Science.gov

Sample records for acid sequence motifs

  1. Mining protein sequences for motifs.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Giri; Bu, Changsong; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Xuning; Xu, Ning; Mathee, Kalai

    2002-01-01

    We use methods from Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery to design an algorithm for detecting motifs in protein sequences. The algorithm assumes that a motif is constituted by the presence of a "good" combination of residues in appropriate locations of the motif. The algorithm attempts to compile such good combinations into a "pattern dictionary" by processing an aligned training set of protein sequences. The dictionary is subsequently used to detect motifs in new protein sequences. Statistical significance of the detection results are ensured by statistically determining the various parameters of the algorithm. Based on this approach, we have implemented a program called GYM. The Helix-Turn-Helix motif was used as a model system on which to test our program. The program was also extended to detect Homeodomain motifs. The detection results for the two motifs compare favorably with existing programs. In addition, the GYM program provides a lot of useful information about a given protein sequence. PMID:12487759

  2. Occurrence probability of structured motifs in random sequences.

    PubMed

    Robin, S; Daudin, J-J; Richard, H; Sagot, M-F; Schbath, S

    2002-01-01

    The problem of extracting from a set of nucleic acid sequences motifs which may have biological function is more and more important. In this paper, we are interested in particular motifs that may be implicated in the transcription process. These motifs, called structured motifs, are composed of two ordered parts separated by a variable distance and allowing for substitutions. In order to assess their statistical significance, we propose approximations of the probability of occurrences of such a structured motif in a given sequence. An application of our method to evaluate candidate promoters in E. coli and B. subtilis is presented. Simulations show the goodness of the approximations. PMID:12614545

  3. CodingMotif: exact determination of overrepresented nucleotide motifs in coding sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been increasingly appreciated that coding sequences harbor regulatory sequence motifs in addition to encoding for protein. These sequence motifs are expected to be overrepresented in nucleotide sequences bound by a common protein or small RNA. However, detecting overrepresented motifs has been difficult because of interference by constraints at the protein level. Sampling-based approaches to solve this problem based on codon-shuffling have been limited to exploring only an infinitesimal fraction of the sequence space and by their use of parametric approximations. Results We present a novel O(N(log N)2)-time algorithm, CodingMotif, to identify nucleotide-level motifs of unusual copy number in protein-coding regions. Using a new dynamic programming algorithm we are able to exhaustively calculate the distribution of the number of occurrences of a motif over all possible coding sequences that encode the same amino acid sequence, given a background model for codon usage and dinucleotide biases. Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of loci where a given motif can occur, greatly speeding up the required convolution calculations. Knowledge of the distribution allows one to assess the exact non-parametric p-value of whether a given motif is over- or under- represented. We demonstrate that our method identifies known functional motifs more accurately than sampling and parametric-based approaches in a variety of coding datasets of various size, including ChIP-seq data for the transcription factors NRSF and GABP. Conclusions CodingMotif provides a theoretically and empirically-demonstrated advance for the detection of motifs overrepresented in coding sequences. We expect CodingMotif to be useful for identifying motifs in functional genomic datasets such as DNA-protein binding, RNA-protein binding, or microRNA-RNA binding within coding regions. A software implementation is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/chuanglab/codingmotif.tar PMID

  4. Identification of G and P genotype-specific motifs in the predicted VP7 and VP4 amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongping

    2015-12-01

    Equine rotavirus (ERV) strain L338 (G13P[18]) has a unique G and P genotype. However, the evolutionary relationship of L338 with other ERVs is still unknown. Here whole genome analysis of the L338 ERV strain was independently performed. Its genotype constellations were determined as G13-P[18]-I6-R9-C9-M6-A6-N9-T12-E14-H11, confirming previous genotype assignments. The L338 strain only shared the P[18] and I6 genotypes with other ERVs. The nucleotide sequences of the other 9 RNA segments were different from those of cogent genes of all other group A rotavirus (RVA) strains including ERVs and formed unique phylogenetic lineages. The L338 evolutionary footprints were tentatively identified in both VP7 and VP4 amino acid sequences: two regions were found in VP7 and twelve in VP4. The conserved regions shared between L338 and other group A rotavirus strains (RVAs) indicated that L338 was more closely related genomically to animal and human RVAs other than ERVs, suggesting that L338 may not be an endogenous equine RV but have emerged as an interspecies reassortant with other RVA strains. Furthermore, genotype-specific motifs of all 27 G and 37 P types were identified in regions 7-1a (aa 91-100) of VP7 and regions 8-1 (aa146-151) and 8-3 (aa113-118 and 125-135) of VP4 (VP8*). PMID:26321159

  5. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features.

  6. Detecting correlations among functional-sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Pirino, Davide; Rigosa, Jacopo; Ledda, Alice; Ferretti, Luca

    2012-06-01

    Sequence motifs are words of nucleotides in DNA with biological functions, e.g., gene regulation. Identification of such words proceeds through rejection of Markov models on the expected motif frequency along the genome. Additional biological information can be extracted from the correlation structure among patterns of motif occurrences. In this paper a log-linear multivariate intensity Poisson model is estimated via expectation maximization on a set of motifs along the genome of E. coli K12. The proposed approach allows for excitatory as well as inhibitory interactions among motifs and between motifs and other genomic features like gene occurrences. Our findings confirm previous stylized facts about such types of interactions and shed new light on genome-maintenance functions of some particular motifs. We expect these methods to be applicable to a wider set of genomic features. PMID:23005179

  7. Incorporating substrate sequence motifs and spatial amino acid composition to identify kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on protein three-dimensional structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in cellular processes. Given the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based experiments, the desire to annotate the catalytic kinases for in vivo phosphorylation sites has motivated. Thus, a variety of computational methods have been developed for performing a large-scale prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. However, most of the proposed methods solely rely on the local amino acid sequences surrounding the phosphorylation sites. An increasing number of three-dimensional structures make it possible to physically investigate the structural environment of phosphorylation sites. Results In this work, all of the experimental phosphorylation sites are mapped to the protein entries of Protein Data Bank by sequence identity. It resulted in a total of 4508 phosphorylation sites containing the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures. To identify phosphorylation sites on protein 3D structures, this work incorporates support vector machines (SVMs) with the information of linear motifs and spatial amino acid composition, which is determined for each kinase group by calculating the relative frequencies of 20 amino acid types within a specific radial distance from central phosphorylated amino acid residue. After the cross-validation evaluation, most of the kinase-specific models trained with the consideration of structural information outperform the models considering only the sequence information. Furthermore, the independent testing set which is not included in training set has demonstrated that the proposed method could provide a comparable performance to other popular tools. Conclusion The proposed method is shown to be capable of predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on 3D structures and has been implemented as a web server which is freely accessible at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/PhosK3D/. Due to the difficulty of identifying the kinase-specific phosphorylation

  8. Detecting seeded motifs in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Cinzia; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Bisognin, Andrea; Coppe, Alessandro; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of detecting DNA motifs with functional relevance in real biological sequences is difficult due to a number of biological, statistical and computational issues and also because of the lack of knowledge about the structure of searched patterns. Many algorithms are implemented in fully automated processes, which are often based upon a guess of input parameters from the user at the very first step. In this paper, we present a novel method for the detection of seeded DNA motifs, composed by regions with a different extent of variability. The method is based on a multi-step approach, which was implemented in a motif searching web tool (MOST). Overrepresented exact patterns are extracted from input sequences and clustered to produce motifs core regions, which are then extended and scored to generate seeded motifs. The combination of automated pattern discovery algorithms and different display tools for the evaluation and selection of results at several analysis steps can potentially lead to much more meaningful results than complete automation can produce. Experimental results on different yeast and human real datasets proved the methodology to be a promising solution for finding seeded motifs. MOST web tool is freely available at http://telethon.bio.unipd.it/bioinfo/MOST. PMID:16141193

  9. Detecting seeded motifs in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, Cinzia; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Bisognin, Andrea; Coppe, Alessandro; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of detecting DNA motifs with functional relevance in real biological sequences is difficult due to a number of biological, statistical and computational issues and also because of the lack of knowledge about the structure of searched patterns. Many algorithms are implemented in fully automated processes, which are often based upon a guess of input parameters from the user at the very first step. In this paper, we present a novel method for the detection of seeded DNA motifs, composed by regions with a different extent of variability. The method is based on a multi-step approach, which was implemented in a motif searching web tool (MOST). Overrepresented exact patterns are extracted from input sequences and clustered to produce motifs core regions, which are then extended and scored to generate seeded motifs. The combination of automated pattern discovery algorithms and different display tools for the evaluation and selection of results at several analysis steps can potentially lead to much more meaningful results than complete automation can produce. Experimental results on different yeast and human real datasets proved the methodology to be a promising solution for finding seeded motifs. MOST web tool is freely available at . PMID:16141193

  10. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by patterns in

  11. Identification of amino acid sequence motifs in desmocollin, a desmosomal glycoprotein, that are required for plakoglobin binding and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Troyanovsky, S M; Troyanovsky, R B; Eshkind, L G; Leube, R E; Franke, W W

    1994-11-01

    By transfecting epithelial cells with gene constructs encoding chimeric proteins of the transmembrane part of the gap junction protein connexin 32 in combination with various segments of the cytoplasmic part of the desmosomal cadherin desmocollin 1a, we have determined that a relatively short sequence element is necessary for the formation of desmosome-like plaques and for the specific anchorage of bundles of intermediate-sized filaments (IFs). Deletion of as little as the carboxyl-terminal 37 aa resulted in a lack of IF anchorage and binding of the plaque protein plakoglobin, as shown by immunolocalization and immunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we show that the sequence requirements for the recruitment of desmoplakin, another desmosomal plaque protein, differ and that a short (10 aa) segment of the desmocollin 1a tail, located close to the plasma membrane, is also required for the binding of plakoglobin, as well as of desmoplakin, and also for IF anchorage. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal domain, homologous in diverse types of cadherins, is emphasized, as it must harbor, in a mutually exclusive pattern, the information for assembly of the IF-anchoring desmosomal plaque in desmocollins and for formation of the alpha-/beta-catenin- and vinculin-containing, actin filament-anchoring plaque in E- and N-cadherin. PMID:7971964

  12. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zirbel, Craig L.; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson–Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  13. Identifying novel sequence variants of RNA 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Zirbel, Craig L; Roll, James; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Pirrung, Meg; Leontis, Neocles B

    2015-09-01

    Predicting RNA 3D structure from sequence is a major challenge in biophysics. An important sub-goal is accurately identifying recurrent 3D motifs from RNA internal and hairpin loop sequences extracted from secondary structure (2D) diagrams. We have developed and validated new probabilistic models for 3D motif sequences based on hybrid Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Markov Random Fields (SCFG/MRF). The SCFG/MRF models are constructed using atomic-resolution RNA 3D structures. To parameterize each model, we use all instances of each motif found in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas and annotations of pairwise nucleotide interactions generated by the FR3D software. Isostericity relations between non-Watson-Crick basepairs are used in scoring sequence variants. SCFG techniques model nested pairs and insertions, while MRF ideas handle crossing interactions and base triples. We use test sets of randomly-generated sequences to set acceptance and rejection thresholds for each motif group and thus control the false positive rate. Validation was carried out by comparing results for four motif groups to RMDetect. The software developed for sequence scoring (JAR3D) is structured to automatically incorporate new motifs as they accumulate in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas when new structures are solved and is available free for download. PMID:26130723

  14. BlockLogo: visualization of peptide and sequence motif conservation.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Simon, Christian; Sun, Jing; Schönbach, Christian; Reinherz, Ellis L; Zhang, Guang Lan; Brusic, Vladimir

    2013-12-31

    BlockLogo is a web-server application for the visualization of protein and nucleotide fragments, continuous protein sequence motifs, and discontinuous sequence motifs using calculation of block entropy from multiple sequence alignments. The user input consists of a multiple sequence alignment, selection of motif positions, type of sequence, and output format definition. The output has BlockLogo along with the sequence logo, and a table of motif frequencies. We deployed BlockLogo as an online application and have demonstrated its utility through examples that show visualization of T-cell epitopes and B-cell epitopes (both continuous and discontinuous). Our additional example shows a visualization and analysis of structural motifs that determine the specificity of peptide binding to HLA-DR molecules. The BlockLogo server also employs selected experimentally validated prediction algorithms to enable on-the-fly prediction of MHC binding affinity to 15 common HLA class I and class II alleles as well as visual analysis of discontinuous epitopes from multiple sequence alignments. It enables the visualization and analysis of structural and functional motifs that are usually described as regular expressions. It provides a compact view of discontinuous motifs composed of distant positions within biological sequences. BlockLogo is available at: http://research4.dfci.harvard.edu/cvc/blocklogo/ and http://met-hilab.bu.edu/blocklogo/. PMID:24001880

  15. A Gibbs sampler for motif detection in phylogenetically close sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddharthan, Rahul; van Nimwegen, Erik; Siggia, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Genes are regulated by transcription factors that bind to DNA upstream of genes and recognize short conserved ``motifs'' in a random intergenic ``background''. Motif-finders such as the Gibbs sampler compare the probability of these short sequences being represented by ``weight matrices'' to the probability of their arising from the background ``null model'', and explore this space (analogous to a free-energy landscape). But closely related species may show conservation not because of functional sites but simply because they have not had sufficient time to diverge, so conventional methods will fail. We introduce a new Gibbs sampler algorithm that accounts for common ancestry when searching for motifs, while requiring minimal ``prior'' assumptions on the number and types of motifs, assessing the significance of detected motifs by ``tracking'' clusters that stay together. We apply this scheme to motif detection in sporulation-cycle genes in the yeast S. cerevisiae, using recent sequences of other closely-related Saccharomyces species.

  16. Loop Sequence Context Influences the Formation and Stability of the i-Motif for DNA Oligomers of Sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, under Slightly Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    McKim, Mikeal; Buxton, Alexander; Johnson, Courtney; Metz, Amanda; Sheardy, Richard D

    2016-08-11

    The structure and stability of DNA is highly dependent upon the sequence context of the bases (A, G, C, and T) and the environment under which the DNA is prepared (e.g., buffer, temperature, pH, ionic strength). Understanding the factors that influence structure and stability of the i-motif conformation can lead to the design of DNA sequences with highly tunable properties. We have been investigating the influence of pH and temperature on the conformations and stabilities for all permutations of the DNA sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, using spectroscopic approaches. All oligomers undergo transitions from single-stranded structures at pH 7.0 to i-motif conformations at pH 5.0 as evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) studies. These folded structures possess stacked C:CH(+) base pairs joined by loops of 5'-XXX-3'. Although the pH at the midpoint of the transition (pHmp) varies slightly with loop sequence, the linkage between pH and log K for the proton induced transition is highly loop sequence dependent. All oligomers also undergo the thermally induced i-motif to single-strand transition at pH 5.0 as the temperature is increased from 25 to 95 °C. The temperature at the midpoint of this transition (Tm) is also highly dependent on loop sequence context effects. For seven of eight possible permutations, the pH induced, and thermally induced transitions appear to be highly cooperative and two state. Analysis of the CD optical melting profiles via a van't Hoff approach reveals sequence-dependent thermodynamic parameters for the unfolding as well. Together, these data reveal that the i-motif conformation exhibits exquisite sensitivity to loop sequence context with respect to formation and stability. PMID:27438583

  17. The BsaHI restriction-modification system: Cloning, sequencing and analysis of conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Robert K; Roberts, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Background Restriction and modification enzymes typically recognise short DNA sequences of between two and eight bases in length. Understanding the mechanism of this recognition represents a significant challenge that we begin to address for the BsaHI restriction-modification system, which recognises the six base sequence GRCGYC. Results The DNA sequences of the genes for the BsaHI methyltransferase, bsaHIM, and restriction endonuclease, bsaHIR, have been determined (GenBank accession #EU386360), cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both the restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase enzymes share significant similarity with a group of 6 other enzymes comprising the restriction-modification systems HgiDI and HgiGI and the putative HindVP, NlaCORFDP, NpuORFC228P and SplZORFNP restriction-modification systems. A sequence alignment of these homologues shows that their amino acid sequences are largely conserved and highlights several motifs of interest. We target one such conserved motif, reading SPERRFD, at the C-terminal end of the bsaHIR gene. A mutational analysis of these amino acids indicates that the motif is crucial for enzymatic activity. Sequence alignment of the methyltransferase gene reveals a short motif within the target recognition domain that is conserved among enzymes recognising the same sequences. Thus, this motif may be used as a diagnostic tool to define the recognition sequences of the cytosine C5 methyltransferases. Conclusion We have cloned and sequenced the BsaHI restriction and modification enzymes. We have identified a region of the R. BsaHI enzyme that is crucial for its activity. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the BsaHI methyltransferase enzyme led us to propose two new motifs that can be used in the diagnosis of the recognition sequence of the cytosine C5-methyltransferases. PMID:18479503

  18. Characterization of the tandem CWCH2 sequence motif: a hallmark of inter-zinc finger interactions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The C2H2 zinc finger (ZF) domain is widely conserved among eukaryotic proteins. In Zic/Gli/Zap1 C2H2 ZF proteins, the two N-terminal ZFs form a single structural unit by sharing a hydrophobic core. This structural unit defines a new motif comprised of two tryptophan side chains at the center of the hydrophobic core. Because each tryptophan residue is located between the two cysteine residues of the C2H2 motif, we have named this structure the tandem CWCH2 (tCWCH2) motif. Results Here, we characterized 587 tCWCH2-containing genes using data derived from public databases. We categorized genes into 11 classes including Zic/Gli/Glis, Arid2/Rsc9, PacC, Mizf, Aebp2, Zap1/ZafA, Fungl, Zfp106, Twincl, Clr1, and Fungl-4ZF, based on sequence similarity, domain organization, and functional similarities. tCWCH2 motifs are mostly found in organisms belonging to the Opisthokonta (metazoa, fungi, and choanoflagellates) and Amoebozoa (amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum). By comparison, the C2H2 ZF motif is distributed widely among the eukaryotes. The structure and organization of the tCWCH2 motif, its phylogenetic distribution, and molecular phylogenetic analysis suggest that prototypical tCWCH2 genes existed in the Opisthokonta ancestor. Within-group or between-group comparisons of the tCWCH2 amino acid sequence identified three additional sequence features (site-specific amino acid frequencies, longer linker sequence between two C2H2 ZFs, and frequent extra-sequences within C2H2 ZF motifs). Conclusion These features suggest that the tCWCH2 motif is a specialized motif involved in inter-zinc finger interactions. PMID:20167128

  19. Discovering Motifs in Biological Sequences Using the Micron Automata Processor.

    PubMed

    Roy, Indranil; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Finding approximately conserved sequences, called motifs, across multiple DNA or protein sequences is an important problem in computational biology. In this paper, we consider the (l, d) motif search problem of identifying one or more motifs of length l present in at least q of the n given sequences, with each occurrence differing from the motif in at most d substitutions. The problem is known to be NP-complete, and the largest solved instance reported to date is (26,11). We propose a novel algorithm for the (l,d) motif search problem using streaming execution over a large set of non-deterministic finite automata (NFA). This solution is designed to take advantage of the micron automata processor, a new technology close to deployment that can simultaneously execute multiple NFA in parallel. We demonstrate the capability for solving much larger instances of the (l, d) motif search problem using the resources available within a single automata processor board, by estimating run-times for problem instances (39,18) and (40,17). The paper serves as a useful guide to solving problems using this new accelerator technology. PMID:26886735

  20. Discovering Motifs in Ranked Lists of DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Eden, Eran; Lipson, Doron; Yogev, Sivan; Yakhini, Zohar

    2007-01-01

    Computational methods for discovery of sequence elements that are enriched in a target set compared with a background set are fundamental in molecular biology research. One example is the discovery of transcription factor binding motifs that are inferred from ChIP–chip (chromatin immuno-precipitation on a microarray) measurements. Several major challenges in sequence motif discovery still require consideration: (i) the need for a principled approach to partitioning the data into target and background sets; (ii) the lack of rigorous models and of an exact p-value for measuring motif enrichment; (iii) the need for an appropriate framework for accounting for motif multiplicity; (iv) the tendency, in many of the existing methods, to report presumably significant motifs even when applied to randomly generated data. In this paper we present a statistical framework for discovering enriched sequence elements in ranked lists that resolves these four issues. We demonstrate the implementation of this framework in a software application, termed DRIM (discovery of rank imbalanced motifs), which identifies sequence motifs in lists of ranked DNA sequences. We applied DRIM to ChIP–chip and CpG methylation data and obtained the following results. (i) Identification of 50 novel putative transcription factor (TF) binding sites in yeast ChIP–chip data. The biological function of some of them was further investigated to gain new insights on transcription regulation networks in yeast. For example, our discoveries enable the elucidation of the network of the TF ARO80. Another finding concerns a systematic TF binding enhancement to sequences containing CA repeats. (ii) Discovery of novel motifs in human cancer CpG methylation data. Remarkably, most of these motifs are similar to DNA sequence elements bound by the Polycomb complex that promotes histone methylation. Our findings thus support a model in which histone methylation and CpG methylation are mechanistically linked. Overall

  1. Oligonucleotide Sequence Motifs as Nucleosome Positioning Signals

    PubMed Central

    Collings, Clayton K.; Fernandez, Alfonso G.; Pitschka, Chad G.; Hawkins, Troy B.; Anderson, John N.

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the sequence patterns that characterize positioned nucleosomes, we first performed an analysis of the periodicities of the 256 tetranucleotides in a yeast genome-wide library of nucleosomal DNA sequences that was prepared by in vitro reconstitution. The approach entailed the identification and analysis of 24 unique tetranucleotides that were defined by 8 consensus sequences. These consensus sequences were shown to be responsible for most if not all of the tetranucleotide and dinucleotide periodicities displayed by the entire library, demonstrating that the periodicities of dinucleotides that characterize the yeast genome are, in actuality, due primarily to the 8 consensus sequences. A novel combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches was then used to show that these tetranucleotides are important for preferred formation of nucleosomes at specific sites along DNA in vitro. These results were then compared to tetranucleotide patterns in genome-wide in vivo libraries from yeast and C. elegans in order to assess the contributions of DNA sequence in the control of nucleosome residency in the cell. These comparisons revealed striking similarities in the tetranucleotide occurrence profiles that are likely to be involved in nucleosome positioning in both in vitro and in vivo libraries, suggesting that DNA sequence is an important factor in the control of nucleosome placement in vivo. However, the strengths of the tetranucleotide periodicities were 3–4 fold higher in the in vitro as compared to the in vivo libraries, which implies that DNA sequence plays less of a role in dictating nucleosome positions in vivo. The results of this study have important implications for models of sequence-dependent positioning since they suggest that a defined subset of tetranucleotides is involved in preferred nucleosome occupancy and that these tetranucleotides are the major source of the dinucleotide periodicities that are characteristic of

  2. An artificial intelligence approach to motif discovery in protein sequences: application to steriod dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bailey, T L; Baker, M E; Elkan, C P

    1997-05-01

    MEME (Multiple Expectation-maximization for Motif Elicitation) is a unique new software tool that uses artificial intelligence techniques to discover motifs shared by a set of protein sequences in a fully automated manner. This paper is the first detailed study of the use of MEME to analyse a large, biologically relevant set of sequences, and to evaluate the sensitivity and accuracy of MEME in identifying structurally important motifs. For this purpose, we chose the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily because it is large and phylogenetically diverse, providing a test of how well MEME can work on sequences with low amino acid similarity. Moreover, this dataset contains enzymes of biological importance, and because several enzymes have known X-ray crystallographic structures, we can test the usefulness of MEME for structural analysis. The first six motifs from MEME map onto structurally important alpha-helices and beta-strands on Streptomyces hydrogenans 20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We also describe MAST (Motif Alignment Search Tool), which conveniently uses output from MEME for searching databases such as SWISS-PROT and Genpept. MAST provides statistical measures that permit a rigorous evaluation of the significance of database searches with individual motifs or groups of motifs. A database search of Genpept90 by MAST with the log-odds matrix of the first six motifs obtained from MEME yields a bimodal output, demonstrating the selectivity of MAST. We show for the first time, using primary sequence analysis, that bacterial sugar epimerases are homologs of short-chain dehydrogenases. MEME and MAST will be increasingly useful as genome sequencing provides large datasets of phylogenetically divergent sequences of biomedical interest. PMID:9366496

  3. Discovering common stem–loop motifs in unaligned RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stricklin, Shawn L.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is often accomplished by proteins binding to specific sequence motifs in mRNA molecules, to affect their translation or stability. The motifs are often composed of a combination of sequence and structural constraints such that the overall structure is preserved even though much of the primary sequence is variable. While several methods exist to discover transcriptional regulatory sites in the DNA sequences of coregulated genes, the RNA motif discovery problem is much more difficult because of covariation in the positions. We describe the combined use of two approaches for RNA structure prediction, FOLDALIGN and COVE, that together can discover and model stem–loop RNA motifs in unaligned sequences, such as UTRs from post-transcriptionally coregulated genes. We evaluate the method on two datasets, one a section of rRNA genes with randomly truncated ends so that a global alignment is not possible, and the other a hyper-variable collection of IRE-like elements that were inserted into randomized UTR sequences. In both cases the combined method identified the motifs correctly, and in the rRNA example we show that it is capable of determining the structure, which includes bulge and internal loops as well as a variable length hairpin loop. Those automated results are quantitatively evaluated and found to agree closely with structures contained in curated databases, with correlation coefficients up to 0.9. A basic server, Stem–Loop Align SearcH (SLASH), which will perform stem–loop searches in unaligned RNA sequences, is available at http://www.bioinf.au.dk/slash/. PMID:11353083

  4. The highly conserved amino acid sequence motif Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser in alpha-like DNA polymerases is required by phage phi 29 DNA polymerase for protein-primed initiation and polymerization.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Lázaro, J M; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-like DNA polymerases from bacteriophage phi 29 and other viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes contain an amino acid consensus sequence that has been proposed to form part of the dNTP binding site. We have used site-directed mutants to study five of the six highly conserved consecutive amino acids corresponding to the most conserved C-terminal segment (Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser). Our results indicate that in phi 29 DNA polymerase this consensus sequence, although irrelevant for the 3'----5' exonuclease activity, is essential for initiation and elongation. Based on these results and on its homology with known or putative metal-binding amino acid sequences, we propose that in phi 29 DNA polymerase the Tyr-Gly-Asp-Thr-Asp-Ser consensus motif is part of the dNTP binding site, involved in the synthetic activities of the polymerase (i.e., initiation and polymerization), and that it is involved particularly in the metal binding associated with the dNTP site. Images PMID:2191296

  5. Classification of protein motifs based on subcellular localization uncovers evolutionary relationships at both sequence and functional levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most proteins have evolved in specific cellular compartments that limit their functions and potential interactions. On the other hand, motifs define amino acid arrangements conserved between protein family members and represent powerful tools for assigning function to protein sequences. The ideal motif would identify all members of a protein family but in practice many motifs identify both family members and unrelated proteins, referred to as True Positive (TP) and False Positive (FP) sequences, respectively. Results To address the relationship between protein motifs, protein function and cellular localization, we systematically assigned subcellular localization data to motif sequences from the comprehensive PROSITE sequence motif database. Using this data we analyzed relationships between localization and function. We find that TPs and FPs have a strong tendency to localize in different compartments. When multiple localizations are considered, TPs are usually distributed between related cellular compartments. We also identified cases where FPs are concentrated in particular subcellular regions, indicating possible functional or evolutionary relationships with TP sequences of the same motif. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the systematic examination of subcellular localization has the potential to uncover evolutionary and functional relationships between motif-containing sequences. We believe that this type of analysis complements existing motif annotations and could aid in their interpretation. Our results shed light on the evolution of cellular organelles and potentially establish the basis for new subcellular localization and function prediction algorithms. PMID:23865897

  6. Computing distribution of scale independent motifs in biological sequences

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jonas S; Vinga, Susana

    2006-01-01

    The use of Chaos Game Representation (CGR) or its generalization, Universal Sequence Maps (USM), to describe the distribution of biological sequences has been found objectionable because of the fractal structure of that coordinate system. Consequently, the investigation of distribution of symbolic motifs at multiple scales is hampered by an inexact association between distance and sequence dissimilarity. A solution to this problem could unleash the use of iterative maps as phase-state representation of sequences where its statistical properties can be conveniently investigated. In this study a family of kernel density functions is described that accommodates the fractal nature of iterative function representations of symbolic sequences and, consequently, enables the exact investigation of sequence motifs of arbitrary lengths in that scale-independent representation. Furthermore, the proposed kernel density includes both Markovian succession and currently used alignment-free sequence dissimilarity metrics as special solutions. Therefore, the fractal kernel described is in fact a generalization that provides a common framework for a diverse suite of sequence analysis techniques. PMID:17049089

  7. Do short, frequent DNA sequence motifs mould the epigenome?

    PubMed

    Quante, Timo; Bird, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    'Epigenome' refers to the panoply of chemical modifications borne by DNA and its associated proteins that locally affect genome function. Epigenomic patterns are thought to be determined by external constraints resulting from development, disease and the environment, but DNA sequence is also a potential influence. We propose that domains of relatively uniform DNA base composition may modulate the epigenome through cell type-specific proteins that recognize short, frequent sequence motifs. Differential recruitment of epigenomic modifiers may adjust gene expression in multigene blocks as an alternative to tuning the activity of each gene separately, thus simplifying gene expression programming. PMID:26837845

  8. Sequence-Based Classification Using Discriminatory Motif Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Sen, Śaunak; Segal, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing methods for sequence-based classification use exhaustive feature generation, employing, for example, all -mer patterns. The motivation behind such (enumerative) approaches is to minimize the potential for overlooking important features. However, there are shortcomings to this strategy. First, practical constraints limit the scope of exhaustive feature generation to patterns of length , such that potentially important, longer () predictors are not considered. Second, features so generated exhibit strong dependencies, which can complicate understanding of derived classification rules. Third, and most importantly, numerous irrelevant features are created. These concerns can compromise prediction and interpretation. While remedies have been proposed, they tend to be problem-specific and not broadly applicable. Here, we develop a generally applicable methodology, and an attendant software pipeline, that is predicated on discriminatory motif finding. In addition to the traditional training and validation partitions, our framework entails a third level of data partitioning, a discovery partition. A discriminatory motif finder is used on sequences and associated class labels in the discovery partition to yield a (small) set of features. These features are then used as inputs to a classifier in the training partition. Finally, performance assessment occurs on the validation partition. Important attributes of our approach are its modularity (any discriminatory motif finder and any classifier can be deployed) and its universality (all data, including sequences that are unaligned and/or of unequal length, can be accommodated). We illustrate our approach on two nucleosome occupancy datasets and a protein solubility dataset, previously analyzed using enumerative feature generation. Our method achieves excellent performance results, with and without optimization of classifier tuning parameters. A Python pipeline implementing the approach is available at http

  9. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx5 [ATS]x4 Gx4 [VIL]WNR[TS]x2 [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x3 {K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes. Proteins 2016; 84:600-610. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26857686

  10. Functional roles of short sequence motifs in the endocytosis of membrane receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2009-01-01

    Internalization and trafficking of cell-surface membrane receptors and proteins into subcellular compartments is mediated by specific short-sequence signal motifs, which are usually located within the cytoplasmic domains of these receptor and protein molecules. The signals usually consist of short linear amino acid sequences, which are recognized by adaptor coat proteins along the endocytic and sorting pathways. The complex arrays of signals and recognition proteins ensure the dynamic movement, accurate trafficking, and designated distribution of transmembrane receptors and ligands into intracellular compartments, particularly to the endosomal-lysosomal system. This review summarizes the new information and concepts, integrating them with the current and established views of endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and sorting of membrane receptors and proteins. Particular emphasis has been given to the functional roles of short-sequence signal motifs responsible for the itinerary and destination of membrane receptors and proteins moving into the subcellular compartments. The specific characteristics and functions of short-sequence motifs, including various tyrosine-based, dileucine-type, and other short-sequence signals in the trafficking and sorting of membrane receptors and membrane proteins are presented and discussed. PMID:19482617

  11. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bryan M.; Keasey, Sarah L.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Lountos, George T.; Dyas, Beverly K.; Cherry, Scott; Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Waugh, David S.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P) residue, but also the Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7), atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27), viral (variola VH1), and Cdc25 (A-C). Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P) peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets. PMID:26302245

  12. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  13. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-01-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins. PMID:25253464

  14. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aalt D. J.; Morabito, Giuseppa; Fiers, Martijn; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and network evolution. PMID

  15. A Monte Carlo-based framework enhances the discovery and interpretation of regulatory sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Discovery of functionally significant short, statistically overrepresented subsequence patterns (motifs) in a set of sequences is a challenging problem in bioinformatics. Oftentimes, not all sequences in the set contain a motif. These non-motif-containing sequences complicate the algorithmic discovery of motifs. Filtering the non-motif-containing sequences from the larger set of sequences while simultaneously determining the identity of the motif is, therefore, desirable and a non-trivial problem in motif discovery research. Results We describe MotifCatcher, a framework that extends the sensitivity of existing motif-finding tools by employing random sampling to effectively remove non-motif-containing sequences from the motif search. We developed two implementations of our algorithm; each built around a commonly used motif-finding tool, and applied our algorithm to three diverse chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data sets. In each case, the motif finder with the MotifCatcher extension demonstrated improved sensitivity over the motif finder alone. Our approach organizes candidate functionally significant discovered motifs into a tree, which allowed us to make additional insights. In all cases, we were able to support our findings with experimental work from the literature. Conclusions Our framework demonstrates that additional processing at the sequence entry level can significantly improve the performance of existing motif-finding tools. For each biological data set tested, we were able to propose novel biological hypotheses supported by experimental work from the literature. Specifically, in Escherichia coli, we suggested binding site motifs for 6 non-traditional LexA protein binding sites; in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we hypothesize 2 disparate mechanisms for novel binding sites of the Cse4p protein; and in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we discoverd subtle differences in a general transcription factor (GTF) binding site motif across several data sets. We

  16. SVM2Motif--Reconstructing Overlapping DNA Sequence Motifs by Mimicking an SVM Predictor.

    PubMed

    Vidovic, Marina M-C; Görnitz, Nico; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Rätsch, Gunnar; Kloft, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Identifying discriminative motifs underlying the functionality and evolution of organisms is a major challenge in computational biology. Machine learning approaches such as support vector machines (SVMs) achieve state-of-the-art performances in genomic discrimination tasks, but--due to its black-box character--motifs underlying its decision function are largely unknown. As a remedy, positional oligomer importance matrices (POIMs) allow us to visualize the significance of position-specific subsequences. Although being a major step towards the explanation of trained SVM models, they suffer from the fact that their size grows exponentially in the length of the motif, which renders their manual inspection feasible only for comparably small motif sizes, typically k ≤ 5. In this work, we extend the work on positional oligomer importance matrices, by presenting a new machine-learning methodology, entitled motifPOIM, to extract the truly relevant motifs--regardless of their length and complexity--underlying the predictions of a trained SVM model. Our framework thereby considers the motifs as free parameters in a probabilistic model, a task which can be phrased as a non-convex optimization problem. The exponential dependence of the POIM size on the oligomer length poses a major numerical challenge, which we address by an efficient optimization framework that allows us to find possibly overlapping motifs consisting of up to hundreds of nucleotides. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach on a synthetic data set as well as a real-world human splice site data set. PMID:26690911

  17. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-07-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson-Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  18. CDR3β sequence motifs regulate autoreactivity of human invariant NKT cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Chamoto, Kenji; Guo, Tingxi; Imataki, Osamu; Tanaka, Makito; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Ochi, Toshiki; Yamashita, Yuki; Saito, Akiko M; Saito, Toshiki I; Butler, Marcus O; Hirano, Naoto

    2016-04-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that recognize lipid ligands presented by monomorphic CD1d. Human iNKT T cell receptor (TCR) is largely composed of invariant Vα24 (Vα24i) TCRα chain and semi-variant Vβ11 TCRβ chain, where complementarity-determining region (CDR)3β is the sole variable region. One of the characteristic features of iNKT cells is that they retain autoreactivity even after the thymic selection. However, the molecular features of human iNKT TCR CDR3β sequences that regulate autoreactivity remain unknown. Since the numbers of iNKT cells with detectable autoreactivity in peripheral blood is limited, we introduced the Vα24i gene into peripheral T cells and generated a de novo human iNKT TCR repertoire. By stimulating the transfected T cells with artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) presenting self-ligands, we enriched strongly autoreactive iNKT TCRs and isolated a large panel of human iNKT TCRs with a broad range autoreactivity. From this panel of unique iNKT TCRs, we deciphered three CDR3β sequence motifs frequently encoded by strongly-autoreactive iNKT TCRs: a VD region with 2 or more acidic amino acids, usage of the Jβ2-5 allele, and a CDR3β region of 13 amino acids in length. iNKT TCRs encoding 2 or 3 sequence motifs also exhibit higher autoreactivity than those encoding 0 or 1 motifs. These data facilitate our understanding of the molecular basis for human iNKT cell autoreactivity involved in immune responses associated with human disease. PMID:26748722

  19. False occurrences of functional motifs in protein sequences highlight evolutionary constraints

    PubMed Central

    Via, Allegra; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Ferraro, Enrico; Ausiello, Gabriele; Scalia Tomba, Gianpaolo; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2007-01-01

    Background False occurrences of functional motifs in protein sequences can be considered as random events due solely to the sequence composition of a proteome. Here we use a numerical approach to investigate the random appearance of functional motifs with the aim of addressing biological questions such as: How are organisms protected from undesirable occurrences of motifs otherwise selected for their functionality? Has the random appearance of functional motifs in protein sequences been affected during evolution? Results Here we analyse the occurrence of functional motifs in random sequences and compare it to that observed in biological proteomes; the behaviour of random motifs is also studied. Most motifs exhibit a number of false positives significantly similar to the number of times they appear in randomized proteomes (=expected number of false positives). Interestingly, about 3% of the analysed motifs show a different kind of behaviour and appear in biological proteomes less than they do in random sequences. In some of these cases, a mechanism of evolutionary negative selection is apparent; this helps to prevent unwanted functionalities which could interfere with cellular mechanisms. Conclusion Our thorough statistical and biological analysis showed that there are several mechanisms and evolutionary constraints both of which affect the appearance of functional motifs in protein sequences. PMID:17331242

  20. Illumina MiSeq sequencing disfavours a sequence motif in the GFP reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Verhelst, Judith; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used reporter genes. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyse the genetic diversity of a recombinant influenza A virus that expresses GFP and found a remarkable coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence. This coverage dip was present when virus-derived RT-PCR product or the parental plasmid DNA was used as starting material for NGS and regardless of whether Nextera XT transposase or Covaris shearing was used for DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the sequence coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence was not the result of emerging GFP mutant viruses or a bias introduced by Nextera XT fragmentation. Instead, we found that the Illumina MiSeq sequencing method disfavours the ‘CCCGCC’ motif in the GFP coding sequence. PMID:27193250

  1. Illumina MiSeq sequencing disfavours a sequence motif in the GFP reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Verhelst, Judith; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most used reporter genes. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyse the genetic diversity of a recombinant influenza A virus that expresses GFP and found a remarkable coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence. This coverage dip was present when virus-derived RT-PCR product or the parental plasmid DNA was used as starting material for NGS and regardless of whether Nextera XT transposase or Covaris shearing was used for DNA fragmentation. Therefore, the sequence coverage dip in the GFP coding sequence was not the result of emerging GFP mutant viruses or a bias introduced by Nextera XT fragmentation. Instead, we found that the Illumina MiSeq sequencing method disfavours the 'CCCGCC' motif in the GFP coding sequence. PMID:27193250

  2. Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins: sequence motifs in structural and evolutionary analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Solidar, Ada; Yoden, Marilyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are a family of monomeric proteins that bind and transfer phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine between membrane compartments. They are required for production of inositol and diacylglycerol second messengers, and are found in most metazoan organisms. While PITPs are known to carry out crucial cell-signaling roles in many organisms, the structure, function and evolution of the majority of family members remains unexplored; primarily because the ubiquity and diversity of the family thwarts traditional methods of global alignment. To surmount this obstacle, we instead took a novel approach, using MEME and a parsimony-based analysis to create a cladogram of conserved sequence motifs in 56 PITP family proteins from 26 species. In keeping with previous functional annotations, three clades were supported within our evolutionary analysis; two classes of soluble proteins and a class of membrane-associated proteins. By, focusing on conserved regions, the analysis allowed for in depth queries regarding possible functional roles of PITP proteins in both intra- and extra- cellular signaling.

  3. CyanoLyase: a database of phycobilin lyase sequences, motifs and functions

    PubMed Central

    Bretaudeau, Anthony; Coste, François; Humily, Florian; Garczarek, Laurence; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Six, Christophe; Ratin, Morgane; Collin, Olivier; Schluchter, Wendy M.; Partensky, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    CyanoLyase (http://cyanolyase.genouest.org/) is a manually curated sequence and motif database of phycobilin lyases and related proteins. These enzymes catalyze the covalent ligation of chromophores (phycobilins) to specific binding sites of phycobiliproteins (PBPs). The latter constitute the building bricks of phycobilisomes, the major light-harvesting systems of cyanobacteria and red algae. Phycobilin lyases sequences are poorly annotated in public databases. Sequences included in CyanoLyase were retrieved from all available genomes of these organisms and a few others by similarity searches using biochemically characterized enzyme sequences and then classified into 3 clans and 32 families. Amino acid motifs were computed for each family using Protomata learner. CyanoLyase also includes BLAST and a novel pattern matching tool (Protomatch) that allow users to rapidly retrieve and annotate lyases from any new genome. In addition, it provides phylogenetic analyses of all phycobilin lyases families, describes their function, their presence/absence in all genomes of the database (phyletic profiles) and predicts the chromophorylation of PBPs in each strain. The site also includes a thorough bibliography about phycobilin lyases and genomes included in the database. This resource should be useful to scientists and companies interested in natural or artificial PBPs, which have a number of biotechnological applications, notably as fluorescent markers. PMID:23175607

  4. Gapped alignment of protein sequence motifs through Monte Carlo optimization of a hidden Markov model

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, Andrew F; Liu, Jun S

    2004-01-01

    Background Certain protein families are highly conserved across distantly related organisms and belong to large and functionally diverse superfamilies. The patterns of conservation present in these protein sequences presumably are due to selective constraints maintaining important but unknown structural mechanisms with some constraints specific to each family and others shared by a larger subset or by the entire superfamily. To exploit these patterns as a source of functional information, we recently devised a statistically based approach called contrast hierarchical alignment and interaction network (CHAIN) analysis, which infers the strengths of various categories of selective constraints from co-conserved patterns in a multiple alignment. The power of this approach strongly depends on the quality of the multiple alignments, which thus motivated development of theoretical concepts and strategies to improve alignment of conserved motifs within large sets of distantly related sequences. Results Here we describe a hidden Markov model (HMM), an algebraic system, and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling strategies for alignment of multiple sequence motifs. The MCMC sampling strategies are useful both for alignment optimization and for adjusting position specific background amino acid frequencies for alignment uncertainties. Associated statistical formulations provide an objective measure of alignment quality as well as automatic gap penalty optimization. Improved alignments obtained in this way are compared with PSI-BLAST based alignments within the context of CHAIN analysis of three protein families: Giα subunits, prolyl oligopeptidases, and transitional endoplasmic reticulum (p97) AAA+ ATPases. Conclusion While not entirely replacing PSI-BLAST based alignments, which likewise may be optimized for CHAIN analysis using this approach, these motif-based methods often more accurately align very distantly related sequences and thus can provide a better measure of

  5. RSAT::Plants: Motif Discovery Within Clusters of Upstream Sequences in Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Castro-Mondragon, Jaime A; Rioualen, Claire; Cantalapiedra, Carlos P; van Helden, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The plant-dedicated mirror of the Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT, http://plants.rsat.eu ) offers specialized options for researchers dealing with plant transcriptional regulation. The website contains whole-sequenced genomes from species regularly updated from Ensembl Plants and other sources (currently 40), and supports an array of tasks frequently required for the analysis of regulatory sequences, such as retrieving upstream sequences, motif discovery, motif comparison, and pattern matching. RSAT::Plants also integrates the footprintDB collection of DNA motifs. This protocol explains step-by-step how to discover DNA motifs in regulatory regions of clusters of co-expressed genes in plants. It also explains how to empirically control the significance of the result, and how to associate the discovered motifs with putative binding factors. PMID:27557774

  6. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis. PMID:26939549

  7. Sequence Analysis and Domain Motifs in the Porcine Skin Decorin Glycosaminoglycan Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue; Yang, Bo; Solakylidirim, Kemal; Joo, Eun Ji; Toida, Toshihiko; Higashi, Kyohei; Linhardt, Robert J.; Li, Lingyun

    2013-01-01

    Decorin proteoglycan is comprised of a core protein containing a single O-linked dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain. Although the sequence of the decorin core protein is determined by the gene encoding its structure, the structure of its GAG chain is determined in the Golgi. The recent application of modern MS to bikunin, a far simpler chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, suggests that it has a single or small number of defined sequences. On this basis, a similar approach to sequence the decorin of porcine skin much larger and more structurally complex dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate GAG chain was undertaken. This approach resulted in information on the consistency/variability of its linkage region at the reducing end of the GAG chain, its iduronic acid-rich domain, glucuronic acid-rich domain, and non-reducing end. A general motif for the porcine skin decorin GAG chain was established. A single small decorin GAG chain was sequenced using MS/MS analysis. The data obtained in the study suggest that the decorin GAG chain has a small or a limited number of sequences. PMID:23423381

  8. Physical-chemical property based sequence motifs and methods regarding same

    DOEpatents

    Braun, Werner; Mathura, Venkatarajan S.; Schein, Catherine H.

    2008-09-09

    A data analysis system, program, and/or method, e.g., a data mining/data exploration method, using physical-chemical property motifs. For example, a sequence database may be searched for identifying segments thereof having physical-chemical properties similar to the physical-chemical property motifs.

  9. Bioinformatic identification of novel regulatory DNA sequence motifs in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J; Bentley, Stephen D; Kormanec, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Background Streptomyces coelicolor is a bacterium with a vast repertoire of metabolic functions and complex systems of cellular development. Its genome sequence is rich in genes that encode regulatory proteins to control these processes in response to its changing environment. We wished to apply a recently published bioinformatic method for identifying novel regulatory sequence signals to gain new insights into regulation in S. coelicolor. Results The method involved production of position-specific weight matrices from alignments of over-represented words of DNA sequence. We generated 2497 weight matrices, each representing a candidate regulatory DNA sequence motif. We scanned the genome sequence of S. coelicolor against each of these matrices. A DNA sequence motif represented by one of the matrices was found preferentially in non-coding sequences immediately upstream of genes involved in polysaccharide degradation, including several that encode chitinases. This motif (TGGTCTAGACCA) was also found upstream of genes encoding components of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransfer system (PTS). We hypothesise that this DNA sequence motif represents a regulatory element that is responsive to availability of carbon-sources. Other motifs of potential biological significance were found upstream of genes implicated in secondary metabolism (TTAGGTtAGgCTaACCTAA), sigma factors (TGACN19TGAC), DNA replication and repair (ttgtCAGTGN13TGGA), nucleotide conversions (CTACgcNCGTAG), and ArsR (TCAGN12TCAG). A motif found upstream of genes involved in chromosome replication (TGTCagtgcN7Tagg) was similar to a previously described motif found in UV-responsive promoters. Conclusions We successfully applied a recently published in silico method to identify conserved sequence motifs in S. coelicolor that may be biologically significant as regulatory elements. Our data are broadly consistent with and further extend data from previously published studies. We invite experimental testing of

  10. Over-represented localized sequence motifs in ribosomal protein gene promoters of basal metazoans.

    PubMed

    Perina, Drago; Korolija, Marina; Roller, Maša; Harcet, Matija; Jeličić, Branka; Mikoč, Andreja; Cetković, Helena

    2011-07-01

    Equimolecular presence of ribosomal proteins (RPs) in the cell is needed for ribosome assembly and is achieved by synchronized expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) with promoters of similar strengths. Over-represented motifs of RPG promoter regions are identified as targets for specific transcription factors. Unlike RPs, those motifs are not conserved between mammals, drosophila, and yeast. We analyzed RPGs proximal promoter regions of three basal metazoans with sequenced genomes: sponge, cnidarian, and placozoan and found common features, such as 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tracts and TATA-boxes. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs, some of which displayed the highest similarity to motifs abundant in human RPG promoters and not present in Drosophila or yeast. Our results indicate that humans over-represented motifs, as well as corresponding domains of transcription factors, were established very early in metazoan evolution. The fast evolving nature of RPGs regulatory network leads to formation of other, lineage specific, over-represented motifs. PMID:21457775

  11. Fast and Accurate Discovery of Degenerate Linear Motifs in Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Emmanuel D.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Linear motifs mediate a wide variety of cellular functions, which makes their characterization in protein sequences crucial to understanding cellular systems. However, the short length and degenerate nature of linear motifs make their discovery a difficult problem. Here, we introduce MotifHound, an algorithm particularly suited for the discovery of small and degenerate linear motifs. MotifHound performs an exact and exhaustive enumeration of all motifs present in proteins of interest, including all of their degenerate forms, and scores the overrepresentation of each motif based on its occurrence in proteins of interest relative to a background (e.g., proteome) using the hypergeometric distribution. To assess MotifHound, we benchmarked it together with state-of-the-art algorithms. The benchmark consists of 11,880 sets of proteins from S. cerevisiae; in each set, we artificially spiked-in one motif varying in terms of three key parameters, (i) number of occurrences, (ii) length and (iii) the number of degenerate or “wildcard” positions. The benchmark enabled the evaluation of the impact of these three properties on the performance of the different algorithms. The results showed that MotifHound and SLiMFinder were the most accurate in detecting degenerate linear motifs. Interestingly, MotifHound was 15 to 20 times faster at comparable accuracy and performed best in the discovery of highly degenerate motifs. We complemented the benchmark by an analysis of proteins experimentally shown to bind the FUS1 SH3 domain from S. cerevisiae. Using the full-length protein partners as sole information, MotifHound recapitulated most experimentally determined motifs binding to the FUS1 SH3 domain. Moreover, these motifs exhibited properties typical of SH3 binding peptides, e.g., high intrinsic disorder and evolutionary conservation, despite the fact that none of these properties were used as prior information. MotifHound is available (http://michnick.bcm.umontreal.ca or http

  12. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Britney L.; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M.; Hinds, Thomas R.; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A. Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  13. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moss, Britney L; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M; Hinds, Thomas R; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  14. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  15. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  16. Repulsive parallel MCMC algorithm for discovering diverse motifs from large sequence sets

    PubMed Central

    Ikebata, Hisaki; Yoshida, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The motif discovery problem consists of finding recurring patterns of short strings in a set of nucleotide sequences. This classical problem is receiving renewed attention as most early motif discovery methods lack the ability to handle large data of recent genome-wide ChIP studies. New ChIP-tailored methods focus on reducing computation time and pay little regard to the accuracy of motif detection. Unlike such methods, our method focuses on increasing the detection accuracy while maintaining the computation efficiency at an acceptable level. The major advantage of our method is that it can mine diverse multiple motifs undetectable by current methods. Results: The repulsive parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo (RPMCMC) algorithm that we propose is a parallel version of the widely used Gibbs motif sampler. RPMCMC is run on parallel interacting motif samplers. A repulsive force is generated when different motifs produced by different samplers near each other. Thus, different samplers explore different motifs. In this way, we can detect much more diverse motifs than conventional methods can. Through application to 228 transcription factor ChIP-seq datasets of the ENCODE project, we show that the RPMCMC algorithm can find many reliable cofactor interacting motifs that existing methods are unable to discover. Availability and implementation: A C++ implementation of RPMCMC and discovered cofactor motifs for the 228 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets are available from http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/yoshidalab/motif. Contact: ikebata.hisaki@ism.ac.jp, yoshidar@ism.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available from Bioinformatics online. PMID:25583120

  17. Sequence motifs and prokaryotic expression of the reptilian paramyxovirus fusion protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, J.; Batts, W.N.; Ahne, W.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Fourteen reptilian paramyxovirus isolates were chosen to represent the known extent of genetic diversity among this novel group of viruses. Selected regions of the fusion (F) gene were sequenced, analyzed and compared. The F gene of all isolates contained conserved motifs homologous to those described for other members of the family Paramyxoviridae including: signal peptide, transmembrane domain, furin cleavage site, fusion peptide, N-linked glycosylation sites, and two heptad repeats, the second of which (HRB-LZ) had the characteristics of a leucine zipper. Selected regions of the fusion gene of isolate Gono-GER85 were inserted into a prokaryotic expression system to generate three recombinant protein fragments of various sizes. The longest recombinant protein was cleaved by furin into two fragments of predicted length. Western blot analysis with virus-neutralizing rabbit-antiserum against this isolate demonstrated that only the longest construct reacted with the antiserum. This construct was unique in containing 30 additional C-terminal amino acids that included most of the HRB-LZ. These results indicate that the F genes of reptilian paramyxoviruses contain highly conserved motifs typical of other members of the family and suggest that the HRB-LZ domain of the reptilian paramyxovirus F protein contains a linear antigenic epitope. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  18. Predicting candidate genomic sequences that correspond to synthetic functional RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Laserson, Uri; Gan, Hin Hark; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Riboswitches and RNA interference are important emerging mechanisms found in many organisms to control gene expression. To enhance our understanding of such RNA roles, finding small regulatory motifs in genomes presents a challenge on a wide scale. Many simple functional RNA motifs have been found by in vitro selection experiments, which produce synthetic target-binding aptamers as well as catalytic RNAs, including the hammerhead ribozyme. Motivated by the prediction of Piganeau and Schroeder [(2003) Chem. Biol., 10, 103–104] that synthetic RNAs may have natural counterparts, we develop and apply an efficient computational protocol for identifying aptamer-like motifs in genomes. We define motifs from the sequence and structural information of synthetic aptamers, search for sequences in genomes that will produce motif matches, and then evaluate the structural stability and statistical significance of the potential hits. Our application to aptamers for streptomycin, chloramphenicol, neomycin B and ATP identifies 37 candidate sequences (in coding and non-coding regions) that fold to the target aptamer structures in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Further energetic screening reveals that several candidates exhibit energetic properties and sequence conservation patterns that are characteristic of functional motifs. Besides providing candidates for experimental testing, our computational protocol offers an avenue for expanding natural RNA's functional repertoire. PMID:16254081

  19. Hydrogen-bond motifs in the crystals of hydrophobic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Fábián, László; Chisholm, James A; Galek, Peter T A; Motherwell, W D Samuel; Feeder, Neil

    2008-08-01

    A computer program has been developed to survey a set of crystal structures for hydrogen-bond motifs. Possible ring and chain motifs are generated automatically from a user-defined list of interacting molecular fragments and intermolecular interactions. The new program was used to analyse the hydrogen-bond networks in the crystals of 52 zwitterionic alpha-amino acids. All the possible chain motifs (repeating 1-4 molecules) are frequent, while the frequency of ring motifs (2-6 molecules) ranges from 0 to 85% of the structures. The list of motifs displayed by each structure reveals structural similarities and it can be used to compare polymorphs. The motifs formed in cocrystals of alpha-amino acids and in crystals of beta- and gamma-amino acids are similar to those of alpha-amino acids. PMID:18641453

  20. REPdenovo: Inferring De Novo Repeat Motifs from Short Sequence Reads

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chong; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wu, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Repeat elements are important components of eukaryotic genomes. One limitation in our understanding of repeat elements is that most analyses rely on reference genomes that are incomplete and often contain missing data in highly repetitive regions that are difficult to assemble. To overcome this problem we develop a new method, REPdenovo, which assembles repeat sequences directly from raw shotgun sequencing data. REPdenovo can construct various types of repeats that are highly repetitive and have low sequence divergence within copies. We show that REPdenovo is substantially better than existing methods both in terms of the number and the completeness of the repeat sequences that it recovers. The key advantage of REPdenovo is that it can reconstruct long repeats from sequence reads. We apply the method to human data and discover a number of potentially new repeats sequences that have been missed by previous repeat annotations. Many of these sequences are incorporated into various parasite genomes, possibly because the filtering process for host DNA involved in the sequencing of the parasite genomes failed to exclude the host derived repeat sequences. REPdenovo is a new powerful computational tool for annotating genomes and for addressing questions regarding the evolution of repeat families. The software tool, REPdenovo, is available for download at https://github.com/Reedwarbler/REPdenovo. PMID:26977803

  1. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pantazes, Robert J; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N; Murray, Joseph A; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  2. Identification of disease-specific motifs in the antibody specificity repertoire via next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pantazes, Robert J.; Reifert, Jack; Bozekowski, Joel; Ibsen, Kelly N.; Murray, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific antibodies can serve as highly effective biomarkers but have been identified for only a relatively small number of autoimmune diseases. A method was developed to identify disease-specific binding motifs through integration of bacterial display peptide library screening, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and computational analysis. Antibody specificity repertoires were determined by identifying bound peptide library members for each specimen using cell sorting and performing NGS. A computational algorithm, termed Identifying Motifs Using Next- generation sequencing Experiments (IMUNE), was developed and applied to discover disease- and healthy control-specific motifs. IMUNE performs comprehensive pattern searches, identifies patterns statistically enriched in the disease or control groups and clusters the patterns to generate motifs. Using celiac disease sera as a discovery set, IMUNE identified a consensus motif (QPEQPF[PS]E) with high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in a validation sera set, in addition to novel motifs. Peptide display and sequencing (Display-Seq) coupled with IMUNE analysis may thus be useful to characterize antibody repertoires and identify disease-specific antibody epitopes and biomarkers. PMID:27481573

  3. Sequence Motifs in Transit Peptides Act as Independent Functional Units and Can Be Transferred to New Sequence Contexts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Woo, Seungjin; Geem, Kyoung Rok; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-09-01

    A large number of nuclear-encoded proteins are imported into chloroplasts after they are translated in the cytosol. Import is mediated by transit peptides (TPs) at the N termini of these proteins. TPs contain many small motifs, each of which is critical for a specific step in the process of chloroplast protein import; however, it remains unknown how these motifs are organized to give rise to TPs with diverse sequences. In this study, we generated various hybrid TPs by swapping domains between Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) and chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, which have highly divergent sequences, and examined the abilities of the resultant TPs to deliver proteins into chloroplasts. Subsequently, we compared the functionality of sequence motifs in the hybrid TPs with those of wild-type TPs. The sequence motifs in the hybrid TPs exhibited three different modes of functionality, depending on their domain composition, as follows: active in both wild-type and hybrid TPs, active in wild-type TPs but inactive in hybrid TPs, and inactive in wild-type TPs but active in hybrid TPs. Moreover, synthetic TPs, in which only three critical motifs from RbcS or chlorophyll a/b-binding protein TPs were incorporated into an unrelated sequence, were able to deliver clients to chloroplasts with a comparable efficiency to RbcS TP. Based on these results, we propose that diverse sequence motifs in TPs are independent functional units that interact with specific translocon components at various steps during protein import and can be transferred to new sequence contexts. PMID:26149569

  4. Improved detection of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, I B; Egan, J B

    1990-01-01

    We present an update of our method for systematic detection and evaluation of potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences [Dodd, I. and Egan, J. B. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 194, 557-564]. The new method is considerably more powerful, detecting approximately 50% more likely helix-turn-helix sequences without an increase in false predictions. This improvement is due almost entirely to the use of a much larger reference set of 91 presumed helix-turn-helix sequences. The scoring matrix derived from this reference set has been calibrated against a large protein sequence database so that the score obtained by a sequence can be used to give a practical estimation of the probability that the sequence is a helix-turn-helix motif. PMID:2402433

  5. Modeling of the Ebola virus delta peptide reveals a potential lytic sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, William R; Garry, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe outbreaks of human infection, including the extensive epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa in 2014. In the course of examining mutations in the glycoprotein gene associated with 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) sequences, a differential level of conservation was noted between the soluble form of glycoprotein (sGP) and the full length glycoprotein (GP), which are both encoded by the GP gene via RNA editing. In the region of the proteins encoded after the RNA editing site sGP was more conserved than the overlapping region of GP when compared to a distant outlier species, Tai Forest ebolavirus. Half of the amino acids comprising the "delta peptide", a 40 amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment of sGP, were identical between otherwise widely divergent species. A lysine-rich amphipathic peptide motif was noted at the carboxyl terminus of delta peptide with high structural relatedness to the cytolytic peptide of the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) of rotavirus. EBOV delta peptide is a candidate viroporin, a cationic pore-forming peptide, and may contribute to EBOV pathogenesis. PMID:25609303

  6. Sequence-Specific Recognition of DNA by Proteins: Binding Motifs Discovered Using a Novel Statistical/Computational Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jakubec, David; Laskowski, Roman A; Vondrasek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Decades of intensive experimental studies of the recognition of DNA sequences by proteins have provided us with a view of a diverse and complicated world in which few to no features are shared between individual DNA-binding protein families. The originally conceived direct readout of DNA residue sequences by amino acid side chains offers very limited capacity for sequence recognition, while the effects of the dynamic properties of the interacting partners remain difficult to quantify and almost impossible to generalise. In this work we investigated the energetic characteristics of all DNA residue-amino acid side chain combinations in the conformations found at the interaction interface in a very large set of protein-DNA complexes by the means of empirical potential-based calculations. General specificity-defining criteria were derived and utilised to look beyond the binding motifs considered in previous studies. Linking energetic favourability to the observed geometrical preferences, our approach reveals several additional amino acid motifs which can distinguish between individual DNA bases. Our results remained valid in environments with various dielectric properties. PMID:27384774

  7. Sequence-Specific Recognition of DNA by Proteins: Binding Motifs Discovered Using a Novel Statistical/Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jakubec, David; Laskowski, Roman A.; Vondrasek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Decades of intensive experimental studies of the recognition of DNA sequences by proteins have provided us with a view of a diverse and complicated world in which few to no features are shared between individual DNA-binding protein families. The originally conceived direct readout of DNA residue sequences by amino acid side chains offers very limited capacity for sequence recognition, while the effects of the dynamic properties of the interacting partners remain difficult to quantify and almost impossible to generalise. In this work we investigated the energetic characteristics of all DNA residue—amino acid side chain combinations in the conformations found at the interaction interface in a very large set of protein—DNA complexes by the means of empirical potential-based calculations. General specificity-defining criteria were derived and utilised to look beyond the binding motifs considered in previous studies. Linking energetic favourability to the observed geometrical preferences, our approach reveals several additional amino acid motifs which can distinguish between individual DNA bases. Our results remained valid in environments with various dielectric properties. PMID:27384774

  8. Development of a salicylic acid inducible minimal sub-genomic transcript promoter from Figwort mosaic virus with enhanced root- and leaf-activity using TGACG motif rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Patro, Sunita; Ghosh, Jayasish; Das, Abhimanyu; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-15

    In Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (F-Sgt), function of the TGACG-regulatory motif, was investigated in the background of artificially designed promoter sequences. The 131bp (FS, -100 to +31) long F-Sgt promoter sequence containing one TGACG motif [FS-(TGACG)] was engineered to generate a set of three modified promoter constructs: [FS-(TGACG)(2), containing one additional TGACG motif at 7 nucleotides upstream of the original one], [FS-(TGACG)(3), containing two additional TGACG motifs at 7 nucleotides upstream and two nucleotides downstream of the original one] and [FS-(TGCTG)(mu), having a mutated TGACG motif]. EMSA and foot-printing analysis confirmed binding of tobacco nuclear factors with modified TGACG motif/s. The transcription-activation of the GUS gene by the TGACG motif/s in above promoter constructs was examined in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants and observed that the transcription activation was affected by the spacing/s and number/s of the TGACG motif/s. The FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter showed strongest root-activity compared to other modified and CaMV35S promoters. Also under salicylic acid (SA) stress, the leaf-activity of the said promoter was further enhanced. All above findings were confirmed by real-time and semi-qRT PCR analysis. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that the TGACG motif plays an important role in inducing the root-specific expression of the F-Sgt promoter. This study advocates the importance of genetic manipulation of functional cis-motif for amending the tissue specificity of a plant promoter. SA inducible FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter with enhanced activity could be a useful candidate promoter for developing plants with enhanced crop productivity. PMID:22561698

  9. An approach to delineate primers for a group of poorly conserved sequences incorporating the common motif region.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Mousumi; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sahoo, Smita; Dehury, Budheswar; Sarma, Kishore; Sarmah, Ranjan; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Barooah, Madhumita

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase (gshB) has previously been reported to confer tolerance to acidic soil condition in Rhizobium species. Cloning the gene coding for this enzyme necessitates the designing of proper primer sets which in turn depends on the identification of high quality sequence similarity in multiple global alignments. In this experiment, a group of homologous gene sequences related to gshB gene (accession no: gi-86355669:327589-328536) of Rhizobium etli CFN 42, were extracted from NCBI nucleotide sequence databases using BLASTN and were analyzed for designing degenerate primers. However, the T-coffee multiple global alignment results did not show any block of conserved region for the above sequence set to design the primers. Therefore, we attempted to identify the location of common motif region based on multiple local alignments employing the MEME algorithm supported with MAST and Primer3. The results revealed some common motif regions that enabled us to design the primer sets for related gshB gene sequences. The result will be validated in wet lab. PMID:22419837

  10. Creation of Hybrid Nanorods From Sequences of Natural Trimeric Fibrous Proteins Using the Fibritin Trimerization Motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; van Raaij, Mark J.; Mitraki, Anna

    Stable, artificial fibrous proteins that can be functionalized open new avenues in fields such as bionanomaterials design and fiber engineering. An important source of inspiration for the creation of such proteins are natural fibrous proteins such as collagen, elastin, insect silks, and fibers from phages and viruses. The fibrous parts of this last class of proteins usually adopt trimeric, β-stranded structural folds and are appended to globular, receptor-binding domains. It has been recently shown that the globular domains are essential for correct folding and trimerization and can be successfully substituted by a very small (27-amino acid) trimerization motif from phage T4 fibritin. The hybrid proteins are correctly folded nanorods that can withstand extreme conditions. When the fibrous part derives from the adenovirus fiber shaft, different tissue-targeting specificities can be engineered into the hybrid proteins, which therefore can be used as gene therapy vectors. The integration of such stable nanorods in devices is also a big challenge in the field of biomechanical design. The fibritin foldon domain is a versatile trimerization motif and can be combined with a variety of fibrous motifs, such as coiled-coil, collagenous, and triple β-stranded motifs, provided the appropriate linkers are used. The combination of different motifs within the same fibrous molecule to create stable rods with multiple functions can even be envisioned. We provide a comprehensive overview of the experimental procedures used for designing, creating, and characterizing hybrid fibrous nanorods using the fibritin trimerization motif.

  11. Differential display detects host nucleic acid motifs altered in scrapie-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Harris, Alyson

    2009-09-25

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) including scrapie have been attributed to an infectious protein or prion. Infectivity is allied to conversion of the endogenous nucleic-acid-binding protein PrP to an infectious modified form known as PrP(sc). The protein-only theory does not easily explain the enigmatic properties of the agent including strain variation. It was previously suggested that a short nucleic acid, perhaps host-encoded, might contribute to the pathoetiology of the TSEs. No candidate host molecules that might explain transmission of strain differences have yet been put forward. Differential display is a robust technique for detecting nucleic acid differences between two populations. We applied this technique to total nucleic acid preparations from scrapie-infected and control brain. Independent RNA preparations from eight normal and eight scrapie-infected (strain 263K) hamster brains were randomly amplified and visualized in parallel. Though the nucleic acid patterns were generally identical in scrapie-infected versus control brain, some rare bands were differentially displayed. Molecular species consistently overrepresented (or underrepresented) in all eight infected brain samples versus all eight controls were excised from the display, sequenced, and assembled into contigs. Only seven ros contigs (RNAs over- or underrepresented in scrapie) emerged, representing <4 kb from the transcriptome. All contained highly stable regions of secondary structure. The most abundant scrapie-only ros sequence was homologous to a repetitive transposable element (LINE; long interspersed nuclear element). Other ros sequences identified cellular RNA 7SL, clathrin heavy chain, visinin-like protein-1, and three highly specific subregions of ribosomal RNA (ros1-3). The ribosomal ros sequences accurately corresponded to LINE; retrotransposon insertion sites in ribosomal DNA (p<0.01). These differential motifs implicate specific host RNAs in the pathoetiology

  12. Discovering active motifs in sets of related protein sequences and using them for classification.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J T; Marr, T G; Shasha, D; Shapiro, B A; Chirn, G W

    1994-01-01

    We describe a method for discovering active motifs in a set of related protein sequences. The method is an automatic two step process: (1) find candidate motifs in a small sample of the sequences; (2) test whether these motifs are approximately present in all the sequences. To reduce the running time, we develop two optimization heuristics based on statistical estimation and pattern matching techniques. Experimental results obtained by running these algorithms on generated data and functionally related proteins demonstrate the good performance of the presented method compared with visual method of O'Farrell and Leopold. By combining the discovered motifs with an existing fingerprint technique, we develop a protein classifier. When we apply the classifier to the 698 groups of related proteins in the PROSITE catalog, it gives information that is complementary to the BLOCKS protein classifier of Henikoff and Henikoff. Thus, using our classifier in conjunction with theirs, one can obtain high confidence classifications (if BLOCKS and our classifier agree) or suggest a new hypothesis (if the two disagree). PMID:8052532

  13. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  14. Defining a Conformational Consensus Motif in Cotransin-Sensitive Signal Sequences: A Proteomic and Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Wolfgang; Westendorf, Carolin; Schmidt, Antje; Conill-Cortés, Mercè; Rutz, Claudia; Blohs, Marcus; Beyermann, Michael; Protze, Jonas; Krause, Gerd; Krause, Eberhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The cyclodepsipeptide cotransin was described to inhibit the biosynthesis of a small subset of proteins by a signal sequence-discriminatory mechanism at the Sec61 protein-conducting channel. However, it was not clear how selective cotransin is, i.e. how many proteins are sensitive. Moreover, a consensus motif in signal sequences mediating cotransin sensitivity has yet not been described. To address these questions, we performed a proteomic study using cotransin-treated human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture technique in combination with quantitative mass spectrometry. We used a saturating concentration of cotransin (30 micromolar) to identify also less-sensitive proteins and to discriminate the latter from completely resistant proteins. We found that the biosynthesis of almost all secreted proteins was cotransin-sensitive under these conditions. In contrast, biosynthesis of the majority of the integral membrane proteins was cotransin-resistant. Cotransin sensitivity of signal sequences was neither related to their length nor to their hydrophobicity. Instead, in the case of signal anchor sequences, we identified for the first time a conformational consensus motif mediating cotransin sensitivity. PMID:25806945

  15. Identification of potential regulatory motifs in odorant receptor genes by analysis of promoter sequences

    PubMed Central

    Michaloski, Jussara S.; Galante, Pedro A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Mouse odorant receptors (ORs) are encoded by >1000 genes dispersed throughout the genome. Each olfactory neuron expresses one single OR gene, while the rest of the genes remain silent. The mechanisms underlying OR gene expression are poorly understood. Here, we investigated if OR genes share common cis-regulatory sequences in their promoter regions. We carried out a comprehensive analysis in which the upstream regions of a large number of OR genes were compared. First, using RLM-RACE, we generated cDNAs containing the complete 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTRs) for a total number of 198 mouse OR genes. Then, we aligned these cDNA sequences to the mouse genome so that the 5′ structure and transcription start sites (TSSs) of the OR genes could be precisely determined. Sequences upstream of the TSSs were retrieved and browsed for common elements. We found DNA sequence motifs that are overrepresented in the promoter regions of the OR genes. Most motifs resemble O/E-like sites and are preferentially localized within 200 bp upstream of the TSSs. Finally, we show that these motifs specifically interact with proteins extracted from nuclei prepared from the olfactory epithelium, but not from brain or liver. Our results show that the OR genes share common promoter elements. The present strategy should provide information on the role played by cis-regulatory sequences in OR gene regulation. PMID:16902085

  16. Using machine learning to predict gene expression and discover sequence motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejing

    Recently, large amounts of experimental data for complex biological systems have become available. We use tools and algorithms from machine learning to build data-driven predictive models. We first present a novel algorithm to discover gene sequence motifs associated with temporal expression patterns of genes. Our algorithm, which is based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, is able to directly model the flow of information, from gene sequence to gene expression, to learn cis regulatory motifs and characterize associated gene expression patterns. Our algorithm outperforms traditional computational methods e.g. clustering in motif discovery. We then present a study of extending a machine learning model for transcriptional regulation predictive of genetic regulatory response to Caenorhabditis elegans. We show meaningful results both in terms of prediction accuracy on the test experiments and biological information extracted from the regulatory program. The model discovers DNA binding sites ab initio. We also present a case study where we detect a signal of lineage-specific regulation. Finally we present a comparative study on learning predictive models for motif discovery, based on different boosting algorithms: Adaptive Boosting (AdaBoost), Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Totally Corrective Boosting (TotalBoost). We evaluate and compare the performance of the three boosting algorithms via both statistical and biological validation, for hypoxia response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  17. Sequence-specific intramembrane proteolysis: identification of a recognition motif in rhomboid substrates.

    PubMed

    Strisovsky, Kvido; Sharpe, Hayley J; Freeman, Matthew

    2009-12-25

    Members of the widespread rhomboid family of intramembrane proteases cleave transmembrane domain (TMD) proteins to regulate processes as diverse as EGF receptor signaling, mitochondrial dynamics, and invasion by apicomplexan parasites. However, lack of information about their substrates means that the biological role of most rhomboids remains obscure. Knowledge of how rhomboids recognize their substrates would illuminate their mechanism and might also allow substrate prediction. Previous work has suggested that rhomboid substrates are specified by helical instability in their TMD. Here we demonstrate that rhomboids instead primarily recognize a specific sequence surrounding the cleavage site. This recognition motif is necessary for substrate cleavage, it determines the cleavage site, and it is more strictly required than TM helix-destabilizing residues. Our work demonstrates that intramembrane proteases can be sequence specific and that genome-wide substrate prediction based on their recognition motifs is feasible. PMID:20064469

  18. A Convex Atomic-Norm Approach to Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ian E. H.; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Jiong; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery, known as NP-hard problems, are two fundamental tasks in Bioinformatics. Existing approaches to these two problems are based on either local search methods such as Expectation Maximization (EM), Gibbs Sampling or greedy heuristic methods. In this work, we develop a convex relaxation approach to both problems based on the recent concept of atomic norm and develop a new algorithm, termed Greedy Direction Method of Multiplier, for solving the convex relaxation with two convex atomic constraints. Experiments show that our convex relaxation approach produces solutions of higher quality than those standard tools widely-used in Bioinformatics community on the Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery problems. PMID:27559428

  19. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  20. Identification of sequence motifs involved in Dengue virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Asnet Mary, J; Paramasivan, R; Shenbagarathai, R

    2016-03-01

    Dengue fever is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne virus infection, which remains a serious global public health problem. As there is no specific treatment or commercial vaccine available for effective control of the disease, the attempts on developing novel control strategies are underway. Viruses utilize the surface receptor proteins of host to enter into the cells. Though various proteins were said to be receptors of Dengue virus (DENV) using Virus Overlay Protein Binding Assay, the precise interaction between DENV and host is not explored. Understanding the structural features of domain III envelope glycoprotein would help in developing efficient antiviral inhibitors. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify the sequence motifs present in domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus. Computational analysis revealed that the NGR motif is present in the domain III envelope glycoprotein of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Similarly, DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4 were found to contain Yxxphi motif which is a tyrosine-based sorting signal responsible for the interaction with a mu subunit of adaptor protein complex. High-throughput virtual screening resulted in five compounds as lead molecules based on glide score, which ranges from -4.664 to -6.52 kcal/Mol. This computational prediction provides an additional tool for understanding the virus-host interactions and helps to identify potential targets in the host. Further, experimental evidence is warranted to confirm the virus-host interactions and also inhibitory activity of reported lead compounds. PMID:25905427

  1. Using a color-coded ambigraphic nucleic acid notation to visualize conserved palindromic motifs within and across genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ambiscript is a graphically-designed nucleic acid notation that uses symbol symmetries to support sequence complementation, highlight biologically-relevant palindromes, and facilitate the analysis of consensus sequences. Although the original Ambiscript notation was designed to easily represent consensus sequences for multiple sequence alignments, the notation’s black-on-white ambiguity characters are unable to reflect the statistical distribution of nucleotides found at each position. We now propose a color-augmented ambigraphic notation to encode the frequency of positional polymorphisms in these consensus sequences. Results We have implemented this color-coding approach by creating an Adobe Flash® application ( http://www.ambiscript.org) that shades and colors modified Ambiscript characters according to the prevalence of the encoded nucleotide at each position in the alignment. The resulting graphic helps viewers perceive biologically-relevant patterns in multiple sequence alignments by uniquely combining color, shading, and character symmetries to highlight palindromes and inverted repeats in conserved DNA motifs. Conclusion Juxtaposing an intuitive color scheme over the deliberate character symmetries of an ambigraphic nucleic acid notation yields a highly-functional nucleic acid notation that maximizes information content and successfully embodies key principles of graphic excellence put forth by the statistician and graphic design theorist, Edward Tufte. PMID:24447494

  2. Role of two sequence motifs of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor in its survival-promoting activity

    PubMed Central

    Mätlik, K; Yu, Li-ying; Eesmaa, A; Hellman, M; Lindholm, P; Peränen, J; Galli, E; Anttila, J; Saarma, M; Permi, P; Airavaara, M; Arumäe, U

    2015-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) is a prosurvival protein that protects the cells when applied intracellularly in vitro or extracellularly in vivo. Its protective mechanisms are poorly known. Here we studied the role of two short sequence motifs within the carboxy-(C) terminal domain of MANF in its neuroprotective activity: the CKGC sequence (a CXXC motif) that could be involved in redox reactions, and the C-terminal RTDL sequence, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. We mutated these motifs and analyzed the antiapoptotic effect and intracellular localization of these mutants of MANF when overexpressed in cultured sympathetic or sensory neurons. As an in vivo model for studying the effect of these mutants after their extracellular application, we used the rat model of cerebral ischemia. Even though we found no evidence for oxidoreductase activity of MANF, the mutation of CXXC motif completely abolished its protective effect, showing that this motif is crucial for both MANF's intracellular and extracellular activity. The RTDL motif was not needed for the neuroprotective activity of MANF after its extracellular application in the stroke model in vivo. However, in vitro the deletion of RTDL motif inactivated MANF in the sympathetic neurons where the mutant protein localized to Golgi, but not in the sensory neurons where the mutant localized to the ER, showing that intracellular MANF protects these peripheral neurons in vitro only when localized to the ER. PMID:26720341

  3. An apoptosis-inhibiting gene from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus encoding a polypeptide with Cys/His sequence motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, M J; Clem, R J; Miller, L K

    1994-01-01

    Two different baculovirus genes are known to be able to block apoptosis triggered upon infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells with p35 mutants of the insect baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV):p35 (P35-encoding gene) of AcMNPV (R. J. Clem, M. Fechheimer, and L. K. Miller, Science 254:1388-1390, 1991) and iap (inhibitor of apoptosis gene) of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV) (N. E. Crook, R. J. Clem, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:2168-2174, 1993). Using a genetic complementation assay to identify additional genes which inhibit apoptosis during infection with a p35 mutant, we have isolated a gene from Orgyia pseudotsugata NPV (OpMNPV) that was able to functionally substitute for AcMNPV p35. The nucleotide sequence of this gene, Op-iap, predicted a 30-kDa polypeptide product with approximately 58% amino acid sequence identity to the product of CpGV iap, Cp-IAP. Like Cp-IAP, the predicted product of Op-iap has a carboxy-terminal C3HC4 zinc finger-like motif. In addition, a pair of additional cysteine/histidine motifs were found in the N-terminal regions of both polypeptide sequences. Recombinant p35 mutant viruses carrying either Op-iap or Cp-iap appeared to have a normal phenotype in S. frugiperda cells. Thus, Cp-IAP and Op-IAP appear to be functionally analogous to P35 but are likely to block apoptosis by a different mechanism which may involve direct interaction with DNA. Images PMID:8139034

  4. An apoptosis-inhibiting gene from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus encoding a polypeptide with Cys/His sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, M J; Clem, R J; Miller, L K

    1994-04-01

    Two different baculovirus genes are known to be able to block apoptosis triggered upon infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells with p35 mutants of the insect baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV):p35 (P35-encoding gene) of AcMNPV (R. J. Clem, M. Fechheimer, and L. K. Miller, Science 254:1388-1390, 1991) and iap (inhibitor of apoptosis gene) of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV) (N. E. Crook, R. J. Clem, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:2168-2174, 1993). Using a genetic complementation assay to identify additional genes which inhibit apoptosis during infection with a p35 mutant, we have isolated a gene from Orgyia pseudotsugata NPV (OpMNPV) that was able to functionally substitute for AcMNPV p35. The nucleotide sequence of this gene, Op-iap, predicted a 30-kDa polypeptide product with approximately 58% amino acid sequence identity to the product of CpGV iap, Cp-IAP. Like Cp-IAP, the predicted product of Op-iap has a carboxy-terminal C3HC4 zinc finger-like motif. In addition, a pair of additional cysteine/histidine motifs were found in the N-terminal regions of both polypeptide sequences. Recombinant p35 mutant viruses carrying either Op-iap or Cp-iap appeared to have a normal phenotype in S. frugiperda cells. Thus, Cp-IAP and Op-IAP appear to be functionally analogous to P35 but are likely to block apoptosis by a different mechanism which may involve direct interaction with DNA. PMID:8139034

  5. qPMS7: a fast algorithm for finding (ℓ, d)-motifs in DNA and protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Hieu; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Davila, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Detection of rare events happening in a set of DNA/protein sequences could lead to new biological discoveries. One kind of such rare events is the presence of patterns called motifs in DNA/protein sequences. Finding motifs is a challenging problem since the general version of motif search has been proven to be intractable. Motifs discovery is an important problem in biology. For example, it is useful in the detection of transcription factor binding sites and transcriptional regulatory elements that are very crucial in understanding gene function, human disease, drug design, etc. Many versions of the motif search problem have been proposed in the literature. One such is the (ℓ, d)-motif search (or Planted Motif Search (PMS)). A generalized version of the PMS problem, namely, Quorum Planted Motif Search (qPMS), is shown to accurately model motifs in real data. However, solving the qPMS problem is an extremely difficult task because a special case of it, the PMS Problem, is already NP-hard, which means that any algorithm solving it can be expected to take exponential time in the worse case scenario. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm named qPMS7 that tackles the qPMS problem on real data as well as challenging instances. Experimental results show that our Algorithm qPMS7 is on an average 5 times faster than the state-of-art algorithm. The executable program of Algorithm qPMS7 is freely available on the web at http://pms.engr.uconn.edu/downloads/qPMS7.zip. Our online motif discovery tools that use Algorithm qPMS7 are freely available at http://pms.engr.uconn.edu or http://motifsearch.com. PMID:22848493

  6. Unique Structural Features and Sequence Motifs of Proline Utilization A (PutA)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ranjan K.; Tanner, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Proline utilization A proteins (PutAs) are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of proline to glutamate using spatially separated proline dehydrogenase and pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase active sites. Here we use the crystal structure of the minimalist PutA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum (BjPutA) along with sequence analysis to identify unique structural features of PutAs. This analysis shows that PutAs have secondary structural elements and domains not found in the related monofunctional enzymes. Some of these extra features are predicted to be important for substrate channeling in BjPutA. Multiple sequence alignment analysis shows that some PutAs have a 17-residue conserved motif in the C-terminal 20–30 residues of the polypeptide chain. The BjPutA structure shows that this motif helps seal the internal substrate-channeling cavity from the bulk medium. Finally, it is shown that some PutAs have a 100–200 residue domain of unknown function in the C-terminus that is not found in minimalist PutAs. Remote homology detection suggests that this domain is homologous to the oligomerization beta-hairpin and Rossmann fold domain of BjPutA. PMID:22201760

  7. Unique structural features and sequence motifs of proline utilization A (PutA).

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjan K; Tanner, John J

    2012-01-01

    Proline utilization A proteins (PutAs) are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of proline to glutamate using spatially separated proline dehydrogenase and pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase active sites. Here we use the crystal structure of the minimalist PutA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum (BjPutA) along with sequence analysis to identify unique structural features of PutAs. This analysis shows that PutAs have secondary structural elements and domains not found in the related monofunctional enzymes. Some of these extra features are predicted to be important for substrate channeling in BjPutA. Multiple sequence alignment analysis shows that some PutAs have a 17-residue conserved motif in the C-terminal 20-30 residues of the polypeptide chain. The BjPutA structure shows that this motif helps seal the internal substrate-channeling cavity from the bulk medium. Finally, it is shown that some PutAs have a 100-200 residue domain of unknown function in the C-terminus that is not found in minimalist PutAs. Remote homology detection suggests that this domain is homologous to the oligomerization beta-hairpin and Rossmann fold domain of BjPutA. PMID:22201760

  8. Quadfinder: server for identification and analysis of quadruplex-forming motifs in nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Vinod; Hariharan, Manoj; Arora, Amit; Maiti, Souvik

    2006-01-01

    G-quadruplex secondary structures, which play a structural role in repetitive DNA such as telomeres, may also play a functional role at other genomic locations as targetable regulatory elements which control gene expression. The recent interest in application of quadruplexes in biological systems prompted us to develop a tool for the identification and analysis of quadruplex-forming nucleotide sequences especially in the RNA. Here we present Quadfinder, an online server for prediction and bioinformatics of uni-molecular quadruplex-forming nucleotide sequences. The server is designed to be user-friendly and needs minimal intervention by the user, while providing flexibility of defining the variants of the motif. The server is freely available at URL . PMID:16845097

  9. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    PubMed

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  10. Carboxylic-Acid-passivated metal oxide nanocrystals: ligand exchange characteristics of a new binding motif.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Justo, Yolanda; De Keukeleere, Katrien; Van den Broeck, Freya; Martins, José C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Hens, Zeger

    2015-05-26

    Ligand exchange is central in the processing of inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) and requires understanding of surface chemistry. Studying sterically stabilized HfO2 and ZrO2 NCs using (1) H solution NMR and IR spectroscopy as well as elemental analysis, this paper demonstrates the reversible exchange of initial oleic acid ligands for octylamine and self-adsorption of oleic acid at NC surfaces. Both processes are incompatible with an X-type binding motif of carboxylic acids as reported for sulfide and selenide NCs. We argue that this behavior stems from the dissociative adsorption of carboxylic acids at the oxide surface. Both proton and carboxylate moieties must be regarded as X-type ligands yielding a combined X2 binding motif that allows for self-adsorption and exchange for L-type ligands. PMID:25866095

  11. Interaction of the Spo20 Membrane-Sensor Motif with Phosphatidic Acid and Other Anionic Lipids, and Influence of the Membrane Environment

    PubMed Central

    Horchani, Habib; de Saint-Jean, Maud; Barelli, Hélène; Antonny, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The yeast protein Spo20 contains a regulatory amphipathic motif that has been suggested to recognize phosphatidic acid, a lipid involved in signal transduction, lipid metabolism and membrane fusion. We have investigated the interaction of the Spo20 amphipathic motif with lipid membranes using a bioprobe strategy that consists in appending this motif to the end of a long coiled-coil, which can be coupled to a GFP reporter for visualization in cells. The resulting construct is amenable to in vitro and in vivo experiments and allows unbiased comparison between amphipathic helices of different chemistry. In vitro, the Spo20 bioprobe responded to small variations in the amount of phosphatidic acid. However, this response was not specific. The membrane binding of the probe depended on the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and also integrated the contribution of other anionic lipids, including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidyl-inositol-(4,5)bisphosphate. Inverting the sequence of the Spo20 motif neither affected the ability of the probe to interact with anionic liposomes nor did it modify its cellular localization, making a stereo-specific mode of phosphatidic acid recognition unlikely. Nevertheless, the lipid binding properties and the cellular localization of the Spo20 alpha-helix differed markedly from that of another amphipathic motif, Amphipathic Lipid Packing Sensor (ALPS), suggesting that even in the absence of stereo specific interactions, amphipathic helices can act as subcellular membrane targeting determinants in a cellular context. PMID:25426975

  12. Functional analysis reveals the possible role of the C-terminal sequences and PI motif in the function of lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) orthologues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Kun; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Two lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) genes, Lily MADS Box Gene 8 and 9 (LMADS8/9), were characterized. LMADS9 lacked 29 C-terminal amino acids including the PI motif that was present in LMADS8. Both LMADS8/9 mRNAs were prevalent in the first and second whorl tepals during all stages of development and were expressed in the stamen only in young flower buds. LMADS8/9 could both form homodimers, but the ability of LMADS8 homodimers to bind to CArG1 was relatively stronger than that of LMADS9 homodimers. 35S:LMADS8 completely, and 35S:LMADS9 only partially, rescued the second whorl petal formation and partially converted the first whorl sepal into a petal-like structure in Arabidopsis pi-1 mutants. Ectopic expression of LMADS8-C (with deletion of the 29 amino acids of the C-terminal sequence) or LMADS8-PI (with only the PI motif deleted) only partially rescued petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS9/pi plants. In contrast, 35:LMADS9+L8C (with the addition of the 29 amino acids of the LMADS8 C-terminal sequence) or 35S:LMADS9+L8PI (with the addition of the LMADS8 PI motif) demonstrated an increased ability to rescue petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS8/pi plants. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LMADS8-M (with the MADS domain truncated) generated more severe dominant negative phenotypes than those seen in 35S:LMADS9-M flowers. These results revealed that the 29 amino acids including the PI motif in the C-terminal region of the lily PI orthologue are valuable for its function in regulating perianth organ formation. PMID:22068145

  13. A search for small noncoding RNAs in Staphylococcus aureus reveals a conserved sequence motif for regulation

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Thomas; Chevalier, Clément; Cros, Marie-Josée; Boisset, Sandrine; Fechter, Pierre; Noirot, Céline; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Vandenesch, François; Gaspin, Christine; Romby, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of the intergenic regions of Staphylococcus aureus predicted multiple regulatory regions. From this analysis, we characterized 11 novel noncoding RNAs (RsaA‐K) that are expressed in several S. aureus strains under different experimental conditions. Many of them accumulate in the late-exponential phase of growth. All ncRNAs are stable and their expression is Hfq-independent. The transcription of several of them is regulated by the alternative sigma B factor (RsaA, D and F) while the expression of RsaE is agrA-dependent. Six of these ncRNAs are specific to S. aureus, four are conserved in other Staphylococci, and RsaE is also present in Bacillaceae. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis indicated that RsaE regulates the synthesis of proteins involved in various metabolic pathways. Phylogenetic analysis combined with RNA structure probing, searches for RsaE‐mRNA base pairing, and toeprinting assays indicate that a conserved and unpaired UCCC sequence motif of RsaE binds to target mRNAs and prevents the formation of the ribosomal initiation complex. This study unexpectedly shows that most of the novel ncRNAs carry the conserved C−rich motif, suggesting that they are members of a class of ncRNAs that target mRNAs by a shared mechanism. PMID:19786493

  14. Temporal motifs reveal homophily, gender-specific patterns, and group talk in call sequences.

    PubMed

    Kovanen, Lauri; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies on electronic communication records have shown that human communication has complex temporal structure. We study how communication patterns that involve multiple individuals are affected by attributes such as sex and age. To this end, we represent the communication records as a colored temporal network where node color is used to represent individuals' attributes, and identify patterns known as temporal motifs. We then construct a null model for the occurrence of temporal motifs that takes into account the interaction frequencies and connectivity between nodes of different colors. This null model allows us to detect significant patterns in call sequences that cannot be observed in a static network that uses interaction frequencies as link weights. We find sex-related differences in communication patterns in a large dataset of mobile phone records and show the existence of temporal homophily, the tendency of similar individuals to participate in communication patterns beyond what would be expected on the basis of their average interaction frequencies. We also show that temporal patterns differ between dense and sparse neighborhoods in the network. Because also this result is independent of interaction frequencies, it can be seen as an extension of Granovetter's hypothesis to temporal networks. PMID:24145424

  15. ZFP57 recognizes multiple and closely spaced sequence motif variants to maintain repressive epigenetic marks in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Anvar, Zahra; Cammisa, Marco; Riso, Vincenzo; Baglivo, Ilaria; Kukreja, Harpreet; Sparago, Angela; Girardot, Michael; Lad, Shraddha; De Feis, Italia; Cerrato, Flavia; Angelini, Claudia; Feil, Robert; Pedone, Paolo V.; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) need to maintain their parental allele-specific DNA methylation during early embryogenesis despite genome-wide demethylation and subsequent de novo methylation. ZFP57 and KAP1 are both required for maintaining the repressive DNA methylation and H3-lysine-9-trimethylation (H3K9me3) at ICRs. In vitro, ZFP57 binds a specific hexanucleotide motif that is enriched at its genomic binding sites. We now demonstrate in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that SNPs disrupting closely-spaced hexanucleotide motifs are associated with lack of ZFP57 binding and H3K9me3 enrichment. Through a transgenic approach in mouse ESCs, we further demonstrate that an ICR fragment containing three ZFP57 motif sequences recapitulates the original methylated or unmethylated status when integrated into the genome at an ectopic position. Mutation of Zfp57 or the hexanucleotide motifs led to loss of ZFP57 binding and DNA methylation of the transgene. Finally, we identified a sequence variant of the hexanucleotide motif that interacts with ZFP57 both in vivo and in vitro. The presence of multiple and closely located copies of ZFP57 motif variants emerges as a distinct characteristic that is required for the faithful maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks at ICRs and other ZFP57 binding sites. PMID:26481358

  16. Exceptional motifs in different Markov chain models for a statistical analysis of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Schbath, S; Prum, B; de Turckheim, E

    1995-01-01

    Identifying exceptional motifs is often used for extracting information from long DNA sequences. The two difficulties of the method are the choice of the model that defines the expected frequencies of words and the approximation of the variance of the difference T(W) between the number of occurrences of a word W and its estimation. We consider here different Markov chain models, either with stationary or periodic transition probabilities. We estimate the variance of the difference T(W) by the conditional variance of the number of occurrences of W given the oligonucleotides counts that define the model. Two applications show how to use asymptotically standard normal statistics associated with the counts to describe a given sequence in terms of its outlying words. Sequences of Escherichia coli and of Bacillus subtilis are compared with respect to their exceptional tri- and tetranucleotides. For both bacteria, exceptional 3-words are mainly found in the coding frame. E. coli palindrome counts are analyzed in different models, showing that many overabundant words are one-letter mutations of avoided palindromes. PMID:8521272

  17. The nature of actinomycin D binding to d(AACCAXYG) sequence motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-Ming; Sha, Feng; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2004-01-01

    Earlier studies by others had indicated that actinomycin D (ACTD) binds well to d(AACCATAG) and the end sequence TAG-3′ is essential for its strong binding. In an effort to verify these assertions and to uncover other possible strong ACTD binding sequences as well as to elucidate the nature of their binding, systematic studies have been carried out with oligomers of d(AACCAXYG) sequence motifs, where X and Y can be any DNA base. The results indicate that in addition to TAG-3′, oligomers ending with XAG-3′ and XCG-3′ all provide binding constants ≥1 × 107 M–1 and even sequences ending with XTG-3′ and XGG-3′ exhibit binding affinities in the range 1–8 × 106 M–1. The nature of the strong ACTD affinity of the sequences d(A1A2C3C4A5X6Y7G8) was delineated via comparative binding studies of d(AACCAAAG), d(AGCCAAAG) and their base substituted derivatives. Two binding modes are proposed to coexist, with the major component consisting of the 3′-terminus G base folding back to base pair with C4 and the ACTD inserting at A2C3C4 by looping out the C3 while both faces of the chromophore are stacked by A and G bases, respectively. The minor mode is for the G to base pair with C3 and to have the same A/chromophore/G stacking but without a looped out base. These assertions are supported by induced circular dichroic and fluorescence spectral measurements. PMID:14715925

  18. Exploiting topological constraints to reveal buried sequence motifs in the membrane-bound N-linked oligosaccharyl transferases.

    PubMed

    Jaffee, Marcie B; Imperiali, Barbara

    2011-09-01

    The central enzyme in N-linked glycosylation is the oligosaccharyl transferase (OTase), which catalyzes glycan transfer from a polyprenyldiphosphate-linked carrier to select asparagines within acceptor proteins. PglB from Campylobacter jejuni is a single-subunit OTase with homology to the Stt3 subunit of the complex multimeric yeast OTase. Sequence identity between PglB and Stt3 is low (17.9%); however, both have a similar predicted architecture and contain the conserved WWDxG motif. To investigate the relationship between PglB and other Stt3 proteins, sequence analysis was performed using 28 homologues from evolutionarily distant organisms. Since detection of small conserved motifs within large membrane-associated proteins is complicated by divergent sequences surrounding the motifs, we developed a program to parse sequences according to predicted topology and then analyze topologically related regions. This approach identified three conserved motifs that served as the basis for subsequent mutagenesis and functional studies. This work reveals that several inter-transmembrane loop regions of PglB/Stt3 contain strictly conserved motifs that are essential for PglB function. The recent publication of a 3.4 Å resolution structure of full-length C. lari OTase provides clear structural evidence that these loops play a fundamental role in catalysis [ Lizak , C. ; ( 2011 ) Nature 474 , 350 - 355 ]. The current study provides biochemical support for the role of the inter-transmembrane domain loops in OTase catalysis and demonstrates the utility of combining topology prediction and sequence analysis for exposing buried pockets of homology in large membrane proteins. The described approach allowed detection of the catalytic motifs prior to availability of structural data and reveals additional catalytically relevant residues that are not predicted by structural data alone. PMID:21812456

  19. Identification of Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Motifs in Truffles: a First Step toward Their DNA Bar Coding▿ †

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-01-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (≤50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  20. Identification of internal transcribed spacer sequence motifs in truffles: a first step toward their DNA bar coding.

    PubMed

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-08-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (< or = 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  1. Protospacer Adjacent Motif (PAM)-Distal Sequences Engage CRISPR Cas9 DNA Target Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, Sylvain; Schmeing, T. Martin; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided nuclease that has been widely adapted for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. However, the in vivo target specificity of Cas9 is poorly understood and most studies rely on in silico predictions to define the potential off-target editing spectrum. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), we delineate the genome-wide binding panorama of catalytically inactive Cas9 directed by two different single guide (sg) RNAs targeting the Trp53 locus. Cas9:sgRNA complexes are able to load onto multiple sites with short seed regions adjacent to 5′NGG3′ protospacer adjacent motifs (PAM). Yet among 43 ChIP-seq sites harboring seed regions analyzed for mutational status, we find editing only at the intended on-target locus and one off-target site. In vitro analysis of target site recognition revealed that interactions between the 5′ end of the guide and PAM-distal target sequences are necessary to efficiently engage Cas9 nucleolytic activity, providing an explanation for why off-target editing is significantly lower than expected from ChIP-seq data. PMID:25275497

  2. Identification of an Electrostatic Ruler Motif for Sequence-Specific Binding of Collagenase to Collagen.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sundar Raman; Singam, Ettayapuram Ramaprasad Azhagiya; Berinski, Michael; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-25

    Sequence-specific cleavage of collagen by mammalian collagenase plays a pivotal role in cell function. Collagenases are matrix metalloproteinases that cleave the peptide bond at a specific position on fibrillar collagen. The collagenase Hemopexin-like (HPX) domain has been proposed to be responsible for substrate recognition, but the mechanism by which collagenases identify the cleavage site on fibrillar collagen is not clearly understood. In this study, Brownian dynamics simulations coupled with atomic-detail and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations were performed to dock matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) on a collagen IIIα1 triple helical peptide. We find that the HPX domain recognizes the collagen triple helix at a conserved R-X11-R motif C-terminal to the cleavage site to which the HPX domain of collagen is guided electrostatically. The binding of the HPX domain between the two arginine residues is energetically stabilized by hydrophobic contacts with collagen. From the simulations and analysis of the sequences and structural flexibility of collagen and collagenase, a mechanistic scheme by which MMP-1 can recognize and bind collagen for proteolysis is proposed. PMID:27245212

  3. Sequence, structure, and cooperativity in folding of elementary protein structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jason K.; Kubelka, Ginka S.; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Residue-level unfolding of two helix-turn-helix proteins—one naturally occurring and one de novo designed—is reconstructed from multiple sets of site-specific 13C isotopically edited infrared (IR) and circular dichroism (CD) data using Ising-like statistical-mechanical models. Several model variants are parameterized to test the importance of sequence-specific interactions (approximated by Miyazawa–Jernigan statistical potentials), local structural flexibility (derived from the ensemble of NMR structures), interhelical hydrogen bonds, and native contacts separated by intervening disordered regions (through the Wako–Saitô–Muñoz–Eaton scheme, which disallows such configurations). The models are optimized by directly simulating experimental observables: CD ellipticity at 222 nm for model proteins and their fragments and 13C-amide I′ bands for multiple isotopologues of each protein. We find that data can be quantitatively reproduced by the model that allows two interacting segments flanking a disordered loop (double sequence approximation) and incorporates flexibility in the native contact maps, but neither sequence-specific interactions nor hydrogen bonds are required. The near-identical free energy profiles as a function of the global order parameter are consistent with expected similar folding kinetics for nearly identical structures. However, the predicted folding mechanism for the two motifs is different, reflecting the order of local stability. We introduce free energy profiles for “experimental” reaction coordinates—namely, the degree of local folding as sensed by site-specific 13C-edited IR, which highlight folding heterogeneity and contrast its overall, average description with the detailed, local picture. PMID:26216963

  4. Sequence, structure, and cooperativity in folding of elementary protein structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jason K; Kubelka, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-08-11

    Residue-level unfolding of two helix-turn-helix proteins--one naturally occurring and one de novo designed--is reconstructed from multiple sets of site-specific (13)C isotopically edited infrared (IR) and circular dichroism (CD) data using Ising-like statistical-mechanical models. Several model variants are parameterized to test the importance of sequence-specific interactions (approximated by Miyazawa-Jernigan statistical potentials), local structural flexibility (derived from the ensemble of NMR structures), interhelical hydrogen bonds, and native contacts separated by intervening disordered regions (through the Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton scheme, which disallows such configurations). The models are optimized by directly simulating experimental observables: CD ellipticity at 222 nm for model proteins and their fragments and (13)C-amide I' bands for multiple isotopologues of each protein. We find that data can be quantitatively reproduced by the model that allows two interacting segments flanking a disordered loop (double sequence approximation) and incorporates flexibility in the native contact maps, but neither sequence-specific interactions nor hydrogen bonds are required. The near-identical free energy profiles as a function of the global order parameter are consistent with expected similar folding kinetics for nearly identical structures. However, the predicted folding mechanism for the two motifs is different, reflecting the order of local stability. We introduce free energy profiles for "experimental" reaction coordinates--namely, the degree of local folding as sensed by site-specific (13)C-edited IR, which highlight folding heterogeneity and contrast its overall, average description with the detailed, local picture. PMID:26216963

  5. A unique transactivation sequence motif is found in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the single-strand-binding protein FBP.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R; Collins, I; Tomonaga, T; Zhang, T; Levens, D

    1996-01-01

    The far-upstream element-binding protein (FBP) is one of several recently described factors which bind to a single strand of DNA in the 5' region of the c-myc gene. Although cotransfection of FBP increases expression from a far-upstream element-bearing c-myc promoter reporter, the mechanism of this stimulation is heretofore unknown. Can a single-strand-binding protein function as a classical transactivator, or are these proteins restricted to stabilizing or altering the conformation of DNA in an architectural role? Using chimeric GAL4-FBP fusion proteins we have shown that the carboxyl-terminal region (residues 448 to 644) is a potent transcriptional activation domain. This region contains three copies of a unique amino acid sequence motif containing tyrosine diads. Analysis of deletion mutants demonstrated that a single tyrosine motif alone (residues 609 to 644) was capable of activating transcription. The activation property of the C-terminal domain is repressed by the N-terminal 107 amino acids of FBP. These results show that FBP contains a transactivation domain which can function alone, suggesting that FBP contributes directly to c-myc transcription while bound to a single-strand site. Furthermore, activation is mediated by a new motif which can be negatively regulated by a repression domain of FBP. PMID:8628294

  6. Solution structure of gamma-bungarotoxin: the functional significance of amino acid residues flanking the RGD motif in integrin binding.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Jia-Hau; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Chang, Long-Sen; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yen-Chin; Lo, Yu-Hui; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2004-12-01

    Gamma-bungarotoxin, a snake venom protein isolated from Bungarus multicinctus, contains 68 amino acids, including 10 cysteine residues and a TAVRGDGP sequence at positions 30-37. The solution structure of gamma-bungarotoxin has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The structure is similar to that of the short-chain neurotoxins that contain three loops extending from a disulfide-bridged core. The tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence is located at the apex of the flexible loop and is similar to that of other RGD-containing proteins. However, gamma-bungarotoxin only inhibits platelet aggregations with an IC50 of 34 microM. To understand its weak activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation, we mutated the RGD loop sequences of rhodostomin, a potent platelet aggregation inhibitor, from RIPRGDMP to TAVRGDGP, resulting in a 196-fold decrease in activity. In addition, the average Calpha-to-Calpha distance between R33 and G36 of gamma-bungarotoxin is 6.02 A, i.e., shorter than that of other RGD-containing proteins that range from 6.55 to 7.46 A. These results suggested that the amino acid residues flanking the RGD motif might control the width of the RGD loop. This structural difference may be responsible for its decrease in platelet aggregation inhibition compared with other RGD-containing proteins. PMID:15390258

  7. AptaTRACE Elucidates RNA Sequence-Structure Motifs from Selection Trends in HT-SELEX Experiments.

    PubMed

    Dao, Phuong; Hoinka, Jan; Takahashi, Mayumi; Zhou, Jiehua; Ho, Michelle; Wang, Yijie; Costa, Fabrizio; Rossi, John J; Backofen, Rolf; Burnett, John; Przytycka, Teresa M

    2016-07-01

    Aptamers, short RNA or DNA molecules that bind distinct targets with high affinity and specificity, can be identified using high-throughput systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (HT-SELEX), but scalable analytic tools for understanding sequence-function relationships from diverse HT-SELEX data are not available. Here we present AptaTRACE, a computational approach that leverages the experimental design of the HT-SELEX protocol, RNA secondary structure, and the potential presence of many secondary motifs to identify sequence-structure motifs that show a signature of selection. We apply AptaTRACE to identify nine motifs in C-C chemokine receptor type 7 targeted by aptamers in an in vitro cell-SELEX experiment. We experimentally validate two aptamers whose binding required both sequence and structural features. AptaTRACE can identify low-abundance motifs, and we show through simulations that, because of this, it could lower HT-SELEX cost and time by reducing the number of selection cycles required. PMID:27467247

  8. Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Catherine [Noblis

    2013-03-22

    Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  9. Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  10. Viroids: From Genotype to Phenotype Just Relying on RNA Sequence and Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson–Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures – either global or local – determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs. PMID:22719735

  11. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. PMID:26151885

  12. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  13. A survey of DNA motif finding algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Modan K; Dai, Ho-Kwok

    2007-01-01

    Background Unraveling the mechanisms that regulate gene expression is a major challenge in biology. An important task in this challenge is to identify regulatory elements, especially the binding sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for transcription factors. These binding sites are short DNA segments that are called motifs. Recent advances in genome sequence availability and in high-throughput gene expression analysis technologies have allowed for the development of computational methods for motif finding. As a result, a large number of motif finding algorithms have been implemented and applied to various motif models over the past decade. This survey reviews the latest developments in DNA motif finding algorithms. Results Earlier algorithms use promoter sequences of coregulated genes from single genome and search for statistically overrepresented motifs. Recent algorithms are designed to use phylogenetic footprinting or orthologous sequences and also an integrated approach where promoter sequences of coregulated genes and phylogenetic footprinting are used. All the algorithms studied have been reported to correctly detect the motifs that have been previously detected by laboratory experimental approaches, and some algorithms were able to find novel motifs. However, most of these motif finding algorithms have been shown to work successfully in yeast and other lower organisms, but perform significantly worse in higher organisms. Conclusion Despite considerable efforts to date, DNA motif finding remains a complex challenge for biologists and computer scientists. Researchers have taken many different approaches in developing motif discovery tools and the progress made in this area of research is very encouraging. Performance comparison of different motif finding tools and identification of the best tools have proven to be a difficult task because tools are designed based on algorithms and motif models that are diverse and complex and our incomplete understanding of

  14. Defining RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions via two-dimensional combinatorial screening and structure-activity relationships through sequencing.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-10-15

    RNA is an extremely important target for the development of chemical probes of function or small molecule therapeutics. Aminoglycosides are the most well studied class of small molecules to target RNA. However, the RNA motifs outside of the bacterial rRNA A-site that are likely to be bound by these compounds in biological systems is largely unknown. If such information were known, it could allow for aminoglycosides to be exploited to target other RNAs and, in addition, could provide invaluable insights into potential bystander targets of these clinically used drugs. We utilized two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS), a library-versus-library screening approach, to select the motifs displayed in a 3×3 nucleotide internal loop library and in a 6-nucleotide hairpin library that bind with high affinity and selectivity to six aminoglycoside derivatives. The selected RNA motifs were then analyzed using structure-activity relationships through sequencing (StARTS), a statistical approach that defines the privileged RNA motif space that binds a small molecule. StARTS allowed for the facile annotation of the selected RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions in terms of affinity and selectivity. The interactions selected by 2DCS generally have nanomolar affinities, which is higher affinity than the binding of aminoglycosides to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the bacterial rRNA A-site. PMID:23719281

  15. DNA recognition for virus assembly through multiple sequence-independent interactions with a helix-turn-helix motif

    PubMed Central

    Greive, Sandra J.; Fung, Herman K.H.; Chechik, Maria; Jenkins, Huw T.; Weitzel, Stephen E.; Aguiar, Pedro M.; Brentnall, Andrew S.; Glousieau, Matthieu; Gladyshev, Grigory V.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2016-01-01

    The helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif features frequently in protein DNA-binding assemblies. Viral pac site-targeting small terminase proteins possess an unusual architecture in which the HTH motifs are displayed in a ring, distinct from the classical HTH dimer. Here we investigate how such a circular array of HTH motifs enables specific recognition of the viral genome for initiation of DNA packaging during virus assembly. We found, by surface plasmon resonance and analytical ultracentrifugation, that individual HTH motifs of the Bacillus phage SF6 small terminase bind the packaging regions of SF6 and related SPP1 genome weakly, with little local sequence specificity. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation studies with an arbitrary single-site substrate suggest that the HTH motif contacts DNA similarly to how certain HTH proteins contact DNA non-specifically. Our observations support a model where specificity is generated through conformational selection of an intrinsically bent DNA segment by a ring of HTHs which bind weakly but cooperatively. Such a system would enable viral gene regulation and control of the viral life cycle, with a minimal genome, conferring a major evolutionary advantage for SPP1-like viruses. PMID:26673721

  16. DNA recognition for virus assembly through multiple sequence-independent interactions with a helix-turn-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Greive, Sandra J; Fung, Herman K H; Chechik, Maria; Jenkins, Huw T; Weitzel, Stephen E; Aguiar, Pedro M; Brentnall, Andrew S; Glousieau, Matthieu; Gladyshev, Grigory V; Potts, Jennifer R; Antson, Alfred A

    2016-01-29

    The helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif features frequently in protein DNA-binding assemblies. Viral pac site-targeting small terminase proteins possess an unusual architecture in which the HTH motifs are displayed in a ring, distinct from the classical HTH dimer. Here we investigate how such a circular array of HTH motifs enables specific recognition of the viral genome for initiation of DNA packaging during virus assembly. We found, by surface plasmon resonance and analytical ultracentrifugation, that individual HTH motifs of the Bacillus phage SF6 small terminase bind the packaging regions of SF6 and related SPP1 genome weakly, with little local sequence specificity. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation studies with an arbitrary single-site substrate suggest that the HTH motif contacts DNA similarly to how certain HTH proteins contact DNA non-specifically. Our observations support a model where specificity is generated through conformational selection of an intrinsically bent DNA segment by a ring of HTHs which bind weakly but cooperatively. Such a system would enable viral gene regulation and control of the viral life cycle, with a minimal genome, conferring a major evolutionary advantage for SPP1-like viruses. PMID:26673721

  17. Binding site discovery from nucleic acid sequences by discriminative learning of hidden Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Maaskola, Jonas; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    We present a discriminative learning method for pattern discovery of binding sites in nucleic acid sequences based on hidden Markov models. Sets of positive and negative example sequences are mined for sequence motifs whose occurrence frequency varies between the sets. The method offers several objective functions, but we concentrate on mutual information of condition and motif occurrence. We perform a systematic comparison of our method and numerous published motif-finding tools. Our method achieves the highest motif discovery performance, while being faster than most published methods. We present case studies of data from various technologies, including ChIP-Seq, RIP-Chip and PAR-CLIP, of embryonic stem cell transcription factors and of RNA-binding proteins, demonstrating practicality and utility of the method. For the alternative splicing factor RBM10, our analysis finds motifs known to be splicing-relevant. The motif discovery method is implemented in the free software package Discrover. It is applicable to genome- and transcriptome-scale data, makes use of available repeat experiments and aside from binary contrasts also more complex data configurations can be utilized. PMID:25389269

  18. Correlation between fibroin amino acid sequence and physical silk properties.

    PubMed

    Fedic, Robert; Zurovec, Michal; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2003-09-12

    The fiber properties of lepidopteran silk depend on the amino acid repeats that interact during H-fibroin polymerization. The aim of our research was to relate repeat composition to insect biology and fiber strength. Representative regions of the H-fibroin genes were sequenced and analyzed in three pyralid species: wax moth (Galleria mellonella), European flour moth (Ephestia kuehniella), and Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella). The amino acid repeats are species-specific, evidently a diversification of an ancestral region of 43 residues, and include three types of regularly dispersed motifs: modifications of GSSAASAA sequence, stretches of tripeptides GXZ where X and Z represent bulky residues, and sequences similar to PVIVIEE. No concatenations of GX dipeptide or alanine, which are typical for Bombyx silkworms and Antheraea silk moths, respectively, were found. Despite different repeat structure, the silks of G. mellonella and E. kuehniella exhibit similar tensile strength as the Bombyx and Antheraea silks. We suggest that in these latter two species, variations in the repeat length obstruct repeat alignment, but sufficiently long stretches of iterated residues get superposed to interact. In the pyralid H-fibroins, interactions of the widely separated and diverse motifs depend on the precision of repeat matching; silk is strong in G. mellonella and E. kuehniella, with 2-3 types of long homogeneous repeats, and nearly 10 times weaker in P. interpunctella, with seven types of shorter erratic repeats. The high proportion of large amino acids in the H-fibroin of pyralids has probably evolved in connection with the spinning habit of caterpillars that live in protective silk tubes and spin continuously, enlarging the tubes on one end and partly devouring the other one. The silk serves as a depot of energetically rich and essential amino acids that may be scarce in the diet. PMID:12816957

  19. Fine Scale Analysis of Crossover and Non-Crossover and Detection of Recombination Sequence Motifs in the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Bessoltane, Nadia; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Solignac, Michel; Mougel, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Background Meiotic exchanges are non-uniformly distributed across the genome of most studied organisms. This uneven distribution suggests that recombination is initiated by specific signals and/or regulations. Some of these signals were recently identified in humans and mice. However, it is unclear whether or not sequence signals are also involved in chromosomal recombination of insects. Methodology We analyzed recombination frequencies in the honeybee, in which genome sequencing provided a large amount of SNPs spread over the entire set of chromosomes. As the genome sequences were obtained from a pool of haploid males, which were the progeny of a single queen, an oocyte method (study of recombination on haploid males that develop from unfertilized eggs and hence are the direct reflect of female gametes haplotypes) was developed to detect recombined pairs of SNP sites. Sequences were further compared between recombinant and non-recombinant fragments to detect recombination-specific motifs. Conclusions Recombination events between adjacent SNP sites were detected at an average distance of 92 bp and revealed the existence of high rates of recombination events. This study also shows the presence of conversion without crossover (i. e. non-crossover) events, the number of which largely outnumbers that of crossover events. Furthermore the comparison of sequences that have undergone recombination with sequences that have not, led to the discovery of sequence motifs (CGCA, GCCGC, CCGCA), which may correspond to recombination signals. PMID:22567142

  20. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  1. Relation between mRNA expression and sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Combinatorial contributions of upstream regulatory motifs and coding sequence features to variations in mRNA abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Nie, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-26

    ABSTRACT-The context-dependent expression of genes is the core for biological activities, and significant attention has been given to identification of various factors contributing to gene expression at genomic scale. However, so far this type of analysis has been focused whether on relation between mRNA expression and non-coding sequence features such as upstream regulatory motifs or on correlation between mRN abundance and non-random features in coding sequences (e.g. codon usage and amino acid usage). In this study multiple regression analyses of the mRNA abundance and all sequence information in Desulfovibrio vulgaris were performed, with the goal to investigate how much coding and non-coding sequence features contribute to the variations in mRNA expression, and in what manner they act together...

  2. Frequency Patterns of T-Cell Exposed Amino Acid Motifs in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Peptides Presented by MHCs.

    PubMed

    Bremel, Robert D; Homan, E Jane

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are highly diverse protein sequences that are processed and presented to T-cells by B-cells and other antigen presenting cells. We examined a large dataset of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions (IGHV) to assess the diversity of T-cell exposed motifs (TCEMs). TCEM comprise those amino acids in a MHC-bound peptide, which face outwards, surrounded by the MHC histotope, and which engage the T-cell receptor. Within IGHV there is a distinct pattern of predicted MHC class II binding and a very high frequency of re-use of the TCEMs. The re-use frequency indicates that only a limited number of different cognate T-cells are required to engage many different clonal B-cells. The amino acids in each outward-facing TCEM are intercalated with the amino acids of inward-facing MHC groove-exposed motifs (GEM). Different GEM may have differing, allele-specific, MHC binding affinities. The intercalation of TCEM and GEM in a peptide allows for a vast combinatorial repertoire of epitopes, each eliciting a different response. Outcome of T-cell receptor binding is determined by overall signal strength, which is a function of the number of responding T-cells and the duration of engagement. Hence, the frequency of TCEM re-use appears to be an important determinant of whether a T-cell response is stimulatory or suppressive. The frequency distribution of TCEMs implies that somatic hypermutation is followed by T-cell clonal expansion that develops along repeated pathways. The observations of TCEM and GEM derived from immunoglobulins suggest a relatively simple, yet powerful, mechanism to correlate T-cell polyspecificity, through re-use of TCEMs, with a very high degree of specificity achieved by combination with a diversity of GEMs. The frequency profile of TCEMs also points to an economical mechanism for maintaining T-cell memory, recall, and self-discrimination based on an endogenously generated profile of motifs. PMID:25389426

  3. Sequence and Spatiotemporal Expression Analysis of CLE-Motif Containing Genes from the Reniform Nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira)

    PubMed Central

    Wubben, Martin J.; Gavilano, Lily; Baum, Thomas J.; Davis, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic species with a host range that encompasses more than 77 plant families. Nematode effector proteins containing plant-ligand motifs similar to CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) peptides have been identified in the Heterodera, Globodera, and Meloidogyne genera of sedentary endoparasites. Here, we describe the isolation, sequence analysis, and spatiotemporal expression of three R. reniformis genes encoding putative CLE motifs named Rr-cle-1, Rr-cle-2, and Rr-cle-3. The Rr-cle cDNAs showed >98% identity with each other and the predicted peptides were identical with the exception of a short stretch of residues at the carboxy(C)-terminus of the variable domain (VD). Each RrCLE peptide possessed an amino-terminal signal peptide for secretion and a single C-terminal CLE motif that was most similar to Heterodera CLE motifs. Aligning the Rr-cle cDNAs with their corresponding genomic sequences showed three exons with an intron separating the signal peptide from the VD and a second intron separating the VD from the CLE motif. An alignment of the RrCLE1 peptide with Heterodera glycines and Heterodera schachtii CLE proteins revealed a high level of homology within the VD region associated with regulating in planta trafficking of the processed CLE peptide. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) showed similar expression profiles for each Rr-cle transcript across the R. reniformis life-cycle with the greatest transcript abundance being in sedentary parasitic female nematodes. In situ hybridization showed specific Rr-cle expression within the dorsal esophageal gland cell of sedentary parasitic females. PMID:26170479

  4. Sequence and Spatiotemporal Expression Analysis of CLE-Motif Containing Genes from the Reniform Nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira).

    PubMed

    Wubben, Martin J; Gavilano, Lily; Baum, Thomas J; Davis, Eric L

    2015-06-01

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic species with a host range that encompasses more than 77 plant families. Nematode effector proteins containing plant-ligand motifs similar to CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) peptides have been identified in the Heterodera, Globodera, and Meloidogyne genera of sedentary endoparasites. Here, we describe the isolation, sequence analysis, and spatiotemporal expression of three R. reniformis genes encoding putative CLE motifs named Rr-cle-1, Rr-cle-2, and Rr-cle-3. The Rr-cle cDNAs showed >98% identity with each other and the predicted peptides were identical with the exception of a short stretch of residues at the carboxy(C)-terminus of the variable domain (VD). Each RrCLE peptide possessed an amino-terminal signal peptide for secretion and a single C-terminal CLE motif that was most similar to Heterodera CLE motifs. Aligning the Rr-cle cDNAs with their corresponding genomic sequences showed three exons with an intron separating the signal peptide from the VD and a second intron separating the VD from the CLE motif. An alignment of the RrCLE1 peptide with Heterodera glycines and Heterodera schachtii CLE proteins revealed a high level of homology within the VD region associated with regulating in planta trafficking of the processed CLE peptide. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) showed similar expression profiles for each Rr-cle transcript across the R. reniformis life-cycle with the greatest transcript abundance being in sedentary parasitic female nematodes. In situ hybridization showed specific Rr-cle expression within the dorsal esophageal gland cell of sedentary parasitic females. PMID:26170479

  5. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  6. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  7. A motif of eleven amino acids is a structural adaptation that facilitates motor capability of eutherian prestin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L.; Tang, Jie; Lovas, Sándor; Beisel, Kirk W.; He, David Z. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) alter their length in response to transmembrane voltage changes. This so-called electromotility is the result of conformational changes of membrane-bound prestin. Prestin-based OHC motility is thought to be responsible for cochlear amplification, which contributes to the exquisite frequency selectivity and sensitivity of mammalian hearing. Prestin belongs to an anion transporter family, the solute carrier protein 26A (SLC26A). Prestin is unique in this family in that it functions as a voltage-dependent motor protein manifested by two hallmarks, nonlinear capacitance and motility. Evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are anion exchangers or transporters with no motor function. We identified a segment of 11 amino acid residues in eutherian prestin that is extremely conserved among eutherian species but highly variable among non-mammalian orthologs and SLC26A paralogs. To determine whether this sequence represents a motif that facilitates motor function in eutherian prestin, we utilized a chimeric approach by swapping corresponding residues from the zebrafish and chicken with those of gerbil. Motility and nonlinear capacitance were measured from chimeric prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a voltage-clamp technique and photodiode-based displacement measurement system. We observed a gain of motor function with both of the hallmarks in the chimeric prestin without loss of transport function. Our results show, for the first time, that the substitution of a span of 11 amino acid residues confers the electrogenic anion transporters of zebrafish and chicken prestins with motor-like function. Thus, this motif represents the structural adaptation that assists gain of motor function in eutherian prestin. PMID:22399806

  8. A motif of eleven amino acids is a structural adaptation that facilitates motor capability of eutherian prestin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Pecka, Jason L; Tang, Jie; Lovas, Sándor; Beisel, Kirk W; He, David Z Z

    2012-02-15

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) alter their length in response to transmembrane voltage changes. This so-called electromotility is the result of conformational changes of membrane-bound prestin. Prestin-based OHC motility is thought to be responsible for cochlear amplification, which contributes to the exquisite frequency selectivity and sensitivity of mammalian hearing. Prestin belongs to an anion transporter family, the solute carrier protein 26A (SLC26A). Prestin is unique in this family in that it functions as a voltage-dependent motor protein manifested by two hallmarks, nonlinear capacitance and motility. Evidence suggests that prestin orthologs from zebrafish and chicken are anion exchangers or transporters with no motor function. We identified a segment of 11 amino acid residues in eutherian prestin that is extremely conserved among eutherian species but highly variable among non-mammalian orthologs and SLC26A paralogs. To determine whether this sequence represents a motif that facilitates motor function in eutherian prestin, we utilized a chimeric approach by swapping corresponding residues from the zebrafish and chicken with those of gerbil. Motility and nonlinear capacitance were measured from chimeric prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a voltage-clamp technique and photodiode-based displacement measurement system. We observed a gain of motor function with both of the hallmarks in the chimeric prestin without loss of transport function. Our results show, for the first time, that the substitution of a span of 11 amino acid residues confers the electrogenic anion transporters of zebrafish and chicken prestins with motor-like function. Thus, this motif represents the structural adaptation that assists gain of motor function in eutherian prestin. PMID:22399806

  9. Application of PCR amplicon sequencing using a single primer pair in PCR amplification to assess variations in Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The presence of various EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs in the CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to contribute to pathogenesis in adults. In this study, a unique PCR assay and sequencing strategy was developed to establish the number and variation of cagA EPIYA motifs. Findings MDA-DNA derived from gastric biopsy specimens from eleven subjects with gastritis was used with M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primers for amplification of the cagA EPIYA motif region. Automated capillary electrophoresis using a high resolution kit and amplicon sequencing confirmed variations in the cagA EPIYA motif region. In nine cases, sequencing revealed the presence of AB, ABC, or ABCC (Western type) cagA EPIYA motif, respectively. In two cases, double cagA EPIYA motifs were detected (ABC/ABCC or ABC/AB), indicating the presence of two H. pylori strains in the same biopsy. Conclusion Automated capillary electrophoresis and Amplicon sequencing using a single, M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primer pair in PCR amplification enabled a rapid molecular typing of cagA EPIYA motifs. Moreover, the techniques described allowed for a rapid detection of mixed H. pylori strains present in the same biopsy specimen. PMID:20181142

  10. Selective recognition of protein tetraserine motifs with a cell-permeable, pro-fluorescent bis-boronic acid.

    PubMed

    Halo, Tiffany L; Appelbaum, Jacob; Hobert, Elissa M; Balkin, Daniel M; Schepartz, Alanna

    2009-01-21

    There is considerable interest in novel cell imaging tools that avoid the use of fluorescent proteins. One widely used class of such reagents are "pro-fluorescent" biarsenical dyes such as FlAsH, ReAsH, CrAsH, and Cy3As. Despite their utility, biarsenicals are plagued by high background labeling and cytotoxicity and are challenging to apply in oxidizing cellular locale. Here we demonstrate that [(3-oxospiro[isobenzofuran-1(3H),9'-[9H]xanthene]-3',6'-diyl)bis(iminomethylene-2,1-phenylene)]bis-(9CI), a rhodamine-derived bisboronic acid (RhoBo) described initially as a monosaccharide sensor, functions as a cell-permeable, turn-on fluorescent sensor for tetraserine motifs in recombinant proteins. RhoBo binds peptides or proteins containing Ser-Ser-Pro-Gly-Ser-Ser with affinities in the nanomolar concentration range and prefers this sequence to simple monosaccharides by >10,000-fold. RhoBo fails to form fluorescent complexes with constituents of the mammalian cell surface, as judged by epifluorescent, confocal, and TIRF microscopy, but fluoresces brightly within the Ser-Ser-Pro-Gly-Ser-Ser-rich cell interior. These results suggest that current efforts to identify optimal serine-rich sequences for RhoBo will allow it to function effectively as a selective small-molecule label for appropriately tagged proteins either upon or within living cells. PMID:19105691

  11. Bayesian Markov models consistently outperform PWMs at predicting motifs in nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Matthias; Söding, Johannes

    2016-07-27

    Position weight matrices (PWMs) are the standard model for DNA and RNA regulatory motifs. In PWMs nucleotide probabilities are independent of nucleotides at other positions. Models that account for dependencies need many parameters and are prone to overfitting. We have developed a Bayesian approach for motif discovery using Markov models in which conditional probabilities of order k - 1 act as priors for those of order k This Bayesian Markov model (BaMM) training automatically adapts model complexity to the amount of available data. We also derive an EM algorithm for de-novo discovery of enriched motifs. For transcription factor binding, BaMMs achieve significantly (P    =  1/16) higher cross-validated partial AUC than PWMs in 97% of 446 ChIP-seq ENCODE datasets and improve performance by 36% on average. BaMMs also learn complex multipartite motifs, improving predictions of transcription start sites, polyadenylation sites, bacterial pause sites, and RNA binding sites by 26-101%. BaMMs never performed worse than PWMs. These robust improvements argue in favour of generally replacing PWMs by BaMMs. PMID:27288444

  12. Two structurally distinct {kappa}B sequence motifs cooperatively control LPS-induced KC gene transcription in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, Y.; Fukumoto, S.; Hamilton, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    The mouse KC gene is an {alpha}-chemokine gene whose transcription is induced in mononuclear phagocytes by LPS. DNA sequences necessary for transcriptional control of KC by LPS were identified in the region flanking the transcription start site. Transient transfection analysis in macrophages using deletion mutants of a 1.5-kb sequence placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene identified an LPS-responsive region between residues -104 and +30. This region contained two {kappa}B sequence motifs. The first motif (position -70 to -59, {kappa}B1) is highly conserved in all three human GRO genes and in the mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) gene. The second {kappa}B motif (position -89 to -78, {kappa}B2) was conserved only between the mouse and the rat KC genes. Consistent with previous reports, the highly conserved {kappa}B site ({kappa}B1) was essential for LPS inducibility. Surprisingly, the distal {kappa}B site ({kappa}B2) was also necessary for optimal response; mutation of either {kappa}B site markedly reduced sensitivity to LPS in RAW264.7 cells and to TNF-{alpha} in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Although both {kappa}B1 and {kappa}B2 sequences were able to bind members of the Rel homology family, including NF{kappa}B1 (P50), RelA (65), and c-Rel, the {kappa}B1 site bound these factors with higher affinity and functioned more effectively than the {kappa}B2 site in a heterologous promoter. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional control of the KC gene requires cooperation between two {kappa}B sites and is thus distinct from that of the three human GRO genes and the mouse MIP-2 gene. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Modeling and analysis of MH1 domain of Smads and their interaction with promoter DNA sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Pooja; Metpally, Raghu Prasad R; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B

    2009-04-01

    The Smads are a group of related intracellular proteins critical for transmitting the signals to the nucleus from the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of proteins at the cell surface. The prototypic members of the Smad family, Mad and Sma, were first described in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. Related proteins in Xenopus, Humans, Mice and Rats were subsequently identified, and are now known as Smads. Smad protein family members act downstream in the TGF-beta signaling pathway mediating various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, matrix production, apoptosis and development. Smads range from about 400-500 amino acids in length and are grouped into the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), the common Smads (Co-Smads) and the inhibitory Smads (I-Smads). There are eight Smads in mammals, Smad1/5/8 (bone morphogenetic protein regulated) and Smad2/3 (TGF-beta/activin regulated) are termed R-Smads, Smad4 is denoted as Co-Smad and Smad6/7 are inhibitory Smads. A typical Smad consists of a conserved N-terminal Mad Homology 1 (MH1) domain and a C-terminal Mad Homology 2 (MH2) domain connected by a proline rich linker. The MH1 domain plays key role in DNA recognition and also facilitates the binding of Smad4 to the phosphorylated C-terminus of R-Smads to form activated complex. The MH2 domain exhibits transcriptional activation properties. In order to understand the structural basis of interaction of various Smads with their target proteins and the promoter DNA, we modeled MH1 domain of the remaining mammalian Smads based on known crystal structures of Smad3-MH1 domain bound to GTCT Smad box DNA sequence (1OZJ). We generated a B-DNA structure using average base-pair parameters of Twist, Tilt, Roll and base Slide angles. We then modeled interaction pose of the MH1 domain of Smad1/5/8 to their corresponding DNA sequence motif GCCG. These models provide the structural basis towards understanding functional

  14. Signature amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae box C/D RNP core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop RNA motif

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Zhang, Xinxin; Qu, Guosheng; Biswas, Shyamasri; Suryadi, Jimmy; Brown, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD protein homologs are members of the L7Ae/15.5kD protein family that characteristically recognize K-turn motifs found in both archaeal and eukaryotic RNAs. In Archaea, the L7Ae protein uniquely binds the K-loop motif found in box C/D and H/ACA sRNAs, whereas the eukaryotic 15.5kD homolog is unable to recognize this variant K-turn RNA. Comparative sequence and structural analyses, coupled with amino acid replacement experiments, have demonstrated that five amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop motif. These signature residues are highly conserved in the archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD homologs, but differ between the two domains of life. Interestingly, loss of K-loop binding by archaeal L7Ae does not disrupt C′/D′ RNP formation or RNA-guided nucleotide modification. L7Ae is still incorporated into the C′/D′ RNP despite its inability to bind the K-loop, thus indicating the importance of protein–protein interactions for RNP assembly and function. Finally, these five signature amino acids are distinct for each of the L7Ae/L30 family members, suggesting an evolutionary continuum of these RNA-binding proteins for recognition of the various K-turn motifs contained in their cognate RNAs. PMID:19926724

  15. Design of polymer motifs for nucleic acid recognition and assembly stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhun

    This dissertation describes the synthesis and assembly of bio-functional polymers and the applications of these polymers to drug encapsulation, delivery, and multivalent biomimetic macromolecular recognition between synthetic polymer and nucleic acids. The main content is divided into three parts: (1) polyacidic domains as strongly stabilizing design elements for aqueous phase polyacrylate diblock assembly; (2) small molecule/polymer recognition triggered macromolecular assembly and drug encapsulation; (3) trizaine derivatized polymer as a novel class of "bifacial polymer nucleic acid" (bPoNA) and applications of bPoNA to nanoparticle loading of DNA/RNA, silencing delivery as well as control of aptamer function. Through the studies in part (1) and part (2), it was demonstrated that well-designed polymer motifs are not only able to enhance assemblies driven by non-specific hydrophobic effect, but are also able to direct assemblies based on specific recognitions. In part (3) of this dissertation, this concept was further extended by the design of polyacrylate polymers that are capable of discrete and robust hybridization with nucleic acids. This surprising finding demonstrated both fundamental and practical applications. Overall, these studies provided insights into the rational design elements for improving the bio-functions of synthetic polymers, and significantly expanded the scope of biological applications in which polymers synthesized via controlled radical polymerization may play a role.

  16. A Glance at Microsatellite Motifs from 454 Sequencing Reads of Watermelon Genomic DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single 454 (Life Sciences Sequencing Technology) run of Charleston Gray watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) genomic DNA was performed and sequence data were assembled. A large scale identification of simple sequence repeat (SSR) was performed and SSR sequence data were used for the develo...

  17. In planta analysis of a cis-regulatory cytokinin response motif in Arabidopsis and identification of a novel enhancer sequence.

    PubMed

    Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Brenner, Wolfram G; Pfeifer, Andreas; Heyl, Alexander; Schmülling, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin plays a key role in regulating plant growth and development, and is involved in numerous physiological responses to environmental changes. The type-B response regulators, which regulate the transcription of cytokinin response genes, are a part of the cytokinin signaling system. Arabidopsis thaliana encodes 11 type-B response regulators (type-B ARRs), and some of them were shown to bind in vitro to the core cytokinin response motif (CRM) 5'-(A/G)GAT(T/C)-3' or, in the case of ARR1, to an extended motif (ECRM), 5'-AAGAT(T/C)TT-3'. Here we obtained in planta proof for the functionality of the latter motif. Promoter deletion analysis of the primary cytokinin response gene ARR6 showed that a combination of two extended motifs within the promoter is required to mediate the full transcriptional activation by ARR1 and other type-B ARRs. CRMs were found to be over-represented in the vicinity of ECRMs in the promoters of cytokinin-regulated genes, suggesting their functional relevance. Moreover, an evolutionarily conserved 27 bp long T-rich region between -220 and -193 bp was identified and shown to be required for the full activation by type-B ARRs and the response to cytokinin. This novel enhancer is not bound by the DNA-binding domain of ARR1, indicating that additional proteins might be involved in mediating the transcriptional cytokinin response. Furthermore, genome-wide expression profiling identified genes, among them ARR16, whose induction by cytokinin depends on both ARR1 and other specific type-B ARRs. This together with the ECRM/CRM sequence clustering indicates cooperative action of different type-B ARRs for the activation of particular target genes. PMID:23620480

  18. Sequence motif upstream of the Hendra virus fusion protein cleavage site is not sufficient to promote efficient proteolytic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Willie Warren; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2005-10-10

    The Hendra virus fusion (HeV F) protein is synthesized as a precursor, F{sub 0}, and proteolytically cleaved into the mature F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} heterodimer, following an HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif. This cleavage event is required for fusogenic activity. To determine the amino acid requirements for processing of the HeV F protein, we constructed multiple mutants. Individual and simultaneous alanine substitutions of the eight residues immediately upstream of the cleavage site did not eliminate processing. A chimeric SV5 F protein in which the furin site was substituted for the VDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein was not processed but was expressed on the cell surface. Another chimeric SV5 F protein containing the HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein underwent partial cleavage. These data indicate that the upstream region can play a role in protease recognition, but is neither absolutely required nor sufficient for efficient processing of the HeV F protein.

  19. Critical Role for an Acidic Amino Acid Region in Platelet Signaling by the HemITAM (Hemi-immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motif) Containing Receptor CLEC-2 (C-type Lectin Receptor-2)*

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Craig E.; Sinha, Uma; Pandey, Anjali; Eble, Johannes A.; O'Callaghan, Christopher A.; Watson, Steve P.

    2013-01-01

    CLEC-2 is a member of new family of C-type lectin receptors characterized by a cytosolic YXXL downstream of three acidic amino acids in a sequence known as a hemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif). Dimerization of two phosphorylated CLEC-2 molecules leads to recruitment of the tyrosine kinase Syk via its tandem SH2 domains and initiation of a downstream signaling cascade. Using Syk-deficient and Zap-70-deficient cell lines we show that hemITAM signaling is restricted to Syk and that the upstream triacidic amino acid sequence is required for signaling. Using surface plasmon resonance and phosphorylation studies, we demonstrate that the triacidic amino acids are required for phosphorylation of the YXXL. These results further emphasize the distinct nature of the proximal events in signaling by hemITAM relative to ITAM receptors. PMID:23264619

  20. Rapid characterization of CRISPR-Cas9 protospacer adjacent motif sequence elements.

    PubMed

    Karvelis, Tautvydas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Young, Joshua; Bigelyte, Greta; Silanskas, Arunas; Cigan, Mark; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2015-01-01

    To expand the repertoire of Cas9s available for genome targeting, we present a new in vitro method for the simultaneous examination of guide RNA and protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) requirements. The method relies on the in vitro cleavage of plasmid libraries containing a randomized PAM as a function of Cas9-guide RNA complex concentration. Using this method, we accurately reproduce the canonical PAM preferences for Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3 (Sth3), and CRISPR1 (Sth1). Additionally, PAM and sgRNA solutions for a novel Cas9 protein from Brevibacillus laterosporus are provided by the assay and are demonstrated to support functional activity in vitro and in plants. PMID:26585795

  1. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  2. Amino-Acid Sequence of Porcine Pepsin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, J.; Sepulveda, P.; Marciniszyn, J.; Chen, K. C. S.; Huang, W-Y.; Tao, N.; Liu, D.; Lanier, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    As the culmination of several years of experiments, we propose a complete amino-acid sequence for porcine pepsin, an enzyme containing 327 amino-acid residues in a single polypeptide chain. In the sequence determination, the enzyme was treated with cyanogen bromide. Five resulting fragments were purified. The amino-acid sequence of four of the fragments accounted for 290 residues. Because the structure of a 37-residue carboxyl-terminal fragment was already known, it was not studied. The alignment of these fragments was determined from the sequence of methionyl-peptides we had previously reported. We also discovered the locations of activesite aspartyl residues, as well as the pairing of the three disulfide bridges. A minor component of commercial crystalline pepsin was found to contain two extra amino-acid residues, Ala-Leu-, at the amino-terminus of the molecule. This minor component was apparently derived from a different site of cleavage during the activation of porcine pepsinogen. PMID:4587252

  3. Identification of Promoter Motifs Involved in the Network of Phytochrome A-Regulated Gene Expression by Combined Analysis of Genomic Sequence and Microarray Data1[w

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Matthew E.; Quail, Peter H.

    2003-01-01

    Several hundred Arabidopsis genes, transcriptionally regulated by phytochrome A (phyA), were previously identified using an oligonucleotide microarray. We have now identified, in silico, conserved sequence motifs in the promoters of these genes by comparing the promoter sequences to those of all the genes present on the microarray from which they were sampled. This was done using a Perl script (called Sift) that identifies over-represented motifs using an enumerative approach. The utility of Sift was verified by analysis of circadian-regulated promoters known to contain a biologically significant motif. Several elements were then identified in phyA-responsive promoters by their over-representation. Five previously undescribed motifs were detected in the promoters of phyA-induced genes. Four novel motifs were found in phyA-repressed promoters, plus a motif that strongly resembles the DE1 element. The G-box, CACGTG, was a prominent hit in both induced and repressed phyA-responsive promoters. Intriguingly, two distinct flanking consensus sequences were observed adjacent to the G-box core sequence: one predominating in phyA-induced promoters, the other in phyA-repressed promoters. Such different conserved flanking nucleotides around the core motif in these two sets of promoters may indicate that different members of the same family of DNA-binding proteins mediate phyA induction and repression. An increased abundance of G-box sequences was observed in the most rapidly phyA-responsive genes and in the promoters of phyA-regulated transcription factors, indicating that G-box-binding transcription factors are upstream components in a transcriptional cascade that mediates phyA-regulated development. PMID:14681527

  4. Identification of a Regulatory Acidic Motif as the Determinant of Membrane Localization of TICAM-2.

    PubMed

    Funami, Kenji; Matsumoto, Misako; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Noriko; Tatematsu, Megumi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    TLR4 triggers LPS signaling through the adaptors Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM)-2 (also called TRAM) and TICAM-1 (also called TRIF), together with Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) and MyD88. The MyD88 pathway mediates early phase responses to LPS on the plasma membrane, whereas the TICAM pathway mediates late-phase responses, which induce the production of type I IFN and activation of inflammasomes. TICAM-2 bridges TLR4 and TICAM-1 for LPS signaling in the endosome. Recently, we identified an acidic motif, E87/D88/D89 in TICAM-2, that provides the interaction surfaces between TICAM-2 and TICAM-1. In the present study, we found additional D91/E92 in TICAM-2, conserved across species, that is crucial for TICAM-1 activation. The D91A/E92A mutant protein was distributed largely to the cytosol, despite myristoylation, suggesting its importance for assistance of membrane localization of TICAM-2. An ectopically expressed D91A/E92A mutant per se failed to activate TICAM-1, unlike its wild-type counterpart that forms self-aggregation, but it still retained the ability to pass LPS-mediated IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 activation. In a TICAM-2 knockout human cell line expressing TLR4/MD-2 with or without CD14, overexpression of the D91A/E92A mutant did not activate IRF3, but upon LPS stimulation, it induced sufficient TLR4-mediated IRF3 activation with high coefficient colocalization. Hence, the D91/E92 motif guides TICAM-2 membrane localization and self-activation for signaling. Our results suggest the presence of two distinct steps underlying endosomal LPS signaling on TICAM-2 for TICAM-1 activation: TICAM-2 assembling in TLR4 and/or TICAM-2 self-activation. D91A/E92A of TICAM-2 selectively associates the TLR4-dependent TICAM-2 assembling, but not cytosolic TICAM-2 self-aggregation, to activate TICAM-1. PMID:26408662

  5. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  6. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  7. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  8. Nucleotide sequence and organization of the human S-protein gene: repeating peptide motifs in the pexin family and a model for their evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, D.; Stanley, K.K.

    1987-10-20

    The S-protein/vitronectin gene was isolated from a human genomic DNA library, and its sequence of about 5.3 kilobases including the adjacent 5' and 3' flanking regions was established. Alignment of the genomic DNA nucleotide sequence and the cDNA sequence indicated that the gene consisted of eight exons and seven introns. The intron positions in the S-protein gene and their phase type were compared to those in the hemopexin gene which shares amino acid sequence homologies with transin and the S-protein. Three introns have been found at equivalent positions; two other introns are very close to these positions and are interpreted as cases of intron sliding. Introns 3-7 occur at a conserved glycine residue within repeating peptide segments, whereas introns 1 and 2 are at the boundaries of the Somatomedin B domain of S-protein. The analysis of the exon structure in relations to repeating peptide motifs within the S-protein strongly suggest that it contains only seven repeats, one less than the hemopexin molecule. A very similar repeat pattern like that in hemopexin is shown to be present also in two other related proteins, transin and interstitial collagenase. An evolutionary model for the generation of the repeat pattern in the S-protein and the other members of this novel pexin gene family is proposed, and the sequence modifications for some of the repeats during divergent evolution are discussed in relation to know unique functional properties of hemopexin and S-protein.

  9. Methods for analyzing nucleic acid sequences

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid. The method provides a complex comprising a polymerase enzyme, a target nucleic acid molecule, and a primer, wherein the complex is immobilized on a support Fluorescent label is attached to a terminal phosphate group of the nucleotide or nucleotide analog. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The time duration of the signal from labeled nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated is distinguished from freely diffusing labels by a longer retention in the observation volume for the nucleotides or nucleotide analogs that become incorporated than for the freely diffusing labels.

  10. Cross-reactivity between the rheumatoid arthritis-associated motif EQKRAA and structurally related sequences found in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tiwana, H; Wilson, C; Alvarez, A; Abuknesha, R; Bansal, S; Ebringer, A

    1999-06-01

    Cross-reactivity or molecular mimicry may be one of the underlying mechanisms involved in the etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antiserum against the RA susceptibility sequence EQKRAA was shown to bind to a similar peptide ESRRAL present in the hemolysin of the gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis, and an anti-ESRRAL serum reacted with EQKRAA. There was no reactivity with either anti-EQKRAA or anti-ESRRAL to a peptide containing the EDERAA sequence which is present in HLA-DRB1*0402, an allele not associated with RA. Furthermore, the EQKRAA and ESRRAL antisera bound to a mouse fibroblast transfectant cell line (Dap.3) expressing HLA-DRB1*0401 but not to DRB1*0402. However, peptide sequences structurally related to the RA susceptibility motif LEIEKDFTTYGEE (P. mirabilis urease), VEIRAEGNRFTY (collagen type II) and DELSPETSPYVKE (collagen type XI) did not bind significantly to cell lines expressing HLA-DRB1*0401 or HLA-DRB1*0402 compared to the control peptide YASGASGASGAS. It is suggested here that molecular mimicry between HLA alleles associated with RA and P. mirabilis may be relevant in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. PMID:10338479

  11. Structural Analysis of a Repetitive Protein Sequence Motif in Strepsirrhine Primate Amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Paine, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Strepsirrhines are members of a primate suborder that has a distinctive set of features associated with the development of the dentition. Amelogenin (AMEL), the better known of the enamel matrix proteins, forms 90% of the secreted organic matrix during amelogenesis. Although AMEL has been sequenced in numerous mammalian lineages, the only reported strepsirrhine AMEL sequences are those of the ring-tailed lemur and galago, which contain a set of additional proline-rich tandem repeats absent in all other primates species analyzed to date, but present in some non-primate mammals. Here, we first determined that these repeats are present in AMEL from three additional lemur species and thus are likely to be widespread throughout this group. To evaluate the functional relevance of these repeats in strepsirrhines, we engineered a mutated murine amelogenin sequence containing a similar proline-rich sequence to that of Lemur catta. In the monomeric form, the MQP insertions had no influence on the secondary structure or refolding properties, whereas in the assembled form, the insertions increased the hydrodynamic radii. We speculate that increased AMEL nanosphere size may influence enamel formation in strepsirrhine primates. PMID:21437261

  12. Structural analysis of a repetitive protein sequence motif in strepsirrhine primate amelogenin.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Bromley, Keith M; Hacia, Joseph G; Bromage, Timothy G; Snead, Malcolm L; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Paine, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Strepsirrhines are members of a primate suborder that has a distinctive set of features associated with the development of the dentition. Amelogenin (AMEL), the better known of the enamel matrix proteins, forms 90% of the secreted organic matrix during amelogenesis. Although AMEL has been sequenced in numerous mammalian lineages, the only reported strepsirrhine AMEL sequences are those of the ring-tailed lemur and galago, which contain a set of additional proline-rich tandem repeats absent in all other primates species analyzed to date, but present in some non-primate mammals. Here, we first determined that these repeats are present in AMEL from three additional lemur species and thus are likely to be widespread throughout this group. To evaluate the functional relevance of these repeats in strepsirrhines, we engineered a mutated murine amelogenin sequence containing a similar proline-rich sequence to that of Lemur catta. In the monomeric form, the MQP insertions had no influence on the secondary structure or refolding properties, whereas in the assembled form, the insertions increased the hydrodynamic radii. We speculate that increased AMEL nanosphere size may influence enamel formation in strepsirrhine primates. PMID:21437261

  13. Radiation Desiccation Response Motif-Like Sequences Are Involved in Transcriptional Activation of the Deinococcal ssb Gene by Ionizing Radiation but Not by Desiccation▿

    PubMed Central

    Ujaoney, Aman Kumar; Potnis, Akhilesh A.; Kane, Pratiksha; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Single-stranded-DNA binding protein (SSB) levels during poststress recovery of Deinococcus radiodurans were significantly enhanced by 60Co gamma rays or mitomycin C treatment but not by exposure to UV rays, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), or desiccation. Addition of rifampin prior to postirradiation recovery blocked such induction. In silico analysis of the ssb promoter region revealed a 17-bp palindromic radiation/desiccation response motif (RDRM1) at bp −114 to −98 and a somewhat similar sequence (RDRM2) at bp −213 to −197, upstream of the ssb open reading frame. Involvement of these cis elements in radiation-responsive ssb gene expression was assessed by constructing transcriptional fusions of edited versions of the ssb promoter region with a nonspecific acid phosphatase encoding reporter gene, phoN. Recombinant D. radiodurans strains carrying such constructs clearly revealed (i) transcriptional induction of the ssb promoter upon irradiation and mitomycin C treatment but not upon UV or H2O2 treatment and (ii) involvement of both RDRM-like sequences in such activation of SSB expression, in an additive manner. PMID:20802034

  14. Distinct XPPX sequence motifs induce ribosome stalling, which is rescued by the translation elongation factor EF-P

    PubMed Central

    Peil, Lauri; Starosta, Agata L.; Lassak, Jürgen; Atkinson, Gemma C.; Virumäe, Kai; Spitzer, Michaela; Tenson, Tanel; Jung, Kirsten; Remme, Jaanus; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are the protein synthesizing factories of the cell, polymerizing polypeptide chains from their constituent amino acids. However, distinct combinations of amino acids, such as polyproline stretches, cannot be efficiently polymerized by ribosomes, leading to translational stalling. The stalled ribosomes are rescued by the translational elongation factor P (EF-P), which by stimulating peptide-bond formation allows translation to resume. Using metabolic stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate in vivo that EF-P is important for expression of not only polyproline-containing proteins, but also for specific subsets of proteins containing diprolyl motifs (XPP/PPX). Together with a systematic in vitro and in vivo analysis, we provide a distinct hierarchy of stalling triplets, ranging from strong stallers, such as PPP, DPP, and PPN to weak stallers, such as CPP, PPR, and PPH, all of which are substrates for EF-P. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how the characteristics of the specific amino acid substrates influence the fundamentals of peptide bond formation. PMID:24003132

  15. The Eps1p Protein Disulfide Isomerase Conserves Classic Thioredoxin Superfamily Amino Acid Motifs but Not Their Functional Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Shai; Gat, Yair; Fass, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The widespread thioredoxin superfamily enzymes typically share the following features: a characteristic α-β fold, the presence of a Cys-X-X-Cys (or Cys-X-X-Ser) redox-active motif, and a proline in the cis configuration abutting the redox-active site in the tertiary structure. The Cys-X-X-Cys motif is at the solvent-exposed amino terminus of an α-helix, allowing the first cysteine to engage in nucleophilic attack on substrates, or substrates to attack the Cys-X-X-Cys disulfide, depending on whether the enzyme functions to reduce, isomerize, or oxidize its targets. We report here the X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme that breaks many of our assumptions regarding the sequence-structure relationship of thioredoxin superfamily proteins. The yeast Protein Disulfide Isomerase family member Eps1p has Cys-X-X-Cys motifs and proline residues at the appropriate primary structural positions in its first two predicted thioredoxin-fold domains. However, crystal structures show that the Cys-X-X-Cys of the second domain is buried and that the adjacent proline is in the trans, rather than the cis isomer. In these configurations, neither the “active-site” disulfide nor the backbone carbonyl preceding the proline is available to interact with substrate. The Eps1p structures thus expand the documented diversity of the PDI oxidoreductase family and demonstrate that conserved sequence motifs in common folds do not guarantee structural or functional conservation. PMID:25437863

  16. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens V.; Hansen, Christian S.; Bøgh, Katrine L.; Sullivan, Eric; Patel, Jigar; Rigby, Neil M.; Eiwegger, Thomas; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Masi, Federico de; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Dufva, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a prominent screening technique with a multitude of applications including therapeutic antibody development and mapping of antigen epitopes. In this study, phages were selected based on their interaction with patient serum and exhaustively characterised by high-throughput sequencing. A bioinformatics approach was developed in order to identify peptide motifs of interest based on clustering and contrasting to control samples. Comparison of patient and control samples confirmed a major issue in phage display, namely the selection of unspecific peptides. The potential of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage display by (i) enabling the analysis of complex biological samples, (ii) circumventing the traditional laborious picking and functional testing of individual phage clones and (iii) reducing the number of selection rounds. PMID:26246327

  17. CpG island erosion, polycomb occupancy and sequence motif enrichment at bivalent promoters in mammalian embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mantsoki, Anna; Devailly, Guillaume; Joshi, Anagha

    2015-01-01

    In embryonic stem (ES) cells, developmental regulators have a characteristic bivalent chromatin signature marked by simultaneous presence of both activation (H3K4me3) and repression (H3K27me3) signals and are thought to be in a ‘poised’ state for subsequent activation or silencing during differentiation. We collected eleven pairs (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) of ChIP sequencing datasets in human ES cells and eight pairs in murine ES cells, and predicted high-confidence (HC) bivalent promoters. Over 85% of H3K27me3 marked promoters were bivalent in human and mouse ES cells. We found that (i) HC bivalent promoters were enriched for developmental factors and were highly likely to be differentially expressed upon transcription factor perturbation; (ii) murine HC bivalent promoters were occupied by both polycomb repressive component classes (PRC1 and PRC2) and grouped into four distinct clusters with different biological functions; (iii) HC bivalent and active promoters were CpG rich while H3K27me3-only promoters lacked CpG islands. Binding enrichment of distinct sets of regulators distinguished bivalent from active promoters. Moreover, a ‘TCCCC’ sequence motif was specifically enriched in bivalent promoters. Finally, this analysis will serve as a resource for future studies to further understand transcriptional regulation during embryonic development. PMID:26582124

  18. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  19. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S; Peterson, Blaise Z

    2010-11-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149-1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate Ca(V)1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with Ca(V)1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on Ca(V)1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca(2+) dynamics in the heart. PMID:20720179

  20. Nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences of the major porin of Comamonas acidovorans and comparison of porin primary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Gerbl-Rieger, S; Peters, J; Kellermann, J; Lottspeich, F; Baumeister, W

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene which codes for the major outer membrane porin (Omp32) of Comamonas acidovorans has been determined. The structural gene encodes a precursor consisting of 351 amino acid residues with a signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues. Comparisons with amino acid sequences of outer membrane proteins and porins from several other members of the class Proteobacteria and of the Chlamydia trachomatis porin and the Neurospora crassa mitochondrial porin revealed a motif of eight regions of local homology. The results of this analysis are discussed with regard to common structural features of porins. PMID:1848840

  1. Flow Cytometry-assisted Cloning of Specific Sequence Motifs fromComplex 16S ribosomal RNA Gene Libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.L.; Schramm, A.; Bernhard, A.E.; van den Engh, G.J.; Stahl, D.A.

    2004-07-21

    A flow cytometry method was developed for rapid screeningand recovery of cloned DNA containing common sequence motifs. Thisapproach, termed fluorescence-activated cell sorting-assisted cloning,was used to recover sequences affiliated with a unique lineage within theBacteroidetes not abundant in a clone library of environmental 16S rRNAgenes. Retrieval and sequence analysis of phylogenetically informativegenes has become a standard cultivation-independent technique toinvestigate microbial diversity in nature (7, 18). Genes encoding the 16SrRNA, because of the relative ease of their selective amplification, havebeen most frequently employed for general diversity surveys (16).Environmental studies have also focused on specific subpopulationsaffiliated with a phylogenetic group or identified by genes encodingspecific metabolic functions (e.g., ammonia oxidation, sulfaterespiration, and nitrate reduction) (8,15,20). However, specificpopulations may be of low abundance (1,23), or the genes encodingspecific metabolic functions may be insufficiently conserved to providepriming sites for general PCR amplification. Three general approacheshave been used to obtain 16S rRNA sequence information from low-abundancepopulations: screening hundreds to thousands of clones in a general 16SrRNA gene library (21), flow cytometric sorting of a subpopulation ofenvironmentally derived cells labeled by fluorescent in situhybridization (FISH) (27), or selective PCR amplification using primersspecific for the subpopulation (2,23). While the first approach is simplytime-consuming and tedious, the second has been restricted to fairlylarge and strongly fluorescent cells from aquatic samples (5, 27). Thethird approach often generates fragments of only a few hundred bases dueto the limited number of specific priming sites. Partial sequenceinformation often degrades analysis, obscuring or distorting thephylogenetic placement of the new sequences (11, 20). A more robustcharacterization of environ

  2. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  3. Lysine residues direct the chlorination of tyrosines in YXXK motifs of apolipoprotein A-I when hypochlorous acid oxidizes high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bergt, Constanze; Fu, Xiaoyun; Huq, Nabiha P; Kao, Jeff; Heinecke, Jay W

    2004-02-27

    Oxidized lipoproteins may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Elevated levels of 3-chlorotyrosine, a specific end product of the reaction between hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and tyrosine residues of proteins, have been detected in atherosclerotic tissue. Thus, HOCl generated by the phagocyte enzyme myeloperoxidase represents one pathway for protein oxidation in humans. One important target of the myeloperoxidase pathway may be high density lipoprotein (HDL), which mobilizes cholesterol from artery wall cells. To determine whether activated phagocytes preferentially chlorinate specific sites in HDL, we used tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to analyze apolipoprotein A-I that had been oxidized by HOCl. The major site of chlorination was a single tyrosine residue located in one of the protein's YXXK motifs (where X represents a nonreactive amino acid). To investigate the mechanism of chlorination, we exposed synthetic peptides to HOCl. The peptides encompassed the amino acid sequences YKXXY, YXXKY, or YXXXY. MS/MS analysis demonstrated that chlorination of tyrosine in the peptides that contained lysine was regioselective and occurred in high yield if the substrate was KXXY or YXXK. NMR and MS analyses revealed that the N(epsilon) amino group of lysine was initially chlorinated, which suggests that chloramine formation is the first step in tyrosine chlorination. Molecular modeling of the YXXK motif in apolipoprotein A-I demonstrated that these tyrosine and lysine residues are adjacent on the same face of an amphipathic alpha-helix. Our observations suggest that HOCl selectively targets tyrosine residues that are suitably juxtaposed to primary amino groups in proteins. This mechanism might enable phagocytes to efficiently damage proteins when they destroy microbial proteins during infection or damage host tissue during inflammation. PMID:14660678

  4. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C. PMID:26782977

  5. Native characterization of nucleic acid motif thermodynamics via non-covalent catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Bae, Jin H.; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-01-01

    DNA hybridization thermodynamics is critical for accurate design of oligonucleotides for biotechnology and nanotechnology applications, but parameters currently in use are inaccurately extrapolated based on limited quantitative understanding of thermal behaviours. Here, we present a method to measure the ΔG° of DNA motifs at temperatures and buffer conditions of interest, with significantly better accuracy (6- to 14-fold lower s.e.) than prior methods. The equilibrium constant of a reaction with thermodynamics closely approximating that of a desired motif is numerically calculated from directly observed reactant and product equilibrium concentrations; a DNA catalyst is designed to accelerate equilibration. We measured the ΔG° of terminal fluorophores, single-nucleotide dangles and multinucleotide dangles, in temperatures ranging from 10 to 45 °C.

  6. Rare k-mer DNA: Identification of sequence motifs and prediction of CpG island and promoter.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Hashim, Ezzeddin Kamil; Abdullah, Rosni

    2015-12-21

    Empirical analysis on k-mer DNA has been proven as an effective tool in finding unique patterns in DNA sequences which can lead to the discovery of potential sequence motifs. In an extensive study of empirical k-mer DNA on hundreds of organisms, the researchers found unique multi-modal k-mer spectra occur in the genomes of organisms from the tetrapod clade only which includes all mammals. The multi-modality is caused by the formation of the two lowest modes where k-mers under them are referred as the rare k-mers. The suppression of the two lowest modes (or the rare k-mers) can be attributed to the CG dinucleotide inclusions in them. Apart from that, the rare k-mers are selectively distributed in certain genomic features of CpG Island (CGI), promoter, 5' UTR, and exon. We correlated the rare k-mers with hundreds of annotated features using several bioinformatic tools, performed further intrinsic rare k-mer analyses within the correlated features, and modeled the elucidated rare k-mer clustering feature into a classifier to predict the correlated CGI and promoter features. Our correlation results show that rare k-mers are highly associated with several annotated features of CGI, promoter, 5' UTR, and open chromatin regions. Our intrinsic results show that rare k-mers have several unique topological, compositional, and clustering properties in CGI and promoter features. Finally, the performances of our RWC (rare-word clustering) method in predicting the CGI and promoter features are ranked among the top three, in eight of the CGI and promoter evaluations, among eight of the benchmarked datasets. PMID:26427337

  7. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  8. Identification of a Novel Calcium Binding Motif Based on the Detection of Sequence Insertions in the Animal Peroxidase Domain of Bacterial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33–79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca2+ binding with a KD of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life. PMID

  9. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life. PMID

  10. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  11. Localization of Daucus carota NMCP1 to the nuclear periphery: the role of the N-terminal region and an NLS-linked sequence motif, RYNLRR, in the tail domain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuta; Fujino, Kaien; Ogawa, Kana; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent ultrastructural studies revealed that a structure similar to the vertebrate nuclear lamina exists in the nuclei of higher plants. However, plant genomes lack genes for lamins and intermediate-type filament proteins, and this suggests that plant-specific nuclear coiled-coil proteins make up the lamina-like structure in plants. NMCP1 is a protein, first identified in Daucus carota cells, that localizes exclusively to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells. It has a tripartite structure comprised of head, rod, and tail domains, and includes putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs. We identified the functional NLS of DcNMCP1 (carrot NMCP1) and determined the protein regions required for localizing to the nuclear periphery using EGFP-fused constructs transiently expressed in Apium graveolens epidermal cells. Transcription was driven under a CaMV35S promoter, and the genes were introduced into the epidermal cells by a DNA-coated microprojectile delivery system. Of the NLS motifs, KRRRK and RRHK in the tail domain were highly functional for nuclear localization. Addition of the N-terminal 141 amino acids from DcNMCP1 shifted the localization of a region including these NLSs from the entire nucleus to the nuclear periphery. Using this same construct, the replacement of amino acids in RRHK or its preceding sequence, YNL, with alanine residues abolished localization to the nuclear periphery, while replacement of KRRRK did not affect localization. The sequence R/Q/HYNLRR/H, including YNL and the first part of the sequence of RRHK, is evolutionarily conserved in a subclass of NMCP1 sequences from many plant species. These results show that NMCP1 localizes to the nuclear periphery by a combined action of a sequence composed of R/Q/HYNLRR/H, NLS, and the N-terminal region including the head and a portion of the rod domain, suggesting that more than one binding site is implicated in localization of NMCP1. PMID:24616728

  12. Formation and Dissociation of the Interstrand i-Motif by the Sequences d(XnC4Ym) Monitored with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanwei; Qin, Yujiao; Bruist, Michael; Gao, Shang; Wang, Bing; Wang, Huixin; Guo, Xinhua

    2015-06-01

    Formation and dissociation of the interstrand i-motifs by DNA with the sequence d(XnC4Ym) (X and Y represent thymine, adenine, or guanine, and n, m range from 0 to 2) are studied with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and UV spectrophotometry. The ion complexes detected in the gas phase and the melting temperatures (Tm) obtained in solution show that a non-C base residue located at 5' end favors formation of the four-stranded structures, with T > A > G for imparting stability. Comparatively, no rule is found when a non-C base is located at the 3' end. Detection of penta- and hexa-stranded ions indicates the formation of i-motifs with more than four strands. In addition, the i-motifs seen in our mass spectra are accompanied by single-, double-, and triple-stranded ions, and the trimeric ions were always less abundant during annealing and heat-induced dissociation process of the DNA strands in solution (pH = 4.5). This provides a direct evidence of a strand-by-strand formation and dissociation pathway of the interstrand i-motif and formation of the triple strands is the rate-limiting step. In contrast, the trimeric ions are abundant when the tetramolecular ions are subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) in the gas phase, suggesting different dissociation behaviors of the interstrand i-motif in the gas phase and in solution. Furthermore, hysteretic UV absorption melting and cooling curves reveal an irreversible dissociation and association kinetic process of the interstrand i-motif in solution.

  13. Three-dimensional structure and mimetic-membrane association of consensus 11-amino-acid motif from soybean LEA3 protein.

    PubMed

    Xue, Rong; Liu, Yun; Zheng, Yizhi; Wu, Yijie; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui; Ni, Jiazuan

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of a highly conserved 11-mer repeating motif in the primary sequence is a major characteristic of group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA3) proteins, which are strongly associated with abiotic stress tolerance of the plants. In this study, the three-dimensional structure, mimetic membrane association, and salt effect for consensus 11-mer motif from soybean PM2 protein (LEA3) were investigated in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles by NMR techniques. It was shown that the 11-mer motif was disordered in aqueous solution, but adopted an α-helix in SDS micelles. NMR diffusion measurements demonstrated that the 11-mer motif was associated with SDS micelles. Paramagnetic quenching NMR experiments further revealed the orientation of the 11-mer motif with respect to the mimetic membrane: the ordered N-terminal segment was inserted into the mimetic membrane, and the disordered C-terminal segment was exposed to water. In addition, salt addition could not change the secondary structure of the 11-mer motif, but might slightly alter the relative spatial position of some N-terminal residue atoms. These results implied that the 11-mer motif would take an important role in structural plasticity and membrane stabilization for LEA3 proteins. PMID:23325560

  14. Using Weeder, Pscan, and PscanChIP for the Discovery of Enriched Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs in Nucleotide Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing modern molecular biology is understanding the complex mechanisms regulating gene expression. A fundamental step in this process requires the characterization of sequence motifs involved in the regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In particular, transcription is modulated by the interaction of transcription factors (TFs) with their corresponding binding sites. Weeder, Pscan, and PscanChIP are software tools freely available for noncommercial users as a stand-alone or Web-based applications for the automatic discovery of conserved motifs in a set of DNA sequences likely to be bound by the same TFs. Input for the tools can be promoter sequences from co-expressed or co-regulated genes (for which Weeder and Pscan are suitable), or regions identified through genome wide ChIP-seq or similar experiments (Weeder and PscanChIP). The motifs are either found by a de novo approach (Weeder) or by using descriptors of the binding specificity of TFs (Pscan and PscanChIP). PMID:25199791

  15. 77 FR 65537 - Requirements for Patent Applications Containing Nucleotide Sequence and/or Amino Acid Sequence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Amino Acid Sequence Disclosures ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract Patent applications that contain nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures must include a copy of the sequence listing in accordance with the requirements in 37 CFR...

  16. Recognition of Conserved Amino Acid Motifs of Common Viruses and Its Role in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The triggers of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) remain elusive. Epidemiological studies suggest that common pathogens can exacerbate and also induce MS, but it has been difficult to pinpoint individual organisms. Here we demonstrate that in vivo clonally expanded CD4+ T cells isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of a MS patient during disease exacerbation respond to a poly-arginine motif of the nonpathogenic and ubiquitous Torque Teno virus. These T cell clones also can be stimulated by arginine-enriched protein domains from other common viruses and recognize multiple autoantigens. Our data suggest that repeated infections with common pathogenic and even nonpathogenic viruses could expand T cells specific for conserved protein domains that are able to cross-react with tissue-derived and ubiquitous autoantigens. PMID:16362076

  17. Structural analysis of cysteine S-nitrosylation: a modified acid-based motif and the emerging role of trans-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    S-nitrosylation, the selective and reversible addition of nitric oxide (NO) moiety to cysteine (Cys) sulfur in proteins, regulates numerous cellular processes. In recent years, proteomic approaches have been developed that are capable of identifying nitrosylated Cys residues. However, the features underlying specificity of Cys modification with NO remain poorly defined. Previous studies suggested that S-nitrosylated Cys may be flanked by an acid-base motif or hydrophobic areas, and show high reactivity, low pKa and high sulfur atom exposure. In the current study, we prepared an extensive, manually curated dataset of proteins with S-nitrosothiols, accounting for a variety of biochemical functions, organisms of origin and physiological responses to NO. Analysis of this generic NO-Cys dataset revealed that proximal acid-base motif, Cys pKa, sulfur atom exposure, Cys conservation or hydrophobicity in the vicinity of the modified Cys do not define the specificity of S-nitrosylation. Instead, this analysis revealed a revised acid-base motif, which is located more distantly to the Cys and has its charged groups exposed. We hypothesize that, rather than being strictly employed for direct activation of Cys, the modified acid-base motif is engaged in protein-protein interactions whereby contributing to trans-nitrosylation as an important and widespread mechanism for reversible modification of Cys with NO moiety. For proteins lacking the revised motif, we discuss alternative mechanisms including a potential role of nitrosoglutathione as a transacting agent. PMID:19854201

  18. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  19. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeremy G.; Lincoln, James E.; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  20. Structural and Functional Studies of a Phosphatidic Acid-Binding Antifungal Plant Defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR Motif Governing Fungal Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghu S.; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip M.

    2013-01-01

    MtDef4 is a 47-amino acid cysteine-rich evolutionary conserved defensin from a model legume Medicago truncatula. It is an apoplast-localized plant defense protein that inhibits the growth of the ascomycetous fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum in vitro at micromolar concentrations. Little is known about the mechanisms by which MtDef4 mediates its antifungal activity. In this study, we show that MtDef4 rapidly permeabilizes fungal plasma membrane and is internalized by the fungal cells where it accumulates in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, analysis of the structure of MtDef4 reveals the presence of a positively charged γ-core motif composed of β2 and β3 strands connected by a positively charged RGFRRR loop. Replacement of the RGFRRR sequence with AAAARR or RGFRAA abolishes the ability of MtDef4 to enter fungal cells, suggesting that the RGFRRR loop is a translocation signal required for the internalization of the protein. MtDef4 binds to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Amino acid substitutions in the RGFRRR sequence which abolish the ability of MtDef4 to enter fungal cells also impair its ability to bind PA. These findings suggest that MtDef4 is a novel antifungal plant defensin capable of entering into fungal cells and affecting intracellular targets and that these processes are mediated by the highly conserved cationic RGFRRR loop via its interaction with PA. PMID:24324798

  1. De Novo Regulatory Motif Discovery Identifies Significant Motifs in Promoters of Five Classes of Plant Dehydrin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zolotarov, Yevgen; Strömvik, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Plants accumulate dehydrins in response to osmotic stresses. Dehydrins are divided into five different classes, which are thought to be regulated in different manners. To better understand differences in transcriptional regulation of the five dehydrin classes, de novo motif discovery was performed on 350 dehydrin promoter sequences from a total of 51 plant genomes. Overrepresented motifs were identified in the promoters of five dehydrin classes. The Kn dehydrin promoters contain motifs linked with meristem specific expression, as well as motifs linked with cold/dehydration and abscisic acid response. KS dehydrin promoters contain a motif with a GATA core. SKn and YnSKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match elements connected with cold/dehydration, abscisic acid and light response. YnKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match abscisic acid and light response elements, but not cold/dehydration response elements. Conserved promoter motifs are present in the dehydrin classes and across different plant lineages, indicating that dehydrin gene regulation is likely also conserved. PMID:26114291

  2. Fast approximate motif statistics.

    PubMed

    Nicodème, P

    2001-01-01

    We present in this article a fast approximate method for computing the statistics of a number of non-self-overlapping matches of motifs in a random text in the nonuniform Bernoulli model. This method is well suited for protein motifs where the probability of self-overlap of motifs is small. For 96% of the PROSITE motifs, the expectations of occurrences of the motifs in a 7-million-amino-acids random database are computed by the approximate method with less than 1% error when compared with the exact method. Processing of the whole PROSITE takes about 30 seconds with the approximate method. We apply this new method to a comparison of the C. elegans and S. cerevisiae proteomes. PMID:11535175

  3. Predicting intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Obradovic, Zoran; Peng, Kang; Vucetic, Slobodan; Radivojac, Predrag; Brown, Celeste J; Dunker, A Keith

    2003-01-01

    Blind predictions of intrinsic order and disorder were made on 42 proteins subsequently revealed to contain 9,044 ordered residues, 284 disordered residues in 26 segments of length 30 residues or less, and 281 disordered residues in 2 disordered segments of length greater than 30 residues. The accuracies of the six predictors used in this experiment ranged from 77% to 91% for the ordered regions and from 56% to 78% for the disordered segments. The average of the order and disorder predictions ranged from 73% to 77%. The prediction of disorder in the shorter segments was poor, from 25% to 66% correct, while the prediction of disorder in the longer segments was better, from 75% to 95% correct. Four of the predictors were composed of ensembles of neural networks. This enabled them to deal more efficiently with the large asymmetry in the training data through diversified sampling from the significantly larger ordered set and achieve better accuracy on ordered and long disordered regions. The exclusive use of long disordered regions for predictor training likely contributed to the disparity of the predictions on long versus short disordered regions, while averaging the output values over 61-residue windows to eliminate short predictions of order or disorder probably contributed to the even greater disparity for three of the predictors. This experiment supports the predictability of intrinsic disorder from amino acid sequence. PMID:14579347

  4. Secondary structure model of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus 5' leader sequence: identification of a structural motif common to a variety of retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, G P; Hunter, E; Lever, A M

    1995-01-01

    A stable secondary structure model is presented for the region 3' of the primer-binding site to 130 bases into the gag sequence of the prototype type D retrovirus Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. Using biochemical probing of RNA from this region in association with free energy minimization, we have identified a stem-loop structure in the region, which from other studies has been shown to be important for genomic RNA encapsidation. The structure involves a highly stable stem of five G-C pairs terminating in a heptaloop. Comparison of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus structure with one predicted for squirrel monkey retrovirus demonstrates an identical stem and a common ACC motif in the loop. Free energy studies of the secondary structure of the 5' regions of eight other retroviruses predict stem loops which have similar GAYC motifs. We believe this may represent a common structural and sequence motif which among other functions may be involved in genomic RNA packaging in these viruses. PMID:7884866

  5. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  6. The Thiamine-Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a cofactor for enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production including the well known decarboxylation of a-keto acid dehydrogenases followed by transketolation. TPP-dependent enzymes constitute a structurally and functionally diverse group exhibiting multimeric subunit organization, multiple domains and two chemically equivalent catalytic centers. Annotation of functional TPP-dependcnt enzymes, therefore, has not been trivial due to low sequence similarity related to this complex organization. Our approach to analysis of structures of known TPP-dependent enzymes reveals for the first time features common to this group, which we have termed the TPP-motif. The TPP-motif consists of specific spatial arrangements of structural elements and their specific contacts to provide for a flip-flop, or alternate site, enzymatic mechanism of action. Analysis of structural elements entrained in the flip-flop action displayed by TPP-dependent enzymes reveals a novel definition of the common amino acid sequences. These sequences allow for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes, thus advancing functional proteomics. Further details of three-dimensional structures of TPP-dependent enzymes will be discussed.

  7. Identification of the First Prokaryotic Collagen Sequence Motif That Mediates Binding to Human Collagen Receptors, Integrins α2β1 and α11β1*

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Clayton C.; Barczyk, Malgorzata; Keene, Douglas R.; Lukomska, Ewa; Gullberg, Donald E.; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2008-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria interact with human integrins to enter host cells and to augment host colonization. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) employs molecular mimicry by direct interactions between the cell surface streptococcal collagen-like protein-1 (Scl1) and the human collagen receptor, integrin α2β1. The collagen-like (CL) region of the Scl1 protein mediates integrin-binding, although, the integrin binding motif was not defined. Here, we used molecular cloning and site-directed mutagenesis to identify the GLPGER sequence as the α2β1 and the α11β1 binding motif. Electron microscopy experiments mapped binding sites of the recombinant α2-integrin-inserted domain to the GLPGER motif of the recombinant Scl (rScl) protein. rScl proteins and a synthetic peptide harboring the GLPGER motif mediated the attachment of C2C12-α2 + myoblasts expressing the α2β1 integrin as the sole collagen receptor. The C2C12-α11 + myoblasts expressing the α11β1 integrin also attached to GLPGER-harboring rScl proteins. Furthermore, the C2C12-α11 + cells attached to rScl1 more efficiently than C2C12-α2 + cells, suggesting that the α11β1 integrin may have a higher binding affinity for the GLPGER sequence. Human endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts adhered to rScl proteins, indicating that multiple cell types may recognize and bind the Scl proteins via their collagen receptors. This work is a stepping stone toward defining the utilization of collagen receptors by microbial collagen-like proteins that are expressed by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18990704

  8. Sequence and spatiotemporal expression analysis of CLE-motif containing genes from the reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic species with a host range that encompasses more than 77 plant families. Nematode effector proteins containing plant-ligand motifs similar to CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) peptides have been identified in the Heterodera, Globode...

  9. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  10. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  11. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  12. Salicylic Acid Suppresses Jasmonic Acid Signaling Downstream of SCFCOI1-JAZ by Targeting GCC Promoter Motifs via Transcription Factor ORA59[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Koornneef, Annemart; Van Verk, Marcel C.; Rodenburg, Nicole; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain; Körbes, Ana P.; Memelink, Johan; Ritsema, Tita; Van Wees, Saskia C.M.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antagonism between the defense hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role in the modulation of the plant immune signaling network, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that suppression of the JA pathway by SA functions downstream of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase Skip-Cullin-F-box complex SCFCOI1, which targets JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressor proteins (JAZs) for proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, neither the stability nor the JA-induced degradation of JAZs was affected by SA. In silico promoter analysis of the SA/JA crosstalk transcriptome revealed that the 1-kb promoter regions of JA-responsive genes that are suppressed by SA are significantly enriched in the JA-responsive GCC-box motifs. Using GCC:GUS lines carrying four copies of the GCC-box fused to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene, we showed that the GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Using plants overexpressing the GCC-box binding APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factors ERF1 or ORA59, we found that SA strongly reduces the accumulation of ORA59 but not that of ERF1. Collectively, these data indicate that the SA pathway inhibits JA signaling downstream of the SCFCOI1-JAZ complex by targeting GCC-box motifs in JA-responsive promoters via a negative effect on the transcriptional activator ORA59. PMID:23435661

  13. Amino acid motifs in both the major and minor capsid proteins of HPV51 impact antigenicity and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Godi, Anna; Epifano, Ilaria; Bissett, Sara L; Dell'Anna, Tiziana; Piana, Andrea; Cocuzza, Clementina; Beddows, Simon

    2015-07-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prerequisite for cervical disease development, yet data regarding the host immune response to infection at the genotype level are quite limited. We created pseudoviruses bearing the major (L1) and minor (L2) capsid proteins and L1 virus-like particles representing the reference sequence and a consensus of 34 European sequences of HPV51. Despite the formation of similarly sized particles, motifs in the reference L1 and L2 genes had a profound impact on the immunogenicity, antigenicity and infectivity of these antigens. The antibody status of women exhibiting low-grade disease was similar between HPV16 and the consensus HPV51, but both demonstrated discrepancies between binding and neutralizing antibody responses. These data support the use of pseudoviruses as the preferred target antigen in studies of natural HPV infection and the need to consider variation in both the L1 and L2 proteins for the appropriate presentation of antibody epitopes. PMID:25770119

  14. Ovodefensins, an Oviduct-Specific Antimicrobial Gene Family, Have Evolved in Birds and Reptiles to Protect the Egg by Both Sequence and Intra-Six-Cysteine Sequence Motif Spacing.

    PubMed

    Whenham, Natasha; Lu, Tian Chee; Maidin, Maisarah B M; Wilson, Peter W; Bain, Maureen M; Stevenson, M Lynn; Stevens, Mark P; Bedford, Michael R; Dunn, Ian C

    2015-06-01

    Ovodefensins are a novel beta defensin-related family of antimicrobial peptides containing conserved glycine and six cysteine residues. Originally thought to be restricted to the albumen-producing region of the avian oviduct, expression was found in chicken, turkey, duck, and zebra finch in large quantities in many parts of the oviduct, but this varied between species and between gene forms in the same species. Using new search strategies, the ovodefensin family now has 35 members, including reptiles, but no representatives outside birds and reptiles have been found. Analysis of their evolution shows that ovodefensins divide into six groups based on the intra-cysteine amino acid spacing, representing a unique mechanism alongside traditional evolution of sequence. The groups have been used to base a nomenclature for the family. Antimicrobial activity for three ovodefensins from chicken and duck was confirmed against Escherichia coli and a pathogenic E. coli strain as well as a Gram-positive organism, Staphylococcus aureus, for the first time. However, activity varied greatly between peptides, with Gallus gallus OvoDA1 being the most potent, suggesting a link with the different structures. Expression of Gallus gallus OvoDA1 (gallin) in the oviduct was increased by estrogen and progesterone and in the reproductive state. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that ovodefensins evolved to protect the egg, but they are not necessarily restricted to the egg white. Therefore, divergent motif structure and sequence present an interesting area of research for antimicrobial peptide design and understanding protection of the cleidoic egg. PMID:25972010

  15. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  16. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  17. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    David J. States

    1998-08-01

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  18. A phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide motif for self-assembly into tunable nanostructures through molecular recognition with arginine in water.

    PubMed

    Nandre, Kamalakar P; Bhosale, Sheshanath V; Rama Krishna, K V S; Gupta, Akhil; Bhosale, Sidhanath V

    2013-06-18

    A naphthalene diimide motif bearing phosphonic acid functionalities has been found to be self-assembled with L- and D-arginine through chirality induced molecular recognitions and leads to the formation of micrometre long nanobelts and spherical aggregates at pH 9 in water, respectively. PMID:23589823

  19. MIDDAS-M: Motif-Independent De Novo Detection of Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters through the Integration of Genome Sequencing and Transcriptome Data

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Nagano, Nozomi; Ishii, Tomoko; Kawano, Jin; Yamane, Noriko; Kozone, Ikuko; Horimoto, Katsuhisa; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Asai, Kiyoshi; Yu, Jiujiang; Bennett, Joan W.; Machida, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Many bioactive natural products are produced as “secondary metabolites” by plants, bacteria, and fungi. During the middle of the 20th century, several secondary metabolites from fungi revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry, for example, penicillin, lovastatin, and cyclosporine. They are generally biosynthesized by enzymes encoded by clusters of coordinately regulated genes, and several motif-based methods have been developed to detect secondary metabolite biosynthetic (SMB) gene clusters using the sequence information of typical SMB core genes such as polyketide synthases (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). However, no detection method exists for SMB gene clusters that are functional and do not include core SMB genes at present. To advance the exploration of SMB gene clusters, especially those without known core genes, we developed MIDDAS-M, a motif-independent de novo detection algorithm for SMB gene clusters. We integrated virtual gene cluster generation in an annotated genome sequence with highly sensitive scoring of the cooperative transcriptional regulation of cluster member genes. MIDDAS-M accurately predicted 38 SMB gene clusters that have been experimentally confirmed and/or predicted by other motif-based methods in 3 fungal strains. MIDDAS-M further identified a new SMB gene cluster for ustiloxin B, which was experimentally validated. Sequence analysis of the cluster genes indicated a novel mechanism for peptide biosynthesis independent of NRPS. Because it is fully computational and independent of empirical knowledge about SMB core genes, MIDDAS-M allows a large-scale, comprehensive analysis of SMB gene clusters, including those with novel biosynthetic mechanisms that do not contain any functionally characterized genes. PMID:24391870

  20. PscanChIP: finding over-represented transcription factor-binding site motifs and their correlations in sequences from ChIP-Seq experiments

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing with next-generation technologies (ChIP-Seq) has become the de facto standard for building genome-wide maps of regions bound by a given transcription factor (TF). The regions identified, however, have to be further analyzed to determine the actual DNA-binding sites for the TF, as well as sites for other TFs belonging to the same TF complex or in general co-operating or interacting with it in transcription regulation. PscanChIP is a web server that, starting from a collection of genomic regions derived from a ChIP-Seq experiment, scans them using motif descriptors like JASPAR or TRANSFAC position-specific frequency matrices, or descriptors uploaded by users, and it evaluates both motif enrichment and positional bias within the regions according to different measures and criteria. PscanChIP can successfully identify not only the actual binding sites for the TF investigated by a ChIP-Seq experiment but also secondary motifs corresponding to other TFs that tend to bind the same regions, and, if present, precise positional correlations among their respective sites. The web interface is free for use, and there is no login requirement. It is available at http://www.beaconlab.it/pscan_chip_dev. PMID:23748563

  1. Sequence and peptide-binding motif for a variant of HLA-A*0214 (A*02142) in an HIV-1-resistant individual from the Nairobi Sex Worker cohort.

    PubMed

    Luscher, M A; MacDonald, K S; Bwayo, J J; Plummer, F A; Barber, B H

    2001-02-01

    As part of the ongoing study of natural HIV-1 resistance in the women of the Nairobi Sex Workers' study, we have examined a resistance-associated HLA class I allele at the molecular level. Typing by polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers determined that this molecule is closely related to HLA-A*0214, one of a family of HLA-A2 supertype alleles which correlate with HIV-1 resistance in this population. Direct nucleotide sequencing shows that this molecule differs from A*0214, having a silent nucleotide substitution. We therefore propose to designate it HLA-A*02142. We have determined the peptide-binding motif of HLA-A*0214/02142 by peptide elution and bulk Edman degradative sequencing. The resulting motif, X-[Q,V]-X-X-X-K-X-X-[V,L], includes lysine as an anchor at position 6. The data complement available information on the peptide-binding characteristics of this molecule, and will be of use in identifying antigenic peptides from HIV-1 and other pathogens. PMID:11261925

  2. Bioinformatics Approaches for Predicting Disordered Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Pallab; Guharoy, Mainak; Tompa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Short, linear motifs (SLiMs) in proteins are functional microdomains consisting of contiguous residue segments along the protein sequence, typically not more than 10 consecutive amino acids in length with less than 5 defined positions. Many positions are 'degenerate' thus offering flexibility in terms of the amino acid types allowed at those positions. Their short length and degenerate nature confers evolutionary plasticity meaning that SLiMs often evolve convergently. Further, SLiMs have a propensity to occur within intrinsically unstructured protein segments and this confers versatile functionality to unstructured regions of the proteome. SLiMs mediate multiple types of protein interactions based on domain-peptide recognition and guide functions including posttranslational modifications, subcellular localization of proteins, and ligand binding. SLiMs thus behave as modular interaction units that confer versatility to protein function and SLiM-mediated interactions are increasingly being recognized as therapeutic targets. In this chapter we start with a brief description about the properties of SLiMs and their interactions and then move on to discuss algorithms and tools including several web-based methods that enable the discovery of novel SLiMs (de novo motif discovery) as well as the prediction of novel occurrences of known SLiMs. Both individual amino acid sequences as well as sets of protein sequences can be scanned using these methods to obtain statistically overrepresented sequence patterns. Lists of putatively functional SLiMs are then assembled based on parameters such as evolutionary sequence conservation, disorder scores, structural data, gene ontology terms and other contextual information that helps to assess the functional credibility or significance of these motifs. These bioinformatics methods should certainly guide experiments aimed at motif discovery. PMID:26387106

  3. Amino Acids of Conserved Kinase Motifs of Cytomegalovirus Protein UL97 Are Essential for Autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Detlef; Kramer, Silke; Höhn, Simone; Schaarschmidt, Peter; Wunderlich, Kirsten; Mertens, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen point mutations targeting predicted domains conserved in homologous protein kinases were introduced into the UL97 coding region of the human cytomegalovirus. All mutagenized proteins were expressed in cells infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVV). Several mutations drastically reduced ganciclovir (GCV) phosphorylation. Mutations at amino acids G340, A442, L446, and F523 resulted in a complete loss of pUL97 phosphorylation, which was strictly associated with a loss of GCV phosphorylation. Our results confirm that in rVV-infected cells pUL97 phosphorylation is due to autophosphorylation and show that several amino acids conserved within domains of protein kinases are essential for this pUL97 phosphorylation. GCV phosphorylation is dependent on pUL97 phosphorylation. PMID:10482650

  4. From Artificial Amino Acids to Sequence-Defined Targeted Oligoaminoamides.

    PubMed

    Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Lächelt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Artificial oligoamino acids with appropriate protecting groups can be used for the sequential assembly of oligoaminoamides on solid-phase. With the help of these oligoamino acids multifunctional nucleic acid (NA) carriers can be designed and produced in highly defined topologies. Here we describe the synthesis of the artificial oligoamino acid Fmoc-Stp(Boc3)-OH, the subsequent assembly into sequence-defined oligomers and the formulation of tumor-targeted plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes. PMID:27436323

  5. GeneMarkS: a self-training method for prediction of gene starts in microbial genomes. Implications for finding sequence motifs in regulatory regions.

    PubMed

    Besemer, J; Lomsadze, A; Borodovsky, M

    2001-06-15

    Improving the accuracy of prediction of gene starts is one of a few remaining open problems in computer prediction of prokaryotic genes. Its difficulty is caused by the absence of relatively strong sequence patterns identifying true translation initiation sites. In the current paper we show that the accuracy of gene start prediction can be improved by combining models of protein-coding and non-coding regions and models of regulatory sites near gene start within an iterative Hidden Markov model based algorithm. The new gene prediction method, called GeneMarkS, utilizes a non-supervised training procedure and can be used for a newly sequenced prokaryotic genome with no prior knowledge of any protein or rRNA genes. The GeneMarkS implementation uses an improved version of the gene finding program GeneMark.hmm, heuristic Markov models of coding and non-coding regions and the Gibbs sampling multiple alignment program. GeneMarkS predicted precisely 83.2% of the translation starts of GenBank annotated Bacillus subtilis genes and 94.4% of translation starts in an experimentally validated set of Escherichia coli genes. We have also observed that GeneMarkS detects prokaryotic genes, in terms of identifying open reading frames containing real genes, with an accuracy matching the level of the best currently used gene detection methods. Accurate translation start prediction, in addition to the refinement of protein sequence N-terminal data, provides the benefit of precise positioning of the sequence region situated upstream to a gene start. Therefore, sequence motifs related to transcription and translation regulatory sites can be revealed and analyzed with higher precision. These motifs were shown to possess a significant variability, the functional and evolutionary connections of which are discussed. PMID:11410670

  6. Analysis of BAC-end sequences in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) towards the development and characterization of long motifs SSRs.

    PubMed

    Müller, Bárbara Salomão de Faria; Sakamoto, Tetsu; de Menezes, Ivandilson Pessoa Pinto; Prado, Guilherme Souza; Martins, Wellington Santos; Brondani, Claudio; de Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves; Vianello, Rosana Pereira

    2014-11-01

    The increasing volume of genomic data on the Phaseolus vulgaris species have contributed to its importance as a model genetic species and positively affected the investigation of other legumes of scientific and economic value. To expand and gain a more in-depth knowledge of the common bean genome, the ends of a number of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) were sequenced, annotated and the presence of repetitive sequences was determined. In total, 52,270 BESs (BAC-end sequences), equivalent to 32 Mbp (~6 %) of the genome, were processed. In total, 3,789 BES-SSRs were identified, with a distribution of one SSR (simple sequence repeat) per 8.36 kbp and 2,000 were suitable for the development of SSRs, of which 194 were evaluated in low-resolution screening. From 40 BES-SSRs based on long motifs SSRs (≥ trinucleotides) analyzed in high-resolution genotyping, 34 showed an equally good amplification for the Andean and for the Mesoamerican genepools, exhibiting an average gene diversity (H E) of 0.490 and 5.59 alleles/locus, of which six classified as Class I showed a H E ≥ 0.7. The PCoA and structure analysis allowed to discriminate the gene pools (K = 2, FST = 0.733). From the 52,270 BESs, 2 % corresponded to transcription factors and 3 % to transposable elements. Putative functions for 24,321 BESs were identified and for 19,363 were assigned functional categories (gene ontology). This study identified highly polymorphic BES-SSRs containing tri- to hexanucleotides motifs and bringing together relevant genetic characteristics useful for breeding programs. Additionally, the BESs were incorporated into the international genome-sequencing project for the common bean. PMID:25164100

  7. Expression and characterization of EF-hand I loop mutants of aequorin replaced with other loop sequences of Ca2+-binding proteins: an approach to studying the EF-hand motif of proteins.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko

    2016-07-01

    The binding properties of Ca(2+) to EF-hand I of aequorin (AQ) were characterized by replacing the loop sequence of EF-hand I (AQ[I]) with other known loop sequences of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including photoproteins (aequorin, clytin-I, clytin-II and mitrocomin), Renilla luciferin-binding protein (RLBP) and calmodulin (CaM). For evaluation of the binding affinity of Ca(2+) to AQ[I] mutants, the half-decay time of the maximum intensity in the luminescence reaction triggered by Ca(2+) was used as an indicator and 22 kinds of AQ[I] mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli cells. AQ[I] mutants replaced with the EF-hand I and EF-hand III from photoproteins showed sufficient luminescence activity, but it was not shown by other EF-hands from RLBP and CaM. An AQ[I] mutant with a lysine or arginine residue at the second position of the non-conserved amino acid residue showed a slow-decay pattern of luminescence, indicating that the Ca(2+)-binding affinity to aequorin was reduced by a positive charge at the second position of the loop sequence. The specific loop sequence of the EF-hand I motif in aequorin caused the specific Ca(2+)-triggered luminescence pattern. PMID:26896488

  8. Ser/Thr-rich repetitive motifs as targets for phosphoglycan modifications in Leishmania mexicana secreted acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wiese, M; Ilg, T; Lottspeich, F; Overath, P

    1995-03-15

    The insect stage of the protozoan parasite Leishmania mexicana secretes a phosphomonoesterase in the form of a filamentous complex. The polypeptide subunits of this polymer are modified by phosphoglycans and/or oligomannosyl residues linked to phosphoserine. Based on peptide sequence data of a predominant 100 kDa protein of the filamentous complex, two tandemly arranged, single copy genes, lmsap1 and lmsap2, were cloned and sequenced. lmsap1 predicts a protein with features characteristic of acid phosphatases and a remarkable serine- and threonine-rich region of 32 amino acids close to the C-terminus. In the otherwise identical lmsap2 product, this region is extended to 383 amino acids and is composed of short Ser/Thr-rich repeats. Deletion analysis demonstrates that lmsap1 encodes the major 100 kDa protein of the complex while a minor 200 kDa component is derived from the lmsap2 gene. Null mutants of either gene retain the ability to secrete acid phosphatase filaments, while a deletion of both genes results in Leishmania defective in enzyme formation. The Ser/Thr-rich domains are the targets for phosphoglycan modifications as shown by the expression of secreted fusion proteins composed of these C-terminal regions and the N-terminal domain of a lysosomal acid phosphatase. PMID:7720697

  9. Structural alphabet motif discovery and a structural motif database.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shih-Yen; Hu, Yuh-Jyh

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a general framework for structural motif discovery. The framework is based on a modular design in which the system components can be modified or replaced independently to increase its applicability to various studies. It is a two-stage approach that first converts protein 3D structures into structural alphabet sequences, and then applies a sequence motif-finding tool to these sequences to detect conserved motifs. We named the structural motif database we built the SA-Motifbase, which provides the structural information conserved at different hierarchical levels in SCOP. For each motif, SA-Motifbase presents its 3D view; alphabet letter preference; alphabet letter frequency distribution; and the significance. SA-Motifbase is available at http://bioinfo.cis.nctu.edu.tw/samotifbase/. PMID:22099701

  10. Evolution of the hydrogen-bonding motif in the melamine-cyanuric acid co-crystal: a topological study.

    PubMed

    Petelski, Andre N; Peruchena, Nelida M; Sosa, Gladis L

    2016-09-01

    The melamine (M)/cyanuric acid (CA) supramolecular system is perhaps one of the most exploited in the field of self-assembly because of the high complementarity of the components. However, it is necessary to investigate further the factors involved in the assembly process. In this study, we analyzed a set of 13 M n /CA m clusters (with n , m = 1, 2, 3), taken from crystallographic data, to characterize the nature of the hydrogen bonds involved in the self-assembly of these components as well as to provide greater understanding of the phenomenon. The calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and ω-B97XD (single point) levels of theory, and the interactions were analyzed within the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules and by means of molecular electrostatic potential maps. Our results show that the stablest structure is the rosette-type motif and the aggregation mechanism is governed by a combination of cooperative and anticooperative effects. Our topological results explain the polymorphism in the self-assembly of coadsorbed monolayers of M and CA. Graphical abstract The aggregation steps of the melamine-cyanuric co-crystal is driven by a hydrogen-bonded network which is governed by a complex combination of cooperative and anticooperative effects. PMID:27491851

  11. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

    PubMed Central

    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  12. Detecting frame shifts by amino acid sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Claverie, J M

    1993-12-20

    Various amino acid substitution scoring matrices are used in conjunction with local alignments programs to detect regions of similarity and infer potential common ancestry between proteins. The usual scoring schemes derive from the implicit hypothesis that related proteins evolve from a common ancestor by the accumulation of point mutations and that amino acids tend to be progressively substituted by others with similar properties. However, other frequent single mutation events, like nucleotide insertion or deletion and gene inversion, change the translation reading frame and cause previously encoded amino acid sequences to become unrecognizable at once. Here, I derive five new types of scoring matrix, each capable of detecting a specific frame shift (deletion, insertion and inversion in 3 frames) and use them with a regular local alignments program to detect amino acid sequences that may have derived from alternative reading frames of the same nucleotide sequence. Frame shifts are inferred from the sole comparison of the protein sequences. The five scoring matrices were used with the BLASTP program to compare all the protein sequences in the Swissprot database. Surprisingly, the searches revealed hundreds of highly significant frame shift matches, of which many are likely to represent sequencing errors. Others provide some evidence that frame shift mutations might be used in protein evolution as a way to create new amino acid sequences from pre-existing coding regions. PMID:7903399

  13. Segments of amino acid sequence similarity in beta-amylases.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, F; Rhodes, C

    1988-01-01

    In alpha-amylases from animals, plants and bacteria and in beta-amylases from plants and bacteria a number of segments exhibit amino acid sequence similarity specific to the alpha or to the beta type, respectively. In the case of the beta-amylases the similar sequence regions are extensive and they are disrupted only by short interspersed dissimilar regions. Close to the C terminus, however, no such sequence similarity exist. PMID:2464171

  14. Direct Imaging of Hippocampal Epileptiform Calcium Motifs Following Kainic Acid Administration in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara K.; Frady, E. Paxon; Nassi, Jonathan J.; Aluisio, Leah; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Otte, Stephani; Wyatt, Ryan M.; Dugovic, Christine; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to abnormally high calcium concentrations is thought to be a core mechanism underlying hippocampal damage in epileptic patients; however, no prior study has characterized calcium activity during seizures in the live, intact hippocampus. We have directly investigated this possibility by combining whole-brain electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements with microendoscopic calcium imaging of pyramidal cells in the CA1 hippocampal region of freely behaving mice treated with the pro-convulsant kainic acid (KA). We observed that KA administration led to systematic patterns of epileptiform calcium activity: a series of large-scale, intensifying flashes of increased calcium fluorescence concurrent with a cluster of low-amplitude EEG waveforms. This was accompanied by a steady increase in cellular calcium levels (>5 fold increase relative to the baseline), followed by an intense spreading calcium wave characterized by a 218% increase in global mean intensity of calcium fluorescence (n = 8, range [114–349%], p < 10−4; t-test). The wave had no consistent EEG phenotype and occurred before the onset of motor convulsions. Similar changes in calcium activity were also observed in animals treated with 2 different proconvulsant agents, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), suggesting the measured changes in calcium dynamics are a signature of seizure activity rather than a KA-specific pathology. Additionally, despite reducing the behavioral severity of KA-induced seizures, the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VA, 300 mg/kg) did not modify the observed abnormalities in calcium dynamics. These results confirm the presence of pathological calcium activity preceding convulsive motor seizures and support calcium as a candidate signaling molecule in a pathway connecting seizures to subsequent cellular damage. Integrating in vivo calcium imaging with traditional assessment of seizures could potentially increase translatability of pharmacological

  15. Identification of a Novel Sequence Motif Recognized by the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of zDHHC17/13 S-Acyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Lemonidis, Kimon; Sanchez-Perez, Maria C; Chamberlain, Luke H

    2015-09-01

    S-Acylation is a major post-translational modification affecting several cellular processes. It is particularly important for neuronal functions. This modification is catalyzed by a family of transmembrane S-acyltransferases that contain a conserved zinc finger DHHC (zDHHC) domain. Typically, eukaryote genomes encode for 7-24 distinct zDHHC enzymes, with two members also harboring an ankyrin repeat (AR) domain at their cytosolic N termini. The AR domain of zDHHC enzymes is predicted to engage in numerous interactions and facilitates both substrate recruitment and S-acylation-independent functions; however, the sequence/structural features recognized by this module remain unknown. The two mammalian AR-containing S-acyltransferases are the Golgi-localized zDHHC17 and zDHHC13, also known as Huntingtin-interacting proteins 14 and 14-like, respectively; they are highly expressed in brain, and their loss in mice leads to neuropathological deficits that are reminiscent of Huntington's disease. Here, we report that zDHHC17 and zDHHC13 recognize, via their AR domain, evolutionary conserved and closely related sequences of a [VIAP][VIT]XXQP consensus in SNAP25, SNAP23, cysteine string protein, Huntingtin, cytoplasmic linker protein 3, and microtubule-associated protein 6. This novel AR-binding sequence motif is found in regions predicted to be unstructured and is present in a number of zDHHC17 substrates and zDHHC17/13-interacting S-acylated proteins. This is the first study to identify a motif recognized by AR-containing zDHHCs. PMID:26198635

  16. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  17. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  18. 37 CFR 1.821 - Nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence disclosures in patent applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... acids are not intended to be embraced by this definition. Any amino acid sequence that contains post-translationally modified amino acids may be described as the amino acid sequence that is initially translated... sequence of four or more amino acids or an unbranched sequence of ten or more nucleotides....

  19. In vitro enzymatic activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase mutants in the highly conserved YMDD amino acid motif correlates with the infectious potential of the proviral genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, J K; Jablonski, S A; Morrow, C D

    1992-01-01

    Reverse transcriptases contain a highly conserved YXDD amino acid motif believed to be important in enzyme function. The second amino acid is not strictly conserved, with a methionine, valine or alanine occupying the second position in reverse transcriptases from various retroviruses and retroelements. Recently, a 3.5-A (0.35-nm) resolution electron density map of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase positioned the YMDD motif within an antiparallel beta-hairpin structure which forms a portion of its catalytic site. To further explore the role of methionine of the conserved YMDD motif in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase function, we have substituted methionine with a valine, alanine, serine, glycine, or proline, reflecting in some cases sequence motifs of other related reverse transcriptases. Wild-type and mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli, partially purified by phosphocellulose chromatography, and assayed for the capacity to polymerize TTP by using a homopolymeric template [poly(rA)] with either a DNA [oligo(dT)] or an RNA [oligo(U)] primer. With a poly(rA).oligo(dT) template-primer, reverse transcriptases with the methionine replaced by valine (YVDD), serine (YSDD), or alanine (YADD) were 70 to 100% as active as the wild type, while those with the glycine substitution (YGDD) were approximately 5 to 10% as active. A proline substitution (YPDD) completely inactivated the enzyme. With a poly(rA).oligo(U) template-primer, only the activity of mutants with YVDD was similar to that of the wild type, while mutants with YADD and YSDD were approximately 5 to 10% as active as the wild-type enzyme. The reverse transcriptases with the YGDD and YPDD mutations demonstrated no activity above background. Proviruses containing the reverse transcriptase with the valine mutation (YVDD) produced viruses with infectivities similar to that of the wild type, as determined by measurement of p24 antigen in culture supernatants and visual inspection

  20. Internalization and trafficking of guanylyl (guanylate) cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor A is regulated by an acidic tyrosine-based cytoplasmic motif GDAY

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.; Nguyen, Huong T.; Garg, Renu; Khurana, Madan L.; Fink, Jude

    2004-01-01

    We have identified a GDAY motif in the C-terminal domain of guanylyl cyclase (guanylate cyclase)/NPRA (natriuretic peptide receptor A) sequence, which serves a dual role as an internalization signal and a recycling signal. To delineate the role of the GDAY motif in receptor internalization and sequestration, we mutated Gly920, Asp921 and Tyr923 to alanine residues (GDAY/AAAA) in the NPRA cDNA sequence. The cDNAs encoding wild-type and mutant receptors were transfected in HEK-293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells). The internalization studies of ligand–receptor complexes revealed that endocytosis of 125I-ANP by HEK-293 cells expressing G920A, Y923A or GDAY/AAAA mutant receptor was decreased by almost 50% (P<0.001) when compared with cells expressing the wild-type receptor. However, the effect of D921A mutation on receptor internalization was minimal. Ligand-mediated down-regulation of G920A, Y923A and GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors was decreased by 35–40% when compared with wild-type NPRA. Subsequently, the recycling of internalized D921A and GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors from the intracellular pool was decreased by more than 40±4% when compared with wild-type NPRA. Recycling of G920A and Y923A mutant receptors was also decreased, but to a significantly lesser extent compared with the D921A or GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors. We conclude that the Gly920 and Tyr923 residues within the GDAY consensus motif are necessary for internalization, and that residue Asp921 is important for recycling of NPRA. The current results provide new evidence for a dual role of the GDAY sequence motif in ligand-mediated internalization, recycling and down-regulation of a single-transmembrane receptor protein NPRA. PMID:15574117

  1. A method to find palindromes in nucleic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Anjana, Ramnath; Shankar, Mani; Vaishnavi, Marthandan Kirti; Sekar, Kanagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Various types of sequences in the human genome are known to play important roles in different aspects of genomic functioning. Among these sequences, palindromic nucleic acid sequences are one such type that have been studied in detail and found to influence a wide variety of genomic characteristics. For a nucleotide sequence to be considered as a palindrome, its complementary strand must read the same in the opposite direction. For example, both the strands i.e the strand going from 5' to 3' and its complementary strand from 3' to 5' must be complementary. A typical nucleotide palindromic sequence would be TATA (5' to 3') and its complimentary sequence from 3' to 5' would be ATAT. Thus, a new method has been developed using dynamic programming to fetch the palindromic nucleic acid sequences. The new method uses less memory and thereby it increases the overall speed and efficiency. The proposed method has been tested using the bacterial (3891 KB bases) and human chromosomal sequences (Chr-18: 74366 kb and Chr-Y: 25554 kb) and the computation time for finding the palindromic sequences is in milli seconds. PMID:23515654

  2. Construction of a Three-Dimensional Motif Dictionary for Protein Structural Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroaki, Kato; Tadokoro, Tetsuo; Miyata, Hiroyuki; Chikamatsu, Shin-Ichi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Abe, Hidetsugu

    With the rapidly increasing number of proteins of which three-dimensional (3D) structures are known, the protein structure database is one of the key elements in many attempts being made to derive the knowledge of structure-function relationships of proteins. In this work, the authors have developed a software tool to assist in constructing the 3D protein motif dictionary that is closely related to the PROSITE sequence motif database. In the PROSITE, a structural feature called motif is described by a sequence pattern of amino acid residues with the regular expression defined in the database. The present system allows us to automatically find the related sites for all the 3D protein structures taken from a protein structure database such as the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and to make a dictionary of the 3D motifs related to the PROSITE sequence motif patterns. A computational trial was carried out for a subset of the PDB's structure data file. The structural feature analysis resulted with the tool showed that there are many different 3D motif patterns but having a particular PROSITE sequence pattern. For this reason, the authors also tried to classify the 3D motif patterns into several groups on the basis of distance similarity matrix, and to determine a representative pattern for each group in preparing the dictionary. The usefulness of the additional approach for preparing the 3D motif dictionary is also discussed with an illustrative example.

  3. Efficient exact motif discovery

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Tobias; Rahmann, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The motif discovery problem consists of finding over-represented patterns in a collection of biosequences. It is one of the classical sequence analysis problems, but still has not been satisfactorily solved in an exact and efficient manner. This is partly due to the large number of possibilities of defining the motif search space and the notion of over-representation. Even for well-defined formalizations, the problem is frequently solved in an ad hoc manner with heuristics that do not guarantee to find the best motif. Results: We show how to solve the motif discovery problem (almost) exactly on a practically relevant space of IUPAC generalized string patterns, using the p-value with respect to an i.i.d. model or a Markov model as the measure of over-representation. In particular, (i) we use a highly accurate compound Poisson approximation for the null distribution of the number of motif occurrences. We show how to compute the exact clump size distribution using a recently introduced device called probabilistic arithmetic automaton (PAA). (ii) We define two p-value scores for over-representation, the first one based on the total number of motif occurrences, the second one based on the number of sequences in a collection with at least one occurrence. (iii) We describe an algorithm to discover the optimal pattern with respect to either of the scores. The method exploits monotonicity properties of the compound Poisson approximation and is by orders of magnitude faster than exhaustive enumeration of IUPAC strings (11.8 h compared with an extrapolated runtime of 4.8 years). (iv) We justify the use of the proposed scores for motif discovery by showing our method to outperform other motif discovery algorithms (e.g. MEME, Weeder) on benchmark datasets. We also propose new motifs on Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Availability and Implementation: The method has been implemented in Java. It can be obtained from http://ls11-www

  4. Mining tertiary structural motifs for assessment of designability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2013-01-01

    The observation of a limited secondary-structural alphabet in native proteins, with significant sequence preferences, has profoundly influenced the fields of protein design and structure prediction (Simons, Kooperberg, Huang, & Baker, 1997; Verschueren et al., 2011). In the era of structural genomics, as the size of the structural dataset continues to grow rapidly, it is becoming possible to extend this analysis to tertiary structural motifs and their sequences. For a hypothetical tertiary motif, the rate of its utilization in natural proteins may be used to assess its designability-the ease with which the motif can be realized with natural amino acids. This requires a structural similarity search methodology, which rather than looking for global topological agreement (more appropriate for categorization of full proteins or domains), identifies detailed geometric matches. In this chapter, we introduce such a method, called MaDCaT, and demonstrate its use by assessing the designability landscapes of two tertiary structural motifs. We also show that such analysis can establish structure/sequence links by providing the sequence constraints necessary to encode designable motifs. As logical extension of their secondary-structure counterparts, tertiary structural preferences will likely prove extremely useful in de novo protein design and structure prediction. PMID:23422424

  5. Amino acid sequence repertoire of the bacterial proteome and the occurrence of untranslatable sequences.

    PubMed

    Navon, Sharon Penias; Kornberg, Guy; Chen, Jin; Schwartzman, Tali; Tsai, Albert; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D; Adir, Noam

    2016-06-28

    Bioinformatic analysis of Escherichia coli proteomes revealed that all possible amino acid triplet sequences occur at their expected frequencies, with four exceptions. Two of the four underrepresented sequences (URSs) were shown to interfere with translation in vivo and in vitro. Enlarging the URS by a single amino acid resulted in increased translational inhibition. Single-molecule methods revealed stalling of translation at the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome, adjacent to ribosomal nucleotides A2062 and U2585. Interaction with these same ribosomal residues is involved in regulation of translation by longer, naturally occurring protein sequences. The E. coli exit tunnel has evidently evolved to minimize interaction with the exit tunnel and maximize the sequence diversity of the proteome, although allowing some interactions for regulatory purposes. Bioinformatic analysis of the human proteome revealed no underrepresented triplet sequences, possibly reflecting an absence of regulation by interaction with the exit tunnel. PMID:27307442

  6. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Foulk, Michael S.; Urban, John M.; Casella, Cinzia; Gerbi, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (λ-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent strands intact. We used genomics and biochemical approaches to determine if λ-exo digests all parental DNA sequences equally. We report that λ-exo does not efficiently digest G-quadruplex (G4) structures in a plasmid. Moreover, λ-exo digestion of nonreplicating genomic DNA (LexoG0) enriches GC-rich DNA and G4 motifs genome-wide. We used LexoG0 data to control for nascent strand–independent λ-exo biases in NS-seq and validated this approach at the rDNA locus. The λ-exo–controlled NS-seq peaks are not GC-rich, and only 35.5% overlap with 6.8% of all G4s, suggesting that G4s are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na+ instead of K+ in the λ-exo digestion buffer reduced the effect of G4s on λ-exo digestion and discuss ways to increase both the sensitivity and specificity of NS-seq. PMID:25695952

  7. RNAPattMatch: a web server for RNA sequence/structure motif detection based on pattern matching with flexible gaps

    PubMed Central

    Drory Retwitzer, Matan; Polishchuk, Maya; Churkin, Elena; Kifer, Ilona; Yakhini, Zohar; Barash, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Searching for RNA sequence-structure patterns is becoming an essential tool for RNA practitioners. Novel discoveries of regulatory non-coding RNAs in targeted organisms and the motivation to find them across a wide range of organisms have prompted the use of computational RNA pattern matching as an enhancement to sequence similarity. State-of-the-art programs differ by the flexibility of patterns allowed as queries and by their simplicity of use. In particular—no existing method is available as a user-friendly web server. A general program that searches for RNA sequence-structure patterns is RNA Structator. However, it is not available as a web server and does not provide the option to allow flexible gap pattern representation with an upper bound of the gap length being specified at any position in the sequence. Here, we introduce RNAPattMatch, a web-based application that is user friendly and makes sequence/structure RNA queries accessible to practitioners of various background and proficiency. It also extends RNA Structator and allows a more flexible variable gaps representation, in addition to analysis of results using energy minimization methods. RNAPattMatch service is available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/rnapattmatch. A standalone version of the search tool is also available to download at the site. PMID:25940619

  8. Limb body wall complex, amniotic band sequence, or new syndrome caused by mutation in IQ Motif containing K (IQCK)?

    PubMed

    Kruszka, Paul; Uwineza, Annette; Mutesa, Leon; Martinez, Ariel F; Abe, Yu; Zackai, Elaine H; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Chung, Brian; Stevenson, Roger E; Adelstein, Robert S; Ma, Xuefei; Mullikin, James C; Hong, Sung-Kook; Muenke, Maximilian

    2015-09-01

    Limb body wall complex (LBWC) and amniotic band sequence (ABS) are multiple congenital anomaly conditions with craniofacial, limb, and ventral wall defects. LBWC and ABS are considered separate entities by some, and a continuum of severity of the same condition by others. The etiology of LBWC/ABS remains unknown and multiple hypotheses have been proposed. One individual with features of LBWC and his unaffected parents were whole exome sequenced and Sanger sequenced as confirmation of the mutation. Functional studies were conducted using morpholino knockdown studies followed by human mRNA rescue experiments. Using whole exome sequencing, a de novo heterozygous mutation was found in the gene IQCK: c.667C>G; p.Q223E and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in an individual with LBWC. Morpholino knockdown of iqck mRNA in the zebrafish showed ventral defects including failure of ventral fin to develop and cardiac edema. Human wild-type IQCK mRNA rescued the zebrafish phenotype, whereas human p.Q223E IQCK mRNA did not, but worsened the phenotype of the morpholino knockdown zebrafish. This study supports a genetic etiology for LBWC/ABS, or potentially a new syndrome. PMID:26436108

  9. Limb body wall complex, amniotic band sequence, or new syndrome caused by mutation in IQ Motif containing K (IQCK)?

    PubMed Central

    Kruszka, Paul; Uwineza, Annette; Mutesa, Leon; Martinez, Ariel F; Abe, Yu; Zackai, Elaine H; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Chung, Brian; Stevenson, Roger E; Adelstein, Robert S; Ma, Xuefei; Mullikin, James C; Hong, Sung-Kook; Muenke, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Limb body wall complex (LBWC) and amniotic band sequence (ABS) are multiple congenital anomaly conditions with craniofacial, limb, and ventral wall defects. LBWC and ABS are considered separate entities by some, and a continuum of severity of the same condition by others. The etiology of LBWC/ABS remains unknown and multiple hypotheses have been proposed. One individual with features of LBWC and his unaffected parents were whole exome sequenced and Sanger sequenced as confirmation of the mutation. Functional studies were conducted using morpholino knockdown studies followed by human mRNA rescue experiments. Using whole exome sequencing, a de novo heterozygous mutation was found in the gene IQCK: c.667C>G; p.Q223E and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in an individual with LBWC. Morpholino knockdown of iqck mRNA in the zebrafish showed ventral defects including failure of ventral fin to develop and cardiac edema. Human wild-type IQCK mRNA rescued the zebrafish phenotype, whereas human p.Q223E IQCK mRNA did not, but worsened the phenotype of the morpholino knockdown zebrafish. This study supports a genetic etiology for LBWC/ABS, or potentially a new syndrome. PMID:26436108

  10. The cytosolic C-terminus of the glucose transporter GLUT4 contains an acidic cluster endosomal targeting motif distal to the dileucine signal.

    PubMed Central

    Shewan, A M; Marsh, B J; Melvin, D R; Martin, S; Gould, G W; James, D E

    2000-01-01

    The insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4 is targeted to a post-endocytic compartment in adipocytes, from where it moves to the cell surface in response to insulin. Previous studies have identified two cytosolic targeting motifs that regulate the intracellular sequestration of this protein: FQQI(5-8) in the N-terminus and LL(489,490) (one-letter amino acid notation) in the C-terminus. In the present study we show that a GLUT4 chimaera in which the C-terminal 12 amino acids in GLUT4 have been replaced with the same region from human GLUT3 is constitutively targeted to the plasma membrane when expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. To further dissect this domain it was divided into three regions, each of which was mutated en bloc to alanine residues. Analysis of these constructs revealed that the targeting information is contained within the residues TELEYLGP(498-505). Using the transferrin-horseradish peroxidase endosomal ablation technique in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we show that mutants in which this C-terminal domain has been disrupted are more sensitive to chemical ablation than wild-type GLUT4. These data indicate that GLUT4 contains a targeting signal in its C-terminus, distal to the dileucine motif, that regulates its sorting into a post-endosomal compartment. Similar membrane-distal, acidic-cluster-based motifs are found in the cytosolic tails of the insulin-responsive aminopeptidase IRAP (insulin-regulated aminopeptidase) and the proprotein convertase PC6B, indicating that this type of motif may play an important role in the endosomal sequestration of a number of different proteins. PMID:10926832

  11. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. PMID:24555784

  12. On Quantum Algorithm for Multiple Alignment of Amino Acid Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriyama, Satoshi; Ohya, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    The alignment of genome sequences or amino acid sequences is one of fundamental operations for the study of life. Usual computational complexity for the multiple alignment of N sequences with common length L by dynamic programming is O(LN). This alignment is considered as one of the NP problems, so that it is desirable to find a nice algorithm of the multiple alignment. Thus in this paper we propose the quantum algorithm for the multiple alignment based on the works12,1,2 in which the NP complete problem was shown to be the P problem by means of quantum algorithm and chaos information dynamics.

  13. Prebiotically plausible mechanisms increase compositional diversity of nucleic acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Derr, Julien; Manapat, Michael L.; Rajamani, Sudha; Leu, Kevin; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Joseph, Isaac; Nowak, Martin A.; Chen, Irene A.

    2012-01-01

    During the origin of life, the biological information of nucleic acid polymers must have increased to encode functional molecules (the RNA world). Ribozymes tend to be compositionally unbiased, as is the vast majority of possible sequence space. However, ribonucleotides vary greatly in synthetic yield, reactivity and degradation rate, and their non-enzymatic polymerization results in compositionally biased sequences. While natural selection could lead to complex sequences, molecules with some activity are required to begin this process. Was the emergence of compositionally diverse sequences a matter of chance, or could prebiotically plausible reactions counter chemical biases to increase the probability of finding a ribozyme? Our in silico simulations using a two-letter alphabet show that template-directed ligation and high concatenation rates counter compositional bias and shift the pool toward longer sequences, permitting greater exploration of sequence space and stable folding. We verified experimentally that unbiased DNA sequences are more efficient templates for ligation, thus increasing the compositional diversity of the pool. Our work suggests that prebiotically plausible chemical mechanisms of nucleic acid polymerization and ligation could predispose toward a diverse pool of longer, potentially structured molecules. Such mechanisms could have set the stage for the appearance of functional activity very early in the emergence of life. PMID:22319215

  14. The amino-acid sequence of kangaroo pancreatic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; Welling, G W; Beintema, J J

    1978-05-01

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) ribonuclease was isolated from pancreatic tissue by affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence was determined by automatic sequencing of overlapping large fragments and by analysis of shorter peptides obtained by digestion with a number of proteolytic enzymes. The polypeptide chain consists of 122 amino acid residues. Compared to other ribonucleases, the N-terminal residue and residue 114 are deleted. In other pancreatic ribonucleases position 114 is occupied by a cis proline residue in an external loop at the surface of the molecule. Other remarkable substitutions are the presence of a tyrosine residue at position 123 instead of a serine which forms a hydrogen bond with the pyrimidine ring of a nucleotide substrate, and a number of hydrophobichydrophilic interchanges in the sequence 51-55, which forms part of an alpha-helix in bovine ribonuclease and exhibits few substitutions in the placental mammals. Kangaroo ribonuclease contains no carbohydrate, although the enzyme possesses a recognition site for carbohydrate attachment in the sequence Asn-Val-Thr (62-64). The enzyme differs at about 35-40% of the positions from all other mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases sequenced to date, which is in agreement with the early divergence between the marsupials and the placental mammals. From fragmentary data a tentative sequence of red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) pancreatic ribonuclease has been derived. Eight differences with the kangaroo sequence were found. PMID:658039

  15. The role of context in RNA structure: flanking sequences reconfigure CAG motif folding in huntingtin exon 1 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Busan, Steven; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    The length of the CAG repeat region in the huntingtin messenger RNA is predictive of Huntington’s disease. Structural studies of CAG repeat-containing RNAs suggest that these sequences form simple hairpin structures; however, in the context of the full-length huntingtin mRNA, CAG repeats may form complex structures that could be targeted for therapeutic intervention. We examined the structures of transcripts spanning the first exon of the huntingtin mRNA with both healthy and disease-prone repeat lengths. In transcripts with 17 to 70 repeats, the CAG sequences base paired extensively with bases in the 5′ UTR and with a conserved region downstream of the CCG repeat region. In huntingtin transcripts with healthy numbers of repeats, the previously observed CAG hairpin was either absent or short. In contrast, in transcripts with disease-associated numbers of repeats, a CAG hairpin was present and extended from a three-helix junction. Our findings demonstrate the profound importance of sequence context in RNA folding and identify specific structural differences between healthy and disease-inducing huntingtin alleles that may be targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24199621

  16. Core sequence in the RNA motif recognized by the ErmE methyltransferase revealed by relaxing the fidelity of the enzyme for its target.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L H; Vester, B; Douthwaite, S

    1999-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the ErmE methyltransferase specifically modifies a single adenosine within ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and thereby confers resistance to multiple antibiotics. The adenosine (A2058 in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA) lies within a highly conserved structure, and is methylated efficiently, and with equally high fidelity, in rRNAs from phylogenetically diverse bacteria. However, the fidelity of ErmE is reduced when magnesium is removed, and over twenty new sites of ErmE methylation appear in E. coli 16S and 23S rRNAs. These sites show widely different degrees of reactivity to ErmE. The canonical A2058 site is largely unaffected by magnesium depletion and remains the most reactive site in the rRNA. This suggests that methylation at the new sites results from changes in the RNA substrate rather than the methyltransferase. Chemical probing confirms that the rRNA structure opens upon magnesium depletion, exposing potential new interaction sites to the enzyme. The new ErmE sites show homology with the canonical A2058 site, and have the consensus sequence aNNNcgGAHAg (ErmE methylation occurs exclusively at adenosines (underlined); these are preceded by a guanosine, equivalent to G2057; there is a high preference for the adenosine equivalent to A2060; H is any nucleotide except G; N is any nucleotide; and there are slight preferences for the nucleotides shown in lower case). This consensus is believed to represent the core of the motif that Erm methyltransferases recognize at their canonical A2058 site. The data also reveal constraints on the higher order structure of the motif that affect methyltransferase recognition. PMID:9917069

  17. Rice MEL2, the RNA recognition motif (RRM) protein, binds in vitro to meiosis-expressed genes containing U-rich RNA consensus sequences in the 3'-UTR.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Saori; Sato, Yutaka; Asano, Tomoya; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Nonomura, Ken-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation by RNA recognition motif (RRM) proteins through binding to cis-elements in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) is widely used in eukaryotes to complete various biological processes. Rice MEIOSIS ARRESTED AT LEPTOTENE2 (MEL2) is the RRM protein that functions in the transition to meiosis in proper timing. The MEL2 RRM preferentially associated with the U-rich RNA consensus, UUAGUU[U/A][U/G][A/U/G]U, dependently on sequences and proportionally to MEL2 protein amounts in vitro. The consensus sequences were located in the putative looped structures of the RNA ligand. A genome-wide survey revealed a tendency of MEL2-binding consensus appearing in 3'-UTR of rice genes. Of 249 genes that conserved the consensus in their 3'-UTR, 13 genes spatiotemporally co-expressed with MEL2 in meiotic flowers, and included several genes whose function was supposed in meiosis; such as Replication protein A and OsMADS3. The proteome analysis revealed that the amounts of small ubiquitin-related modifier-like protein and eukaryotic translation initiation factor3-like protein were dramatically altered in mel2 mutant anthers. Taken together with transcriptome and gene ontology results, we propose that the rice MEL2 is involved in the translational regulation of key meiotic genes on 3'-UTRs to achieve the faithful transition of germ cells to meiosis. PMID:26319516

  18. Sequence analysis of mouse vomeronasal receptor gene clusters reveals common promoter motifs and a history of recent expansion

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Robert P.; Cutforth, Tyler; Axel, Richard; Hood, Leroy; Trask, Barbara J.

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed the organization and sequence of 73 V1R genes encoding putative pheromone receptors to identify regulatory features and characterize the evolutionary history of the V1R family. The 73 V1Rs arose from seven ancestral genes around the time of mouse–rat speciation through large local duplications, and this expansion may contribute to speciation events. Orthologous V1R genes appear to have been lost during primate evolution. Exceptional noncoding homology is observed across four V1R subfamilies at one cluster and thus may be important for locus-specific transcriptional regulation. PMID:11752409

  19. Cooperative Hybridization of γPNA Miniprobes to a Repeating Sequence Motif and Application to Telomere Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sureshkumar, Gopalsamy; Ly, Danith H.; Opresko, Patricia L.; Armitage, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    GammaPNA oligomers having one or two repeats of the sequence AATCCC were designed to hybridize to DNA having one or more repeats of the complementary TTAGGG sequence found in the human telomere. UV melting curves and surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrate high affinity and cooperativity for hybridization of these miniprobes to DNA having multiple complementary repeats. Fluorescence spectroscopy for Cy3-labeled miniprobes demonstrate increases in fluorescence intensity for assembling multiple short probes on a DNA target compared with fewer longer probes. The fluorescent γPNA miniprobes were then used to stain telomeres in metaphase chromosomes derived from U2OS cells possessing heterogeneous long telomeres and Jurkat cells harboring homogenous short telomeres. The miniprobes yielded comparable fluorescence intensity to a commercially available PNA 18mer probe in U2OS cells, but significantly brighter fluorescence was observed for telomeres in Jurkat cells. These results suggest that γPNA miniprobes can be effective telomere-staining reagents with applications toward analysis of critically short telomeres, which have been implicated in a range of human diseases. PMID:25115693

  20. Amino acid sequence of Salmonella typhimurium branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Feild, M J; Nguyen, D C; Armstrong, F B

    1989-06-13

    The complete amino acid sequence of the subunit of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (transaminase B, EC 2.6.1.42) of Salmonella typhimurium was determined. An Escherichia coli recombinant containing the ilvGEDAY gene cluster of Salmonella was used as the source of the hexameric enzyme. The peptide fragments used for sequencing were generated by treatment with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, endoproteinase Lys-C, and cyanogen bromide. The enzyme subunit contains 308 residues and has a molecular weight of 33,920. To determine the coenzyme-binding site, the pyridoxal 5-phosphate containing enzyme was treated with tritiated sodium borohydride prior to trypsin digestion. Peptide map comparisons with an apoenzyme tryptic digest and monitoring radioactivity incorporation allowed identification of the pyridoxylated peptide, which was then isolated and sequenced. The coenzyme-binding site is the lysyl residue at position 159. The amino acid sequence of Salmonella transaminase B is 97.4% identical with that of Escherichia coli, differing in only eight amino acid positions. Sequence comparisons of transaminase B to other known aminotransferase sequences revealed limited sequence similarity (24-33%) when conserved amino acid substitutions are allowed and alignments were forced to occur on the coenzyme-binding site. PMID:2669973

  1. Structural and functional studies of a phosphatidic acid-binding antifungal plant defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR motif governing fungal cell entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaram, Uma S.; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghoottama; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip

    2013-12-04

    A highly conserved plant defensin MtDef4 potently inhibits the growth of a filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. MtDef4 is internalized by cells of F. graminearum. To determine its mechanism of fungal cell entry and antifungal action, NMR solution structure of MtDef4 has been determined. The analysis of its structure has revealed a positively charged patch on the surface of the protein consisting of arginine residues in its γ-core signature, a major determinant of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. Here, we report functional analysis of the RGFRRR motif of the γ-core signature of MtDef4. The replacement of RGFRRR to AAAARR or to RGFRAA not only abolishes fungal cell entry but also results in loss of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. MtDef4 binds strongly to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Mutations of RGFRRR which abolish fungal cell entry of MtDef4 also impair its binding to PA. Our results suggest that RGFRRR motif is a translocation signal for entry of MtDef4 into fungal cells and that this positively charged motif likely mediates interaction of this defensin with PA as part of its antifungal action.

  2. Amino acid sequence of bovine heart coupling factor 6.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, J K; Jacobs, J W; Kanner, B I; Racker, E; Bradshaw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of bovine heart mitochondrial coupling factor 6 (F6) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and derived peptides. Preparations based on heat precipitation and ethanol extraction showed allotypic variation at three positions while material further purified by HPLC yielded only one sequence that also differed by a Phe-Thr replacement at residue 62. The mature protein contains 76 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 9006 and a pI of approximately equal to 5, in good agreement with experimentally measured values. The charged amino acids are mainly clustered at the termini and in one section in the middle; these three polar segments are separated by two segments relatively rich in nonpolar residues. Chou-Fasman analysis suggests three stretches of alpha-helix coinciding (or within) the high-charge-density sequences with a single beta-turn at the first polar-nonpolar junction. Comparison of the F6 sequence with those of other proteins did not reveal any homologous structures. PMID:6149548

  3. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  4. A domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr containing repeated H(S/F)RIG amino acid motifs causes cell growth arrest and structural defects.

    PubMed Central

    Macreadie, I G; Castelli, L A; Hewish, D R; Kirkpatrick, A; Ward, A C; Azad, A A

    1995-01-01

    Vpr is a virion-associated protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) whose function in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been uncertain. Employing the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to examine the effects of HIV-1 auxiliary proteins on basic cellular functions, we found that the vpr gene caused cell growth arrest and structural defects indicated by osmotic sensitivity and gross cell enlargement. Production of various domains by gene expression showed that this effect arose from within the carboxyl-terminal third of the Vpr protein and implicated the sequence HFRIGCRHSRIG, containing two H(S/F)RIG motifs. Electroporation with a series of peptides containing these motifs caused structural defects in yeast that resulted in osmotic sensitivity. A protein with functions relating to the yeast cytoskeleton, Sac1p [Cleves, A. E., Novick, P.J. & Bankaitis, V.A. (1989) J. Cell Biol. 109, 2939-2950], shows sequence similarity to Vpr, and Vpr's effect in yeast may be to disrupt normal Sac1p functions. The Sac1p equivalent has not yet been described in mammalian cells, but in rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma cell lines Vpr also caused gross cell enlargement and replication arrest [Levy, D.N., Fernandes, L.S., Williams, W.V. & Weiner, D.B. (1993) Cell 72, 541-550]. We note that there is a correlation between the region containing the H(S/F)RIG motifs and the pathogenicity of primate lentiviruses and we suggest that the function of Vpr may be to bring about cell growth arrest and/or cytoskeletal changes as an early step in HIV-1 infection. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7708721

  5. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  6. A comparative study of 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase in vertebrates: cDNA cloning and amino acid sequences for chicken and bullfrog enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kasama-Yoshida, H; Tohyama, Y; Kurihara, T; Sakuma, M; Kojima, H; Tamai, Y

    1997-10-01

    In mammalian brain, two 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.37) isoforms, CNP1 and CNP2, are translated, respectively, from the two mRNAs, which have been transcribed and processed by alternative use of the two transcription start points and by differential splicing. In the present study, the cDNAs encoding chicken CNP2 and bullfrog CNP1, respectively, were isolated, and the amino acid sequences of chicken CNP2 and bullfrog CNP1 were deduced. Western blot analysis showed that chicken brain contains a major CNP2-type protein together with a minor unidentified isoform, and bullfrog brain contains only a CNP1-type protein. All available amino acid sequences of vertebrate 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterases were aligned and compared. Three conserved motif sequences were noted: (a) an ATP-binding site near the amino terminus, (b) an isoprenylation site at the carboxyl terminus, and (c) a probable catalytic site resembling the active site of beta-ketoacyl synthase (EC 2.3.1.41). The second and the third motifs are conserved also in goldfish RICH (regeneration-induced 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase homologue), which has been shown recently to have 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase activity. The third motif (probably catalytic site) was assigned for the first time in the present report. PMID:9326261

  7. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank. PMID:16780982

  8. A Short Sequence Motif in the 5′ Leader of the HIV-1 Genome Modulates Extended RNA Dimer Formation and Virus Replication*

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The 5′ leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via intermolecular kissing loop (KL) base pairing. The KL dimer can be stabilized by including the DIS stem nucleotides in the intermolecular base pairing, forming an extended dimer (ED). The role of the ED RNA dimer in HIV-1 replication has hardly been addressed because of technical challenges. We analyzed a set of leader mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin for in vitro RNA dimerization and virus replication in T cells. In agreement with previous observations, DIS hairpin stability modulated KL and ED dimerization. An unexpected previous finding was that mutation of three nucleotides immediately upstream of the DIS hairpin significantly reduced in vitro ED formation. In this study, we tested such mutants in vivo for the importance of the ED in HIV-1 biology. Mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin replicated less efficiently than WT HIV-1. This defect was most severe when the upstream sequence motif was altered. Virus evolution experiments with the defective mutants yielded fast replicating HIV-1 variants with second site mutations that (partially) restored the WT hairpin stability. Characterization of the mutant and revertant RNA molecules and the corresponding viruses confirmed the correlation between in vitro ED RNA dimer formation and efficient virus replication, thus indicating that the ED structure is important for HIV-1 replication. PMID:25368321

  9. Function of a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat of feline leukemia virus isolated from an unusual set of naturally occurring tumors.

    PubMed

    Athas, G B; Lobelle-Rich, P; Levy, L S

    1995-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviruses have been characterized from naturally occurring non-B-cell, non-T-cell tumors occurring in the spleens of infected cats. These proviruses exhibit a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat (LTR), namely, a 21-bp tandem triplication beginning 25 bp downstream of the enhancer. The repeated finding of the triplication-containing LTR in non-B-cell, non-T-cell lymphomas of the spleen suggests that the unique LTR is an essential participant in the development of tumors of this particular phenotype. The nucleotide sequence of the triplication-containing LTR most closely resembles that of FeLV subgroup C. Studies performed to measure the ability of the triplication-containing LTR to modulate gene expression indicate that the 21-bp triplication provides transcriptional enhancer function to the LTR that contains it and that it substitutes at least in part for the duplication of the enhancer. The 21-bp triplication confers a bona fide enhancer function upon LTR-directed reporter gene expression; however, the possibility of a spacer function was not eliminated. The studies demonstrate further that the triplication-containing LTR acts preferentially in a cell-type-specific manner, i.e., it is 12-fold more active in K-562 cells than is an LTR lacking the triplication. A recombinant, infectious FeLV bearing the 21-bp triplication in U3 was constructed. Cells infected with the recombinant were shown to accumulate higher levels of viral RNA transcripts and virus particles in culture supernatants than did cells infected with the parental type. The triplication-containing LTR is implicated in the induction of tumors of a particular phenotype, perhaps through transcriptional regulation of the virus and/or adjacent cellular genes, in the appropriate target cell. PMID:7745680

  10. DILIMOT: discovery of linear motifs in proteins.

    PubMed

    Neduva, Victor; Russell, Robert B

    2006-07-01

    Discovery of protein functional motifs is critical in modern biology. Small segments of 3-10 residues play critical roles in protein interactions, post-translational modifications and trafficking. DILIMOT (DIscovery of LInear MOTifs) is a server for the prediction of these short linear motifs within a set of proteins. Given a set of sequences sharing a common functional feature (e.g. interaction partner or localization) the method finds statistically over-represented motifs likely to be responsible for it. The input sequences are first passed through a set of filters to remove regions unlikely to contain instances of linear motifs. Motifs are then found in the remaining sequence and ranked according to a statistic that measure over-representation and conservation across homologues in related species. The results are displayed via a visual interface for easy perusal. The server is available at http://dilimot.embl.de. PMID:16845024

  11. Common sequence motifs coding for higher-plant and prokaryotic O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyases: bacterial origin of a chloroplast transit peptide?

    PubMed

    Rolland, N; Job, D; Douce, R

    1993-08-01

    A comparison of the amino acid sequence of O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyase (EC 4.2.99.8) from Escherichia coli and the isoforms of this enzyme found in the cytosolic and chloroplastic compartments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf cells allows the essential lysine residue involved in the binding of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor to be identified. The results of further sequence comparison of cDNAs coding for these proteins are discussed in the frame of the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast evolution. The results are compatible with a mechanism in which the chloroplast enzyme originated from the cytosolic enzyme and both plant genes originated from a common prokaryotic ancestor. The comparison also suggests that the 5'-non-coding sequence of the bacterial gene was transferred to the plant cell nucleus and that it has been used to create the N-terminal portions of both plant enzymes, and possibly the transit peptide of the chloroplast enzyme. PMID:7916619

  12. Binding of Actinomycin D to Single-Stranded DNA of Sequence Motifs d(TGTCTnG) and d(TGTnGTCT)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-Ming; Sha, Feng; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Our recent binding studies with oligomers derived from base replacements on d(CGTCGTCG) had led to the finding that actinomycin D (ACTD) binds strongly to d(TGTCATTG) of apparent single-stranded conformation without GpC sequence. A fold-back binding model was speculated in which the planar phenoxazone inserts at the GTC site with a loop-out T base whereas the G base at the 3′-terminus folds back to form a basepair with the internal C and stacks on the opposite face of the chromophore. To provide a more concrete support for such a model, ACTD equilibrium binding studies were carried out and the results are reported herein on oligomers of sequence motifs d(TGTCTnG) and d(TGTnGTC). These oligomers are not expected to form dimeric duplexes and contain no canonical GpC sequences. It was found that ACTD binds strongly to d(TGTCTTTTG), d(TGTTTTGTC), and d(TGTTTTTGTC), all exhibiting 1:1 drug/strand binding stoichiometry. The fold-back binding model with displaced T base is further supported by the finding that appending TC and TCA at the 3′-terminus of d(TGTCTTTTG) results in oligomers that exhibit enhanced ACTD affinities, consequence of the added basepairing to facilitate the hairpin formation of d(TGTCTTTTGTC) and d(TGTCTTTTGTCA) in stabilizing the GTC/GTC binding site for juxtaposing the two G bases for easy stacking on both faces of the phenoxazone chromophore. Further support comes from the observation of considerable reduction in ACTD affinity when GTC is replaced by GTTC in an oligomer, in line with the reasoning that displacing two T bases to form a bulge for ACTD binding is more difficult than displacing a single base. Based on the elucidated binding principle of phenoxazone ring requiring its opposite faces to be stacked by the 3′-sides of two G bases for tight ACTD binding, several oligonucleotide sequences have been designed and found to bind well. PMID:12524296

  13. MotifMiner: A Table Driven Greedy Algorithm for DNA Motif Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeja, K. R.; Alam, M. A.; Jain, S. K.

    DNA motif discovery is a much explored problem in functional genomics. This paper describes a table driven greedy algorithm for discovering regulatory motifs in the promoter sequences of co-expressed genes. The proposed algorithm searches both DNA strands for the common patterns or motifs. The inputs to the algorithm are set of promoter sequences, the motif length and minimum Information Content. The algorithm generates subsequences of given length from the shortest input promoter sequence. It stores these subsequences and their reverse complements in a table. Then it searches the remaining sequences for good matches of these subsequences. The Information Content score is used to measure the goodness of the motifs. The algorithm has been tested with synthetic data and real data. The results are found promising. The algorithm could discover meaningful motifs from the muscle specific regulatory sequences.

  14. Solid-phase synthesis of amidine-substituted phenylbenzimidazoles and incorporation of this DNA binding and recognition motif into amino acid and peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Garner, Matthew L; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M; Li, Jessica Bo; Wang, Tianxiu; Long, Eric C

    2014-05-01

    Amidine-substituted phenylbenzimidazoles are well-established DNA-binding structural motifs that have contributed to the development of diverse classes of DNA-targeted agents; this ring system not only assists in increasing the overall DNA affinity of an agent, but can also influence its site selectivity. Seeking a means to conveniently exploit these attributes, a protocol for the on-resin synthesis of amino acid- and peptide-phenylbenzimidazole-amidine conjugates was developed to facilitate installation of phenylbenzimidazole-amidines into peptide chains during the course of standard solid-phase syntheses. Building from a resin-bound amino acid or peptide on Rink amide resin, 4-formyl benzoic acid was coupled to the resin-bound free amine followed by introduction of 3,4-diamino-N'-hydroxybenzimidamide (in the presence of 1,4-benzoquinone) to construct the benzimidazole heterocycle. Finally, the resin-bound N'-hydroxybenzimidamide functionality was reduced to an amidine via 1 M SnCl2·2H2O in DMF prior to resin cleavage to release final product. This procedure permits the straightforward synthesis of amino acids or peptides that are N-terminally capped by a phenylbenzimidazole-amidine ring system. Employing this protocol, a series of amino acid-phenylbenzimidazole-amidine (Xaa-R) conjugates was synthesized as well as dipeptide conjugates of the general form Xaa-Gly-R (where R is the phenylbenzimidazole-amidine and Xaa is any amino acid). PMID:24562478

  15. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  16. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC). A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans. PMID:22122911

  17. Amino acid sequence of the nonsecretory ribonuclease of human urine.

    PubMed

    Beintema, J J; Hofsteenge, J; Iwama, M; Morita, T; Ohgi, K; Irie, M; Sugiyama, R H; Schieven, G L; Dekker, C A; Glitz, D G

    1988-06-14

    The amino acid sequence of a nonsecretory ribonuclease isolated from human urine was determined except for the identity of the residue at position 7. Sequence information indicates that the ribonucleases of human liver and spleen and an eosinophil-derived neurotoxin are identical or very closely related gene products. The sequence is identical at about 30% of the amino acid positions with those of all of the secreted mammalian ribonucleases for which information is available. Identical residues include active-site residues histidine-12, histidine-119, and lysine-41, other residues known to be important for substrate binding and catalytic activity, and all eight half-cystine residues common to these enzymes. Major differences include a deletion of six residues in the (so-called) S-peptide loop, insertions of two, and nine residues, respectively, in three other external loops of the molecule, and an addition of three residues at the amino terminus. The sequence shows the human nonsecretory ribonuclease to belong to the same ribonuclease superfamily as the mammalian secretory ribonucleases, turtle pancreatic ribonuclease, and human angiogenin. Sequence data suggest that a gene duplication occurred in an ancient vertebrate ancestor; one branch led to the nonsecretory ribonuclease, while the other branch led to a second duplication, with one line leading to the secretory ribonucleases (in mammals) and the second line leading to pancreatic ribonuclease in turtle and an angiogenic factor in mammals (human angiogenin). The nonsecretory ribonuclease has five short carbohydrate chains attached via asparagine residues at the surface of the molecule; these chains may have been shortened by exoglycosidase action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3166997

  18. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-05-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  19. Susceptibility of muridae cell lines to ecotropic murine leukemia virus and the cationic amino acid transporter 1 viral receptor sequences: implications for evolution of the viral receptor.

    PubMed

    Kakoki, Katsura; Shinohara, Akio; Izumida, Mai; Koizumi, Yosuke; Honda, Eri; Kato, Goro; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Hayashi, Hideki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Morita, Tetsuo; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-06-01

    Ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (Eco-MLVs) infect mouse and rat, but not other mammalian cells, and gain access for infection through binding the cationic amino acid transporter 1 (CAT1). Glycosylation of the rat and hamster CAT1s inhibits Eco-MLV infection, and treatment of rat and hamster cells with a glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin, enhances Eco-MLV infection. Although the mouse CAT1 is also glycosylated, it does not inhibit Eco-MLV infection. Comparison of amino acid sequences between the rat and mouse CAT1s shows amino acid insertions in the rat protein near the Eco-MLV-binding motif. In addition to the insertion present in the rat CAT1, the hamster CAT1 has additional amino acid insertions. In contrast, tunicamycin treatment of mink and human cells does not elevate the infection, because their CAT1s do not have the Eco-MLV-binding motif. To define the evolutionary pathway of the Eco-MLV receptor, we analyzed CAT1 sequences and susceptibility to Eco-MLV infection of other several murinae animals, including the southern vole (Microtus rossiaemeridionalis), large Japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus), and Eurasian harvest mouse (Micromys minutus). Eco-MLV infection was enhanced by tunicamycin in these cells, and their CAT1 sequences have the insertions like the hamster CAT1. Phylogenetic analysis of mammalian CAT1s suggested that the ancestral CAT1 does not have the Eco-MLV-binding motif, like the human CAT1, and the mouse CAT1 is thought to be generated by the amino acid deletions in the third extracellular loop of CAT1. PMID:24469466

  20. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  1. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  2. The amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Corran, P H; Waley, S G

    1975-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase was deduced by characterizing peptides that overlap the tryptic peptides. Thiol groups were modified by oxidation, carboxymethylation or aminoen. About 50 peptides that provided information about overlaps were isolated; the peptides were mostly characterized by their compositions and N-terminal residues. The peptide chains contain 248 amino acid residues, and no evidence for dissimilarity of the two subunits that comprise the native enzyme was found. The sequence of the rabbit muscle enzyme may be compared with that of the coelacanth enzyme (Kolb et al., 1974): 84% of the residues are in identical positions. Similarly, comparison of the sequence with that inferred for the chicken enzyme (Furth et al., 1974) shows that 87% of the residues are in identical positions. Limited though these comparisons are, they suggest that triose phosphate isomerase has one of the lowest rates of evolutionary change. An extended version of the present paper has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50040 (42 pages) at the British Library (Lending Division) (formerly the National Lending Library for Science and Technology), Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1171682

  3. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-01-01

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  4. The amino acid sequence of chymopapain from Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Watson, D C; Yaguchi, M; Lynn, K R

    1990-02-15

    Chymopapain is a polypeptide of 218 amino acid residues. It has considerable structural similarity with papain and papaya proteinase omega, including conservation of the catalytic site and of the disulphide bonding. Chymopapain is like papaya proteinase omega in carrying four extra residues between papain positions 168 and 169, but differs from both papaya proteinases in the composition of its S2 subsite, as well as in having a second thiol group, Cys-117. Some evidence for the amino acid sequence of chymopapain has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50153 (12 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa., Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1990) 265, 5. The information comprises Supplement Tables 1-4, which contain, in order, amino acid compositions of peptides from tryptic, peptic, CNBr and mild acid cleavages, Supplement Fig. 1, showing re-fractionation of selected peaks from Fig. 2 of the main paper. Supplement Fig. 2, showing cation-exchange chromatography of the earliest-eluted peak of Fig. 3 of the main paper, Supplement Fig. 3, showing reverse-phase h.p.l.c. of the later-eluted peak from Fig. 3 of the main paper, and Supplement Fig. 4, showing the separation of peptides after mild acid hydrolysis of CNBr-cleavage fragment CB3. PMID:2106878

  5. MEME Suite: tools for motif discovery and searching

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Timothy L.; Boden, Mikael; Buske, Fabian A.; Frith, Martin; Grant, Charles E.; Clementi, Luca; Ren, Jingyuan; Li, Wilfred W.; Noble, William S.

    2009-01-01

    The MEME Suite web server provides a unified portal for online discovery and analysis of sequence motifs representing features such as DNA binding sites and protein interaction domains. The popular MEME motif discovery algorithm is now complemented by the GLAM2 algorithm which allows discovery of motifs containing gaps. Three sequence scanning algorithms—MAST, FIMO and GLAM2SCAN—allow scanning numerous DNA and protein sequence databases for motifs discovered by MEME and GLAM2. Transcription factor motifs (including those discovered using MEME) can be compared with motifs in many popular motif databases using the motif database scanning algorithm Tomtom. Transcription factor motifs can be further analyzed for putative function by association with Gene Ontology (GO) terms using the motif-GO term association tool GOMO. MEME output now contains sequence LOGOS for each discovered motif, as well as buttons to allow motifs to be conveniently submitted to the sequence and motif database scanning algorithms (MAST, FIMO and Tomtom), or to GOMO, for further analysis. GLAM2 output similarly contains buttons for further analysis using GLAM2SCAN and for rerunning GLAM2 with different parameters. All of the motif-based tools are now implemented as web services via Opal. Source code, binaries and a web server are freely available for noncommercial use at http://meme.nbcr.net. PMID:19458158

  6. New structural motifs and properties of squaric acid anions in the presence of the L-lysinium counterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tsonko; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Seidel, Rüdiger W.; Sheldrick, William S.; Spiteller, Michael; Koleva, Bojidarka B.

    2009-02-01

    Two novel L-lysinium hydrogensquarate monohydrate ( 1) and the corresponding salt of the L-lysinium dication ( 2) are synthesized and their structure and properties elucidated in detail spectroscopically, thermally and structurally, using single crystal X-ray diffraction, linear-polarized solid-state IR-spectroscopy oriented colloid suspensions in nematic host, TGA, DSC, DTA methods, positive and negative HPLC tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS·MS). Quantum chemical methods are used to calculate the electronic structure, vibrational data and electronic spectra. Two novel structural motifs have been obtained, isolated [(HSq -)] and tetramolecular [(H 2Sq)(HSq) 2(Sq)] 4- anion, respectively. Preliminary second harmonic generation measurements are also performed.

  7. The Annotation of RNA Motifs

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The recent deluge of new RNA structures, including complete atomic-resolution views of both subunits of the ribosome, has on the one hand literally overwhelmed our individual abilities to comprehend the diversity of RNA structure, and on the other hand presented us with new opportunities for comprehensive use of RNA sequences for comparative genetic, evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Two concepts are key to understanding RNA structure: hierarchical organization of global structure and isostericity of local interactions. Global structure changes extremely slowly, as it relies on conserved long-range tertiary interactions. Tertiary RNA–RNA and quaternary RNA–protein interactions are mediated by RNA motifs, defined as recurrent and ordered arrays of non-Watson–Crick base-pairs. A single RNA motif comprises a family of sequences, all of which can fold into the same three-dimensional structure and can mediate the same interaction(s). The chemistry and geometry of base pairing constrain the evolution of motifs in such a way that random mutations that occur within motifs are accepted or rejected insofar as they can mediate a similar ordered array of interactions. The steps involved in the analysis and annotation of RNA motifs in 3D structures are: (a) decomposition of each motif into non-Watson–Crick base-pairs; (b) geometric classification of each basepair; (c) identification of isosteric substitutions for each basepair by comparison to isostericity matrices; (d) alignment of homologous sequences using the isostericity matrices to identify corresponding positions in the crystal structure; (e) acceptance or rejection of the null hypothesis that the motif is conserved. PMID:18629252

  8. Sequence-specific DNA binding by long hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides containing an 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid unit.

    PubMed

    Sawatani, Yoshito; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Chandran, Anandhakumar; Asamitsu, Sefan; Guo, Chuanxin; Sato, Shinsuke; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-08-15

    With the aim of improving aqueous solubility, we designed and synthesized five N-methylpyrrole (Py)-N-methylimidazole (Im) polyamides capable of recognizing 9-bp sequences. Their DNA-binding affinities and sequence specificities were evaluated by SPR and Bind-n-Seq analyses. The design of polyamide 1 was based on a conventional model, with three consecutive Py or Im rings separated by a β-alanine to match the curvature and twist of long DNA helices. Polyamides 2 and 3 contained an 8-amino-3,6-dioxaoctanoic acid (AO) unit, which has previously only been used as a linker within linear Py-Im polyamides or between Py-Im hairpin motifs for tandem hairpin. It is demonstrated herein that AO also functions as a linker element that can extend to 2-bp in hairpin motifs. Notably, although the AO-containing unit can fail to bind the expected sequence, polyamide 4, which has two AO units facing each other in a hairpin form, successfully showed the expected motif and a KD value of 16nM was recorded. Polyamide 5, containing a β-alanine-β-alanine unit instead of the AO of polyamide 2, was synthesized for comparison. The aqueous solubilities and nuclear localization of three of the polyamides were also examined. The results suggest the possibility of applying the AO unit in the core of Py-Im polyamide compounds. PMID:27301681

  9. Amino acid sequence prerequisites for the formation of cn ions.

    PubMed

    Downard, K M; Biemann, K

    1993-11-01

    Ammo acid sequence prerequisites are described for the formation of c, ions observed in high-energy collision-induced decomposition spectra of peptides. It is shown that the formation of cn ions is promoted by the nature of the amino acid C-terminal to the cleavage site. A propensity for cn cleavage preceding threonine, and to a lesser extent tryptophan, lysine, and serine, is demonstrated where fragmentation is directed N-terminally at these residues. In addition, the nature of the residue N-terminal to the cleavage site is shown to have little effect on cn ion formation. A mechanism for cn ion formation is proposed and its applicability to the results observed is discussed. PMID:24227531

  10. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid sequence detection by single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A; Shera, E.B.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There has been considerable interest in the development of very sensitive clinical diagnostic techniques over the last few years. Many pathogenic agents are often present in extremely small concentrations in clinical samples, especially at the initial stages of infection, making their detection very difficult. This project sought to develop a new technique for the detection and accurate quantification of specific bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences in clinical samples. The scheme involved the use of novel hybridization probes for the detection of nucleic acids combined with our recently developed technique of single-molecule electrophoresis. This project is directly relevant to the DOE`s Defense Programs strategic directions in the area of biological warfare counter-proliferation.

  11. Sequence-Based Screening for Rare Enzymes: New Insights into the World of AMDases Reveal a Conserved Motif and 58 Novel Enzymes Clustering in Eight Distinct Families

    PubMed Central

    Maimanakos, Janine; Chow, Jennifer; Gaßmeyer, Sarah K.; Güllert, Simon; Busch, Florian; Kourist, Robert; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Arylmalonate Decarboxylases (AMDases, EC 4.1.1.76) are very rare and mostly underexplored enzymes. Currently only four known and biochemically characterized representatives exist. However, their ability to decarboxylate α-disubstituted malonic acid derivatives to optically pure products without cofactors makes them attractive and promising candidates for the use as biocatalysts in industrial processes. Until now, AMDases could not be separated from other members of the aspartate/glutamate racemase superfamily based on their gene sequences. Within this work, a search algorithm was developed that enables a reliable prediction of AMDase activity for potential candidates. Based on specific sequence patterns and screening methods 58 novel AMDase candidate genes could be identified in this work. Thereby, AMDases with the conserved sequence pattern of Bordetella bronchiseptica’s prototype appeared to be limited to the classes of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria. Amino acid homologies and comparison of gene surrounding sequences enabled the classification of eight enzyme clusters. Particularly striking is the accumulation of genes coding for different transporters of the tripartite tricarboxylate transporters family, TRAP transporters and ABC transporters as well as genes coding for mandelate racemases/muconate lactonizing enzymes that might be involved in substrate uptake or degradation of AMDase products. Further, three novel AMDases were characterized which showed a high enantiomeric excess (>99%) of the (R)-enantiomer of flurbiprofen. These are the recombinant AmdA and AmdV from Variovorax sp. strains HH01 and HH02, originated from soil, and AmdP from Polymorphum gilvum found by a data base search. Altogether our findings give new insights into the class of AMDases and reveal many previously unknown enzyme candidates with high potential for bioindustrial processes. PMID:27610105

  12. Sequence-Based Screening for Rare Enzymes: New Insights into the World of AMDases Reveal a Conserved Motif and 58 Novel Enzymes Clustering in Eight Distinct Families.

    PubMed

    Maimanakos, Janine; Chow, Jennifer; Gaßmeyer, Sarah K; Güllert, Simon; Busch, Florian; Kourist, Robert; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2016-01-01

    Arylmalonate Decarboxylases (AMDases, EC 4.1.1.76) are very rare and mostly underexplored enzymes. Currently only four known and biochemically characterized representatives exist. However, their ability to decarboxylate α-disubstituted malonic acid derivatives to optically pure products without cofactors makes them attractive and promising candidates for the use as biocatalysts in industrial processes. Until now, AMDases could not be separated from other members of the aspartate/glutamate racemase superfamily based on their gene sequences. Within this work, a search algorithm was developed that enables a reliable prediction of AMDase activity for potential candidates. Based on specific sequence patterns and screening methods 58 novel AMDase candidate genes could be identified in this work. Thereby, AMDases with the conserved sequence pattern of Bordetella bronchiseptica's prototype appeared to be limited to the classes of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria. Amino acid homologies and comparison of gene surrounding sequences enabled the classification of eight enzyme clusters. Particularly striking is the accumulation of genes coding for different transporters of the tripartite tricarboxylate transporters family, TRAP transporters and ABC transporters as well as genes coding for mandelate racemases/muconate lactonizing enzymes that might be involved in substrate uptake or degradation of AMDase products. Further, three novel AMDases were characterized which showed a high enantiomeric excess (>99%) of the (R)-enantiomer of flurbiprofen. These are the recombinant AmdA and AmdV from Variovorax sp. strains HH01 and HH02, originated from soil, and AmdP from Polymorphum gilvum found by a data base search. Altogether our findings give new insights into the class of AMDases and reveal many previously unknown enzyme candidates with high potential for bioindustrial processes. PMID:27610105

  13. Canine preprorelaxin: nucleic acid sequence and localization within the canine placenta.

    PubMed

    Klonisch, T; Hombach-Klonisch, S; Froehlich, C; Kauffold, J; Steger, K; Steinetz, B G; Fischer, B

    1999-03-01

    Employing uteroplacental tissue at Day 35 of gestation, we determined the nucleic acid sequence of canine preprorelaxin using reverse transcription- and rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction. Canine preprorelaxin cDNA consisted of 534 base pairs encoding a protein of 177 amino acids with a signal peptide of 25 amino acids (aa), a B domain of 35 aa, a C domain of 93 aa, and an A domain of 24 aa. The putative receptor binding region in the N'-terminal part of the canine relaxin B domain GRDYVR contained two substitutions from the classical motif (E-->D and L-->Y). Canine preprorelaxin shared highest homology with porcine and equine preprorelaxin. Northern analysis revealed a 1-kilobase transcript present in total RNA of canine uteroplacental tissue but not of kidney tissue. Uteroplacental tissue from two bitches each at Days 30 and 35 of gestation were studied by in situ hybridization to localize relaxin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry for relaxin, cytokeratin, vimentin, and von Willebrand factor was performed on uteroplacental tissue at Day 30 of gestation. The basal cell layer at the core of the chorionic villi was devoid of relaxin mRNA and immunoreactive relaxin or vimentin but was immunopositive for cytokeratin and identified as cytotrophoblast cells. The cell layer surrounding the chorionic villi displayed specific hybridization signals for relaxin mRNA and immunoreactivity for relaxin and cytokeratin but not for vimentin, and was identified as syncytiotrophoblast. Those areas of the chorioallantoic tissue with most intense relaxin immunoreactivity were highly vascularized as demonstrated by immunoreactive von Willebrand factor expressed on vascular endothelium. The uterine glands and nonplacental uterine areas of the canine zonary girdle placenta were devoid of relaxin mRNA and relaxin. We conclude that the syncytiotrophoblast is the source of relaxin in the canine placenta. PMID:10026098

  14. Cloning, Expression, and Sequencing of a Cell Surface Antigen Containing a Leucine-Rich Repeat Motif from Bacteroides forsythus ATCC 43037

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashu; Sojar, Hakimuddin T.; Glurich, Ingrid; Honma, Kiyonobu; Kuramitsu, Howard K.; Genco, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Bacteroides forsythus is a recently recognized human periodontopathogen associated with advanced, as well as recurrent, periodontitis. However, very little is known about the mechanism of pathogenesis of this organism. The present study was undertaken to identify the surface molecules of this bacterium that may play roles in its adherence to oral tissues or triggering of a host immune response(s). The gene (bspA) encoding a cell surface-associated protein of B. forsythus with an apparent molecular mass of 98 kDa was isolated by immunoscreening of a B. forsythus gene library constructed in a lambda ZAP II vector. The encoded 98-kDa protein (BspA) contains 14 complete repeats of 23 amino acid residues that show partial homology to leucine-rich repeat motifs. A recombinant protein containing the repeat region was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and utilized for antibody production, as well as in vitro binding studies. The purified recombinant protein bound strongly to fibronectin and fibrinogen in a dose-dependent manner and further inhibited the binding of B. forsythus cells to these extracellular matrix (ECM) components. In addition, adult patients with B. forsythus-associated periodontitis expressed specific antibodies against the BspA protein. We report here the cloning and expression of an immunogenic cell surface-associated protein (BspA) of B. forsythus and speculate that it mediates the binding of bacteria to ECM components and clotting factors (fibronectin and fibrinogen, respectively), which may be important in the colonization of the oral cavity by this bacterium and is also a target for the host immune response. PMID:9826345

  15. Structural analysis of complementary DNA and amino acid sequences of human and rat androgen receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Kokontis, J.; Liao, S. )

    1988-10-01

    Structural analysis of cDNAs for human and rat androgen receptors (ARs) indicates that the amino-terminal regions of ARs are rich in oligo- and poly(amino acid) motifs as in some homeotic genes. The human AR has a long stretch of repeated glycines, whereas rat AR has a long stretch of glutamines. There is a considerable sequence similarity among ARs and the receptors for glucocorticoids, progestins, and mineralocorticoids within the steroid-binding domains. The cysteine-rich DNA-binding domains are well conserved. Translation of mRNA transcribed from AR cDNAs yielded 94- and 76-kDa proteins and smaller forms that bind to DNA and have high affinity toward androgens. These rat or human ARs were recognized by human autoantibodies to natural Ars. Molecular hybridization studies, using AR cDNAs as probes, indicated that the ventral prostate and other male accessory organs are rich in AR mRNA and that the production of AR mRNA in the target organs may be autoregulated by androgens.

  16. Enhanced stability of Cu(2+)-ATCUN complexes under physiologically relevant conditions by insertion of structurally bulky and hydrophobic amino acid residues into the ATCUN motif.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Takaaki; Fukino, Yuta; Kamino, Shinichiro; Ueda, Masashi; Enomoto, Shuichi

    2016-06-21

    Copper complexes formed by an amino terminal Cu(2+)- and Ni(2+)-binding (ATCUN) motif have attracted attention as metallodrug candidates that cleave DNA or RNA and inactivate enzymes. Although the stability of the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complex under physiologically relevant conditions is a key factor for medical applications, it has remained unclear. Here we prepared a series of ATCUN peptides by inserting various amino acid residues into positions 1 and 2, and investigated the stability of the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complexes in aqueous solution, blood plasma, and living animals. Systematic pH titration showed that the low basicity of the N-terminal amine of the peptide stabilized the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complex in aqueous solution. Interestingly, the stability of (64)Cu-labeled ATCUN complexes in blood plasma was significantly enhanced by the structural bulkiness and hydrophobicity of the amino acid residues at positions 1 and 2. To validate the in vivo stability, six ATCUN motifs (YYH, VVH, NNH, TTH, GGH, and DDH) were conjugated to a tumor-targeting peptide, octreotide (Oct). The stability of the (64)Cu-ATCUN-Oct complexes in blood plasma showed a similar trend to that of the (64)Cu-ATCUN complexes. The (64)Cu-YYH-Oct complex exhibited the highest stability in blood plasma. According to the positron emission tomography and competitive blocking studies of a tumor-bearing mouse model, (64)Cu-YYH-Oct specifically accumulated in tumors, suggesting that the complex was sufficiently stable to reach its target in vivo. The results show that the structural bulkiness and hydrophobicity of the residues at positions 1 and 2 are key parameters for designing metallodrugs on the basis of the Cu(2+)-ATCUN complex. PMID:27184978

  17. A Motif Unique to the Human Dead-Box Protein DDX3 Is Important for Nucleic Acid Binding, ATP Hydrolysis, RNA/DNA Unwinding and HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Di Cicco, Giulia; Dietrich, Ursula; Maga, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are enzymes endowed with nucleic acid-dependent ATPase, RNA translocase and unwinding activities. The human DEAD-box protein DDX3 has been shown to play important roles in tumor proliferation and viral infections. In particular, DDX3 has been identified as an essential cofactor for HIV-1 replication. Here we characterized a set of DDX3 mutants biochemically with respect to nucleic acid binding, ATPase and helicase activity. In particular, we addressed the functional role of a unique insertion between motifs I and Ia of DDX3 and provide evidence for its implication in nucleic acid binding and HIV-1 replication. We show that human DDX3 lacking this domain binds HIV-1 RNA with lower affinity. Furthermore, a specific peptide ligand for this insertion selected by phage display interferes with HIV-1 replication after transduction into HelaP4 cells. Besides broadening our understanding of the structure-function relationships of this important protein, our results identify a specific domain of DDX3 which may be suited as target for antiviral drugs designed to inhibit cellular cofactors for HIV-1 replication. PMID:21589879

  18. Modulation of RGD sequence motifs regulates disintegrin recognition of alphaIIb beta3 and alpha5 beta1 integrin complexes. Replacement of elegantin alanine-50 with proline, N-terminal to the RGD sequence, diminishes recognition of the alpha5 beta1 complex with restoration induced by Mn2+ cation.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, S; Aitken, A; Flynn, G; Formstone, C; Savidge, G F

    1998-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that the amino acid residues flanking the RGD sequence of high-affinity ligands modulate their specificity of interaction with integrin complexes. The present study has addressed the role of the residues flanking the RGD sequence in regulating the recognition by disintegrin of the alphaIIb beta3 and alpha5beta1 complexes by construction of a panel of recombinant molecules of Elegantin (the platelet aggregation inhibitor from the venom of Trimerasurus elegans) expressing specific RGD sequence motifs. Wild-type Elegantin (ARGDNP) and several variants including Eleg. AM (ARGDMP), Eleg. PM (PRGDMP) and Eleg. PN (PRGDNP) were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The inhibitory efficacies of the panel of Elegantin variants were analysed in platelet adhesion assays with substrates immobilized with fibrinogen and fibronectin. Elegantin molecules containing an Ala residue N-terminal to the RGD sequence (wild-type Elegantin and Eleg. AM) showed strong inhibitory activity towards alphaIIbbeta3-dependent platelet adhesion on fibronectin, whereas a Pro residue in this position (Eleg. PM and Kistrin, the inhibitor from the venom of Calloselasma rhodostoma) engendered lower activity. The decreased activity could not be attributed to a decrease in the affinity of the disintegrin for the alphaIIb beta3 complex because both Eleg. AM and Eleg. PM had similar Kd (app) values. In contrast, Elegantin molecules into which a Met residue was introduced in place of the Asn residue C-terminal to the RGD sequence showed 10-13-fold elevated inhibitory activity towards platelet adhesion on fibrinogen and this was maintained with either a Pro or Ala residue N-terminal to the RGD sequence. In experiments with the alpha5 beta1 complex on K562 cells, the inhibitory efficacies of the panel of Elegantin molecules were analysed under two different cation conditions. First, in the presence of Ca2+/Mg2+, K562 cell

  19. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  20. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  1. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in the sequence. (4) The enumeration of amino acids may start at the first amino acid of the first..., counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1. Otherwise, the enumeration of amino acids... sequence every 5 amino acids. The enumeration method for amino acid sequences that is set forth......

  2. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  3. Stochastic motif extraction using hidden Markov model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yukiko; Asogawa, Minoru; Konagaya, Akihiko

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we study the application of an HMM (hidden Markov model) to the problem of representing protein sequences by a stochastic motif. A stochastic protein motif represents the small segments of protein sequences that have a certain function or structure. The stochastic motif, represented by an HMM, has conditional probabilities to deal with the stochastic nature of the motif. This HMM directive reflects the characteristics of the motif, such as a protein periodical structure or grouping. In order to obtain the optimal HMM, we developed the {open_quotes}iterative duplication method{close_quotes} for HMM topology learning. It starts from a small fully-connected network and iterates the network generation and parameter optimization until it achieves sufficient discrimination accuracy. Using this method, we obtained an HMM for a leucine zipper motif. Compared to the accuracy of a symbolic pattern representation with accuracy of 14.8 percent, an HMM achieved 79.3 percent in prediction. Additionally, the method can obtain an HMM for various types of zinc finger motifs, and it might separate the mixed data. We demonstrated that this approach is applicable to the validation of the protein databases; a constructed HMM b as indicated that one protein sequence annotated as {open_quotes}lencine-zipper like sequence{close_quotes} in the database is quite different from other leucine-zipper sequences in terms of likelihood, and we found this discrimination is plausible.

  4. SiO2 nanoparticles modified CPE as a biosensor for determination of i-motif DNA/Tamoxifen interaction.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Elham; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza; Bagheryan, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    Cytosine-rich DNA sequences can form a highly ordered structure known as i-motif in slightly acidic solutions. The stability of the folded i-motif structure is a good strategy to inhibit the telomerase reaction in cancer cells. The electrochemical biosensor was prepared by modifying carbon paste electrode with SiO2 nanoparticles to investigate drugs which can stabilize this structure. Tamoxifen (Tam), an antiestrogen hormonal agent for treatment of breast cancer, was chosen as the model ligand and its interaction with i-motif structure was examined. The interaction between i-motif DNA and Tam was studied in PBS buffer and [Fe(CN)6](3-) through the cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry methods. The oxidation peak of Tam, due to the i-motif DNA/Tam interaction, was observed after i-motif immobilized on the surface of the electrode. The i-motif formation was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy and the results showed that this structure can certainly be made with pH around 4.5, but its stability reduced by going to the more alkaline pH. The selectivity which was studied in the presence of complementary strand demonstrated that i-motif structure could be stabilized in acidic pH even in the presence of its complementary strand. PMID:27151665

  5. Identification of the amino acid sequence that targets peroxiredoxin 6 to lysosome-like structures of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Elena M; Feinstein, Sheldon I; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Fisher, Aron B

    2009-11-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), an enzyme with glutathione peroxidase and PLA2 (aiPLA2) activities, is highly expressed in respiratory epithelium, where it participates in phospholipid turnover and antioxidant defense. Prdx6 has been localized by immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation to acidic organelles (lung lamellar bodies and lysosomes) and cytosol. On the basis of their pH optima, we have postulated that protein subcellular localization determines the balance between the two activities of Prdx6. Using green fluorescent protein-labeled protein expression in alveolar epithelial cell lines, we showed Prdx6 localization to organellar structures resembling lamellar bodies in mouse lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells and lysosomes in A549 cells. Localization within lamellar bodies/lysosomes was in the luminal compartment. Targeting to lysosome-like organelles was abolished by the deletion of amino acids 31-40 from the Prdx6 NH2-terminal region; deletion of the COOH-terminal region had no effect. A green fluorescent protein-labeled peptide containing only amino acids 31-40 showed lysosomal targeting that was abolished by mutation of S32 or G34 within the peptide. Studies with mutated protein indicated that lipid binding was not necessary for Prdx6 targeting. This peptide sequence has no homology to known organellar targeting motifs. These studies indicate that the localization of Prdx6 in acidic organelles and consequent PLA2 activity depend on a novel 10-aa peptide located at positions 31-40 of the protein. PMID:19700648

  6. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-11-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological-temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network.

  7. The transcription factor-like nuclear regulator (TFNR) contains a novel 55-amino-acid motif repeated nine times and maps closely to SMN1.

    PubMed

    Kelter, A R; Herchenbach, J; Wirth, B

    2000-12-15

    The transcription factor-like nuclear regulator (TFNR) is a novel human gene that maps on 5q13, distal to the duplicated region that includes SMN1, the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) determining gene. The location of TFNR allowed us to design an evolutionary model of the SMA region. The 9.5-kb TFNR transcript is highly expressed in cerebellum and weakly in all other tissues tested. TFNR encodes a protein of 2254 amino acids (aa) and contains nine repeats of a novel 55-aa motif, of yet unknown function. The coding region is organized in 32 exons. Alternative splicing of exon 15 results in a truncated protein of 796 aa. TFNR comprises a series of polypeptides that range from 55 to 250 kDa. Immunocytological studies showed that the TFNR protein is present exclusively in the nucleus, where it is concentrated in several nuclear structures. Amino acids 155-474 show significant homology to TFC5, a subunit of the yeast transcription factor TFIIIB, suggesting that TFNR is a putative transcription factor. Based on its proximity to SMN1 and its expression pattern, TFNR may be a candidate gene for atypical forms of SMA with cerebral atrophy and axonal neuropathy that have been shown to carry large deletions in the SMA region. PMID:11161782

  8. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S J; Bayse, Craig A; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-05-13

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used (77)Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of (77)Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs' reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20-25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs' flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  9. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, J; Yamamoto, S; Morihara, K; Atsumi, Y; Takeuchi, H; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1989-01-01

    The DNA encoding the elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IFO 3455 was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited high levels of both elastase activity and elastase antigens. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature elastase consisted of 301 amino acids with a relative molecular mass of 32,926 daltons. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was quite similar to the chemically determined composition of purified elastase reported previously. We also observed nucleotide sequence encoding a signal peptide and "pro" sequence consisting of 197 amino acids upstream from the mature elastase protein gene. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that both the N-terminal sequence of the purified elastase and the N-terminal side sequences of the C-terminal tryptic peptide as well as the internal lysyl peptide fragment were completely identical to the deduced amino acid sequences. The pattern of identity of amino acid sequences was quite evident in the regions that include structurally and functionally important residues of Bacillus subtilis thermolysin. PMID:2493453

  10. RSAT peak-motifs: motif analysis in full-size ChIP-seq datasets.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Herrmann, Carl; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Thieffry, Denis; van Helden, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    ChIP-seq is increasingly used to characterize transcription factor binding and chromatin marks at a genomic scale. Various tools are now available to extract binding motifs from peak data sets. However, most approaches are only available as command-line programs, or via a website but with size restrictions. We present peak-motifs, a computational pipeline that discovers motifs in peak sequences, compares them with databases, exports putative binding sites for visualization in the UCSC genome browser and generates an extensive report suited for both naive and expert users. It relies on time- and memory-efficient algorithms enabling the treatment of several thousand peaks within minutes. Regarding time efficiency, peak-motifs outperforms all comparable tools by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate its accuracy by analyzing data sets ranging from 4000 to 1,28,000 peaks for 12 embryonic stem cell-specific transcription factors. In all cases, the program finds the expected motifs and returns additional motifs potentially bound by cofactors. We further apply peak-motifs to discover tissue-specific motifs in peak collections for the p300 transcriptional co-activator. To our knowledge, peak-motifs is the only tool that performs a complete motif analysis and offers a user-friendly web interface without any restriction on sequence size or number of peaks. PMID:22156162

  11. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  12. Structure and applications of a temperature responsive recombinant protein hydrogel based on silk- and elastin-like amino acid motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummy, Lawrence; Tomczak, Melanie; Macauliffe, Joseph; Vaia, Richard; Naik, Rajesh

    2008-03-01

    Proteins form the main components of many natural materials, and they can be designed to offer tailored functionality and material properties. Silk elastin-like proteins (SELP)s come from a family of repeat sequence protein polymers based on Bombyx mori silk and mammalian elastin that are recombinantly expressed in E. coli. SELP gels are formed by heating the protein solutions in order to induce physical crosslinking of the silk β-sheet regions, they contain approximately 80-90% water by weight and they can be used for encapsulation of enzymes or nanoparticles. For example, horseradish peroxidase demonstrates added resistance to drying and heat treatment when encapsulated in the gel matrix. During gel formation, small angle X-ray scattering shows intensity increases in two distinct regions of reciprocal space, one reversible with temperature and one irreversible. By fitting the scattering data to a unified power-law/Gunier model, morphological parameters are extracted. The thermally reversible intensity changes are attributed to a hydrophilic/hydrophobic transition in the elastin segments, while the irreversible intensity change is due to the crystalline regions formed by the silk blocks.

  13. Natural vs. random protein sequences: Discovering combinatorics properties on amino acid words.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Daniele; Felici, Giovanni; Vergni, Davide

    2016-02-21

    Casual mutations and natural selection have driven the evolution of protein amino acid sequences that we observe at present in nature. The question about which is the dominant force of proteins evolution is still lacking of an unambiguous answer. Casual mutations tend to randomize protein sequences while, in order to have the correct functionality, one expects that selection mechanisms impose rigid constraints on amino acid sequences. Moreover, one also has to consider that the space of all possible amino acid sequences is so astonishingly large that it could be reasonable to have a well tuned amino acid sequence indistinguishable from a random one. In order to study the possibility to discriminate between random and natural amino acid sequences, we introduce different measures of association between pairs of amino acids in a sequence, and apply them to a dataset of 1047 natural protein sequences and 10,470 random sequences, carefully generated in order to preserve the relative length and amino acid distribution of the natural proteins. We analyze the multidimensional measures with machine learning techniques and show that, to a reasonable extent, natural protein sequences can be differentiated from random ones. PMID:26656109

  14. The LIMP-2/SCARB2 binding motif on acid β-glucosidase: basic and applied implications for Gaucher disease and associated neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Liou, Benjamin; Haffey, Wendy D; Greis, Kenneth D; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2014-10-24

    The acid β-glucosidase (glucocerbrosidase (GCase)) binding sequence to LIMP-2 (lysosomal integral membrane protein 2), the receptor for intracellular GCase trafficking to the lysosome, has been identified. Heterologous expression of deletion constructs, the available GCase crystal structures, and binding and co-localization of identified peptides or mutant GCases were used to identify and characterize a highly conserved 11-amino acid sequence, DSPIIVDITKD, within human GCase. The binding to LIMP-2 is not dependent upon a single amino acid, but the interactions of GCase with LIMP-2 are heavily influenced by Asp(399) and the di-isoleucines, Ile(402) and Ile(403). A single alanine substitution at any of these decreases GCase binding to LIMP-2 and alters its pH-dependent binding as well as diminishing the trafficking of GCase to the lysosome and significantly increasing GCase secretion. Enterovirus 71 also binds to LIMP-2 (also known as SCARB2) on the external surface of the plasma membrane. However, the LIMP-2/SCARB2 binding sequences for enterovirus 71 and GCase are not similar, indicating that LIMP-2/SCARB2 may have multiple or overlapping binding sites with differing specificities. These findings have therapeutic implications for the production of GCase and the distribution of this enzyme that is delivered to various organs. PMID:25202012

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  16. Transcriptome Sequencing in Response to Salicylic Acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane; Liu, Hailong; Wang, Jiao; Qi, Yuexin; Liang, Zongsuo

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, whose quality and yield are often affected by diseases and environmental stresses during its growing season. Salicylic acid (SA) plays a significant role in plants responding to biotic and abiotic stresses, but the involved regulatory factors and their signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. In order to identify the genes involved in SA signaling, the RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) strategy was employed to evaluate the transcriptional profiles in S. miltiorrhiza cell cultures. A total of 50,778 unigenes were assembled, in which 5,316 unigenes were differentially expressed among 0-, 2-, and 8-h SA induction. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in stimulus response and multi-organism process. A core set of candidate novel genes coding SA signaling component proteins was identified. Many transcription factors (e.g., WRKY, bHLH and GRAS) and genes involved in hormone signal transduction were differentially expressed in response to SA induction. Detailed analysis revealed that genes associated with defense signaling, such as antioxidant system genes, cytochrome P450s and ATP-binding cassette transporters, were significantly overexpressed, which can be used as genetic tools to investigate disease resistance. Our transcriptome analysis will help understand SA signaling and its mechanism of defense systems in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26808150

  17. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  18. The extracellular matrix protein Del1 induces apoptosis via its epidermal growth factor motif.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Hisataka; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Hidai, Chiaki

    2010-03-19

    Mouse Del1 is an extracellular matrix protein mainly expressed in the developing embryo. Del1 has three EGF motifs and two discoidin domains. The second EGF motif reportedly contains an RGD sequence that binds to integrin receptors. Here, we provide evidence that Del1 protein induces cell death in vitro. Chromatin condensation and DNA laddering were observed, suggestive of apoptosis. The results of analysis using the TUNEL method and annexin V staining were also consistent with apoptosis. The apoptosis-inducing activity of Del1 could be mapped to the third EGF motif, which fitted the consensus sequence CX(D/N)XXXX(F/Y)XCXC, wherein the aspartic acid residue (D) could be beta-hydroxylated. As little as twenty-five picomolar of recombinant E3 could induce apoptosis. PMID:20171188

  19. Merging the Structural Motifs of Functionalized Amino Acids and α-Aminoamides: Compounds with Significant Anticonvulsant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Salomé, Christophe; Salomé-Grosjean, Elise; Stables, James P.; Kohn, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Functional amino acids (FAAs) and α-aminoamides (AAAs) are two classes of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that exhibit pronounced anticonvulsant activities. We combined key structural pharmacophores present in FAAs and AAAs to generate a new series of compounds and document that select compounds exhibit activity superior to either the prototypical FAA (lacosamide) or the prototypical AAA (safinamide) in the maximal electroshock (MES) seizure model in rats. A representative compound, (R)-N-4′-((3″-fluoro)benzyloxy)benzyl 2-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide ((R)-10), was tested in the MES (mice, ip), MES (rat, po), psychomotor 6 Hz (32 mA) (mice, ip), and hippocampal kindled (rat, ip) seizure tests providing excellent protection with ED50 values of 13, 14, ~10 mg/kg, and 12 mg/kg, respectively. In the rat sciatic nerve ligation model (ip), (R)-10 (12 mg/kg) provided an 11.2-fold attenuation of mechanical allodynia. In the mouse biphasic formalin pain model (ip), (R)-10 (15 mg/kg) reduced pain responses in the acute and the chronic inflammatory phases. PMID:20394379

  20. Sampling Motif-Constrained Ensembles of Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rico; Leitão, Jorge C.; Peixoto, Tiago P.; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2015-10-01

    The statistical significance of network properties is conditioned on null models which satisfy specified properties but that are otherwise random. Exponential random graph models are a principled theoretical framework to generate such constrained ensembles, but which often fail in practice, either due to model inconsistency or due to the impossibility to sample networks from them. These problems affect the important case of networks with prescribed clustering coefficient or number of small connected subgraphs (motifs). In this Letter we use the Wang-Landau method to obtain a multicanonical sampling that overcomes both these problems. We sample, in polynomial time, networks with arbitrary degree sequences from ensembles with imposed motifs counts. Applying this method to social networks, we investigate the relation between transitivity and homophily, and we quantify the correlation between different types of motifs, finding that single motifs can explain up to 60% of the variation of motif profiles.

  1. Matrix genes of measles virus and canine distemper virus: cloning, nucleotide sequences, and deduced amino acid sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, W J; Englund, G; Richardson, C D; Rozenblatt, S; Lazzarini, R A

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the matrix (M) proteins of measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) were determined from cDNA clones containing these genes in their entirety. In both cases, single open reading frames specifying basic proteins of 335 amino acid residues were predicted from the nucleotide sequences. Both viral messages were composed of approximately 1,450 nucleotides and contained 400 nucleotides of presumptive noncoding sequences at their respective 3' ends. MV and CDV M-protein-coding regions were 67% homologous at the nucleotide level and 76% homologous at the amino acid level. Only chance homology was observed in the 400-nucleotide trailer sequences. Comparisons of the M protein sequences of MV and CDV with the sequence reported for Sendai virus (B. M. Blumberg, K. Rose, M. G. Simona, L. Roux, C. Giorgi, and D. Kolakofsky, J. Virol. 52:656-663; Y. Hidaka, T. Kanda, K. Iwasaki, A. Nomoto, T. Shioda, and H. Shibuta, Nucleic Acids Res. 12:7965-7973) indicated the greatest homology among these M proteins in the carboxyterminal third of the molecule. Secondary-structure analyses of this shared region indicated a structurally conserved, hydrophobic sequence which possibly interacted with the lipid bilayer. Images PMID:3754588

  2. Identification of Novel N-Glycosylation Sites at Noncanonical Protein Consensus Motifs.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Davis, Kiersta S; Formolo, Trina; Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Phinney, Karen W

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation of proteins is well known to occur at asparagine residues that fall within the canonical consensus sequence N-X-S/T but has also been identified at a small number of asparagine residues within N-X-C motifs, including the N491 residue of human serotransferrin. Here we report novel glycosylation sites within noncanonical consensus motifs, in the conformation N-X-C, based on mass spectrometry analysis of partially deglycosylated glycopeptide targets. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (A1AG) and serotransferrin (Tf) were observed for the first time to be N-glycosylated on asparagine residues within a total of six unique noncanonical motifs. N-glycosylation was initially predicted in silico based on the evolutionary conservation of the N-X-C motif among related mammalian species and demonstrated experimentally in A1AG from porcine, canine, and feline sources and in human serotransferrin. High-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was employed to collect fragmentation data of predicted GlcNAcylated peptides and to assign modification sites within N-X-C motifs. A combination of targeted analytical techniques that includes complementary mass spectrometry platforms, enzymatic digestions, and partial-deglycosylation procedures was developed to confirm the novel observations. Additionally, we found that A1AG in porcine and canine sources is highly N-glycosylated at a noncanonical motif (N-Q-C) based on semiquantitative multiple reaction monitoring analysis-the first report of an N-X-C motif exhibiting substantial N-glycosylation. Although reports of N-X-C motif N-glycosylation are relatively uncommon in the literature, this work adds to a growing list of glycoproteins reported with glycosylation at various forms of noncanonical motifs. PMID:27246700

  3. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  4. Complete cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) delta subunit from Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Blitvich, B J; Rayms-Keller, A; Blair, C D; Beaty, B J

    2001-01-01

    The chaperonin containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) assists in the ATP-dependent folding and assembly of newly translated actin and tubulin in the eukaryotic cytosol. CCT is composed of eight different subunits, each encoded by an independent gene. In this report, we used RT-PCR amplification and 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to determine the complete cDNA sequence of the CCT delta subunit from Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes. The CCT delta cDNA is 1936 nucleotides in length and encodes a putative 533 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 57,179 daltons and pI of 7.15. Hydrophobic residues comprise 39.8% of the amino acid sequence and putative motifs for ATP-binding and ATPase-activity are present. The amino acid sequence displays strong sequence similarity to Drosophila melanogaster (92%), human (85%), puffer fish (84%) and mouse (84%) counterparts. CCT delta mRNA was detected in both biosynthetically active (embryonating) and dormant (diapausing) Ae. triseriatus embryos by RT-PCR analysis. PMID:11762197

  5. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Prof. Sandor Pongor, Dr. Yuriy Gusev, and Dr. Shyam Prabhakar (nominated by Prof. Limsoon Wong). PMID:24555784

  6. Sequence and structural analysis of the Asp-box motif and Asp-box beta-propellers; a widespread propeller-type characteristic of the Vps10 domain family and several glycoside hydrolase families

    PubMed Central

    Quistgaard, Esben M; Thirup, Søren S

    2009-01-01

    Background The Asp-box is a short sequence and structure motif that folds as a well-defined β-hairpin. It is present in different folds, but occurs most prominently as repeats in β-propellers. Asp-box β-propellers are known to be characteristically irregular and to occur in many medically important proteins, most of which are glycosidase enzymes, but they are otherwise not well characterized and are only rarely treated as a distinct β-propeller family. We have analyzed the sequence, structure, function and occurrence of the Asp-box and s-Asp-box -a related shorter variant, and provide a comprehensive classification and computational analysis of the Asp-box β-propeller family. Results We find that all conserved residues of the Asp-box support its structure, whereas the residues in variable positions are generally used for other purposes. The Asp-box clearly has a structural role in β-propellers and is highly unlikely to be involved in ligand binding. Sequence analysis of the Asp-box β-propeller family reveals it to be very widespread especially in bacteria and suggests a wide functional range. Disregarding the Asp-boxes, sequence conservation of the propeller blades is very low, but a distinct pattern of residues with specific properties have been identified. Interestingly, Asp-boxes are occasionally found very close to other propeller-associated repeats in extensive mixed-motif stretches, which strongly suggests the existence of a novel class of hybrid β-propellers. Structural analysis reveals that the top and bottom faces of Asp-box β-propellers have striking and consistently different loop properties; the bottom is structurally conserved whereas the top shows great structural variation. Interestingly, only the top face is used for functional purposes in known structures. A structural analysis of the 10-bladed β-propeller fold, which has so far only been observed in the Asp-box family, reveals that the inner strands of the blades are unusually far apart

  7. DNA Motif Databases and Their Uses.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. The specificity of a TF is usually represented as a position weight matrix (PWM). Several databases of DNA motifs exist and are used in biological research to address important biological questions. This overview describes PWMs and some of the most commonly used motif databases, as well as a few of their common applications. PMID:26334922

  8. Partial amino acid sequence of human factor D:homology with serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Volanakis, J E; Bhown, A; Bennett, J C; Mole, J E

    1980-01-01

    Human factor D purified to homogeneity by a modified procedure was subjected to NH2-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by using a modified automated Beckman sequencer. We identified 48 of the first 57 NH2-terminal amino acids in a single sequencer run, using microgram quantities of factor D. The deduced amino acid sequence represents approximately 25% of the primary structure of factor D. This extended NH2-terminal amino acid sequence of factor D was compared to that of other trypsin-related serine proteases. By visual inspection, strong homologies (33--50% identity) were observed with all the serine proteases included in the comparison. Interestingly, factor D showed a higher degree of homology to serine proteases of pancreatic origin than to those of serum origin. Images PMID:6987665

  9. Amino acid sequence of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Goodson, John; Beckstead, Robert B; Payne, Jason; Singh, Rakesh K; Mohan, Anand

    2015-08-15

    Myoglobin has an important physiological role in vertebrates, and as the primary sarcoplasmic pigment in meat, influences quality perception and consumer acceptability. In this study, the amino acid sequences of Japanese quail and northern bobwhite myoglobin were deduced by cDNA cloning of the coding sequence from mRNA. Japanese quail myoglobin was isolated from quail cardiac muscles, purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel-filtration, and subjected to multiple enzymatic digestions. Mass spectrometry corroborated the deduced protein amino acid sequence at the protein level. Sequence analysis revealed both species' myoglobin structures consist of 153 amino acids, differing at only three positions. When compared with chicken myoglobin, Japanese quail showed 98% sequence identity, and northern bobwhite 97% sequence identity. The myoglobin in both quail species contained eight histidine residues instead of the nine present in chicken and turkey. PMID:25794748

  10. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  11. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  12. tax and rex Sequences of bovine leukaemia virus from globally diverse isolates: rex amino acid sequence more variable than tax.

    PubMed

    McGirr, K M; Buehring, G C

    2005-02-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is an important agricultural problem with high costs to the dairy industry. Here, we examine the variation of the tax and rex genes of BLV. The tax and rex genes share 420 bases and have overlapping reading frames. The tax gene encodes a protein that functions as a transactivator of the BLV promoter, is required for viral replication, acts on cellular promoters, and is responsible for oncogenesis. The rex facilitates the export of viral mRNAs from the nucleus and regulates transcription. We have sequenced five new isolates of the tax/rex gene. We examined the five new and three previously published tax/rex DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of BLV isolates from cattle in representative regions worldwide. The highest variation among nucleic acid sequences for tax and rex was 7% and 5%, respectively; among predicted amino acid sequences for Tax and Rex, 9% and 11%, respectively. Significantly more nucleotide changes resulted in predicted amino acid changes in the rex gene than in the tax gene (P < or = 0.0006). This variability is higher than previously reported for any region of the viral genome. This research may also have implications for the development of Tax-based vaccines. PMID:15702995

  13. The amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J

    1985-01-01

    Protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. It comprises 65 amino acids including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 has been elucidated. The sequence (residues 1-50) resembles that of the N-terminal sequence of the subunits of a synergistic type protein and residues 51-65 that of the C-terminal sequence of an angusticeps type protein. Mixtures of protein CM-3 and angusticeps type proteins showed no apparent synergistic effect, in that their toxicity in combination was no greater than the sum of their individual toxicities. PMID:4029488

  14. Mutational analysis of the adeno-associated virus type 2 Rep68 protein helicase motifs.

    PubMed

    Walker, S L; Wonderling, R S; Owens, R A

    1997-09-01

    The adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) Rep78 and Rep68 proteins are required for viral replication. These proteins are encoded by unspliced and spliced transcripts, respectively, from the p5 promoter of AAV and therefore have overlapping amino acid sequences. The Rep78 and Rep68 proteins share a variety of activities including endonuclease, helicase, and ATPase activities and the ability to bind AAV hairpin DNA. The part of the amino acid sequence which is identical in Rep78 and Rep68 contains consensus helicase motifs that are conserved among the parvovirus replication proteins. In the present study, we mutated highly conserved amino acids within these helicase motifs. The mutant proteins were synthesized as maltose binding protein-Rep68 fusions in Escherichia coli cells and affinity purified on amylose resin. The fusion proteins were assayed in vitro, and their activities were directly compared to those of the fusion protein MBP-Rep68 delta, which contains most of the amino acid sequences common to Rep78 and Rep68 and was demonstrated previously to have all of the in vitro activities of wild-type Rep78 and Rep68. Our analysis showed that almost all mutations in the putative helicase motifs severely reduced or abolished helicase activity in vitro. Most mutants also had ATPase activity less than one-eighth of the wild-type levels and lacked endonuclease activity. PMID:9261429

  15. Space-related pharma-motifs for fast search of protein binding motifs and polypharmacological targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To discover a compound inhibiting multiple proteins (i.e. polypharmacological targets) is a new paradigm for the complex diseases (e.g. cancers and diabetes). In general, the polypharmacological proteins often share similar local binding environments and motifs. As the exponential growth of the number of protein structures, to find the similar structural binding motifs (pharma-motifs) is an emergency task for drug discovery (e.g. side effects and new uses for old drugs) and protein functions. Results We have developed a Space-Related Pharmamotifs (called SRPmotif) method to recognize the binding motifs by searching against protein structure database. SRPmotif is able to recognize conserved binding environments containing spatially discontinuous pharma-motifs which are often short conserved peptides with specific physico-chemical properties for protein functions. Among 356 pharma-motifs, 56.5% interacting residues are highly conserved. Experimental results indicate that 81.1% and 92.7% polypharmacological targets of each protein-ligand complex are annotated with same biological process (BP) and molecular function (MF) terms, respectively, based on Gene Ontology (GO). Our experimental results show that the identified pharma-motifs often consist of key residues in functional (active) sites and play the key roles for protein functions. The SRPmotif is available at http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/SRP/. Conclusions SRPmotif is able to identify similar pharma-interfaces and pharma-motifs sharing similar binding environments for polypharmacological targets by rapidly searching against the protein structure database. Pharma-motifs describe the conservations of binding environments for drug discovery and protein functions. Additionally, these pharma-motifs provide the clues for discovering new sequence-based motifs to predict protein functions from protein sequence databases. We believe that SRPmotif is useful for elucidating protein functions and drug discovery

  16. QGRS-Conserve: a computational method for discovering evolutionarily conserved G-quadruplex motifs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nucleic acids containing guanine tracts can form quadruplex structures via non-Watson-Crick base pairing. Formation of G-quadruplexes is associated with the regulation of important biological functions such as transcription, genetic instability, DNA repair, DNA replication, epigenetic mechanisms, regulation of translation, and alternative splicing. G-quadruplexes play important roles in human diseases and are being considered as targets for a variety of therapies. Identification of functional G-quadruplexes and the study of their overall distribution in genomes and transcriptomes is an important pursuit. Traditional computational methods map sequence motifs capable of forming G-quadruplexes but have difficulty in distinguishing motifs that occur by chance from ones which fold into G-quadruplexes. Results We present Quadruplex forming ‘G’-rich sequences (QGRS)-Conserve, a computational method for calculating motif conservation across exomes and supports filtering to provide researchers with more precise methods of studying G-quadruplex distribution patterns. Our method quantitatively evaluates conservation between quadruplexes found in homologous nucleotide sequences based on several motif structural characteristics. QGRS-Conserve also efficiently manages overlapping G-quadruplex sequences such that the resulting datasets can be analyzed effectively. Conclusions We have applied QGRS-Conserve to identify a large number of G-quadruplex motifs in the human exome conserved across several mammalian and non-mammalian species. We have successfully identified multiple homologs of many previously published G-quadruplexes that play post-transcriptional regulatory roles in human genes. Preliminary large-scale analysis identified many homologous G-quadruplexes in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions of mammalian species. An expectedly smaller set of G-quadruplex motifs was found to be conserved across larger phylogenetic distances. QGRS-Conserve provides means

  17. A polymorphic motif in the small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase modulates interactions between the small and large subunits.

    PubMed

    Cross, Joanna M; Clancy, Maureen; Shaw, Janine R; Boehlein, Susan K; Greene, Thomas W; Schmidt, Robert R; Okita, Thomas W; Hannah, L Curtis

    2005-02-01

    The heterotetrameric, allosterically regulated enzyme, adenosine-5'-diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in starch synthesis. Despite vast differences in allosteric properties and a long evolutionary separation, heterotetramers of potato small subunit and maize large subunit have activity comparable to either parent in an Escherichia coli expression system. In contrast, co-expression of maize small subunit with the potato large subunit produces little activity as judged by in vivo activity stain. To pinpoint the region responsible for differential activity, we expressed chimeric maize/potato small subunits in E. coli. This identified a 55-amino acid motif of the potato small subunit that is critical for glycogen production when expressed with the potato large subunit. Potato and maize small subunit sequences differ at five amino acids in this motif. Replacement experiments revealed that at least four amino acids of maize origin were required to reduce staining. An AGPase composed of a chimeric potato small subunit containing the 55-amino acid maize motif with the potato large subunit exhibited substantially less affinity for the substrates, glucose-1-phosphate and ATP and an increased Ka for the activator, 3-phosphoglyceric acid. Placement of the potato motif into the maize small subunit restored glycogen synthesis with the potato large subunit. Hence, a small polymorphic motif within the small subunit influences both catalytic and allosteric properties by modulating subunit interactions. PMID:15686515

  18. Mechano-chemical selections of two competitive unfolding pathways of a single DNA i-motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Chen, Hu; Qu, Yu-Jie; Artem, K. Efremov; Li, Ming; Ouyang, Zhong-Can; Liu, Dong-Sheng; Yan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The DNA i-motif is a quadruplex structure formed in tandem cytosine-rich sequences in slightly acidic conditions. Besides being considered as a building block of DNA nano-devices, it may also play potential roles in regulating chromosome stability and gene transcriptions. The stability of i-motif is crucial for these functions. In this work, we investigated the mechanical stability of a single i-motif formed in the human telomeric sequence 5'-(CCCTAA)3CCC, which revealed a novel pH and loading rate-dependent bimodal unfolding force distribution. Although the cause of the bimodal unfolding force species is not clear, we proposed a phenomenological model involving a direct unfolding favored at lower loading rate or higher pH value, which is subject to competition with another unfolding pathway through a mechanically stable intermediate state whose nature is yet to be determined. Overall, the unique mechano—chemical responses of i-motif-provide a new perspective to its stability, which may be useful to guide designing new i-motif-based DNA mechanical nano-devices.

  19. Theme and variations: evolutionary diversification of the HET-s functional amyloid motif

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Dyrka, Witold; Saupe, Sven J.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals and fungi, Nod-like receptors (NLR) activate downstream cell death execution proteins by a prion-like mechanism. In Podospora anserina, the NWD2 NLR activates the HET-S Helo-domain pore-forming protein by converting its prion-forming domain into a characteristic β-solenoid amyloid fold. The amyloid forming region of HET-S/s comprises two repetitions of a 21 amino acid motif. Herein, we systematically analyze the sequences of C-terminal regions of fungal HeLo and HeLo-like domain proteins to identify HET-s-related amyloid motifs (HRAM). We now identify four novel HRAM subfamilies in addition to the canonical HET-S/s subfamily. These novel motifs share the pseudo-repeat structure of HET-S/s and a specific pattern of distribution of hydrophobic and polar residues. Sequence co-variance analyses predict parallel in-register β-stacking of the two repeats and residue-residue interactions compatible with the β-solenoid fold. As described for HET-S, most genes encoding the HeLo proteins are adjacent to genes encoding NLRs also displaying HRAMs. The motifs of the NLRs are similar to those of their cognate HeLo-domain protein, indicating concerted evolution between repeats. This study shows that HET-s-related amyloid motifs are more common than anticipated and that they have diversified into discrete subfamilies that apparently share a common overall fold. PMID:26219477

  20. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Bayse, Craig A.; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used 77Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of 77Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs’ reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20–25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs’ flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  1. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  2. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T P; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:4514-4518, 1980) and (iv) the CHO and mouse 4.5S ribonucleic acid (this report; F. Harada and N. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1273-1285, 1980). Because the CHO consensus sequence shows significant homology to the human Alu sequence it is termed the CHO Alu-equivalent sequence. A conserved structure surrounding CHO Alu-equivalent family members can be recognized. It is similar to that surrounding the human Alu and the mouse B1 sequences, and is represented as follows: direct repeat-CHO-Alu-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. A composite interspersed repetitious sequence has been identified. Its structure is represented as follows: direct repeat-residue 47 to 107 of CHO-Alu-non-Alu repetitious sequence-A-rich sequence-direct repeat. Because the Alu flanking sequences resemble those that flank known transposable elements, we think it likely that the Alu sequence dispersed throughout the mammalian genome by transposition. Images PMID:9279371

  3. Characterization of DNA sequences that mediate nuclear protein binding to the regulatory region of the Pisum sativum (pea) chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80: identification of a repeated heptamer motif.

    PubMed

    Argüello, G; García-Hernández, E; Sánchez, M; Gariglio, P; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-05-01

    Two protein factors binding to the regulatory region of the pea chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80 have been identified. One of these factors is found only in green tissue but not in etiolated or root tissue. The second factor (denominated ABF-2) binds to a DNA sequence element that contains a direct heptamer repeat TCTCAAA. It was found that presence of both of the repeats is essential for binding. ABF-2 is present in both green and etiolated tissue and in roots and factors analogous to ABF-2 are present in several plant species. Computer analysis showed that the TCTCAAA motif is present in the regulatory region of several plant genes. PMID:1303797

  4. Computer Simulation of the Determination of Amino Acid Sequences in Polypeptides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Stephen D.; Sontum, Stephen F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a computer program that generates a random string of amino acids and guides the student in determining the correct sequence of a given protein by using experimental analytic data for that protein. (MLH)

  5. QM Computations on Complete Nucleic Acids Building Blocks: Analysis of the Sarcin-Ricin RNA Motif Using DFT-D3, HF-3c, PM6-D3H, and MM Approaches.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Holger; Havrila, Marek; Šponer, Jiřı

    2014-06-10

    A set of conformations obtained from explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Sarcin-Ricin internal loop (SRL) RNA motif is investigated using quantum mechanical (QM, TPSS-D3/def2-TZVP DFT-D3) and molecular mechanics (MM, AMBER parm99bsc0+χol3 force field) methods. Solvent effects are approximated using implicit solvent methods (COSMO for DFT-D3; GB and PB for MM). Large-scale DFT-D3 optimizations of the full 11-nucleotide motif are compared to MM results and reveal a higher flexibility of DFT-D3 over the MM in the optimization procedure. Conformational energies of the SRL motif expose significant differences in the DFT-D3 and MM energy descriptions that explain difficulties in MD simulations of the SRL motif. The TPSS-D3 data are in excellent agreement with results obtained by the hybrid functionals PW6B95-D3 and M06-2X. Computationally more efficient methods such as PM6-D3H and HF-3c show promising but partly inconsistent results. It is demonstrated that large-scale DFT-D3 computations on complete nucleic acids building blocks are a viable tool to complement the picture obtained from MD simulations and can be used as benchmarks for faster computational methods. Methodological challenges of large-scale QM computations on nucleic acids such as missing solvent-solute interactions and the truncation of the studied systems are discussed. PMID:26580782

  6. Accuracy of sequence alignment and fold assessment using reduced amino acid alphabets.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Reduced or simplified amino acid alphabets group the 20 naturally occurring amino acids into a smaller number of representative protein residues. To date, several reduced amino acid alphabets have been proposed, which have been derived and optimized by a variety of methods. The resulting reduced amino acid alphabets have been applied to pattern recognition, generation of consensus sequences from multiple alignments, protein folding, and protein structure prediction. In this work, amino acid substitution matrices and statistical potentials were derived based on several reduced amino acid alphabets and their performance assessed in a large benchmark for the tasks of sequence alignment and fold assessment of protein structure models, using as a reference frame the standard alphabet of 20 amino acids. The results showed that a large reduction in the total number of residue types does not necessarily translate into a significant loss of discriminative power for sequence alignment and fold assessment. Therefore, some definitions of a few residue types are able to encode most of the relevant sequence/structure information that is present in the 20 standard amino acids. Based on these results, we suggest that the use of reduced amino acid alphabets may allow to increasing the accuracy of current substitution matrices and statistical potentials for the prediction of protein structure of remote homologs. PMID:16506243

  7. Characterization of mouse cellular deoxyribonucleic acid homologous to Abelson murine leukemia virus-specific sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, B; Ozanne, B

    1981-01-01

    The genome of Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) consists of sequences derived from both BALB/c mouse deoxyribonucleic acid and the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Using deoxyribonucleic acid linear intermediates as a source of retroviral deoxyribonucleic acid, we isolated a recombinant plasmid which contained 1.9 kilobases of the 3.5-kilobase mouse-derived sequences found in A-MuLV (A-MuLV-specific sequences). We used this clone, designated pSA-17, as a probe restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses to examine the arrangement of homologous sequences in BALB/c deoxyribonucleic acid (endogenous Abelson sequences). The endogenous Abelson sequences within the mouse genome were interrupted by noncoding regions, suggesting that a rearrangement of the cell sequences was required to produce the sequence found in the virus. Endogenous Abelson sequences were arranged similarly in mice that were susceptible to A-MuLV tumors and in mice that were resistant to A-MuLV tumors. An examination of three BALB/c plasmacytomas and a BALB/c early B-cell tumor likewise revealed no alteration in the arrangement of the endogenous Abelson sequences. Homology to pSA-17 was also observed in deoxyribonucleic acids prepared from rat, hamster, chicken, and human cells. An isolate of A-MuLV which encoded a 160,000-dalton transforming protein (P160) contained 700 more base pairs of mouse sequences than the standard A-MuLV isolate, which encoded a 120,000-dalton transforming protein (P120). Images PMID:9279386

  8. Calmodulation meta-analysis: predicting calmodulin binding via canonical motif clustering.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Karen; Farley, Brian M; Ritacco, Alan W; Kobertz, William R

    2014-07-01

    The calcium-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) directly binds to membrane transport proteins to modulate their function in response to changes in intracellular calcium concentrations. Because CaM recognizes and binds to a wide variety of target sequences, identifying CaM-binding sites is difficult, requiring intensive sequence gazing and extensive biochemical analysis. Here, we describe a straightforward computational script that rapidly identifies canonical CaM-binding motifs within an amino acid sequence. Analysis of the target sequences from high resolution CaM-peptide structures using this script revealed that CaM often binds to sequences that have multiple overlapping canonical CaM-binding motifs. The addition of a positive charge discriminator to this meta-analysis resulted in a tool that identifies potential CaM-binding domains within a given sequence. To allow users to search for CaM-binding motifs within a protein of interest, perform the meta-analysis, and then compare the results to target peptide-CaM structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank, we created a website and online database. The availability of these tools and analyses will facilitate the design of CaM-related studies of ion channels and membrane transport proteins. PMID:24935744

  9. The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Matsumoto, T; Torikata, T

    1998-10-01

    The amino acid sequence of monal pheasant lysozyme and its activity were analyzed. Carboxymethylated lysozyme was digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were sequenced. The established amino acid sequence had one amino acid substitution at position 102 (Arg to Gly) comparing with Indian peafowl lysozyme and four amino acid substitutions at positions 3 (Phe to Tyr), 15 (His to Leu), 41 (Gln to His), and 121 (Gln to His) with chicken lysozyme. Analysis of the time-courses of reaction using N-acetylglucosamine pentamer as a substrate showed a difference of binding free energy change (-0.4 kcal/mol) at subsites A between monal pheasant and Indian peafowl lysozyme. This was assumed to be caused by the amino acid substitution at subsite A with loss of a positive charge at position 102 (Arg102 to Gly). PMID:9836434

  10. Studies on monotreme proteins. VII. Amino acid sequence of myoglobin from the platypus, Ornithoryhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W K; Thompson, E O

    1976-03-01

    Myoglobin isolated from skeletal muscle of the platypus contains 153 amino acid residues. The complete amino acid sequence has been determined following cleavage with cyanogen bromide and further digestion of the four fragments with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin and thermolysin. Sequences of the purified peptides were determined by the dansyl-Edman procedure. The amino acid sequence showed 25 differences from human myoglobin and 24 from kangaroo myoglobin. Amino acid sequences in myoglobins are more conserved than sequences in the alpha- and beta-globin chains, and platypus myoglobin shows a similar number of variations in sequence to kangaroo myoglobin when compared with myoglobin of other species. The date of divergence of the platypus from other mammals was estimated at 102 +/- 31 million years, based on the number of amino acid differences between species and allowing for mutations during the evolutionary period. This estimate differs widely from the estimate given by similar treatment of the alpha- and beta-chain sequences and a constant rate of mutation of globin chains is not supported. PMID:962722

  11. cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of myoglobins from nine species of whales and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Kentaro; Mita, Hajime; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Tadasu; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2006-10-01

    We determined the myoglobin (Mb) cDNA sequences of nine cetaceans, of which six are the first reports of Mb sequences: sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri), Longman's beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus), and melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra), and three confirm the previously determined chemical amino acid sequences: sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata). We found two types of Mb in the skeletal muscle of pantropical spotted dolphin: Mb I with the same amino acid sequence as that deposited in the protein database, and Mb II, which differs at two amino acid residues compared with Mb I. Using an alignment of the amino acid or cDNA sequences of cetacean Mb, we constructed a phylogenetic tree by the NJ method. Clustering of cetacean Mb amino acid and cDNA sequences essentially follows the classical taxonomy of cetaceans, suggesting that Mb sequence data is valid for classification of cetaceans at least to the family level. PMID:16962803

  12. A molecular mechanism realizing sequence-specific recognition of nucleic acids by TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoh; Fukuoka, Mami; Nagasawa, Kenichi; Nakagome, Kenta; Shimizu, Hideaki; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Akiyama, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein containing two consecutive RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2) in tandem. Functional abnormality of TDP-43 has been proposed to cause neurodegeneration, but it remains obscure how the physiological functions of this protein are regulated. Here, we show distinct roles of RRM1 and RRM2 in the sequence-specific substrate recognition of TDP-43. RRM1 was found to bind a wide spectrum of ssDNA sequences, while no binding was observed between RRM2 and ssDNA. When two RRMs are fused in tandem as in native TDP-43, the fused construct almost exclusively binds ssDNA with a TG-repeat sequence. In contrast, such sequence-specificity was not observed in a simple mixture of RRM1 and RRM2. We thus propose that the spatial arrangement of multiple RRMs in DNA/RNA binding proteins provides steric effects on the substrate-binding site and thereby controls the specificity of its substrate nucleotide sequences. PMID:26838063

  13. Envelope formation is blocked by mutation of a sequence related to the HKD phospholipid metabolism motif in the vaccinia virus F13L protein.

    PubMed

    Roper, R L; Moss, B

    1999-02-01

    The outer envelope of the extracellular form of vaccinia virus is derived from Golgi membranes that have been modified by the insertion of specific viral proteins, of which the major component is the 37-kDa, palmitylated, nonglycosylated product of the F13L gene. The F13L protein contains a variant of the HKD (His-Lys-Asp) motif, which is conserved in numerous enzymes of phospholipid metabolism. Vaccinia virus mutants with a conservative substitution of either the K (K314R) or the D (D319E) residue of the F13L protein formed only tiny plaques similar to those produced by an F13L deletion mutant, were unable to produce extracellular enveloped virions, and failed to mediate low-pH-induced fusion of infected cells. Membrane-wrapped forms of intracellular virus were rarely detected in electron microscopic images of cells infected with either of the mutants. Western blotting and pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the D319E protein was less stable than either the K314R or wild-type F13L protein. Most striking, however, was the failure of either of the two mutated proteins to concentrate in the Golgi compartment. Palmitylation, oleation, and partitioning of the F13L protein in Triton X-114 detergent were unaffected by the K314R substitution. These results indicated that the F13L protein must retain the K314 and D319 for it to localize in the Golgi compartment and function in membrane envelopment of vaccinia virus. PMID:9882312

  14. Evolutionary Analysis and Classification of OATs, OCTs, OCTNs, and Other SLC22 Transporters: Structure-Function Implications and Analysis of Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Date, Rishabh C.; Bush, Kevin T.; Springer, Stevan A.; Saier, Milton H.; Wu, Wei; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2015-01-01

    The SLC22 family includes organic anion transporters (OATs), organic cation transporters (OCTs) and organic carnitine and zwitterion transporters (OCTNs). These are often referred to as drug transporters even though they interact with many endogenous metabolites and signaling molecules (Nigam, S.K., Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, 14:29–44, 2015). Phylogenetic analysis of SLC22 supports the view that these transporters may have evolved over 450 million years ago. Many OAT members were found to appear after a major expansion of the SLC22 family in mammals, suggesting a physiological and/or toxicological role during the mammalian radiation. Putative SLC22 orthologs exist in worms, sea urchins, flies, and ciona. At least six groups of SLC22 exist. OATs and OCTs form two Major clades of SLC22, within which (apart from Oat and Oct subclades), there are also clear Oat-like, Octn, and Oct-related subclades, as well as a distantly related group we term “Oat-related” (which may have different functions). Based on available data, it is arguable whether SLC22A18, which is related to bacterial drug-proton antiporters, should be assigned to SLC22. Disease-causing mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other functionally analyzed mutations in OAT1, OAT3, URAT1, OCT1, OCT2, OCTN1, and OCTN2 map to the first extracellular domain, the large central intracellular domain, and transmembrane domains 9 and 10. These regions are highly conserved within subclades, but not between subclades, and may be necessary for SLC22 transporter function and functional diversification. Our results not only link function to evolutionarily conserved motifs but indicate the need for a revised sub-classification of SLC22. PMID:26536134

  15. Comparative analysis of the full genome sequence of European bat lyssavirus type 1 and type 2 with other lyssaviruses and evidence for a conserved transcription termination and polyadenylation motif in the G-L 3' non-translated region.

    PubMed

    Marston, D A; McElhinney, L M; Johnson, N; Müller, T; Conzelmann, K K; Tordo, N; Fooks, A R

    2007-04-01

    We report the first full-length genomic sequences for European bat lyssavirus type-1 (EBLV-1) and type-2 (EBLV-2). The EBLV-1 genomic sequence was derived from a virus isolated from a serotine bat in Hamburg, Germany, in 1968 and the EBLV-2 sequence was derived from a virus isolate from a human case of rabies that occurred in Scotland in 2002. A long-distance PCR strategy was used to amplify the open reading frames (ORFs), followed by standard and modified RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) techniques to amplify the 3' and 5' ends. The lengths of each complete viral genome for EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 were 11 966 and 11 930 base pairs, respectively, and follow the standard rhabdovirus genome organization of five viral proteins. Comparison with other lyssavirus sequences demonstrates variation in degrees of homology, with the genomic termini showing a high degree of complementarity. The nucleoprotein was the most conserved, both intra- and intergenotypically, followed by the polymerase (L), matrix and glyco- proteins, with the phosphoprotein being the most variable. In addition, we have shown that the two EBLVs utilize a conserved transcription termination and polyadenylation (TTP) motif, approximately 50 nt upstream of the L gene start codon. All available lyssavirus sequences to date, with the exception of Pasteur virus (PV) and PV-derived isolates, use the second TTP site. This observation may explain differences in pathogenicity between lyssavirus strains, dependent on the length of the untranslated region, which might affect transcriptional activity and RNA stability. PMID:17374776

  16. Self-association motifs in the enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-resistant agglutinin 1.

    PubMed

    Glaubman, Jessica; Hofmann, Jennifer; Bonney, Megan E; Park, Sumin; Thomas, Jessica M; Kokona, Bashkim; Ramos Falcón, Laura I; Chung, Yoonjie K; Fairman, Robert; Okeke, Iruka N

    2016-07-01

    The heat-resistant agglutinin 1 (Hra1) is an integral outer membrane protein found in strains of Escherichia coli that are exceptional colonizers. Hra1 from enteroaggregative E. coli strain 042 is sufficient to confer adherence to human epithelial cells and to cause bacterial autoaggregation. Hra1 is closely related to the Tia invasin, which also confers adherence, but not autoaggregation. Here, we have demonstrated that Hra1 mediates autoaggregation by self-association and we hypothesize that at least some surface-exposed amino acid sequences that are present in Hra1, but absent in Tia, represent autoaggregation motifs. We inserted FLAG tags along the length of Hra1 and used immune-dot blots to verify that four in silico-predicted outer loops were indeed surface exposed. In Hra1 we swapped nine candidate motifs in three of these loops, ranging from one to ten amino acids in length, to the corresponding sequences in Tia. Three of the motifs were required for Hra1-mediated autoaggregation. The database was searched for other surface proteins containing these motifs; the GGXWRDDXK motif was also present in a surface-exposed region of Rck, a Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium complement resistance protein. Cloning and site-specific mutagenesis demonstrated that Rck can confer weak, GGXWRDDXK-dependent autoaggregation by self-association. Hra1 and Rck appear to form heterologous associations and GGXWRDDXK is required on both molecules for Hra1-Rck association. However, a GGYWRDDLKE peptide was not sufficient to interfere with Hra1-mediated autoaggregation. In the present study, three autoaggregation motifs in an integral outer membrane protein have been identified and it was demonstrated that at least one of them works in the context of a different cell surface. PMID:27166217

  17. Numb directs the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF motif.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin-Feng; Wei, Jian; Li, Pei-Shan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Ma, Yong-Chao; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Xu, Jie; Qin, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang; Xu, Zheng-Ping; Luo, Jie

    2016-08-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3, also known as SLC1A1) is a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent glutamate carrier that localizes primarily within the cell and at the apical plasma membrane. Although previous studies have reported proteins and sequence regions involved in EAAT3 trafficking, the detailed molecular mechanism by which EAAT3 is distributed to the correct location still remains elusive. Here, we identify that the YVNGGF sequence in the C-terminus of EAAT3 is responsible for its intracellular localization and apical sorting in rat hepatoma cells CRL1601 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, respectively. We further demonstrate that Numb, a clathrin adaptor protein, directly binds the YVNGGF motif and regulates the localization of EAAT3. Mutation of Y503, N505 and F508 within the YVNGGF motif to alanine residues or silencing Numb by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in the aberrant localization of EAAT3. Moreover, both Numb and the YVNGGF motif mediate EAAT3 endocytosis in CRL1601 cells. In summary, our study suggests that Numb is a pivotal adaptor protein that mediates the subcellular localization of EAAT3 through binding the YxNxxF (where x stands for any amino acid) motif. PMID:27358480

  18. A natural variant of the cysteine protease virulence factor of group A Streptococcus with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif preferentially binds human integrins alphavbeta3 and alphaIIbbeta3.

    PubMed

    Stockbauer, K E; Magoun, L; Liu, M; Burns, E H; Gubba, S; Renish, S; Pan, X; Bodary, S C; Baker, E; Coburn, J; Leong, J M; Musser, J M

    1999-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus produces an extracellular cysteine protease [streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB)] that is a critical virulence factor for invasive disease episodes. Sequence analysis of the speB gene from 200 group A Streptococcus isolates collected worldwide identified three main mature SpeB (mSpeB) variants. One of these variants (mSpeB2) contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence, a tripeptide motif that is commonly recognized by integrin receptors. mSpeB2 is made by all isolates of the unusually virulent serotype M1 and several other geographically widespread clones that frequently cause invasive infections. Only the mSpeB2 variant bound to transfected cells expressing integrin alphavbeta3 (also known as the vitronectin receptor) or alphaIIbbeta3 (platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa), and binding was blocked by a mAb that recognizes the streptococcal protease RGD motif region. In addition, mSpeB2 bound purified platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3. Defined beta3 mutants that are altered for fibrinogen binding were defective for SpeB binding. Synthetic peptides with the mSpeB2 RGD motif, but not the RSD sequence present in other mSpeB variants, blocked binding of mSpeB2 to transfected cells expressing alphavbeta3 and caused detachment of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results (i) identify a Gram-positive virulence factor that directly binds integrins, (ii) identify naturally occurring variants of a documented Gram-positive virulence factor with biomedically relevant differences in their interactions with host cells, and (iii) add to the theme that subtle natural variation in microbial virulence factor structure alters the character of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:9874803

  19. A natural variant of the cysteine protease virulence factor of group A Streptococcus with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif preferentially binds human integrins αvβ3 and αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Stockbauer, Kathryn E.; Magoun, Loranne; Liu, Mengyao; Burns, Eugene H.; Gubba, Siddeswar; Renish, Sarah; Pan, Xi; Bodary, Sarah C.; Baker, Elizabeth; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.; Musser, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus produces an extracellular cysteine protease [streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB)] that is a critical virulence factor for invasive disease episodes. Sequence analysis of the speB gene from 200 group A Streptococcus isolates collected worldwide identified three main mature SpeB (mSpeB) variants. One of these variants (mSpeB2) contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence, a tripeptide motif that is commonly recognized by integrin receptors. mSpeB2 is made by all isolates of the unusually virulent serotype M1 and several other geographically widespread clones that frequently cause invasive infections. Only the mSpeB2 variant bound to transfected cells expressing integrin αvβ3 (also known as the vitronectin receptor) or αIIbβ3 (platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa), and binding was blocked by a mAb that recognizes the streptococcal protease RGD motif region. In addition, mSpeB2 bound purified platelet integrin αIIbβ3. Defined β3 mutants that are altered for fibrinogen binding were defective for SpeB binding. Synthetic peptides with the mSpeB2 RGD motif, but not the RSD sequence present in other mSpeB variants, blocked binding of mSpeB2 to transfected cells expressing αvβ3 and caused detachment of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results (i) identify a Gram-positive virulence factor that directly binds integrins, (ii) identify naturally occurring variants of a documented Gram-positive virulence factor with biomedically relevant differences in their interactions with host cells, and (iii) add to the theme that subtle natural variation in microbial virulence factor structure alters the character of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:9874803

  20. Comparison of SIV and HIV-1 genomic RNA structures reveals impact of sequence evolution on conserved and non-conserved structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Pollom, Elizabeth; Dang, Kristen K; Potter, E Lake; Gorelick, Robert J; Burch, Christina L; Weeks, Kevin M; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    RNA secondary structure plays a central role in the replication and metabolism of all RNA viruses, including retroviruses like HIV-1. However, structures with known function represent only a fraction of the secondary structure reported for HIV-1(NL4-3). One tool to assess the importance of RNA structures is to examine their conservation over evolutionary time. To this end, we used SHAPE to model the secondary structure of a second primate lentiviral genome, SIVmac239, which shares only 50% sequence identity at the nucleotide level with HIV-1NL4-3. Only about half of the paired nucleotides are paired in both genomic RNAs and, across the genome, just 71 base pairs form with the same pairing partner in both genomes. On average the RNA secondary structure is thus evolving at a much faster rate than the sequence. Structure at the Gag-Pro-Pol frameshift site is maintained but in a significantly altered form, while the impact of selection for maintaining a protein binding interaction can be seen in the conservation of pairing partners in the small RRE stems where Rev binds. Structures that are conserved between SIVmac239 and HIV-1(NL4-3) also occur at the 5' polyadenylation sequence, in the plus strand primer sites, PPT and cPPT, and in the stem-loop structure that includes the first splice acceptor site. The two genomes are adenosine-rich and cytidine-poor. The structured regions are enriched in guanosines, while unpaired regions are enriched in adenosines, and functionaly important structures have stronger base pairing than nonconserved structures. We conclude that much of the secondary structure is the result of fortuitous pairing in a metastable state that reforms during sequence evolution. However, secondary structure elements with important function are stabilized by higher guanosine content that allows regions of structure to persist as sequence evolution proceeds, and, within the confines of selective pressure, allows structures to evolve. PMID:23593004

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ameet J; Sharp, Jonathan O; Yoder, Michael J; Almstrand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Acidimicrobiaceae Members from an Acid Mine Drainage Biofilm Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Yoder, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the family Acidimicrobiaceae are frequently encountered in heavy metal-contaminated acidic environments. However, their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is poorly resolved. We present draft genome sequences of two novel and phylogenetically distinct Acidimicrobiaceae members assembled from an acid mine drainage biofilm metagenome. PMID:26769942

  3. Two distinct ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus: complete amino acid sequences and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Suetsugu, Y; Yao, Y; Horio, T; Marrs, B L; Matsubara, H

    1990-09-01

    Two distinct ferredoxins were purified from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Their complete amino acid sequences were determined by a combination of protease digestion, BrCN cleavage and Edman degradation. Ferredoxins I and II were composed of 64 and 111 amino acids, respectively, with molecular weights of 6,728 and 12,549 excluding iron and sulfur atoms. Both contained two Cys clusters in their amino acid sequences. The first cluster of ferredoxin I and the second cluster of ferredoxin II had a sequence, CxxCxxCxxxCP, in common with the ferredoxins found in Clostridia. The second cluster of ferredoxin I had a sequence, CxxCxxxxxxxxCxxxCM, with extra amino acids between the second and third Cys, which has been reported for other photosynthetic bacterial ferredoxins and putative ferredoxins (nif-gene products) from nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and with a unique occurrence of Met. The first cluster of ferredoxin II had a CxxCxxxxCxxxCP sequence, with two additional amino acids between the second and third Cys, a characteristics feature of Azotobacter-[3Fe-4S] [4Fe-4S]-ferredoxin. Ferredoxin II was also similar to Azotobacter-type ferredoxins with an extended carboxyl (C-) terminal sequence compared to the common Clostridium-type. The evolutionary relationship of the two together with a putative one recently found to be encoded in nifENXQ region in this bacterium [Moreno-Vivian et al. (1989) J. Bacteriol. 171, 2591-2598] is discussed. PMID:2277040

  4. Amino Acid Sequence of Anionic Peroxidase from the Windmill Palm Tree Trachycarpus fortunei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications. PMID:25383699

  5. Protein chemotaxonomy. XIII. Amino acid sequence of ferredoxin from Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Mino, Yoshiki

    2006-08-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) has been determined by automated Edman degradation of the entire S-carboxymethylcysteinyl protein and of the peptides obtained by enzymatic digestion. This ferredoxin has a unique amino acid sequence, which includes an insertion of Tyr at the 3rd position from the amino-terminus and a deletion of two amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus. This ferredoxin had 18 differences in its amino acid sequence compared to that of Petroselinum sativum (Umbelliferae). In contrast, 23-33 differences were observed compared to other dicotyledonous plants. This suggests that Panax ginseng is related taxonomically to umbelliferous plants. PMID:16880642

  6. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor. PMID:2708331

  7. A systematic study of fundamentals in α-helical coiled coil mimicry by alternating sequences of β- and γ-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Araghi, Raheleh; Baldauf, Carsten; Gerling, Ulla I M; Cadicamo, Cosimo Damiano; Koksch, Beate

    2011-08-01

    Aimed at understanding the crucially important structural features for the integrity of α-helical mimicry by βγ-sequences, an α-amino acid sequence in a native peptide was substituted by differently arranged βγ-sequences. The self- and hetero-assembly of a series of αβγ-chimeric sequences based on a 33-residue GCN4-derived peptide was investigated by means of molecular dynamics, circular dichroism, and a disulfide exchange assay. Despite the native-like behavior of βγ alternating sequences such as retention of α-helix dipole and the formation of 13-membered α-helix turns, the αβγ-chimeras with different βγ substitution patterns do not equally mimic the structural behavior of the native parent peptide in solution. The preservation of the key residue contacts such as van der Waals interactions and intrahelical H-bonding, which can be met only by particular substitution patterns, thermodynamically favor the adoption of coiled coil folding motif. In this study, we show how successfully the destabilizing structural consequences of α → βγ modification can be harnessed by reducing the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area and placing of suitably long and bulky helix-forming side chains at the hydrophobic core. The pairing of αβγ-chimeric sequences with the native wild-type are thermodynamically allowed in the case of ideal arrangement of β- and γ-residues. This indicates a similarity in local side chain packing of β- and γ-amino acids at the helical interface of αβγ-chimeras and the native α-peptide. Consequently, the backbone extended residues are able to participate in classical "knob-into-hole" packing with native α-peptide. PMID:21638022

  8. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  9. N-terminal sequence of amino acids and some properties of an acid-stable alpha-amylase from citric acid-koji (Aspergillus usamii var.).

    PubMed

    Suganuma, T; Tahara, N; Kitahara, K; Nagahama, T; Inuzuka, K

    1996-01-01

    An acid-stable alpha-amylase (AA) was purified from an acidic extract of citric acid-koji (A. usamii var.). The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of the enzyme was identical with that of AA from A. niger, but the two enzymes differed in molecular weight. HPLC analysis for identifying the anomers of products indicated that the AA hydrolyzed maltopentaose (G5) at the third glycoside bond predominantly, which differed from Taka-amylase A and the neutral alpha-amylase (NA) from the citric acid-koji. PMID:8824843

  10. Encoded Expansion: An Efficient Algorithm to Discover Identical String Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Aqil M.; Al-Ssulami, Abdulrakeeb

    2014-01-01

    A major task in computational biology is the discovery of short recurring string patterns known as motifs. Most of the schemes to discover motifs are either stochastic or combinatorial in nature. Stochastic approaches do not guarantee finding the correct motifs, while the combinatorial schemes tend to have an exponential time complexity with respect to motif length. To alleviate the cost, the combinatorial approach exploits dynamic data structures such as trees or graphs. Recently (Karci (2009) Efficient automatic exact motif discovery algorithms for biological sequences, Expert Systems with Applications 36:7952–7963) devised a deterministic algorithm that finds all the identical copies of string motifs of all sizes in theoretical time complexity of and a space complexity of where is the length of the input sequence and is the length of the longest possible string motif. In this paper, we present a significant improvement on Karci's original algorithm. The algorithm that we propose reports all identical string motifs of sizes that occur at least times. Our algorithm starts with string motifs of size 2, and at each iteration it expands the candidate string motifs by one symbol throwing out those that occur less than times in the entire input sequence. We use a simple array and data encoding to achieve theoretical worst-case time complexity of and a space complexity of Encoding of the substrings can speed up the process of comparison between string motifs. Experimental results on random and real biological sequences confirm that our algorithm has indeed a linear time complexity and it is more scalable in terms of sequence length than the existing algorithms. PMID:24871320

  11. Genomic analysis of membrane protein families: abundance and conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Background Polytopic membrane proteins can be related to each other on the basis of the number of transmembrane helices and sequence similarities. Building on the Pfam classification of protein domain families, and using transmembrane-helix prediction and sequence-similarity searching, we identified a total of 526 well-characterized membrane protein families in 26 recently sequenced genomes. To this we added a clustering of a number of predicted but unclassified membrane proteins, resulting in a total of 637 membrane protein families. Results Analysis of the occurrence and composition of these families revealed several interesting trends. The number of assigned membrane protein domains has an approximately linear relationship to the total number of open reading frames (ORFs) in 26 genomes studied. Caenorhabditis elegans is an apparent outlier, because of its high representation of seven-span transmembrane (7-TM) chemoreceptor families. In all genomes, including that of C. elegans, the number of distinct membrane protein families has a logarithmic relation to the number of ORFs. Glycine, proline, and tyrosine locations tend to be conserved in transmembrane regions within families, whereas isoleucine, valine, and methionine locations are relatively mutable. Analysis of motifs in putative transmembrane helices reveals that GxxxG and GxxxxxxG (which can be written GG4 and GG7, respectively; see Materials and methods) are among the most prevalent. This was noted in earlier studies; we now find these motifs are particularly well conserved in families, however, especially those corresponding to transporters, symporters, and channels. Conclusions We carried out a genome-wide analysis on patterns of the classified polytopic membrane protein families and analyzed the distribution of conserved amino acids and motifs in the transmembrane helix regions in these families. PMID:12372142

  12. Potential of known and short prokaryotic protein motifs as a basis for novel peptide-based antibacterial therapeutics: a computational survey

    PubMed Central

    Ruhanen, Heini; Hurley, Daniel; Ghosh, Ambarnil; O'Brien, Kevin T.; Johnston, Catrióna R.; Shields, Denis C.

    2014-01-01

    Short linear motifs (SLiMs) are functional stretches of protein sequence that are of crucial importance for numerous biological processes by mediating protein–protein interactions. These motifs often comprise peptides of less than 10 amino acids that modulate protein–protein interactions. While well-characterized in eukaryotic intracellular signaling, their role in prokaryotic signaling is less well-understood. We surveyed the distribution of known motifs in prokaryotic extracellular and virulence proteins across a range of bacterial species and conducted searches for novel motifs in virulence proteins. Many known motifs in virulence effector proteins mimic eukaryotic motifs and enable the pathogen to control the intracellular processes of their hosts. Novel motifs were detected by finding those that had evolved independently in three or more unrelated virulence proteins. The search returned several significantly over-represented linear motifs of which some were known motifs and others are novel candidates with potential roles in bacterial pathogenesis. A putative C-terminal G[AG].$ motif found in type IV secretion system proteins was among the most significant detected. A KK$ motif that has been previously identified in a plasminogen-binding protein, was demonstrated to be enriched across a number of adhesion and lipoproteins. While there is some potential to develop peptide drugs against bacterial infection based on bacterial peptides that mimic host components, this could have unwanted effects on host signaling. Thus, novel SLiMs in virulence factors that do not mimic host components but are crucial for bacterial pathogenesis, such as the type IV secretion system, may be more useful to develop as leads for anti-microbial peptides or drugs. PMID:24478765

  13. Return of the GDI: the GoLoco motif in cell division.

    PubMed

    Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P

    2004-01-01

    The GoLoco motif is a 19-amino-acid sequence with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor activity against G-alpha subunits of the adenylyl-cyclase-inhibitory subclass. The GoLoco motif is present as an independent element within multidomain signaling regulators, such as Loco, RGS12, RGS14, and Rap1GAP, as well as in tandem arrays in proteins, such as AGS3, G18, LGN, Pcp-2/L7, and Partner of Inscuteable (Pins/Rapsynoid). Here we discuss the biochemical mechanisms of GoLoco motif action on G-alpha subunits in light of the recent crystal structure of G-alpha-i1 bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif. Currently, there is sparse evidence for GoLoco motif regulation of canonical G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Rather, studies of asymmetric cell division in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as mammalian mitosis, implicate GoLoco proteins, such as Pins, GPR-1/GPR-2, LGN, and RGS14, in mitotic spindle organization and force generation. We discuss potential mechanisms by which GoLoco/Galpha complexes might modulate spindle dynamics. PMID:15189163

  14. A Conserved Motif Provides Binding Specificity to the PP2A-B56 Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Emil Peter Thrane; Kruse, Thomas; Davey, Norman E; López-Méndez, Blanca; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Montoya, Guillermo; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-08-18

    Dynamic protein phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism regulating biological processes in all organisms. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the main source of phosphatase activity in the cell, but the molecular details of substrate recognition are unknown. Here, we report that a conserved surface-exposed pocket on PP2A regulatory B56 subunits binds to a consensus sequence on interacting proteins, which we term the LxxIxE motif. The composition of the motif modulates the affinity for B56, which in turn determines the phosphorylation status of associated substrates. Phosphorylation of amino acid residues within the motif increases B56 binding, allowing integration of kinase and phosphatase activity. We identify conserved LxxIxE motifs in essential proteins throughout the eukaryotic domain of life and in human viruses, suggesting that the motifs are required for basic cellular function. Our study provides a molecular description of PP2A binding specificity with broad implications for understanding signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:27453045

  15. Phage randomization in a charybdotoxin scaffold leads to CD4-mimetic recognition motifs that bind HIV-1 envelope through non-aromatic sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Dowd, C S; Zhang, W; Chaiken, I M

    2001-06-01

    Binding of HIV-1 gp120 to T-cell receptor CD4 initiates conformational changes in the viral envelope that trigger viral entry into host cells. Phage epitope randomization of a beta-turn loop of a charybdotoxin-based miniprotein scaffold was used to identify peptides that can bind gp120 and block the gp120-CD4 interaction. We describe here the display of the charybdotoxin scaffold on the filamentous phage fUSE5, its use to construct a beta-turn library, and miniprotein sequences identified through library panning with immobilized Env gp120. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) identified high-frequency phage selectants for which specific gp120 binding was competed by sCD4. Several of these selectants contain hydrophobic residues in place of the Phe that occurs in the gp120-binding beta-turns of both CD4 and previously identified scorpion toxin CD4 mimetics. One of these selectants, denoted TXM[24GQTL27], contains GQTL in place of the CD4 beta-turn sequence 40QGSF43. TXM[24GQTL27] peptide was prepared using solid-phase chemical synthesis, its binding to gp120 demonstrated by optical biosensor kinetics analysis and its affinity for the CD4 binding site of gp120 confirmed by competition ELISA. The results demonstrate that aromatic-less loop-containing CD4 recognition mimetics can be formed with detectable envelope protein binding within a beta-turn of the charybdotoxin miniprotein scaffold. The results of this work establish a methodology for phage display of a charybdotoxin miniprotein scaffold and point to the potential value of phage-based epitope randomization of this miniprotein for identifying novel CD4 mimetics. The latter are potentially useful in deconvoluting structural determinants of CD4-HIV envelope recognition and possibly in designing antagonists of viral entry. PMID:11437954

  16. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  17. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  18. Pressure-dependent formation of i-motif and G-quadruplex DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Sugimoto, N

    2015-12-14

    Pressure is an important physical stimulus that can influence the fate of cells by causing structural changes in biomolecules such as DNA. We investigated the effect of high pressure on the folding of duplex, DNA i-motif, and G-quadruplex (G4) structures; the non-canonical structures may be modulators of expression of genes involved in cancer progression. The i-motif structure was stabilized by high pressure, whereas the G4 structure was destabilized. The melting temperature of an intramolecular i-motif formed by 5'-dCGG(CCT)10CGG-3' increased from 38.8 °C at atmospheric pressure to 61.5 °C at 400 MPa. This effect was also observed in the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, a crowding agent. In the presence of 40 wt% ethylene glycol, the G4 structure was less destabilized than in the absence of the crowding agent. P-T stability diagrams of duplex DNA with a telomeric sequence indicated that the duplex is more stable than G4 and i-motif structures under low pressure, but the i-motif dominates the structural composition under high pressure. Under crowding conditions, the P-T diagrams indicated that the duplex does not form under high pressure, and i-motif and G4 structures dominate. Our findings imply that temperature regulates the formation of the duplex structure, whereas pressure triggers the formation of non-canonical DNA structures like i-motif and G4. These results suggest that pressure impacts the function of nucleic acids by stabilizing non-canonical structures; this may be relevant to deep sea organisms and during evolution under prebiotic conditions. PMID:26387909

  19. Amino acid binding by the class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: role for a conserved proline in the signature sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Burbaum, J. J.; Schimmel, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although partial or complete three-dimensional structures are known for three Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the amino acid-binding sites in these proteins remain poorly characterized. To explore the methionine binding site of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase, we chose to study a specific, randomly generated methionine auxotroph that contains a mutant methionyl-tRNA synthetase whose defect is manifested in an elevated Km for methionine (Barker, D.G., Ebel, J.-P., Jakes, R.C., & Bruton, C.J., 1982, Eur. J. Biochem. 127, 449-457), and employed the polymerase chain reaction to sequence this mutant synthetase directly. We identified a Pro 14 to Ser replacement (P14S), which accounts for a greater than 300-fold elevation in Km for methionine and has little effect on either the Km for ATP or the kcat of the amino acid activation reaction. This mutation destabilizes the protein in vivo, which may partly account for the observed auxotrophy. The altered proline is found in the "signature sequence" of the Class I synthetases and is conserved. This sequence motif is 1 of 2 found in the 10 Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and, in the known structures, it is in the nucleotide-binding fold as part of a loop between the end of a beta-strand and the start of an alpha-helix. The phenotype of the mutant and the stability and affinity for methionine of the wild-type and mutant enzymes are influenced by the amino acid that is 25 residues beyond the C-terminus of the signature sequence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1304356

  20. Discovering short linear protein motif based on selective training of profile hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Gu, Hong

    2015-07-21

    Short linear motifs (SLiMs) in proteins are relatively conservative sequence patterns within disordered regions of proteins, typically 3-10 amino acids in length. They play an important role in mediating protein-protein interactions. Discovering SLiMs by computational methods has attracted more and more attention, most of which were based on regular expressions and profiles. In this paper, a de novo motif discovery method was proposed based on profile hidden Markov models (HMMs), which can not only provide the emission probabilities of amino acids in the defined positions of SLiMs, but also model the undefined positions. We adopted the ordered region masking and the relative local conservation (RLC) masking to improve the signal to noise ratio of the query sequences while applying evolutionary weighting to make the important sequences in evolutionary process get more attention by the selective training of profile HMMs. The experimental results show that our method and the profile-based method returned different subsets within a SLiMs dataset, and the performance of the two approaches are equivalent on a more realistic discovery dataset. Profile HMM-based motif discovery methods complement the existing methods and provide another way for SLiMs analysis. PMID:25791288

  1. Piriform Spider Silk Sequences Reveal Unique Repetitive Elements

    PubMed Central

    Perry, David J.; Bittencourt, Daniela; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Rech, Elibio L.; Lewis, Randolph V.

    2010-01-01

    Orb-weaving spider silk fibers are assembled from very large, highly repetitive proteins. The repeated segments contain, in turn, short, simple repetitive amino acid motifs that account for the physical and mechanical properties of the assembled fiber. Of the six orb-weaver silk fibroins, the piriform silk that makes the attachment discs, which lashes the joints of the web and attaches dragline silk to surfaces has not been previously characterized. Piriform silk protein cDNAs were isolated from phage libraries of three species, A. trifasciata, N. clavipes, and N. cruentata. The deduced amino acid sequences from these genes revealed two new repetitive motifs: an alternating proline motif where every other amino acid is proline, and a glutamine-rich motif of 6 to 8 amino acids. Similar to other spider silk proteins, the repeated segments are large (>200 amino acids) and highly homogenized within a species. There is also substantial sequence similarity across the genes from the three species with particular conservation of the repetitive motifs. Northern blot analysis revealed that the messenger RNA is larger than 11kb and is expressed exclusively in the piriform glands of the spider. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal regions of the new proteins with published spidroins robustly shows that the pirifom sequences form an ortholog group. PMID:20954740

  2. Conservation of Shannon's redundancy for proteins. [information theory applied to amino acid sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts of information theory are applied to examine various proteins in terms of their redundancy in natural originators such as animals and plants. The Monte Carlo method is used to derive information parameters for random protein sequences. Real protein sequence parameters are compared with the standard parameters of protein sequences having a specific length. The tendency of a chain to contain some amino acids more frequently than others and the tendency of a chain to contain certain amino acid pairs more frequently than other pairs are used as randomness measures of individual protein sequences. Non-periodic proteins are generally found to have random Shannon redundancies except in cases of constraints due to short chain length and genetic codes. Redundant characteristics of highly periodic proteins are discussed. A degree of periodicity parameter is derived.

  3. One-step catalytic asymmetric synthesis of all-syn deoxypropionate motif from propylene: Total synthesis of (2R,4R,6R,8R)-2,4,6,8-tetramethyldecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yusuke; Murayama, Toshiki; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2016-03-15

    In nature, many complex structures are assembled from simple molecules by a series of tailored enzyme-catalyzed reactions. One representative example is the deoxypropionate motif, an alternately methylated alkyl chain containing multiple stereogenic centers, which is biosynthesized by a series of enzymatic reactions from simple building blocks. In organic synthesis, however, the majority of the reported routes require the syntheses of complex building blocks. Furthermore, multistep reactions with individual purifications are required at each elongation. Here we show the construction of the deoxypropionate structure from propylene in a single step to achieve a three-step synthesis of (2R,4R,6R,8R)-2,4,6,8-tetramethyldecanoic acid, a major acid component of a preen-gland wax of the graylag goose. To realize this strategy, we focused on the coordinative chain transfer polymerization and optimized the reaction condition to afford a stereo-controlled oligomer, which is contrastive to the other synthetic strategies developed to date that require 3-6 steps per unit, with unavoidable byproduct generation. Furthermore, multiple oligomers with different number of deoxypropionate units were isolated from one batch, showing application to the construction of library. Our strategy opens the door for facile synthetic routes toward other natural products that share the deoxypropionate motif. PMID:26908873

  4. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  5. Position Weight Matrix, Gibbs Sampler, and the Associated Significance Tests in Motif Characterization and Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xuhua

    2012-01-01

    Position weight matrix (PWM) is not only one of the most widely used bioinformatic methods, but also a key component in more advanced computational algorithms (e.g., Gibbs sampler) for characterizing and discovering motifs in nucleotide or amino acid sequences. However, few generally applicable statistical tests are available for evaluating the significance of site patterns, PWM, and PWM scores (PWMS) of putative motifs. Statistical significance tests of the PWM output, that is, site-specific frequencies, PWM itself, and PWMS, are in disparate sources and have never been collected in a single paper, with the consequence that many implementations of PWM do not include any significance test. Here I review PWM-based methods used in motif characterization and prediction (including a detailed illustration of the Gibbs sampler for de novo motif discovery), present statistical and probabilistic rationales behind statistical significance tests relevant to PWM, and illustrate their application with real data. The multiple comparison problem associated with the test of site-specific frequencies is best handled by false discovery rate methods. The test of PWM, due to the use of pseudocounts, is best done by resampling methods. The test of individual PWMS for each sequence segment should be based on the extreme value distribution. PMID:24278755

  6. Identification of sequence–structure RNA binding motifs for SELEX-derived aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hoinka, Jan; Zotenko, Elena; Friedman, Adam; Sauna, Zuben E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX) represents a state-of-the-art technology to isolate single-stranded (ribo)nucleic acid fragments, named aptamers, which bind to a molecule (or molecules) of interest via specific structural regions induced by their sequence-dependent fold. This powerful method has applications in designing protein inhibitors, molecular detection systems, therapeutic drugs and antibody replacement among others. However, full understanding and consequently optimal utilization of the process has lagged behind its wide application due to the lack of dedicated computational approaches. At the same time, the combination of SELEX with novel sequencing technologies is beginning to provide the data that will allow the examination of a variety of properties of the selection process. Results: To close this gap we developed, Aptamotif, a computational method for the identification of sequence–structure motifs in SELEX-derived aptamers. To increase the chances of identifying functional motifs, Aptamotif uses an ensemble-based approach. We validated the method using two published aptamer datasets containing experimentally determined motifs of increasing complexity. We were able to recreate the author's findings to a high degree, thus proving the capability of our approach to identify binding motifs in SELEX data. Additionally, using our new experimental dataset, we illustrate the application of Aptamotif to elucidate several properties of the selection process. Contact: przytyck@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, Zuben.Sauna@fda.hhs.gov PMID:22689764

  7. Protein location prediction using atomic composition and global features of the amino acid sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cherian, Betsy Sheena; Nair, Achuthsankar S.

    2010-01-22

    Subcellular location of protein is constructive information in determining its function, screening for drug candidates, vaccine design, annotation of gene products and in selecting relevant proteins for further studies. Computational prediction of subcellular localization deals with predicting the location of a protein from its amino acid sequence. For a computational localization prediction method to be more accurate, it should exploit all possible relevant biological features that contribute to the subcellular localization. In this work, we extracted the biological features from the full length protein sequence to incorporate more biological information. A new biological feature, distribution of atomic composition is effectively used with, multiple physiochemical properties, amino acid composition, three part amino acid composition, and sequence similarity for predicting the subcellular location of the protein. Support Vector Machines are designed for four modules and prediction is made by a weighted voting system. Our system makes prediction with an accuracy of 100, 82.47, 88.81 for self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent data test respectively. Our results provide evidence that the prediction based on the biological features derived from the full length amino acid sequence gives better accuracy than those derived from N-terminal alone. Considering the features as a distribution within the entire sequence will bring out underlying property distribution to a greater detail to enhance the prediction accuracy.

  8. Ab initio detection of fuzzy amino acid tandem repeats in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandem repetitions within protein amino acid sequences often correspond to regular secondary structures and form multi-repeat 3D assemblies of varied size and function. Developing internal repetitions is one of the evolutionary mechanisms that proteins employ to adapt their structure and function under evolutionary pressure. While there is keen interest in understanding such phenomena, detection of repeating structures based only on sequence analysis is considered an arduous task, since structure and function is often preserved even under considerable sequence divergence (fuzzy tandem repeats). Results In this paper we present PTRStalker, a new algorithm for ab-initio detection of fuzzy tandem repeats in protein amino acid sequences. In the reported results we show that by feeding PTRStalker with amino acid sequences from the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database we detect novel tandemly repeated structures not captured by other state-of-the-art tools. Experiments with membrane proteins indicate that PTRStalker can detect global symmetries in the primary structure which are then reflected in the tertiary structure. Conclusions PTRStalker is able to detect fuzzy tandem repeating structures in protein sequences, with performance beyond the current state-of-the art. Such a tool may be a valuable support to investigating protein structural properties when tertiary X-ray data is not available. PMID:22536906

  9. Multimodal phylogeny for taxonomy: integrating information from nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Bicego, Manuele; Dellaglio, Franco; Felis, Giovanna E

    2007-10-01

    The crucial role played by the analysis of microbial diversity in biotechnology-based innovations has increased the interest in the microbial taxonomy research area. Phylogenetic sequence analyses have contributed significantly to the advances in this field, also in the view of the large amount of sequence data collected in recent years. Phylogenetic analyses could be realized on the basis of protein-encoding nucleotide sequences or encoded amino acid molecules: these two mechanisms present different peculiarities, still starting from two alternative representations of the same information. This complementarity could be exploited to achieve a multimodal phylogenetic scheme that is able to integrate gene and protein information in order to realize a single final tree. This aspect has been poorly addressed in the literature. In this paper, we propose to integrate the two phylogenetic analyses using basic schemes derived from the multimodality fusion theory (or multiclassifier systems theory), a well-founded and rigorous branch for which its powerfulness has already been demonstrated in other pattern recognition contexts. The proposed approach could be applied to distance matrix-based phylogenetic techniques (like neighbor joining), resulting in a smart and fast method. The proposed methodology has been tested in a real case involving sequences of some species of lactic acid bacteria. With this dataset, both nucleotide sequence- and amino acid sequence-based phylogenetic analyses present some drawbacks, which are overcome with the multimodal analysis. PMID:17933011

  10. The amino-acid sequence of leghemoglobin component a from Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean).

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, P; Ellfolk, N

    1975-06-01

    1. Leghemoglobin component a from Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) was digested with trypsin; 15 tryptic peptides and free lysine were purified and the amino acid sequences of the peptides determined. 2. The internal order of the tryptic peptides was determined by the bridge peptides obtained from the thermolytic digest and the dilute acid hydrolyzate of kidney bean leghemoglobin a; 12 thermolytic peptides and two acid hydrolysis peptides were purified and the sequences were partially or completely determined. 3. The complete amino acid sequence of kidney bean leghemoglobin a is compared to that of leghemoglobin a from soybean (Glycine max) and to some animal globins. As regards sequence, the kidney bean globin has 79% identity with the soybean globin and 21% identity with human hemoglobin gamma-chain. Seven of the 14 amino acid residues common to most globins are found in the kidney bean globin. Trp-15 and Tyr-145 are evolutionarily conserved in this globin, which confirms the concept of a common origin of animal and plant globins. PMID:809270

  11. An evolutionary analysis of flightin reveals a conserved motif unique and widespread in Pancrustacea.

    PubMed

    Soto-Adames, Felipe N; Alvarez-Ortiz, Pedro; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2014-01-01

    Flightin is a thick filament protein that in Drosophila melanogaster is uniquely expressed in the asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFM). Flightin is required for the structure and function of the IFM and is indispensable for flight in Drosophila. Given the importance of flight acquisition in the evolutionary history of insects, here we study the phylogeny and distribution of flightin. Flightin was identified in 69 species of hexapods in classes Collembola (springtails), Protura, Diplura, and insect orders Thysanura (silverfish), Dictyoptera (roaches), Orthoptera (grasshoppers), Pthiraptera (lice), Hemiptera (true bugs), Coleoptera (beetles), Neuroptera (green lacewing), Hymenoptera (bees, ants, and wasps), Lepidoptera (moths), and Diptera (flies and mosquitoes). Flightin was also found in 14 species of crustaceans in orders Anostraca (water flea), Cladocera (brine shrimp), Isopoda (pill bugs), Amphipoda (scuds, sideswimmers), and Decapoda (lobsters, crabs, and shrimps). Flightin was not identified in representatives of chelicerates, myriapods, or any species outside Pancrustacea (Tetraconata, sensu Dohle). Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed a conserved region of 52 amino acids, referred herein as WYR, that is bound by strictly conserved tryptophan (W) and arginine (R) and an intervening sequence with a high content of tyrosines (Y). This motif has no homologs in GenBank or PROSITE and is unique to flightin and paraflightin, a putative flightin paralog identified in decapods. A third motif of unclear affinities to pancrustacean WYR was observed in chelicerates. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of the conserved motif suggests that paraflightin originated before the divergence of amphipods, isopods, and decapods. We conclude that flightin originated de novo in the ancestor of Pancrustacea > 500 MYA, well before the divergence of insects (~400 MYA) and the origin of flight (~325 MYA), and that its IFM-specific function in Drosophila is a more

  12. Coupling caspase cleavage and proteasomal degradation of proteins carrying PEST motif.

    PubMed

    Belizario, José E; Alves, Juliano; Garay-Malpartida, Miguel; Occhiucci, João Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    The degradation is critical to activation and deactivation of regulatory proteins involved in signaling pathways to cell growth, differentiation, stress responses and physiological cell death. Proteins carry domains and sequence motifs that function as prerequisite for their proteolysis by either individual proteases or the 26S multicomplex proteasomes. Two models for entry of substrates into the proteasomes have been considered. In one model, it is proposed that the ubiquitin chain attached to the protein serves as recognition element to drag them into the 19S regulatory particle, which promotes the unfolding required to its access into the 20S catalytic chamber. In second model, it is proposed that an unstructured tail located at amino or carboxyl terminus directly track proteins into the 26S/20S proteasomes. Caspases are cysteinyl aspartate proteases that control diverse signaling pathways, promoting the cleavage at one or two sites of hundreds of structural and regulatory protein substrates. Caspase cleavage sites are commonly found within PEST motifs, which are segments rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (D), aspartic acid (E) and serine (S) or threonine (T) residues. Considering that N- and C- terminal peptide carrying PEST motifs form disordered loops in the globular proteins after caspase cleavage, it is postulated here that these exposed termini serve as unstructured initiation site, coupling caspase cleavage and ubiquitin-proteasome dependent and independent degradation of short-lived proteins. This could explain the inherent susceptibility to proteolysis among proteins containing PEST motif. PMID:18537676

  13. Draft genome sequence of the docosahexaenoic acid producing thraustochytrid Aurantiochytrium sp. T66.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ertesvåg, Helga; Aasen, Inga Marie; Vadstein, Olav; Brautaset, Trygve; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan

    2016-06-01

    Thraustochytrids are unicellular, marine protists, and there is a growing industrial interest in these organisms, particularly because some species, including strains belonging to the genus Aurantiochytrium, accumulate high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Aurantiochytrium sp. T66 (ATCC PRA-276), with a size of 43 Mbp, and 11,683 predicted protein-coding sequences. The data has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/Genbank under the accession LNGJ00000000. The genome sequence will contribute new insight into DHA biosynthesis and regulation, providing a basis for metabolic engineering of thraustochytrids. PMID:27222814

  14. Conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase belonged to motif B′ methyltransferase family in Coffea arabica

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Matsuzaki, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Shiho; Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Kato, Misako

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: Trigonelline synthase catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline. We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene(s) from Coffea arabica. - Highlights: • Trigonelline is a major compound in coffee been same as caffeine is. • We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene. • Coffee trigonelline synthases are highly homologous with coffee caffeine synthases. • This study contributes the fully understanding of pyridine alkaloid metabolism. - Abstract: Trigonelline (N-methylnicotinate), a member of the pyridine alkaloids, accumulates in coffee beans along with caffeine. The biosynthetic pathway of trigonelline is not fully elucidated. While it is quite likely that the production of trigonelline from nicotinate is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase, as is caffeine synthase (CS), the enzyme(s) and gene(s) involved in N-methylation have not yet been characterized. It should be noted that, similar to caffeine, trigonelline accumulation is initiated during the development of coffee fruits. Interestingly, the expression profiles for two genes homologous to caffeine synthases were similar to the accumulation profile of trigonelline. We presumed that these two CS-homologous genes encoded trigonelline synthases. These genes were then expressed in Escherichiacoli, and the resulting recombinant enzymes that were obtained were characterized. Consequently, using the N-methyltransferase assay with S-adenosyl[methyl-{sup 14}C]methionine, it was confirmed that these recombinant enzymes catalyzed the conversion of nicotinate to trigonelline, coffee trigonelline synthases (termed CTgS1 and CTgS2) were highly identical (over 95% identity) to each other. The sequence homology between the CTgSs and coffee CCS1 was 82%. The pH-dependent activity curve of CTgS1 and CTgS2 revealed optimum activity at pH 7.5. Nicotinate was the specific methyl acceptor for CTgSs, and no activity was detected with any other nicotinate derivatives, or

  15. Transcriptome sequencing revealed the transcriptional organization at ribosome-mediated attenuation sites in Corynebacterium glutamicum and identified a novel attenuator involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Neshat, Armin; Mentz, Almut; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2014-11-20

    The Gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum belongs to the order Corynebacteriales and is used as a producer of amino acids at industrial scales. Due to its economic importance, gene expression and particularly the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis has been investigated extensively. Applying the high-resolution technique of transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), recently a vast amount of data has been generated that was used to comprehensively analyze the C. glutamicum transcriptome. By analyzing RNA-seq data from a small RNA cDNA library of C. glutamicum, short transcripts in the known transcriptional attenuators sites of the trp operon, the ilvBNC operon and the leuA gene were verified. Furthermore, whole transcriptome RNA-seq data were used to elucidate the transcriptional organization of these three amino acid biosynthesis operons. In addition, we discovered and analyzed the novel attenuator aroR, located upstream of the aroF gene (cg1129). The DAHP synthase encoded by aroF catalyzes the first step in aromatic amino acid synthesis. The AroR leader peptide contains the amino acid sequence motif F-Y-F, indicating a regulatory effect by phenylalanine and tyrosine. Analysis by real-time RT-PCR suggests that the attenuator regulates the transcription of aroF in dependence of the cellular amount of tRNA loaded with phenylalanine when comparing a phenylalanine-auxotrophic C. glutamicum mutant fed with limiting and excess amounts of a phenylalanine-containing dipeptide. Additionally, the very interesting finding was made that all analyzed attenuators are leaderless transcripts. PMID:24910972

  16. Protein chaperones Q8ZP25_SALTY from Salmonella typhimurium and HYAE_ECOLI from Escherichia coli exhibit thioredoxin-like structures despite lack of canonical thioredoxin active site sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Parish, David; Benach, Jordi; Liu, Goahua; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Su, Min; Bansal, Sonal; Prestegard, James H; Hunt, John; Montelione, Gaetano T; Szyperski, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    The structure of the 142-residue protein Q8ZP25_SALTY encoded in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was determined independently by NMR and X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the 140-residue protein HYAE_ECOLI encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli was determined by NMR. The two proteins belong to Pfam (Finn et al. 34:D247-D251, 2006) PF07449, which currently comprises 50 members, and belongs itself to the 'thioredoxin-like clan'. However, protein HYAE_ECOLI and the other proteins of Pfam PF07449 do not contain the canonical Cys-X-X-Cys active site sequence motif of thioredoxin. Protein HYAE_ECOLI was previously classified as a [NiFe] hydrogenase-1 specific chaperone interacting with the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptide. The structures presented here exhibit the expected thioredoxin-like fold and support the view that members of Pfam family PF07449 specifically interact with Tat signal peptides. PMID:19039680

  17. Protein Chaperones Q8ZP25_SALTY from Salmonella Typhimurium and HYAE_ECOLI from Escherichia coli Exhibit Thioredoxin-like Structures Despite Lack of Canonical Thioredoxin Active Site Sequence Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, D.; Benach, J; Liu, G; Singarapu, K; Xiao, R; Acton, T; Hunt, J; Montelione, G; Szyperski, T; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the 142-residue protein Q8ZP25 SALTY encoded in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was determined independently by NMR and X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the 140-residue protein HYAE ECOLI encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli was determined by NMR. The two proteins belong to Pfam (Finn et al. 34:D247-D251, 2006) PF07449, which currently comprises 50 members, and belongs itself to the 'thioredoxin-like clan'. However, protein HYAE ECOLI and the other proteins of Pfam PF07449 do not contain the canonical Cys-X-X-Cys active site sequence motif of thioredoxin. Protein HYAE ECOLI was previously classified as a (NiFe) hydrogenase-1 specific chaperone interacting with the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptide. The structures presented here exhibit the expected thioredoxin-like fold and support the view that members of Pfam family PF07449 specifically interact with Tat signal peptides.

  18. A classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of 301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes have been compared. A total of 291 sequences corresponding to 39 EC entries could be classified into 35 families. Only ten sequences (less than 5% of the sample) could not be assigned to any family. With the sequences available for this analysis, 18 families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number) and 17 were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). Implications on the folding characteristics and mechanism of action of these enzymes and on the evolution of carbohydrate metabolism are discussed. With the steady increase in sequence and structural data, it is suggested that the enzyme classification system should perhaps be revised. PMID:1747104

  19. New families in the classification of glycosyl hydrolases based on amino acid sequence similarities.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Bairoch, A

    1993-01-01

    301 glycosyl hydrolases and related enzymes corresponding to 39 EC entries of the I.U.B. classification system have been classified into 35 families on the basis of amino-acid-sequence similarities [Henrissat (1991) Biochem. J. 280, 309-316]. Approximately half of the families were found to be monospecific (containing only one EC number), whereas the other half were found to be polyspecific (containing at least two EC numbers). A > 60% increase in sequence data for glycosyl hydrolases (181 additional enzymes or enzyme domains sequences have since become available) allowed us to update the classification not only by the addition of more members to already identified families, but also by the finding of ten new families. On the basis of a comparison of 482 sequences corresponding to 52 EC entries, 45 families, out of which 22 are polyspecific, can now be defined. This classification has been implemented in the SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank. PMID:8352747

  20. Sequence-specific purification of nucleic acids by PNA-controlled hybrid selection.

    PubMed

    Orum, H; Nielsen, P E; Jørgensen, M; Larsson, C; Stanley, C; Koch, T

    1995-09-01

    Using an oligohistidine peptide nucleic acids (oligohistidine-PNA) chimera, we have developed a rapid hybrid selection method that allows efficient, sequence-specific purification of a target nucleic acid. The method exploits two fundamental features of PNA. First, that PNA binds with high affinity and specificity to its complementary nucleic acid. Second, that amino acids are easily attached to the PNA oligomer during synthesis. We show that a (His)6-PNA chimera exhibits strong binding to chelated Ni2+ ions without compromising its native PNA hybridization properties. We further show that these characteristics allow the (His)6-PNA/DNA complex to be purified by the well-established method of metal ion affinity chromatography using a Ni(2+)-NTA (nitrilotriactic acid) resin. Specificity and efficiency are the touchstones of any nucleic acid purification scheme. We show that the specificity of the (His)6-PNA selection approach is such that oligonucleotides differing by only a single nucleotide can be selectively purified. We also show that large RNAs (2224 nucleotides) can be captured with high efficiency by using multiple (His)6-PNA probes. PNA can hybridize to nucleic acids in low-salt concentrations that destabilize native nucleic acid structures. We demonstrate that this property of PNA can be utilized to purify an oligonucleotide in which the target sequence forms part of an intramolecular stem/loop structure. PMID:7495562

  1. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences. PMID:18397498

  2. Differences in local genomic context of bound and unbound motifs

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Loren; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Landsman, David

    2012-01-01

    Understanding gene regulation is a major objective in molecular biology research. Frequently, transcription is driven by transcription factors (TFs) that bind to specific DNA sequences. These motifs are usually short and degenerate, rendering the likelihood of multiple copies occurring throughout the genome due to random chance as high. Despite this, TFs only bind to a small subset of sites, thus prompting our investigation into the differences between motifs that are bound by TFs and those that remain unbound. Here we constructed vectors representing various chromatin- and sequence-based features for a published set of bound and unbound motifs representing nine TFs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a machine learning approach, we identified a set of features that can be used to discriminate between bound and unbound motifs. We also discovered that some TFs bind most or all of their strong motifs in intergenic regions. Our data demonstrate that local sequence context can be strikingly different around motifs that are bound compared to motifs that are unbound. We concluded that there are multiple combinations of genomic features that characterize bound or unbound motifs. PMID:22692006

  3. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  4. Sequence motifs of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2) determining progelatinase A (proMMP-2) binding and activation by membrane-type metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP).

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Joanna R; Thompkins, Philip B; Lee, Meng H; Hutton, Mike; Soloway, Paul; Edwards, Dylan R; Murphy, Gillian; Knäuper, Vera

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental cellular processes including angiogenesis and cell migration require a proteolytic cascade driven by interactions of membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) and progelatinase A (proMMP-2) that are dependent on the presence of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2). There are unique interactions between TIMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which we have previously defined, and here we identify TIMP-2 sequence motifs specific for proMMP-2 binding in the context of its activation by MT1-MMP. A TIMP-2 mutant encoding the C-terminal domain of TIMP-4 showed loss of proMMP-2 activation, indicating that the C-terminal domain of TIMP-2 is important in establishing the trimolecular complex between MT1-MMP, TIMP-2 and proMMP-2. This was confirmed by analysis of a TIMP-4 mutant encoding the C-terminal domain of TIMP-2, which formed a trimolecular complex and promoted proMMP-2 processing to the intermediate form. Mutants encoding TIMP-4 from Cys(1) to Leu(185) and partial tail sequence of TIMP-2 showed some gain of activating capability relative to TIMP-4. The identified residues were subsequently mutated in TIMP-2 (E(192)-D(193) to I(192)-Q(193)) and this inhibitor showed a significantly reduced ability to facilitate proMMP-2 processing by MT1-MMP. Furthermore, the tail-deletion mutant Delta(186-194)TIMP-2 was completely incapable of promoting proMMP-2 activation by MT1-MMP. Thus the C-terminal tail residues of TIMP-2 are important determinants for stable trimolecular complex formation between TIMP-2, proMMP-2 and MT1-MMP and play an important role in MT1-MMP-mediated processing to the intermediate and final active forms of MMP-2 at the cell surface. PMID:12630911

  5. Using the Gibbs Motif Sampler for Phylogenetic Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, William; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann; Lawrence, Charles

    2007-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler (Gibbs) (1) is a software package used to predict conserved elements in biopolymer sequences. While the software can be used to locate conserved motifs in protein sequences, its most common use is the prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in promoters upstream of gene sequences. We will describe approaches that use Gibbs to locate TFBSs in a collection of orthologous nucleotide sequences, i.e. phylogenetic footprinting. To illustrate this technique, we present examples that use Gibbs to detect binding sites for the transcription factor LexA in orthologous sequence data from representative species belonging to two different proteobacterial divisions.

  6. The position of the Gly-xxx-Gly motif in transmembrane segments modulates dimer affinity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2006-12-01

    Although the intrinsic low solubility of membrane proteins presents challenges to their high-resolution structure determination, insight into the amino acid sequence features and forces that stabilize their folds has been provided through study of sequence-dependent helix-helix interactions between single transmembrane (TM) helices. While the stability of helix-helix partnerships mediated by the Gly-xxx-Gly (GG4) motif is known to be generally modulated by distal interfacial residues, it has not been established whether the position of this motif, with respect to the ends of a given TM segment, affects dimer affinity. Here we examine the relationship between motif position and affinity in the homodimers of 2 single-spanning membrane protein TM sequences: glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 coat protein (MCP). Using the TOXCAT assay for dimer affinity on a series of GpA and MCP TM segments that have been modified with either 4 Leu residues at each end or with 8 Leu residues at the N-terminal end, we show that in each protein, centrally located GG4 motifs are capable of stronger helix-helix interactions than those proximal to TM helix ends, even when surrounding interfacial residues are maintained. The relative importance of GG4 motifs in stabilizing helix-helix interactions therefore must be considered not only in its specific residue context but also in terms of the location of the interactive surface relative to the N and C termini of alpha-helical TM segments. PMID:17215886

  7. [Personal motif in art].

    PubMed

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy. PMID:26202617

  8. ET-Motif: Solving the Exact (l, d)-Planted Motif Problem Using Error Tree Structure.

    PubMed

    Al-Okaily, Anas; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2016-07-01

    Motif finding is an important and a challenging problem in many biological applications such as discovering promoters, enhancers, locus control regions, transcription factors, and more. The (l, d)-planted motif search, PMS, is one of several variations of the problem. In this problem, there are n given sequences over alphabets of size [Formula: see text], each of length m, and two given integers l and d. The problem is to find a motif m of length l, where in each sequence there is at least an l-mer at a Hamming distance of [Formula: see text] of m. In this article, we propose ET-Motif, an algorithm that can solve the PMS problem in [Formula: see text] time and [Formula: see text] space. The time bound can be further reduced by a factor of m with [Formula: see text] space. In case the suffix tree that is built for the input sequences is balanced, the problem can be solved in [Formula: see text] time and [Formula: see text] space. Similarly, the time bound can be reduced by a factor of m using [Formula: see text] space. Moreover, the variations of the problem, namely the edit distance PMS and edited PMS (Quorum), can be solved using ET-Motif with simple modifications but upper bands of space and time. For edit distance PMS, the time and space bounds will be increased by [Formula: see text], while for edited PMS the increase will be of [Formula: see text] in the time bound. PMID:27152692

  9. Amino acid sequence of a vitamin K-dependent Ca2+-binding peptide from bovine prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Howard, J B; Fausch, M D

    1975-08-10

    The amino acid sequence of a 31-residue peptide from bovine prothrombin has been determined. This peptide has been shown to contain the vitamin K-dependent modification required for Ca2+ binding (Nelsestuen, G. L., and Suttie, J. W. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 3366-3370) and the modified amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Nelsestuen, G. L., Zytkovicz, T., and Howard, J. B. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 6347-6350). The peptide was shown to correspond to residues 12 to 42 of prothrombin. PMID:807581

  10. Amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Janet C.; Waley, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    1. The nature of the subunits in rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase has been investigated. 2. Amino acid analyses show that there are five cysteine residues and two methionine residues/subunit. 3. The amino acid sequences around the cysteine residues have been determined; these account for about 75 residues. 4. Cleavage at the methionine residues with cyanogen bromide gave three fragments. 5. These results show that the subunits correspond to polypeptide chains, containing about 230 amino acid residues. The chains in triose phosphate isomerase seem to be shorter than those of other glycolytic enzymes. PMID:5165707

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of the Mu heavy chain of a human IgM immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Putnam, F W; Florent, G; Paul, C; Shinoda, T; Shimizu, A

    1973-10-19

    The amino acid sequence of the micro, chain of a human IgM immunoglobulin, including the location of all disulfide bridges and oligosaccharides, has been determined. The homology of the constant regions of immunoglobulin micro, gamma, alpha, and epsilon heavy chains reveals evolutionary relationships and suggests that two genes code for each heavy chain. PMID:4742735

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Butyric Acid Producer Clostridium tyrobutyricum Strain CIP I-776 (IFP923)

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Benjamin; Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CIP I-776 (IFP923), an efficient producer of butyric acid. The genome consists of a single chromosome of 3.19 Mb and provides useful data concerning the metabolic capacities of the strain. PMID:26941139

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Perfluorooctane Acid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chongjian; Peng, Qingjing; Peng, Qingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1, isolated from perfluorinated compound-contaminated soil, has the ability to degrade perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) compound. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the PFOA-degrading bacterium P. parafulva YAB-1. The data provide the basis to investigate the molecular mechanism of PFOA metabolism. PMID:26337877

  14. The amino acid sequence of cytochrome c-555 from the methane-oxidizing bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P; Dalton, H; Meyer, T E; Bartsch, R G; Kamen, M D

    1986-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the cytochrome c-555 from the obligate methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus strain Bath (N.C.I.B. 11132) was determined. It is a single polypeptide chain of 96 residues, binding a haem group through the cysteine residues at positions 19 and 22, and the only methionine residue is a position 59. The sequence does not closely resemble that of any other cytochrome c that has yet been characterized. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence of the protein has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50131 (12 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies are available on prepayment. PMID:3006666

  15. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Guo, Manhong; Vidhyasagar, Venkatasubramanian; Talwar, Tanu; Wu, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI). The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ) with an invariant glutamine (Q) residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11) gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase. PMID:26474416

  16. A tobacco bZip transcription activator (TAF-1) binds to a G-box-like motif conserved in plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Oeda, K; Salinas, J; Chua, N H

    1991-01-01

    Tobacco nuclear extract contains a factor that binds specifically to the motif I sequence (5'-GTACGTGGCG-3') conserved among rice rab genes and cotton lea genes. We isolated from a tobacco cDNA expression library, a partial cDNA clone encoding a truncated derivative of a protein designated as TAF-1. The truncated TAF-1 (Mr = 26,000) contains an acidic region at its N-terminus and a bZip motif at its C-terminus. Using a panel of motif I mutants as probes, we showed that the truncated TAF-1 and the tobacco nuclear factor for motif I have similar, it not identical, binding specificities. In particular, both show high-affinity binding to the perfect palindrome 5'-GCCACGTGGC-3' which is also known as the G-box motif. TAF-1 mRNA is highly expressed in root, but the level is at least 10 times lower in stem and leaf. Consistent with this observation, we found that a motif I tetramer, when fused to the -90 derivative of the CaMV 35S promoter, is inactive in leaf of transgenic tobacco. The activity, however, can be elevated by transient expression of the truncated TAF-1. We conclude from these results that TAF-1 can bind to the G-box and related motifs and that it functions as a transcription activator. Images PMID:2050116

  17. Allelic polymorphism in arabian camel ribonuclease and the amino acid sequence of bactrian camel ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Welling, G W; Mulder, H; Beintema, J J

    1976-04-01

    Pancreatic ribonucleases from several species (whitetail deer, roe deer, guinea pig, and arabian camel) exhibit more than one amino acid at particular positions in their amino acid sequences. Since these enzymes were isolated from pooled pancreas, the origin of this heterogeneity is not clear. The pancreatic ribonucleases from 11 individual arabian camels (Camelus dromedarius) have been investigated with respect to the lysine-glutamine heterogeneity at position 103 (Welling et al., 1975). Six ribonucleases showed only one basic band and five showed two bands after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting a gene frequency of about 0.75 for the Lys gene and about 0.25 for the Gln gene. The amino acid sequence of bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) ribonuclease isolated from individual pancreatic tissue was determined and compared with that of arabian camel ribonuclease. The only difference was observed at position 103. In the ribonucleases from two unrelated bactrian camels, only glutamine was observed at that position. PMID:962846

  18. Use of a structural alphabet to find compatible folds for amino acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Sanejouand, Yves-Henri; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Offmann, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The structural annotation of proteins with no detectable homologs of known 3D structure identified using sequence-search methods is a major challenge today. We propose an original method that computes the conditional probabilities for the amino-acid sequence of a protein to fit to known protein 3D structures using a structural alphabet, known as “Protein Blocks” (PBs). PBs constitute a library of 16 local structural prototypes that approximate every part of protein backbone structures. It is used to encode 3D protein structures into 1D PB sequences and to capture sequence to structure relationships. Our method relies on amino acid occurrence matrices, one for each PB, to score global and local threading of query amino acid sequences to protein folds encoded into PB sequences. It does not use any information from residue contacts or sequence-search methods or explicit incorporation of hydrophobic effect. The performance of the method was assessed with independent test datasets derived from SCOP 1.75A. With a Z-score cutoff that achieved 95% specificity (i.e., less than 5% false positives), global and local threading showed sensitivity of 64.1% and 34.2%, respectively. We further tested its performance on 57 difficult CASP10 targets that had no known homologs in PDB: 38 compatible templates were identified by our approach and 66% of these hits yielded correctly predicted structures. This method scales-up well and offers promising perspectives for structural annotations at genomic level. It has been implemented in the form of a web-server that is freely available at http://www.bo-protscience.fr/forsa. PMID:25297700

  19. Use of a structural alphabet to find compatible folds for amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Sanejouand, Yves-Henri; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Offmann, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The structural annotation of proteins with no detectable homologs of known 3D structure identified using sequence-search methods is a major challenge today. We propose an original method that computes the conditional probabilities for the amino-acid sequence of a protein to fit to known protein 3D structures using a structural alphabet, known as "Protein Blocks" (PBs). PBs constitute a library of 16 local structural prototypes that approximate every part of protein backbone structures. It is used to encode 3D protein structures into 1D PB sequences and to capture sequence to structure relationships. Our method relies on amino acid occurrence matrices, one for each PB, to score global and local threading of query amino acid sequences to protein folds encoded into PB sequences. It does not use any information from residue contacts or sequence-search methods or explicit incorporation of hydrophobic effect. The performance of the method was assessed with independent test datasets derived from SCOP 1.75A. With a Z-score cutoff that achieved 95% specificity (i.e., less than 5% false positives), global and local threading showed sensitivity of 64.1% and 34.2%, respectively. We further tested its performance on 57 difficult CASP10 targets that had no known homologs in PDB: 38 compatible templates were identified by our approach and 66% of these hits yielded correctly predicted structures. This method scales-up well and offers promising perspectives for structural annotations at genomic level. It has been implemented in the form of a web-server that is freely available at http://www.bo-protscience.fr/forsa. PMID:25297700

  20. Software scripts for quality checking of high-throughput nucleic acid sequencers.

    PubMed

    Lazo, G R; Tong, J; Miller, R; Hsia, C; Rausch, C; Kang, Y; Anderson, O D

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a graphical interface to allow the researcher to view and assess the quality of sequencing results using a series of program scripts developed to process data generated by automated sequencers. The scripts are written in Perl programming language and are executable under the cgibin directory of a Web server environment. The scripts direct nucleic acid sequencing trace file data output from automated sequencers to be analyzed by the phred molecular biology program and are displayed as graphical hypertext mark-up language (HTML) pages. The scripts are mainly designed to handle 96-well microtiter dish samples, but the scripts are also able to read data from 384-well microtiter dishes 96 samples at a time. The scripts may be customized for different laboratory environments and computer configurations. Web links to the sources and discussion page are provided. PMID:11414222

  1. Accumulation of extracellular proteins bearing unique proline-rich motifs in intercellular spaces of the legume nodule parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Sherrier, D J; Taylor, G S; Silverstein, K A T; Gonzales, M B; VandenBosch, K A

    2005-04-01

    Nodulins encoding repetitive proline-rich cell wall proteins (PRPs) are induced during early interactions with rhizobia, suggesting a massive restructuring of the plant extracellular matrix during infection and nodulation. However, the proteins corresponding to these gene products have not been isolated or characterized, nor have cell wall localizations been confirmed. Posttranslational modifications, conformation, and interactions with other wall polymers are difficult to predict on the basis of only the deduced amino acid sequence of PRPs. PsENOD2 is expressed in nodule parenchyma tissue during nodule organogenesis and encodes a protein with distinctive PRP motifs that are rich in glutamate and basic amino acids. A database search for the ENOD2 signature motifs indicates that similar proteins may have a limited phylogenetic distribution, as they are presently only known from legumes. To determine the ultrastructural location of the proteins, antibodies were raised against unique motifs from the predicted ENOD2 sequence. The antibodies recognized nodule-specific proteins in pea (Pisum sativum), with a major band detected at 110 kDa, representing a subset of PRPs from nodules. The protein was detected specifically in organelles of the secretory pathway and intercellular spaces in the nodule parenchyma, but it was not abundant in primary walls. Similar proteins with an analogous distribution were detected in soybean (Glycine max). The use of polyclonal antibodies raised against signature motifs of extracellular matrix proteins thus appears to be an effective strategy to identify and isolate specific structural proteins for functional analysis. PMID:15868212

  2. Identification of a New Motif in Family B DNA Polymerases by Mutational Analyses of the Bacteriophage T4 DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Vincent; Hogg, Matthew; Reha-Krantz, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Structure-based protein sequence alignments of family B DNA polymerases revealed a conserved motif that is formed from interacting residues between loops from the N-terminal and palm domains and between the N-terminal loop and a conserved proline residue. The importance of the motif for function of the bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase was revealed by suppressor analysis. T4 DNA polymerases that form weak replicating complexes cannot replicate DNA when the dGTP pool is reduced. The conditional lethality provides the means to identify amino acid substitutions that restore replication activity under low dGTP conditions by either correcting the defect produced by the first amino acid substitution or by generally increasing the stability of polymerase complexes; the second type are global suppressors that can effectively counter the reduced stability caused by a variety of amino acid substitutions. Some amino acid substitutions that increase the stability of polymerase complexes produce a new phenotype - sensitivity to the antiviral drug phosphonoacetic acid. Amino acid substitutions that confer decreased ability to replicate DNA under low dGTP conditions or drug sensitivity were identified in the new motif, which suggests that the motif functions in regulating the stability of polymerase complexes. Additional suppressor analyses revealed an apparent network of interactions that link the new motif to the fingers domain and to two patches of conserved residues that bind DNA. The collection of mutant T4 DNA polymerases provides a foundation for future biochemical studies to determine how DNA polymerases remain stably associated with DNA while waiting for the next available dNTP, how DNA polymerases translocate, and the biochemical basis for sensitivity to antiviral drugs. PMID:20493878

  3. Ballast: A Ball-based Algorithm for Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    He, Lu; Vandin, Fabio; Pandurangan, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Structural motifs encapsulate local sequence-structure-function relationships characteristic of related proteins, enabling the prediction of functional characteristics of new proteins, providing molecular-level insights into how those functions are performed, and supporting the development of variants specifically maintaining or perturbing function in concert with other properties. Numerous computational methods have been developed to search through databases of structures for instances of specified motifs. However, it remains an open problem how best to leverage the local geometric and chemical constraints underlying structural motifs in order to develop motif-finding algorithms that are both theoretically and practically efficient. We present a simple, general, efficient approach, called Ballast (ball-based algorithm for structural motifs), to match given structural motifs to given structures. Ballast combines the best properties of previously developed methods, exploiting the composition and local geometry of a structural motif and its possible instances in order to effectively filter candidate matches. We show that on a wide range of motif-matching problems, Ballast efficiently and effectively finds good matches, and we provide theoretical insights into why it works well. By supporting generic measures of compositional and geometric similarity, Ballast provides a powerful substrate for the development of motif-matching algorithms. PMID:23383999

  4. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of cloned human and mouse preprocathepsin B cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S J; San Segundo, B; McCormick, M B; Steiner, D F

    1986-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a lysosomal thiol proteinase that may have additional extralysosomal functions. To further our investigations on the structure, mode of biosynthesis, and intracellular sorting of this enzyme, we have determined the complete coding sequences for human and mouse preprocathepsin B by using cDNA clones isolated from human hepatoma and kidney phage libraries. The nucleotide sequences predict that the primary structure of preprocathepsin B contains 339 amino acids organized as follows: a 17-residue NH2-terminal prepeptide sequence followed by a 62-residue propeptide region, 254 residues in mature (single chain) cathepsin B, and a 6-residue extension at the COOH terminus. A comparison of procathepsin B sequences from three species (human, mouse, and rat) reveals that the homology between the propeptides is relatively conserved with a minimum of 68% sequence identity. In particular, two conserved sequences in the propeptide that may be functionally significant include a potential glycosylation site and the presence of a single cysteine at position 59. Comparative analysis of the three sequences also suggests that processing of procathepsin B is a multistep process, during which enzymatically active intermediate forms may be generated. The availability of the cDNA clones will facilitate the identification of possible active or inactive intermediate processive forms as well as studies on the transcriptional regulation of the cathepsin B gene. PMID:3463996

  5. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization.

    PubMed

    Anahtar, Melis N; Bowman, Brittany A; Kwon, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  6. Efficient Nucleic Acid Extraction and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing for Bacterial Community Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Anahtar, Melis N.; Bowman, Brittany A.; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the role of microbial communities as critical modulators of human health and disease. High throughput sequencing technologies have allowed for the rapid and efficient characterization of bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequencing from a variety of sources. Although readily available tools for 16S rRNA sequence analysis have standardized computational workflows, sample processing for DNA extraction remains a continued source of variability across studies. Here we describe an efficient, robust, and cost effective method for extracting nucleic acid from swabs. We also delineate downstream methods for 16S rRNA gene sequencing, including generation of sequencing libraries, data quality control, and sequence analysis. The workflow can accommodate multiple samples types, including stool and swabs collected from a variety of anatomical locations and host species. Additionally, recovered DNA and RNA can be separated and used for other applications, including whole genome sequencing or RNA-seq. The method described allows for a common processing approach for multiple sample types and accommodates downstream analysis of genomic, metagenomic and transcriptional information. PMID:27168460

  7. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken]; SNL,

    2013-01-25

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. cWINNOWER Algorithm for Finding Fuzzy DNA Motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    The cWINNOWER algorithm detects fuzzy motifs in DNA sequences rich in protein-binding signals. A signal is defined as any short nucleotide pattern having up to d mutations differing from a motif of length l. The algorithm finds such motifs if multiple mutated copies of the motif (i.e., the signals) are present in the DNA sequence in sufficient abundance. The cWINNOWER algorithm substantially improves the sensitivity of the winnower method of Pevzner and Sze by imposing a consensus constraint, enabling it to detect much weaker signals. We studied the minimum number of detectable motifs qc as a function of sequence length N for random sequences. We found that qc increases linearly with N for a fast version of the algorithm based on counting three-member sub-cliques. Imposing consensus constraints reduces qc, by a factor of three in this case, which makes the algorithm dramatically more sensitive. Our most sensitive algorithm, which counts four-member sub-cliques, needs a minimum of only 13 signals to detect motifs in a sequence of length N = 12000 for (l,d) = (15,4).

  9. The amino acid sequence of ribonuclease U2 from Ustilago sphaerogena.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, S; Uchida, T

    1975-01-01

    1. RNAase (ribonuclease) U2, a purine-specific RNAase, was reduced, aminoethylated and hydrolysed with trypsin, chymotrypsin and thermolysin. On the basis of the analyses of the resulting peptides, the complete amino acid sequence of RNAase U2 was determined, 2. When the sequence was compared with the amino acid sequence of RNAase T1 (EC 3.1.4.8), the following regions were found to be similar in the two enzymes; Tyr-Pro-His-Gln-Tyr (38-42) in RNAase U2 and Tyr-Pro-His-Lys-Tyr (38-42) in RNAase T1, Glu-Phe-Pro-Leu-Val (61-65) in RNAase U2 and Glu-Trp-Pro-Ile-Leu (58-62) in RNAase T1, Asp-Arg-Val-Ile-Tyr-Gln (83-88) in RNAase U2 and Asp-Arg-Val-Phe-Asn (76-81) in RNAase T1 and Val-Thr-His-Thr-Gly-Ala (98-103) in RNAase U2 and Ile-Thr-His-Thr-Gly-Ala (90-95) in RNAase T1. All of the amino acid residues, histidine-40, glutamate-58, arginine-77 and histidine-92, which were found to play a crucial role in the biological activity of RNAase T1, were included in the regions cited here. 3. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequence of the sequence of the proteins has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50041 (33 PAGES) AT THE British Library (Lending Division)(formerly the National Lending Library for Science and Technology), Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1975), 145, 5. PMID:1156364

  10. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  11. Complete nucleic acid sequence of Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV) from India.

    PubMed

    Rai, Praveen; Safeena, Muhammed P; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2011-06-01

    Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) of shrimp, recently been classified as Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV). The complete nucleic acid sequence of PstDNV from India was obtained by cloning and sequencing of different DNA fragment of the virus. The genome organisation of PstDNV revealed that there were three major coding domains: a left ORF (NS1) of 2001 bp, a mid ORF (NS2) of 1092 bp and a right ORF (VP) of 990 bp. The complete genome and amino acid sequences of three proteins viz., NS1, NS2 and VP were compared with the genomes of the virus reported from Hawaii, China and Mexico and with partial sequence available from isolates from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis of shrimp, insect and vertebrate parvovirus sequences showed that the Indian PstDNV isolate is phylogenetically more closely related to one of the three isolates from Taiwan (AY355307), and two isolates (AY362547 and AY102034) from Thailand. PMID:21402111

  12. Human liver type pyruvate kinase: complete amino acid sequence and the expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tani, K; Fujii, H; Nagata, S; Miwa, S

    1988-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) has four isozymes (L, R, M1, M2) that are encoded by two different genes. Among these isozymes, abnormalities of liver (L)-type PK is considered to be associated with hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia in humans. We isolated and determined the full-length sequence of human L-type PK cDNA. The cDNA contains 1629 base pairs encoding 543 amino acids, 68 base pairs of 5'-noncoding sequence, and 734 base pairs of 3'-noncoding sequence. The similarity between human and rat L-type PK was 86.9% at the nucleotide sequence level and 92.4% at the amino acid sequence level. The full-length L-type PK cDNA was placed under the promoter of simian virus 40 and introduced into monkey COS cells. Human L-type PK activity was detected in the extract of COS cells by the classical PK electrophoresis method. Images PMID:3126495

  13. Human liver type pyruvate kinase: Complete amino acid sequence and the expression in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Kenzaburo; Nagata, Shigekazu ); Fujii, Hisaichi ); Miwa, Shiro )

    1988-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) has four isozymes (L, R, M{sub 1}, M{sub 2}) that are encoded by two different genes. Among these isozymes, abnormalities of liver (L)-type PK is considered to be associated with hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia in humans. The authors isolated and determined the full-length sequence of human L-type PK cDNA. The cDNA contains 1,629 base pairs encoding 543 amino acids, 68 base pairs of 5{prime}-noncoding sequence, and 734 base pairs of 3{prime}-noncoding sequence. The similarity between human and rat L-type PK was 86.9% at the nucleotide sequence level and 92.4% at the amino acid sequence level. The full-length L-type PK cDNA was placed under the promoter of simian virus 40 and introduced into monkey COS cells. Human L-type PK activity was detected in the extract of COS cells by the classical PK electrophoresis method.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKK(EE)), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKKEE), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  16. Molecular cytogenetics by polymerase catalyzed amplification or in situ labelling of specific nucleic acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bolund, L.; Brandt, C.; Hindkjaer, J.; Koch, J.; Koelvraa, S.; Pedersen, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) can be performed on isolated cells or chromosomes and the product can be analyzed by DNA technology or by FISH to test metaphases. The authors have good experiences analyzing aberrant chromosomes by FACS sorting, PCR with degenerated primers and painting of test metaphases with the PCR product. They also utilize polymerases for PRimed IN Situ labelling (PRINS) of specific nucleic acid sequences. In PRINS oligonucleotides are hybridized to their target sequences and labeled nucleotides are incorporated at the site of hybridization with the oligonucleotide as primer. PRINS may eventually allow the study of individual genes, gene expression and even somatic mutations (in mRNA) in single cells.

  17. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  18. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient. 2 figs.

  19. Method for high-volume sequencing of nucleic acids: random and directed priming with libraries of oligonucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William

    1995-04-18

    Random and directed priming methods for determining nucleotide sequences by enzymatic sequencing techniques, using libraries of primers of lengths 8, 9 or 10 bases, are disclosed. These methods permit direct sequencing of nucleic acids as large as 45,000 base pairs or larger without the necessity for subcloning. Individual primers are used repeatedly to prime sequence reactions in many different nucleic acid molecules. Libraries containing as few as 10,000 octamers, 14,200 nonamers, or 44,000 decamers would have the capacity to determine the sequence of almost any cosmid DNA. Random priming with a fixed set of primers from a smaller library can also be used to initiate the sequencing of individual nucleic acid molecules, with the sequence being completed by directed priming with primers from the library. In contrast to random cloning techniques, a combined random and directed priming strategy is far more efficient.

  20. Partial amino acid sequence of apolipoprotein(a) shows that it is homologous to plasminogen

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, D.L.; Fless, G.M.; Kohr, W.J.; McLean, J.W.; Xu, Q.T.; Miller, C.G.; Lawn, R.M.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) is a glycoprotein with M/sub r/ approx. 280,000 that is disulfide linked to apolipoprotein B in lipoprotein(a) particles. Elevated plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) are correlated with atherosclerosis. Partial amino acid sequence of apo(a) shows that it has striking homology to plasminogen. Plasminogen is a plasma serine protease zymogen that consists of five homologous and tandemly repeated domains called kringles and a trypsin-like protease domain. The amino-terminal sequence obtained for apo(a) is homologous to the beginning of kringle 4 but not the amino terminus of plasminogen. Apo(a) was subjected to limited proteolysis by trypsin or V8 protease, and fragments generated were isolated and sequenced. Sequences obtained from several of these fragments are highly (77-100%) homologous to plasminogen residues 391-421, which reside within kringle 4. Analysis of these internal apo(a) sequences revealed that apo(a) may contain at least two kringle 4-like domains. A sequence obtained from another tryptic fragment also shows homology to the end of kringle 4 and the beginning of kringle 5. Sequence data obtained from the two tryptic fragments shows homology with the protease domain of plasminogen. One of these sequences is homologous to the sequences surrounding the activation site of plasminogen. Plasminogen is activated by the cleavage of a specific arginine residue by urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator; however, the corresponding site in apo(a) is a serine that would not be cleaved by tissue plasminogen activator or urokinase. Using a plasmin-specific assay, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for lipoprotein(a) particles. These results suggest that apo(a) contains kringle-like domains and an inactive protease domain.

  1. CSTX-9, a toxic peptide from the spider Cupiennius salei: amino acid sequence, disulphide bridge pattern and comparison with other spider toxins containing the cystine knot structure.

    PubMed

    Schalle, J; Kämpfer, U; Schürch, S; Kuhn-Nentwig, L; Haeberli, S; Nentwig, W

    2001-09-01

    CSTX-9 (68 residues, 7530.9 Da) is one of the most abundant toxic polypeptides in the venom of the wandering spider Cupiennius salei. The amino acid sequence was determined by Edman degradation using reduced and alkylated CSTX-9 and peptides generated by cleavages with endoproteinase Asp-N and trypsin, respectively. Sequence comparison with CSTX-1, the most abundant and the most toxic polypeptide in the crude spider venom, revealed a high degree of similarity (53% identity). By means of limited proteolysis with immobilised trypsin and RP-HPLC, the cystine-containing peptides of CSTX-9 were isolated and the disulphide bridges were assigned by amino acid analysis, Edman degradation and nanospray tandem mass spectrometry. The four disulphide bonds present in CSTX-9 are arranged in the following pattern: 1-4, 2-5, 3-8 and 6-7 (Cys6-Cys21, Cys13-Cys30, Cys20-Cys48, Cys32-Cys46). Sequence comparison of CSTX-1 with CSTX-9 clearly indicates the same disulphide bridge pattern, which is also found in other spider polypeptide toxins, e.g. agatoxins (omega-AGA-IVA, omega-AGA-IVB, mu-AGA-I and mu-AGA-VI) from Agelenopsis aperta, SNX-325 from Segestria florentina and curtatoxins (CT-I, CT-II and CT-III) from Hololena curta. CSTX-1/CSTX-9 belong to the family of ion channel toxins containing the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif. CSTX-9, lacking the lysine-rich C-terminal tail of CSTX-1, exhibits a ninefold lower toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster than CSTX-1. This is in accordance with previous observations of CSTX-2a and CSTX-2b, two truncated forms of CSTX-1 which, like CSTX-9, also lack the C-terminal lysine-rich tail. PMID:11693532

  2. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  3. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I.

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  4. Identification and sequence analysis of pWcMBF8-1, a bacteriocin-encoding plasmid from the lactic acid bacterium Weissella confusa.

    PubMed

    Malik, Amarila; Sumayyah, Sumayyah; Yeh, Chia-Wen; Heng, Nicholas C K

    2016-04-01

    Members of the Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well-known for their beneficial properties as starter cultures and probiotics. Many LAB species produce ribosomally synthesized proteinaceous antibiotics (bacteriocins). Weissella confusa MBF8-1 is a strain isolated from a fermented soybean product that not only produces useful exopolysaccharides but also exhibits bacteriocin activity, which we call weissellicin MBF. Here, we show that bacteriocin production by W. confusa MBF8-1 is specified by a large plasmid, pWcMBF8-1. Plasmid pWcMBF8-1 (GenBank accession number KR350502), which was identified from the W. confusa MBF8-1 draft genome sequence, is 17 643 bp in length with a G + C content of 34.8% and contains 25 open reading frames (ORFs). Six ORFs constitute the weissellicin MBF locus, encoding three putative double-glycine-motif peptides (Bac1, Bac2, Bac3), an ABC transporter complex (BacTE) and a putative immunity protein (BacI). Two ORFs encode plasmid partitioning and mobilization proteins, suggesting that pWcMBF8-1 is transferable to other hosts. To the best of our knowledge, plasmid pWcMBF8-1 not only represents the first large Weissella plasmid to be sequenced but also the first to be associated with bacteriocin production in W. confusa. PMID:26976853

  5. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Waleń, Tomasz; Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-03-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx.

  6. The C-terminal portion of the cleaved HT motif is necessary and sufficient to mediate export of proteins from the malaria parasite into its host cell

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Sarah J; Cryar, Adam; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Haldar, Kasturi; Osborne, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    The malaria parasite exports proteins across its plasma membrane and a surrounding parasitophorous vacuole membrane, into its host erythrocyte. Most exported proteins contain a Host Targeting motif (HT motif) that targets them for export. In the parasite secretory pathway, the HT motif is cleaved by the protease plasmepsin V, but the role of the newly generated N-terminal sequence in protein export is unclear. Using a model protein that is cleaved by an exogenous viral protease, we show that the new N-terminal sequence, normally generated by plasmepsin V cleavage, is sufficient to target a protein for export, and that cleavage by plasmepsin V is not coupled directly to the transfer of a protein to the next component in the export pathway. Mutation of the fourth and fifth positions of the HT motif, as well as amino acids further downstream, block or affect the efficiency of protein export indicating that this region is necessary for efficient export. We also show that the fifth position of the HT motif is important for plasmepsin V cleavage. Our results indicate that plasmepsin V cleavage is required to generate a new N-terminal sequence that is necessary and sufficient to mediate protein export by the malaria parasite. PMID:23279267

  7. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  8. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  9. Self-sequencing of amino acids and origins of polyfunctional protocells.

    PubMed

    Fox, S W

    1984-01-01

    The primal role of the origins of proteins in molecular evolution is discussed. On the basis of this premise, the significance of the experimentally established self-sequencing of amino acids under simulated geological conditions is explained as due to the fact that the products are highly nonrandom and accordingly contain many kinds of information. When such thermal proteins are aggregated into laboratory protocells, an action that occurs readily, the resultant protocells also contain many kinds of information. Residue-by-residue order, enzymic activities, and lipid quality accordingly occur within each preparation of proteinoid (thermal protein). In this paper are reviewed briefly the phenomenon of self-sequencing of amino acids, its relationship to evolutionary processes, other significance of such self-ordering, and the experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells. PMID:6462684

  10. Self-Sequencing of Amino Acids and Origins of Polyfunctional Protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1984-12-01

    The primal role of the origins of proteins in molecular evolution is discussed. On the basis of this premise, the significance of the experimentally established self-sequencing of amino acids under simulated geological conditions is explained as due to the fact that the products are highly nonrandom and accordingly contain many kinds of information. When such thermal proteins are aggregated into laboratory protocells, an action that occurs readily, the resultant protocells also contain many kinds of information. Residue-by-residue order, enzymic activities, and lipid quality accordingly occur within each preparation of proteinoid (thermal protein). In this paper are reviewed briefly the phenomenon of self-sequencing of amino acids, its relationship to evolutionary processes, other significance of such self-ordering, and the experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells.

  11. Sequence of morphological transitions in two-dimensional pattern growth from aqueous ascorbic Acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, A S

    2002-08-12

    A sequence of morphological transitions in two-dimensional dehydration patterns of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid is observed with humidity as a control parameter. Change in morphology occurs due to humidity induced variation in the concentration of the metastable supersaturated solution phase formed after initial solvent evaporation. As percent humidity is varied from 40 to 80, patterns change from compact circular --> radial --> density modulated radial (a new morphology) --> density modulated circular --> density modulated dendritic (a new morphology) --> dense branching. PMID:12190528

  12. Self-sequencing of amino acids and origins of polyfunctional protocells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    The role of proteins in the origin of living things is discussed. It has been experimentally established that amino acids can sequence themselves under simulated geological conditions with highly nonrandom products which accordingly contain diverse information. Multiple copies of each type of macromolecule are formed, resulting in greater power for any protoenzymic molecule than would accrue from a single copy of each type. Thermal proteins are readily incorporated into laboratory protocells. The experimental evidence for original polyfunctional protocells is discussed.

  13. Snake venom. The amino acid sequence of protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J; Strydom, D J

    1980-12-01

    Protein A from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom comprises 81 amino acids, including ten half-cystine residues. The complete primary structures of protein A and its variant A' were elucidated. The sequences of proteins A and A', which differ in a single position, show no homology with various neurotoxins and non-neurotoxic proteins and represent a new type of elapid venom protein. PMID:7461607

  14. SPIC: A novel similarity metric for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs based on information contents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Discovering transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) is one of primary challenges to decipher complex gene regulatory networks encrypted in a genome. A set of short DNA sequences identified by a transcription factor (TF) is known as a motif, which can be expressed accurately in matrix form such as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) and a position frequency matrix. Very frequently, we need to query a motif in a database of motifs by seeking its similar motifs, merge similar TFBS motifs possibly identified by the same TF, separate irrelevant motifs, or filter out spurious motifs. Therefore, a novel metric is required to seize slight differences between irrelevant motifs and highlight the similarity between motifs of the same group in all these applications. While there are already several metrics for motif similarity proposed before, their performance is still far from satisfactory for these applications. Methods A novel metric has been proposed in this paper with name as SPIC (Similarity with Position Information Contents) for measuring the similarity between a column of a motif and a column of another motif. When defining this similarity score, we consider the likelihood that the column of the first motif's PFM can be produced by the column of the second motif's PSSM, and multiply the likelihood by the information content of the column of the second motif's PSSM, and vise versa. We evaluated the performance of SPIC combined with a local or a global alignment method having a function for affine gap penalty, for computing the similarity between two motifs. We also compared SPIC with seven existing state-of-the-arts metrics for their capability of clustering motifs from the same group and retrieving motifs from a database on three datasets. Results When used jointly with the Smith-Waterman local alignment method with an affine gap penalty function (gap open penalty is equal to1, gap extension penalty is equal to 0.5), SPIC outperforms the seven

  15. Characterization of the microbial acid mine drainage microbial community using culturing and direct sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Auld, Ryan R; Myre, Maxine; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Leduc, Leo G; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-05-01

    We characterized the bacterial community from an AMD tailings pond using both classical culturing and modern direct sequencing techniques and compared the two methods. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is produced by the environmental and microbial oxidation of minerals dissolved from mining waste. Surprisingly, we know little about the microbial communities associated with AMD, despite the fundamental ecological roles of these organisms and large-scale economic impact of these waste sites. AMD microbial communities have classically been characterized by laboratory culturing-based techniques and more recently by direct sequencing of marker gene sequences, primarily the 16S rRNA gene. In our comparison of the techniques, we find that their results are complementary, overall indicating very similar community structure with similar dominant species, but with each method identifying some species that were missed by the other. We were able to culture the majority of species that our direct sequencing results indicated were present, primarily species within the Acidithiobacillus and Acidiphilium genera, although estimates of relative species abundance were only obtained from direct sequencing. Interestingly, our culture-based methods recovered four species that had been overlooked from our sequencing results because of the rarity of the marker gene sequences, likely members of the rare biosphere. Further, direct sequencing indicated that a single genus, completely missed in our culture-based study, Legionella, was a dominant member of the microbial community. Our results suggest that while either method does a reasonable job of identifying the dominant members of the AMD microbial community, together the methods combine to give a more complete picture of the true diversity of this environment. PMID:23485423

  16. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... base or modified or unusual amino acid may be presented in a given sequence as the corresponding unmodified base or amino acid if the modified base or modified or unusual amino acid is one of those...

  17. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... base or modified or unusual amino acid may be presented in a given sequence as the corresponding unmodified base or amino acid if the modified base or modified or unusual amino acid is one of those...

  18. Nanopore Analysis of Nucleic Acids: Single-Molecule Studies of Molecular Dynamics, Structure, and Base Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasagasti, Felix; Deamer, David W.

    Nucleic acids are linear polynucleotides in which each base is covalently linked to a pentose sugar and a phosphate group carrying a negative charge. If a pore having roughly the crosssectional diameter of a single-stranded nucleic acid is embedded in a thin membrane and a voltage of 100 mV or more is applied, individual nucleic acids in solution can be captured by the electrical field in the pore and translocated through by single-molecule electrophoresis. The dimensions of the pore cannot accommodate anything larger than a single strand, so each base in the molecule passes through the pore in strict linear sequence. The nucleic acid strand occupies a large fraction of the pore's volume during translocation and therefore produces a transient blockade of the ionic current created by the applied voltage. If it could be demonstrated that each nucleotide in the polymer produced a characteristic modulation of the ionic current during its passage through the nanopore, the sequence of current modulations would reflect the sequence of bases in the polymer. According to this basic concept, nanopores are analogous to a Coulter counter that detects nanoscopic molecules rather than microscopic [1,2]. However, the advantage of nanopores is that individual macromolecules can be characterized because different chemical and physical properties affect their passage through the pore. Because macromolecules can be captured in the pore as well as translocated, the nanopore can be used to detect individual functional complexes that form between a nucleic acid and an enzyme. No other technique has this capability.

  19. Recurrent Structural Motifs in Non-Homologous Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Maria U.; Zoete, Vincent; Guex, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We have extracted an extensive collection of recurrent structural motifs (RSMs), which consist of sequentially non-contiguous structural motifs (4–6 residues), each of which appears with very similar conformation in three or more mutually unrelated protein structures. We find that the proteins in our set are covered to a substantial extent by the recurrent non-contiguous structural motifs, especially the helix and strand regions. Computational alanine scanning calculations indicate that the average folding free energy changes upon alanine mutation for most types of non-alanine residues are higher for amino acids that are present in recurrent structural motifs than for amino acids that are not. The non-alanine amino acids that are most common in the recurrent structural motifs, i.e., phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine and tyrosine and the less abundant methionine and tryptophan, have the largest folding free energy changes. This indicates that the recurrent structural motifs, as we define them, describe recurrent structural patterns that are important for protein stability. In view of their properties, such structural motifs are potentially useful for inter-residue contact prediction and protein structure refinement. PMID:23574940

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1979-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence has been determined for a fragment of human ceruloplasmin [ferroxidase; iron(II):oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.16.3.1]. The fragment (designated Cp F5) contains 159 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 18,650; it lacks carbohydrate, is rich in histidine, and contains one free cysteine that may be part of a copper-binding site. This fragment is present in most commercial preparations of ceruloplasmin, probably owing to proteolytic degradation, but can also be obtained by limited cleavage of single-chain ceruloplasmin with plasmin. Cp F5 probably is an intact domain attached to the COOH-terminal end of single-chain ceruloplasmin via a labile interdomain peptide bond. A model of the secondary structure predicted by empirical methods suggests that almost one-third of the amino acid residues are distributed in alpha helices, about a third in beta-sheet structure, and the remainder in beta turns and unidentified structures. Computer analysis of the amino acid sequence has not demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between this ceruloplasmin fragment and any other protein, but there is some evidence for an internal duplication. PMID:287005

  1. The β-Lactamase Gene Regulator AmpR Is a Tetramer That Recognizes and Binds the d-Ala-d-Ala Motif of Its Repressor UDP-N-acetylmuramic Acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide*

    PubMed Central

    Vadlamani, Grishma; Thomas, Misty D.; Patel, Trushar R.; Donald, Lynda J.; Reeve, Thomas M.; Stetefeld, Jörg; Standing, Kenneth G.; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression of chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is induced by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR, which activates ampC expression in response to changes in peptidoglycan (PG) metabolite levels that occur during exposure to β-lactams. Under normal conditions, AmpR represses ampC transcription by binding the PG precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide. When exposed to β-lactams, however, PG catabolites (1,6-anhydroMurNAc-peptides) accumulate in the cytosol, which have been proposed to competitively displace UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide from AmpR and convert it into an activator of ampC transcription. Here we describe the molecular interactions between AmpR (from Citrobacter freundii), its DNA operator, and repressor UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Non-denaturing mass spectrometry revealed AmpR to be a homotetramer that is stabilized by DNA containing the T-N11-A LTTR binding motif and revealed that it can bind four repressor molecules in an apparently stepwise manner. A crystal structure of the AmpR effector-binding domain bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide revealed that the terminal d-Ala-d-Ala motif of the repressor forms the primary contacts with the protein. This observation suggests that 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-pentapeptide may convert AmpR into an activator of ampC transcription more effectively than 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-tripeptide (which lacks the d-Ala-d-Ala motif). Finally, small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that the AmpR·DNA complex adopts a flat conformation similar to the LTTR protein AphB and undergoes only a slight conformational change when binding UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Modeling the AmpR·DNA tetramer bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide predicts that the UDP-MurNAc moiety of the repressor participates in modulating AmpR function. PMID:25480792

  2. The β-lactamase gene regulator AmpR is a tetramer that recognizes and binds the D-Ala-D-Ala motif of its repressor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, Grishma; Thomas, Misty D; Patel, Trushar R; Donald, Lynda J; Reeve, Thomas M; Stetefeld, Jörg; Standing, Kenneth G; Vocadlo, David J; Mark, Brian L

    2015-01-30

    Inducible expression of chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is induced by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR, which activates ampC expression in response to changes in peptidoglycan (PG) metabolite levels that occur during exposure to β-lactams. Under normal conditions, AmpR represses ampC transcription by binding the PG precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide. When exposed to β-lactams, however, PG catabolites (1,6-anhydroMurNAc-peptides) accumulate in the cytosol, which have been proposed to competitively displace UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide from AmpR and convert it into an activator of ampC transcription. Here we describe the molecular interactions between AmpR (from Citrobacter freundii), its DNA operator, and repressor UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Non-denaturing mass spectrometry revealed AmpR to be a homotetramer that is stabilized by DNA containing the T-N11-A LTTR binding motif and revealed that it can bind four repressor molecules in an apparently stepwise manner. A crystal structure of the AmpR effector-binding domain bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide revealed that the terminal D-Ala-D-Ala motif of the repressor forms the primary contacts with the protein. This observation suggests that 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-pentapeptide may convert AmpR into an activator of ampC transcription more effectively than 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-tripeptide (which lacks the D-Ala-D-Ala motif). Finally, small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that the AmpR·DNA complex adopts a flat conformation similar to the LTTR protein AphB and undergoes only a slight conformational change when binding UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Modeling the AmpR·DNA tetramer bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide predicts that the UDP-MurNAc moiety of the repressor participates in modulating AmpR function. PMID:25480792

  3. The amino acid sequence of Lady Amherst's pheasant (Chrysolophus amherstiae) and golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) egg-white lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kuramoto, M; Torikata, T

    1990-09-01

    The amino acids of Lady Amherst's pheasant and golden pheasant egg-white lysozymes have been sequenced. The carboxymethylated lysozymes were digested with trypsin followed by sequencing of the tryptic peptides. Lady Amherst's pheasant lysozyme proved to consist of 129 amino acid residues, and a relative molecular mass of 14,423 Da was calculated. This lysozyme had 6 amino acids substitutions when compared with hen egg-white lysozyme: Phe3 to Tyr, His15 to Leu, Gln41 to His, Asn77 to His, Gln 121 to Asn, and a newly found substitution of Ile124 to Thr. The amino acid sequence of golden pheasant lysozyme was identical to that of Lady Amherst's phesant lysozyme. The phylogenetic tree constructured by the comparison of amino acid sequences of phasianoid birds lysozymes revealed a minimum genetic distance between these pheasants and the turkey-peafowl group. PMID:1368578

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria. PMID:22648692

  6. [Partial sequence homology of FtsZ in phylogenetics analysis of lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dong, Xiu-zhu

    2005-10-01

    FtsZ is a structurally conserved protein, which is universal among the prokaryotes. It plays a key role in prokaryote cell division. A partial fragment of the ftsZ gene about 800bp in length was amplified and sequenced and a partial FtsZ protein phylogenetic tree for the lactic acid bacteria was constructed. By comparing the FtsZ phylogenetic tree with the 16S rDNA tree, it was shown that the two trees were similar in topology. Both trees revealed that Pediococcus spp. were closely related with L. casei group of Lactobacillus spp. , but less related with other lactic acid cocci such as Enterococcus and Streptococcus. The results also showed that the discriminative power of FtsZ was higher than that of 16S rDNA for either inter-species or inter-genus and could be a very useful tool in species identification of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:16342751

  7. The building blocks and motifs of RNA architecture

    PubMed Central

    Leontis, Neocles B; Lescoute, Aurelie; Westhof, Eric

    2010-01-01

    RNA motifs can be defined broadly as recurrent structural elements containing multiple intramolecular RNA–RNA interactions, as observed in atomic-resolution RNA structures. They constitute the modular building blocks of RNA architecture, which is organized hierarchically. Recent work has focused on analyzing RNA backbone conformations to identify, define and search for new instances of recurrent motifs in X-ray structures. One current view asserts that recurrent RNA strand segments with characteristic backbone configurations qualify as independent motifs. Other considerations indicate that, to characterize modular motifs, one must take into account the larger structural context of such strand segments. This follows the biologically relevant motivation, which is to identify RNA structural characteristics that are subject to sequence constraints and that thus relate RNA architectures to sequences. PMID:16713707

  8. Role of GxxxG Motifs in Transmembrane Domain Interactions.

    PubMed

    Teese, Mark G; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-08-25

    Transmembrane (TM) helices of integral membrane proteins can facilitate strong and specific noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis and structural analyses have revealed numerous examples in which the interaction between TM helices of single-pass membrane proteins is dependent on a GxxxG or (small)xxx(small) motif. It is therefore tempting to use the presence of these simple motifs as an indicator of TM helix interactions. In this Current Topic review, we point out that these motifs are quite common, with more than 50% of single-pass TM domains containing a (small)xxx(small) motif. However, the actual interaction strength of motif-containing helices depends strongly on sequence context and membrane properties. In addition, recent studies have revealed several GxxxG-containing TM domains that interact via alternative interfaces involving hydrophobic, polar, aromatic, or even ionizable residues that do not form recognizable motifs. In multipass membrane proteins, GxxxG motifs can be important for protein folding, and not just oligomerization. Our current knowledge thus suggests that the presence of a GxxxG motif alone is a weak predictor of protein dimerization in the membrane. PMID:26244771

  9. ELM: the status of the 2010 eukaryotic linear motif resource

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Cathryn M.; Diella, Francesca; Via, Allegra; Puntervoll, Pål; Gemünd, Christine; Chabanis-Davidson, Sophie; Michael, Sushama; Sayadi, Ahmed; Bryne, Jan Christian; Chica, Claudia; Seiler, Markus; Davey, Norman E.; Haslam, Niall; Weatheritt, Robert J.; Budd, Aidan; Hughes, Tim; Paś, Jakub; Rychlewski, Leszek; Travé, Gilles; Aasland, Rein; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Linding, Rune; Gibson, Toby J.

    2010-01-01

    Linear motifs are short segments of multidomain proteins that provide regulatory functions independently of protein tertiary structure. Much of intracellular signalling passes through protein modifications at linear motifs. Many thousands of linear motif instances, most notably phosphorylation sites, have now been reported. Although clearly very abundant, linear motifs are difficult to predict de novo in protein sequences due to the difficulty of obtaining robust statistical assessments. The ELM resource at http://elm.eu.org/ provides an expanding knowledge base, currently covering 146 known motifs, with annotation that includes >1300 experimentally reported instances. ELM is also an exploratory tool for suggesting new candidates of known linear motifs in proteins of interest. Information about protein domains, protein structure and native disorder, cellular and taxonomic contexts is used to reduce or deprecate false positive matches. Results are graphically displayed in a ‘Bar Code’ format, which also displays known instances from homologous proteins through a novel ‘Instance Mapper’ protocol based on PHI-BLAST. ELM server output provides links to the ELM annotation as well as to a number of remote resources. Using the links, researchers can explore the motifs, proteins, complex structures and associated literature to evaluate whether candidate motifs might be worth experimental investigation. PMID:19920119

  10. Comparative characterization of random-sequence proteins consisting of 5, 12, and 20 kinds of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junko; Doi, Nobuhide; Takashima, Hideaki; Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    Screening of functional proteins from a random-sequence library has been used to evolve novel proteins in the field of evolutionary protein engineering. However, random-sequence proteins consisting of the 20 natural amino acids tend to aggregate, and the occurrence rate of functional proteins in a random-sequence library is low. From the viewpoint of the origin of life, it has been proposed that primordial proteins consisted of a limited set of amino acids that could have been abundantly formed early during chemical evolution. We have previously found that members of a random-sequence protein library constructed with five primitive amino acids show high solubility (Doi et al., Protein Eng Des Sel 2005;18:279-284). Although such a library is expected to be appropriate for finding functional proteins, the functionality may be limited, because they have no positively charged amino acid. Here, we constructed three libraries of 120-amino acid, random-sequence proteins using alphabets of 5, 12, and 20 amino acids by preselection using mRNA display (to eliminate sequences containing stop codons and frameshifts) and characterized and compared the structural properties of random-sequence proteins arbitrarily chosen from these libraries. We found that random-sequence proteins constructed with the 12-member alphabet (including five primitive amino acids and positively charged amino acids) have higher solubility than those constructed with the 20-member alphabet, though other biophysical properties are very similar in the two libraries. Thus, a library of moderate complexity constructed from 12 amino acids may be a more appropriate resource for functional screening than one constructed from 20 amino acids. PMID:20162614

  11. A sialoreceptor binding motif in the Mycoplasma synoviae adhesin VlhA.

    PubMed

    May, Meghan; Dunne, Dylan W; Brown, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae depends on its adhesin VlhA to mediate cytadherence to sialylated host cell receptors. Allelic variants of VlhA arise through recombination between an assemblage of promoterless vlhA pseudogenes and a single transcription promoter site, creating lineages of M. synoviae that each express a different vlhA allele. The predicted full-length VlhA sequences adjacent to the promoter of nine lineages of M. synoviae varying in avidity of cytadherence were aligned with that of the reference strain MS53 and with a 60-a.a. hemagglutinating VlhA C-terminal fragment from a Tunisian lineage of strain WVU1853(T). Seven different sequence variants of an imperfectly conserved, single-copy, 12-a.a. candidate cytadherence motif were evident amid the flanking variable residues of the 11 total sequences examined. The motif was predicted to adopt a short hairpin structure in a low-complexity region near the C-terminus of VlhA. Biotinylated synthetic oligopeptides representing four selected variants of the 12-a.a. motif, with the whole synthesized 60-a.a. fragment as a positive control, differed (P<0.01) in the extent they bound to chicken erythrocyte membranes. All bound to a greater extent (P<0.01) than scrambled or irrelevant VlhA domain negative control peptides did. Experimentally introduced branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) substitutions Val3Ile and Leu7Ile did not significantly alter binding, whereas fold-destabilizing substitutions Thr4Gly and Ala9Gly tended to reduce it (P<0.05). Binding was also reduced to background levels (P<0.01) when the peptides were exposed to desialylated membranes, or were pre-saturated with free sialic acid before exposure to untreated membranes. From this evidence we conclude that the motif P-X-(BCAA)-X-F-X-(BCAA)-X-A-K-X-G binds sialic acid and likely mediates VlhA-dependent M. synoviae attachment to host cells. This conserved mechanism retains the potential for fine-scale rheostasis in binding avidity, which could be a general

  12. A Sialoreceptor Binding Motif in the Mycoplasma synoviae Adhesin VlhA

    PubMed Central

    May, Meghan; Dunne, Dylan W.; Brown, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae depends on its adhesin VlhA to mediate cytadherence to sialylated host cell receptors. Allelic variants of VlhA arise through recombination between an assemblage of promoterless vlhA pseudogenes and a single transcription promoter site, creating lineages of M. synoviae that each express a different vlhA allele. The predicted full-length VlhA sequences adjacent to the promoter of nine lineages of M. synoviae varying in avidity of cytadherence were aligned with that of the reference strain MS53 and with a 60-a.a. hemagglutinating VlhA C-terminal fragment from a Tunisian lineage of strain WVU1853T. Seven different sequence variants of an imperfectly conserved, single-copy, 12-a.a. candidate cytadherence motif were evident amid the flanking variable residues of the 11 total sequences examined. The motif was predicted to adopt a short hairpin structure in a low-complexity region near the C-terminus of VlhA. Biotinylated synthetic oligopeptides representing four selected variants of the 12-a.a. motif, with the whole synthesized 60-a.a. fragment as a positive control, differed (P<0.01) in the extent they bound to chicken erythrocyte membranes. All bound to a greater extent (P<0.01) than scrambled or irrelevant VlhA domain negative control peptides did. Experimentally introduced branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) substitutions Val3Ile and Leu7Ile did not significantly alter binding, whereas fold-destabilizing substitutions Thr4Gly and Ala9Gly tended to reduce it (P<0.05). Binding was also reduced to background levels (P<0.01) when the peptides were exposed to desialylated membranes, or were pre-saturated with free sialic acid before exposure to untreated membranes. From this evidence we conclude that the motif P-X-(BCAA)-X-F-X-(BCAA)-X-A-K-X-G binds sialic acid and likely mediates VlhA-dependent M. synoviae attachment to host cells. This conserved mechanism retains the potential for fine-scale rheostasis in binding avidity, which could be a general

  13. N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequence Determination of Proteins by N-Terminal Dimethyl Labeling: Pitfalls and Advantages When Compared with Edman Degradation Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Elizabeth; Pourmal, Sergei; Zhou, Chun; Kumar, Rupesh; Teplova, Marianna; Pavletich, Nikola P; Marians, Kenneth J; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye

    2016-07-01

    In recent history, alternative approaches to Edman sequencing have been investigated, and to this end, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Protein Sequencing Research Group (PSRG) initiated studies in 2014 and 2015, looking into bottom-up and top-down N-terminal (Nt) dimethyl derivatization of standard quantities of intact proteins with the aim to determine Nt sequence information. We have expanded this initiative and used low picomole amounts of myoglobin to determine the efficiency of Nt-dimethylation. Application of this approach on protein domains, generated by limited proteolysis of overexpressed proteins, confirms that it is a universal labeling technique and is very sensitive when compared with Edman sequencing. Finally, we compared Edman sequencing and Nt-dimethylation of the same polypeptide fragments; results confirm that there is agreement in the identity of the Nt amino acid sequence between these 2 methods. PMID:27006647

  14. N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequence Determination of Proteins by N-Terminal Dimethyl Labeling: Pitfalls and Advantages When Compared with Edman Degradation Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Elizabeth; Pourmal, Sergei; Zhou, Chun; Kumar, Rupesh; Teplova, Marianna; Pavletich, Nikola P.; Marians, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, alternative approaches to Edman sequencing have been investigated, and to this end, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Protein Sequencing Research Group (PSRG) initiated studies in 2014 and 2015, looking into bottom-up and top-down N-terminal (Nt) dimethyl derivatization of standard quantities of intact proteins with the aim to determine Nt sequence information. We have expanded this initiative and used low picomole amounts of myoglobin to determine the efficiency of Nt-dimethylation. Application of this approach on protein domains, generated by limited proteolysis of overexpressed proteins, confirms that it is a universal labeling technique and is very sensitive when compared with Edman sequencing. Finally, we compared Edman sequencing and Nt-dimethylation of the same polypeptide fragments; results confirm that there is agreement in the identity of the Nt amino acid sequence between these 2 methods. PMID:27006647

  15. Partial amino acid sequence of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase from the blue-green algae Synechococcus leopoliensis.

    PubMed

    Marcus, F; Latshaw, S P; Steup, M; Gerbling, K P

    1989-08-01

    Purified fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis was S-carboxymethylated and cleaved with trypsin. The resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and the amino acid sequence of six of the purified peptides was determined by gas-phase microsequencing. The results revealed sequence homology with other fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases. The obtained sequence data provides information required for the design of oligonucleotide hybridization probes to screen existing libraries of cyanobacterial DNA. The determination of the amino acid sequence of cyanobacterial proteins may yield important information with respect to the endosymbiotic theory of evolution. PMID:2550924

  16. Protein sequence analysis by incorporating modified chaos game and physicochemical properties into Chou's general pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunrui; Sun, Dandan; Liu, Shenghui; Zhang, Yusen

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution we introduced a novel graphical method to compare protein sequences. By mapping a protein sequence into 3D space based on codons and physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids, we are able to get a unique P-vector from the 3D curve. This approach is consistent with wobble theory of amino acids. We compute the distance between sequences by their P-vectors to measure similarities/dissimilarities among protein sequences. Finally, we use our method to analyze four datasets and get better results compared with previous approaches. PMID:27375218

  17. Stanniocalcin 1 binds hemin through a partially conserved heme regulatory motif

    SciTech Connect

    Westberg, Johan A.; Jiang, Ji; Andersson, Leif C.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) binds heme through novel heme binding motif. {yields} Central iron atom of heme and cysteine-114 of STC1 are essential for binding. {yields} STC1 binds Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} heme. {yields} STC1 peptide prevents oxidative decay of heme. -- Abstract: Hemin (iron protoporphyrin IX) is a necessary component of many proteins, functioning either as a cofactor or an intracellular messenger. Hemoproteins have diverse functions, such as transportation of gases, gas detection, chemical catalysis and electron transfer. Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) is a protein involved in respiratory responses of the cell but whose mechanism of action is still undetermined. We examined the ability of STC1 to bind hemin in both its reduced and oxidized states and located Cys{sup 114} as the axial ligand of the central iron atom of hemin. The amino acid sequence differs from the established (Cys-Pro) heme regulatory motif (HRM) and therefore presents a novel heme binding motif (Cys-Ser). A STC1 peptide containing the heme binding sequence was able to inhibit both spontaneous and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced decay of hemin. Binding of hemin does not affect the mitochondrial localization of STC1.

  18. The LINKS motif zippers trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines into a biosynthetic megacomplex.

    PubMed

    Gay, Darren C; Wagner, Drew T; Meinke, Jessica L; Zogzas, Charles E; Gay, Glen R; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T

    2016-03-01

    Polyketides such as the clinically-valuable antibacterial agent mupirocin are constructed by architecturally-sophisticated assembly lines known as trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases. Organelle-sized megacomplexes composed of several copies of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines have been observed by others through transmission electron microscopy to be located at the Bacillus subtilis plasma membrane, where the synthesis and export of the antibacterial polyketide bacillaene takes place. In this work we analyze ten crystal structures of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases ketosynthase domains, seven of which are reported here for the first time, to characterize a motif capable of zippering assembly lines into a megacomplex. While each of the three-helix LINKS (Laterally-INteracting Ketosynthase Sequence) motifs is observed to similarly dock with a spatially-reversed copy of itself through hydrophobic and ionic interactions, the amino acid sequences of this motif are not conserved. Such a code is appropriate for mediating homotypic contacts between assembly lines to ensure the ordered self-assembly of a noncovalent, yet tightly-knit, enzymatic network. LINKS-mediated lateral interactions would also have the effect of bolstering the vertical association of the polypeptides that comprise a polyketide synthase assembly line. PMID:26724270

  19. Investigations on dendrimer space reveal solid and liquid tumor growth-inhibition by original phosphorus-based dendrimers and the corresponding monomers and dendrons with ethacrynic acid motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Brahmi, Nabil; Mignani, Serge M.; Caron, Joachim; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Cresteil, Thierry; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The well-known reactive diuretic ethacrynic acid (EA, Edecrin), with low antiproliferative activities, was chemically modified and grafted onto phosphorus dendrimers and the corresponding simple branched phosphorus dendron-like derivatives affording novel nanodevices showing moderate to strong antiproliferative activities against liquid and solid tumor cell lines, respectively.The well-known reactive diuretic ethacrynic acid (EA, Edecrin), with low antiproliferative activities, was chemically modified and grafted onto phosphorus dendrimers and the corresponding simple branched phosphorus dendron-like derivatives affording novel nanodevices showing moderate to strong antiproliferative activities against liquid and solid tumor cell lines, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05983b

  20. cWINNOWER algorithm for finding fuzzy dna motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.; Samanta, M. P.; Biegel, B. A.

    2004-01-01

    The cWINNOWER algorithm detects fuzzy motifs in DNA sequences rich in protein-binding signals. A signal is defined as any short nucleotide pattern having up to d mutations differing from a motif of length l. The algorithm finds such motifs if a clique consisting of a sufficiently large number of mutated copies of the motif (i.e., the signals) is present in the DNA sequence. The cWINNOWER algorithm substantially improves the sensitivity of the winnower method of Pevzner and Sze by imposing a consensus constraint, enabling it to detect much weaker signals. We studied the minimum detectable clique size qc as a function of sequence length N for random sequences. We found that qc increases linearly with N for a fast version of the algorithm based on counting three-member sub-cliques. Imposing consensus constraints reduces qc by a factor of three in this case, which makes the algorithm dramatically more sensitive. Our most sensitive algorithm, which counts four-member sub-cliques, needs a minimum of only 13 signals to detect motifs in a sequence of length N = 12,000 for (l, d) = (15, 4). Copyright Imperial College Press.

  1. Finding specific RNA motifs: Function in a zeptomole world?

    PubMed Central

    KNIGHT, ROB; YARUS, MICHAEL

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a new method for estimating the abundance of any modular (piecewise) RNA motif within a longer random region. We have used this method to estimate the size of the active motifs available to modern SELEX experiments (picomoles of unique sequences) and to a plausible RNA World (zeptomoles of unique sequences: 1 zmole = 602 sequences). Unexpectedly, activities such as specific isoleucine binding are almost certainly present in zeptomoles of molecules, and even ribozymes such as self-cleavage motifs may appear (depending on assumptions about the minimal structures). The number of specified nucleotides is not the only important determinant of a motif’s rarity: The number of modules into which it is divided, and the details of this division, are also crucial. We propose three maxims for easily isolated motifs: the Maxim of Minimization, the Maxim of Multiplicity, and the Maxim of the Median. These maxims together state that selected motifs should be small and composed of as many separate, equally sized modules as possible. For evenly divided motifs with four modules, the largest accessible activity in picomole scale (1–1000 pmole) pools of length 100 is about 34 nucleotides; while for zeptomole scale (1–1000 zmole) pools it is about 20 specific nucleotides (50% probability of occurrence). This latter figure includes some ribozymes and aptamers. Consequently, an RNA metabolism apparently could have begun with only zeptomoles of RNA molecules. PMID:12554865

  2. Identify Beta-Hairpin Motifs with Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm Based on the Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    YongE, Feng; GaoShan, Kou

    2015-01-01

    Successful prediction of the beta-hairpin motif will be helpful for understanding the of the fold recognition. Some algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of beta-hairpin motifs. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on the amino acid sequences. Here, we proposed a novel model for predicting beta-hairpin structure based on the chemical shift. Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in not beta-hairpin and beta-hairpin motifs. Secondly, we used these chemical shifts as features combined with three algorithms to predict beta-hairpin structure. Finally, we achieved the best prediction, namely sensitivity of 92%, the specificity of 94% with 0.85 of Mathew’s correlation coefficient using quadratic discriminant analysis algorithm, which is clearly superior to the same method for the prediction of beta-hairpin structure from 20 amino acid compositions in the three-fold cross-validation. Our finding showed that the chemical shift is an effective parameter for beta-hairpin prediction, suggesting the quadratic discriminant analysis is a powerful algorithm for the prediction of beta-hairpin. PMID:26422468

  3. Complete genome sequence of yam chlorotic necrotic mosaic virus from Dioscorea parviflora.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyuan; Peng, Jiejun; Guo, Huachun; Chen, Jianping; Chen, Suiyun; Wang, Jianguang

    2016-06-01

    The complete genome sequence of yam chlorotic necrotic mosaic virus (YCNMV) was determined. It is a monopartite ssRNA 8208 nucleotides in length (excluding the poly(A) tail) and encoding a polyprotein of 2622 amino acids. Sequence analysis showed that the P1 region and some conserved motifs, such as the typical potyvirus aphid-transmission motifs DAG, PTK and KITC, are absent. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete polyprotein sequences of YCNMV and selected members of the family Potyviridae clearly showed that this virus should be assigned to the genus Macluravirus and suggest that YCNMV is a new member of the genus Macluravirus. PMID:26973231

  4. Nucleotide sequence of the phosphoglycerate kinase gene from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of the mesophilic yeast phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, D; Littlechild, J A; Fothergill, J E; Watson, H C; Hall, L

    1988-01-01

    Using oligonucleotide probes derived from amino acid sequencing information, the structural gene for phosphoglycerate kinase from the extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus, was cloned in Escherichia coli and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. The gene consists of an open reading frame corresponding to a protein of 390 amino acid residues (calculated Mr 41,791) with an extreme bias for G or C (93.1%) in the codon third base position. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of the corresponding mesophilic yeast enzyme indicated a number of significant differences. These are discussed in terms of the unusual codon bias and their possible role in enhanced protein thermal stability. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3052437

  5. The Molecular Evolution of the Qo Motif

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Wei-Chun; Hunte, Carola

    2014-01-01

    Quinol oxidation in the catalytic quinol oxidation site (Qo site) of cytochrome (cyt) bc1 complexes is the key step of the Q cycle mechanism, which laid the ground for Mitchell’s chemiosmotic theory of energy conversion. Bifurcated electron transfer upon quinol oxidation enables proton uptake and release on opposite membrane sides, thus generating a proton gradient that fuels ATP synthesis in cellular respiration and photosynthesis. The Qo site architecture formed by cyt b and Rieske iron–sulfur protein (ISP) impedes harmful bypass reactions. Catalytic importance is assigned to four residues of cyt b formerly described as PEWY motif in the context of mitochondrial complexes, which we now denominate Qo motif as comprehensive evolutionary sequence analysis of cyt b shows substantial natural variance of the motif with phylogenetically specific patterns. In particular, the Qo motif is identified as PEWY in mitochondria, α- and ε-Proteobacteria, Aquificae, Chlorobi, Cyanobacteria, and chloroplasts. PDWY is present in Gram-positive bacteria, Deinococcus–Thermus and haloarchaea, and PVWY in β- and γ-Proteobacteria. PPWF only exists in Archaea. Distinct patterns for acidophilic organisms indicate environment-specific adaptations. Importantly, the presence of PDWY and PEWY is correlated with the redox potential of Rieske ISP and quinone species. We propose that during evolution from low to high potential electron-transfer systems in the emerging oxygenic atmosphere, cyt bc1 complexes with PEWY as Qo motif prevailed to efficiently use high potential ubiquinone as substrate, whereas cyt b with PDWY operate best with low potential Rieske ISP and menaquinone, with the latter being the likely composition of the ancestral cyt bc1 complex. PMID:25115012

  6. Bacteria obtained from a sequencing batch reactor that are capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, W W

    1995-01-01

    Eleven isolates capable of growth on the resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DhA) were obtained from a sequencing batch reactor designed to treat a high-strength process stream from a paper mill. The isolates belonged to two groups, represented by strains DhA-33 and DhA-35, which were characterized. In the bioreactor, bacteria like DhA-35 were more abundant than those like DhA-33. The population in the bioreactor of organisms capable of growth on DhA was estimated to be 1.1 x 10(6) propagules per ml, based on a most-probable-number determination. Analysis of small-subunit rRNA partial sequences indicated that DhA-33 was most closely related to Sphingomonas yanoikuyae (Sab = 0.875) and that DhA-35 was most closely related to Zoogloea ramigera (Sab = 0.849). Both isolates additionally grew on other abietanes, i.e., abietic and palustric acids, but not on the pimaranes, pimaric and isopimaric acids. For DhA-33 and DhA-35 with DhA as the sole organic substrate, doubling times were 2.7 and 2.2 h, respectively, and growth yields were 0.30 and 0.25 g of protein per g of DhA, respectively. Glucose as a cosubstrate stimulated growth of DhA-33 on DhA and stimulated DhA degradation by the culture. Pyruvate as a cosubstrate did not stimulate growth of DhA-35 on DhA and reduced the specific rate of DhA degradation of the culture. DhA induced DhA and abietic acid degradation activities in both strains, and these activities were heat labile. Cell suspensions of both strains consumed DhA at a rate of 6 mumol mg of protein-1 h-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7793937

  7. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    PubMed Central

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Waleń, Tomasz; Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-01-01

    Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx. PMID:25760616

  8. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Lange, Bernd Markus; McCaskill, David G.

    2001-01-01

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  9. Novel method for PIK3CA mutation analysis: locked nucleic acid--PCR sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne; O'Gara, Rebecca; Schilling, Amy; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Troxell, Megan L; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    Somatic mutations in PIK3CA are commonly seen in invasive breast cancer and several other carcinomas, occurring in three hotspots: codons 542 and 545 of exon 9 and in codon 1047 of exon 20. We designed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-PCR sequencing assay to detect low levels of mutant PIK3CA DNA with attention to avoiding amplification of a pseudogene on chromosome 22 that has >95% homology to exon 9 of PIK3CA. We tested 60 FFPE breast DNA samples with known PIK3CA mutation status (48 cases had one or more PIK3CA mutations, and 12 were wild type) as identified by PCR-mass spectrometry. PIK3CA exons 9 and 20 were amplified in the presence or absence of LNA-oligonucleotides designed to bind to the wild-type sequences for codons 542, 545, and 1047, and partially suppress their amplification. LNA-PCR sequencing confirmed all 51 PIK3CA mutations; however, the mutation detection rate by standard Sanger sequencing was only 69% (35 of 51). Of the 12 PIK3CA wild-type cases, LNA-PCR sequencing detected three additional H1047R mutations in "normal" breast tissue and one E545K in usual ductal hyperplasia. Histopathological review of these three normal breast specimens showed columnar cell change in two (both with known H1047R mutations) and apocrine metaplasia in one. The novel LNA-PCR shows higher sensitivity than standard Sanger sequencing and did not amplify the known pseudogene. PMID:23541593

  10. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  11. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  12. Bile acid sulfotransferase I from rat liver sulfates bile acids and 3-hydroxy steroids: purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S; Buchina, E S; King, R J; McBurnett, T; Taylor, K B

    1989-04-01

    A bile acid:3'phosphoadenosine-5'phosphosulfate:sulfotransferase (BAST I) from adult female rat liver cytosol has been purified 157-fold by a two-step isolation procedure. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 30,000 subunit has been determined for the first 35 residues. The Vmax of purified BAST I is 18.7 nmol/min per mg protein with N-(3-hydroxy-5 beta-cholanoyl)glycine (glycolithocholic acid) as substrate, comparable to that of the corresponding purified human BAST (Chen, L-J., and I. H. Segel, 1985. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 241: 371-379). BAST I activity has a broad pH optimum from 5.5-7.5. Although maximum activity occurs with 5 mM MgCl2, Mg2+ is not essential for BAST I activity. The greatest sulfotransferase activity and the highest substrate affinity is observed with bile acids or steroids that have a steroid nucleus containing a 3 beta-hydroxy group and a 5-6 double bond or a trans A-B ring junction. These substrates have normal hyperbolic initial velocity curves with substrate inhibition occurring above 5 microM. Of the saturated 5 beta-bile acids, those with a single 3-hydroxy group are the most active. The addition of a second hydroxy group at the 6- or 7-position eliminates more than 99% of the activity. In contrast, 3 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid (deoxycholic acid) is an excellent substrate. The initial velocity curves for glycolithocholic and deoxycholic acid conjugates are sigmoidal rather than hyperbolic, suggestive of an allosteric effect. Maximum activity is observed at 80 microM for glycolithocholic acid. All substrates, bile acids and steroids, are inhibited by the 5 beta-bile acid, 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid. The data suggest that BAST I is the same protein as hydrosteroid sulfotransferase 2 (Marcus, C. J., et al. 1980. Anal. Biochem. 107: 296-304). PMID:2754334

  13. Motifs, modules and games in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Denise M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2003-04-01

    Global explorations of regulatory network dynamics, organization and evolution have become tractable thanks to high-throughput sequencing