muhammad Nashir

    2016-11-01

    The current practice of crash characterization in highway engineering reduces multiple dimensions of crash contributing factors and their relative sequential connections, crash sequences, into broad definitions, resulting in crash categories such as head-on, sideswipe, rear-end, angle, and fixed-object. As a result, crashes that are classified in the same category may contain many different crash sequences. This makes it difficult to develop effective countermeasures because these crash categorizations are based on the outcomes rather than the preceding events. Consequently, the efficacy of a countermeasure designed for a specific type of crash may not be appropriate due to different pre-crash sequences. This research seeks to explore the use of event sequence to characterize crashes. Additionally, this research seeks to identify crash sequences that are likely to result in severe crash outcomes so that researchers can develop effective countermeasures to reduce severe crashes. This study utilizes the sequence of events from roadway departure crashes in the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), and converts the information to form a new categorization called "crash sequences." The similarity distance between each pair of crash sequences were calculated using the Optimal Matching approach. Cluster analysis was applied to group crash sequences that are etiologically similar in terms of the similarity distance. A hybrid model was constructed to mitigate the potential sample selection bias of FARS data, which is biased toward more severe crashes. The major findings include: (1) in terms of a roadway departure crash, the crash sequences that are most likely to result in high crash severity include a vehicle that first crosses the median or centerline, runs-off-road on the left, and then collides with a roadside fixed-object; (2) seat-belt and airbag usage reduces the probability of dying in a roadway departure crash by 90%; and (3) occupants who are seated on the

  5. Identify sequence of events likely to result in severe crash outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun-Feng; Thor, Craig P; Ardiansyah, Muhammad Nashir

    2016-11-01

    The current practice of crash characterization in highway engineering reduces multiple dimensions of crash contributing factors and their relative sequential connections, crash sequences, into broad definitions, resulting in crash categories such as head-on, sideswipe, rear-end, angle, and fixed-object. As a result, crashes that are classified in the same category may contain many different crash sequences. This makes it difficult to develop effective countermeasures because these crash categorizations are based on the outcomes rather than the preceding events. Consequently, the efficacy of a countermeasure designed for a specific type of crash may not be appropriate due to different pre-crash sequences. This research seeks to explore the use of event sequence to characterize crashes. Additionally, this research seeks to identify crash sequences that are likely to result in severe crash outcomes so that researchers can develop effective countermeasures to reduce severe crashes. This study utilizes the sequence of events from roadway departure crashes in the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), and converts the information to form a new categorization called "crash sequences." The similarity distance between each pair of crash sequences were calculated using the Optimal Matching approach. Cluster analysis was applied to group crash sequences that are etiologically similar in terms of the similarity distance. A hybrid model was constructed to mitigate the potential sample selection bias of FARS data, which is biased toward more severe crashes. The major findings include: (1) in terms of a roadway departure crash, the crash sequences that are most likely to result in high crash severity include a vehicle that first crosses the median or centerline, runs-off-road on the left, and then collides with a roadside fixed-object; (2) seat-belt and airbag usage reduces the probability of dying in a roadway departure crash by 90%; and (3) occupants who are seated on the

  6. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Factor Required for Secretory Granule Maturation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Kontur, Cassandra; Kumar, Santosh; Lan, Xun; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Unbiased genetic approaches have a unique ability to identify novel genes associated with specific biological pathways. Thanks to next generation sequencing, forward genetic strategies can be expanded to a wider range of model organisms. The formation of secretory granules, called mucocysts, in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila relies, in part, on ancestral lysosomal sorting machinery, but is also likely to involve novel factors. In prior work, multiple strains with defects in mucocyst biogenesis were generated by nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, and characterized using genetic and cell biological approaches, but the genetic lesions themselves were unknown. Here, we show that analyzing one such mutant by whole genome sequencing reveals a novel factor in mucocyst formation. Strain UC620 has both morphological and biochemical defects in mucocyst maturation—a process analogous to dense core granule maturation in animals. Illumina sequencing of a pool of UC620 F2 clones identified a missense mutation in a novel gene called MMA1 (Mucocyst maturation). The defects in UC620 were rescued by expression of a wild-type copy of MMA1, and disrupting MMA1 in an otherwise wild-type strain phenocopies UC620. The product of MMA1, characterized as a CFP-tagged copy, encodes a large soluble cytosolic protein. A small fraction of Mma1p-CFP is pelletable, which may reflect association with endosomes. The gene has no identifiable homologs except in other Tetrahymena species, and therefore represents an evolutionarily recent innovation that is required for granule maturation. PMID:27317773

  7. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation of EPS8L3 in Marie Unna hereditary hypotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Guo, Bi-Rong; Cai, Li-Qiong; Jiang, Tao; Sun, Liang-Dan; Cui, Yong; Hu, Jing-Chu; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Gang; Tang, Xian-Fa; Sun, Guang-Qing; Tang, Hua-Yang; Liu, Yuan; Li, Min; Li, Qi-Bin; Cheng, Hui; Gao, Min; Li, Ping; Yang, Xu; Zuo, Xian-Bo; Zheng, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Pei-Guang; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jian-Jun; Yang, Sen; Li, Ying-Rui; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Marie Unna hereditary hypotrichosis (MUHH) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by coarse, wiry, twisted hair developed in early childhood and subsequent progressive hair loss. MUHH is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. No gene in 1p21.1–1q21.3 region responsible for MUHH has been identified. Methods Exome sequencing was performed on two affected subjects, who had normal vertex hair and modest alopecia, and one unaffected individual from a four-generation MUHH family of which our previous linkage study mapped the MUHH locus on chromosome 1p21.1–1q21.3. Results We identified a missense mutation in EPS8L3 (NM_024526.3: exon2: c.22G->A:p.Ala8Thr) within 1p21.1–1q21.3. Sanger sequencing confirmed the cosegregation of this mutation with the disease phenotype in the family by demonstrating the presence of the heterozygous mutation in all the eight affected and absence in all the seven unaffected individuals. This mutation was found to be absent in 676 unrelated healthy controls and 781 patients of other disease from another unpublished project of our group. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that EPS8L3 is a causative gene for MUHH, which was helpful for advancing us on understanding of the pathogenesis of MUHH. Our study also has further demonstrated the effectiveness of combining exome sequencing with linkage information for identifying Mendelian disease genes. PMID:23099647

  8. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1) warrant further exploration. To evaluate the clinical relevance of these genes, investigation of larger patient cohorts and functional studies are required. PMID:26780541

  9. A Flexible, Efficient Binomial Mixed Model for Identifying Differential DNA Methylation in Bisulfite Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying sources of variation in DNA methylation levels is important for understanding gene regulation. Recently, bisulfite sequencing has become a popular tool for investigating DNA methylation levels. However, modeling bisulfite sequencing data is complicated by dramatic variation in coverage across sites and individual samples, and because of the computational challenges of controlling for genetic covariance in count data. To address these challenges, we present a binomial mixed model and an efficient, sampling-based algorithm (MACAU: Mixed model association for count data via data augmentation) for approximate parameter estimation and p-value computation. This framework allows us to simultaneously account for both the over-dispersed, count-based nature of bisulfite sequencing data, as well as genetic relatedness among individuals. Using simulations and two real data sets (whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) data from Arabidopsis thaliana and reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) data from baboons), we show that our method provides well-calibrated test statistics in the presence of population structure. Further, it improves power to detect differentially methylated sites: in the RRBS data set, MACAU detected 1.6-fold more age-associated CpG sites than a beta-binomial model (the next best approach). Changes in these sites are consistent with known age-related shifts in DNA methylation levels, and are enriched near genes that are differentially expressed with age in the same population. Taken together, our results indicate that MACAU is an efficient, effective tool for analyzing bisulfite sequencing data, with particular salience to analyses of structured populations. MACAU is freely available at www.xzlab.org/software.html. PMID:26599596

  10. Identifiability of PBPK Models with Applications to Dimethylarsinic Acid Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Any statistical model should be identifiable in order for estimates and tests using it to be meaningful. We consider statistical analysis of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in which parameters cannot be estimated precisely from available data, and discuss diff...

  11. Fatty Acid Profile and Unigene-Derived Simple Sequence Repeat Markers in Tung Tree (Vernicia fordii)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Jia, Baoguang; Tan, Xiaofeng; Thammina, Chandra S.; Long, Hongxu; Liu, Min; Wen, Shanna; Song, Xianliang; Cao, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) provides the sole source of tung oil widely used in industry. Lack of fatty acid composition and molecular markers hinders biochemical, genetic and breeding research. The objectives of this study were to determine fatty acid profiles and develop unigene-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in tung tree. Fatty acid profiles of 41 accessions showed that the ratio of α-eleostearic acid was increasing continuously with a parallel trend to the amount of tung oil accumulation while the ratios of other fatty acids were decreasing in different stages of the seeds and that α-eleostearic acid (18∶3) consisted of 77% of the total fatty acids in tung oil. Transcriptome sequencing identified 81,805 unigenes from tung cDNA library constructed using seed mRNA and discovered 6,366 SSRs in 5,404 unigenes. The di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellites accounted for 92% of the SSRs with AG/CT and AAG/CTT being the most abundant SSR motifs. Fifteen polymorphic genic-SSR markers were developed from 98 unigene loci tested in 41 cultivated tung accessions by agarose gel and capillary electrophoresis. Genbank database search identified 10 of them putatively coding for functional proteins. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that all 15 polymorphic SSR-associated unigenes were expressed in tung seeds and some of them were highly correlated with oil composition in the seeds. Dendrogram revealed that most of the 41 accessions were clustered according to the geographic region. These new polymorphic genic-SSR markers will facilitate future studies on genetic diversity, molecular fingerprinting, comparative genomics and genetic mapping in tung tree. The lipid profiles in the seeds of 41 tung accessions will be valuable for biochemical and breeding studies. PMID:25167054

  12. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Hallström, Björn M.; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Uhlén, Mathias; Joensson, Haakan N.; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for biotech-based production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals in the food and feed industry and in industrial applications. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among preferred cell factories for recombinant protein production, and there is increasing interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV mutagenesis. Several screening and sorting rounds resulted in the selection of eight yeast clones with significantly improved secretion of recombinant α-amylase. Efficient secretion was genetically stable in the selected clones. We performed whole-genome sequencing of the eight clones and identified 330 mutations in total. Gene ontology analysis of mutated genes revealed many biological processes, including some that have not been identified before in the context of protein secretion. Mutated genes identified in this study can be potentially used for reverse metabolic engineering, with the objective to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could broadly facilitate design of novel cell factories. PMID:26261321

  13. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  14. Genomic islands of divergence in hybridizing Heliconius butterflies identified by large-scale targeted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Nicola J.; Whibley, Annabel; Jones, Robert T.; Davey, John W.; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Baxter, Simon W.; Quail, Michael A.; Joron, Mathieu; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Mallet, James; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    Heliconius butterflies represent a recent radiation of species, in which wing pattern divergence has been implicated in speciation. Several loci that control wing pattern phenotypes have been mapped and two were identified through sequencing. These same gene regions play a role in adaptation across the whole Heliconius radiation. Previous studies of population genetic patterns at these regions have sequenced small amplicons. Here, we use targeted next-generation sequence capture to survey patterns of divergence across these entire regions in divergent geographical races and species of Heliconius. This technique was successful both within and between species for obtaining high coverage of almost all coding regions and sufficient coverage of non-coding regions to perform population genetic analyses. We find major peaks of elevated population differentiation between races across hybrid zones, which indicate regions under strong divergent selection. These ‘islands’ of divergence appear to be more extensive between closely related species, but there is less clear evidence for such islands between more distantly related species at two further points along the ‘speciation continuum’. We also sequence fosmid clones across these regions in different Heliconius melpomene races. We find no major structural rearrangements but many relatively large (greater than 1 kb) insertion/deletion events (including gain/loss of transposable elements) that are variable between races. PMID:22201164

  15. Genetic Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identify Variants Associated with Five Novel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Jinks, Robert N.; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Cassidy, Ryan P.; Fiorentini, Christopher J.; Heiken, Kory F.; Lawrence, Johnny J.; Mahoney, Molly H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nair, Devika T.; Politi, Kristin A.; Worcester, Kimberly N.; Setton, Roni A.; DiPiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A.; Eastman, James T.; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L.; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean = 4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean = 79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data. PMID:22279524

  16. Mutations of ANK3 identified by exome sequencing are associated with autism susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cheng; Wu, Jinyu; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Qi; Cai, Wanshi; Yu, Ping; Cai, Tao; Zhao, Mei; Jiang, Yong-hui; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2012-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are common neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic etiology. However, due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity of ASDs, traditional approaches for gene discovery are challenging. Next-generation sequencing technologies offer an opportunity to accelerate the identification of the genetic causes of ASDs. Here, we report the results of whole-exome sequence in a cohort of 20 ASD patients. By extensive bioinformatic analysis, we identified novel mutations in seven genes that are implicated in synaptic function and neurodevelopment. After sequencing an additional 47 ASD samples, we identified three different missense mutations in ANK3 in four unrelated ASD patients, one of which, c.4705T>G (p.S1569A), is a de novo mutation. Given the fact that ANK3 has been shown to strongly associate with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, our findings support an association between ANK3 mutations and ASD susceptibility and imply a shared molecular pathophysiology between ASDs and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22865819

  17. Identifying significant associations of orthologous simple sequence repeats with gene ontologies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Pai, Tun-Wen; Chuang, Chia-Sheng; Huang, Jhen-Li; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, regulate gene functions. SSR mutations in a disease gene may cause various genetic disorders. To identify putative functional SSRs, a web-based system, Gene Ontology SSR Hierarchy (GOSH), was developed to facilitate discovery of significant associations between SSRs and Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Using the GO hierarchy term structure, GOSH assists users with selecting functional or biological gene subsets. Significant SSR patterns are retrieved and identified via comprehensive overrepresentation analysis within a target gene subset and by comparing results with orthologous genes. Pattern relationships between different biological subsets or supersets can be observed by using the GO hierarchy structure directly. GOSH also supports GO searching through identified significant SSR patterns and all GO terms possessing such patterns are listed for consultation. GOSH is the first comprehensive and efficient online mining tool for discovering significant orthologous SSR patterns in GO terms and is available at http://gosh.cs.ntou.edu.tw/.

  18. Multiplex targeted sequencing identifies recurrently mutated genes in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Roak, Brian J; Vives, Laura; Fu, Wenqing; Egertson, Jarrett D; Stanaway, Ian B; Phelps, Ian G; Carvill, Gemma; Kumar, Akash; Lee, Choli; Ankenman, Katy; Munson, Jeff; Hiatt, Joseph B; Turner, Emily H; Levy, Roie; O'Day, Diana R; Krumm, Niklas; Coe, Bradley P; Martin, Beth K; Borenstein, Elhanan; Nickerson, Deborah A; Mefford, Heather C; Doherty, Dan; Akey, Joshua M; Bernier, Raphael; Eichler, Evan E; Shendure, Jay

    2012-12-21

    Exome sequencing studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have identified many de novo mutations but few recurrently disrupted genes. We therefore developed a modified molecular inversion probe method enabling ultra-low-cost candidate gene resequencing in very large cohorts. To demonstrate the power of this approach, we captured and sequenced 44 candidate genes in 2446 ASD probands. We discovered 27 de novo events in 16 genes, 59% of which are predicted to truncate proteins or disrupt splicing. We estimate that recurrent disruptive mutations in six genes-CHD8, DYRK1A, GRIN2B, TBR1, PTEN, and TBL1XR1-may contribute to 1% of sporadic ASDs. Our data support associations between specific genes and reciprocal subphenotypes (CHD8-macrocephaly and DYRK1A-microcephaly) and replicate the importance of a β-catenin-chromatin-remodeling network to ASD etiology. PMID:23160955

  19. Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C; Dion, Patrick A; Leblond, Claire S; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E; Boone, Braden E; Wimbish, Jack R; Waite, Lindsay L; Jones, Angela L; Carulli, John P; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Staropoli, John F; Xin, Winnie W; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; Vianney de Jong, J M B; Kenna, Kevin P; Smith, Bradley N; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E; Baloh, Robert H; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A; Chung, Wendy K; Ravits, John M; Glass, Jonathan D; Sims, Katherine B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S; Bedlack, Richard S; Harper, J Wade; Gitler, Aaron D; Rouleau, Guy A; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B; Cooper, Gregory M; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Goldstein, David B

    2015-03-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. We report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at increasing the number of genes known to contribute to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 2869 ALS patients and 6405 controls. Several known ALS genes were found to be associated, and TBK1 (the gene encoding TANK-binding kinase 1) was identified as an ALS gene. TBK1 is known to bind to and phosphorylate a number of proteins involved in innate immunity and autophagy, including optineurin (OPTN) and p62 (SQSTM1/sequestosome), both of which have also been implicated in ALS. These observations reveal a key role of the autophagic pathway in ALS and suggest specific targets for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Multiple Amino Acid Sequence Alignment Nitrogenase Component 1: Insights into Phylogenetics and Structure-Function Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Howard, James B.; Kechris, Katerina J.; Rees, Douglas C.; Glazer, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as “core” for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf) yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification provides the bases

  1. Desktop transcriptome sequencing from archival tissue to identify clinically relevant translocations.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Robert T; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Shirley X; Varma, Sushama; Smith, Kevin S; Montgomery, Stephen B; van de Rijn, Matt; Zehnder, Jim; West, Robert B

    2013-06-01

    Somatic mutations, often translocations or single nucleotide variations, are pathognomonic for certain types of cancers and are increasingly of clinical importance for diagnosis and prediction of response to therapy. Conventional clinical assays only evaluate 1 mutation at a time, and targeted tests are often constrained to identify only the most common mutations. Genome-wide or transcriptome-wide high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of clinical samples offers an opportunity to evaluate for all clinically significant mutations with a single test. Recently a "desktop version" of HTS has become available, but most of the experience to date is based on data obtained from high-quality DNA from frozen specimens. In this study, we demonstrate, as a proof of principle, that translocations in sarcomas can be diagnosed from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue with desktop HTS. Using the first generation MiSeq platform, full transcriptome sequencing was performed on FFPE material from archival blocks of 3 synovial sarcomas, 3 myxoid liposarcomas, 2 Ewing sarcomas, and 1 clear cell sarcoma. Mapping the reads to the "sarcomatome" (all known 83 genes involved in translocations and mutations in sarcoma) and using a novel algorithm for ranking fusion candidates, the pathognomonic fusions and the exact breakpoints were identified in all cases of synovial sarcoma, myxoid liposarcoma, and clear cell sarcoma. The Ewing sarcoma fusion gene was detectable in FFPE material only with a sequencing platform that generates greater sequencing depth. The results show that a single transcriptome HTS assay, from FFPE, has the potential to replace conventional molecular diagnostic techniques for the evaluation of clinically relevant mutations in cancer.

  2. Exome sequencing identifies a rare HSPG2 variant associated with familial idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Baschal, Erin E; Wethey, Cambria I; Swindle, Kandice; Baschal, Robin M; Gowan, Katherine; Tang, Nelson L S; Alvarado, David M; Haller, Gabe E; Dobbs, Matthew B; Taylor, Matthew R G; Gurnett, Christina A; Jones, Kenneth L; Miller, Nancy H

    2014-12-12

    Idiopathic scoliosis occurs in 3% of individuals and has an unknown etiology. The objective of this study was to identify rare variants that contribute to the etiology of idiopathic scoliosis by using exome sequencing in a multigenerational family with idiopathic scoliosis. Exome sequencing was completed for three members of this multigenerational family with idiopathic scoliosis, resulting in the identification of a variant in the HSPG2 gene as a potential contributor to the phenotype. The HSPG2 gene was sequenced in a separate cohort of 100 unrelated individuals affected with idiopathic scoliosis and also was examined in an independent idiopathic scoliosis population. The exome sequencing and subsequent bioinformatics filtering resulted in 16 potentially damaging and rare coding variants. One of these variants, p.Asn786Ser, is located in the HSPG2 gene. The variant p.Asn786Ser also is overrepresented in a larger cohort of idiopathic scoliosis cases compared with a control population (P = 0.024). Furthermore, we identified additional rare HSPG2 variants that are predicted to be damaging in two independent cohorts of individuals with idiopathic scoliosis. The HSPG2 gene encodes for a ubiquitous multifunctional protein within the extracellular matrix in which loss of function mutation are known to result in a musculoskeletal phenotype in both mouse and humans. Based on these results, we conclude that rare variants in the HSPG2 gene potentially contribute to the idiopathic scoliosis phenotype in a subset of patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Further studies must be completed to confirm the effect of the HSPG2 gene on the idiopathic scoliosis phenotype.

  3. Novel method for identifying sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Levens, D; Howley, P M

    1985-01-01

    We developed a general method for the enrichment and identification of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. A well-characterized protein-DNA interaction is used to isolate from crude cellular extracts or fractions thereof proteins which bind to specific DNA sequences; the method is based solely on this binding property of the proteins. The DNA sequence of interest, cloned adjacent to the lac operator DNA segment is incubated with a lac repressor-beta-galactosidase fusion protein which retains full operator and inducer binding properties. The DNA fragment bound to the lac repressor-beta-galactosidase fusion protein is precipitated by the addition of affinity-purified anti-beta-galactosidase immobilized on beads. This forms an affinity matrix for any proteins which might interact specifically with the DNA sequence cloned adjacent to the lac operator. When incubated with cellular extracts in the presence of excess competitor DNA, any protein(s) which specifically binds to the cloned DNA sequence of interest can be cleanly precipitated. When isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside is added, the lac repressor releases the bound DNA, and thus the protein-DNA complex consisting of the specific restriction fragment and any specific binding protein(s) is released, permitting the identification of the protein by standard biochemical techniques. We demonstrate the utility of this method with the lambda repressor, another well-characterized DNA-binding protein, as a model. In addition, with crude preparations of the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase, we identified a 70,000-molecular-weight peptide which binds specifically to the promoter region of the yeast mitochondrial 14S rRNA gene. Images PMID:3016526

  4. Heterogeneity of amino acid sequence in hippopotamus cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Borden, D; Tarr, G E; Margoliash, E

    1978-12-25

    The amino acid sequences of chymotryptic and tryptic peptides of Hippopotamus amphibius cytochrome c were determined by a recent modification of the manual Edman sequential degradation procedure. They were ordered by comparison with the structure of the hog protein. The hippopotamus protein differs in three positions: serine, alanine, and glutamine replace alanine, glutamic acid, and lysine in positions 43, 92, and 100, respectively. Since the artiodactyl suborders diverged in the mid-Eocene some 50 million years ago, the fact that representatives of some of them show no differences in their cytochromes c (cow, sheep, and hog), while another exhibits as many as three such differences, verifies that even in relatively closely related lines of descent the rate at which cytochrome c changes in the course of evolution is not constant. Furthermore, 10.6% of the hippopotamus cytochrome c preparation was shown to contain isoleucine instead of valine at position 3, indicating that one of the four animals from which the protein was obtained was heterozygous in the cytochrome c gene. Such heterogeneity is a necessary condition of evolutionary variation and has not been previously observed in the cytochrome c of a wild mammalian population.

  5. Homozygosity Mapping Identifies a Bile Acid Biosynthetic Defect in an Adult with Cirrhosis of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Molho-Pessach, Vered; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Hobbs, Helen H.

    2013-01-01

    The most common inborn error of bile acid metabolism is 3β-hydroxy-Δ5-C27-steroid oxidoreductase (3β-HSD) deficiency, a disorder that usually presents in early childhood with hepatic dysfunction. Timely diagnosis of this disorder is crucial since it can be effectively treated with primary bile acid replacement. Here we describe a 24-year-old woman from Iran with cirrhosis of unknown etiology. Her sister and a first cousin died of cirrhosis (ages 19 and 6 years) and another 32-year old first cousin had a self-limited liver disorder in childhood that resolved at age 9 years. The family history was consistent with the notion that affected family members were homozygous for a mutant allele inherited identical-by-descent. A genome-wide analysis of 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) was performed to identify regions of homozygosity that were present in the proband and the 32-year old first cousin, but not in a healthy relative. One of these regions contained the gene encoding 3β-HSD (HSD3B7). Sequence analysis of HSD3B7 revealed that the proband and her 32-year old cousin were homozygous for a frame shift mutation (c.45_46del AG, p.T15Tfsx27) in exon 1. The diagnosis of 3β-HSD deficiency was confirmed by documenting high levels of 3β-hydroxy-Δ5 bile acids in the serum of the first cousin using mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, the 32-year old relative in this family represents the oldest asymptomatic patient with this disorder. Conclusion: This study highlights the clinical utility of homozygosity mapping in diagnosing autosomal recessive metabolic disorders. This family illustrates the wide variation in expressivity that occurs in 3β-HSD deficiency and underscores the need to consider a bile acid synthetic defect as a possible cause of liver disease in adults. PMID:22095780

  6. Point Mutations within and outside the Homeodomain Identify Sequences Required for Proboscipedia Homeotic Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Benassayag, C.; Boube, M.; Seroude, L.; Cribbs, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila homeotic gene proboscipedia (pb) encodes a homeodomain protein homologous to vertebrate HoxA2/B2 required for adult mouthparts formation. A transgenic Hsp70-pb (HSPB) element that rescues pb mutations also induces the dominant transformation of antennae to maxillary palps. To identify sequences essential to PB protein function, we screened for EMS-induced HSPB mutations leading to phenotypic reversion of the HSPB transformation. Ten revertants harbor identified point mutations in HSPB coding sequences. The point mutations that remove all detectable phenotypes in vivo reside either within the homeodomain or, more unexpectedly, in evolutionarily nonconserved regions outside the homeodomain. Two independent homeodomain mutations that change the highly conserved Arginine-5 in the N-terminal hinge show effects on adult eye development, suggesting a previously unsuspected role for Arg5 in functional specificity. Three additional revertant mutations outside the homeodomain reduce but do not abolish PB(+) activity, identifying protein elements that contribute quantitatively to pb function. This in vivo analysis shows that apart from the conserved motifs of PB, other elements throughout the protein make important contributions to homeotic function. PMID:9215898

  7. An SF1 affinity model to identify branch point sequences in human introns

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Blanchette, Marco; Rio, Donald C.; Brenner, Steven E.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing factor 1 (SF1) binds to the branch point sequence (BPS) of mammalian introns and is believed to be important for the splicing of some, but not all, introns. To help identify BPSs, particularly those that depend on SF1, we generated a BPS profile model in which SF1 binding affinity data, validated by branch point mapping, were iteratively incorporated into computational models. We searched a data set of 117 499 human introns for best matches to the SF1 Affinity Model above a threshold, and counted the number of matches at each intronic position. After subtracting a background value, we found that 87.9% of remaining high-scoring matches identified were located in a region upstream of 3′-splice sites where BPSs are typically found. Since U2AF65 recognizes the polypyrimidine tract (PPT) and forms a cooperative RNA complex with SF1, we combined the SF1 model with a PPT model computed from high affinity binding sequences for U2AF65. The combined model, together with binding site location constraints, accurately identified introns bound by SF1 that are candidates for SF1-dependent splicing. PMID:21071404

  8. Mass spectrometric detection of the amino acid sequence polymorphism of the hepatitis C virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Kaysheva, A L; Ivanov, Yu D; Frantsuzov, P A; Krohin, N V; Pavlova, T I; Uchaikin, V F; Konev, V А; Kovalev, O B; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-03-01

    A method for detection and identification of the hepatitis C virus antigen (HCVcoreAg) in human serum with consideration for possible amino acid substitutions is proposed. The method is based on a combination of biospecific capturing and concentrating of the target protein on the surface of the chip for atomic force microscope (AFM chip) with subsequent protein identification by tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. Biospecific AFM-capturing of viral particles containing HCVcoreAg from serum samples was performed by use of AFM chips with monoclonal antibodies (anti-HCVcore) covalently immobilized on the surface. Biospecific complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS/MS analysis allowed to reliably identify the HCVcoreAg in the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. Analysis of MS/MS spectra, with the account taken of the possible polymorphisms in the amino acid sequence of the HCVcoreAg, enabled us to increase the number of identified peptides.

  9. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J; Van Esch, H; Raynaud, M; de Brouwer, A P M; Weinert, S; Froyen, G; Frints, S G M; Laumonnier, F; Zemojtel, T; Love, M I; Richard, H; Emde, A-K; Bienek, M; Jensen, C; Hambrock, M; Fischer, U; Langnick, C; Feldkamp, M; Wissink-Lindhout, W; Lebrun, N; Castelnau, L; Rucci, J; Montjean, R; Dorseuil, O; Billuart, P; Stuhlmann, T; Shaw, M; Corbett, M A; Gardner, A; Willis-Owen, S; Tan, C; Friend, K L; Belet, S; van Roozendaal, K E P; Jimenez-Pocquet, M; Moizard, M-P; Ronce, N; Sun, R; O'Keeffe, S; Chenna, R; van Bömmel, A; Göke, J; Hackett, A; Field, M; Christie, L; Boyle, J; Haan, E; Nelson, J; Turner, G; Baynam, G; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Müller, U; Steinberger, D; Budny, B; Badura-Stronka, M; Latos-Bieleńska, A; Ousager, L B; Wieacker, P; Rodríguez Criado, G; Bondeson, M-L; Annerén, G; Dufke, A; Cohen, M; Van Maldergem, L; Vincent-Delorme, C; Echenne, B; Simon-Bouy, B; Kleefstra, T; Willemsen, M; Fryns, J-P; Devriendt, K; Ullmann, R; Vingron, M; Wrogemann, K; Wienker, T F; Tzschach, A; van Bokhoven, H; Gecz, J; Jentsch, T J; Chen, W; Ropers, H-H; Kalscheuer, V M

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases.

  10. Utility of next-generation RNA-sequencing in identifying chimeric transcription involving human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Jessen, Karen Margrethe; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human endogenous retroviruses and endogenous retrovirus-like repeats (here collectively HERVs) impose direct regulation on human genes through enhancer and promoter motifs present in their long terminal repeats (LTRs). Although chimeric transcription in which novel gene isoforms containing retroviral and human sequence are transcribed from viral promoters are commonly associated with disease, regulation by HERVs is beneficial in other settings; for example, in human testis chimeric isoforms of TP63 induced by an ERV9 LTR protect the male germ line upon DNA damage by inducing apoptosis, whereas in the human globin locus the γ- and β-globin switch during normal hematopoiesis is mediated by complex interactions of an ERV9 LTR and surrounding human sequence. The advent of deep sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way researchers solve important scientific questions and develop novel hypotheses in relation to human genome regulation. We recently applied next-generation paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) to examine ERV9 chimeric transcription in human reference cell lines from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This led to the discovery of advanced regulation mechanisms by ERV9s and other HERVs across numerous human loci including transcription of large gene-unannotated genomic regions, as well as cooperative regulation by multiple HERVs and non-LTR repeats such as Alu elements. In this article, well-established examples of human gene regulation by HERVs are reviewed followed by a description of paired-end RNA-seq, and its application in identifying chimeric transcription genome-widely. Based on integrative analyses of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, data we then present novel examples of regulation by ERV9s of tumor suppressor genes CADM2 and SEMA3A, as well as transcription of an unannotated region. Taken together, this article highlights

  11. Identifying and Mitigating Bias in Next-Generation Sequencing Methods for Chromatin Biology

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Clifford A.; Liu, X. Shirley

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been used in diverse ways to investigate facets of chromatin biology by identifying genomic loci that are bound by transcription factors, occupied by nucleosomes, accessible to nuclease cleavage, or physically interact with remote genomic loci. Reaching sound biological conclusions from such NGS enrichment profiles, however, requires that many potential biases be taken into account. In this Review we discuss common ways in which bias may be introduced into NGS chromatin profiling data, ways in which these biases can be diagnosed, and analytical techniques to mitigate their effect. PMID:25223782

  12. Metazoan remaining genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis: sequence conservation and evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor R; Thompson, Julie D; Ortega, José Miguel; Prosdocimi, Francisco

    2014-12-24

    Essential amino acids (EAA) consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS) and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL) relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  13. The amino acid sequence of the aspartate aminotransferase from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, V B; Maras, B; Barra, D; Doonan, S

    1991-01-01

    1. The single (cytosolic) aspartate aminotransferase was purified in high yield from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). 2. Amino-acid-sequence analysis was carried out by digestion of the protein with trypsin and with CNBr; some of the peptides produced were further subdigested with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase or with pepsin. Peptides were sequenced by the dansyl-Edman method and/or by automated gas-phase methods. The amino acid sequence obtained was complete except for a probable gap of two residues as indicated by comparison with the structures of counterpart proteins in other species. 3. The N-terminus of the enzyme is blocked. Fast-atom-bombardment m.s. was used to identify the blocking group as an acetyl one. 4. Alignment of the sequence of the enzyme with those of vertebrate cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases and with the enzyme from Escherichia coli showed that about 25% of residues are conserved between these distantly related forms. 5. Experimental details and confirmatory data for the results presented here are given in a Supplementary Publication (SUP 50164, 25 pages) that has been deposited at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7 BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273, 5. PMID:1859361

  14. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  15. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    DOE PAGES

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; et al

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1more » amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factor–specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.« less

  16. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Kornelius; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Letouzé, Eric; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R.; Llovet, Josep M.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-03-30

    Our genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors identified mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol and tobacco consumption and exposure to aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrently altered pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (hepatitis B virus, HBV) and AXIN1. These analyses according to tumor stage progression identified TERT promoter mutation as an early event, whereasFGF3, FGF4, FGF19 or CCND1 amplification and TP53 and CDKN2A alterations appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors, we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs. Finally, we identified risk factor–specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC, which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy.

  17. Fast and Sequence-Specific Palladium-Mediated Cross-Coupling Reaction Identified from Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and specific bioorthogonal reactions are highly desirable because they provide efficient tracking of biomolecules that are present in low abundance and/or involved in fast dynamic process in living systems. Toward this end, classic strategy involves the optimization of substrate structures and reaction conditions in test tubes, testing their compatibility with biological systems, devising synthetic biology schemes to introduce the modified substrates into living cells or organisms, and finally validating the superior kinetics for enhanced capacity in tracking biomolecules in vivo—a lengthy process often mired by unexpected results. Here, we report a streamlined approach in which the “microenvironment” of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter is exploited directly in biological systems via phage-assisted interrogation of reactivity (PAIR) to optimize not only reaction kinetics but also specificity. Using the PAIR strategy, we identified a short alkyne-containing peptide sequence showing fast kinetics (k2 = 13 000 ± 2000 M–1 s–1) in a palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that the residues surrounding the alkyne moiety facilitate the assembly of a key palladium–alkyne intermediate along the reaction pathway. When this peptide sequence was inserted into the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), this reactive sequence directed the specific labeling of EGFR in live mammalian cells. PMID:25025771

  18. Characterization of functional methylomes by next-generation capture sequencing identifies novel disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Allum, Fiona; Shao, Xiaojian; Guénard, Frédéric; Simon, Marie-Michelle; Busche, Stephan; Caron, Maxime; Lambourne, John; Lessard, Julie; Tandre, Karolina; Hedman, Åsa K; Kwan, Tony; Ge, Bing; Rönnblom, Lars; McCarthy, Mark I; Deloukas, Panos; Richmond, Todd; Burgess, Daniel; Spector, Timothy D; Tchernof, André; Marceau, Simon; Lathrop, Mark; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Pastinen, Tomi; Grundberg, Elin

    2015-05-29

    Most genome-wide methylation studies (EWAS) of multifactorial disease traits use targeted arrays or enrichment methodologies preferentially covering CpG-dense regions, to characterize sufficiently large samples. To overcome this limitation, we present here a new customizable, cost-effective approach, methylC-capture sequencing (MCC-Seq), for sequencing functional methylomes, while simultaneously providing genetic variation information. To illustrate MCC-Seq, we use whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on adipose tissue (AT) samples and public databases to design AT-specific panels. We establish its efficiency for high-density interrogation of methylome variability by systematic comparisons with other approaches and demonstrate its applicability by identifying novel methylation variation within enhancers strongly correlated to plasma triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol, including at CD36. Our more comprehensive AT panel assesses tissue methylation and genotypes in parallel at ∼4 and ∼3 M sites, respectively. Our study demonstrates that MCC-Seq provides comparable accuracy to alternative approaches but enables more efficient cataloguing of functional and disease-relevant epigenetic and genetic variants for large-scale EWAS.

  19. Characterization of functional methylomes by next-generation capture sequencing identifies novel disease-associated variants

    PubMed Central

    Allum, Fiona; Shao, Xiaojian; Guénard, Frédéric; Simon, Marie-Michelle; Busche, Stephan; Caron, Maxime; Lambourne, John; Lessard, Julie; Tandre, Karolina; Hedman, Åsa K.; Kwan, Tony; Ge, Bing; Rönnblom, Lars; McCarthy, Mark I.; Deloukas, Panos; Richmond, Todd; Burgess, Daniel; Spector, Timothy D.; Tchernof, André; Marceau, Simon; Lathrop, Mark; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Pastinen, Tomi; Grundberg, Elin; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Ainali, Chrysanthi; Barrett, Amy; Bataille, Veronique; Bell, Jordana T.; Buil, Alfonso; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Durbin, Richard; Glass, Daniel; Hassanali, Neelam; Ingle, Catherine; Knowles, David; Krestyaninova, Maria; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lowe, Christopher E.; Meduri, Eshwar; di Meglio, Paola; Min, Josine L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Nestle, Frank O.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Nisbet, James; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Parts, Leopold; Potter, Simon; Sandling, Johanna; Sekowska, Magdalena; Shin, So-Youn; Small, Kerrin S.; Soranzo, Nicole; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Travers, Mary E.; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Tsoka, Sophia; Wilk, Alicja; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2015-01-01

    Most genome-wide methylation studies (EWAS) of multifactorial disease traits use targeted arrays or enrichment methodologies preferentially covering CpG-dense regions, to characterize sufficiently large samples. To overcome this limitation, we present here a new customizable, cost-effective approach, methylC-capture sequencing (MCC-Seq), for sequencing functional methylomes, while simultaneously providing genetic variation information. To illustrate MCC-Seq, we use whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on adipose tissue (AT) samples and public databases to design AT-specific panels. We establish its efficiency for high-density interrogation of methylome variability by systematic comparisons with other approaches and demonstrate its applicability by identifying novel methylation variation within enhancers strongly correlated to plasma triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol, including at CD36. Our more comprehensive AT panel assesses tissue methylation and genotypes in parallel at ∼4 and ∼3 M sites, respectively. Our study demonstrates that MCC-Seq provides comparable accuracy to alternative approaches but enables more efficient cataloguing of functional and disease-relevant epigenetic and genetic variants for large-scale EWAS. PMID:26021296

  20. Fast and sequence-specific palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction identified from phage display.

    PubMed

    Lim, Reyna K V; Li, Nan; Ramil, Carlo P; Lin, Qing

    2014-09-19

    Fast and specific bioorthogonal reactions are highly desirable because they provide efficient tracking of biomolecules that are present in low abundance and/or involved in fast dynamic process in living systems. Toward this end, classic strategy involves the optimization of substrate structures and reaction conditions in test tubes, testing their compatibility with biological systems, devising synthetic biology schemes to introduce the modified substrates into living cells or organisms, and finally validating the superior kinetics for enhanced capacity in tracking biomolecules in vivo--a lengthy process often mired by unexpected results. Here, we report a streamlined approach in which the "microenvironment" of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter is exploited directly in biological systems via phage-assisted interrogation of reactivity (PAIR) to optimize not only reaction kinetics but also specificity. Using the PAIR strategy, we identified a short alkyne-containing peptide sequence showing fast kinetics (k2=13,000±2000 M(-1) s(-1)) in a palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that the residues surrounding the alkyne moiety facilitate the assembly of a key palladium-alkyne intermediate along the reaction pathway. When this peptide sequence was inserted into the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), this reactive sequence directed the specific labeling of EGFR in live mammalian cells. PMID:25025771

  1. ESPERR: learning strong and weak signals in genomic sequence alignments to identify functional elements.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; King, David C; Hardison, Ross C; Miller, Webb; Chiaromonte, Francesca

    2006-12-01

    Genomic sequence signals - such as base composition, presence of particular motifs, or evolutionary constraint - have been used effectively to identify functional elements. However, approaches based only on specific signals known to correlate with function can be quite limiting. When training data are available, application of computational learning algorithms to multispecies alignments has the potential to capture broader and more informative sequence and evolutionary patterns that better characterize a class of elements. However, effective exploitation of patterns in multispecies alignments is impeded by the vast number of possible alignment columns and by a limited understanding of which particular strings of columns may characterize a given class. We have developed a computational method, called ESPERR (evolutionary and sequence pattern extraction through reduced representations), which uses training examples to learn encodings of multispecies alignments into reduced forms tailored for the prediction of chosen classes of functional elements. ESPERR produces a greatly improved Regulatory Potential score, which can discriminate regulatory regions from neutral sites with excellent accuracy ( approximately 94%). This score captures strong signals (GC content and conservation), as well as subtler signals (with small contributions from many different alignment patterns) that characterize the regulatory elements in our training set. ESPERR is also effective for predicting other classes of functional elements, as we show for DNaseI hypersensitive sites and highly conserved regions with developmental enhancer activity. Our software, training data, and genome-wide predictions are available from our Web site (http://www.bx.psu.edu/projects/esperr).

  2. Sequencing and molecular modeling identifies candidate members of Caliciviridae family in bats.

    PubMed

    Kemenesi, Gábor; Gellért, Ákos; Dallos, Bianka; Görföl, Tamás; Boldogh, Sándor; Estók, Péter; Marton, Szilvia; Oldal, Miklós; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2016-07-01

    Emerging viral diseases represent an ongoing challenge for globalized world and bats constitute an immense, partially explored, reservoir of potentially zoonotic viruses. Caliciviruses are important human and animal pathogens and, as observed for human noroviruses, they may impact on human health on a global scale. By screening fecal samples of bats in Hungary, calicivirus RNA was identified in the samples of Myotis daubentonii and Eptesicus serotinus bats. In order to characterize more in detail the bat caliciviruses, large portions of the genome sequence of the viruses were determined. Phylogenetic analyses and molecular modeling identified firmly the two viruses as candidate members within the Caliciviridae family, with one calicivirus strain resembling members of the Sapovirus genus and the other bat calicivirus being more related to porcine caliciviruses of the proposed genus Valovirus. This data serves the effort for detecting reservoir hosts for potential emerging viruses and recognize important evolutionary relationships. PMID:27085289

  3. Small RNA sequencing identifies miRNA roles in ovule and fibre development.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fuliang; Jones, Don C; Wang, Qinglian; Sun, Runrun; Zhang, Baohong

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be differentially expressed during cotton fibre development. However, which specific miRNAs and how they are involved in fibre development is unclear. Here, using deep sequencing, 65 conserved miRNA families were identified and 32 families were differentially expressed between leaf and ovule. At least 40 miRNAs were either leaf or ovule specific, whereas 62 miRNAs were shared in both leaf and ovule. qRT-PCR confirmed these miRNAs were differentially expressed during fibre early development. A total of 820 genes were potentially targeted by the identified miRNAs, whose functions are involved in a series of biological processes including fibre development, metabolism and signal transduction. Many predicted miRNA-target pairs were subsequently validated by degradome sequencing analysis. GO and KEGG analyses showed that the identified miRNAs and their targets were classified to 1027 GO terms including 568 biological processes, 324 molecular functions and 135 cellular components and were enriched to 78 KEGG pathways. At least seven unique miRNAs participate in trichome regulatory interaction network. Eleven trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA) candidate genes were also identified in cotton. One has never been found in other plant species and two of them were derived from MYB and ARF, both of which play important roles in cotton fibre development. Sixteen genes were predicted to be tasiRNA targets, including sucrose synthase and MYB2. Together, this study discovered new miRNAs in cotton and offered evidences that miRNAs play important roles in cotton ovule/fibre development. The identification of tasiRNA genes and their targets broadens our understanding of the complicated regulatory mechanism of miRNAs in cotton.

  4. NR-2L: a two-level predictor for identifying nuclear receptor subfamilies based on sequence-derived features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are one of the most abundant classes of transcriptional regulators in animals. They regulate diverse functions, such as homeostasis, reproduction, development and metabolism. Therefore, NRs are a very important target for drug development. Nuclear receptors form a superfamily of phylogenetically related proteins and have been subdivided into different subfamilies due to their domain diversity. In this study, a two-level predictor, called NR-2L, was developed that can be used to identify a query protein as a nuclear receptor or not based on its sequence information alone; if it is, the prediction will be automatically continued to further identify it among the following seven subfamilies: (1) thyroid hormone like (NR1), (2) HNF4-like (NR2), (3) estrogen like, (4) nerve growth factor IB-like (NR4), (5) fushi tarazu-F1 like (NR5), (6) germ cell nuclear factor like (NR6), and (7) knirps like (NR0). The identification was made by the Fuzzy K nearest neighbor (FK-NN) classifier based on the pseudo amino acid composition formed by incorporating various physicochemical and statistical features derived from the protein sequences, such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, complexity factor, and low-frequency Fourier spectrum components. As a demonstration, it was shown through some benchmark datasets derived from the NucleaRDB and UniProt with low redundancy that the overall success rates achieved by the jackknife test were about 93% and 89% in the first and second level, respectively. The high success rates indicate that the novel two-level predictor can be a useful vehicle for identifying NRs and their subfamilies. As a user-friendly web server, NR-2L is freely accessible at either http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/NR2L or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/NR2L. Each job submitted to NR-2L can contain up to 500 query protein sequences and be finished in less than 2 minutes. The less the number of query proteins is, the shorter the time will

  5. Whole-genome sequencing identifies EN1 as a determinant of bone density and fracture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hou-Feng; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Estrada, Karol; Rosello-Diez, Alberto; Leo, Paul J; Dahia, Chitra L; Park-Min, Kyung Hyun; Tobias, Jonathan H; Kooperberg, Charles; Kleinman, Aaron; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Liu, Ching-Ti; Uggla, Charlotta; Evans, Daniel S; Nielson, Carrie M; Walter, Klaudia; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; McCarthy, Shane; Eriksson, Joel; Kwan, Tony; Jhamai, Mila; Trajanoska, Katerina; Memari, Yasin; Min, Josine; Huang, Jie; Danecek, Petr; Wilmot, Beth; Li, Rui; Chou, Wen-Chi; Mokry, Lauren E; Moayyeri, Alireza; Claussnitzer, Melina; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Cheung, Warren; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Choi, Kwangbom; Oei, Ling; Fraser, James; Kraaij, Robert; Hibbs, Matthew A; Gregson, Celia L; Paquette, Denis; Hofman, Albert; Wibom, Carl; Tranah, Gregory J; Marshall, Mhairi; Gardiner, Brooke B; Cremin, Katie; Auer, Paul; Hsu, Li; Ring, Sue; Tung, Joyce Y; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Enneman, Anke W; van Schoor, Natasja M; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; van der Velde, Nathalie; Melin, Beatrice; Kemp, John P; Christiansen, Claus; Sayers, Adrian; Zhou, Yanhua; Calderari, Sophie; van Rooij, Jeroen; Carlson, Chris; Peters, Ulrike; Berlivet, Soizik; Dostie, Josée; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Williams, Stephen R; Farber, Charles; Grinberg, Daniel; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Haessler, Jeff; Chasman, Daniel I; Giulianini, Franco; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Eisman, John A; Nguyen, Tuan V; Center, Jacqueline R; Nogues, Xavier; Garcia-Giralt, Natalia; Launer, Lenore L; Gudnason, Vilmunder; Mellström, Dan; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Amin, Najaf; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Karlsson, Magnus K; Ljunggren, Östen; Svensson, Olle; Hallmans, Göran; Rousseau, François; Giroux, Sylvie; Bussière, Johanne; Arp, Pascal P; Koromani, Fjorda; Prince, Richard L; Lewis, Joshua R; Langdahl, Bente L; Hermann, A Pernille; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Kaptoge, Stephen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Reeve, Jonathan; Formosa, Melissa M; Xuereb-Anastasi, Angela; Åkesson, Kristina; McGuigan, Fiona E; Garg, Gaurav; Olmos, Jose M; Zarrabeitia, Maria T; Riancho, Jose A; Ralston, Stuart H; Alonso, Nerea; Jiang, Xi; Goltzman, David; Pastinen, Tomi; Grundberg, Elin; Gauguier, Dominique; Orwoll, Eric S; Karasik, David; Davey-Smith, George; Smith, Albert V; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Harris, Tamara B; Zillikens, M Carola; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Maurano, Matthew T; Timpson, Nicholas J; Soranzo, Nicole; Durbin, Richard; Wilson, Scott G; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Hinds, David A; Spector, Tim; Cupples, L Adrienne; Ohlsson, Claes; Greenwood, Celia M T; Jackson, Rebecca D; Rowe, David W; Loomis, Cynthia A; Evans, David M; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Joyner, Alexandra L; Duncan, Emma L; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Richards, J Brent

    2015-10-01

    The extent to which low-frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 1-5%) and rare (MAF ≤ 1%) variants contribute to complex traits and disease in the general population is mainly unknown. Bone mineral density (BMD) is highly heritable, a major predictor of osteoporotic fractures, and has been previously associated with common genetic variants, as well as rare, population-specific, coding variants. Here we identify novel non-coding genetic variants with large effects on BMD (ntotal = 53,236) and fracture (ntotal = 508,253) in individuals of European ancestry from the general population. Associations for BMD were derived from whole-genome sequencing (n = 2,882 from UK10K (ref. 10); a population-based genome sequencing consortium), whole-exome sequencing (n = 3,549), deep imputation of genotyped samples using a combined UK10K/1000 Genomes reference panel (n = 26,534), and de novo replication genotyping (n = 20,271). We identified a low-frequency non-coding variant near a novel locus, EN1, with an effect size fourfold larger than the mean of previously reported common variants for lumbar spine BMD (rs11692564(T), MAF = 1.6%, replication effect size = +0.20 s.d., Pmeta = 2 × 10(-14)), which was also associated with a decreased risk of fracture (odds ratio = 0.85; P = 2 × 10(-11); ncases = 98,742 and ncontrols = 409,511). Using an En1(cre/flox) mouse model, we observed that conditional loss of En1 results in low bone mass, probably as a consequence of high bone turnover. We also identified a novel low-frequency non-coding variant with large effects on BMD near WNT16 (rs148771817(T), MAF = 1.2%, replication effect size = +0.41 s.d., Pmeta = 1 × 10(-11)). In general, there was an excess of association signals arising from deleterious coding and conserved non-coding variants. These findings provide evidence that low-frequency non-coding variants have large effects on BMD and fracture

  6. High-throughput single-cell sequencing identifies photoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs in freshwater bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; Swan, Brandon K; Poulton, Nicole J; Gomez, Monica Lluesma; Masland, Dashiell; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries suggest that photoheterotrophs (rhodopsin-containing bacteria (RBs) and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs (AAPs)) and chemoautotrophs may be significant for marine and freshwater ecosystem productivity. However, their abundance and taxonomic identities remain largely unknown. We used a combination of single-cell and metagenomic DNA sequencing to study the predominant photoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs inhabiting the euphotic zone of temperate, physicochemically diverse freshwater lakes. Multi-locus sequencing of 712 single amplified genomes, generated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and whole genome multiple displacement amplification, showed that most of the cosmopolitan freshwater clusters contain photoheterotrophs. These comprised at least 10–23% of bacterioplankton, and RBs were the dominant fraction. Our data demonstrate that Actinobacteria, including clusters acI, Luna and acSTL, are the predominant freshwater RBs. We significantly broaden the known taxonomic range of freshwater RBs, to include Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Sphingobacteria. By sequencing single cells, we found evidence for inter-phyla horizontal gene transfer and recombination of rhodopsin genes and identified specific taxonomic groups involved in these evolutionary processes. Our data suggest that members of the ubiquitous betaproteobacteria Polynucleobacter spp. are the dominant AAPs in temperate freshwater lakes. Furthermore, the RuBisCO (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) gene was found in several single cells of Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria, suggesting that chemoautotrophs may be more prevalent among aerobic bacterioplankton than previously thought. This study demonstrates the power of single-cell DNA sequencing addressing previously unresolved questions about the metabolic potential and evolutionary histories of uncultured microorganisms, which dominate most natural environments

  7. Exome sequencing identified FGF12 as a novel candidate gene for Kashin-Beck disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Dai, Lanlan; Lin, Weimin; Wang, Wenyu; Liu, Xuanzhu; Zhang, Jianguo; Yang, Tielin; Liu, Xiaogang; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiangding; Tan, Lijun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Xu, Xun; Guo, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify novel causal genes involved in the pathogenesis of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). A representative grade III KBD sib pair with serious skeletal growth and development failure was subjected to exome sequencing using the Illumina Hiseq2000 platform. The detected gene mutations were then filtered against the data of 1000 Genome Project, dbSNP database, and BGI inhouse database, and replicated by a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of KBD. Ninety grade II or III KBD patients with extreme KBD phenotypes and 1627 healthy controls were enrolled in the GWAS. Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 was applied for genotyping. PLINK software was used for association analysis. We identified a novel 106T>C at the 3'UTR of the FGF12 gene, which has not been reported by now. Sequence alignment observed high conversation at the mutated 3'UTR+106T>C locus across various vertebrates. In the GWAS of KBD, we detected nine SNPs of the FGF12 gene showing association evidence (P value < 0.05) with KBD. The most significant association signal was observed at rs1847340 (P value = 1.90 × 10(-5)). This study suggests that FGF12 was a susceptibility gene of KBD. Our results provide novel clues for revealing the pathogenesis of KBD and the biological function of FGF12. PMID:26290467

  8. Exome and whole genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity

    PubMed Central

    Dulak, Austin M.; Stojanov, Petar; Peng, Shouyong; Lawrence, Michael S.; Fox, Cameron; Stewart, Chip; Bandla, Santhoshi; Imamura, Yu; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shefler, Erica; McKenna, Aaron; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Carter, Scott L.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H.; Auclair, Daniel; Thompson, Kristin; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C.; Guiducci, Candace; Beroukhim, Rameen; Zhou, David; Lin, Lin; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Chang, Andrew; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Ogino, Shuji; Golub, Todd R.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Beer, David G.; Godfrey, Tony E.; Getz, Gad; Bass, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a five-year survival rate of 15%, identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation spectra from whole exome sequencing of 149 EAC tumors/normal pairs, 15 of which have also been subjected to whole genome sequencing. We identify a mutational signature defined by a high prevalence of A to C transversions at AA dinucleotides. Statistical analysis of exome data identified significantly mutated 26 genes. Of these genes, four (TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, and PIK3CA) have been previously implicated in EAC. The novel significantly mutated genes include chromatin modifying factors and candidate contributors: SPG20, TLR4, ELMO1, and DOCK2. Functional analyses of EAC-derived mutations in ELMO1 reveal increased cellular invasion. Therefore, we suggest a new hypothesis about the potential activation of the RAC1 pathway to be a contributor to EAC tumorigenesis. PMID:23525077

  9. Next-generation sequencing identifies major DNA methylation changes during progression of Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heller, G; Topakian, T; Altenberger, C; Cerny-Reiterer, S; Herndlhofer, S; Ziegler, B; Datlinger, P; Byrgazov, K; Bock, C; Mannhalter, C; Hörmann, G; Sperr, W R; Lion, T; Zielinski, C C; Valent, P; Zöchbauer-Müller, S

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the impact of DNA methylation on the evolution/progression of Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We investigated the methylome of CML patients in chronic phase (CP-CML), accelerated phase (AP-CML) and blast crisis (BC-CML) as well as in controls by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing. Although only ~600 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified in samples obtained from CP-CML patients compared with controls, ~6500 differentially methylated CpG sites were found in samples from BC-CML patients. In the majority of affected CpG sites, methylation was increased. In CP-CML patients who progressed to AP-CML/BC-CML, we identified up to 897 genes that were methylated at the time of progression but not at the time of diagnosis. Using RNA-sequencing, we observed downregulated expression of many of these genes in BC-CML compared with CP-CML samples. Several of them are well-known tumor-suppressor genes or regulators of cell proliferation, and gene re-expression was observed by the use of epigenetic active drugs. Together, our results demonstrate that CpG site methylation clearly increases during CML progression and that it may provide a useful basis for revealing new targets of therapy in advanced CML. PMID:27211271

  10. Challenges in identifying cancer genes by analysis of exome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Hofree, Matan; Carter, Hannah; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Mischel, Paul S.; Friend, Stephen; Ideker, Trey

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has permitted an unprecedented examination of the cancer exome, leading to predictions that all genes important to cancer will soon be identified by genetic analysis of tumours. To examine this potential, here we evaluate the ability of state-of-the-art sequence analysis methods to specifically recover known cancer genes. While some cancer genes are identified by analysis of recurrence, spatial clustering or predicted impact of somatic mutations, many remain undetected due to lack of power to discriminate driver mutations from the background mutational load (13–60% recall of cancer genes impacted by somatic single-nucleotide variants, depending on the method). Cancer genes not detected by mutation recurrence also tend to be missed by all types of exome analysis. Nonetheless, these genes are implicated by other experiments such as functional genetic screens and expression profiling. These challenges are only partially addressed by increasing sample size and will likely hold even as greater numbers of tumours are analysed. PMID:27417679

  11. Genomic sequencing of meningiomas identifies oncogenic SMO and AKT1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Santagata, Sandro; Jones, Robert T.; McKenna, Aaron; Getz, Gad; Ligon, Keith L.; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Van Hummelen, Paul; Ducar, Matthew D.; Raza, Alina; Sunkavalli, Ashwini; MacConaill, Laura E.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Louis, David N.; Hahn, William C.; Dunn, Ian F.; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2013-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary nervous system tumor. The tumor suppressor NF2 is disrupted in approximately half of meningiomas1 but the complete spectrum of genetic changes remains undefined. We performed whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing on 17 meningiomas and focused sequencing on an additional 48 tumors to identify and validate somatic genetic alterations. Most meningiomas exhibited simple genomes, with fewer mutations, rearrangements, and copy-number alterations than reported in other adult tumors. However, several meningiomas harbored more complex patterns of copy-number changes and rearrangements including one tumor with chromothripsis. We confirmed focal NF2 inactivation in 43% of tumors and found alterations in epigenetic modifiers among an additional 8% of tumors. A subset of meningiomas lacking NF2 alterations harbored recurrent oncogenic mutations in AKT1 (E17K) and SMO (W535L) and exhibited immunohistochemical evidence of activation of their pathways. These mutations were present in therapeutically challenging tumors of the skull base and higher grade. These results begin to define the spectrum of genetic alterations in meningiomas and identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23334667

  12. Challenges in identifying cancer genes by analysis of exome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Hofree, Matan; Carter, Hannah; Kreisberg, Jason F; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Mischel, Paul S; Friend, Stephen; Ideker, Trey

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has permitted an unprecedented examination of the cancer exome, leading to predictions that all genes important to cancer will soon be identified by genetic analysis of tumours. To examine this potential, here we evaluate the ability of state-of-the-art sequence analysis methods to specifically recover known cancer genes. While some cancer genes are identified by analysis of recurrence, spatial clustering or predicted impact of somatic mutations, many remain undetected due to lack of power to discriminate driver mutations from the background mutational load (13-60% recall of cancer genes impacted by somatic single-nucleotide variants, depending on the method). Cancer genes not detected by mutation recurrence also tend to be missed by all types of exome analysis. Nonetheless, these genes are implicated by other experiments such as functional genetic screens and expression profiling. These challenges are only partially addressed by increasing sample size and will likely hold even as greater numbers of tumours are analysed. PMID:27417679

  13. Next-generation sequencing identifies major DNA methylation changes during progression of Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heller, G; Topakian, T; Altenberger, C; Cerny-Reiterer, S; Herndlhofer, S; Ziegler, B; Datlinger, P; Byrgazov, K; Bock, C; Mannhalter, C; Hörmann, G; Sperr, W R; Lion, T; Zielinski, C C; Valent, P; Zöchbauer-Müller, S

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the impact of DNA methylation on the evolution/progression of Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We investigated the methylome of CML patients in chronic phase (CP-CML), accelerated phase (AP-CML) and blast crisis (BC-CML) as well as in controls by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing. Although only ~600 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified in samples obtained from CP-CML patients compared with controls, ~6500 differentially methylated CpG sites were found in samples from BC-CML patients. In the majority of affected CpG sites, methylation was increased. In CP-CML patients who progressed to AP-CML/BC-CML, we identified up to 897 genes that were methylated at the time of progression but not at the time of diagnosis. Using RNA-sequencing, we observed downregulated expression of many of these genes in BC-CML compared with CP-CML samples. Several of them are well-known tumor-suppressor genes or regulators of cell proliferation, and gene re-expression was observed by the use of epigenetic active drugs. Together, our results demonstrate that CpG site methylation clearly increases during CML progression and that it may provide a useful basis for revealing new targets of therapy in advanced CML.

  14. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; Pinyol, Magda; Quesada, Víctor; Conde, Laura; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Villamor, Neus; Escaramis, Georgia; Jares, Pedro; Beà, Sílvia; González-Díaz, Marcos; Bassaganyas, Laia; Baumann, Tycho; Juan, Manel; López-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Tubío, José M. C.; López, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Tornador, Cristian; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Hernández, Jesús M.; Puente, Diana A.; Freije, José M. P.; Velasco, Gloria; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Costa, Dolors; Carrió, Anna; Guijarro, Sara; Enjuanes, Anna; Hernández, Lluís; Yagüe, Jordi; Nicolás, Pilar; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Castillo, Ester; Dohm, Juliane C.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A.; de Alava, Enrique; Miguel, Jesús San; Royo, Romina; Gelpí, Josep L.; Torrents, David; Orozco, Modesto; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Guigó, Roderic; Bayés, Mónica; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Klatt, Peter; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; Estivill, Xavier; Montserrat, Emili; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most frequent leukaemia in adults in Western countries, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical presentation and evolution1,2. Two major molecular subtypes can be distinguished, characterized respectively by a high or low number of somatic hypermutations in the variable region of immunoglobulin genes3,4. The molecular changes leading to the pathogenesis of the disease are still poorly understood. Here we performed whole-genome sequencing of four cases of CLL and identified 46 somatic mutations that potentially affect gene function. Further analysis of these mutations in 363 patients with CLL identified four genes that are recurrently mutated: notch 1 (NOTCH1), exportin 1 (XPO1), myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88) and kelch-like 6 (KLHL6). Mutations in MYD88 and KLHL6 are predominant in cases of CLL with mutated immunoglobulin genes, whereas NOTCH1 and XPO1 mutations are mainly detected in patients with unmutated immunoglobulins. The patterns of somatic mutation, supported by functional and clinical analyses, strongly indicate that the recurrent NOTCH1, MYD88 and XPO1 mutations are oncogenic changes that contribute to the clinical evolution of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of CLL combining whole-genome sequencing with clinical characteristics and clinical outcomes. It highlights the usefulness of this approach for the identification of clinically relevant mutations in cancer. PMID:21642962

  15. Identifying Genetic Signatures of Natural Selection Using Pooled Population Sequencing in Picea abies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Källman, Thomas; Ma, Xiao-Fei; Zaina, Giusi; Morgante, Michele; Lascoux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The joint inference of selection and past demography remain a costly and demanding task. We used next generation sequencing of two pools of 48 Norway spruce mother trees, one corresponding to the Fennoscandian domain, and the other to the Alpine domain, to assess nucleotide polymorphism at 88 nuclear genes. These genes are candidate genes for phenological traits, and most belong to the photoperiod pathway. Estimates of population genetic summary statistics from the pooled data are similar to previous estimates, suggesting that pooled sequencing is reliable. The nonsynonymous SNPs tended to have both lower frequency differences and lower FST values between the two domains than silent ones. These results suggest the presence of purifying selection. The divergence between the two domains based on synonymous changes was around 5 million yr, a time similar to a recent phylogenetic estimate of 6 million yr, but much larger than earlier estimates based on isozymes. Two approaches, one of them novel and that considers both FST and difference in allele frequencies between the two domains, were used to identify SNPs potentially under diversifying selection. SNPs from around 20 genes were detected, including genes previously identified as main target for selection, such as PaPRR3 and PaGI. PMID:27172202

  16. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058, a probiotic strain with high conjugated linoleic acid production ability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei

    2015-11-20

    Lactobacillus plantarum ZS2058 was isolated from sauerkraut and identified to synthesize the beneficial metabolite conjugated linoleic acid. The genome contains a 319,7363-bp chromosome and three plasmids. The sequence will facilitate identification and characterization of the genetic determinants for its putative biological benefits.

  17. Novel pathogenic variants and genes for myopathies identified by whole exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jesse M; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Balak, Christopher D; Liang, Winnie S; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Russell, Megan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Carpten, John; Coons, Stephen W; DeMello, Daphne E; Hall, Judith G; Bernes, Saunder M; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD) account for a significant proportion of infant and childhood mortality and devastating chronic disease. Determining the specific diagnosis of NMD is challenging due to thousands of unique or rare genetic variants that result in overlapping phenotypes. We present four unique childhood myopathy cases characterized by relatively mild muscle weakness, slowly progressing course, mildly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and contractures. We also present two additional cases characterized by severe prenatal/neonatal myopathy. Prior extensive genetic testing and histology of these cases did not reveal the genetic etiology of disease. Here, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and bioinformatics to identify likely causal pathogenic variants in each pedigree. In two cases, we identified novel pathogenic variants in COL6A3. In a third case, we identified novel likely pathogenic variants in COL6A6 and COL6A3. We identified a novel splice variant in EMD in a fourth case. Finally, we classify two cases as calcium channelopathies with identification of novel pathogenic variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S. These are the first cases of myopathies reported to be caused by variants in COL6A6 and CACNA1S. Our results demonstrate the utility and genetic diagnostic value of WES in the broad class of NMD phenotypes. PMID:26247046

  18. A sequence-based hybrid predictor for identifying conformationally ambivalent regions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteins are dynamic macromolecules which may undergo conformational transitions upon changes in environment. As it has been observed in laboratories that protein flexibility is correlated to essential biological functions, scientists have been designing various types of predictors for identifying structurally flexible regions in proteins. In this respect, there are two major categories of predictors. One category of predictors attempts to identify conformationally flexible regions through analysis of protein tertiary structures. Another category of predictors works completely based on analysis of the polypeptide sequences. As the availability of protein tertiary structures is generally limited, the design of predictors that work completely based on sequence information is crucial for advances of molecular biology research. Results In this article, we propose a novel approach to design a sequence-based predictor for identifying conformationally ambivalent regions in proteins. The novelty in the design stems from incorporating two classifiers based on two distinctive supervised learning algorithms that provide complementary prediction powers. Experimental results show that the overall performance delivered by the hybrid predictor proposed in this article is superior to the performance delivered by the existing predictors. Furthermore, the case study presented in this article demonstrates that the proposed hybrid predictor is capable of providing the biologists with valuable clues about the functional sites in a protein chain. The proposed hybrid predictor provides the users with two optional modes, namely, the high-sensitivity mode and the high-specificity mode. The experimental results with an independent testing data set show that the proposed hybrid predictor is capable of delivering sensitivity of 0.710 and specificity of 0.608 under the high-sensitivity mode, while delivering sensitivity of 0.451 and specificity of 0.787 under the high

  19. Method for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences by polymerase nucleotide incorporation

    DOEpatents

    Castro, Alonso

    2004-06-01

    A method for rapid and efficient detection of a target DNA or RNA sequence is provided. A primer having a 3'-hydroxyl group at one end and having a sequence of nucleotides sufficiently homologous with an identifying sequence of nucleotides in the target DNA is selected. The primer is hybridized to the identifying sequence of nucleotides on the DNA or RNA sequence and a reporter molecule is synthesized on the target sequence by progressively binding complementary nucleotides to the primer, where the complementary nucleotides include nucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. Fluorescence emitted by fluorophores on single reporter molecules is detected to identify the target DNA or RNA sequence.

  20. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  1. Exome Sequencing Identifies Three Novel Candidate Genes Implicated in Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Maleeha; Ayub, Humaira; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Gilissen, Christian; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Riaz, Moeen; Veltman, Joris A.; Pfundt, Rolph; van Bokhoven, Hans; Qamar, Raheel

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a major health problem mostly with an unknown etiology. Recently exome sequencing of individuals with ID identified novel genes implicated in the disease. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to identify the genetic cause of ID in one syndromic and two non-syndromic Pakistani families. Whole exome of three ID probands was sequenced. Missense variations in two plausible novel genes implicated in autosomal recessive ID were identified: lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2B (KMT2B), zinc finger protein 589 (ZNF589), as well as hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) with a de novo mutation with autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The KMT2B recessive variant is the first report of recessive Kleefstra syndrome-like phenotype. Identification of plausible causative mutations for two recessive and a dominant type of ID, in genes not previously implicated in disease, underscores the large genetic heterogeneity of ID. These results also support the viewpoint that large number of ID genes converge on limited number of common networks i.e. ZNF589 belongs to KRAB-domain zinc-finger proteins previously implicated in ID, HHAT is predicted to affect sonic hedgehog, which is involved in several disorders with ID, KMT2B associated with syndromic ID fits the epigenetic module underlying the Kleefstra syndromic spectrum. The association of these novel genes in three different Pakistani ID families highlights the importance of screening these genes in more families with similar phenotypes from different populations to confirm the involvement of these genes in pathogenesis of ID. PMID:25405613

  2. Sequencing of SCN5A identifies rare and common variants associated with cardiac conduction

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Jared W.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Prins, Bram P.; Arking, Dan E.; Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Morrison, Alanna C.; Zhang, Feng; Spector, Tim D.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Lubitz, Steven A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Pulit, Sara L.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Santibanez, Jireh; Taylor, Herman A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Lange, Leslie A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca; Rich, Stephen S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Jamshidi, Yalda; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Background The cardiac sodium channel SCN5A regulates atrioventricular and ventricular conduction. Genetic variants in this gene are associated with PR and QRS intervals. We sought to further characterize the contribution of rare and common coding variation in SCN5A to cardiac conduction. Methods and Results In the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Targeted Sequencing Study (CHARGE), we performed targeted exonic sequencing of SCN5A (n=3699, European-ancestry individuals) and identified 4 common (minor allele frequency >1%) and 157 rare variants. Common and rare SCN5A coding variants were examined for association with PR and QRS intervals through meta-analysis of European ancestry participants from CHARGE, NHLBI’s Exome Sequencing Project (ESP, n=607) and the UK10K (n=1275) and by examining ESP African-ancestry participants (N=972). Rare coding SCN5A variants in aggregate were associated with PR interval in European and African-ancestry participants (P=1.3×10−3). Three common variants were associated with PR and/or QRS interval duration among European-ancestry participants and one among African-ancestry participants. These included two well-known missense variants; rs1805124 (H558R) was associated with PR and QRS shortening in European-ancestry participants (P=6.25×10−4 and P=5.2×10−3 respectively) and rs7626962 (S1102Y) was associated with PR shortening in those of African ancestry (P=2.82×10−3). Among European-ancestry participants, two novel synonymous variants, rs1805126 and rs6599230, were associated with cardiac conduction. Our top signal, rs1805126 was associated with PR and QRS lengthening (P=3.35×10−7 and P=2.69×10−4 respectively), and rs6599230 was associated with PR shortening (P=2.67×10−5). Conclusions By sequencing SCN5A, we identified novel common and rare coding variants associated with cardiac conduction. PMID:24951663

  3. Identification of amino acid sequences in the polyomavirus capsid proteins that serve as nuclear localization signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. Jr; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The molecular mechanism participating in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Recently, the nuclear localization signal sequences (NLS) of many nuclear proteins have been identified, and most have been found to be composed of a highly basic amino acid stretch. A genetic "subtractive" and a biochemical "additive" approach were used in our studies to identify the NLS's of the polyomavirus structural capsid proteins. An NLS was identified at the N-terminus (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) of the major capsid protein VP1 and at the C-terminus (Glu307 -Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Glu-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) of the VP2/VP3 minor capsid proteins.

  4. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones.

  5. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  6. Whole-genome sequencing of individuals from a founder population identifies candidate genes for asthma.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catarina D; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS. PMID:25116239

  7. Whole-genome sequencing of individuals from a founder population identifies candidate genes for asthma.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catarina D; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J; Gern, James E; Lemanske, Robert F; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS.

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Individuals from a Founder Population Identifies Candidate Genes for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catarina D.; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M.; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X.; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J.; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J.; Gern, James E.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G.; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p = 0.004; Bonferroni p = 0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p = 0.03; Odds ratio (OR) = 3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p = 0.056; OR = 1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS. PMID:25116239

  9. Whole-genome sequencing identifies EN1 as a determinant of bone density and fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hou-Feng; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Estrada, Karol; Rosello-Diez, Alberto; Leo, Paul J; Dahia, Chitra L; Park-Min, Kyung Hyun; Tobias, Jonathan H; Kooperberg, Charles; Kleinman, Aaron; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Liu, Ching-Ti; Uggla, Charlotta; Evans, Daniel S; Nielson, Carrie M; Walter, Klaudia; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; McCarthy, Shane; Eriksson, Joel; Kwan, Tony; Jhamai, Mila; Trajanoska, Katerina; Memari, Yasin; Min, Josine; Huang, Jie; Danecek, Petr; Wilmot, Beth; Li, Rui; Chou, Wen-Chi; Mokry, Lauren E; Moayyeri, Alireza; Claussnitzer, Melina; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Cheung, Warren; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Choi, Kwangbom; Oei, Ling; Fraser, James; Kraaij, Robert; Hibbs, Matthew A; Gregson, Celia L; Paquette, Denis; Hofman, Albert; Wibom, Carl; Tranah, Gregory J; Marshall, Mhairi; Gardiner, Brooke B; Cremin, Katie; Auer, Paul; Hsu, Li; Ring, Sue; Tung, Joyce Y; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Enneman, Anke W; van Schoor, Natasja M; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; Melin, Beatrice; Kemp, John P; Christiansen, Claus; Sayers, Adrian; Zhou, Yanhua; Calderari, Sophie; van Rooij, Jeroen; Carlson, Chris; Peters, Ulrike; Berlivet, Soizik; Dostie, Josée; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Williams, Stephen R.; Farber, Charles; Grinberg, Daniel; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Haessler, Jeff; Chasman, Daniel I; Giulianini, Franco; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Eisman, John A; Nguyen, Tuan V; Center, Jacqueline R; Nogues, Xavier; Garcia-Giralt, Natalia; Launer, Lenore L; Gudnason, Vilmunder; Mellström, Dan; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Karlsson, Magnus K; Ljunggren, Östen; Svensson, Olle; Hallmans, Göran; Rousseau, François; Giroux, Sylvie; Bussière, Johanne; Arp, Pascal P; Koromani, Fjorda; Prince, Richard L; Lewis, Joshua R; Langdahl, Bente L; Hermann, A Pernille; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Kaptoge, Stephen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Reeve, Jonathan; Formosa, Melissa M; Xuereb-Anastasi, Angela; Åkesson, Kristina; McGuigan, Fiona E; Garg, Gaurav; Olmos, Jose M; Zarrabeitia, Maria T; Riancho, Jose A; Ralston, Stuart H; Alonso, Nerea; Jiang, Xi; Goltzman, David; Pastinen, Tomi; Grundberg, Elin; Gauguier, Dominique; Orwoll, Eric S; Karasik, David; Davey-Smith, George; Smith, Albert V; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Harris, Tamara B; Zillikens, M Carola; van Meurs, Joyce BJ; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Maurano, Matthew T; Timpson, Nicholas J; Soranzo, Nicole; Durbin, Richard; Wilson, Scott G; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Hinds, David A; Spector, Tim; Cupples, L Adrienne; Ohlsson, Claes; Greenwood, Celia MT; Jackson, Rebecca D; Rowe, David W; Loomis, Cynthia A; Evans, David M; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Joyner, Alexandra L; Duncan, Emma L; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Richards, J Brent

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The extent to which low-frequency (minor allele frequency [MAF] between 1–5%) and rare (MAF ≤ 1%) variants contribute to complex traits and disease in the general population is largely unknown. Bone mineral density (BMD) is highly heritable, is a major predictor of osteoporotic fractures and has been previously associated with common genetic variants1–8, and rare, population-specific, coding variants9. Here we identify novel non-coding genetic variants with large effects on BMD (ntotal = 53,236) and fracture (ntotal = 508,253) in individuals of European ancestry from the general population. Associations for BMD were derived from whole-genome sequencing (n=2,882 from UK10K), whole-exome sequencing (n= 3,549), deep imputation of genotyped samples using a combined UK10K/1000Genomes reference panel (n=26,534), and de-novo replication genotyping (n= 20,271). We identified a low-frequency non-coding variant near a novel locus, EN1, with an effect size 4-fold larger than the mean of previously reported common variants for lumbar spine BMD8 (rs11692564[T], MAF = 1.7%, replication effect size = +0.20 standard deviations [SD], Pmeta = 2×10−14), which was also associated with a decreased risk of fracture (OR = 0.85; P = 2×10−11; ncases = 98,742 and ncontrols = 409,511). Using an En1Cre/flox mouse model, we observed that conditional loss of En1 results in low bone mass, likely as a consequence of high bone turn-over. We also identified a novel low-frequency non-coding variant with large effects on BMD near WNT16 (rs148771817[T], MAF = 1.1%, replication effect size = +0.39 SD, Pmeta = 1×10−11). In general, there was an excess of association signals arising from deleterious coding and conserved non-coding variants. These findings provide evidence that low-frequency non-coding variants have large effects on BMD and fracture, thereby providing rationale for whole-genome sequencing and improved imputation reference panels to study the genetic architecture of

  10. Targeted sequencing identifies patients with preclinical MDS at high risk of disease progression.

    PubMed

    Cargo, Catherine A; Rowbotham, Nicola; Evans, Paul A; Barrans, Sharon L; Bowen, David T; Crouch, Simon; Jack, Andrew S

    2015-11-19

    The diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remains problematic due to the subjective nature of morphologic assessment. The reported high frequency of somatic mutations and increased structural variants by array-based cytogenetics have provided potential objective markers of disease; however, this has been complicated by reports of similar abnormalities in the healthy population. We aimed to identify distinguishing features between those with early MDS and reported healthy individuals by characterizing 69 patients who, following a nondiagnostic marrow, developed progressive dysplasia or acute myeloid leukemia. Targeted sequencing and array-based cytogenetics identified a driver mutation and/or structural variant in 91% (63/69) of prediagnostic samples with the mutational spectrum mirroring that in the MDS population. When compared with the reported healthy population, the mutations detected had significantly greater median variant allele fraction (40% vs 9% to 10%), and occurred more commonly with additional mutations (≥2 mutations, 64% vs 8%). Furthermore, mutational analysis identified a high-risk group of patients with a shorter time to disease progression and poorer overall survival. The mutational features in our cohort are distinct from those seen in the healthy population and, even in the absence of definitive disease, can predict outcome. Early detection may allow consideration of intervention in poor-risk patients. PMID:26392596

  11. WHITE-DWARF-MAIN-SEQUENCE BINARIES IDENTIFIED FROM THE LAMOST PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Juanjuan; Luo Ali; Li Yinbi; Wei Peng; Zhao Jingkun; Zhao Yongheng; Song Yihan; Zhao Gang E-mail: lal@nao.cas.cn

    2013-10-01

    We present a set of white-dwarf-main-sequence (WDMS) binaries identified spectroscopically from the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called the Guo Shou Jing Telescope) pilot survey. We develop a color selection criteria based on what is so far the largest and most complete Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 WDMS binary catalog and identify 28 WDMS binaries within the LAMOST pilot survey. The primaries in our binary sample are mostly DA white dwarfs except for one DB white dwarf. We derive the stellar atmospheric parameters, masses, and radii for the two components of 10 of our binaries. We also provide cooling ages for the white dwarf primaries as well as the spectral types for the companion stars of these 10 WDMS binaries. These binaries tend to contain hot white dwarfs and early-type companions. Through cross-identification, we note that nine binaries in our sample have been published in the SDSS DR7 WDMS binary catalog. Nineteen spectroscopic WDMS binaries identified by the LAMOST pilot survey are new. Using the 3{sigma} radial velocity variation as a criterion, we find two post-common-envelope binary candidates from our WDMS binary sample.

  12. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R; Llovet, Josep M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization in order to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors revealed mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol/tobacco consumption, and aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrent pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (HBV), and AXIN1. Analyses according to tumor stage progression revealed TERT promoter mutation as an early event whereas FGF3, FGF4, FGF19/CCND1 amplification, TP53 and CDKN2A alterations, appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by FDA-approved drugs. In conclusion, we identified risk factor-specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy. PMID:25822088

  13. Whole genome sequencing of Gir cattle for identifying polymorphisms and loci under selection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoping; Peng, Fred; Forni, Selma; McLaren, David; Plastow, Graham; Stothard, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Genetic variation in Gir cattle (Bos indicus) has so far not been well characterized. In this study, we used whole genome sequencing of three Gir bulls and a pooled sample from another 11 bulls to identify polymorphisms and loci under selection. A total of 9 990 733 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 604 308 insertion/deletions (indels) were discovered in Gir samples, of which 62.34% and 83.62%, respectively, are previously unknown. Moreover, we detected 79 putative selective sweeps using the sequence data of the pooled sample. One of the most striking sweeps harbours several genes belonging to the cathelicidin gene family, such as CAMP, CATHL1, CATHL2, and CATHL3, which are related to pathogen- and parasite-resistance. Another interesting region harbours genes encoding mitogen-activated protein kinases, which are involved in directing cellular responses to a variety of stimuli, such as osmotic stress and heat shock. These findings are particularly interesting because Gir is resistant to hot temperatures and tropical diseases. This initial selective sweep analysis of Gir cattle has revealed a number of loci that could be important for their adaptation to tropical climates.

  14. Integrated sequence analysis pipeline provides one-stop solution for identifying disease-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H Hilger

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has greatly accelerated the search for disease-causing defects, but even for experts the data analysis can be a major challenge. To facilitate the data processing in a clinical setting, we have developed a novel medical resequencing analysis pipeline (MERAP). MERAP assesses the quality of sequencing, and has optimized capacity for calling variants, including single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy-number variation, and other structural variants. MERAP identifies polymorphic and known causal variants by filtering against public domain databases, and flags nonsynonymous and splice-site changes. MERAP uses a logistic model to estimate the causal likelihood of a given missense variant. MERAP considers the relevant information such as phenotype and interaction with known disease-causing genes. MERAP compares favorably with GATK, one of the widely used tools, because of its higher sensitivity for detecting indels, its easy installation, and its economical use of computational resources. Upon testing more than 1,200 individuals with mutations in known and novel disease genes, MERAP proved highly reliable, as illustrated here for five families with disease-causing variants. We believe that the clinical implementation of MERAP will expedite the diagnostic process of many disease-causing defects.

  15. Whole-exome sequencing identifies somatic mutations of BCOR in acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Vera; Tiacci, Enrico; Holmes, Antony B; Kohlmann, Alexander; Martelli, Maria Paola; Kern, Wolfgang; Spanhol-Rosseto, Ariele; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Schindela, Sonja; Trifonov, Vladimir; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia; Bassan, Renato; Wells, Victoria A; Spinelli, Orietta; Chan, Joseph; Rossi, Roberta; Baldoni, Stefano; De Carolis, Luca; Goetze, Katharina; Serve, Hubert; Peceny, Rudolf; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Oruzio, Daniel; Specchia, Giorgina; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Fabbiano, Francesco; Sborgia, Marco; Liso, Arcangelo; Farinelli, Laurent; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rabadan, Raul; Haferlach, Torsten; Falini, Brunangelo

    2011-12-01

    Among acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with a normal karyotype (CN-AML), NPM1 and CEBPA mutations define World Health Organization 2008 provisional entities accounting for approximately 60% of patients, but the remaining 40% are molecularly poorly characterized. Using whole-exome sequencing of one CN-AML patient lacking mutations in NPM1, CEBPA, FLT3-ITD, IDH1, and MLL-PTD, we newly identified a clonal somatic mutation in BCOR (BCL6 corepressor), a gene located on chromosome Xp11.4. Further analyses of 553 AML patients showed that BCOR mutations occurred in 3.8% of unselected CN-AML patients and represented a substantial fraction (17.1%) of CN-AML patients showing the same genotype as the AML index patient subjected to whole-exome sequencing. BCOR somatic mutations were: (1) disruptive events similar to the germline BCOR mutations causing the oculo-facio-cardio-dental genetic syndrome; (2) associated with decreased BCOR mRNA levels, absence of full-length BCOR, and absent or low expression of a truncated BCOR protein; (3) virtually mutually exclusive with NPM1 mutations; and (4) frequently associated with DNMT3A mutations, suggesting cooperativity among these genetic alterations. Finally, BCOR mutations tended to be associated with an inferior outcome in a cohort of 422 CN-AML patients (25.6% vs 56.7% overall survival at 2 years; P = .032). Our results for the first time implicate BCOR in CN-AML pathogenesis. PMID:22012066

  16. Exome sequencing identifies somatic mutations of DDX3X in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lu; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Yan, Zi-Xun; Zhao, Xia; Xie, Yin-Yin; Zhang, Zi-Guan; Pan, Chun-Ming; Hu, Yuan; Cai, Chang-Ping; Dong, Ying; Huang, Jin-Yan; Wang, Li; Shen, Yang; Meng, Guoyu; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Hu, Jian-Da; Wang, Jin-Fen; Liu, Yuan-Hua; Yang, Lin-Hua; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jian-Min; Wang, Zhao; Peng, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Sun, Zi-Min; Ding, Hao; Shi, Ju-Mei; Hou, Jian; Yan, Jin-Song; Shi, Jing-Yi; Xu, Lan; Li, Yang; Lu, Jing; Zheng, Zhong; Xue, Wen; Zhao, Wei-Li; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is a malignant proliferation of CD56(+) and cytoCD3(+) lymphocytes with aggressive clinical course, which is prevalent in Asian and South American populations. The molecular pathogenesis of NKTCL has largely remained elusive. We identified somatic gene mutations in 25 people with NKTCL by whole-exome sequencing and confirmed them in an extended validation group of 80 people by targeted sequencing. Recurrent mutations were most frequently located in the RNA helicase gene DDX3X (21/105 subjects, 20.0%), tumor suppressors (TP53 and MGA), JAK-STAT-pathway molecules (STAT3 and STAT5B) and epigenetic modifiers (MLL2, ARID1A, EP300 and ASXL3). As compared to wild-type protein, DDX3X mutants exhibited decreased RNA-unwinding activity, loss of suppressive effects on cell-cycle progression in NK cells and transcriptional activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Clinically, patients with DDX3X mutations presented a poor prognosis. Our work thus contributes to the understanding of the disease mechanism of NKTCL. PMID:26192917

  17. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-nan; Yang, Ya-dong; Li, Shu-jin; Yang, Ya-ran; Zhang, Xiao-jing; Fang, Xiang-dong; Yan, Jiang-wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these “nucleosome protected STRs” (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  18. iACP: a sequence-based tool for identifying anticancer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui; Feng, Pengmian; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer remains a major killer worldwide. Traditional methods of cancer treatment are expensive and have some deleterious side effects on normal cells. Fortunately, the discovery of anticancer peptides (ACPs) has paved a new way for cancer treatment. With the explosive growth of peptide sequences generated in the post genomic age, it is highly desired to develop computational methods for rapidly and effectively identifying ACPs, so as to speed up their application in treating cancer. Here we report a sequence-based predictor called iACP developed by the approach of optimizing the g-gap dipeptide components. It was demonstrated by rigorous cross-validations that the new predictor remarkably outperformed the existing predictors for the same purpose in both overall accuracy and stability. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a publicly accessible web-server for iACP has been established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iACP, by which users can easily obtain their desired results. PMID:26942877

  19. Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare pathogenic variants in new predisposition genes for familial colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Garre, Pilar; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltran, Sergi; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Piqué, Josep M.; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer is an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Hereditary forms are due to germ-line mutations in APC, MUTYH, and the mismatch repair genes, but many cases present familial aggregation but an unknown inherited cause. The hypothesis of rare high-penetrance mutations in new genes is a likely explanation for the underlying predisposition in some of these familial cases. Methods: Exome sequencing was performed in 43 patients with colorectal cancer from 29 families with strong disease aggregation without mutations in known hereditary colorectal cancer genes. Data analysis selected only very rare variants (0–0.1%), producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. Variants in genes previously involved in hereditary colorectal cancer or nearby previous colorectal cancer genome-wide association study hits were also chosen. Results: Twenty-eight final candidate variants were selected and validated by Sanger sequencing. Correct family segregation and somatic studies were used to categorize the most interesting variants in CDKN1B, XRCC4, EPHX1, NFKBIZ, SMARCA4, and BARD1. Conclusion: We identified new potential colorectal cancer predisposition variants in genes that have a role in cancer predisposition and are involved in DNA repair and the cell cycle, which supports their putative involvement in germ-line predisposition to this neoplasm. PMID:25058500

  20. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Nan; Yang, Ya-Dong; Li, Shu-Jin; Yang, Ya-Ran; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Fang, Xiang-Dong; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these "nucleosome protected STRs" (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  1. Coinfections of Zika and Chikungunya Viruses in Bahia, Brazil, Identified by Metagenomic Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Silvia I; Somasekar, Sneha; Naccache, Samia N; Bandeira, Antonio C; Tauro, Laura B; Campos, Gubio S; Chiu, Charles Y

    2016-09-01

    Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) of samples from 15 patients with documented Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in Bahia, Brazil, from April 2015 to January 2016 identified coinfections with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in 2 of 15 ZIKV-positive cases by PCR (13.3%). While generally nonspecific, the clinical presentation corresponding to these two CHIKV/ZIKV coinfections reflected infection by the virus present at a higher titer. Aside from CHIKV and ZIKV, coinfections of other viral pathogens were not detected. The mNGS approach is promising for differential diagnosis of acute febrile illness and identification of coinfections, although targeted arbovirus screening may be sufficient in the current ZIKV outbreak setting. PMID:27413190

  2. Adaptation and possible ancient interspecies introgression in pigs identified by whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ai, Huashui; Fang, Xiaodong; Yang, Bin; Huang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Mao, Likai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Lu; Cui, Leilei; He, Weiming; Yang, Jie; Yao, Xiaoming; Zhou, Lisheng; Han, Lijuan; Li, Jing; Sun, Silong; Xie, Xianhua; Lai, Boxian; Su, Ying; Lu, Yao; Yang, Hui; Huang, Tao; Deng, Wenjiang; Nielsen, Rasmus; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng

    2015-03-01

    Domestic pigs have evolved genetic adaptations to their local environmental conditions, such as cold and hot climates. We sequenced the genomes of 69 pigs from 15 geographically divergent locations in China and detected 41 million variants, of which 21 million were absent from the dbSNP database. In a genome-wide scan, we identified a set of loci that likely have a role in regional adaptations to high- and low-latitude environments within China. Intriguingly, we found an exceptionally large (14-Mb) region with a low recombination rate on the X chromosome that appears to have two distinct haplotypes in the high- and low-latitude populations, possibly underlying their adaptation to cold and hot environments, respectively. Surprisingly, the adaptive sweep in the high-latitude regions has acted on DNA that might have been introgressed from an extinct Sus species. Our findings provide new insights into the evolutionary history of pigs and the role of introgression in adaptation.

  3. Coinfections of Zika and Chikungunya Viruses in Bahia, Brazil, Identified by Metagenomic Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Silvia I; Somasekar, Sneha; Naccache, Samia N; Bandeira, Antonio C; Tauro, Laura B; Campos, Gubio S; Chiu, Charles Y

    2016-09-01

    Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) of samples from 15 patients with documented Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in Bahia, Brazil, from April 2015 to January 2016 identified coinfections with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in 2 of 15 ZIKV-positive cases by PCR (13.3%). While generally nonspecific, the clinical presentation corresponding to these two CHIKV/ZIKV coinfections reflected infection by the virus present at a higher titer. Aside from CHIKV and ZIKV, coinfections of other viral pathogens were not detected. The mNGS approach is promising for differential diagnosis of acute febrile illness and identification of coinfections, although targeted arbovirus screening may be sufficient in the current ZIKV outbreak setting.

  4. Transcriptome Sequencing of Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus) to Identify Putative Positive Selection in Phaseolus and Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengqi; Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    The identification of genes under positive selection is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Many legume species, including Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and Phaseolus lunatus (lima bean), have important ecological and economic value. In this study, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of one Phaseolus species, lima bean. A comparison with the genomes of six other legume species, including the common bean, Medicago, lotus, soybean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, revealed 15 and 4 orthologous groups with signatures of positive selection among the two Phaseolus species and among the seven legume species, respectively. Characterization of these positively selected genes using Non redundant (nr) annotation, gene ontology (GO) classification, GO term enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses revealed that these genes are mostly involved in thylakoids, photosynthesis and metabolism. This study identified genes that may be related to the divergence of the Phaseolus and legume species. These detected genes are particularly good candidates for subsequent functional studies. PMID:26151849

  5. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-12-10

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future.

  6. Exome Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutations in Infantile Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Alexandra; Tyynismaa, Henna; Euro, Liliya; Ellonen, Pekka; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Ojala, Tiina; Hämäläinen, Riikka H.; Tommiska, Johanna; Raivio, Taneli; Oresic, Matej; Karikoski, Riitta; Tammela, Outi; Simola, Kalle O.J.; Paetau, Anders; Tyni, Tiina; Suomalainen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Infantile cardiomyopathies are devastating fatal disorders of the neonatal period or the first year of life. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of this group of diseases, but the underlying gene defects have been characterized in only a minority of cases, because tissue specificity of the manifestation hampers functional cloning and the heterogeneity of causative factors hinders collection of informative family materials. We sequenced the exome of a patient who died at the age of 10 months of hypertrophic mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with combined cardiac respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency. Rigorous data analysis allowed us to identify a homozygous missense mutation in AARS2, which we showed to encode the mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS). Two siblings from another family, both of whom died perinatally of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, had the same mutation, compound heterozygous with another missense mutation. Protein structure modeling of mtAlaRS suggested that one of the mutations affected a unique tRNA recognition site in the editing domain, leading to incorrect tRNA aminoacylation, whereas the second mutation severely disturbed the catalytic function, preventing tRNA aminoacylation. We show here that mutations in AARS2 cause perinatal or infantile cardiomyopathy with near-total combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in the heart. Our results indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful tool for identifying mutations in single patients and allows recognition of the genetic background in single-gene disorders of variable clinical manifestation and tissue-specific disease. Furthermore, we show that mitochondrial disorders extend to prenatal life and are an important cause of early infantile cardiac failure. PMID:21549344

  7. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant–pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future. PMID:26690414

  8. iRSpot-TNCPseAAC: identify recombination spots with trinucleotide composition and pseudo amino acid components.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wang-Ren; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Meiosis and recombination are the two opposite aspects that coexist in a DNA system. As a driving force for evolution by generating natural genetic variations, meiotic recombination plays a very important role in the formation of eggs and sperm. Interestingly, the recombination does not occur randomly across a genome, but with higher probability in some genomic regions called "hotspots", while with lower probability in so-called "coldspots". With the ever-increasing amount of genome sequence data in the postgenomic era, computational methods for effectively identifying the hotspots and coldspots have become urgent as they can timely provide us with useful insights into the mechanism of meiotic recombination and the process of genome evolution as well. To meet the need, we developed a new predictor called "iRSpot-TNCPseAAC", in which a DNA sample was formulated by combining its trinucleotide composition (TNC) and the pseudo amino acid components (PseAAC) of the protein translated from the DNA sample according to its genetic codes. The former was used to incorporate its local or short-rage sequence order information; while the latter, its global and long-range one. Compared with the best existing predictor in this area, iRSpot-TNCPseAAC achieved higher rates in accuracy, Mathew's correlation coefficient, and sensitivity, indicating that the new predictor may become a useful tool for identifying the recombination hotspots and coldspots, or, at least, become a complementary tool to the existing methods. It has not escaped our notice that the aforementioned novel approach to incorporate the DNA sequence order information into a discrete model may also be used for many other genome analysis problems. The web-server for iRSpot-TNCPseAAC is available at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iRSpot-TNCPseAAC. Furthermore, for the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the current web server to obtain their desired

  9. Nucleotide and protein sequences for dog masticatory tropomyosin identify a novel Tpm4 gene product.

    PubMed

    Brundage, Elizabeth A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Reiser, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Jaw-closing muscles of several vertebrate species, including members of Carnivora, express a unique, "masticatory", isoform of myosin heavy chain, along with isoforms of other myofibrillar proteins that are not expressed in most other muscles. It is generally believed that the complement of myofibrillar isoforms in these muscles serves high force generation for capturing live prey, breaking down tough plant material and defensive biting. A unique isoform of tropomyosin (Tpm) was reported to be expressed in cat jaw-closing muscle, based upon two-dimensional gel mobility, peptide mapping, and immunohistochemistry. The objective of this study was to obtain protein and gene sequence information for this unique Tpm isoform. Samples of masseter (a jaw-closing muscle), tibialis (predominantly fast-twitch fibers), and the deep lateral gastrocnemius (predominantly slow-twitch fibers) were obtained from adult dogs. Expressed Tpm isoforms were cloned and sequencing yielded cDNAs that were identical to genomic predicted striated muscle Tpm1.1St(a,b,b,a) (historically referred to as αTpm), Tpm2.2St(a,b,b,a) (βTpm) and Tpm3.12St(a,b,b,a) (γTpm) isoforms (nomenclature reflects predominant tissue expression ("St"-striated muscle) and exon splicing pattern), as well as a novel 284 amino acid isoform observed in jaw-closing muscle that is identical to a genomic predicted product of the Tpm4 gene (δTpm) family. The novel isoform is designated as Tpm4.3St(a,b,b,a). The myofibrillar Tpm isoform expressed in dog masseter exhibits a unique electrophoretic mobility on gels containing 6 M urea, compared to other skeletal Tpm isoforms. To validate that the cloned Tpm4.3 isoform is the Tpm expressed in dog masseter, E. coli-expressed Tpm4.3 was electrophoresed in the presence of urea. Results demonstrate that Tpm4.3 has identical electrophoretic mobility to the unique dog masseter Tpm isoform and is of different mobility from that of muscle Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2 and Tpm3.12 isoforms. We

  10. Nucleotide and protein sequences for dog masticatory tropomyosin identify a novel Tpm4 gene product

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Jaw-closing muscles of several vertebrate species, including members of Carnivora, express a unique, “masticatory”, isoform of myosin heavy chain, along with isoforms of other myofibrillar proteins that are not expressed in most other muscles. It is generally believed that the complement of myofibrillar isoforms in these muscles serves high force generation for capturing live prey, breaking down tough plant material and defensive biting. A unique isoform of tropomyosin (Tpm) was reported to be expressed in cat jaw-closing muscle, based upon two-dimensional gel mobility, peptide mapping, and immunohistochemistry. The objective of this study was to obtain protein and gene sequence information for this unique Tpm isoform. Samples of masseter (also a jaw-closing muscle), tibialis (with predominantly fast-twitch fibers), and the deep lateral gastrocnemius (predominantly slow-twitch fibers) were obtained from adult dogs. Expressed Tpm isoforms were cloned and sequencing yielded cDNAs that were identical to genomic predicted striated muscle Tpm1.1St(a,b,b,a) (historically referred to as αTpm), Tpm2.2St(a,b,b,a) (βTpm) and Tpm3.12St(a,b,b,a) (cTpm) isoforms (nomenclature reflects predominant tissue expression (“St”—striated muscle) and exon splicing pattern), as well as a novel 284 amino acid isoform observed in jaw-closing muscle that is identical to a genomic predicted product of the Tpm4 gene (δTpm) family. The novel isoform is designated as Tpm4.3St(a,b,b,a). The myofibrillar Tpm isoform expressed in dog masseter exhibits a unique electrophoretic mobility on gels containing 6 M urea, compared to other skeletal Tpm isoforms. To validate that the cloned Tpm4.3 isoform is the Tpm expressed in dog masseter, E. coli-expressed Tpm4.3 was electrophoresed in the presence of urea. Results demonstrate that Tpm4.3 has identical electrophoretic mobility to the unique dog masseter Tpm isoform and is of different mobility from that of muscle Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2 and Tpm3

  11. SSR_pipeline: a bioinformatic infrastructure for identifying microsatellites from paired-end Illumina high-throughput DNA sequencing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Knaus, Brian J.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Haig, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    SSR_pipeline is a flexible set of programs designed to efficiently identify simple sequence repeats (e.g., microsatellites) from paired-end high-throughput Illumina DNA sequencing data. The program suite contains 3 analysis modules along with a fourth control module that can automate analyses of large volumes of data. The modules are used to 1) identify the subset of paired-end sequences that pass Illumina quality standards, 2) align paired-end reads into a single composite DNA sequence, and 3) identify sequences that possess microsatellites (both simple and compound) conforming to user-specified parameters. The microsatellite search algorithm is extremely efficient, and we have used it to identify repeats with motifs from 2 to 25bp in length. Each of the 3 analysis modules can also be used independently to provide greater flexibility or to work with FASTQ or FASTA files generated from other sequencing platforms (Roche 454, Ion Torrent, etc.). We demonstrate use of the program with data from the brine fly Ephydra packardi (Diptera: Ephydridae) and provide empirical timing benchmarks to illustrate program performance on a common desktop computer environment. We further show that the Illumina platform is capable of identifying large numbers of microsatellites, even when using unenriched sample libraries and a very small percentage of the sequencing capacity from a single DNA sequencing run. All modules from SSR_pipeline are implemented in the Python programming language and can therefore be used from nearly any computer operating system (Linux, Macintosh, and Windows).

  12. SSR_pipeline: a bioinformatic infrastructure for identifying microsatellites from paired-end Illumina high-throughput DNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark P; Knaus, Brian J; Mullins, Thomas D; Haig, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    SSR_pipeline is a flexible set of programs designed to efficiently identify simple sequence repeats (e.g., microsatellites) from paired-end high-throughput Illumina DNA sequencing data. The program suite contains 3 analysis modules along with a fourth control module that can automate analyses of large volumes of data. The modules are used to 1) identify the subset of paired-end sequences that pass Illumina quality standards, 2) align paired-end reads into a single composite DNA sequence, and 3) identify sequences that possess microsatellites (both simple and compound) conforming to user-specified parameters. The microsatellite search algorithm is extremely efficient, and we have used it to identify repeats with motifs from 2 to 25 bp in length. Each of the 3 analysis modules can also be used independently to provide greater flexibility or to work with FASTQ or FASTA files generated from other sequencing platforms (Roche 454, Ion Torrent, etc.). We demonstrate use of the program with data from the brine fly Ephydra packardi (Diptera: Ephydridae) and provide empirical timing benchmarks to illustrate program performance on a common desktop computer environment. We further show that the Illumina platform is capable of identifying large numbers of microsatellites, even when using unenriched sample libraries and a very small percentage of the sequencing capacity from a single DNA sequencing run. All modules from SSR_pipeline are implemented in the Python programming language and can therefore be used from nearly any computer operating system (Linux, Macintosh, and Windows). PMID:24052535

  13. Deep sequencing reveals the complete genome and evidence for transcriptional activity of the first virus-like sequences identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry).

    PubMed

    Villacreses, Javier; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Sánchez, Carolina; Hewstone, Nicole; Undurraga, Soledad F; Alzate, Juan F; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Polanco, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1). High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs): ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%-73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP); ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs), AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq). Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant. PMID:25855242

  14. Deep Sequencing Reveals the Complete Genome and Evidence for Transcriptional Activity of the First Virus-Like Sequences Identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry)

    PubMed Central

    Villacreses, Javier; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Sánchez, Carolina; Hewstone, Nicole; Undurraga, Soledad F.; Alzate, Juan F.; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Polanco, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1). High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs): ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%–73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP); ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs), AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq). Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant. PMID:25855242

  15. Exome sequencing identifies rare LDLR and APOA5 alleles conferring risk for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Do, Ron; Stitziel, Nathan O; Won, Hong-Hee; Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Duga, Stefano; Angelica Merlini, Pier; Kiezun, Adam; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Zuk, Or; Guella, Illaria; Asselta, Rosanna; Lange, Leslie A; Peloso, Gina M; Auer, Paul L; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola; Farlow, Deborah N; DePristo, Mark A; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexander F R; Saleheen, Danish; Danesh, John; Epstein, Stephen E; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Davies, Robert; Nikpay, Majid; Johansen, Christopher T; Wang, Jian; Hegele, Robert A; Hechter, Eliana; Marz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Huang, Jie; Johnson, Andrew D; Li, Mingyao; Burke, Greg L; Gross, Myron; Liu, Yongmei; Assimes, Themistocles L; Heiss, Gerardo; Lange, Ethan M; Folsom, Aaron R; Taylor, Herman A; Olivieri, Oliviero; Hamsten, Anders; Clarke, Robert; Reilly, Dermot F; Yin, Wu; Rivas, Manuel A; Donnelly, Peter; Rossouw, Jacques E; Psaty, Bruce M; Herrington, David M; Wilson, James G; Rich, Stephen S; Bamshad, Michael J; Tracy, Russell P; Cupples, L Adrienne; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Spertus, John A; Cresci, Sharon; Hartiala, Jaana; Tang, W H Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L; Allayee, Hooman; Reiner, Alex P; Carlson, Christopher S; Kooperberg, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lander, Eric S; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; McPherson, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Watkins, Hugh; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ardissino, Diego; Sunyaev, Shamil R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI), a leading cause of death around the world, displays a complex pattern of inheritance. When MI occurs early in life, genetic inheritance is a major component to risk. Previously, rare mutations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) genes have been shown to contribute to MI risk in individual families, whereas common variants at more than 45 loci have been associated with MI risk in the population. Here we evaluate how rare mutations contribute to early-onset MI risk in the population. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 9,793 genomes from patients with MI at an early age (≤50 years in males and ≤60 years in females) along with MI-free controls. We identified two genes in which rare coding-sequence mutations were more frequent in MI cases versus controls at exome-wide significance. At low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), carriers of rare non-synonymous mutations were at 4.2-fold increased risk for MI; carriers of null alleles at LDLR were at even higher risk (13-fold difference). Approximately 2% of early MI cases harbour a rare, damaging mutation in LDLR; this estimate is similar to one made more than 40 years ago using an analysis of total cholesterol. Among controls, about 1 in 217 carried an LDLR coding-sequence mutation and had plasma LDL cholesterol > 190 mg dl(-1). At apolipoprotein A-V (APOA5), carriers of rare non-synonymous mutations were at 2.2-fold increased risk for MI. When compared with non-carriers, LDLR mutation carriers had higher plasma LDL cholesterol, whereas APOA5 mutation carriers had higher plasma triglycerides. Recent evidence has connected MI risk with coding-sequence mutations at two genes functionally related to APOA5, namely lipoprotein lipase and apolipoprotein C-III (refs 18, 19). Combined, these observations suggest that, as well as LDL cholesterol, disordered metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins contributes to MI risk.

  16. Exome Sequencing Identifies Biallelic MSH3 Germline Mutations as a Recessive Subtype of Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ronja; Spier, Isabel; Zhao, Bixiao; Kloth, Michael; Marquez, Jonathan; Hinrichsen, Inga; Kirfel, Jutta; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Uhlhaas, Siegfried; Stienen, Dietlinde; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Kayser, Katrin; Thiele, Holger; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Marra, Giancarlo; Kristiansen, Glen; Nöthen, Markus M; Büttner, Reinhard; Möslein, Gabriela; Betz, Regina C; Brieger, Angela; Lifton, Richard P; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    In ∼30% of families affected by colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutations have been identified in the previously implicated genes APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, and NTHL1, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover further genes with high-penetrance causative mutations, we performed exome sequencing of leukocyte DNA from 102 unrelated individuals with unexplained adenomatous polyposis. We identified two unrelated individuals with differing compound-heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) germline mutations in the mismatch-repair gene MSH3. The impact of the MSH3 mutations (c.1148delA, c.2319-1G>A, c.2760delC, and c.3001-2A>C) was indicated at the RNA and protein levels. Analysis of the diseased individuals' tumor tissue demonstrated high microsatellite instability of di- and tetranucleotides (EMAST), and immunohistochemical staining illustrated a complete loss of nuclear MSH3 in normal and tumor tissue, confirming the LoF effect and causal relevance of the mutations. The pedigrees, genotypes, and frequency of MSH3 mutations in the general population are consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Both index persons have an affected sibling carrying the same mutations. The tumor spectrum in these four persons comprised colorectal and duodenal adenomas, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and an early-onset astrocytoma. Additionally, we detected one unrelated individual with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations, representing constitutional mismatch-repair deficiency. Potentially causative variants in 14 more candidate genes identified in 26 other individuals require further workup. In the present study, we identified biallelic germline MSH3 mutations in individuals with a suspected hereditary tumor syndrome. Our data suggest that MSH3 mutations represent an additional recessive subtype of colorectal adenomatous polyposis. PMID:27476653

  17. FN-Identify: Novel Restriction Enzymes-Based Method for Bacterial Identification in Absence of Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Awad, Mohamed; Ouda, Osama; El-Refy, Ali; El-Feky, Fawzy A; Mosa, Kareem A; Helmy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and restriction analysis of genes like 16S rRNA and HSP60 are intensively used for molecular identification in the microbial communities. With aid of the rapid progress in bioinformatics, genome sequencing became the method of choice for bacterial identification. However, the genome sequencing technology is still out of reach in the developing countries. In this paper, we propose FN-Identify, a sequencing-free method for bacterial identification. FN-Identify exploits the gene sequences data available in GenBank and other databases and the two algorithms that we developed, CreateScheme and GeneIdentify, to create a restriction enzyme-based identification scheme. FN-Identify was tested using three different and diverse bacterial populations (members of Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium groups) in an in silico analysis using restriction enzymes and sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The analysis of the restriction maps of the members of three groups using the fragment numbers information only or along with fragments sizes successfully identified all of the members of the three groups using a minimum of four and maximum of eight restriction enzymes. Our results demonstrate the utility and accuracy of FN-Identify method and its two algorithms as an alternative method that uses the standard microbiology laboratories techniques when the genome sequencing is not available.

  18. Detection of piscine nodaviruses by real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA).

    PubMed

    Starkey, William G; Millar, Rose Mary; Jenkins, Mary E; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Muir, K Fiona; Richards, Randolph H

    2004-05-01

    Nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification procedure based on target-specific primers and probes, and the co-ordinated activity of 3 enzymes: AMV reverse transcriptase, RNase H, and T7 RNA polymerase. We have developed a real-time NASBA procedure for detection of piscine nodaviruses, which have emerged as major pathogens of marine fish. Viral RNA was isolated by guanidine thiocyanate lysis followed by purification on silica particles. Primers were designed to target sequences in the nodavirus capsid protein gene, yielding an amplification product of 120 nucleotides. Amplification products were detected in real-time with a molecular beacon (FAM labelled/methyl-red quenched) that recognised an internal region of the target amplicon. Amplification and detection were performed at 41 degrees C for 90 min in a Corbett Research Rotorgene. Based on the detection of cell culture-derived nodavirus, and a synthetic RNA target, the real-time NASBA procedure was approximately 100-fold more sensitive than single-tube RT-PCR. When used to test a panel of 37 clinical samples (negative, n = 18; positive, n = 19), the real-time NASBA assay correctly identified all 18 negative and 19 positive samples. In comparison, the RT-PCR procedure identified all 18 negative samples, but only 16 of the positive samples. These results suggest that real-time NASBA may represent a sensitive and specific diagnostic procedure for piscine nodaviruses.

  19. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Blumberg, B.S.; Putnam, F.W.

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  20. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Takahashi, Y; Blumberg, B S; Putnam, F W

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO4/PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  1. Sequence of the cDNA and 5'-flanking region for human acid alpha-glucosidase, detection of an intron in the 5' untranslated leader sequence, definition of 18-bp polymorphisms, and differences with previous cDNA and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Martiniuk, F; Mehler, M; Tzall, S; Meredith, G; Hirschhorn, R

    1990-03-01

    Acid maltase or acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes glycogen to glucose and is deficient in glycogen storage disease type II. Previously, we isolated a partial cDNA (1.9 kb) for human GAA; we have now used this cDNA to isolate and determine sequence in longer cDNAs from four additional independent cDNA libraries. Primer extension studies indicated that the mRNA extended approximately 200 bp 5' of the cDNA sequence obtained. Therefore, we isolated a genomic fragment containing 5' cDNA sequences that overlapped the previous cDNA sequence and extended an additional 24 bp to an initiation codon within a Kozak consensus sequence. The sequence of the genomic clone revealed an intron-exon junction 32 bp 5' to the ATG, indicating that the 5' leader sequence was interrupted by an intron. The remaining 186 bp of 5' untranslated sequence was identified approximately 3 kb upstream. The promoter region upstream from the start site of transcription was GC rich and contained areas of homology to Sp1 binding sites but no identifiable CAAT or TATA box. The combined data gave a nucleotide sequence of 2,856 bp for the coding region from the ATG to a stop codon, predicting a protein of 952 amino acids. The 3' untranslated region contained 555 bp with a polyadenylation signal at 3,385 bp followed by 16 bp prior to a poly(A) tail. This sequence of the GAA coding region differs from that reported by Hoefsloot et al. (1988) in three areas that change a total of 42 amino acids. Direct determination of the amino acid sequence in one of these areas confirmed the nucleotide sequence reported here but also disagreed with the directly determined amino acid sequence reported by Hoefsloot et al. (1988). At two other areas, changes in base pairs predicted new restriction sites that were identified in cDNAs from several independent libraries. The amino acid changes in all three ares increased the homology to rabbit-human isomaltase. Therefore, we believe that our

  2. Whole-exome sequencing identifies recurrent AKT1 mutations in sclerosing hemangioma of lung

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sung-Hak; Park, Hyun-Chun; Choi, Hyun Joo; Maeng, Leeso; Min, Ki Ouk; Kim, Jeana; Park, Tae In; Shin, Ok Ran; Kim, Tae-Jung; Xu, Haidong; Lee, Kyo Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Song, Sang Yong; Lee, Charles; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is a benign tumor with two cell populations (epithelial and stromal cells), for which genomic profiles remain unknown. We conducted exome sequencing of 44 PSHs and identified recurrent somatic mutations of AKT1 (43.2%) and β-catenin (4.5%). We used a second subset of 24 PSHs to confirm the high frequency of AKT1 mutations (overall 31/68, 45.6%; p.E17K, 33.8%) and recurrent β-catenin mutations (overall 3 of 68, 4.4%). Of the PSHs without AKT1 mutations, two exhibited AKT1 copy gain. AKT1 mutations existed in both epithelial and stromal cells. In two separate PSHs from one patient, we observed two different AKT1 mutations, indicating they were not disseminated but independent arising tumors. Because the AKT1 mutations were not found to co-occur with β-catenin mutations (or any other known driver alterations) in any of the PSHs studied, we speculate that this may be the single-most common driver alteration to develop PSHs. Our study revealed genomic differences between PSHs and lung adenocarcinomas, including a high rate of AKT1 mutation in PSHs. These genomic features of PSH identified in the present study provide clues to understanding the biology of PSH and for differential genomic diagnosis of lung tumors. PMID:27601661

  3. Exome Sequencing in 53 Sporadic Cases of Schizophrenia Identifies 18 Putative Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Guipponi, Michel; Santoni, Federico A.; Setola, Vincent; Gehrig, Corinne; Rotharmel, Maud; Cuenca, Macarena; Guillin, Olivier; Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios; Papadimitriou, George; Curtis, Logos; Méary, Alexandre; Schürhoff, Franck; Jamain, Stéphane; Avramopoulos, Dimitri; Leboyer, Marion; Rujescu, Dan; Pulver, Ann; Campion, Dominique; Siderovski, David P.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe, debilitating mental illness which has a significant genetic component. The identification of genetic factors related to SCZ has been challenging and these factors remain largely unknown. To evaluate the contribution of de novo variants (DNVs) to SCZ, we sequenced the exomes of 53 individuals with sporadic SCZ and of their non-affected parents. We identified 49 DNVs, 18 of which were predicted to alter gene function, including 13 damaging missense mutations, 2 conserved splice site mutations, 2 nonsense mutations, and 1 frameshift deletion. The average number of exonic DNV per proband was 0.88, which corresponds to an exonic point mutation rate of 1.7×10−8 per nucleotide per generation. The non-synonymous-to-synonymous mutation ratio of 2.06 did not differ from neutral expectations. Overall, this study provides a list of 18 putative candidate genes for sporadic SCZ, and when combined with the results of similar reports, identifies a second proband carrying a non-synonymous DNV in the RGS12 gene. PMID:25420024

  4. Identifying and removing the cell-cycle effect from single-cell RNA-Sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Martin; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is a revolutionary technique for discovering and describing cell types in heterogeneous tissues, yet its measurement of expression often suffers from large systematic bias. A major source of this bias is the cell cycle, which introduces large within-cell-type heterogeneity that can obscure the differences in expression between cell types. The current method for removing the cell-cycle effect is unable to effectively identify this effect and has a high risk of removing other biological components of interest, compromising downstream analysis. We present ccRemover, a new method that reliably identifies the cell-cycle effect and removes it. ccRemover preserves other biological signals of interest in the data and thus can serve as an important pre-processing step for many scRNA-Seq data analyses. The effectiveness of ccRemover is demonstrated using simulation data and three real scRNA-Seq datasets, where it boosts the performance of existing clustering algorithms in distinguishing between cell types. PMID:27670849

  5. Comparison of inherently essential genes of Porphyromonas gingivalis identified in two transposon-sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Hutcherson, J A; Gogeneni, H; Yoder-Himes, D; Hendrickson, E L; Hackett, M; Whiteley, M; Lamont, R J; Scott, D A

    2016-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe and keystone periodontal pathogen. A mariner transposon insertion mutant library has recently been used to define 463 genes as putatively essential for the in vitro growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in planktonic culture (Library 1). We have independently generated a transposon insertion mutant library (Library 2) for the same P. gingivalis strain and herein compare genes that are putatively essential for in vitro growth in complex media, as defined by both libraries. In all, 281 genes (61%) identified by Library 1 were common to Library 2. Many of these common genes are involved in fundamentally important metabolic pathways, notably pyrimidine cycling as well as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis, and nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. Also in common are genes encoding heat-shock protein homologues, sigma factors, enzymes with proteolytic activity, and the majority of sec-related protein export genes. In addition to facilitating a better understanding of critical physiological processes, transposon-sequencing technology has the potential to identify novel strategies for the control of P. gingivalis infections. Those genes defined as essential by two independently generated TnSeq mutant libraries are likely to represent particularly attractive therapeutic targets.

  6. Exome sequencing in 53 sporadic cases of schizophrenia identifies 18 putative candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Guipponi, Michel; Santoni, Federico A; Setola, Vincent; Gehrig, Corinne; Rotharmel, Maud; Cuenca, Macarena; Guillin, Olivier; Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios; Papadimitriou, George; Curtis, Logos; Méary, Alexandre; Schürhoff, Franck; Jamain, Stéphane; Avramopoulos, Dimitri; Leboyer, Marion; Rujescu, Dan; Pulver, Ann; Campion, Dominique; Siderovski, David P; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe, debilitating mental illness which has a significant genetic component. The identification of genetic factors related to SCZ has been challenging and these factors remain largely unknown. To evaluate the contribution of de novo variants (DNVs) to SCZ, we sequenced the exomes of 53 individuals with sporadic SCZ and of their non-affected parents. We identified 49 DNVs, 18 of which were predicted to alter gene function, including 13 damaging missense mutations, 2 conserved splice site mutations, 2 nonsense mutations, and 1 frameshift deletion. The average number of exonic DNV per proband was 0.88, which corresponds to an exonic point mutation rate of 1.7×10(-8) per nucleotide per generation. The non-synonymous-to-synonymous mutation ratio of 2.06 did not differ from neutral expectations. Overall, this study provides a list of 18 putative candidate genes for sporadic SCZ, and when combined with the results of similar reports, identifies a second proband carrying a non-synonymous DNV in the RGS12 gene. PMID:25420024

  7. Exome Sequencing Identifies INPPL1 Mutations as a Cause of Opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Céline; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Bartholdi, Deborah; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Borochowitz, Zvi; Cavalcanti, Denise P.; Frigo, Amandine; Nitschke, Patrick; Roume, Joelle; Santos, Heloísa G.; Shalev, Stavit A.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Opsismodysplasia (OPS) is a severe autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by pre- and postnatal micromelia with extremely short hands and feet. The main radiological features are severe platyspondyly, squared metacarpals, delayed skeletal ossification, and metaphyseal cupping. In order to identify mutations causing OPS, a total of 16 cases (7 terminated pregnancies and 9 postnatal cases) from 10 unrelated families were included in this study. We performed exome sequencing in three cases from three unrelated families and only one gene was found to harbor mutations in all three cases: inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1). Screening INPPL1 in the remaining cases identified a total of 12 distinct INPPL1 mutations in the 10 families, present at the homozygote state in 7 consanguinous families and at the compound heterozygote state in the 3 remaining families. Most mutations (6/12) resulted in premature stop codons, 2/12 were splice site, and 4/12 were missense mutations located in the catalytic domain, 5-phosphatase. INPPL1 belongs to the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase family, a family of signal-modulating enzymes that govern a plethora of cellular functions by regulating the levels of specific phosphoinositides. Our finding of INPPL1 mutations in OPS, a severe spondylodysplastic dysplasia with major growth plate disorganization, supports a key and specific role of this enzyme in endochondral ossification. PMID:23273569

  8. Exome sequencing identifies MAX mutations as a cause of hereditary pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Gracia-Aznárez, Francisco J; Schiavi, Francesca; Landa, Iñigo; Leandro-García, Luis J; Letón, Rocío; Honrado, Emiliano; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Caronia, Daniela; Pita, Guillermo; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Maliszewska, Agnieszka; Taschin, Elisa; Bobisse, Sara; Pica, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Hernández-Lavado, Rafael; Díaz, José A; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; González-Neira, Anna; Roncador, Giovanna; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Benítez, Javier; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary pheochromocytoma (PCC) is often caused by germline mutations in one of nine susceptibility genes described to date, but there are familial cases without mutations in these known genes. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals with hereditary PCC (cases) and identified mutations in MAX, the MYC associated factor X gene. Absence of MAX protein in the tumors and loss of heterozygosity caused by uniparental disomy supported the involvement of MAX alterations in the disease. A follow-up study of a selected series of 59 cases with PCC identified five additional MAX mutations and suggested an association with malignant outcome and preferential paternal transmission of MAX mutations. The involvement of the MYC-MAX-MXD1 network in the development and progression of neural crest cell tumors is further supported by the lack of functional MAX in rat PCC (PC12) cells and by the amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma and suggests that loss of MAX function is correlated with metastatic potential. PMID:21685915

  9. Whole-exome sequencing identifies recurrent AKT1 mutations in sclerosing hemangioma of lung.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Lee, Sung-Hak; Park, Hyun-Chun; Choi, Hyun Joo; Maeng, Leeso; Min, Ki Ouk; Kim, Jeana; Park, Tae In; Shin, Ok Ran; Kim, Tae-Jung; Xu, Haidong; Lee, Kyo Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Song, Sang Yong; Lee, Charles; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-09-20

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) is a benign tumor with two cell populations (epithelial and stromal cells), for which genomic profiles remain unknown. We conducted exome sequencing of 44 PSHs and identified recurrent somatic mutations of AKT1 (43.2%) and β-catenin (4.5%). We used a second subset of 24 PSHs to confirm the high frequency of AKT1 mutations (overall 31/68, 45.6%; p.E17K, 33.8%) and recurrent β-catenin mutations (overall 3 of 68, 4.4%). Of the PSHs without AKT1 mutations, two exhibited AKT1 copy gain. AKT1 mutations existed in both epithelial and stromal cells. In two separate PSHs from one patient, we observed two different AKT1 mutations, indicating they were not disseminated but independent arising tumors. Because the AKT1 mutations were not found to co-occur with β-catenin mutations (or any other known driver alterations) in any of the PSHs studied, we speculate that this may be the single-most common driver alteration to develop PSHs. Our study revealed genomic differences between PSHs and lung adenocarcinomas, including a high rate of AKT1 mutation in PSHs. These genomic features of PSH identified in the present study provide clues to understanding the biology of PSH and for differential genomic diagnosis of lung tumors. PMID:27601661

  10. Exome sequencing identifies MAX mutations as a cause of hereditary pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Gracia-Aznárez, Francisco J; Schiavi, Francesca; Landa, Iñigo; Leandro-García, Luis J; Letón, Rocío; Honrado, Emiliano; Ramos-Medina, Rocío; Caronia, Daniela; Pita, Guillermo; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; de Cubas, Aguirre A; Inglada-Pérez, Lucía; Maliszewska, Agnieszka; Taschin, Elisa; Bobisse, Sara; Pica, Giuseppe; Loli, Paola; Hernández-Lavado, Rafael; Díaz, José A; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; González-Neira, Anna; Roncador, Giovanna; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina; Benítez, Javier; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2011-06-19

    Hereditary pheochromocytoma (PCC) is often caused by germline mutations in one of nine susceptibility genes described to date, but there are familial cases without mutations in these known genes. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals with hereditary PCC (cases) and identified mutations in MAX, the MYC associated factor X gene. Absence of MAX protein in the tumors and loss of heterozygosity caused by uniparental disomy supported the involvement of MAX alterations in the disease. A follow-up study of a selected series of 59 cases with PCC identified five additional MAX mutations and suggested an association with malignant outcome and preferential paternal transmission of MAX mutations. The involvement of the MYC-MAX-MXD1 network in the development and progression of neural crest cell tumors is further supported by the lack of functional MAX in rat PCC (PC12) cells and by the amplification of MYCN in neuroblastoma and suggests that loss of MAX function is correlated with metastatic potential.

  11. Exome sequencing identifies ATP4A gene as responsible of an atypical familial type I gastric neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Oriol; Reyes, Jose; Zuñiga, Sheila; Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Fernández, Victoria; Bujanda, Luís; Rodriguez-Pinilla, María S; Palacios, Jose; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Cañamero, Marta; Pritchard, D Mark; Benítez, Javier

    2015-05-15

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) arise from enterochromaffin-like cells, which are located in oxyntic glands within the stomach. Type I tumours represent 70-80% of gastric NETs and are associated with hypergastrinaemia, chronic atrophic gastritis and achlorhydria. Gastrin is involved in the endocrine regulation of gastric acid production. Most type I gastric NETs are sporadic, have a good prognosis and their genetic basis are unknown. We performed an exome sequencing study in a family with consanguineous parents and 10 children, five of whom were affected by type I gastric NET. Atypical clinical traits included an earlier age of onset (around 30 years), aggressiveness (three had nodal infiltration requiring total gastrectomy and one an adenocarcinoma) and iron-deficiency rather than megaloblastic anaemia. We identified a homozygous missense mutation in the 14th exon of the ATP4A gene (c.2107C>T), which encodes the proton pump responsible for acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. The amino acid p.Arg703Cys is highly conserved across species and originates a change of one of the transmembrane domains that avoids the liberation of protons from cells to stomach. This is consistent with the achlorhydria that was observed in the affected individuals. No germline or somatic mutations in the ATP4A gene were found in sporadic gastric NET patients. Based on the results of this large family, it seems that this atypical form of gastric NET has an earlier age of onset, behaves more aggressively and has atypical clinical traits that differentiated from other studied cases. PMID:25678551

  12. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  13. [Distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from clinical specimens and identified with DNA sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Özçolpan, O Olcay; Sürücüoğlu, Süheyla; Özkütük, Nuri; Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz

    2015-10-01

    The aims of the study were to perform the identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated from different clinical specimens in the Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Celal Bayar University, Manisa (located at Aegean region of Turkey), by DNA sequence analysis, and to discuss the epidemiological aspects of the data obtained. Out of 5122 clinical specimens sent to the laboratory with the initial diagnosis of tuberculosis in the period April 2007 to July 2011, M.tuberculosis complex and NTM were identified in 225 (4.39%) and 126 (2.46%) samples, respectively. DNA sequence analysis by targeting hsp65 and 16S rDNA gene regions was performed on 101 of the NTM strains in Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Ege University, Izmir. DNA sequence analysis data was evaluated using RIDOM and GenBLAST data bases. NTM strains were identified as 40 M.porcinum (39.60%), 36 M.lentiflavum (35.65%), six M.abscessus (5.64%), five M.peregrinum (4.95%), four M.gordonae (3.96%), three M.fortuitum (2.97%), two M.chelonae (1.98%), and one for each M.alvei (0.99%), M.scrofulaceum (0.99%), M.kansasii (0.99%) species. Two strains which were both 95-98% compatible with other mycobacteria in the data bases could not be identified with certainty. Seventy-two (94.73%) strains of M.lentiflavum and M.porcinum, which were the most frequent (75.24%) species in the study, were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. The remaining 99 strains examined could not be proven as the cause of the disease due to absence of patients' clinical data, whereas two M.abscessus strains isolated from the sputum were considered as the cause of the disease according to the ATS/IDSA criteria. The isolation rate of NTM in 2010 was found significantly higher (5.33%) than previous years. Review of the 2010 data showed that all strains of M.porcinum and M.lentiflavum, which were the most frequently identified strains were isolated from BAL specimens. This situation is in line with the start of using of an

  14. [Distribution of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolated from clinical specimens and identified with DNA sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Özçolpan, O Olcay; Sürücüoğlu, Süheyla; Özkütük, Nuri; Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz

    2015-10-01

    The aims of the study were to perform the identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated from different clinical specimens in the Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Celal Bayar University, Manisa (located at Aegean region of Turkey), by DNA sequence analysis, and to discuss the epidemiological aspects of the data obtained. Out of 5122 clinical specimens sent to the laboratory with the initial diagnosis of tuberculosis in the period April 2007 to July 2011, M.tuberculosis complex and NTM were identified in 225 (4.39%) and 126 (2.46%) samples, respectively. DNA sequence analysis by targeting hsp65 and 16S rDNA gene regions was performed on 101 of the NTM strains in Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Ege University, Izmir. DNA sequence analysis data was evaluated using RIDOM and GenBLAST data bases. NTM strains were identified as 40 M.porcinum (39.60%), 36 M.lentiflavum (35.65%), six M.abscessus (5.64%), five M.peregrinum (4.95%), four M.gordonae (3.96%), three M.fortuitum (2.97%), two M.chelonae (1.98%), and one for each M.alvei (0.99%), M.scrofulaceum (0.99%), M.kansasii (0.99%) species. Two strains which were both 95-98% compatible with other mycobacteria in the data bases could not be identified with certainty. Seventy-two (94.73%) strains of M.lentiflavum and M.porcinum, which were the most frequent (75.24%) species in the study, were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. The remaining 99 strains examined could not be proven as the cause of the disease due to absence of patients' clinical data, whereas two M.abscessus strains isolated from the sputum were considered as the cause of the disease according to the ATS/IDSA criteria. The isolation rate of NTM in 2010 was found significantly higher (5.33%) than previous years. Review of the 2010 data showed that all strains of M.porcinum and M.lentiflavum, which were the most frequently identified strains were isolated from BAL specimens. This situation is in line with the start of using of an

  15. Sorting the Wheat from the Chaff: Identifying miRNAs in Genomic Survey Sequences of Triticum aestivum Chromosome 1AL

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Stuart J.; Budak, Hikmet

    2012-01-01

    Individual chromosome-based studies of bread wheat are beginning to provide valuable structural and functional information about one of the world’s most important crops. As new genome sequences become available, identifying miRNA coding sequences is arguably as important a task as annotating protein coding sequences, but one that is not as well developed. We compared conservation-based identification of conserved miRNAs in 1.5× coverage survey sequences of wheat chromosome 1AL with a predictive method based on pre-miRNA hairpin structure alone. In total, 42 sequences expected to encode conserved miRNAs were identified on chromosome 1AL, including members of several miRNA families that have not previously been reported to be expressed in T. aestivum. In addition, we demonstrate that a number of sequences previously annotated as novel wheat miRNAs are closely related to transposable elements, particularly Miniature Inverted Terminal repeat Elements (MITEs). Some of these TE-miRNAs may well have a functional role, but separating true miRNA coding sequences from TEs in genomic sequences is far from straightforward. We propose a strategy for annotation to minimize the risk of mis-identifying TE sequences as miRNAs. PMID:22815845

  16. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  17. Comparison of phenotypic and molecular tests to identify lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Paula Mendonça; Perin, Luana Martins; Júnior, Abelardo Silva; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-nine lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates were submitted for identification using Biolog, API50CHL, 16S rDNA sequencing, and species-specific PCR reactions. The identification results were compared, and it was concluded that a polyphasic approach is necessary for proper LAB identification, being the molecular analyzes the most reliable. PMID:24159291

  18. Whole-exome sequencing identifies MST1R as a genetic susceptibility gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Zheng, Hong; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Tang, Clara Sze-man; Ko, Josephine Mun Yee; Wong, Bonnie Wing Yan; Leong, Merrin Man Long; Sham, Pak Chung; Cheung, Florence; Kwong, Dora Lai-Wan; Ngan, Roger Kai Cheong; Ng, Wai Tong; Yau, Chun Chung; Pan, Jianji; Peng, Xun; Tung, Stewart; Zhang, Zengfeng; Ji, Mingfang; Chiang, Alan Kwok-Shing; Lee, Anne Wing-Mui; Lee, Victor Ho-fun; Lam, Ka-On; Au, Kwok Hung; Cheng, Hoi Ching; Yiu, Harry Ho-Yin; Lung, Maria Li

    2016-01-01

    Multiple factors, including host genetics, environmental factors, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection, contribute to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) development. To identify genetic susceptibility genes for NPC, a whole-exome sequencing (WES) study was performed in 161 NPC cases and 895 controls of Southern Chinese descent. The gene-based burden test discovered an association between macrophage-stimulating 1 receptor (MST1R) and NPC. We identified 13 independent cases carrying the MST1R pathogenic heterozygous germ-line variants, and 53.8% of these cases were diagnosed with NPC aged at or even younger than 20 y, indicating that MST1R germ-line variants are relevant to disease early-age onset (EAO) (age of ≤20 y). In total, five MST1R missense variants were found in EAO cases but were rare in controls (EAO vs. control, 17.9% vs. 1.2%, P = 7.94 × 10−12). The validation study, including 2,160 cases and 2,433 controls, showed that the MST1R variant c.G917A:p.R306H is highly associated with NPC (odds ratio of 9.0). MST1R is predominantly expressed in the tissue-resident macrophages and is critical for innate immunity that protects organs from tissue damage and inflammation. Importantly, MST1R expression is detected in the ciliated epithelial cells in normal nasopharyngeal mucosa and plays a role in the cilia motility important for host defense. Although no somatic mutation of MST1R was identified in the sporadic NPC tumors, copy number alterations and promoter hypermethylation at MST1R were often observed. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of NPC by highlighting the involvement of the MST1R-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:26951679

  19. Multilocus Sequence Typing Identifies Epidemic Clones of Flavobacterium psychrophilum in Nordic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Duchaud, Eric; Nicolas, Pierre; Dalsgaard, Inger; Madsen, Lone; Aspán, Anna; Jansson, Eva; Colquhoun, Duncan J.; Wiklund, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the causative agent of bacterial cold water disease (BCWD), which affects a variety of freshwater-reared salmonid species. A large-scale study was performed to investigate the genetic diversity of F. psychrophilum in the four Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Multilocus sequence typing of 560 geographically and temporally disparate F. psychrophilum isolates collected from various sources between 1983 and 2012 revealed 81 different sequence types (STs) belonging to 12 clonal complexes (CCs) and 30 singleton STs. The largest CC, CC-ST10, which represented almost exclusively isolates from rainbow trout and included the most predominant genotype, ST2, comprised 65% of all isolates examined. In Norway, with a shorter history (<10 years) of BCWD in rainbow trout, ST2 was the only isolated CC-ST10 genotype, suggesting a recent introduction of an epidemic clone. The study identified five additional CCs shared between countries and five country-specific CCs, some with apparent host specificity. Almost 80% of the singleton STs were isolated from non-rainbow trout species or the environment. The present study reveals a simultaneous presence of genetically distinct CCs in the Nordic countries and points out specific F. psychrophilum STs posing a threat to the salmonid production. The study provides a significant contribution toward mapping the genetic diversity of F. psychrophilum globally and support for the existence of an epidemic population structure where recombination is a significant driver in F. psychrophilum evolution. Evidence indicating dissemination of a putatively virulent clonal complex (CC-ST10) with commercial movement of fish or fish products is strengthened. PMID:24561585

  20. Diversity of the causal genes in hearing impaired Algerian individuals identified by whole exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Bonnet, Crystel; Dahmani, Malika; Ouhab, Sofiane; Lefèvre, Gaelle M; Ibrahim, Hassina; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Weil, Dominique; Louha, Malek; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of congenital hearing disorders makes molecular diagnosis expensive and time-consuming using conventional techniques such as Sanger sequencing of DNA. In order to design an appropriate strategy of molecular diagnosis in the Algerian population, we explored the diversity of the involved mutations by studying 65 families affected by autosomal recessive forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment (DFNB forms), which are the most prevalent early onset forms. We first carried out a systematic screening for mutations in GJB2 and the recurrent p.(Arg34*) mutation in TMC1, which were found in 31 (47.7%) families and 1 (1.5%) family, respectively. We then performed whole exome sequencing in nine of the remaining families, and identified the causative mutations in all the patients analyzed, either in the homozygous state (eight families) or in the compound heterozygous state (one family): (c.709C>T: p.(Arg237*)) and (c.2122C>T: p.(Arg708*)) in OTOF, (c.1334T>G: p.(Leu445Trp)) in SLC26A4, (c.764T>A: p.(Met255Lys)) in GIPC3, (c.518T>A: p.(Cys173Ser)) in LHFPL5, (c.5336T>C: p.(Leu1779Pro)) in MYO15A, (c.1807G>T: p.(Val603Phe)) in OTOA, (c.6080dup: p.(Asn2027Lys*9)) in PTPRQ, and (c.6017del: p.(Gly2006Alafs*13); c.7188_7189ins14: p.(Val2397Leufs*2)) in GPR98. Notably, 7 of these 10 mutations affecting 8 different genes had not been reported previously. These results highlight for the first time the genetic heterogeneity of the early onset forms of nonsyndromic deafness in Algerian families. PMID:26029705

  1. Rare coding mutations identified by sequencing of Alzheimer disease genome‐wide association studies loci

    PubMed Central

    Vardarajan, Badri N.; Ghani, Mahdi; Kahn, Amanda; Sheikh, Stephanie; Sato, Christine; Barral, Sandra; Lee, Joseph H.; Cheng, Rong; Reitz, Christiane; Lantigua, Rafael; Reyes‐Dumeyer, Dolly; Medrano, Martin; Jimenez‐Velazquez, Ivonne Z.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George‐Hyslop, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect rare coding variants underlying loci detected by genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) of late onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). Methods We conducted targeted sequencing of ABCA7, BIN1, CD2AP, CLU, CR1, EPHA1, MS4A4A/MS4A6A, and PICALM in 3 independent LOAD cohorts: 176 patients from 124 Caribbean Hispanics families, 120 patients and 33 unaffected individuals from the 129 National Institute on Aging LOAD Family Study; and 263 unrelated Canadian individuals of European ancestry (210 sporadic patients and 53 controls). Rare coding variants found in at least 2 data sets were genotyped in independent groups of ancestry‐matched controls. Additionally, the Exome Aggregation Consortium was used as a reference data set for population‐based allele frequencies. Results Overall we detected a statistically significant 3.1‐fold enrichment of the nonsynonymous mutations in the Caucasian LOAD cases compared with controls (p = 0.002) and no difference in synonymous variants. A stop‐gain mutation in ABCA7 (E1679X) and missense mutation in CD2AP (K633R) were highly significant in Caucasian LOAD cases, and mutations in EPHA1 (P460L) and BIN1 (K358R) were significant in Caribbean Hispanic families with LOAD. The EPHA1 variant segregated completely in an extended Caribbean Hispanic family and was also nominally significant in the Caucasians. Additionally, BIN1 (K358R) segregated in 2 of the 6 Caribbean Hispanic families where the mutations were discovered. Interpretation Targeted sequencing of confirmed GWAS loci revealed an excess burden of deleterious coding mutations in LOAD, with the greatest burden observed in ABCA7 and BIN1. Identifying coding variants in LOAD will facilitate the creation of tractable models for investigation of disease‐related mechanisms and potential therapies. Ann Neurol 2015;78:487–498 PMID:26101835

  2. Amino acid sequence of horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle troponin C.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kagami, O; Takagi, T; Konishi, K

    1989-05-01

    The amino acid sequence of troponin C obtained from horseshoe crab, Tachypleus tridentatus, striated muscle was determined by sequence analysis and alignments of chemically and enzymatically cleaved peptides. Troponin C is composed of 153 amino acid residues with a blocked N-terminus and contains no tryptophan or cysteine residue. The site I, one of the four Ca2+-binding sites, is considered to have lost its ability to bind Ca2+ owing to the replacements of certain amino acid residues.

  3. Third-Generation Sequencing and Analysis of Four Complete Pig Liver Esterase Gene Sequences in Clones Identified by Screening BAC Library

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiliang; Xiao, Yuncai; Bi, Dingren; Yin, Jingdong; Shi, Deshi

    2016-01-01

    Aim Pig liver carboxylesterase (PLE) gene sequences in GenBank are incomplete, which has led to difficulties in studying the genetic structure and regulation mechanisms of gene expression of PLE family genes. The aim of this study was to obtain and analysis of complete gene sequences of PLE family by screening from a Rongchang pig BAC library and third-generation PacBio gene sequencing. Methods After a number of existing incomplete PLE isoform gene sequences were analysed, primers were designed based on conserved regions in PLE exons, and the whole pig genome used as a template for Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Specific primers were then selected based on the PCR amplification results. A three-step PCR screening method was used to identify PLE-positive clones by screening a Rongchang pig BAC library and PacBio third-generation sequencing was performed. BLAST comparisons and other bioinformatics methods were applied for sequence analysis. Results Five PLE-positive BAC clones, designated BAC-10, BAC-70, BAC-75, BAC-119 and BAC-206, were identified. Sequence analysis yielded the complete sequences of four PLE genes, PLE1, PLE-B9, PLE-C4, and PLE-G2. Complete PLE gene sequences were defined as those containing regulatory sequences, exons, and introns. It was found that, not only did the PLE exon sequences of the four genes show a high degree of homology, but also that the intron sequences were highly similar. Additionally, the regulatory region of the genes contained two 720bps reverse complement sequences that may have an important function in the regulation of PLE gene expression. Significance This is the first report to confirm the complete sequences of four PLE genes. In addition, the study demonstrates that each PLE isoform is encoded by a single gene and that the various genes exhibit a high degree of sequence homology, suggesting that the PLE family evolved from a single ancestral gene. Obtaining the complete sequences of these PLE genes

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Seneca Valley Virus CH-01-2015 Identified in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiwen; Zhao, Xiaoya; Chen, Yanshan; He, Xiaoming; Zhang, Guanqun; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a single-stranded RNA virus that causes porcine vesicular disease in China, has been sequenced and analyzed. This Chinese isolate shares 94.4 to 97.1% sequence identity to another 8 strains from Canada, Brazil, and the United States. This is the first report of SVV infecting swine in China. PMID:26798089

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Seneca Valley Virus CH-01-2015 Identified in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiwen; Zhao, Xiaoya; Chen, Yanshan; He, Xiaoming; Zhang, Guanqun; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-01-21

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a single-stranded RNA virus that causes porcine vesicular disease in China, has been sequenced and analyzed. This Chinese isolate shares 94.4 to 97.1% sequence identity to another 8 strains from Canada, Brazil, and the United States. This is the first report of SVV infecting swine in China.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Seneca Valley Virus CH-01-2015 Identified in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiwen; Zhao, Xiaoya; Chen, Yanshan; He, Xiaoming; Zhang, Guanqun

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a single-stranded RNA virus that causes porcine vesicular disease in China, has been sequenced and analyzed. This Chinese isolate shares 94.4 to 97.1% sequence identity to another 8 strains from Canada, Brazil, and the United States. This is the first report of SVV infecting swine in China. PMID:26798089

  7. Long Non-Coding RNA and Alternative Splicing Modulations in Parkinson's Leukocytes Identified by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Guffanti, Alessandro; Salomonis, Nathan; Simchovitz, Alon; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5′-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  8. High density genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing and association identifies common and low frequency SNPs, and novel candidate genes influencing cow milk traits

    PubMed Central

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M.; Peters, Sunday O.; Akwanji, Kingsley A.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have increased the ability to detect sequence variations for complex trait improvement. A high throughput genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method was used to generate 515,787 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from which 76,355 SNPs with call rates >85% and minor allele frequency ≥1.5% were used in genome wide association study (GWAS) of 44 milk traits in 1,246 Canadian Holstein cows. GWAS was accomplished with a mixed linear model procedure implementing the additive and dominant models. A strong signal within the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 14 was associated with test day fat percentage. Several SNPs were associated with eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, CLA:9c11t and gamma linolenic acid. Most of the significant SNPs for 44 traits studied are novel and located in intergenic regions or introns of genes. Novel potential candidate genes for milk traits or mammary gland functions include ERCC6, TONSL, NPAS2, ACER3, ITGB4, GGT6, ACOX3, MECR, ADAM12, ACHE, LRRC14, FUK, NPRL3, EVL, SLCO3A1, PSMA4, FTO, ADCK5, PP1R16A and TEP1. Our study further demonstrates the utility of the GBS approach for identifying population-specific SNPs for use in improvement of complex dairy traits. PMID:27506634

  9. High density genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing and association identifies common and low frequency SNPs, and novel candidate genes influencing cow milk traits.

    PubMed

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M; Peters, Sunday O; Akwanji, Kingsley A; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have increased the ability to detect sequence variations for complex trait improvement. A high throughput genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method was used to generate 515,787 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from which 76,355 SNPs with call rates >85% and minor allele frequency ≥1.5% were used in genome wide association study (GWAS) of 44 milk traits in 1,246 Canadian Holstein cows. GWAS was accomplished with a mixed linear model procedure implementing the additive and dominant models. A strong signal within the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 14 was associated with test day fat percentage. Several SNPs were associated with eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, CLA:9c11t and gamma linolenic acid. Most of the significant SNPs for 44 traits studied are novel and located in intergenic regions or introns of genes. Novel potential candidate genes for milk traits or mammary gland functions include ERCC6, TONSL, NPAS2, ACER3, ITGB4, GGT6, ACOX3, MECR, ADAM12, ACHE, LRRC14, FUK, NPRL3, EVL, SLCO3A1, PSMA4, FTO, ADCK5, PP1R16A and TEP1. Our study further demonstrates the utility of the GBS approach for identifying population-specific SNPs for use in improvement of complex dairy traits. PMID:27506634

  10. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo-Ik ); Hammes, G.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  11. Exome sequencing identifies PDE4D mutations as another cause of acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Michot, Caroline; Le Goff, Carine; Goldenberg, Alice; Abhyankar, Avinash; Klein, Céline; Kinning, Esther; Guerrot, Anne-Marie; Flahaut, Philippe; Duncombe, Alice; Baujat, Genevieve; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Thalassinos, Caroline; Nitschke, Patrick; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    Acrodysostosis is a rare autosomal-dominant condition characterized by facial dysostosis, severe brachydactyly with cone-shaped epiphyses, and short stature. Moderate intellectual disability and resistance to multiple hormones might also be present. Recently, a recurrent mutation (c.1102C>T [p.Arg368*]) in PRKAR1A has been identified in three individuals with acrodysostosis and resistance to multiple hormones. After studying ten unrelated acrodysostosis cases, we report here de novo PRKAR1A mutations in five out of the ten individuals (we found c.1102C>T [p.Arg368(∗)] in four of the ten and c.1117T>C [p.Tyr373His] in one of the ten). We performed exome sequencing in two of the five remaining individuals and selected phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) as a candidate gene. PDE4D encodes a class IV cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase that regulates cAMP concentration. Exome analysis detected heterozygous PDE4D mutations (c.673C>A [p.Pro225Thr] and c.677T>C [p.Phe226Ser]) in these two individuals. Screening of PDE4D identified heterozygous mutations (c.568T>G [p.Ser190Ala] and c.1759A>C [p.Thr587Pro]) in two additional acrodysostosis cases. These mutations occurred de novo in all four cases. The four individuals with PDE4D mutations shared common clinical features, namely characteristic midface and nasal hypoplasia and moderate intellectual disability. Metabolic screening was normal in three of these four individuals. However, resistance to parathyroid hormone and thyrotropin was consistently observed in the five cases with PRKAR1A mutations. Finally, our study further supports the key role of the cAMP signaling pathway in skeletogenesis. PMID:22464250

  12. Identifying Conserved and Novel MicroRNAs in Developing Seeds of Brassica napus Using Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Körbes, Ana Paula; Machado, Ronei Dorneles; Guzman, Frank; Almerão, Mauricio Pereira; de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; Loss-Morais, Guilherme; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina; Cagliari, Alexandro; dos Santos Maraschin, Felipe; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Margis, Rogerio

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of plant development and seed formation. In Brassica napus, an important edible oil crop, valuable lipids are synthesized and stored in specific seed tissues during embryogenesis. The miRNA transcriptome of B. napus is currently poorly characterized, especially at different seed developmental stages. This work aims to describe the miRNAome of developing seeds of B. napus by identifying plant-conserved and novel miRNAs and comparing miRNA abundance in mature versus developing seeds. Members of 59 miRNA families were detected through a computational analysis of a large number of reads obtained from deep sequencing two small RNA and two RNA-seq libraries of (i) pooled immature developing stages and (ii) mature B. napus seeds. Among these miRNA families, 17 families are currently known to exist in B. napus; additionally 29 families not reported in B. napus but conserved in other plant species were identified by alignment with known plant mature miRNAs. Assembled mRNA-seq contigs allowed for a search of putative new precursors and led to the identification of 13 novel miRNA families. Analysis of miRNA population between libraries reveals that several miRNAs and isomiRNAs have different abundance in developing stages compared to mature seeds. The predicted miRNA target genes encode a broad range of proteins related to seed development and energy storage. This work presents a comparative study of the miRNA transcriptome of mature and developing B. napus seeds and provides a basis for future research on individual miRNAs and their functions in embryogenesis, seed maturation and lipid accumulation in B. napus. PMID:23226347

  13. Barcode Sequencing Screen Identifies SUB1 as a Regulator of Yeast Pheromone Inducible Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sliva, Anna; Kuang, Zheng; Meluh, Pamela B.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2016-01-01

    The yeast pheromone response pathway serves as a valuable model of eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and transcription of their downstream targets. Here, we describe application of a screening method combining two technologies: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-Seq). Using this screening method, and pFUS1-GFP as a reporter for MAPK pathway activation, we readily identified mutants in known mating pathway components. In this study, we also include a comprehensive analysis of the FUS1 induction properties of known mating pathway mutants by flow cytometry, featuring single cell analysis of each mutant population. We also characterized a new source of false positives resulting from the design of this screen. Additionally, we identified a deletion mutant, sub1Δ, with increased basal expression of pFUS1-GFP. Here, in the first ChIP-Seq of Sub1, our data shows that Sub1 binds to the promoters of about half the genes in the genome (tripling the 991 loci previously reported), including the promoters of several pheromone-inducible genes, some of which show an increase upon pheromone induction. Here, we also present the first RNA-Seq of a sub1Δ mutant; the majority of genes have no change in RNA, but, of the small subset that do, most show decreased expression, consistent with biochemical studies implicating Sub1 as a positive transcriptional regulator. The RNA-Seq data also show that certain pheromone-inducible genes are induced less in the sub1Δ mutant relative to the wild type, supporting a role for Sub1 in regulation of mating pathway genes. The sub1Δ mutant has increased basal levels of a small subset of other genes besides FUS1, including IMD2 and FIG1, a gene encoding an integral membrane protein necessary for efficient mating. PMID:26837954

  14. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genetic alterations in pediatric low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Miller, Claudia P; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Orisme, Wilda; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Parker, Matthew; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Boop, Fredrick A; Lu, Charles; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Lee, Ryan; Huether, Robert; Chen, Xiang; Hedlund, Erin; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Cheng, Jinjun; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Song, Guangchun; Li, Yongjin; Wei, Lei; Wang, Jianmin; Shurtleff, Sheila; Easton, John; Zhao, David; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Dooling, David J; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Mulder, Heather L; Tang, Chunlao; Ochoa, Kerri; Mullighan, Charles G; Gajjar, Amar; Kriwacki, Richard; Sheer, Denise; Gilbertson, Richard J; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Baker, Suzanne J; Ellison, David W

    2013-06-01

    The most common pediatric brain tumors are low-grade gliomas (LGGs). We used whole-genome sequencing to identify multiple new genetic alterations involving BRAF, RAF1, FGFR1, MYB, MYBL1 and genes with histone-related functions, including H3F3A and ATRX, in 39 LGGs and low-grade glioneuronal tumors (LGGNTs). Only a single non-silent somatic alteration was detected in 24 of 39 (62%) tumors. Intragenic duplications of the portion of FGFR1 encoding the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) and rearrangements of MYB were recurrent and mutually exclusive in 53% of grade II diffuse LGGs. Transplantation of Trp53-null neonatal astrocytes expressing FGFR1 with the duplication involving the TKD into the brains of nude mice generated high-grade astrocytomas with short latency and 100% penetrance. FGFR1 with the duplication induced FGFR1 autophosphorylation and upregulation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K pathways, which could be blocked by specific inhibitors. Focusing on the therapeutically challenging diffuse LGGs, our study of 151 tumors has discovered genetic alterations and potential therapeutic targets across the entire range of pediatric LGGs and LGGNTs.

  15. An approach to identify the novel miRNA encoded from H. Annuus EST sequences.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Hemant; Tiwari, Tanushree; Patel, Maulik; Mehta, Aditya; Ghosh, Arpita

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a newly discovered class of non-protein small RNAs with 22-24 nucleotides. They play multiple roles in biological processes including development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, stress responses and many other cell functions. In this research, several approaches were combined to make a computational prediction of potential miRNAs and their targets in Helianthus annuus (H. annuus). The already available information of the plant miRNAs present in miRBase v21 was used against expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of three miRNAs were detected from which one potential novel miRNA was identified following a range of strict filtering criteria. The target prediction was carried out for these three miRNAs having various targets. These targets were functionally annotated and GO terms were assigned. To study the conserved nature of the miRNAs, predicted phylogenetic analysis was carried out. These findings will significantly provide the broader picture for understanding the functions in H. annuus. PMID:26697356

  16. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD.

  17. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD. PMID:27479907

  18. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Momordica cochinchinensis to identify genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; Rim, Yeonggil; Jang, Hui-Jeong; Kim, Cheol Hong; Park, Jongsun; Kumar, Ritesh; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Byung Chul; Bhak, Jong; Nguyen-Quoc, Binh; Kim, Seon-Won; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2012-07-01

    The ripe fruit of Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng, known as gac, is featured by very high carotenoid content. Although this plant might be a good resource for carotenoid metabolic engineering, so far, the genes involved in the carotenoid metabolic pathways in gac were unidentified due to lack of genomic information in the public database. In order to expedite the process of gene discovery, we have undertaken Illumina deep sequencing of mRNA prepared from aril of gac fruit. From 51,446,670 high-quality reads, we obtained 81,404 assembled unigenes with average length of 388 base pairs. At the protein level, gac aril transcripts showed about 81.5% similarity with cucumber proteomes. In addition 17,104 unigenes have been assigned to specific metabolic pathways in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and all of known enzymes involved in terpenoid backbones biosynthetic and carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were also identified in our library. To analyze the relationship between putative carotenoid biosynthesis genes and alteration of carotenoid content during fruit ripening, digital gene expression analysis was performed on three different ripening stages of aril. This study has revealed putative phytoene synthase, 15-cis-phytone desaturase, zeta-carotene desaturase, carotenoid isomerase and lycopene epsilon cyclase might be key factors for controlling carotenoid contents during aril ripening. Taken together, this study has also made availability of a large gene database. This unique information for gac gene discovery would be helpful to facilitate functional studies for improving carotenoid quantities. PMID:22580955

  19. Whole-exome sequencing identifies ADRA2A mutation in atypical familial partial lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sankella, Shireesha; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite identification of causal genes for various lipodystrophy syndromes, the molecular basis of some peculiar lipodystrophies remains obscure. In an African-American pedigree with a novel autosomal dominant, atypical familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), we performed linkage analysis for candidate regions and whole-exome sequencing to identify the disease-causing mutation. Affected adults reported marked loss of fat from the extremities, with excess fat in the face and neck at age 13–15 years, and developed metabolic complications later. A heterozygous g.112837956C>T mutation on chromosome 10 (c.202C>T, p.Leu68Phe) affecting a highly conserved residue in adrenoceptor α 2A (ADRA2A) was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected relatives. ADRA2A is the main presynaptic inhibitory feedback G protein–coupled receptor regulating norepinephrine release. Activation of ADRA2A inhibits cAMP production and reduces lipolysis in adipocytes. As compared with overexpression of a wild-type ADRA2A construct in human embryonic kidney–293 cells and differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, the mutant ADRA2A produced more cAMP and glycerol, which were resistant to the effects of the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine and the α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine, suggesting loss of function. We conclude that heterozygous p.Leu68Phe ADRA2A mutation causes a rare atypical FPLD, most likely by inducing excessive lipolysis in some adipose tissue depots. PMID:27376152

  20. Identifying Highly Penetrant Disease Causal Mutations Using Next Generation Sequencing: Guide to Whole Process

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; Shihab, Hashem A.; Baird, Denis; Richardson, Tom G.; Day, Ian N. M.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances have created challenges for geneticists and a need to adapt to a wide range of new bioinformatics tools and an expanding wealth of publicly available data (e.g., mutation databases, and software). This wide range of methods and a diversity of file formats used in sequence analysis is a significant issue, with a considerable amount of time spent before anyone can even attempt to analyse the genetic basis of human disorders. Another point to consider that is although many possess “just enough” knowledge to analyse their data, they do not make full use of the tools and databases that are available and also do not fully understand how their data was created. The primary aim of this review is to document some of the key approaches and provide an analysis schema to make the analysis process more efficient and reliable in the context of discovering highly penetrant causal mutations/genes. This review will also compare the methods used to identify highly penetrant variants when data is obtained from consanguineous individuals as opposed to nonconsanguineous; and when Mendelian disorders are analysed as opposed to common-complex disorders. PMID:26106619

  1. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genomic heterogeneity at a nucleotide and chromosomal level in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Pengyuan; Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Zhang, Jianmin; Luo, Wei; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Sabatini, Linda; Vedell, Peter; Xiong, Donghai; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin; Shen, He; Li, Yinwei; Omilian, Angela R.; Hill, Annette; Head, Karen; Guru, Khurshid; Kunnev, Dimiter; Leach, Robert; Eng, Kevin H.; Darlak, Christopher; Hoeflich, Christopher; Veeranki, Srividya; Glenn, Sean; You, Ming; Pruitt, Steven C.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Using complete genome analysis, we sequenced five bladder tumors accrued from patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB) and identified a spectrum of genomic aberrations. In three tumors, complex genotype changes were noted. All three had tumor protein p53 mutations and a relatively large number of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs; average of 11.2 per megabase), structural variants (SVs; average of 46), or both. This group was best characterized by chromothripsis and the presence of subclonal populations of neoplastic cells or intratumoral mutational heterogeneity. Here, we provide evidence that the process of chromothripsis in TCC-UB is mediated by nonhomologous end-joining using kilobase, rather than megabase, fragments of DNA, which we refer to as “stitchers,” to repair this process. We postulate that a potential unifying theme among tumors with the more complex genotype group is a defective replication–licensing complex. A second group (two bladder tumors) had no chromothripsis, and a simpler genotype, WT tumor protein p53, had relatively few SNVs (average of 5.9 per megabase) and only a single SV. There was no evidence of a subclonal population of neoplastic cells. In this group, we used a preclinical model of bladder carcinoma cell lines to study a unique SV (translocation and amplification) of the gene glutamate receptor ionotropic N-methyl D-aspertate as a potential new therapeutic target in bladder cancer. PMID:24469795

  2. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Momordica cochinchinensis to identify genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; Rim, Yeonggil; Jang, Hui-Jeong; Kim, Cheol Hong; Park, Jongsun; Kumar, Ritesh; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Byung Chul; Bhak, Jong; Nguyen-Quoc, Binh; Kim, Seon-Won; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2012-07-01

    The ripe fruit of Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng, known as gac, is featured by very high carotenoid content. Although this plant might be a good resource for carotenoid metabolic engineering, so far, the genes involved in the carotenoid metabolic pathways in gac were unidentified due to lack of genomic information in the public database. In order to expedite the process of gene discovery, we have undertaken Illumina deep sequencing of mRNA prepared from aril of gac fruit. From 51,446,670 high-quality reads, we obtained 81,404 assembled unigenes with average length of 388 base pairs. At the protein level, gac aril transcripts showed about 81.5% similarity with cucumber proteomes. In addition 17,104 unigenes have been assigned to specific metabolic pathways in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and all of known enzymes involved in terpenoid backbones biosynthetic and carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were also identified in our library. To analyze the relationship between putative carotenoid biosynthesis genes and alteration of carotenoid content during fruit ripening, digital gene expression analysis was performed on three different ripening stages of aril. This study has revealed putative phytoene synthase, 15-cis-phytone desaturase, zeta-carotene desaturase, carotenoid isomerase and lycopene epsilon cyclase might be key factors for controlling carotenoid contents during aril ripening. Taken together, this study has also made availability of a large gene database. This unique information for gac gene discovery would be helpful to facilitate functional studies for improving carotenoid quantities.

  3. Ectrodactyly and Lethal Pulmonary Acinar Dysplasia Associated with Homozygous FGFR2 Mutations Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher P; Nataren, Nathalie J; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Schwarz, Quenten; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young K; Bruno, Damien L; Lipsett, Jill; McPhee, Andrew J; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-09-01

    Ectrodactyly/split hand-foot malformation is genetically heterogeneous with more than 100 syndromic associations. Acinar dysplasia is a rare congenital lung lesion of unknown etiology, which is frequently lethal postnatally. To date, there have been no reports of combinations of these two phenotypes. Here, we present an infant from a consanguineous union with both ectrodactyly and autopsy confirmed acinar dysplasia. SNP array and whole-exome sequencing analyses of the affected infant identified a novel homozygous Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) missense mutation (p.R255Q) in the IgIII domain (D3). Expression studies of Fgfr2 in development show localization to the affected limbs and organs. Molecular modeling and genetic and functional assays support that this mutation is at least a partial loss-of-function mutation, and contributes to ectrodactyly and acinar dysplasia only in homozygosity, unlike previously reported heterozygous activating FGFR2 mutations that cause Crouzon, Apert, and Pfeiffer syndromes. This is the first report of mutations in a human disease with ectrodactyly with pulmonary acinar dysplasia and, as such, homozygous loss-of-function FGFR2 mutations represent a unique syndrome. PMID:27323706

  4. A targeted next-generation sequencing method for identifying clinically relevant mutation profiles in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Di; Lin, Yongping; Liu, Jilong; Wan, Liang; Liu, Zu; Cheng, Shaomin; Fei, Lingna; Deng, Rongqing; Wang, Jian; Chen, Xi; Liu, Liping; Gu, Xia; Liang, Wenhua; He, Ping; Wang, Jun; Ye, Mingzhi; He, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Molecular profiling of lung cancer has become essential for prediction of an individual’s response to targeted therapies. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a promising technique for routine diagnostics, but has not been sufficiently evaluated in terms of feasibility, reliability, cost and capacity with routine diagnostic formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) materials. Here, we report the validation and application of a test based on Ion Proton technology for the rapid characterisation of single nucleotide variations (SNVs), short insertions and deletions (InDels), copy number variations (CNVs), and gene rearrangements in 145 genes with FFPE clinical specimens. The validation study, using 61 previously profiled clinical tumour samples, showed a concordance rate of 100% between results obtained by NGS and conventional test platforms. Analysis of tumour cell lines indicated reliable mutation detection in samples with 5% tumour content. Furthermore, application of the panel to 58 clinical cases, identified at least one actionable mutation in 43 cases, 1.4 times the number of actionable alterations detected by current diagnostic tests. We demonstrated that targeted NGS is a cost-effective and rapid platform to detect multiple mutations simultaneously in various genes with high reproducibility and sensitivity. PMID:26936516

  5. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutations in Usher Syndrome Genes in Profoundly Deaf Tunisian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Zainine, Rim; Lahbib, Saida; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Bechraoui, Rym; Marrakchi, Jihène; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Largueche, Leila; Ben Yahia, Salim; Kheirallah, Moncef; Elmatri, Leila; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3) are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys), in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24), and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*). Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss. PMID:25798947

  6. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genomic heterogeneity at a nucleotide and chromosomal level in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Carl D; Liu, Pengyuan; Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Zhang, Jianmin; Luo, Wei; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Conroy, Jeffrey M; Sabatini, Linda; Vedell, Peter; Xiong, Donghai; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin; Shen, He; Li, Yinwei; Omilian, Angela R; Hill, Annette; Head, Karen; Guru, Khurshid; Kunnev, Dimiter; Leach, Robert; Eng, Kevin H; Darlak, Christopher; Hoeflich, Christopher; Veeranki, Srividya; Glenn, Sean; You, Ming; Pruitt, Steven C; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2014-02-11

    Using complete genome analysis, we sequenced five bladder tumors accrued from patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB) and identified a spectrum of genomic aberrations. In three tumors, complex genotype changes were noted. All three had tumor protein p53 mutations and a relatively large number of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs; average of 11.2 per megabase), structural variants (SVs; average of 46), or both. This group was best characterized by chromothripsis and the presence of subclonal populations of neoplastic cells or intratumoral mutational heterogeneity. Here, we provide evidence that the process of chromothripsis in TCC-UB is mediated by nonhomologous end-joining using kilobase, rather than megabase, fragments of DNA, which we refer to as "stitchers," to repair this process. We postulate that a potential unifying theme among tumors with the more complex genotype group is a defective replication-licensing complex. A second group (two bladder tumors) had no chromothripsis, and a simpler genotype, WT tumor protein p53, had relatively few SNVs (average of 5.9 per megabase) and only a single SV. There was no evidence of a subclonal population of neoplastic cells. In this group, we used a preclinical model of bladder carcinoma cell lines to study a unique SV (translocation and amplification) of the gene glutamate receptor ionotropic N-methyl D-aspertate as a potential new therapeutic target in bladder cancer.

  7. Whole exome sequencing identifies a recurrent RQCD1 P131L mutation in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephen Q.; Behren, Andreas; Mar, Victoria J.; Woods, Katherine; Li, Jason; Martin, Claire; Sheppard, Karen E.; Wolfe, Rory; Kelly, John; Cebon, Jonathan; Dobrovic, Alexander; McArthur, Grant A.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is often caused by mutations due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This study reports a recurrent somatic C > T change causing a P131L mutation in the RQCD1 (Required for Cell Differentiation1 Homolog) gene identified through whole exome sequencing of 20 metastatic melanomas. Screening in 715 additional primary melanomas revealed a prevalence of ~4%. This represents the first reported recurrent mutation in a member of the CCR4-NOT complex in cancer. Compared to tumors without the mutation, the P131L mutant positive tumors were associated with increased thickness (p = 0.02), head and neck (p = 0.009) and upper limb (p = 0.03) location, lentigo maligna melanoma subtype (p = 0.02) and BRAF V600K (p = 0.04) but not V600E or NRAS codon 61 mutations. There was no association with nodal disease (p = 0.3). Mutually exclusive mutations of other members of the CCR4-NOT complex were found in ~20% of the TCGA melanoma dataset suggesting the complex may play an important role in melanoma biology. Mutant RQCD1 was predicted to bind strongly to HLA-A0201 and HLA-Cw3 MHC1 complexes. From thirteen patients with mutant RQCD1, an anti-tumor CD8+ T cell response was observed from a single patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cell population stimulated with mutated peptide compared to wildtype indicating a neoantigen may be formed. PMID:25544760

  8. Identifying Highly Penetrant Disease Causal Mutations Using Next Generation Sequencing: Guide to Whole Process.

    PubMed

    Erzurumluoglu, A Mesut; Rodriguez, Santiago; Shihab, Hashem A; Baird, Denis; Richardson, Tom G; Day, Ian N M; Gaunt, Tom R

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances have created challenges for geneticists and a need to adapt to a wide range of new bioinformatics tools and an expanding wealth of publicly available data (e.g., mutation databases, and software). This wide range of methods and a diversity of file formats used in sequence analysis is a significant issue, with a considerable amount of time spent before anyone can even attempt to analyse the genetic basis of human disorders. Another point to consider that is although many possess "just enough" knowledge to analyse their data, they do not make full use of the tools and databases that are available and also do not fully understand how their data was created. The primary aim of this review is to document some of the key approaches and provide an analysis schema to make the analysis process more efficient and reliable in the context of discovering highly penetrant causal mutations/genes. This review will also compare the methods used to identify highly penetrant variants when data is obtained from consanguineous individuals as opposed to nonconsanguineous; and when Mendelian disorders are analysed as opposed to common-complex disorders.

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus whole-genome sequencing identifies convergent evolution of sequence duplication in the C-terminus of the G gene

    PubMed Central

    Schobel, Seth A.; Stucker, Karla M.; Moore, Martin L.; Anderson, Larry J.; Larkin, Emma K.; Shankar, Jyoti; Bera, Jayati; Puri, Vinita; Shilts, Meghan H.; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Shrivastava, Susmita; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Hartert, Tina V.; Das, Suman R.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide and is the most important respiratory viral pathogen in infants. Extensive sequence variability within and between RSV group A and B viruses and the ability of multiple clades and sub-clades of RSV to co-circulate are likely mechanisms contributing to the evasion of herd immunity. Surveillance and large-scale whole-genome sequencing of RSV is currently limited but would help identify its evolutionary dynamics and sites of selective immune evasion. In this study, we performed complete-genome next-generation sequencing of 92 RSV isolates from infants in central Tennessee during the 2012–2014 RSV seasons. We identified multiple co-circulating clades of RSV from both the A and B groups. Each clade is defined by signature N- and O-linked glycosylation patterns. Analyses of specific RSV genes revealed high rates of positive selection in the attachment (G) gene. We identified RSV-A viruses in circulation with and without a recently reported 72-nucleotide G gene sequence duplication. Furthermore, we show evidence of convergent evolution of G gene sequence duplication and fixation over time, which suggests a potential fitness advantage of RSV with the G sequence duplication. PMID:27212633

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus whole-genome sequencing identifies convergent evolution of sequence duplication in the C-terminus of the G gene.

    PubMed

    Schobel, Seth A; Stucker, Karla M; Moore, Martin L; Anderson, Larry J; Larkin, Emma K; Shankar, Jyoti; Bera, Jayati; Puri, Vinita; Shilts, Meghan H; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Halpin, Rebecca A; Fedorova, Nadia; Shrivastava, Susmita; Stockwell, Timothy B; Peebles, R Stokes; Hartert, Tina V; Das, Suman R

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide and is the most important respiratory viral pathogen in infants. Extensive sequence variability within and between RSV group A and B viruses and the ability of multiple clades and sub-clades of RSV to co-circulate are likely mechanisms contributing to the evasion of herd immunity. Surveillance and large-scale whole-genome sequencing of RSV is currently limited but would help identify its evolutionary dynamics and sites of selective immune evasion. In this study, we performed complete-genome next-generation sequencing of 92 RSV isolates from infants in central Tennessee during the 2012-2014 RSV seasons. We identified multiple co-circulating clades of RSV from both the A and B groups. Each clade is defined by signature N- and O-linked glycosylation patterns. Analyses of specific RSV genes revealed high rates of positive selection in the attachment (G) gene. We identified RSV-A viruses in circulation with and without a recently reported 72-nucleotide G gene sequence duplication. Furthermore, we show evidence of convergent evolution of G gene sequence duplication and fixation over time, which suggests a potential fitness advantage of RSV with the G sequence duplication. PMID:27212633

  11. RNA Sequencing of Sessile Serrated Colon Polyps Identifies Differentially Expressed Genes and Immunohistochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Delker, Don A.; Pop, Stelian; Neklason, Deborah W.; Bronner, Mary P.; Burt, Randall W.; Hagedorn, Curt H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) may account for 20–30% of colon cancers. Although large SSA/Ps are generally recognized phenotypically, small (<1 cm) or dysplastic SSA/Ps are difficult to differentiate from hyperplastic or small adenomatous polyps by endoscopy and histopathology. Our aim was to define the comprehensive gene expression phenotype of SSA/Ps to better define this cancer precursor. Results RNA sequencing was performed on 5′ capped RNA from seven SSA/Ps collected from patients with the serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) versus eight controls. Highly expressed genes were analyzed by qPCR in additional SSA/Ps, adenomas and controls. The cellular localization and level of gene products were examined by immunohistochemistry in syndromic and sporadic SSA/Ps, adenomatous and hyperplastic polyps and controls. We identified 1,294 differentially expressed annotated genes, with 106 increased ≥10-fold, in SSA/Ps compared to controls. Comparing these genes with an array dataset for adenomatous polyps identified 30 protein coding genes uniquely expressed ≥10-fold in SSA/Ps. Biological pathways altered in SSA/Ps included mucosal integrity, cell adhesion, and cell development. Marked increased expression of MUC17, the cell junction protein genes VSIG1 and GJB5, and the antiapoptotic gene REG4 were found in SSA/Ps, relative to controls and adenomas, were verified by qPCR analysis of additional SSA/Ps (n = 21) and adenomas (n = 10). Immunohistochemical staining of syndromic (n≥11) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n≥17), adenomatous (n≥13) and hyperplastic (n≥10) polyps plus controls (n≥16) identified unique expression patterns for VSIG1 and MUC17 in SSA/Ps. Conclusion A subset of genes and pathways are uniquely increased in SSA/Ps, compared to adenomatous polyps, thus supporting the concept that cancer develops by different pathways in these phenotypically distinct polyps with markedly different gene expression profiles. Immunostaining

  12. tax and rex Sequences of bovine leukaemia virus from globally diverse isolates: rex amino acid sequence more variable than tax.

    PubMed

    McGirr, K M; Buehring, G C

    2005-02-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is an important agricultural problem with high costs to the dairy industry. Here, we examine the variation of the tax and rex genes of BLV. The tax and rex genes share 420 bases and have overlapping reading frames. The tax gene encodes a protein that functions as a transactivator of the BLV promoter, is required for viral replication, acts on cellular promoters, and is responsible for oncogenesis. The rex facilitates the export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus and regulates transcription. We have sequenced five new isolates of the tax/rex gene. We examined the five new and three previously published tax/rex DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of BLV isolates from cattle in representative regions worldwide. The highest variation among nucleic acid sequences for tax and rex was 7% and 5%, respectively; among predicted amino acid sequences for Tax and Rex, 9% and 11%, respectively. Significantly more nucleotide changes resulted in predicted amino acid changes in the rex gene than in the tax gene (P < or = 0.0006). This variability is higher than previously reported for any region of the viral genome. This research may also have implications for the development of Tax-based vaccines. PMID:15702995

  13. A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes hlyA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, B W; Turner, G; Sooknanan, R; Malek, L T

    1997-01-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system primarily targeting mRNA from the Listeria monocytogenes hlyA gene was developed. This system enabled the detection of low numbers (< 10 CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes cells inoculated into a variety of dairy and egg products after 48 h of enrichment in modified listeria enrichment broth. PMID:8979357

  14. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  15. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-12-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses.

  16. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  17. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  18. Investigating Salmonella Eko from Various Sources in Nigeria by Whole Genome Sequencing to Identify the Source of Human Infections.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Raufu, Ibrahim; Nielsen, Mette T; Rosenqvist Lund, Birthe S; Ameh, James A; Ambali, Abdul G; Sørensen, Gitte; Le Hello, Simon; Aarestrup, Frank M; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-six Salmonella enterica serovar Eko isolated from various sources in Nigeria were investigated by whole genome sequencing to identify the source of human infections. Diversity among the isolates was observed and camel and cattle were identified as the primary reservoirs and the most likely source of the human infections.

  19. Investigating Salmonella Eko from Various Sources in Nigeria by Whole Genome Sequencing to Identify the Source of Human Infections.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Raufu, Ibrahim; Nielsen, Mette T; Rosenqvist Lund, Birthe S; Ameh, James A; Ambali, Abdul G; Sørensen, Gitte; Le Hello, Simon; Aarestrup, Frank M; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-six Salmonella enterica serovar Eko isolated from various sources in Nigeria were investigated by whole genome sequencing to identify the source of human infections. Diversity among the isolates was observed and camel and cattle were identified as the primary reservoirs and the most likely source of the human infections. PMID:27228329

  20. Investigating Salmonella Eko from Various Sources in Nigeria by Whole Genome Sequencing to Identify the Source of Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Raufu, Ibrahim; Nielsen, Mette T.; Rosenqvist Lund, Birthe S.; Ameh, James A.; Ambali, Abdul G.; Sørensen, Gitte; Le Hello, Simon; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-six Salmonella enterica serovar Eko isolated from various sources in Nigeria were investigated by whole genome sequencing to identify the source of human infections. Diversity among the isolates was observed and camel and cattle were identified as the primary reservoirs and the most likely source of the human infections. PMID:27228329

  1. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis identifies proteins associated with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Soper, Jennifer L; Gulland, Frances M D; Bell, P Darwin; Kindy, Mark; Arthur, John M; Janech, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic studies including marine mammals are rare, largely due to the lack of fully sequenced genomes. This has hampered the application of these techniques toward biomarker discovery efforts for monitoring of health and disease in these animals. We conducted a pilot label-free LC-MS/MS study to profile and compare the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) and without DAT. Across 11 samples, a total of 206 proteins were identified (FDR<0.1) using a composite mammalian database. Several peptide identifications were validated using stable isotope labeled peptides. Comparison of spectral counts revealed seven proteins that were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid from sea lions with DAT: complement C3, complement factor B, dickkopf-3, malate dehydrogenase 1, neuron cell adhesion molecule 1, gelsolin, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule. Immunoblot analysis found reelin to be depressed in the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with DAT. Mice administered domoic acid also had lower hippocampal reelin protein levels suggesting that domoic acid depresses reelin similar to kainic acid. In summary, proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in marine mammals is a useful tool to characterize the underlying molecular pathology of neurodegenerative disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002105 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002105).

  2. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis identifies proteins associated with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Soper, Jennifer L; Gulland, Frances M D; Bell, P Darwin; Kindy, Mark; Arthur, John M; Janech, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic studies including marine mammals are rare, largely due to the lack of fully sequenced genomes. This has hampered the application of these techniques toward biomarker discovery efforts for monitoring of health and disease in these animals. We conducted a pilot label-free LC-MS/MS study to profile and compare the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) and without DAT. Across 11 samples, a total of 206 proteins were identified (FDR<0.1) using a composite mammalian database. Several peptide identifications were validated using stable isotope labeled peptides. Comparison of spectral counts revealed seven proteins that were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid from sea lions with DAT: complement C3, complement factor B, dickkopf-3, malate dehydrogenase 1, neuron cell adhesion molecule 1, gelsolin, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule. Immunoblot analysis found reelin to be depressed in the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with DAT. Mice administered domoic acid also had lower hippocampal reelin protein levels suggesting that domoic acid depresses reelin similar to kainic acid. In summary, proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in marine mammals is a useful tool to characterize the underlying molecular pathology of neurodegenerative disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002105 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002105). PMID:26364553

  3. The amino acid sequence of elephant (Elephas maximus) myoglobin and the phylogeny of Proboscidea.

    PubMed

    Dene, H; Goodman, M; Romero-Herrera, A E

    1980-02-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of skeletal myoglobin from the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is reported. The functional significance of variations seen when this sequence is compared with that of sperm whale myoglobin is explored in the light of the crystallographic model available for the latter molecule. The phylogenetic implications of the elephant myoglobin amino acid sequence are evaluated by using the maximum parsimony technique. A similar analysis is also presented which incorporates all of the proteins sequenced from the elephant. These results are discussed with respect to current views on proboscidean phylogeny.

  4. Purification, amino acid sequence and characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II have been purified to homogeneity from kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum, thus this represents the first report of the purification, sequencing and characterisation of marsupial IGFs. N-Terminal protein sequencing reveals that there are six amino acid differences between kangaroo and human IGF-I. Kangaroo IGF-II has been partially sequenced and no differences were found between human and kangaroo IGF-II in the 53 residues identified. Thus the IGFs appear to be remarkably structurally conserved during mammalian radiation. In addition, in vitro characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I demonstrated that the functional properties of human, kangaroo and chicken IGF-I are very similar. In an assay measuring the ability of the proteins to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts, all IGF-I proteins were found to be equally potent. The ability of all three proteins to compete for binding with radiolabelled human IGF-I to type-1 IGF receptors in L6 myoblasts and in Sminthopsis crassicaudata transformed lung fibroblasts, a marsupial cell line, was comparable. Furthermore, kangaroo and human IGF-I react equally in a human IGF-I RIA using a human reference standard, radiolabelled human IGF-I and a polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human IGF-I. This study indicates that not only is the primary structure of eutherian and metatherian IGF-I conserved, but also the proteins appear to be functionally similar.

  5. Diversity, population structure, and evolution of local peach cultivars in China identified by simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z J; Ma, R J; Cai, Z X; Yu, M L; Zhang, Z

    2015-01-15

    The fruit peach originated in China and has a history of domestication of more than 4000 years. Numerous local cultivars were selected during the long course of cultivation, and a great morphological diversity exists. To study the diversity and genetic background of local peach cultivars in China, a set of 158 accessions from different ecological regions, together with 27 modern varieties and 10 wild accessions, were evaluated using 49 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) covering the peach genome. Broad diversity was also observed in local cultivars at the SSR level. A total of 648 alleles were amplified with an average of 13.22 observed alleles per locus. The number of genotypes detected ranged from 9 (UDP96015) to 58 (BPPCT008) with an average of 27.00 genotypes per marker. Eight subpopulations divided by STRUCTURE basically coincided with the dendrogram of genetic relationships and could be explained by the traditional groups. The 8 subpopulations were juicy honey peach, southwestern peach I, wild peach, Buddha peach + southwestern peach II, northern peach, southern crisp peach, ornamental peach, and Prunus davidiana + P. kansuensis. Most modern varieties carried the genetic backgrounds of juicy honey peach and southwestern peach I, while others carried diverse genetic backgrounds, indicating that local cultivars were partly used in modern breeding programs. Based on the traditional evolution pathway, a modified pathway for the development of local peach cultivars in China was proposed using the genetic background of subpopulations that were identified by SSRs. Current status and prospects of utilization of Chinese local peach cultivars were also discussed according to the SSR information.

  6. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  7. Identifying the catalytic acid/base in GH29 α-L-fucosidase subfamilies.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, F Aidha; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; Davies, Gideon J; Withers, Stephen G

    2013-08-27

    While the catalytic nucleophile in the configuration-retaining α-L-fucosidases from family GH29 is fully conserved with respect to sequence, there is no fully sequence-conserved acid/base residue candidate across the family. X-ray crystallographic studies and kinetic characterizations have allowed the identification of this residue in a few cases, and a recent combination of phylogenetic tree analyses with substrate specificity data has allowed the division of GH29 enzymes into two subfamilies, A and B, allowing the probable assignment of these residues. Here, we perform detailed kinetic and mechanistic characterizations of the corresponding alanine mutants and other candidates. Through comparison of kinetic parameters obtained for the hydrolysis of fucosyl substrates with activated leaving groups by these mutants with those of the corresponding wild-type enzymes, in conjunction with the demonstration of azide rescue, we largely confirm the acid/base residue predictions for the GH29 fucosidases from the two subfamilies.

  8. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  9. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Warburgia ugandensis to Identify Genes Involved in Terpenoids and Unsaturated Fatty Acids Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Chen; Yang, Xianpeng; Miao, Di; Zhang, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    The bark of Warburgia ugandensis (Canellaceae family) has been used as a medicinal source for a long history in many African countries. The presence of diverse terpenoids and abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in this organ contributes to its broad range of pharmacological properties. Despite its medicinal and economic importance, the knowledge on the biosynthesis of terpenoid and unsaturated fatty acid in W. ugandensis bark remains largely unknown. Therefore, it is necessary to construct a genomic and/or transcriptomic database for the functional genomics study on W. ugandensis. The chemical profiles of terpenoids and fatty acids between the bark and leaves of W. ugandensis were compared by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Meanwhile, the transcriptome database derived from both tissues was created using Illumina sequencing technology. In total, about 17.1 G clean nucleotides were obtained, and de novo assembled into 72,591 unigenes, of which about 38.06% can be aligned to the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Many candidate genes in the biosynthetic pathways of terpenoids and unsaturated fatty acids were identified, including 14 unigenes for terpene synthases. Furthermore, 2,324 unigenes were discovered to be differentially expressed between both tissues; the functions of those differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were predicted by gene ontology enrichment and metabolic pathway enrichment analyses. In addition, the expression of 12 DEGs with putative roles in terpenoid and unsaturated fatty acid metabolic pathways was confirmed by qRT-PCRs, which was consistent with the data of the RNA-sequencing. In conclusion, we constructed a comprehensive transcriptome dataset derived from the bark and leaf of W. ugandensis, which forms the basis for functional genomics studies on this plant species. Particularly, the comparative analysis of the transcriptome data between the bark and leaf will provide critical clues to reveal the regulatory

  10. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  11. Boronic acid functionalized peptidyl synthetic lectins: Combinatorial library design, peptide sequencing, and selective glycoprotein recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bicker, Kevin L.; Sun, Jing; Lavigne, John J.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of cell membrane and secreted glycoproteins is a hallmark of various disease states, including cancer. The natural lectins currently used in the recognition of these glycoproteins are costly, difficult to produce, and unstable towards rigorous use. Herein we describe the design and synthesis of several boronic acid functionalized peptide-based synthetic lectin (SL) libraries, as well as the optimized methodology for obtaining peptide sequences of these SLs. SL libraries were subsequently used to identify SLs with as high as 5-fold selectivity for various glycoproteins. SLs will inevitably find a role in cancer diagnositics, given that they do not suffer from the drawbacks of natural lectins and that the combinatorial nature of these libraries allows for the identification of an SL for nearly any glycosylated biomolecule. PMID:21405093

  12. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay for detection of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Abd el-Galil, Khaled H; el-Sokkary, M A; Kheira, S M; Salazar, Andre M; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2005-11-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay in combination with a molecular beacon was developed for the real-time detection and quantification of hepatitis A virus (HAV). A 202-bp, highly conserved 5' noncoding region of HAV was targeted. The sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was tested with 10-fold dilutions of viral RNA, and a detection limit of 1 PFU was obtained. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by testing with other environmental pathogens and indicator microorganisms, with only HAV positively identified. When combined with immunomagnetic separation, the NASBA assay successfully detected as few as 10 PFU from seeded lake water samples. Due to its isothermal nature, its speed, and its similar sensitivity compared to the real-time RT-PCR assay, this newly reported real-time NASBA method will have broad applications for the rapid detection of HAV in contaminated food or water.

  13. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  14. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intra-Host Evolution (LASSIE) identifies immune-selected HIV variants

    DOE PAGES

    Hraber, Peter; Korber, Bette; Wagh, Kshitij; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gnanakaran, S.; Lapedes, Alan S.; Learn, Gerald H.; Kreider, Edward F.; Li, Yingying; et al

    2015-10-21

    Within-host genetic sequencing from samples collected over time provides a dynamic view of how viruses evade host immunity. Immune-driven mutations might stimulate neutralization breadth by selecting antibodies adapted to cycles of immune escape that generate within-subject epitope diversity. Comprehensive identification of immune-escape mutations is experimentally and computationally challenging. With current technology, many more viral sequences can readily be obtained than can be tested for binding and neutralization, making down-selection necessary. Typically, this is done manually, by picking variants that represent different time-points and branches on a phylogenetic tree. Such strategies are likely to miss many relevant mutations and combinations ofmore » mutations, and to be redundant for other mutations. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intrahost Evolution (LASSIE) uses transmitted founder loss to identify virus “hot-spots” under putative immune selection and chooses sequences that represent recurrent mutations in selected sites. LASSIE favors earliest sequences in which mutations arise. Here, with well-characterized longitudinal Env sequences, we confirmed selected sites were concentrated in antibody contacts and selected sequences represented diverse antigenic phenotypes. Finally, practical applications include rapidly identifying immune targets under selective pressure within a subject, selecting minimal sets of reagents for immunological assays that characterize evolving antibody responses, and for immunogens in polyvalent “cocktail” vaccines.« less

  15. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intra-Host Evolution (LASSIE) identifies immune-selected HIV variants

    SciTech Connect

    Hraber, Peter; Korber, Bette; Wagh, Kshitij; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gnanakaran, S.; Lapedes, Alan S.; Learn, Gerald H.; Kreider, Edward F.; Li, Yingying; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Montefiori, David C.; Alam, S. Munir; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton

    2015-10-21

    Within-host genetic sequencing from samples collected over time provides a dynamic view of how viruses evade host immunity. Immune-driven mutations might stimulate neutralization breadth by selecting antibodies adapted to cycles of immune escape that generate within-subject epitope diversity. Comprehensive identification of immune-escape mutations is experimentally and computationally challenging. With current technology, many more viral sequences can readily be obtained than can be tested for binding and neutralization, making down-selection necessary. Typically, this is done manually, by picking variants that represent different time-points and branches on a phylogenetic tree. Such strategies are likely to miss many relevant mutations and combinations of mutations, and to be redundant for other mutations. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intrahost Evolution (LASSIE) uses transmitted founder loss to identify virus “hot-spots” under putative immune selection and chooses sequences that represent recurrent mutations in selected sites. LASSIE favors earliest sequences in which mutations arise. Here, with well-characterized longitudinal Env sequences, we confirmed selected sites were concentrated in antibody contacts and selected sequences represented diverse antigenic phenotypes. Finally, practical applications include rapidly identifying immune targets under selective pressure within a subject, selecting minimal sets of reagents for immunological assays that characterize evolving antibody responses, and for immunogens in polyvalent “cocktail” vaccines.

  16. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis to identify sources of soil in surface water.

    PubMed

    Banowetz, Gary M; Whittaker, Gerald W; Dierksen, Karen P; Azevedo, Mark D; Kennedy, Ann C; Griffith, Stephen M; Steiner, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to improve land-use practices to prevent contamination of surface waters with soil are limited by an inability to identify the primary sources of soil present in these waters. We evaluated the utility of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles of dry reference soils for multivariate statistical classification of soils collected from surface waters adjacent to agricultural production fields and a wooded riparian zone. Trials that compared approaches to concentrate soil from surface water showed that aluminum sulfate precipitation provided comparable yields to that obtained by vacuum filtration and was more suitable for handling large numbers of samples. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles were developed from reference soils collected from contrasting land uses in different seasons to determine whether specific fatty acids would consistently serve as variables in multivariate statistical analyses to permit reliable classification of soils. We used a Bayesian method and an independent iterative process to select appropriate fatty acids and found that variable selection was strongly impacted by the season during which soil was collected. The apparent seasonal variation in the occurrence of marker fatty acids in FAME profiles from reference soils prevented preparation of a standardized set of variables. Nevertheless, accurate classification of soil in surface water was achieved utilizing fatty acid variables identified in seasonally matched reference soils. Correlation analysis of entire chromatograms and subsequent discriminant analyses utilizing a restricted number of fatty acid variables showed that FAME profiles of soils exposed to the aquatic environment still had utility for classification at least 1 wk after submersion. PMID:16391284

  17. Detection of Vibrio cholerae by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Fykse, Else M; Skogan, Gunnar; Davies, William; Olsen, Jaran Strand; Blatny, Janet M

    2007-03-01

    A multitarget molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay for the specific detection of Vibrio cholerae has been developed. The genes encoding the cholera toxin (ctxA), the toxin-coregulated pilus (tcpA; colonization factor), the ctxA toxin regulator (toxR), hemolysin (hlyA), and the 60-kDa chaperonin product (groEL) were selected as target sequences for detection. The beacons for the five different genetic targets were evaluated by serial dilution of RNA from V. cholerae cells. RNase treatment of the nucleic acids eliminated all NASBA, whereas DNase treatment had no effect, showing that RNA and not DNA was amplified. The specificity of the assay was investigated by testing several isolates of V. cholerae, other Vibrio species, and Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli strains. The toxR, groEL, and hlyA beacons identified all V. cholerae isolates, whereas the ctxA and tcpA beacons identified the O1 toxigenic clinical isolates. The NASBA assay detected V. cholerae at 50 CFU/ml by using the general marker groEL and tcpA that specifically indicates toxigenic strains. A correlation between cell viability and NASBA was demonstrated for the ctxA, toxR, and hlyA targets. RNA isolated from different environmental water samples spiked with V. cholerae was specifically detected by NASBA. These results indicate that NASBA can be used in the rapid detection of V. cholerae from various environmental water samples. This method has a strong potential for detecting toxigenic strains by using the tcpA and ctxA markers. The entire assay including RNA extraction and NASBA was completed within 3 h.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype G23P[37] Pheasant Rotavirus Strain Identified in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Gál, János; Marton, Szilvia; Ihász, Katalin; Papp, Hajnalka; Jakab, Ferenc; Malik, Yashpal S.; Bányai, Krisztián

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the genomic properties of a rotavirus A strain isolated from diarrheic pheasant poults in Hungary in 2015. Sequence analyses revealed a shared genomic constellation (G23-P[37]-I4-R4-C4-M4-A16-N10-T4-E4-H4) and close relationship (range of nucleotide sequence similarity: VP2, 88%; VP1 and NSP4, 98%) with another pheasant rotavirus strain isolated previously in Germany. PMID:27034484

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Genotype G23P[37] Pheasant Rotavirus Strain Identified in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Gál, János; Marton, Szilvia; Ihász, Katalin; Papp, Hajnalka; Jakab, Ferenc; Malik, Yashpal S; Bányai, Krisztián; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2016-03-31

    We investigated the genomic properties of a rotavirus A strain isolated from diarrheic pheasant poults in Hungary in 2015. Sequence analyses revealed a shared genomic constellation (G23-P[37]-I4-R4-C4-M4-A16-N10-T4-E4-H4) and close relationship (range of nucleotide sequence similarity: VP2, 88%; VP1 and NSP4, 98%) with another pheasant rotavirus strain isolated previously in Germany.

  20. Next-generation RAD sequencing identifies thousands of SNPs for assessing hybridization between rainbow and westslope cutthroat trout.

    PubMed

    Hohenlohe, Paul A; Amish, Stephen J; Catchen, Julian M; Allendorf, Fred W; Luikart, Gordon

    2011-03-01

    The increased numbers of genetic markers produced by genomic techniques have the potential to both identify hybrid individuals and localize chromosomal regions responding to selection and contributing to introgression. We used restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing to identify a dense set of candidate SNP loci with fixed allelic differences between introduced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi). We distinguished candidate SNPs from homeologs (paralogs resulting from whole-genome duplication) by detecting excessively high observed heterozygosity and deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions. We identified 2923 candidate species-specific SNPs from a single Illumina sequencing lane containing 24 barcode-labelled individuals. Published sequence data and ongoing genome sequencing of rainbow trout will allow physical mapping of SNP loci for genome-wide scans and will also provide flanking sequence for design of qPCR-based TaqMan(®) assays for high-throughput, low-cost hybrid identification using a subset of 50-100 loci. This study demonstrates that it is now feasible to identify thousands of informative SNPs in nonmodel species quickly and at reasonable cost, even if no prior genomic information is available. PMID:21429168

  1. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly).

  2. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  3. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  4. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  5. Unraveling the origin of Cladocera by identifying heterochrony in the developmental sequences of Branchiopoda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction One of the most interesting riddles within crustaceans is the origin of Cladocera (water fleas). Cladocerans are morphologically diverse and in terms of size and body segmentation differ considerably from other branchiopod taxa (Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata, Spinicaudata and Cyclestherida). In 1876, the famous zoologist Carl Claus proposed with regard to their origin that cladocerans might have evolved from a precociously maturing larva of a clam shrimp-like ancestor which was able to reproduce at this early stage of development. In order to shed light on this shift in organogenesis and to identify (potential) changes in the chronology of development (heterochrony), we investigated the external and internal development of the ctenopod Penilia avirostris and compared it to development in representatives of Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata, Spinicaudata and Cyclestherida. The development of the nervous system was investigated using immunohistochemical labeling and confocal microscopy. External morphological development was followed using a scanning electron microscope and confocal microscopy to detect the autofluorescence of the external cuticle. Results In Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata and Spinicaudata development is indirect and a free-swimming nauplius hatches from resting eggs. In contrast, development in Cyclestherida and Cladocera, in which non-swimming embryo-like larvae hatch from subitaneous eggs (without a resting phase) is defined herein as pseudo-direct and differs considerably from that of the other groups. Both external and internal development in Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata and Spinicaudata is directed from anterior to posterior, whereas in Cyclestherida and Cladocera differentiation is more synchronous. Conclusions In this study, developmental sequences from representatives of all branchiopod taxa are compared and analyzed using a Parsimov event-pairing approach. The analysis reveals clear evolutionary

  6. Multiple Genome Sequences of Important Beer-Spoiling Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Andreas J.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Seven strains of important beer-spoiling lactic acid bacteria were sequenced using single-molecule real-time sequencing. Complete genomes were obtained for strains of Lactobacillus paracollinoides, Lactobacillus lindneri, and Pediococcus claussenii. The analysis of these genomes emphasizes the role of plasmids as the genomic foundation of beer-spoiling ability. PMID:27795248

  7. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  8. Integrated genome and transcriptome sequencing identifies a novel form of hybrid and aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wyatt, Alexander W; Lapuk, Anna V; McPherson, Andrew; McConeghy, Brian J; Bell, Robert H; Anderson, Shawn; Haegert, Anne; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Shukin, Robert; Mo, Fan; Li, Estelle; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Jones, Edward C; Butterfield, Yaron S; Hach, Faraz; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G; Jones, Steven Jm; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Maher, Christopher A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Gleave, Martin E; Volik, Stanislav V; Collins, Colin C

    2012-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing is making sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology viable. We selected an individual initially diagnosed with conventional but aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma and sequenced the genome and transcriptome from primary and metastatic tissues collected prior to hormone therapy. The histology-pathology and copy number profiles were remarkably homogeneous, yet it was possible to propose the quadrant of the prostate tumour that likely seeded the metastatic diaspora. Despite a homogeneous cell type, our transcriptome analysis revealed signatures of both luminal and neuroendocrine cell types. Remarkably, the repertoire of expressed but apparently private gene fusions, including C15orf21:MYC, recapitulated this biology. We hypothesize that the amplification and over-expression of the stem cell gene MSI2 may have contributed to the stable hybrid cellular identity. This hybrid luminal-neuroendocrine tumour appears to represent a novel and highly aggressive case of prostate cancer with unique biological features and, conceivably, a propensity for rapid progression to castrate-resistance. Overall, this work highlights the importance of integrated analyses of genome, exome and transcriptome sequences for basic tumour biology, sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology.

  9. Integrated genome and transcriptome sequencing identifies a novel form of hybrid and aggressive prostate cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wyatt, Alexander W; Lapuk, Anna V; McPherson, Andrew; McConeghy, Brian J; Bell, Robert H; Anderson, Shawn; Haegert, Anne; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Shukin, Robert; Mo, Fan; Li, Estelle; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Jones, Edward C; Butterfield, Yaron S; Hach, Faraz; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G; Jones, Steven JM; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Maher, Christopher A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Gleave, Martin E; Volik, Stanislav V; Collins, Colin C

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is making sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology viable. We selected an individual initially diagnosed with conventional but aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma and sequenced the genome and transcriptome from primary and metastatic tissues collected prior to hormone therapy. The histology-pathology and copy number profiles were remarkably homogeneous, yet it was possible to propose the quadrant of the prostate tumour that likely seeded the metastatic diaspora. Despite a homogeneous cell type, our transcriptome analysis revealed signatures of both luminal and neuroendocrine cell types. Remarkably, the repertoire of expressed but apparently private gene fusions, including C15orf21:MYC, recapitulated this biology. We hypothesize that the amplification and over-expression of the stem cell gene MSI2 may have contributed to the stable hybrid cellular identity. This hybrid luminal-neuroendocrine tumour appears to represent a novel and highly aggressive case of prostate cancer with unique biological features and, conceivably, a propensity for rapid progression to castrate-resistance. Overall, this work highlights the importance of integrated analyses of genome, exome and transcriptome sequences for basic tumour biology, sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology. PMID:22294438

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxiang; Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces clavuligerus F613-1, an Industrial Producer of Clavulanic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Zong, Gongli; Fu, Jiafang; Liu, Zhong; Zhang, Guimin; Qin, Ronghuo

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus strain F613-1 is an industrial strain with high-yield clavulanic acid production. In this study, the complete genome sequence of S. clavuligerus strain F613-1 was determined, including one linear chromosome and one linear plasmid, carrying numerous sets of genes involving in the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid. PMID:27660792

  14. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  15. Universal and domain-specific sequences in 23S–28S ribosomal RNA identified by computational phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Doris, Stephen M.; Smith, Deborah R.; Beamesderfer, Julia N.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Nathanson, Judith A.; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences has elucidated phylogenetic relationships. However, this powerful approach has not been fully exploited to address ribosome function. Here we identify stretches of evolutionarily conserved sequences, which correspond with regions of high functional importance. For this, we developed a structurally aligned database, FLORA (full-length organismal rRNA alignment) to identify highly conserved nucleotide elements (CNEs) in 23S–28S rRNA from each phylogenetic domain (Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea). Universal CNEs (uCNEs) are conserved in sequence and structural position in all three domains. Those in regions known to be essential for translation validate our approach. Importantly, some uCNEs reside in areas of unknown function, thus identifying novel sequences of likely great importance. In contrast to uCNEs, domain-specific CNEs (dsCNEs) are conserved in just one phylogenetic domain. This is the first report of conserved sequence elements in rRNA that are domain-specific; they are largely a eukaryotic phenomenon. The locations of the eukaryotic dsCNEs within the structure of the ribosome suggest they may function in nascent polypeptide transit through the ribosome tunnel and in tRNA exit from the ribosome. Our findings provide insights and a resource for ribosome function studies. PMID:26283689

  16. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  17. Asaia bogorensis peritonitis identified by 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis in a patient receiving peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Richard W; Ruhe, Jorg; Kobrin, Sidney; Wasserstein, Alan; Doline, Christa; Nachamkin, Irving; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2004-08-01

    Here the authors report a case of refractory peritonitis leading to multiple hospitalizations and the loss of peritoneal dialysis access in a patient on automated peritoneal dialysis, caused by Asaia bogorensis, a bacterium not previously described as a human pathogen. This organism was identified by sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Unusual microbial agents may cause peritonitis, and molecular microbiological techniques are important tools for identifying these agents.

  18. An Efficient Method for Identifying Gene Fusions by Targeted RNA Sequencing from Fresh Frozen and FFPE Samples.

    PubMed

    Scolnick, Jonathan A; Dimon, Michelle; Wang, I-Ching; Huelga, Stephanie C; Amorese, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    Fusion genes are known to be key drivers of tumor growth in several types of cancer. Traditionally, detecting fusion genes has been a difficult task based on fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal abnormalities. More recently, RNA sequencing has enabled an increased pace of fusion gene identification. However, RNA-Seq is inefficient for the identification of fusion genes due to the high number of sequencing reads needed to detect the small number of fusion transcripts present in cells of interest. Here we describe a method, Single Primer Enrichment Technology (SPET), for targeted RNA sequencing that is customizable to any target genes, is simple to use, and efficiently detects gene fusions. Using SPET to target 5701 exons of 401 known cancer fusion genes for sequencing, we were able to identify known and previously unreported gene fusions from both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue RNA in both normal tissue and cancer cells. PMID:26132974

  19. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  20. Diverse Array of New Viral Sequences Identified in Worldwide Populations of the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri) Using Viral Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Shahideh; Salem, Nidá; Nigg, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, is the natural vector of the causal agent of Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening disease. Together; HLB and D. citri represent a major threat to world citrus production. As there is no cure for HLB, insect vector management is considered one strategy to help control the disease, and D. citri viruses might be useful. In this study, we used a metagenomic approach to analyze viral sequences associated with the global population of D. citri. By sequencing small RNAs and the transcriptome coupled with bioinformatics analysis, we showed that the virus-like sequences of D. citri are diverse. We identified novel viral sequences belonging to the picornavirus superfamily, the Reoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Bunyaviridae families, and an unclassified positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus. Moreover, a Wolbachia prophage-related sequence was identified. This is the first comprehensive survey to assess the viral community from worldwide populations of an agricultural insect pest. Our results provide valuable information on new putative viruses, some of which may have the potential to be used as biocontrol agents. IMPORTANCE Insects have the most species of all animals, and are hosts to, and vectors of, a great variety of known and unknown viruses. Some of these most likely have the potential to be important fundamental and/or practical resources. In this study, we used high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and bioinformatics analysis to identify putative viruses associated with Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid. D. citri is the vector of the bacterium causing Huanglongbing (HLB), currently the most serious threat to citrus worldwide. Here, we report several novel viral sequences associated with D. citri. PMID:26676774

  1. Newly Identified Enterovirus C Genotypes, Identified in the Netherlands through Routine Sequencing of All Enteroviruses Detected in Clinical Materials from 2008 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Poelman, Randy; Borger, Renze; Niesters, Hubert G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are a group of human and animal viruses that are capable of causing a variety of clinical syndromes. Different genotypes classified into species can be distinguished on the basis of sequence divergence in the VP1 capsid-coding region. Apparently new genotypes are discovered regularly, often as incidental findings in studies investigating respiratory syndromes or as part of poliovirus surveillance. Recently, some EVs have become recognized as significant respiratory pathogens, and a number of new genotypes belonging to species C have been identified. The circulation of these newly identified species C EVs, such as EV-C104, EV-C105, EV-C109, and EV-C117, nevertheless appears to be limited. In this report, we show the results of routine genotyping of all enteroviruses detected in our tertiary care hospital between January 2008 and April 2015. We detected 365 EVs belonging to 40 genotypes. Interestingly, several newly identified species C EVs were detected during the study period. Sequencing of the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of these viruses shows divergence in this region, which is a target region in many detection assays. PMID:27358467

  2. Newly Identified Enterovirus C Genotypes, Identified in the Netherlands through Routine Sequencing of All Enteroviruses Detected in Clinical Materials from 2008 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Van Leer-Buter, Coretta C; Poelman, Randy; Borger, Renze; Niesters, Hubert G M

    2016-09-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are a group of human and animal viruses that are capable of causing a variety of clinical syndromes. Different genotypes classified into species can be distinguished on the basis of sequence divergence in the VP1 capsid-coding region. Apparently new genotypes are discovered regularly, often as incidental findings in studies investigating respiratory syndromes or as part of poliovirus surveillance. Recently, some EVs have become recognized as significant respiratory pathogens, and a number of new genotypes belonging to species C have been identified. The circulation of these newly identified species C EVs, such as EV-C104, EV-C105, EV-C109, and EV-C117, nevertheless appears to be limited. In this report, we show the results of routine genotyping of all enteroviruses detected in our tertiary care hospital between January 2008 and April 2015. We detected 365 EVs belonging to 40 genotypes. Interestingly, several newly identified species C EVs were detected during the study period. Sequencing of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of these viruses shows divergence in this region, which is a target region in many detection assays.

  3. Newly Identified Enterovirus C Genotypes, Identified in the Netherlands through Routine Sequencing of All Enteroviruses Detected in Clinical Materials from 2008 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Van Leer-Buter, Coretta C; Poelman, Randy; Borger, Renze; Niesters, Hubert G M

    2016-09-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are a group of human and animal viruses that are capable of causing a variety of clinical syndromes. Different genotypes classified into species can be distinguished on the basis of sequence divergence in the VP1 capsid-coding region. Apparently new genotypes are discovered regularly, often as incidental findings in studies investigating respiratory syndromes or as part of poliovirus surveillance. Recently, some EVs have become recognized as significant respiratory pathogens, and a number of new genotypes belonging to species C have been identified. The circulation of these newly identified species C EVs, such as EV-C104, EV-C105, EV-C109, and EV-C117, nevertheless appears to be limited. In this report, we show the results of routine genotyping of all enteroviruses detected in our tertiary care hospital between January 2008 and April 2015. We detected 365 EVs belonging to 40 genotypes. Interestingly, several newly identified species C EVs were detected during the study period. Sequencing of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of these viruses shows divergence in this region, which is a target region in many detection assays. PMID:27358467

  4. Amino acid sequence of a new mitochondrially synthesized proteolipid of the ATP synthase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Velours, J; Esparza, M; Hoppe, J; Sebald, W; Guerin, B

    1984-01-01

    The purification and the amino acid sequence of a proteolipid translated on ribosomes in yeast mitochondria is reported. This protein, which is a subunit of the ATP synthase, was purified by extraction with chloroform/methanol (2/1) and subsequent chromatography on phosphocellulose and reverse phase h.p.l.c. A mol. wt. of 5500 was estimated by chromatography on Bio-Gel P-30 in 80% formic acid. The complete amino acid sequence of this protein was determined by automated solid phase Edman degradation of the whole protein and of fragments obtained after cleavage with cyanogen bromide. The sequence analysis indicates a length of 48 amino acid residues. The calculated mol. wt. of 5870 corresponds to the value found by gel chromatography. This polypeptide contains three basic residues and no negatively charged side chain. The three basic residues are clustered at the C terminus. The primary structure of this protein is in full agreement with the predicted amino acid sequence of the putative polypeptide encoded by the mitochondrial aap1 gene recently discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, this protein shows 50% homology with the amino acid sequence of a putative polypeptide encoded by an unidentified reading frame also discovered near the mitochondrial ATPase subunit 6 gene in Aspergillus nidulans. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6323165

  5. TranslatorX: multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences guided by amino acid translations.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Zardoya, Rafael; Telford, Maximilian J

    2010-07-01

    We present TranslatorX, a web server designed to align protein-coding nucleotide sequences based on their corresponding amino acid translations. Many comparisons between biological sequences (nucleic acids and proteins) involve the construction of multiple alignments. Alignments represent a statement regarding the homology between individual nucleotides or amino acids within homologous genes. As protein-coding DNA sequences evolve as triplets of nucleotides (codons) and it is known that sequence similarity degrades more rapidly at the DNA than at the amino acid level, alignments are generally more accurate when based on amino acids than on their corresponding nucleotides. TranslatorX novelties include: (i) use of all documented genetic codes and the possibility of assigning different genetic codes for each sequence; (ii) a battery of different multiple alignment programs; (iii) translation of ambiguous codons when possible; (iv) an innovative criterion to clean nucleotide alignments with GBlocks based on protein information; and (v) a rich output, including Jalview-powered graphical visualization of the alignments, codon-based alignments coloured according to the corresponding amino acids, measures of compositional bias and first, second and third codon position specific alignments. The TranslatorX server is freely available at http://translatorx.co.uk.

  6. Genome Sequences of the Novel Porcine Parvovirus 3, Identified in Guangxi Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hui; Li, Xiangmin; Zhao, Zekai; An, Chunjing; Wan, Peng; Wu, Mengge; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-01-01

    Porcine parvovirus 3 is a novel parvovirus that infects pigs. Here, we report two genome sequences of porcine parvovirus 3 strains GX1 and GX2, which are highly prevalent in Guangxi province. It will help in understanding the epidemiology and molecular characteristics of the porcine parvovirus 3. PMID:26941135

  7. Identifying microbial fitness determinants by Insertion Sequencing (INSeq) using genome-wide transposon mutant libraries

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Andrew L.; Wu, Meng; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    Insertion Sequencing (INSeq) is a method for determining the insertion site and relative abundance of large numbers of transposon mutants in a mixed population of isogenic mutants of a sequenced microbial species. INSeq is based on a modified mariner transposon containing MmeI sites at its ends, allowing cleavage at chromosomal sites 16–17bp from the inserted transposon. Genomic regions adjacent to the transposons are amplified by linear PCR with a biotinylated primer. Products are bound to magnetic beads, digested with MmeI, and barcoded with sample-specific linkers appended to each restriction fragment. After limited PCR amplification, fragments are sequenced using a high-throughput instrument. The sequence of each read can be used to map the location of a transposon in the genome. Read count measures the relative abundance of that mutant in the population. Solid-phase library preparation makes this protocol rapid (18h), easy to scale-up, amenable to automation, and useful for a variety of samples. A protocol for characterizing libraries of transposon mutant strains clonally arrayed in multi-well format is provided. PMID:22094732

  8. Identifying Learning Behaviors by Contextualizing Differential Sequence Mining with Action Features and Performance Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnebrew, John S.; Biswas, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Our learning-by-teaching environment, Betty's Brain, captures a wealth of data on students' learning interactions as they teach a virtual agent. This paper extends an exploratory data mining methodology for assessing and comparing students' learning behaviors from these interaction traces. The core algorithm employs sequence mining techniques to…

  9. Genome Sequences for a Cluster of Human Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes Identified in South Africa in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Naicker, Preneshni; Bamford, Colleen; Shuping, Liliwe; McCarthy, Kerrigan M.; Sooka, Arvinda; Smouse, Shannon L.; Tau, Nomsa; Keddy, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium with a ubiquitous presence in the environment. There is growing concern about the increasing prevalence of L. monocytogenes associated with food-borne outbreaks. Here we report genome sequences for a cluster of human isolates of L. monocytogenes identified in South Africa in 2015. PMID:27056221

  10. Genome sequencing identifies Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov., isolated from a ranch.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, Henk C; Manuel, Clyde S; Fortes, Esther D; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra K

    2013-09-01

    Twenty Listeria-like isolates were obtained from environmental samples collected on a cattle ranch in northern Colorado; all of these isolates were found to share an identical partial sigB sequence, suggesting close relatedness. The isolates were similar to members of the genus Listeria in that they were Gram-stain-positive, short rods, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive; the isolates were similar to Listeria fleischmannii because they were non-motile at 25 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequencing for representative isolates and whole genome sequencing for one isolate was performed. The genome of the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii (strain LU2006-1(T)) was also sequenced. The draft genomes were very similar in size and the average MUMmer nucleotide identity across 91% of the genomes was 95.16%. Genome sequence data were used to design primers for a six-gene multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme. Phylogenies based on (i) the near-complete 16S rRNA gene, (ii) 31 core genes and (iii) six housekeeping genes illustrated the close relationship of these Listeria-like isolates to Listeria fleischmannii LU2006-1(T). Sufficient genetic divergence of the Listeria-like isolates from the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii and differing phenotypic characteristics warrant these isolates to be classified as members of a distinct infraspecific taxon, for which the name Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TTU M1-001(T) ( =BAA-2414(T) =DSM 25391(T)). The isolates of Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. differ from the nominate subspecies by the inability to utilize melezitose, turanose and sucrose, and the ability to utilize inositol. The results also demonstrate the utility of whole genome sequencing to facilitate identification of novel taxa within a well-described genus. The genomes of both subspecies of Listeria fleischmannii contained putative enhancin genes; the Listeria fleischmannii subsp

  11. CandiSSR: An Efficient Pipeline used for Identifying Candidate Polymorphic SSRs Based on Multiple Assembled Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xia, En-Hua; Yao, Qiu-Yang; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Li-Ping; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, are ubiquitous short tandem duplications commonly found in genomes and/or transcriptomes of diverse organisms. They represent one of the most powerful molecular markers for genetic analysis and breeding programs because of their high mutation rate and neutral evolution. However, traditionally experimental screening of the SSR polymorphic status and their subsequent applicability to genetic studies are extremely labor-intensive and time-consuming. Thankfully, the recently decreased costs of next generation sequencing and increasing availability of large genome and/or transcriptome sequences have provided an excellent opportunity and sources for large-scale mining this type of molecular markers. However, current tools are limited. Thus we here developed a new pipeline, CandiSSR, to identify candidate polymorphic SSRs (PolySSRs) based on the multiple assembled sequences. The pipeline allows users to identify putative PolySSRs not only from the transcriptome datasets but also from multiple assembled genome sequences. In addition, two confidence metrics including standard deviation and missing rate of the SSR repetitions are provided to systematically assess the feasibility of the detected PolySSRs for subsequent application to genetic characterization. Meanwhile, primer pairs for each identified PolySSR are also automatically designed and further evaluated by the global sequence similarities of the primer-binding region, ensuring the successful rate of the marker development. Screening rice genomes with CandiSSR and subsequent experimental validation showed an accuracy rate of over 90%. Besides, the application of CandiSSR has successfully identified a large number of PolySSRs in the Arabidopsis genomes and Camellia transcriptomes. CandiSSR and the PolySSR marker sources are publicly available at: http://www.plantkingdomgdb.com/CandiSSR/index.html. PMID:26779212

  12. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  13. Homology of amino acid sequences of rat liver cathepsins B and H with that of papain.

    PubMed Central

    Takio, K; Towatari, T; Katunuma, N; Teller, D C; Titani, K

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of rat liver lysosomal thiol endopeptidases, cathepsins B and H, are presented and compared with that of the plant thiol protease papain. The 252-residue sequence of cathepsin B and the 220-residue sequence of cathepsin H were determined largely by automated Edman degradation of their intact polypeptide chains and of the two chains of each enzyme generated by limited proteolysis. Subfragments of the chains were produced by enzymatic digestion and by chemical cleavage of methionyl and tryptophanyl bonds. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of cathepsins B and H with each other and with that of papain demonstrates a striking homology among their primary structures. Sequence identity is extremely high in regions which, according to the three-dimensional structure of papain, constitute the catalytic site. The results not only reveal the first structural features of mammalian thiol endopeptidases but also provide insight into the evolutionary relationships among plant and mammalian thiol proteases. PMID:6574504

  14. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, an efficient L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yanase, Hiroaki; Hirose, Yuu; Satomi, Shohei; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus mundtii QU 25, a non-dairy bacterial strain of ovine faecal origin, can ferment both cellobiose and xylose to produce l-lactic acid. The use of this strain is highly desirable for economical l-lactate production from renewable biomass substrates. Genome sequence determination is necessary for the genetic improvement of this strain. We report the complete genome sequence of strain QU 25, primarily determined using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology. The E. mundtii QU 25 genome comprises a 3 022 186-bp single circular chromosome (GC content, 38.6%) and five circular plasmids: pQY182, pQY082, pQY039, pQY024, and pQY003. In all, 2900 protein-coding sequences, 63 tRNA genes, and 6 rRNA operons were predicted in the QU 25 chromosome. Plasmid pQY024 harbours genes for mundticin production. We found that strain QU 25 produces a bacteriocin, suggesting that mundticin-encoded genes on plasmid pQY024 were functional. For lactic acid fermentation, two gene clusters were identified-one involved in the initial metabolism of xylose and uptake of pentose and the second containing genes for the pentose phosphate pathway and uptake of related sugars. This is the first complete genome sequence of an E. mundtii strain. The data provide insights into lactate production in this bacterium and its evolution among enterococci.

  15. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  16. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  17. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Dominant TNNT3 Mutation in a Large Family with Distal Arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Sarah B.; Shah, Hitesh; O'Sullivan, James; Anderson, Beverley; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Williams, Simon; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Mueed Bidchol, Abdul; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G.; Girisha, Katta M.

    2014-01-01

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) is a group of rare, clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders primarily characterized by congenital contractures of the distal limb joints without a neuromuscular disease. Mutations in at least 8 different genes have been shown to cause DA. Here, we report a 4-generation Indian family with 18 affected members presenting variable features of camptodactyly, brachydactyly, syndactyly, decreased flexion palmar creases, ulnar deviation of the hands, sandal gaps and club feet. We undertook exome sequencing of 3 distantly related affected individuals. Bioinformatics filtering revealed a known pathogenic missense mutation c.188G>A (p.Arg63His) in TNNT3 in all 3 affected individuals that segregated with the phenotype. The affected individuals exhibit significant phenotypic variability. This study demonstrates the value of exome sequencing helping to define the causative variant in genetically heterogeneous disorders. PMID:25337069

  18. Complete genome sequence of a novel monopartite geminivirus identified in mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Lu, Quan-You; Wu, Zu-Jian; Xia, Zhi-Song; Xie, Lian-Hui

    2015-08-01

    The genome sequence of a novel geminivirus from mulberry samples exhibiting crinkle leaf symptoms is reported. The sequence consisted of 2952 nt, containing four open reading frames (ORFs) in the viral-sense strand and two ORFs in the complementary-sense strand. The size of the genome and the conserved origin of replication are similar to those of members of the family Geminiviridae, but the genomic organization, number of ORFs, and especially five contiguous GAAAAA repeats positioned upstream of ORF1 distinguish it from other geminiviruses. Phylogenetic analysis coupled with ORF analysis suggests that this is a novel virus that does not fit into the established seven genera of the family Geminiviridae. The virus, found in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province, China, is tentatively named mulberry crinkle leaf virus isolate Jiangsu (MCLV-js).

  19. Unique features of a global human ectoparasite identified through sequencing of the bed bug genome.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Joshua B; Adelman, Zach N; Reinhardt, Klaus; Dolan, Amanda; Poelchau, Monica; Jennings, Emily C; Szuter, Elise M; Hagan, Richard W; Gujar, Hemant; Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Zhu, Fang; Mohan, M; Nelson, David R; Rosendale, Andrew J; Derst, Christian; Resnik, Valentina; Wernig, Sebastian; Menegazzi, Pamela; Wegener, Christian; Peschel, Nicolai; Hendershot, Jacob M; Blenau, Wolfgang; Predel, Reinhard; Johnston, Paul R; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Waterhouse, Robert M; Nauen, Ralf; Schorn, Corinna; Ott, Mark-Christoph; Maiwald, Frank; Johnston, J Spencer; Gondhalekar, Ameya D; Scharf, Michael E; Peterson, Brittany F; Raje, Kapil R; Hottel, Benjamin A; Armisén, David; Crumière, Antonin Jean Johan; Refki, Peter Nagui; Santos, Maria Emilia; Sghaier, Essia; Viala, Sèverine; Khila, Abderrahman; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Childers, Christopher; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Lin, Han; Hughes, Daniel S T; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Murali, Shwetha C; Qu, Jiaxin; Dugan, Shannon; Lee, Sandra L; Chao, Hsu; Dinh, Huyen; Han, Yi; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Wheeler, David; Panfilio, Kristen A; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M; Vargo, Edward L; Booth, Warren; Friedrich, Markus; Weirauch, Matthew T; Anderson, Michelle A E; Jones, Jeffery W; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Zhao, Chaoyang; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Evans, Jay D; Attardo, Geoffrey M; Robertson, Hugh M; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gibbs, Richard A; Werren, John H; Palli, Subba R; Schal, Coby; Richards, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has re-established itself as a ubiquitous human ectoparasite throughout much of the world during the past two decades. This global resurgence is likely linked to increased international travel and commerce in addition to widespread insecticide resistance. Analyses of the C. lectularius sequenced genome (650 Mb) and 14,220 predicted protein-coding genes provide a comprehensive representation of genes that are linked to traumatic insemination, a reduced chemosensory repertoire of genes related to obligate hematophagy, host-symbiont interactions, and several mechanisms of insecticide resistance. In addition, we document the presence of multiple putative lateral gene transfer events. Genome sequencing and annotation establish a solid foundation for future research on mechanisms of insecticide resistance, human-bed bug and symbiont-bed bug associations, and unique features of bed bug biology that contribute to the unprecedented success of C. lectularius as a human ectoparasite. PMID:26836814

  20. The genome sequence of the emerging common midwife toad virus identifies an evolutionary intermediate within ranaviruses.

    PubMed

    Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Alcamí, Antonio; Alejo, Alí

    2012-04-01

    Worldwide amphibian population declines have been ascribed to global warming, increasing pollution levels, and other factors directly related to human activities. These factors may additionally be favoring the emergence of novel pathogens. In this report, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the emerging common midwife toad ranavirus (CMTV), which has caused fatal disease in several amphibian species across Europe. Phylogenetic and gene content analyses of the first complete genomic sequence from a ranavirus isolated in Europe show that CMTV is an amphibian-like ranavirus (ALRV). However, the CMTV genome structure is novel and represents an intermediate evolutionary stage between the two previously described ALRV groups. We find that CMTV clusters with several other ranaviruses isolated from different hosts and locations which might also be included in this novel ranavirus group. This work sheds light on the phylogenetic relationships within this complex group of emerging, disease-causing viruses.

  1. Unique features of a global human ectoparasite identified through sequencing of the bed bug genome.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Joshua B; Adelman, Zach N; Reinhardt, Klaus; Dolan, Amanda; Poelchau, Monica; Jennings, Emily C; Szuter, Elise M; Hagan, Richard W; Gujar, Hemant; Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Zhu, Fang; Mohan, M; Nelson, David R; Rosendale, Andrew J; Derst, Christian; Resnik, Valentina; Wernig, Sebastian; Menegazzi, Pamela; Wegener, Christian; Peschel, Nicolai; Hendershot, Jacob M; Blenau, Wolfgang; Predel, Reinhard; Johnston, Paul R; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Waterhouse, Robert M; Nauen, Ralf; Schorn, Corinna; Ott, Mark-Christoph; Maiwald, Frank; Johnston, J Spencer; Gondhalekar, Ameya D; Scharf, Michael E; Peterson, Brittany F; Raje, Kapil R; Hottel, Benjamin A; Armisén, David; Crumière, Antonin Jean Johan; Refki, Peter Nagui; Santos, Maria Emilia; Sghaier, Essia; Viala, Sèverine; Khila, Abderrahman; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Childers, Christopher; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Lin, Han; Hughes, Daniel S T; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Murali, Shwetha C; Qu, Jiaxin; Dugan, Shannon; Lee, Sandra L; Chao, Hsu; Dinh, Huyen; Han, Yi; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Wheeler, David; Panfilio, Kristen A; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M; Vargo, Edward L; Booth, Warren; Friedrich, Markus; Weirauch, Matthew T; Anderson, Michelle A E; Jones, Jeffery W; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Zhao, Chaoyang; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Evans, Jay D; Attardo, Geoffrey M; Robertson, Hugh M; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gibbs, Richard A; Werren, John H; Palli, Subba R; Schal, Coby; Richards, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has re-established itself as a ubiquitous human ectoparasite throughout much of the world during the past two decades. This global resurgence is likely linked to increased international travel and commerce in addition to widespread insecticide resistance. Analyses of the C. lectularius sequenced genome (650 Mb) and 14,220 predicted protein-coding genes provide a comprehensive representation of genes that are linked to traumatic insemination, a reduced chemosensory repertoire of genes related to obligate hematophagy, host-symbiont interactions, and several mechanisms of insecticide resistance. In addition, we document the presence of multiple putative lateral gene transfer events. Genome sequencing and annotation establish a solid foundation for future research on mechanisms of insecticide resistance, human-bed bug and symbiont-bed bug associations, and unique features of bed bug biology that contribute to the unprecedented success of C. lectularius as a human ectoparasite.

  2. The Genome Sequence of the Emerging Common Midwife Toad Virus Identifies an Evolutionary Intermediate within Ranaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Alcamí, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide amphibian population declines have been ascribed to global warming, increasing pollution levels, and other factors directly related to human activities. These factors may additionally be favoring the emergence of novel pathogens. In this report, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the emerging common midwife toad ranavirus (CMTV), which has caused fatal disease in several amphibian species across Europe. Phylogenetic and gene content analyses of the first complete genomic sequence from a ranavirus isolated in Europe show that CMTV is an amphibian-like ranavirus (ALRV). However, the CMTV genome structure is novel and represents an intermediate evolutionary stage between the two previously described ALRV groups. We find that CMTV clusters with several other ranaviruses isolated from different hosts and locations which might also be included in this novel ranavirus group. This work sheds light on the phylogenetic relationships within this complex group of emerging, disease-causing viruses. PMID:22301140

  3. Unique features of a global human ectoparasite identified through sequencing of the bed bug genome

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B.; Adelman, Zach N.; Reinhardt, Klaus; Dolan, Amanda; Poelchau, Monica; Jennings, Emily C.; Szuter, Elise M.; Hagan, Richard W.; Gujar, Hemant; Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Zhu, Fang; Mohan, M.; Nelson, David R.; Rosendale, Andrew J.; Derst, Christian; Resnik, Valentina; Wernig, Sebastian; Menegazzi, Pamela; Wegener, Christian; Peschel, Nicolai; Hendershot, Jacob M.; Blenau, Wolfgang; Predel, Reinhard; Johnston, Paul R.; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Nauen, Ralf; Schorn, Corinna; Ott, Mark-Christoph; Maiwald, Frank; Johnston, J. Spencer; Gondhalekar, Ameya D.; Scharf, Michael E.; Peterson, Brittany F.; Raje, Kapil R.; Hottel, Benjamin A.; Armisén, David; Crumière, Antonin Jean Johan; Refki, Peter Nagui; Santos, Maria Emilia; Sghaier, Essia; Viala, Sèverine; Khila, Abderrahman; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Childers, Christopher; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Lin, Han; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Duncan, Elizabeth J.; Murali, Shwetha C.; Qu, Jiaxin; Dugan, Shannon; Lee, Sandra L.; Chao, Hsu; Dinh, Huyen; Han, Yi; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Wheeler, David; Panfilio, Kristen A.; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M.; Vargo, Edward L.; Booth, Warren; Friedrich, Markus; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Anderson, Michelle A. E.; Jones, Jeffery W.; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Zhao, Chaoyang; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Evans, Jay D.; Attardo, Geoffrey M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Werren, John H.; Palli, Subba R.; Schal, Coby; Richards, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has re-established itself as a ubiquitous human ectoparasite throughout much of the world during the past two decades. This global resurgence is likely linked to increased international travel and commerce in addition to widespread insecticide resistance. Analyses of the C. lectularius sequenced genome (650 Mb) and 14,220 predicted protein-coding genes provide a comprehensive representation of genes that are linked to traumatic insemination, a reduced chemosensory repertoire of genes related to obligate hematophagy, host–symbiont interactions, and several mechanisms of insecticide resistance. In addition, we document the presence of multiple putative lateral gene transfer events. Genome sequencing and annotation establish a solid foundation for future research on mechanisms of insecticide resistance, human–bed bug and symbiont–bed bug associations, and unique features of bed bug biology that contribute to the unprecedented success of C. lectularius as a human ectoparasite. PMID:26836814

  4. Whole genome sequencing to identify host genetic risk factors for severe outcomes of hepatitis a virus infection.

    PubMed

    Long, Dustin; Fix, Oren K; Deng, Xutao; Seielstad, Mark; Lauring, Adam S

    2014-10-01

    Acute liver failure is a severe, but rare, outcome of hepatitis A virus infection. Unusual presentations of prevalent infections have often been attributed to pathogen-specific immune deficits that exhibit Mendelian inheritance. Genome-wide resequencing of unrelated cases has proven to be a powerful approach for identifying highly penetrant risk alleles that underlie such syndromes. Rare mutations likely to affect protein expression or function can be identified from sequence data, and their association with a similarly rare phenotype rests on their existence in multiple affected individuals. A rare or novel sequence variant that is enriched to a significant degree in a genetically diverse cohort suggests a candidate susceptibility allele. Whole genome sequencing of ten individuals from ethnically diverse backgrounds with HAV-associated acute liver failure was performed. A set of rational filtering criteria was used to identify genetic variants that are rare in the population, but enriched in this cohort. Single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, and deletions were considered and autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and polygenic models were applied. Analysis of the protein-coding exome identified no single gene with putatively deleterious mutations shared by multiple individuals, arguing against a simple Mendelian model of inheritance. A number of rare variants were significantly enriched in this cohort, consistent with a complex and genetically heterogeneous trait. Several of the variants identified in this genome-wide study lie within genes important to hepatic pathophysiology and are candidate susceptibility alleles for hepatitis A virus infection.

  5. baySeq: Empirical Bayesian methods for identifying differential expression in sequence count data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High throughput sequencing has become an important technology for studying expression levels in many types of genomic, and particularly transcriptomic, data. One key way of analysing such data is to look for elements of the data which display particular patterns of differential expression in order to take these forward for further analysis and validation. Results We propose a framework for defining patterns of differential expression and develop a novel algorithm, baySeq, which uses an empirical Bayes approach to detect these patterns of differential expression within a set of sequencing samples. The method assumes a negative binomial distribution for the data and derives an empirically determined prior distribution from the entire dataset. We examine the performance of the method on real and simulated data. Conclusions Our method performs at least as well, and often better, than existing methods for analyses of pairwise differential expression in both real and simulated data. When we compare methods for the analysis of data from experimental designs involving multiple sample groups, our method again shows substantial gains in performance. We believe that this approach thus represents an important step forward for the analysis of count data from sequencing experiments. PMID:20698981

  6. Burkholderia pseudomallei sequencing identifies genomic clades with distinct recombination, accessory, and epigenetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Tannistha; Holden, Matthew T G; Holden, Mathew T G; Didelot, Xavier; Mehershahi, Kurosh; Boddey, Justin A; Beacham, Ifor; Peak, Ian; Harting, John; Baybayan, Primo; Guo, Yan; Wang, Susana; How, Lee Chee; Sim, Bernice; Essex-Lopresti, Angela; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Nelson, Michelle; Smither, Sophie; Ong, Catherine; Aw, Lay Tin; Hoon, Chua Hui; Michell, Stephen; Studholme, David J; Titball, Richard; Chen, Swaine L; Parkhill, Julian; Tan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. To investigate population diversity, recombination, and horizontal gene transfer in closely related Bp isolates, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 106 clinical, animal, and environmental strains from a restricted Asian locale. Whole-genome phylogenies resolved multiple genomic clades of Bp, largely congruent with multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We discovered widespread recombination in the Bp core genome, involving hundreds of regions associated with multiple haplotypes. Highly recombinant regions exhibited functional enrichments that may contribute to virulence. We observed clade-specific patterns of recombination and accessory gene exchange, and provide evidence that this is likely due to ongoing recombination between clade members. Reciprocally, interclade exchanges were rarely observed, suggesting mechanisms restricting gene flow between clades. Interrogation of accessory elements revealed that each clade harbored a distinct complement of restriction-modification (RM) systems, predicted to cause clade-specific patterns of DNA methylation. Using methylome sequencing, we confirmed that representative strains from separate clades indeed exhibit distinct methylation profiles. Finally, using an E. coli system, we demonstrate that Bp RM systems can inhibit uptake of non-self DNA. Our data suggest that RM systems borne on mobile elements, besides preventing foreign DNA invasion, may also contribute to limiting exchanges of genetic material between individuals of the same species. Genomic clades may thus represent functional units of genetic isolation in Bp, modulating intraspecies genetic diversity. PMID:25236617

  7. Fad7 gene identification and fatty acids phenotypic variation in an olive collection by EcoTILLING and sequencing approaches.

    PubMed

    Sabetta, Wilma; Blanco, Antonio; Zelasco, Samanta; Lombardo, Luca; Perri, Enzo; Mangini, Giacomo; Montemurro, Cinzia

    2013-08-01

    The ω-3 fatty acid desaturases (FADs) are enzymes responsible for catalyzing the conversion of linoleic acid to α-linolenic acid localized in the plastid or in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this research we report the genotypic and phenotypic variation of Italian Olea europaea L. germoplasm for the fatty acid composition. The phenotypic oil characterization was followed by the molecular analysis of the plastidial-type ω-3 FAD gene (fad7) (EC 1.14.19), whose full-length sequence has been here identified in cultivar Leccino. The gene consisted of 2635 bp with 8 exons and 5'- and 3'-UTRs of 336 and 282 bp respectively, and showed a high level of heterozygousity (1/110 bp). The natural allelic variation was investigated both by a LiCOR EcoTILLING assay and the PCR product direct sequencing. Only three haplotypes were identified among the 96 analysed cultivars, highlighting the strong degree of conservation of this gene. PMID:23685785

  8. A crystallographic fragment screen identifies cinnamic acid derivatives as starting points for potent Pim-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Michèle N; Fanghänel, Jörg; Schäfer, Martina; Badock, Volker; Briem, Hans; Boemer, Ulf; Nguyen, Duy; Husemann, Manfred; Hillig, Roman C

    2011-03-01

    A crystallographic fragment screen was carried out to identify starting points for the development of inhibitors of protein kinase Pim-1, a potential target for tumour therapy. All fragment hits identified via soaking in this study turned out to bind to the unusually hydrophobic pocket at the hinge region. The most potent fragments, two cinnamic acid derivatives (with a best IC(50) of 130 µM), additionally form a well defined hydrogen bond. The balance between hydrophobic and polar interactions makes these molecules good starting points for further optimization. Pim-2 inhibitors from a recently reported high-throughput screening campaign also feature a cinnamic acid moiety. Two of these Pim-2 inhibitors were synthesized, their potencies against Pim-1 were determined and their cocrystal structures were elucidated in order to determine to what degree the binding modes identified by fragment screening are conserved in optimized inhibitors. The structures show that the cinnamic acid moieties indeed adopt the same binding mode. Fragment screening thus correctly identified binding modes which are maintained when fragments are grown into larger and higher affinity inhibitors. The high-throughput screening-derived compound (E)-3-{3-[6-(4-aminocyclohexylamino)-pyrazin-2-yl]phenyl}acrylic acid (compound 1) is the most potent inhibitor of the cinnamic acid series for which the three-dimensional binding mode is known (IC(50) = 17 nM, K(d) = 28 nM). The structure reveals the molecular basis for the large gain in potency between the initial fragment hit and this optimized inhibitor.

  9. The genome sequence of the most widely cultivated cacao type and its use to identify candidate genes regulating pod color

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Theobroma cacao L. cultivar Matina 1-6 belongs to the most cultivated cacao type. The availability of its genome sequence and methods for identifying genes responsible for important cacao traits will aid cacao researchers and breeders. Results We describe the sequencing and assembly of the genome of Theobroma cacao L. cultivar Matina 1-6. The genome of the Matina 1-6 cultivar is 445 Mbp, which is significantly larger than a sequenced Criollo cultivar, and more typical of other cultivars. The chromosome-scale assembly, version 1.1, contains 711 scaffolds covering 346.0 Mbp, with a contig N50 of 84.4 kbp, a scaffold N50 of 34.4 Mbp, and an evidence-based gene set of 29,408 loci. Version 1.1 has 10x the scaffold N50 and 4x the contig N50 as Criollo, and includes 111 Mb more anchored sequence. The version 1.1 assembly has 4.4% gap sequence, while Criollo has 10.9%. Through a combination of haplotype, association mapping and gene expression analyses, we leverage this robust reference genome to identify a promising candidate gene responsible for pod color variation. We demonstrate that green/red pod color in cacao is likely regulated by the R2R3 MYB transcription factor TcMYB113, homologs of which determine pigmentation in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Brassicaceae. One SNP within the target site for a highly conserved trans-acting siRNA in dicots, found within TcMYB113, seems to affect transcript levels of this gene and therefore pod color variation. Conclusions We report a high-quality sequence and annotation of Theobroma cacao L. and demonstrate its utility in identifying candidate genes regulating traits. PMID:23731509

  10. Exome sequencing identifies a DNAJB6 mutation in a family with dominantly-inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Couthouis, Julien; Raphael, Alya R; Siskind, Carly; Findlay, Andrew R; Buenrostro, Jason D; Greenleaf, William J; Vogel, Hannes; Day, John W; Flanigan, Kevin M; Gitler, Aaron D

    2014-05-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy primarily affects the muscles of the hips and shoulders (the "limb-girdle" muscles), although it is a heterogeneous disorder that can present with varying symptoms. There is currently no cure. We sought to identify the genetic basis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in an American family of Northern European descent using exome sequencing. Exome sequencing was performed on DNA samples from two affected siblings and one unaffected sibling and resulted in the identification of eleven candidate mutations that co-segregated with the disease. Notably, this list included a previously reported mutation in DNAJB6, p.Phe89Ile, which was recently identified as a cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D. Additional family members were Sanger sequenced and the mutation in DNAJB6 was only found in affected individuals. Subsequent haplotype analysis indicated that this DNAJB6 p.Phe89Ile mutation likely arose independently of the previously reported mutation. Since other published mutations are located close by in the G/F domain of DNAJB6, this suggests that the area may represent a mutational hotspot. Exome sequencing provided an unbiased and effective method for identifying the genetic etiology of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in a previously genetically uncharacterized family. This work further confirms the causative role of DNAJB6 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D.

  11. Towards a Phylogeny for Coffea (Rubiaceae): Identifying Well-supported Lineages Based on Nuclear and Plastid DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, Olivier; Davis, Aaron P.; Chester, Michael; Mvungi, Esther F.; Jaufeerally-Fakim, Yasmina; Fay, Michael F.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The phylogenetic relationships between species of Coffea and Psilanthus remain poorly understood, owing to low levels of sequence variation recovered in previous studies, coupled with relatively limited species sampling. In this study, the relationships between Coffea and Psilanthus species are assessed based on substantially increased molecular sequence data and greatly improved species sampling. Method Phylogenetic relationships are assessed using parsimony, with sequence data from four plastid regions [trnL–F intron, trnL–F intergenic spacer (IGS), rpl16 intron and accD–psa1 IGS], and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear rDNA (ITS 1/5·8S/ITS 2). Supported lineages in Coffea are discussed within the context of geographical correspondence, biogeography, morphology and systematics. Key Results Several major lineages with geographical coherence, as identified in previous studies based on smaller data sets, are supported. Other lineages with either geographical or ecological correspondence are recognized for the first time. Coffea subgenus Baracoffea is shown to be monophyletic, but Coffea subgenus Coffea is paraphyletic. Sequence data do not substantiate the monophyly of either Coffea or Psilanthus. Low levels of sequence divergence do not allow detailed resolution of relationships within Coffea, most notably for species of Coffea subgenus Coffea occurring in Madagascar. The origin of C. arabica by recent hybridization between C. canephora and C. eugenioides is supported. Phylogenetic separation resulting from the presence of the Dahomey Gap is inferred based on sequence data from Coffea. PMID:17956855

  12. Amino acid sequence heterogeneity of the chromosomal encoded Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato major antigen P100.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, W; Farencena, A; Redl, B; Sambri, V; Cevenini, R; Stöffler, G

    1995-04-01

    The entire nucleotide sequence of the chromosomal encoded major antigen p100 of the European Borrelia garinii isolate B29 was determined and the deduced amino acid sequence was compared to the homologous antigen p83 of the North American Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31 and the p100 of the European Borrelia afzelii (group VS461) strain PKo. p100 of strain B29 shows 87% amino acid sequence identity to strain B31 and 79.2% to strain PKo, p100 of strain B31 and PKo shows 62.5% identity to each other. In addition, partial nucleotide sequences of the most heterogeneous region of the p100 gene of two other Borrelia garinii isolates (PBi and VS286) have been determined and the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with all p100 of Borrelia garinii published so far. We found an amino acid sequence identity between 88.6 and 100% within the same genospecies. The N-terminal part of the p100 proteins is highly conserved whereas a striking heterogeneous region within the C-terminal part of the proteins was observed.

  13. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  14. Identification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of the conjugation-inducing glycoprotein (blepharmone) in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Mayumi; Harumoto, Terue

    2001-01-01

    Conjugation in Blepharisma japonicum is induced by interaction between complementary mating-types I and II, which excrete blepharmone (gamone 1) and blepharismone (gamone 2), respectively. Gamone 1 transforms type II cells such that they can unite, and gamone 2 similarly transforms type I cells. Moreover, each gamone promotes the production of the other gamone. Gamone 2 has been identified as calcium-3-(2′-formylamino-5′-hydroxy-benzoyl) lactate and has been synthesized chemically. Gamone 1 was isolated and characterized as a glycoprotein of 20–30 kDa containing 175 amino acids and 6 sugars. However, the amino acid sequence and arrangement of sugars in this gamone are still unknown. To determine partial amino acid sequences of gamone 1, we established a method of isolation based on the finding that this glycoprotein can be concentrated by a Con A affinity column. Gamone 1 is extremely unstable and loses its biological activity once adsorbed to any of the columns that we tested. By using a Con A affinity column and native PAGE, we detected a 30-kDa protein corresponding to gamone 1 activity and determined the partial amino acid sequences of the four peptides. To isolate gamone 1 cDNA, we isolated mRNA from mating-type I cells stimulated by synthetic gamone 2 and then performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures by using gene-specific primers and cloned cDNA of gamone 1. The cDNA sequence contains an ORF of 305 amino acids and codes a possibly novel protein. We also estimated the arrangement of sugars by comparing the affinity to various lectin columns. PMID:11724922

  15. Identification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of the conjugation-inducing glycoprotein (blepharmone) in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, M; Harumoto, T

    2001-12-01

    Conjugation in Blepharisma japonicum is induced by interaction between complementary mating-types I and II, which excrete blepharmone (gamone 1) and blepharismone (gamone 2), respectively. Gamone 1 transforms type II cells such that they can unite, and gamone 2 similarly transforms type I cells. Moreover, each gamone promotes the production of the other gamone. Gamone 2 has been identified as calcium-3-(2'-formylamino-5'-hydroxy-benzoyl) lactate and has been synthesized chemically. Gamone 1 was isolated and characterized as a glycoprotein of 20-30 kDa containing 175 amino acids and 6 sugars. However, the amino acid sequence and arrangement of sugars in this gamone are still unknown. To determine partial amino acid sequences of gamone 1, we established a method of isolation based on the finding that this glycoprotein can be concentrated by a Con A affinity column. Gamone 1 is extremely unstable and loses its biological activity once adsorbed to any of the columns that we tested. By using a Con A affinity column and native PAGE, we detected a 30-kDa protein corresponding to gamone 1 activity and determined the partial amino acid sequences of the four peptides. To isolate gamone 1 cDNA, we isolated mRNA from mating-type I cells stimulated by synthetic gamone 2 and then performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures by using gene-specific primers and cloned cDNA of gamone 1. The cDNA sequence contains an ORF of 305 amino acids and codes a possibly novel protein. We also estimated the arrangement of sugars by comparing the affinity to various lectin columns.

  16. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  17. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  18. DNA sequences identify numerous cryptic species of the vertebrate: a lesson from the gobioid fish Schindleria.

    PubMed

    Kon, Takeshi; Yoshino, Tetsuo; Mukai, Takahiko; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2007-07-01

    Schindleria (Gobioidei, Schindleriidae), believed to include one of the smallest and youngest reproducing vertebrates, is broadly distributed in the Indo-Pacific Oceans, inhabiting coral reef lagoons. They are all characterized by a reduced larval-like form, such as a slender translucent and scaleless body. The three nominal species recognized in the genus to date have been distinguished by only combination of dorsal and anal fin-ray counts, and the existence of some undescribed species has been suggested in Schindleria; thus a total picture of species composition of the genus is poorly known. Towards the disclosure of diversity of Schindleria, a molecular phylogenetic analysis using partial mitochondrial 16S rRNA sequences was conducted for specimens from the Ryukyu and Ogasawara Islands, Japan. This analysis showed clearly that as many as 21 genetically distinguishable species occurred within the geographical areas. The degree of species crypticness of "S. praematura" [15.0=15 (new cryptic species + known species)/1 (known species)] is higher than the values of well-known animal examples, such as the pan-mesopelagic bristlemouth fish Cyclothone alba (5.0) and the South American skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator (10.0). This discovery of many cryptic species in Schindleria suggests that the use of DNA sequences is necessary for species identification of such morphologically conserved taxa. Because molecular analyses should increase the number of hitherto unnamed and pseudonymous species, especially in tropical areas, it is proposed that DNA-based designation is necessary for such taxa in order to compile the full "species lists", although there is presently no consensus for the inclusion of DNA sequencing data in the formal descriptions of new species.

  19. Peptide array on cellulose support--a screening tool to identify peptides with dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitory activity within the sequence of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Isabelle M E; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2014-11-13

    The inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is an effective pharmacotherapeutic approach for the management of type 2 diabetes. Recent findings have suggested that dietary proteins, including bovine α-lactalbumin, could be precursors of peptides able to inhibit DPP-IV. However, information on the location of active peptide sequences within the proteins is far from being comprehensive. Moreover, the traditional approach to identify bioactive peptides from foods can be tedious and long. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use peptide arrays to screen α-lactalbumin-derived peptides for their interaction with DPP-IV. Deca-peptides spanning the entire α-lactalbumin sequence, with a frame shift of 1 amino acid between successive sequences, were synthesized on cellulose membranes using "SPOT" technology, and their binding to and inhibition of DPP-IV was studied. Among the 114 α-lactalbumin-derived decamers investigated, the peptides 60WCKDDQNPHS69 (αK(i) = 76 µM), 105LAHKALCSEK114 (K(i) = 217 µM) and 110LCSEKLDQWL119 (K(i) = 217 µM) were among the strongest DPP-IV inhibitors. While the SPOT- and traditionally-synthesized peptides showed consistent trends in DPP-IV inhibitory activity, the cellulose-bound peptides' binding behavior was not correlated to their ability to inhibit the enzyme. This research showed, for the first time, that peptide arrays are useful screening tools to identify DPP-IV inhibitory peptides from dietary proteins.

  20. Fatty acids identified in the Burmese python promote beneficial cardiac growth.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cecilia A; Magida, Jason A; Harrison, Brooke C; Wall, Christopher E; Marr, Thomas G; Secor, Stephen M; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-10-28

    Burmese pythons display a marked increase in heart mass after a large meal. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of this physiological heart growth with the goal of applying this knowledge to the mammalian heart. We found that heart growth in pythons is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy in the absence of cell proliferation and by activation of physiological signal transduction pathways. Despite high levels of circulating lipids, the postprandial python heart does not accumulate triglycerides or fatty acids. Instead, there is robust activation of pathways of fatty acid transport and oxidation combined with increased expression and activity of superoxide dismutase, a cardioprotective enzyme. We also identified a combination of fatty acids in python plasma that promotes physiological heart growth when injected into either pythons or mice.

  1. Nucleolar targeting of proteins by the tandem array of basic amino acid stretches identified in the RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49

    SciTech Connect

    Ushijima, Ryujiro; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Nagata, Izumi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2008-05-16

    There is accumulating evidence to indicate that the regulation of subnuclear compartmentalization plays important roles in cellular processes. The RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49 has been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus in growing cells, but disperse into the nucleoplasm in growth-arrested cells. Serial deletion analysis revealed that amino acids 199-338 were necessary for the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Combinatorial point mutation analysis indicated that the individual basic amino acid stretches (BS) within the central (BS1-4) and the C-terminal (BS5 and 6) regions may cooperatively confer the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Addition of the basic stretches in tandem to a heterologous protein, such as the interferon regulatory factor-3, translocated the tagged protein into the nucleolus, even in the presence of an intrinsic nuclear export sequence. Thus, tandem array of the basic amino acid stretches identified here functions as a dominant nucleolar targeting sequence.

  2. Exome sequencing in pooled DNA samples to identify maternal pre-eclampsia risk variants.

    PubMed

    Kaartokallio, Tea; Wang, Jingwen; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Gerdhem, Paul; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy disorder that is a major cause for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Variants predisposing to pre-eclampsia might be under negative evolutionary selection that is likely to keep their population frequencies low. We exome sequenced samples from a hundred Finnish pre-eclamptic women in pools of ten to screen for low-frequency, large-effect risk variants for pre-eclampsia. After filtering and additional genotyping steps, we selected 28 low-frequency missense, nonsense and splice site variants that were enriched in the pre-eclampsia pools compared to reference data, and genotyped the variants in 1353 pre-eclamptic and 699 non-pre-eclamptic women to test the association of them with pre-eclampsia and quantitative traits relevant for the disease. Genotypes from the SISu project (n = 6118 exome sequenced Finnish samples) were included in the binary trait association analysis as a population reference to increase statistical power. In these analyses, none of the variants tested reached genome-wide significance. In conclusion, the genetic risk for pre-eclampsia is likely complex even in a population isolate like Finland, and larger sample sizes will be necessary to detect risk variants. PMID:27384325

  3. Complete genome sequence of an astrovirus identified in a domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) with gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A colony of domestic rabbits in Tennessee, USA, experienced a high-mortality (~90%) outbreak of enterocolitis. The clinical characteristics were one to six days of lethargy, bloating, and diarrhea, followed by death. Heavy intestinal coccidial load was a consistent finding as was mucoid enteropathy with cecal impaction. Preliminary analysis by electron microscopy revealed the presence of virus-like particles in the stool of one of the affected rabbits. Analysis using the Virochip, a viral detection microarray, suggested the presence of an astrovirus, and follow-up PCR and sequence determination revealed a previously uncharacterized member of that family. Metagenomic sequencing enabled the recovery of the complete viral genome, which contains the characteristic attributes of astrovirus genomes. Attempts to propagate the virus in tissue culture have yet to succeed. Although astroviruses cause gastroenteric disease in other mammals, the pathogenicity of this virus and the relationship to this outbreak remains to be determined. This study therefore defines a viral species and a potential rabbit pathogen. PMID:22998755

  4. Mulibrey nanism: Two novel mutations in a child identified by Array CGH and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mozzillo, Enza; Cozzolino, Carla; Genesio, Rita; Melis, Daniela; Frisso, Giulia; Orrico, Ada; Lombardo, Barbara; Fattorusso, Valentina; Discepolo, Valentina; Della Casa, Roberto; Simonelli, Francesca; Nitsch, Lucio; Salvatore, Francesco; Franzese, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    In childhood, several rare genetic diseases have overlapping symptoms and signs, including those regarding growth alterations, thus the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. The proband, aged 3 years, was suspected to have Silver-Russel syndrome because of intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth retardation, typical facial dysmorphic features, macrocephaly, body asymmetry, and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. Other features were left atrial and ventricular enlargement and patent foramen ovale. Total X-ray skeleton showed hypoplasia of the twelfth rib bilaterally and of the coccyx, slender long bones with thick cortex, and narrow medullary channels. The genetic investigation did not confirm Silver-Russel syndrome. At the age of 5 the patient developed an additional sign: hepatomegaly. Array CGH revealed a 147 kb deletion (involving TRIM 37 and SKA2 genes) on one allele of chromosome 17, inherited from his mother. These results suggested Mulibrey nanism. The clinical features were found to fit this hypothesis. Sequencing of the TRIM 37 gene showed a single base change at a splicing locus, inherited from his father that provoked a truncated protein. The combined use of Array CGH and DNA sequencing confirmed diagnosis of Mulibrey nanism. The large deletion involving the SKA2 gene, along with the increased frequency of malignant tumours in mulibrey patients, suggests closed monitoring for cancer of our patient and his mother. Array CGH should be performed as first tier test in all infants with multiple anomalies. The clinician should reconsider the clinical features when the genetics suggests this. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Characterization of microsatellites identified by next-generation sequencing in the Neotropical tree Handroanthus billbergii (Bignoniaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Eduardo; Buitron, Johanna; Limongi, Ricardo; Vignes, Helene; Argout, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed microsatellite (simple sequence repeat [SSR]) markers in the Neotropical tree Handroanthus billbergii (Bignoniaceae), to be applied in assessment of genetic diversity in this species as a reference for inferring the impact of dry forest fragmentation in Ecuador. Methods and Results: Using next-generation sequencing, we detected a total of 26,893 putative SSRs reported here. Using an ABI 3500xl sequencer, we identified and characterized a set of polymorphic markers in 23 individuals belonging to three populations of H. billbergii. Conclusions: We report a set of 30 useful SSR markers for H. billbergii and a large list of potential microsatellites for developing new markers for this or related species. PMID:27213123

  6. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  7. The amino acid sequence of mitogenic lectin-B from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yurino, N; Kino, M; Ishiguro, M; Funatsu, G

    1997-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-B (PL-B) has been analyzed by first sequencing seven lysylendopeptidase peptides derived from the reduced and S-pyridylethylated PL-B and then connecting them by analyzing the arginylendopeptidase peptides from the reduced and S-carboxymethylated PL-B. PL-B consists of 295 amino acid residues and two oligosaccharides linked to Asn96 and Asn139, and has a molecular mass of 34,493 Da. PL-B is composed of seven repetitive chitin-binding domains having 48-79% sequence homology with each other. Twelve amino acid residues including eight cysteine residues in these domains are absolutely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains of plant lectins and class I chitinases. Also, it was strongly suggested that the extremely high hemagglutinating and mitogenic activities of PL-B may be ascribed to its seven-domain structure.

  8. ConSurf 2010: calculating evolutionary conservation in sequence and structure of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Erez, Elana; Martz, Eric; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2010-07-01

    It is informative to detect highly conserved positions in proteins and nucleic acid sequence/structure since they are often indicative of structural and/or functional importance. ConSurf (http://consurf.tau.ac.il) and ConSeq (http://conseq.tau.ac.il) are two well-established web servers for calculating the evolutionary conservation of amino acid positions in proteins using an empirical Bayesian inference, starting from protein structure and sequence, respectively. Here, we present the new version of the ConSurf web server that combines the two independent servers, providing an easier and more intuitive step-by-step interface, while offering the user more flexibility during the process. In addition, the new version of ConSurf calculates the evolutionary rates for nucleic acid sequences. The new version is freely available at: http://consurf.tau.ac.il/.

  9. Amino acid repeats cause extraordinary coding sequence variation in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Scala, Clea; Tian, Xiangjun; Mehdiabadi, Natasha J; Smith, Margaret H; Saxer, Gerda; Stephens, Katie; Buzombo, Prince; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Protein sequences are normally the most conserved elements of genomes owing to purifying selection to maintain their functions. We document an extraordinary amount of within-species protein sequence variation in the model eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum stemming from triplet DNA repeats coding for long strings of single amino acids. D. discoideum has a very large number of such strings, many of which are polyglutamine repeats, the same sequence that causes various human neurological disorders in humans, like Huntington's disease. We show here that D. discoideum coding repeat loci are highly variable among individuals, making D. discoideum a candidate for the most variable proteome. The coding repeat loci are not significantly less variable than similar non-coding triplet repeats. This pattern is consistent with these amino-acid repeats being largely non-functional sequences evolving primarily by mutation and drift. PMID:23029418

  10. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  11. Shark myoglobins. II. Isolation, characterization and amino acid sequence of myoglobin from Galeorhinus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Suzuki, T; Yata, T

    1985-01-01

    Native oxymyoglobin (MbO2) was isolated from red muscle of G. japonicus by chromatographic separation from metmyoglobin (metMb) on DEAE-cellulose and the amino acid sequence of the major chain was determined with the aid of sequence homology with that of G. australis. It was shown to differ in amino acid sequence from that of G. australis by 10 replacements, to be acetylated at the amino terminus and to contain glutamine at the distal (E7) residue. It was also shown to have a spectrum very similar to that of mammalian MbO2. However, the pH-dependence for the autoxidation of MbO2 was seen to be quite different from that of sperm whale (Physeter catodon) MbO2. Although the sequence homology between sperm whale and G. japonicus myoglobins is about 40%, their hydropathy profiles were very similar, indicating that they have a similar geometry in their globin folding.

  12. Next generation exome sequencing of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients identifies rare and novel variants in candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Katja; Wiskin, Anthony E; Gibson, Jane; Tapper, William; Willis, Claire; Afzal, Nadeem A; Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna; Holloway, John W; Simpson, Michael A; Beattie, R Mark; Collins, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple genes have been implicated by association studies in altering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predisposition. Paediatric patients often manifest more extensive disease and a particularly severe disease course. It is likely that genetic predisposition plays a more substantial role in this group. Objective To identify the spectrum of rare and novel variation in known IBD susceptibility genes using exome sequencing analysis in eight individual cases of childhood onset severe disease. Design DNA samples from the eight patients underwent targeted exome capture and sequencing. Data were processed through an analytical pipeline to align sequence reads, conduct quality checks, and identify and annotate variants where patient sequence differed from the reference sequence. For each patient, the entire complement of rare variation within strongly associated candidate genes was catalogued. Results Across the panel of 169 known IBD susceptibility genes, approximately 300 variants in 104 genes were found. Excluding splicing and HLA-class variants, 58 variants across 39 of these genes were classified as rare, with an alternative allele frequency of <5%, of which 17 were novel. Only two patients with early onset Crohn's disease exhibited rare deleterious variations within NOD2: the previously described R702W variant was the sole NOD2 variant in one patient, while the second patient also carried the L1007 frameshift insertion. Both patients harboured other potentially damaging mutations in the GSDMB, ERAP2 and SEC16A genes. The two patients severely affected with ulcerative colitis exhibited a distinct profile: both carried potentially detrimental variation in the BACH2 and IL10 genes not seen in other patients. Conclusion For each of the eight individuals studied, all non-synonymous, truncating and frameshift mutations across all known IBD genes were identified. A unique profile of rare and potentially damaging variants was evident for each patient with this

  13. Whole exome sequencing identifies three recessive FIG4 mutations in an apparently dominant pedigree with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Manoj P; Waddell, Leigh; Lenk, Guy M; Kaur, Simranpreet; MacArthur, Daniel G; Meisler, Miriam H; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous and classification based on motor nerve conduction velocity and inheritance is used to direct genetic testing. With the less common genetic forms of CMT, identifying the causative genetic mutation by Sanger sequencing of individual genes can be time-consuming and costly. Next-generation sequencing technologies show promise for clinical testing in diseases where a similar phenotype is caused by different genes. We report the unusual occurrence of CMT4J, caused by mutations in FIG4, in a apparently dominant pedigree. The affected proband and her mother exhibit different disease severities associated with different combinations of compound heterozygous FIG4 mutations, identified by whole exome sequencing. The proband was also shown to carry a de novo nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, which may contribute to her more severe phenotype. This study is a cautionary reminder that in families with two generations affected, explanations other than dominant inheritance are possible, such as recessive inheritance due to three mutations segregating in the family. It also emphasises the advantages of next-generation sequencing approaches that screen multiple CMT genes at once for patients in whom the common genes have been excluded.

  14. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  15. Exome sequencing identifies early gastric carcinoma as an early stage of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guhyun; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Do, In-Gu; Wang, Kai; Kang, So Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Kang, Won Ki; Jang, Jiryeon; Choi, Min-Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung; Kim, Min Ji; Kim, Seonwoo; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2013-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection and treatment leads to an excellent prognosis in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC), whereas the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor. It is unclear whether EGCs and AGCs are distinct entities or whether EGCs are the beginning stages of AGCs. We performed whole exome sequencing of four samples from patients with EGC and compared the results with those from AGCs. In both EGCs and AGCs, a total of 268 genes were commonly mutated and independent mutations were additionally found in EGCs (516 genes) and AGCs (3104 genes). A higher frequency of C>G transitions was observed in intestinal-type compared to diffuse-type carcinomas (P = 0.010). The DYRK3, GPR116, MCM10, PCDH17, PCDHB1, RDH5 and UNC5C genes are recurrently mutated in EGCs and may be involved in early carcinogenesis.

  16. Murine candidate bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility genes identified by gene expression and sequence analysis of linkage regions

    PubMed Central

    Haston, C; Tomko, T; Godin, N; Kerckhoff, L; Hallett, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary fibrosis is a complex disease for which the predisposing genetic variants remain unknown. In a prior study, susceptibility to bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was mapped to loci Blmpf1 and Blmpf2 on chromosomes 17 and 11, respectively, in a C57BL/6J (B6, susceptible) and C3Hf/KAM (C3H, resistant) mouse cross. Methods: Herein, the genetic basis of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated in an approach combining gene expression and sequencing data with previously mapped linkage intervals. Results: In this study, gene expression analysis with microarrays revealed 1892 genes or ESTs (expressed sequence tags) to be differentially expressed between bleomycin treated B6 and C3H mice and 67 of these genetic elements map to Blmpf1 or Blmpf2. This group included genes involved in an oxidative stress response, in apoptosis, and in immune regulation. A comparison of the B6 and C3H sequence, for Blmpf1 and Blmpf2, made using the NCBI database and available C3H sequence, revealed approximately 35% of the genes in these regions contain non-synonymous coding sequence changes. An assessment of genotype/phenotype correlation among other inbred strains revealed 36% of these B6/C3H sequence variations predict for the known bleomycin induced fibrosis susceptibility of the DBA (susceptible) and A/J (resistant) mouse strains. Conclusions: Combining genomics approaches of differential gene expression and sequence variation potentially identifies approximately 5% the linked genes as fibrosis susceptibility candidate genes in this mouse cross. PMID:15937080

  17. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma hyorhinis strains identified by a real-time TaqMan PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Tocqueville, Véronique; Ferré, Séverine; Nguyen, Ngoc Hong Phuc; Kempf, Isabelle; Marois-Créhan, Corinne

    2014-05-01

    A real-time TaqMan PCR assay based on the gene encoding the protein p37 was developed to detect Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Its specificity was validated with 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains (28 field strains and one reference strain) and other mycoplasma species or with other microorganisms commonly found in pigs. The estimated detection limit of this qPCR assay was 125 microorganism equivalents/μl. The same 29 epidemiologically unrelated M. hyorhinis strains and four previously fully sequenced strains were typed by two portable typing methods, the sequencing of the p37 gene and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. The first method revealed 18 distinct nucleotide sequences and insufficient discriminatory power (0.934). The MLST scheme was developed with the sequenced genomes of the M. hyorhinis strains HUB-1, GDL-1, MCLD, and SK76 and based on the genes dnaA, rpoB, gyrB, gltX, adk, and gmk. In total, 2,304 bp of sequence was analyzed for each strain. MLST was capable of subdividing the 33 strains into 29 distinct sequence types. The discriminatory power of the method was >0.95, which is the threshold value for interpreting typing results with confidence (D=0.989). Population analysis showed that recombination in M. hyorhinis occurs and that strains are diverse but with a certain clonality (one unique clonal complex was identified). The new qPCR assay and the robust MLST scheme are available for the acquisition of new knowledge on M. hyorhinis epidemiology. A web-accessible database has been set up for the M. hyorhinis MLST scheme at http://pubmlst.org/mhyorhinis/.

  18. Two different high throughput sequencing approaches identify thousands of de novo genomic markers for the genetically depleted Bornean elephant.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reeta; Goossens, Benoit; Kun-Rodrigues, Célia; Teixeira, Tatiana; Othman, Nurzhafarina; Boone, Jason Q; Jue, Nathaniel K; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Rachel J; Chikhi, Lounès

    2012-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technologies are being applied to an increasing number of model species with a high-quality reference genome. The application and analyses of whole-genome sequence data in non-model species with no prior genomic information are currently under way. Recent sequencing technologies provide new opportunities for gathering genomic data in natural populations, laying the empirical foundation for future research in the field of conservation and population genomics. Here we present the case study of the Bornean elephant, which is the most endangered subspecies of Asian elephant and exhibits very low genetic diversity. We used two different sequencing platforms, the Roche 454 FLX (shotgun) and Illumina, GAIIx (Restriction site associated DNA, RAD) to evaluate the feasibility of the two methodologies for the discovery of de novo markers (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNPs and microsatellites) using low coverage data. Approximately, 6,683 (shotgun) and 14,724 (RAD) SNPs were detected within our elephant sequence dataset. Genotyping of a representative sample of 194 SNPs resulted in a SNP validation rate of ~83 to 94% and 17% of the loci were polymorphic with a low diversity (H(o)=0.057). Different numbers of microsatellites were identified through shotgun (27,226) and RAD (868) techniques. Out of all di-, tri-, and tetra-microsatellite loci, 1,706 loci had sufficient flanking regions (shotgun) while only 7 were found with RAD. All microsatellites were monomorphic in the Bornean but polymorphic in another elephant subspecies. Despite using different sample sizes, and the well known differences in the two platforms used regarding sequence length and throughput, the two approaches showed high validation rate. The approaches used here for marker development in a threatened species demonstrate the utility of high throughput sequencing technologies as a starting point for the development of genomic tools in a non-model species and in particular for a

  19. Complete amino acid sequence of an acidic, cardiotoxic phospholipase A2 from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra): a novel cobra venom enzyme with "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Chung, M C; Kini, R M

    1997-02-15

    A phospholipase A2 (OHV A-PLA2) from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is an acidic protein exhibiting cardiotoxicity, myotoxicity, and antiplatelet activity. The complete amino acid sequence of OHV A-PLA2 has been determined using a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometric techniques. OHV A-PLA2 is composed of a single chain of 124 amino acid residues with 14 cysteines and a calculated molecular weight of 13719 Da. It contains the loop of residues (62-66) found in pancreatic PLA2s and hence belongs to class IB enzymes. This pancreatic loop is between two proline residues (Pro 59 and Pro 68) and contains several hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Asp). This region has high degree of conformational flexibility and is on the surface of the molecule, and hence it may be a potential protein-protein interaction site. A relatively low sequence homology is found between OHV A-PLA2 and other known cardiotoxic PLA2s, and hence a contiguous segment could not be identified as a site responsible for the cardiotoxic activity.

  20. Exome Sequencing of Uterine Leiomyosarcomas Identifies Frequent Mutations in TP53, ATRX, and MED12

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, Netta; Aavikko, Mervi; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Taipale, Minna; Taipale, Jussi; Koivisto-Korander, Riitta; Bützow, Ralf; Vahteristo, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcomas (ULMSs) are aggressive smooth muscle tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Despite previous cytogenetic and molecular studies, their molecular background has remained elusive. To examine somatic variation in ULMS, we performed exome sequencing on 19 tumors. Altogether, 43 genes were mutated in at least two ULMSs. Most frequently mutated genes included tumor protein P53 (TP53; 6/19; 33%), alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX; 5/19; 26%), and mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12; 4/19; 21%). Unlike ATRX mutations, both TP53 and MED12 alterations have repeatedly been associated with ULMSs. All the observed ATRX alterations were either nonsense or frameshift mutations. ATRX protein levels were reliably analyzed by immunohistochemistry in altogether 44 ULMSs, and the majority of tumors (23/44; 52%) showed clearly reduced expression. Loss of ATRX expression has been associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), and thus the telomere length was analyzed with telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization. The ALT phenotype was confirmed in all ULMSs showing diminished ATRX expression. Exome data also revealed one nonsense mutation in death-domain associated protein (DAXX), another gene previously associated with ALT, and the tumor showed ALT positivity. In conclusion, exome sequencing revealed that TP53, ATRX, and MED12 are frequently mutated in ULMSs. ALT phenotype was commonly seen in tumors, indicating that ATR inhibitors, which were recently suggested as possible new drugs for ATRX-deficient tumors, could provide a potential novel therapeutic option for ULMS. PMID:26891131

  1. Exome Sequencing of Uterine Leiomyosarcomas Identifies Frequent Mutations in TP53, ATRX, and MED12.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Netta; Aavikko, Mervi; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Taipale, Minna; Taipale, Jussi; Koivisto-Korander, Riitta; Bützow, Ralf; Vahteristo, Pia

    2016-02-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcomas (ULMSs) are aggressive smooth muscle tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Despite previous cytogenetic and molecular studies, their molecular background has remained elusive. To examine somatic variation in ULMS, we performed exome sequencing on 19 tumors. Altogether, 43 genes were mutated in at least two ULMSs. Most frequently mutated genes included tumor protein P53 (TP53; 6/19; 33%), alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX; 5/19; 26%), and mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12; 4/19; 21%). Unlike ATRX mutations, both TP53 and MED12 alterations have repeatedly been associated with ULMSs. All the observed ATRX alterations were either nonsense or frameshift mutations. ATRX protein levels were reliably analyzed by immunohistochemistry in altogether 44 ULMSs, and the majority of tumors (23/44; 52%) showed clearly reduced expression. Loss of ATRX expression has been associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), and thus the telomere length was analyzed with telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization. The ALT phenotype was confirmed in all ULMSs showing diminished ATRX expression. Exome data also revealed one nonsense mutation in death-domain associated protein (DAXX), another gene previously associated with ALT, and the tumor showed ALT positivity. In conclusion, exome sequencing revealed that TP53, ATRX, and MED12 are frequently mutated in ULMSs. ALT phenotype was commonly seen in tumors, indicating that ATR inhibitors, which were recently suggested as possible new drugs for ATRX-deficient tumors, could provide a potential novel therapeutic option for ULMS. PMID:26891131

  2. Transcriptome Sequencing of a Large Human Family Identifies the Impact of Rare Noncoding Variants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Battle, Alexis; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Zappala, Zach; Knowles, David A.; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Wu, Eric; Simon, Noah; Montgomery, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent and rapid human population growth has led to an excess of rare genetic variants that are expected to contribute to an individual’s genetic burden of disease risk. To date, much of the focus has been on rare protein-coding variants, for which potential impact can be estimated from the genetic code, but determining the impact of rare noncoding variants has been more challenging. To improve our understanding of such variants, we combined high-quality genome sequencing and RNA sequencing data from a 17-individual, three-generation family to contrast expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) and splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTLs) within this family to eQTLs and sQTLs within a population sample. Using this design, we found that eQTLs and sQTLs with large effects in the family were enriched with rare regulatory and splicing variants (minor allele frequency < 0.01). They were also more likely to influence essential genes and genes involved in complex disease. In addition, we tested the capacity of diverse noncoding annotation to predict the impact of rare noncoding variants. We found that distance to the transcription start site, evolutionary constraint, and epigenetic annotation were considerably more informative for predicting the impact of rare variants than for predicting the impact of common variants. These results highlight that rare noncoding variants are important contributors to individual gene-expression profiles and further demonstrate a significant capability for genomic annotation to predict the impact of rare noncoding variants. PMID:25192044

  3. Mulibrey nanism: Two novel mutations in a child identified by Array CGH and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mozzillo, Enza; Cozzolino, Carla; Genesio, Rita; Melis, Daniela; Frisso, Giulia; Orrico, Ada; Lombardo, Barbara; Fattorusso, Valentina; Discepolo, Valentina; Della Casa, Roberto; Simonelli, Francesca; Nitsch, Lucio; Salvatore, Francesco; Franzese, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    In childhood, several rare genetic diseases have overlapping symptoms and signs, including those regarding growth alterations, thus the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. The proband, aged 3 years, was suspected to have Silver-Russel syndrome because of intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth retardation, typical facial dysmorphic features, macrocephaly, body asymmetry, and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. Other features were left atrial and ventricular enlargement and patent foramen ovale. Total X-ray skeleton showed hypoplasia of the twelfth rib bilaterally and of the coccyx, slender long bones with thick cortex, and narrow medullary channels. The genetic investigation did not confirm Silver-Russel syndrome. At the age of 5 the patient developed an additional sign: hepatomegaly. Array CGH revealed a 147 kb deletion (involving TRIM 37 and SKA2 genes) on one allele of chromosome 17, inherited from his mother. These results suggested Mulibrey nanism. The clinical features were found to fit this hypothesis. Sequencing of the TRIM 37 gene showed a single base change at a splicing locus, inherited from his father that provoked a truncated protein. The combined use of Array CGH and DNA sequencing confirmed diagnosis of Mulibrey nanism. The large deletion involving the SKA2 gene, along with the increased frequency of malignant tumours in mulibrey patients, suggests closed monitoring for cancer of our patient and his mother. Array CGH should be performed as first tier test in all infants with multiple anomalies. The clinician should reconsider the clinical features when the genetics suggests this. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27256967

  4. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from Helicobacter pylori 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Anjum, Farah; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP). This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein. PMID:27729842

  5. Applications of molecular markers and DNA sequences in identifying fungal pathogens of cool season grain legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular techniques have now been widely applied in many disciplines of biological sciences including fungal identification in microbial ecology and plant pathology. In plant pathology, it is now common to use molecular techniques to identify and study plant pathogens of many agronomic and horticul...

  6. Visible sensing of nucleic acid sequences using a genetically encodable unmodified mRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Narita, Atsushi; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sando, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported a molecular beacon-mRNA (MB-mRNA) strategy for nucleic acid detection/sensing in a cell-free translation system using unmodified RNA as a probe. Here in this presentation, we report that a combination with RNase H activity, which induces an additional process of irreversible cleavage of MB-domain, achieves an improved sequence selectivity (one nucleotide selectivity) and an enhanced sensitivity. This improved system finally enabled visible sensing of target nucleic acid sequence at a single nucleotide resolution under isothermal conditions.

  7. Identity-by-descent filtering of exome sequence data identifies PIGV mutations in hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krawitz, Peter M; Schweiger, Michal R; Rödelsperger, Christian; Marcelis, Carlo; Kölsch, Uwe; Meisel, Christian; Stephani, Friederike; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko; Bauer, Sebastian; Isau, Melanie; Fischer, Axel; Dahl, Andreas; Kerick, Martin; Hecht, Jochen; Köhler, Sebastian; Jäger, Marten; Grünhagen, Johannes; de Condor, Birgit Jonske; Doelken, Sandra; Brunner, Han G; Meinecke, Peter; Passarge, Eberhard; Thompson, Miles D; Cole, David E; Horn, Denise; Roscioli, Tony; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N

    2010-10-01

    Hyperphosphatasia mental retardation (HPMR) syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of mental retardation with distinct facial features and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed whole-exome sequencing in three siblings of a nonconsanguineous union with HPMR and performed computational inference of regions identical by descent in all siblings to establish PIGV, encoding a member of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway, as the gene mutated in HPMR. We identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in PIGV in three additional families.

  8. Novel Exons and Splice Variants in the Human Antibody Heavy Chain Identified by Single Cell and Single Molecule Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vollmers, Christopher; Penland, Lolita; Kanbar, Jad N.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody heavy chains contain a variable and a constant region. The constant region of the antibody heavy chain is encoded by multiple groups of exons which define the isotype and therefore many functional characteristics of the antibody. We performed both single B cell RNAseq and long read single molecule sequencing of antibody heavy chain transcripts and were able to identify novel exons for IGHA1 and IGHA2 as well as novel isoforms for IGHM antibody heavy chain. PMID:25611855

  9. Identity-by-descent filtering of exome sequence data identifies PIGV mutations in hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krawitz, Peter M; Schweiger, Michal R; Rödelsperger, Christian; Marcelis, Carlo; Kölsch, Uwe; Meisel, Christian; Stephani, Friederike; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko; Bauer, Sebastian; Isau, Melanie; Fischer, Axel; Dahl, Andreas; Kerick, Martin; Hecht, Jochen; Köhler, Sebastian; Jäger, Marten; Grünhagen, Johannes; de Condor, Birgit Jonske; Doelken, Sandra; Brunner, Han G; Meinecke, Peter; Passarge, Eberhard; Thompson, Miles D; Cole, David E; Horn, Denise; Roscioli, Tony; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N

    2010-10-01

    Hyperphosphatasia mental retardation (HPMR) syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of mental retardation with distinct facial features and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed whole-exome sequencing in three siblings of a nonconsanguineous union with HPMR and performed computational inference of regions identical by descent in all siblings to establish PIGV, encoding a member of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway, as the gene mutated in HPMR. We identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in PIGV in three additional families. PMID:20802478

  10. Employment of 16 S rDNA gene sequencing techniques to identify culturable environmental eubacteria in a tertiary referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Smyth, C L; Buchanan, J A; Dolan, A; Rooney, P J; Millar, B C; Goldsmith, C E; Elborn, J S; Moore, J E

    2004-05-01

    Universal or 'broad-range' eubacterial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on 53 isolates from environmental water-associated sites in a haematology unit (N = 22) and the outer surfaces of cleaning lotion containers sited throughout a tertiary referral hospital (N = 31) 16 S rDNA PCR was performed using two sets of universal primers, including the novel reverse primer, XB4, to generate a composite amplicon of 1068 bp, which was sequenced to obtain each isolate's identity. Sequence analysis was able to identify 51 isolates. Most (75% from the haematology unit and 81% from cleaner containers) were Gram-positive. Nine different genera were identified from the haematology unit and 13 from the cleaning lotion containers. This study provides the first reports of Terrabacter spp. and Brachybacterium paraconglomeratum isolated from a hospital environment. As unusual and difficult-to-identify environmental organisms are unlikely to be clinically significant, and molecular identification is costly and labour-intensive, we recommend that molecular methods are only used as an adjunct to first-line phenotypic identification schemes where a definitive identification is required. Where molecular identification methods are justified, partial 16 S rDNA PCR and sequencing employing the novel universal primer XB4, is a valuable and reliable technique.

  11. Characterization of new ACADSB gene sequence mutations and clinical implications in patients with 2-methylbutyrylglycinuria identified by newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Alfardan, Jaffar; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Copeland, Sara; Ellison, Jay; Keppen-Davis, Laura; Rohrbach, Marianne; Powell, Berkley R; Gillis, Jane; Matern, Dietrich; Kant, Jeffrey; Vockley, Jerry

    2010-08-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SBCAD) deficiency, also known as 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder of isoleucine metabolism. Most patients reported thus far have originated from a founder mutation in the Hmong Chinese population. While the first reported patients had severe disease, most of the affected Hmong have remained asymptomatic. In this study, we describe 11 asymptomatic non-Hmong patients brought to medical attention by elevated C5-carnitine found by newborn screening and one discovered because of clinical symptoms. The diagnosis of SBCAD deficiency was determined by metabolite analysis of blood, urine, and fibroblast samples. PCR and bidirectional sequencing were performed on genomic DNA from five of the patients covering the entire SBCAD (ACADSB) gene sequence of 11 exons. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from each patient identified variations in the SBCAD gene not previously reported. Escherichia coli expression studies revealed that the missense mutations identified lead to inactivation or instability of the mutant SBCAD enzymes. These findings confirm that SBCAD deficiency can be identified through newborn screening by acylcarnitine analysis. Our patients have been well without treatment and call for careful follow-up studies to learn the true clinical impact of this disorder.

  12.  Bile salt export pump deficiency disease: two novel, late onset, ABCB11 mutations identified by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Pirillo, Martina; Mantovani, Vilma; Marasco, Elena; Aquilano, Adelia; Gamal, Nesrine; Francalanci, Paola; Conti, Fabio; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-01-01

     Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive cholestatic diseases of childhood and represents the main indication for liver transplantation at this age; PFIC2 involves ABCB11 gene, that encodes the ATPdependent canalicular bile salt export pump (BSEP). Benign intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC) identifies a group of diseases involving the same genes and characterized by intermittent attacks of cholestasis with no progression to liver cirrhosis. Diagnosis with standard sequencing techniques is expensive and available only at a few tertiary centers. We report the application of next generation sequencing (NGS) in the diagnosis of the familial intrahepatic cholestasis with a parallel sequencing of three causative genes. We identified the molecular defects in ABCB11 gene in two different probands who developed a severe cholestatic disease of unknown origin. In the first patient a compound heterozygosity for the novel frameshift mutation p.Ser1100GlnfsX38 and the missense variant p.Glu135Lys was detected. In the second patient, triggered by contraceptive therapy, we identified homozygosity for a novel missense variant p.Ala523Gly. In conclusion, these mutations seem to have a late onset and a less aggressive clinical impact, acting as an intermediate form between BRIC and PFIC. PMID:27493120

  13. Whole exome sequencing identified novel CRB1 mutations in Chinese and Indian populations with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin; Yang, Yeming; Huang, Lulin; Zhai, Yaru; Li, Jie; Jiang, Zhilin; Gong, Bo; Fang, Hao; Kim, Ramasamy; Yang, Zhenglin; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Zhu, Xianjun; Zhou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a leading cause of inherited blindness characterized by progressive degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells. This study aims to identify genetic mutations in a Chinese family RP-2236, an Indian family RP-IC-90 and 100 sporadic Indian individuals with autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Whole exome sequencing was performed on the index patients of RP-2236, RP-IC-90 and all of the 100 sporadic Indian patients. Direct Sanger sequencing was used to validate the mutations identified. Four novel mutations and one reported mutation in the crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1) gene, which has been known to cause severe retinal dystrophies, were identified. A novel homozygous splicing mutation c.2129-1G>C was found in the three patients In family RP-2236. A homozygous point mutation p.R664C was found in RP-IC-90. A novel homozygous mutation p.G1310C was identified in patient I-44, while novel compound heterozygous mutations p.N629D and p.A593T were found in patient I-7. All mutations described above were not present in the 1000 normal controls. In conclusion, we identified four novel mutations in CRB1 in a cohort of RP patients from the Chinese and Indian populations. Our data enlarges the CRB1 mutation spectrums and may provide new target loci for RP diagnose and treatment. PMID:27670293

  14. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of complementary DNA encoding rat mammary gland medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Safford, R.; de Silva, J.; Lucas, C.; Windust, J.H.C.; Shedden, J.; James, C.M.; Sidebottom, C.M.; Slabas, A.R.; Tombs, M.P.; Hughes, S.G.

    1987-03-10

    Poly(A) + RNA from pregnant rat mammary glands was size-fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and fractions enriched in medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase (MCH) were identified by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. A cDNA library was constructed, in pBR322, from enriched poly(A) + RNA and screened with two oligonucleotide probes deduced from rat MCH amino acid sequence data. Cross-hybridizing clones were isolated and found to contain cDNA inserts ranging from approx. 1100 to 1550 base pairs (bp). A 1550-bp cDNA insert, from clone 43H09, was confirmed to encode MCH by hybrid-select translation/immunoprecipitation studies and by comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence of the clone to the amino acid sequence of the MCH peptides. Northern blot analysis revealed the size of the MCH mRNA to be 1500 nucleotides, and it is therefore concluded that the 1550-bp insert (including G x C tails) of clone 43H09 represents a full- or near-full-length copy of the MCH gene. The rat MCH sequence is the first reported sequence of a thioesterase from a mammalian source, but comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of MCH and the recently published mallard duck medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioesterase reveals significant homology. In particular, a seven amino acid sequence containing the proposed active serine of the duck thioesterase is found to be perfectly conserved in rat MCH.

  15. Evaluation of a novel food composition database that includes glutamine and other amino acids derived from gene sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Lenders, CM; Liu, S; Wilmore, DW; Sampson, L; Dougherty, LW; Spiegelman, D; Willett, WC

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the content of glutamine in major food proteins. Subjects/Methods We used a validated 131-food item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to identify the foods that contributed the most to protein intake among 70 356 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS, 1984). The content of glutamine and other amino acids in foods was calculated based on protein fractions generated from gene sequencing methods (Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics) and compared with data from conventional (USDA) and modified biochemical (Khun) methods. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to compare the participants’ dietary intakes of amino acids by sequencing and USDA methods. Results The glutamine content varied from 0.01 to to 9.49 g/100 g of food and contributed from 1 to to 33% of total protein for all FFQ foods with protein. When comparing the sequencing and Kuhn’s methods, the proportion of glutamine in meat was 4.8 vs 4.4%. Among NHS participants, mean glutamine intake was 6.84 (s.d.=2.19) g/day and correlation coefficients for amino acid between intakes assessed by sequencing and USDA methods ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 for absolute intake, −0.08 to 0.90 after adjusting for 100 g of protein, and 0.88 to 0.99 after adjusting for 1000 kcal. The between-person coefficient of variation of energy-adjusted intake of glutamine was 16%. Conclusions These data suggest that (1) glutamine content can be estimated from gene sequencing methods and (2) there is a reasonably wide variation in energy-adjusted glutamine intake, allowing for exploration of glutamine consumption and disease. PMID:19756030

  16. Deep Sequencing Identifies Ethnicity-Specific Bacterial Signatures in the Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Matthew R.; Nagaraja, Haikady N.; Camerlengo, Terry; Joshi, Vinayak; Kumar, Purnima S.

    2013-01-01

    Oral infections have a strong ethnic predilection; suggesting that ethnicity is a critical determinant of oral microbial colonization. Dental plaque and saliva samples from 192 subjects belonging to four major ethnicities in the United States were analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) and 16S pyrosequencing. Ethnicity-specific clustering of microbial communities was apparent in saliva and subgingival biofilms, and a machine-learning classifier was capable of identifying an individual’s ethnicity from subgingival microbial signatures. The classifier identified African Americans with a 100% sensitivity and 74% specificity and Caucasians with a 50% sensitivity and 91% specificity. The data demonstrates a significant association between ethnic affiliation and the composition of the oral microbiome; to the extent that these microbial signatures appear to be capable of discriminating between ethnicities. PMID:24194878

  17. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids. PMID:27222814

  18. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids.

  19. Clinically relevant variants identified in thoracic aortic aneurysm patients by research exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jeffrey A; Landis, Benjamin J; Shikany, Amy R; Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving subclinical and progressive dilation of the thoracic aorta, which can lead to life-threatening complications such as dissection or rupture. Genetic testing is important for risk stratification and identification of at risk family members, and clinically available genetic testing panels have been expanding rapidly. However, when past testing results are normal, there is little evidence to guide decision-making about the indications and timing to pursue additional clinical genetic testing. Results from research based genetic testing can help inform this process. Here we present 10 TAA patients who have a family history of disease and who enrolled in research-based exome testing. Nine of these ten patients had previous clinical genetic testing that did not identify the cause of disease. We sought to determine the number of rare variants in 23 known TAA associated genes identified by research-based exome testing. In total, we found 10 rare variants in six patients. Likely pathogenic variants included a TGFB2 variant in one patient and a SMAD3 variant in another. These variants have been reported previously in individuals with similar phenotypes. Variants of uncertain significance of particular interest included novel variants in MYLK and MFAP5, which were identified in a third patient. In total, clinically reportable rare variants were found in 6/10 (60%) patients, with at least 2/10 (20%) patients having likely pathogenic variants identified. These data indicate that consideration of re-testing is important in TAA patients with previous negative or inconclusive results. PMID:26854089

  20. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies CRB1 Defect in an Unusual Maculopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Burke, Tomas; Oll, Maris; Yzer, Suzanne; Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing (Angela); Allikmets, Rando

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report a new phenotype caused by mutations in the CRB1 gene in a family with 2 affected siblings. Design Molecular genetics and observational case studies. Participants Two affected siblings and 3 unaffected family members. Methods Each subject received a complete ophthalmic examination together with color fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Microperimetry 1 (MP-1) mapping and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis were performed on the proband. Screening for disease-causing mutations was performed by whole exome sequencing in 3 family members followed by segregation analyses in the entire family. Main Outcome Measures Appearance of the macula as examined by clinical examination, fundus photography, FAF imaging, SD-OCT, and visual function by MP-1 and ERG. Results The proband and her affected brother exhibited unusual, previously unreported, findings of a macular dystrophy with relative sparing of the retinal periphery beyond the vascular arcades. The FAF imaging showed severely affected areas of hypoautofluorescence that extended nasally beyond the optic disc in both eyes. A central macular patch of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) sparing was evident in both eyes on FAF, whereas photoreceptor sparing was documented in the right eye only using SD-OCT. The affected brother presented with irregular patterns of autofluorescence in both eyes characterized by concentric rings of alternating hyper- and hypoautofluorescence, and foveal sparing of photoreceptors and RPE, as seen on SD-OCT, bilaterally. After negative results in screening for mutations in candidate genes including ABCA4 and PRPH2, DNA from 3 members of the family, including both affected siblings and their mother, was screened by whole exome sequencing resulting in identification of 2 CRB1 missense mutations, c.C3991T:p.R1331C and c.C4142T:p.P1381L, which segregated with the disease in the family. Of the 2, the p.R1331C CRB1

  1. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene that is central to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28–31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Results Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at −31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at −31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription factors. Conclusion The

  2. AcalPred: a sequence-based tool for discriminating between acidic and alkaline enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment.

  3. AcalPred: A Sequence-Based Tool for Discriminating between Acidic and Alkaline Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment. PMID:24130738

  4. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, André M.; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform. PMID:27192129

  5. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform. PMID:27192129

  6. Jejunal Cancer with WRN Mutation Identified from Next-Generation Sequencing: A Case Study and Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christopher; Shiah, Her-Shyong; Hsu, Nan-Yung; Huang, Hsiu-Ying; Chu, Jan-Show; Yen, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel cancer is a rare, gastrointestinal cancer originating from the small intestines. Carcinogenesis in the jejunum, the middle segment of the small intestines, occurs less commonly than in the duodenum and ileum. Despite the increasing incidences globally, the cancer is still poorly understood, which includes lack of pathological understanding and etiological reasoning, as it seems to exhibit both similarities and differences with other types of cancers. A 76-year-old Asian man was presented with abdominal pain, which was later attributed to an adenocarcinoma in the jejunum. Initial immunoreactive staining results found no connections to colorectal cancer. The microsatellite instability test was further examined by immunohistochemistry which revealed them to be wild-type. From our exome-capture sequencing results, mutations of WRN may be important as they represent the only genetic defect in this jejunal cancer. The patient has since undergone surgical resection of his cancer and is currently being treated with chemotherapy. The pathology, genomic markers, and treatments are described along with literature review. PMID:25018888

  7. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform.

  8. Single epicardial cell transcriptome sequencing identifies Caveolin 1 as an essential factor in zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingli; Navis, Adam; Cox, Ben D; Dickson, Amy L; Gemberling, Matthew; Karra, Ravi; Bagnat, Michel; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-01-15

    In contrast to mammals, adult zebrafish have a high capacity to regenerate damaged or lost myocardium through proliferation of cardiomyocytes spared from damage. The epicardial sheet covering the heart is activated by injury and aids muscle regeneration through paracrine effects and as a multipotent cell source, and has received recent attention as a target in cardiac repair strategies. Although it is recognized that epicardium is required for muscle regeneration and itself has high regenerative potential, the extent of cellular heterogeneity within epicardial tissue is largely unexplored. Here, we performed transcriptome analysis on dozens of epicardial lineage cells purified from zebrafish harboring a transgenic reporter for the pan-epicardial gene tcf21. Hierarchical clustering analysis suggested the presence of at least three epicardial cell subsets defined by expression signatures. We validated many new pan-epicardial and epicardial markers by alternative expression assays. Additionally, we explored the function of the scaffolding protein and main component of caveolae, caveolin 1 (cav1), which was present in each epicardial subset. In BAC transgenic zebrafish, cav1 regulatory sequences drove strong expression in ostensibly all epicardial cells and in coronary vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, cav1 mutant zebrafish generated by genome editing showed grossly normal heart development and adult cardiac anatomy, but displayed profound defects in injury-induced cardiomyocyte proliferation and heart regeneration. Our study defines a new platform for the discovery of epicardial lineage markers, genetic tools, and mechanisms of heart regeneration.

  9. TCR sequencing facilitates diagnosis and identifies mature T cells as the cell of origin in CTCL.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Ilan R; Watanabe, Rei; O'Malley, John T; Williamson, David W; Scott, Laura-Louise; Elco, Christopher P; Teague, Jessica E; Gehad, Ahmed; Lowry, Elizabeth L; LeBoeuf, Nicole R; Krueger, James G; Robins, Harlan S; Kupper, Thomas S; Clark, Rachael A

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is difficult and takes on average 6 years after presentation, in part because the clinical appearance and histopathology of CTCL can resemble that of benign inflammatory skin diseases. Detection of a malignant T cell clone is critical in making the diagnosis of CTCL, but the T cell receptor γ (TCRγ) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis in current clinical use detects clones in only a subset of patients. High-throughput TCR sequencing (HTS) detected T cell clones in 46 of 46 CTCL patients, was more sensitive and specific than TCRγ PCR, and successfully discriminated CTCL from benign inflammatory diseases. HTS also accurately assessed responses to therapy and facilitated diagnosis of disease recurrence. In patients with new skin lesions and no involvement of blood by flow cytometry, HTS demonstrated hematogenous spread of small numbers of malignant T cells. Analysis of CTCL TCRγ genes demonstrated that CTCL is a malignancy derived from mature T cells. There was a maximal T cell density in skin in benign inflammatory diseases that was exceeded in CTCL, suggesting that a niche of finite size may exist for benign T cells in skin. Last, immunostaining demonstrated that the malignant T cell clones in mycosis fungoides and leukemic CTCL localized to different anatomic compartments in the skin. In summary, HTS accurately diagnosed CTCL in all stages, discriminated CTCL from benign inflammatory skin diseases, and provided insights into the cell of origin and location of malignant CTCL cells in skin. PMID:26446955

  10. TCR sequencing facilitates diagnosis and identifies mature T cells as the cell of origin in CTCL

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, John T.; Williamson, David W.; Scott, Laura-Louise; Elco, Christopher P.; Teague, Jessica E.; Gehad, Ahmed; Lowry, Elizabeth L.; LeBoeuf, Nicole R.; Krueger, James G.; Robins, Harlan S.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of CTCL is difficult and takes on average six years after presentation, in part because the clinical appearance and histopathology of CTCL can resemble that of benign inflammatory skin diseases. Detection of a malignant T cell clone is critical in making the diagnosis of CTCL but the TCRγ PCR analysis in current clinical use detect clones in only a subset of patients. High-throughput TCR sequencing (HTS) detected T cell clones in 46/46 CTCL patients, was more sensitive and specific than TCRγ PCR, and successfully discriminated CTCL from benign inflammatory diseases. HTS also accurately assessed responses to therapy and facilitated diagnosis of disease recurrence. In patients with new skin lesions and no involvement of blood by flow cytometry, HTS demonstrated hematogenous spread of small numbers of malignant T cells. Analysis of CTCL TCRγ genes demonstrated that CTCL is a malignancy derived from mature T cells. There was a maximal T cell density in skin in benign inflammatory diseases that was exceeded in CTCL, suggesting a niche of finite size may exist for benign T cells in skin. Lastly, immunostaining demonstrated that the malignant T cell clones in mycosis fungoides and leukemic CTCL localized to different anatomic compartments in the skin. In summary, HTS accurately diagnosed CTCL in all stages, discriminated CTCL from benign inflammatory skin diseases and provided insights into the cell of origin and location of malignant CTCL cells in skin. PMID:26446955

  11. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  12. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells.

  13. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A.; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K.; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A.; Stewart, Rodney A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, called Tg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to produce sox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis of Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. Treating Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RA in vivo and raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  14. Whole-exome sequencing identifies novel MPL and JAK2 mutations in triple-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Milosevic Feenstra, Jelena D.; Nivarthi, Harini; Gisslinger, Heinz; Leroy, Emilie; Rumi, Elisa; Chachoua, Ilyas; Bagienski, Klaudia; Kubesova, Blanka; Pietra, Daniela; Gisslinger, Bettina; Milanesi, Chiara; Jäger, Roland; Chen, Doris; Berg, Tiina; Schalling, Martin; Schuster, Michael; Bock, Christoph; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are chronic diseases characterized by clonal hematopoiesis and hyperproliferation of terminally differentiated myeloid cells. The disease is driven by somatic mutations in exon 9 of CALR or exon 10 of MPL or JAK2-V617F in >90% of the cases, whereas the remaining cases are termed “triple negative.” We aimed to identify the disease-causing mutations in the triple-negative cases of ET and PMF by applying whole-exome sequencing (WES) on paired tumor and control samples from 8 patients. We found evidence of clonal hematopoiesis in 5 of 8 studied cases based on clonality analysis and presence of somatic genetic aberrations. WES identified somatic mutations in 3 of 8 cases. We did not detect any novel recurrent somatic mutations. In 3 patients with clonal hematopoiesis analyzed by WES, we identified a somatic MPL-S204P, a germline MPL-V285E mutation, and a germline JAK2-G571S variant. We performed Sanger sequencing of the entire coding region of MPL in 62, and of JAK2 in 49 additional triple-negative cases of ET or PMF. New somatic (T119I, S204F, E230G, Y591D) and 1 germline (R321W) MPL mutation were detected. All of the identified MPL mutations were gain-of-function when analyzed in functional assays. JAK2 variants were identified in 5 of 57 triple-negative cases analyzed by WES and Sanger sequencing combined. We could demonstrate that JAK2-V625F and JAK2-F556V are gain-of-function mutations. Our results suggest that triple-negative cases of ET and PMF do not represent a homogenous disease entity. Cases with polyclonal hematopoiesis might represent hereditary disorders. PMID:26423830

  15. Novel somatic mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    PAN, HUIXING; XU, XIAOJIAN; WU, DEYAO; QIU, QIAOCHENG; ZHOU, SHOUJUN; HE, XUEFENG; ZHOU, YUNFENG; QU, PING; HOU, JIANQUAN; HE, JUN; ZHOU, JIAN

    2016-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the one of the most commonly observed types of cancer globally. The identification of novel disease-associated genes in TCC has had a significant effect on the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer; however, there may be a large number of novel genes that have not been identified. In the present study, the exomes of two individuals who were diagnosed with muscle-invasive TCC (MI-TCC) were sequenced to investigate potential variants. Subsequently, following algorithm and filter analysis, Sanger sequencing was used to validate the results of deep sequencing. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was employed to observe the differences in HECT, C2 and WW domain-containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HECW1) protein expression between tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues. A total of 6 nonsynonymous mutation genes were identified in MI-TCC, identified as copine VII, RNA binding motif protein, X-linked-like 3, acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 2A, HECW1, zinc finger protein 273 and trichohyalin. Furthermore, 5 cases were identified to possess a HECW1 gene mutation in 61 MI-TCC specimens, and all of these were point mutations located at exon 11 on chromosome 7. The mutation categories of HECW1 had 4 missense mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. IHC revealed that HECW1 protein was expressed at significantly increased levels in MI-TCC compared with normal bladder urothelium (P<0.001). The present study provided a novel approach for investigating genetic changes in the MI-TCC exome, and identified the novel mutant gene HECW1, which may possess a significant role in the pathogenesis of TCC. PMID:26893765

  16. Use of a Drosophila Genome-Wide Conserved Sequence Database to Identify Functionally Related cis-Regulatory Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Thomas; Yavatkar, Amarendra S; Kuzin, Alexander; Kundu, Mukta; Tyson, Leonard J; Ross, Jermaine; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Lee, Chi-Hon; Awasaki, Takeshi; Lee, Tzumin; Odenwald, Ward F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Phylogenetic footprinting has revealed that cis-regulatory enhancers consist of conserved DNA sequence clusters (CSCs). Currently, there is no systematic approach for enhancer discovery and analysis that takes full-advantage of the sequence information within enhancer CSCs. Results: We have generated a Drosophila genome-wide database of conserved DNA consisting of >100,000 CSCs derived from EvoPrints spanning over 90% of the genome. cis-Decoder database search and alignment algorithms enable the discovery of functionally related enhancers. The program first identifies conserved repeat elements within an input enhancer and then searches the database for CSCs that score highly against the input CSC. Scoring is based on shared repeats as well as uniquely shared matches, and includes measures of the balance of shared elements, a diagnostic that has proven to be useful in predicting cis-regulatory function. To demonstrate the utility of these tools, a temporally-restricted CNS neuroblast enhancer was used to identify other functionally related enhancers and analyze their structural organization. Conclusions: cis-Decoder reveals that co-regulating enhancers consist of combinations of overlapping shared sequence elements, providing insights into the mode of integration of multiple regulating transcription factors. The database and accompanying algorithms should prove useful in the discovery and analysis of enhancers involved in any developmental process. Developmental Dynamics 241:169–189, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Key findings A genome-wide catalog of Drosophila conserved DNA sequence clusters. cis-Decoder discovers functionally related enhancers. Functionally related enhancers share balanced sequence element copy numbers. Many enhancers function during multiple phases of development. PMID:22174086

  17. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  18. Analytical Framework for Identifying and Differentiating Recent Hitchhiking and Severe Bottleneck Effects from Multi-Locus DNA Sequence Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, Ori

    2012-05-25

    Hitchhiking and severe bottleneck effects have impact on the dynamics of genetic diversity of a population by inducing homogenization at a single locus and at the genome-wide scale, respectively. As a result, identification and differentiation of the signatures of such events from DNA sequence data at a single locus is challenging. This study develops an analytical framework for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple neutral loci in low recombination regions. The dynamics of genetic diversity at a locus after a recent homogenization event is modeled according to the infinite-sites mutation model and the Wright-Fisher model of reproduction with constant population size. In this setting, I derive analytical expressions for the distribution, mean, and variance of the number of polymorphic sites in a random sample of DNA sequences from a locus affected by a recent homogenization event. Based on this framework, three likelihood-ratio based tests are presented for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple loci. Lastly, I apply the framework to two data sets. First, I consider human DNA sequences from four non-coding loci on different chromosomes for inferring evolutionary history of modern human populations. The results suggest, in particular, that recent homogenization events at the loci are identifiable when the effective human population size is 50000 or greater in contrast to 10000, and the estimates of the recent homogenization events are agree with the “Out of Africa” hypothesis. Second, I use HIV DNA sequences from HIV-1-infected patients to infer the times of HIV seroconversions. The estimates are contrasted with other estimates derived as the mid-time point between the last HIV-negative and first HIV-positive screening tests. Finally, the results show that significant discrepancies can exist between the estimates.

  19. Analytical Framework for Identifying and Differentiating Recent Hitchhiking and Severe Bottleneck Effects from Multi-Locus DNA Sequence Data

    DOE PAGES

    Sargsyan, Ori

    2012-05-25

    Hitchhiking and severe bottleneck effects have impact on the dynamics of genetic diversity of a population by inducing homogenization at a single locus and at the genome-wide scale, respectively. As a result, identification and differentiation of the signatures of such events from DNA sequence data at a single locus is challenging. This study develops an analytical framework for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple neutral loci in low recombination regions. The dynamics of genetic diversity at a locus after a recent homogenization event is modeled according to the infinite-sites mutation model and the Wright-Fisher model of reproduction withmore » constant population size. In this setting, I derive analytical expressions for the distribution, mean, and variance of the number of polymorphic sites in a random sample of DNA sequences from a locus affected by a recent homogenization event. Based on this framework, three likelihood-ratio based tests are presented for identifying and differentiating recent homogenization events at multiple loci. Lastly, I apply the framework to two data sets. First, I consider human DNA sequences from four non-coding loci on different chromosomes for inferring evolutionary history of modern human populations. The results suggest, in particular, that recent homogenization events at the loci are identifiable when the effective human population size is 50000 or greater in contrast to 10000, and the estimates of the recent homogenization events are agree with the “Out of Africa” hypothesis. Second, I use HIV DNA sequences from HIV-1-infected patients to infer the times of HIV seroconversions. The estimates are contrasted with other estimates derived as the mid-time point between the last HIV-negative and first HIV-positive screening tests. Finally, the results show that significant discrepancies can exist between the estimates.« less

  20. Use of whole-genus genome sequence data to develop a multilocus sequence typing tool that accurately identifies Yersinia isolates to the species and subspecies levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, Miquette; Chattaway, Marie A; Reuter, Sandra; Savin, Cyril; Strauch, Eckhard; Carniel, Elisabeth; Connor, Thomas; Van Damme, Inge; Rajakaruna, Lakshani; Rajendram, Dunstan; Jenkins, Claire; Thomson, Nicholas R; McNally, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The genus Yersinia is a large and diverse bacterial genus consisting of human-pathogenic species, a fish-pathogenic species, and a large number of environmental species. Recently, the phylogenetic and population structure of the entire genus was elucidated through the genome sequence data of 241 strains encompassing every known species in the genus. Here we report the mining of this enormous data set to create a multilocus sequence typing-based scheme that can identify Yersinia strains to the species level to a level of resolution equal to that for whole-genome sequencing. Our assay is designed to be able to accurately subtype the important human-pathogenic species Yersinia enterocolitica to whole-genome resolution levels. We also report the validation of the scheme on 386 strains from reference laboratory collections across Europe. We propose that the scheme is an important molecular typing system to allow accurate and reproducible identification of Yersinia isolates to the species level, a process often inconsistent in nonspecialist laboratories. Additionally, our assay is the most phylogenetically informative typing scheme available for Y. enterocolitica.

  1. Use of Whole-Genus Genome Sequence Data To Develop a Multilocus Sequence Typing Tool That Accurately Identifies Yersinia Isolates to the Species and Subspecies Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Miquette; Chattaway, Marie A.; Reuter, Sandra; Savin, Cyril; Strauch, Eckhard; Carniel, Elisabeth; Connor, Thomas; Van Damme, Inge; Rajakaruna, Lakshani; Rajendram, Dunstan; Jenkins, Claire; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Yersinia is a large and diverse bacterial genus consisting of human-pathogenic species, a fish-pathogenic species, and a large number of environmental species. Recently, the phylogenetic and population structure of the entire genus was elucidated through the genome sequence data of 241 strains encompassing every known species in the genus. Here we report the mining of this enormous data set to create a multilocus sequence typing-based scheme that can identify Yersinia strains to the species level to a level of resolution equal to that for whole-genome sequencing. Our assay is designed to be able to accurately subtype the important human-pathogenic species Yersinia enterocolitica to whole-genome resolution levels. We also report the validation of the scheme on 386 strains from reference laboratory collections across Europe. We propose that the scheme is an important molecular typing system to allow accurate and reproducible identification of Yersinia isolates to the species level, a process often inconsistent in nonspecialist laboratories. Additionally, our assay is the most phylogenetically informative typing scheme available for Y. enterocolitica. PMID:25339391

  2. Whole-exome sequencing identifies OR2W3 mutation as a cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangyu; Guan, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Long, Jirong; Wu, Na; Wu, Long; Xiang, Ying; Xu, Bin; Shen, Miaozhong; Chen, Yanhua; Wang, Yuewen; Yin, Ye; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Haiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Yafei

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases, is a genetic condition that causes retinal degeneration and eventual vision loss. Though some genes have been identified to be associated with RP, still a large part of the clinical cases could not be explained. Here we reported a four-generation Chinese family with RP, during which 6 from 9 members of the second generation affected the disease. To identify the genetic defect in this family, whole-exome sequencing together with validation analysis by Sanger sequencing were performed to find possible pathogenic mutations. After a pipeline of database filtering, including public databases and in-house databases, a novel missense mutation, c. 424 C > T transition (p.R142W) in OR2W3 gene, was identified as a potentially causative mutation for autosomal dominant RP. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype over four generations. This mutation was validated in another independent three-generation family. RT-PCR analysis also identified that OR2W3 gene was expressed in HESC-RPE cell line. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of RP, but also provide helpful clues for designing future studies to further investigate genetic factors for familial RP. PMID:25783483

  3. Sequencing EVC and EVC2 identifies mutations in two-thirds of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Tompson, Stuart W J; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Barton, Stephanie; Navarro, Victoria; Robson, Joanne L; Wright, Michael J; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2, genes in a divergent orientation separated by only 2.6 kb. We systematically sought mutations in both genes in a panel of 65 affected individuals to assess the proportion of cases resulting from mutations in each gene. We PCR amplified and sequenced the coding exons of both genes. We investigated mutations that could affect splicing by in vitro splicing assays and cDNA analysis. We have identified EVC mutations in 20 cases (31%); in all of these we have detected the mutation on each allele. We have identified EVC2 mutations in 25 cases (38%); in 22 of these we have isolated a mutation on each allele. The majority of the mutations introduce a premature termination codon. We sequenced the region between the two genes in 10 of the 20 cases in which we had not identified a mutation in either gene, revealing only one SNP that was not a common polymorphism. As we have not identified mutations in either gene in 20 cases (31%) it is possible that there is further genetic heterogeneity.

  4. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Homozygous Mutation in the Phosphate Transporter SLC34A1 in Hypophosphatemia and Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Braslavsky, Débora; Lu, James T.; Kleppe, Soledad; Clément, Florencia; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Liu, David S.; Liern, Jose Miguel; Vallejo, Graciela; Bergadá, Ignacio; Gibbs, Richard A.; Campeau, Phillipe M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Two Argentinean siblings (a boy and a girl) from a nonconsanguineous family presented with hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypophosphatemia, low parathyroid hormone (PTH), and nephrocalcinosis. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify genetic causes of the clinical findings in the two siblings. Design: Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations in the youngest sibling, and a candidate variant was screened in other family members by Sanger sequencing. In vitro experiments were conducted to determine the effects of the mutation that was identified. Patients and Other Participants: Affected siblings (2 y.o. female and 10 y.o male) and their parents were included in the study. Informed consent was obtained for genetic studies. Results: A novel homozygous mutation in the gene encoding the renal sodium-dependent phosphate transporter SLC34A1 was identified in both siblings (c.1484G>A, p.Arg495His). In vitro studies showed that the p.Arg495His mutation resulted in decreased phosphate uptake when compared to wild-type SLC34A1. Conclusions: The homozygous G>A transition that results in the substitution of histidine for arginine at position 495 of the renal sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, SLC34A1, is involved in disease pathogenesis in these patients. Our report of the second family with two mutated SLC34A1 alleles expands the known phenotype of this rare condition. PMID:25050900

  5. Identifying genomic changes associated with insecticide resistance in the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti by deep targeted sequencing.

    PubMed

    Faucon, Frederic; Dusfour, Isabelle; Gaude, Thierry; Navratil, Vincent; Boyer, Frederic; Chandre, Fabrice; Sirisopa, Patcharawan; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Girod, Romain; Corbel, Vincent; Reynaud, Stephane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of mosquitoes to resist insecticides threatens the control of diseases such as dengue and malaria. Until alternative control tools are implemented, characterizing resistance mechanisms is crucial for managing resistance in natural populations. Insecticide biodegradation by detoxification enzymes is a common resistance mechanism; however, the genomic changes underlying this mechanism have rarely been identified, precluding individual resistance genotyping. In particular, the role of copy number variations (CNVs) and polymorphisms of detoxification enzymes have never been investigated at the genome level, although they can represent robust markers of metabolic resistance. In this context, we combined target enrichment with high-throughput sequencing for conducting the first comprehensive screening of gene amplifications and polymorphisms associated with insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. More than 760 candidate genes were captured and deep sequenced in several populations of the dengue mosquito Ae. aegypti displaying distinct genetic backgrounds and contrasted resistance levels to the insecticide deltamethrin. CNV analysis identified 41 gene amplifications associated with resistance, most affecting cytochrome P450s overtranscribed in resistant populations. Polymorphism analysis detected more than 30,000 variants and strong selection footprints in specific genomic regions. Combining Bayesian and allele frequency filtering approaches identified 55 nonsynonymous variants strongly associated with resistance. Both CNVs and polymorphisms were conserved within regions but differed across continents, confirming that genomic changes underlying metabolic resistance to insecticides are not universal. By identifying novel DNA markers of insecticide resistance, this study opens the way for tracking down metabolic changes developed by mosquitoes to resist insecticides within and among populations.

  6. Identifying genomic changes associated with insecticide resistance in the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti by deep targeted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Faucon, Frederic; Dusfour, Isabelle; Gaude, Thierry; Navratil, Vincent; Boyer, Frederic; Chandre, Fabrice; Sirisopa, Patcharawan; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Girod, Romain; Corbel, Vincent; Reynaud, Stephane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of mosquitoes to resist insecticides threatens the control of diseases such as dengue and malaria. Until alternative control tools are implemented, characterizing resistance mechanisms is crucial for managing resistance in natural populations. Insecticide biodegradation by detoxification enzymes is a common resistance mechanism; however, the genomic changes underlying this mechanism have rarely been identified, precluding individual resistance genotyping. In particular, the role of copy number variations (CNVs) and polymorphisms of detoxification enzymes have never been investigated at the genome level, although they can represent robust markers of metabolic resistance. In this context, we combined target enrichment with high-throughput sequencing for conducting the first comprehensive screening of gene amplifications and polymorphisms associated with insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. More than 760 candidate genes were captured and deep sequenced in several populations of the dengue mosquito Ae. aegypti displaying distinct genetic backgrounds and contrasted resistance levels to the insecticide deltamethrin. CNV analysis identified 41 gene amplifications associated with resistance, most affecting cytochrome P450s overtranscribed in resistant populations. Polymorphism analysis detected more than 30,000 variants and strong selection footprints in specific genomic regions. Combining Bayesian and allele frequency filtering approaches identified 55 nonsynonymous variants strongly associated with resistance. Both CNVs and polymorphisms were conserved within regions but differed across continents, confirming that genomic changes underlying metabolic resistance to insecticides are not universal. By identifying novel DNA markers of insecticide resistance, this study opens the way for tracking down metabolic changes developed by mosquitoes to resist insecticides within and among populations. PMID:26206155

  7. Site-directed gene mutation at mixed sequence targets by psoralen-conjugated pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding molecules such as triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide a means for inducing site-specific mutagenesis and recombination at chromosomal sites in mammalian cells. However, the utility of TFOs is limited by the requirement for homopurine stretches in the target duplex DNA. Here, we report the use of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids (pcPNAs) for intracellular gene targeting at mixed sequence sites. Due to steric hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA–pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences by Watson–Crick pairing via double duplex-invasion complex formation. We show that psoralen-conjugated pcPNAs can deliver site-specific photoadducts and mediate targeted gene modification within both episomal and chromosomal DNA in mammalian cells without detectable off-target effects. Most of the induced psoralen-pcPNA mutations were single-base substitutions and deletions at the predicted pcPNA-binding sites. The pcPNA-directed mutagenesis was found to be dependent on PNA concentration and UVA dose and required matched pairs of pcPNAs. Neither of the individual pcPNAs alone had any effect nor did complementary PNA pairs of the same sequence. These results identify pcPNAs as new tools for site-specific gene modification in mammalian cells without purine sequence restriction, thereby providing a general strategy for designing gene targeting molecules. PMID:17977869

  8. Bioinformatic analysis of neurotropic HIV envelope sequences identifies polymorphisms in the gp120 bridging sheet that increase macrophage-tropism through enhanced interactions with CCR5

    SciTech Connect

    Mefford, Megan E.; Kunstman, Kevin; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-07-15

    Macrophages express low levels of the CD4 receptor compared to T-cells. Macrophage-tropic HIV strains replicating in brain of untreated patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) express Envs that are adapted to overcome this restriction through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here, bioinformatic analysis of env sequence datasets together with functional studies identified polymorphisms in the β3 strand of the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that increase M-tropism. D197, which results in loss of an N-glycan located near the HIV Env trimer apex, was detected in brain in some HAD patients, while position 200 was estimated to be under positive selection. D197 and T/V200 increased fusion and infection of cells expressing low CD4 by enhancing gp120 binding to CCR5. These results identify polymorphisms in the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that overcome the restriction to macrophage infection imposed by low CD4 through enhanced gp120–CCR5 interactions, thereby promoting infection of brain and other macrophage-rich tissues. - Highlights: • We analyze HIV Env sequences and identify amino acids in beta 3 of the gp120 bridging sheet that enhance macrophage tropism. • These amino acids at positions 197 and 200 are present in brain of some patients with HIV-associated dementia. • D197 results in loss of a glycan near the HIV Env trimer apex, which may increase exposure of V3. • These variants may promote infection of macrophages in the brain by enhancing gp120–CCR5 interactions.

  9. Quantitative detection of Aspergillus spp. by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Perlin, David S

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and quantitative detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate an early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). As nucleic acid-based detection is a viable option, we demonstrate that Aspergillus burdens can be rapidly and accurately detected by a novel real-time nucleic acid assay other than qPCR by using the combination of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and the molecular beacon (MB) technology. Here, we detail a real-time NASBA assay to determine quantitative Aspergillus burdens in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids of rats with experimental IPA.

  10. Metagenomic sequencing of bile from gallstone patients to identify different microbial community patterns and novel biliary bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongzhang; Ye, Fuqiang; Xie, Lu; Yang, Jianfeng; Li, Zhen; Xu, Peisong; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high worldwide prevalence of gallstone disease, the role of the biliary microbiota in gallstone pathogenesis remains obscure. Next-generation sequencing offers advantages for systematically understanding the human microbiota; however, there have been few such investigations of the biliary microbiome. Here, we performed whole-metagenome shotgun (WMS) sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing on bile samples from 15 Chinese patients with gallstone disease. Microbial communities of most individuals were clustered into two types, according to the relative enrichment of different intestinal bacterial species. In the bile samples, oral cavity/respiratory tract inhabitants were more prevalent than intestinal inhabitants and existed in both community types. Unexpectedly, the two types were not associated with fever status or surgical history, and many bacteria were patient-specific. We identified 13 novel biliary bacteria based on WMS sequencing, as well as genes encoding putative proteins related to gallstone formation and bile resistance (e.g., β-glucuronidase and multidrug efflux pumps). Bile samples from gallstone patients had reduced microbial diversity compared to healthy faecal samples. Patient samples were enriched in pathways related to oxidative stress and flagellar assembly, whereas carbohydrate metabolic pathways showed varying behaviours. As the first biliary WMS survey, our study reveals the complexity and specificity of biliary microecology. PMID:26625708

  11. Identifying proteins from two-dimensional gels by molecular mass searching of peptide fragments in protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Henzel, W J; Billeci, T M; Stults, J T; Wong, S C; Grimley, C; Watanabe, C

    1993-06-01

    A rapid method for the identification of known proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is described in which molecular masses of peptide fragments are used to search a protein sequence database. The peptides are generated by in situ reduction, alkylation, and tryptic digestion of proteins electroblotted from two-dimensional gels. Masses are determined at the subpicomole level by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of the unfractionated digest. A computer program has been developed that searches the protein sequence database for multiple peptides of individual proteins that match the measured masses. To ensure that the most recent database updates are included, a theoretical digest of the entire database is generated each time the program is executed. This method facilitates simultaneous processing of a large number of two-dimensional gel spots. The method was applied to a two-dimensional gel of a crude Escherichia coli extract that was electroblotted onto poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane. Ten randomly chosen spots were analyzed. With as few as three peptide masses, each protein was uniquely identified from over 91,000 protein sequences. All identifications were verified by concurrent N-terminal sequencing of identical spots from a second blot. One of the spots contained an N-terminally blocked protein that required enzymatic cleavage, peptide separation, and Edman degradation for confirmation of its identity.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  13. Amino acid sequence of the encephalitogenic basic protein from human myelin

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    Myelin from the central nervous system contains an unusual basic protein, which can induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The basic protein from human brain was digested with trypsin and other enzymes and the sequence of the 170 amino acids was determined. The localization of the encephalitogenic determinants was described. Possible roles for the protein in the structure and function of myelin are discussed. PMID:4108501

  14. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation in GPC3 gene in a patient with overgrowth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das Bhowmik, Aneek; Dalal, Ashwin

    2015-11-10

    Overgrowth syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by focal or generalized overgrowth. Many of the syndromes have overlapping clinical features and it is difficult to diagnose the condition based on clinical features alone. In the present study we report on a patient with overgrowth syndrome where extensive investigation did not reveal the cause of disease. Finally exome sequencing revealed a novel hemizygous single base pair deletion in exon 8 of GPC3 gene (chrX:132670203delA) resulting in a frameshift and creating a new stop codon at 62 amino acids downstream to codon 564 (c.1692delT; p.Leu565SerfsTer63) of the protein. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was found to be heterozygous for the mutation. This variation is not reported in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server (EVS), Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) and dbSNP databases and the region is conserved across primates. Exome sequencing was helpful in establishing diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) in a patient with unknown overgrowth syndrome.

  15. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation in GPC3 gene in a patient with overgrowth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das Bhowmik, Aneek; Dalal, Ashwin

    2015-11-10

    Overgrowth syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by focal or generalized overgrowth. Many of the syndromes have overlapping clinical features and it is difficult to diagnose the condition based on clinical features alone. In the present study we report on a patient with overgrowth syndrome where extensive investigation did not reveal the cause of disease. Finally exome sequencing revealed a novel hemizygous single base pair deletion in exon 8 of GPC3 gene (chrX:132670203delA) resulting in a frameshift and creating a new stop codon at 62 amino acids downstream to codon 564 (c.1692delT; p.Leu565SerfsTer63) of the protein. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was found to be heterozygous for the mutation. This variation is not reported in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server (EVS), Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) and dbSNP databases and the region is conserved across primates. Exome sequencing was helpful in establishing diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) in a patient with unknown overgrowth syndrome. PMID:26321508

  16. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  17. Sequence-based association and selection scans identify drug resistance loci in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Valim, Clarissa; Ribacke, Ulf; Van Tyne, Daria; Galinsky, Kevin; Galligan, Meghan; Becker, Justin S.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wiegand, Roger C.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Through rapid genetic adaptation and natural selection, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite—the deadliest of those that cause malaria—is able to develop resistance to antimalarial drugs, thwarting present efforts to control it. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a critical hypothesis-generating tool for understanding how this occurs. However, in P.