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Sample records for acid sequence-based amplification

  1. Ligation with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M; Artenstein, Andrew W; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  2. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification in nanoliter volumes.

    PubMed

    Gulliksen, Anja; Solli, Lars; Karlsen, Frank; Rogne, Henrik; Hovig, Eivind; Nordstrøm, Trine; Sirevåg, Reidun

    2004-01-01

    Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal method specifically designed for amplification of RNA. Fluorescent molecular beacon probes enable real-time monitoring of the amplification process. Successful identification, utilizing the real-time NASBA technology, was performed on a microchip with oligonucleotides at a concentration of 1.0 and 0.1 microM, in 10- and 50-nL reaction chambers, respectively. The microchip was developed in a silicon-glass structure. An instrument providing thermal control and an optical detection system was built for amplification readout. Experimental results demonstrate distinct amplification processes. Miniaturized real-time NASBA in microchips makes high-throughput diagnostics of bacteria, viruses, and cancer markers possible, at reduced cost and without contamination.

  3. Quantitative detection of Aspergillus spp. by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Perlin, David S

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and quantitative detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate an early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). As nucleic acid-based detection is a viable option, we demonstrate that Aspergillus burdens can be rapidly and accurately detected by a novel real-time nucleic acid assay other than qPCR by using the combination of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and the molecular beacon (MB) technology. Here, we detail a real-time NASBA assay to determine quantitative Aspergillus burdens in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids of rats with experimental IPA.

  4. Detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus by real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification.

    PubMed

    Starkey, William G; Smail, David A; Bleie, Hogne; Muir, K Fiona; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Richards, Randolph H

    2006-10-17

    We have developed a real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) procedure for detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Primers were designed to target a 124 nucleotide region of ISAV genome segment 8. Amplification products were detected in real-time with a molecular beacon (carboxyfluorescin [FAM]-labelled and methyl-red quenched) that recognised an internal region of the target amplicon. Amplification and detection were performed at 41 degrees C for 90 min in a Corbett Research Rotorgene. The real-time NASBA assay was compared to a conventional RT-PCR for ISAV detection. From a panel of 45 clinical samples, both assays detected ISAV in the same 19 samples. Based on the detection of a synthetic RNA target, the real-time NASBA procedure was approximately 100x more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR. These results suggest that real-time NASBA may represent a useful diagnostic procedure for ISAV.

  5. Detection of piscine nodaviruses by real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA).

    PubMed

    Starkey, William G; Millar, Rose Mary; Jenkins, Mary E; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Muir, K Fiona; Richards, Randolph H

    2004-05-01

    Nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification procedure based on target-specific primers and probes, and the co-ordinated activity of 3 enzymes: AMV reverse transcriptase, RNase H, and T7 RNA polymerase. We have developed a real-time NASBA procedure for detection of piscine nodaviruses, which have emerged as major pathogens of marine fish. Viral RNA was isolated by guanidine thiocyanate lysis followed by purification on silica particles. Primers were designed to target sequences in the nodavirus capsid protein gene, yielding an amplification product of 120 nucleotides. Amplification products were detected in real-time with a molecular beacon (FAM labelled/methyl-red quenched) that recognised an internal region of the target amplicon. Amplification and detection were performed at 41 degrees C for 90 min in a Corbett Research Rotorgene. Based on the detection of cell culture-derived nodavirus, and a synthetic RNA target, the real-time NASBA procedure was approximately 100-fold more sensitive than single-tube RT-PCR. When used to test a panel of 37 clinical samples (negative, n = 18; positive, n = 19), the real-time NASBA assay correctly identified all 18 negative and 19 positive samples. In comparison, the RT-PCR procedure identified all 18 negative samples, but only 16 of the positive samples. These results suggest that real-time NASBA may represent a sensitive and specific diagnostic procedure for piscine nodaviruses.

  6. Pyrosequencing on templates generated by asymmetric nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (asymmetric-NASBA).

    PubMed

    Jia, Huning; Chen, Zhiyao; Wu, Haiping; Ye, Hui; Yan, Zhengyu; Zhou, Guohua

    2011-12-21

    Pyrosequencing is an ideal tool for verifying the sequence of amplicons. To enable pyrosequencing on amplicons from nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), asymmetric NASBA with unequal concentrations of T7 promoter primer and reverse transcription primer was proposed. By optimizing the ratio of two primers and the concentration of dNTPs and NTPs, the amount of single-stranded cDNA in the amplicons from asymmetric NASBA was found increased 12 times more than the conventional NASBA through the real-time detection of a molecular beacon specific to cDNA of interest. More than 20 bases have been successfully detected by pyrosequencing on amplicons from asymmetric NASBA using Human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) as an amplification template. The primary results indicate that the combination of NASBA with a pyrosequencing system is practical, and should open a new field in clinical diagnosis.

  7. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay for detection of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Abd el-Galil, Khaled H; el-Sokkary, M A; Kheira, S M; Salazar, Andre M; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2005-11-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay in combination with a molecular beacon was developed for the real-time detection and quantification of hepatitis A virus (HAV). A 202-bp, highly conserved 5' noncoding region of HAV was targeted. The sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was tested with 10-fold dilutions of viral RNA, and a detection limit of 1 PFU was obtained. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by testing with other environmental pathogens and indicator microorganisms, with only HAV positively identified. When combined with immunomagnetic separation, the NASBA assay successfully detected as few as 10 PFU from seeded lake water samples. Due to its isothermal nature, its speed, and its similar sensitivity compared to the real-time RT-PCR assay, this newly reported real-time NASBA method will have broad applications for the rapid detection of HAV in contaminated food or water.

  8. A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes hlyA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, B W; Turner, G; Sooknanan, R; Malek, L T

    1997-01-01

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification system primarily targeting mRNA from the Listeria monocytogenes hlyA gene was developed. This system enabled the detection of low numbers (< 10 CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes cells inoculated into a variety of dairy and egg products after 48 h of enrichment in modified listeria enrichment broth. PMID:8979357

  9. Detection of Dengue Viral RNA Using a Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.; Lee, Eun Mi; Putvatana, Ravithat; Shurtliff, Roxanne N.; Porter, Kevin R.; Suharyono, Wuryadi; Watts, Douglas M.; King, Chwan-Chuen; Murphy, Gerald S.; Hayes, Curtis G.; Romano, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    Faster techniques are needed for the early diagnosis of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever during the acute viremic phase of infection. An isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay was optimized to amplify viral RNA of all four dengue virus serotypes by a set of universal primers and to type the amplified products by serotype-specific capture probes. The NASBA assay involved the use of silica to extract viral nucleic acid, which was amplified without thermocycling. The amplified product was detected by a probe-hybridization method that utilized electrochemiluminescence. Using normal human plasma spiked with dengue viruses, the NASBA assay had a detection threshold of 1 to 10 PFU/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were determined by testing 67 dengue virus-positive and 21 dengue virus-negative human serum or plasma samples. The “gold standard” used for comparison and evaluation was the mosquito C6/36 cell culture assay followed by an immunofluorescent assay. Viral infectivity titers in test samples were also determined by a direct plaque assay in Vero cells. The NASBA assay was able to detect dengue viral RNA in the clinical samples at plaque titers below 25 PFU/ml (the detection limit of the plaque assay). Of the 67 samples found positive by the C6/36 assay, 66 were found positive by the NASBA assay, for a sensitivity of 98.5%. The NASBA assay had a specificity of 100% based on the negative test results for the 21 normal human serum or plasma samples. These results indicate that the NASBA assay is a promising assay for the early diagnosis of dengue infections. PMID:11473994

  10. Detection of Vibrio cholerae by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Fykse, Else M; Skogan, Gunnar; Davies, William; Olsen, Jaran Strand; Blatny, Janet M

    2007-03-01

    A multitarget molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay for the specific detection of Vibrio cholerae has been developed. The genes encoding the cholera toxin (ctxA), the toxin-coregulated pilus (tcpA; colonization factor), the ctxA toxin regulator (toxR), hemolysin (hlyA), and the 60-kDa chaperonin product (groEL) were selected as target sequences for detection. The beacons for the five different genetic targets were evaluated by serial dilution of RNA from V. cholerae cells. RNase treatment of the nucleic acids eliminated all NASBA, whereas DNase treatment had no effect, showing that RNA and not DNA was amplified. The specificity of the assay was investigated by testing several isolates of V. cholerae, other Vibrio species, and Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli strains. The toxR, groEL, and hlyA beacons identified all V. cholerae isolates, whereas the ctxA and tcpA beacons identified the O1 toxigenic clinical isolates. The NASBA assay detected V. cholerae at 50 CFU/ml by using the general marker groEL and tcpA that specifically indicates toxigenic strains. A correlation between cell viability and NASBA was demonstrated for the ctxA, toxR, and hlyA targets. RNA isolated from different environmental water samples spiked with V. cholerae was specifically detected by NASBA. These results indicate that NASBA can be used in the rapid detection of V. cholerae from various environmental water samples. This method has a strong potential for detecting toxigenic strains by using the tcpA and ctxA markers. The entire assay including RNA extraction and NASBA was completed within 3 h.

  11. Construction strategy for an internal amplification control for real-time diagnostic assays using nucleic Acid sequence-based amplification: development and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; D'Agostino, Martin; Pla, Maria; Cook, Nigel

    2004-12-01

    An important analytical control in molecular amplification-based methods is an internal amplification control (IAC), which should be included in each reaction mixture. An IAC is a nontarget nucleic acid sequence which is coamplified simultaneously with the target sequence. With negative results for the target nucleic acid, the absence of an IAC signal indicates that amplification has failed. A general strategy for the construction of an IAC for inclusion in molecular beacon-based real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assays is presented. Construction proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, a double-stranded DNA molecule that contains nontarget sequences flanked by target sequences complementary to the NASBA primers is produced. At the 5' end of this DNA molecule is a T7 RNA polymerase binding sequence. In the second phase of construction, RNA transcripts are produced from the DNA by T7 RNA polymerase. This RNA is the IAC; it is amplified by the target NASBA primers and is detected by a molecular beacon probe complementary to the internal nontarget sequences. As a practical example, an IAC for use in an assay for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is described, its incorporation and optimization within the assay are detailed, and its application to spiked and natural clinical samples is shown to illustrate the correct interpretation of the diagnostic results.

  12. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification using molecular beacons for detection of enterovirus RNA in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Landry, Marie L; Garner, Robin; Ferguson, David

    2005-07-01

    Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) using molecular beacon technology (NASBA-beacon) was compared to standard NASBA with postamplification hybridization using electrochemiluminescently labeled probes (NASBA-ECL) for detection of enteroviruses (EV) in 133 cerebrospinal fluid and 27 stool samples. NASBA-ECL and NASBA-beacon were similar in sensitivity, detecting 55 (100%) and 52 (94.5%) EV-positive samples, respectively. There were no false positives. Both NASBA assays were significantly more sensitive than culture. Real-time NASBA-beacon reagents and equipment rental were more expensive than those for NASBA-ECL; however, time to result was shortened by 1.5 h, hands-on time was reduced by 25 min, and the assay was much simpler for technologists to learn and perform.

  13. Detection and quantification of the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Casper, Erica T; Paul, John H; Smith, Matthew C; Gray, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) is an isothermal method of RNA amplification that has been previously used in clinical diagnostic testing. A real-time NASBA assay has been developed for the detection of rbcL mRNA from the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. This assay is sensitive to one K. brevis cell and 1.0 fg of in vitro transcript, with occasional detection of lower concentrations of transcript. The assay did not detect rbcL mRNA from a wide range of nontarget organisms and environmental clones, while 10 strains (all tested) of K. brevis were detected. By the use of standard curves based on time to positivity, concentrations of K. brevis in environmental samples were predicted by NASBA and classified into different levels of blooms per the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) system. NASBA classification matched FWC classification (based on cell counts) 72% of the time. Those samples that did not match were off by only one class. NASBA is sensitive, rapid, and effective and may be used as an additional or alternative method to detect and quantify K. brevis in the marine environment. PMID:15294808

  14. Universal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification for simultaneous amplification of messengerRNAs and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mader, Andreas; Riehle, Ulrike; Brandstetter, Thomas; Stickeler, Elmar; Ruehe, Juergen

    2012-11-19

    A universal NASBA assay is presented for simultaneous amplification of multiple microRNA (miRNA) and messengerRNA (mRNA) sequences. First, miRNA and mRNA sequences are reverse transcribed using tailed reverse transcription primer pairs containing a gene-specific and an non-specific region. For reverse transcription of small miRNA molecules a non-specific region is incorporated into a structured stem-loop reverse transcription primer. Second, a universal NASBA primer pair that recognizes the tagged cDNA molecules enables a simultaneous, transcription-based amplification reaction (NASBA) of all different cDNA molecules in one reaction. The NASBA products (RNA copies) are detected by gene-specific DNA probes immobilized on a biochip. By using the multiplex reverse transcription combined with the universal NASBA amplification up to 14 different mRNA and miRNA sequences can be specifically amplified and detected in parallel. In comparison with standard multiplex NASBA assays this approach strongly enhances the multiplex capacity of NASBA-based amplification reactions. Furthermore simultaneous assaying of different RNA classes can be achieved that might be beneficial for studying miRNA-based regulation of gene expression or for RNA-based tumor diagnostics. PMID:23140948

  15. Development and evaluation of a real-time nucleic acid sequence based amplification assay for rapid detection of influenza A.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine; Hibbitts, Sam; Owen, Neil; Corden, Sally A; Harrison, Graham; Fox, Julie; Gelder, Colin; Westmoreland, Diana

    2004-12-01

    The development and introduction of effective treatment for influenza A in the form of neuraminidase inhibitors have made the rapid diagnosis of infection important especially in high-risk populations. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time nucleic acid sequenced based amplification (NASBA) using a molecular beacon that could detect a wide range of influenza A subtypes and strains in a single reaction by targeting a conserved region of the influenza genome, and to evaluate its sensitivity and specificity against traditional laboratory techniques on a range of clinical samples usefulness during the 2003/2004 influenza season. The results demonstrated the assay to be highly sensitive and specific, detecting <0.1 TCID50 of virus stock. Three hundred eighty-nine clinical samples were tested in total from two patient groups. Overall, the real-time NASBA assay detected 64% (66/103) more influenza positive samples than cell culture and direct immunofluorescence (IF) and, therefore, was shown to be more sensitive in detecting influenza A in a wide range of respiratory samples than traditional methods. In conclusion, the real-time influenza A assay demonstrated clinical usefulness in both hospital and community populations.

  16. Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays for rapid detection of West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, R S; Kerst, A J

    2001-12-01

    The development and application of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assays for the detection of West Nile (WN) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses are reported. Two unique detection formats were developed for the NASBA assays: a postamplification detection step with a virus-specific internal capture probe and electrochemiluminescence (NASBA-ECL assay) and a real-time assay with 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled virus-specific molecular beacon probes (NASBA-beacon assay). The sensitivities and specificities of these NASBA assays were compared to those of a newly described standard reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and TaqMan assays for SLE virus and to a previously published TaqMan assay for WN virus. The NASBA assays demonstrated exceptional sensitivities and specificities compared to those of virus isolation, the TaqMan assays, and standard RT-PCR, with the NASBA-beacon assay yielding results in less than 1 h. These assays should be of utility in the diagnostic laboratory to complement existing diagnostic testing methodologies and as a tool in conducting flavivirus surveillance in the United States.

  17. Evaluation of a real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay using molecular beacons for detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    McClernon, D R; Vavro, C; St Clair, M

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the performance characteristics of a new, real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay that incorporates molecular beacon technology for detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The quantitative results were comparable to those obtained with three leading commercially available assays. The analytical sensitivity was 37 IU/ml. The NASBA assay detected clinically relevant recombinant viruses and all group M HIV-1 subtypes.

  18. Detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in chicken meat samples by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Churruca, E; Girbau, C; Martínez, I; Mateo, E; Alonso, R; Fernández-Astorga, A

    2007-06-10

    A nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay based on molecular beacons was used for real-time detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in samples of chicken meat. A set of specific primers and beacon probe were designed to target the 16S rRNA of both species. The real-time NASBA protocol including the RNA isolation was valid for both of the cell suspensions in buffered saline and the artificially contaminated chicken meat samples. The presence of rRNA could be correlated with cellular viability, following inactivation of the bacteria by heating, in inoculated chicken meat samples but not in RNase-free cell suspensions.

  19. Quantitative detection of hepatitis B virus DNA by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with molecular beacon detection.

    PubMed

    Yates, S; Penning, M; Goudsmit, J; Frantzen, I; van de Weijer, B; van Strijp, D; van Gemen, B

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA detection and quantification system based on amplification with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) technology and real-time detection with molecular beacon technology. NASBA is normally applied to amplify single-stranded target RNA, producing RNA amplicons. In this work we show that with modifications like primer design, sample extraction method, and template denaturation, the NASBA technique can be made suitable for DNA target amplification resulting in RNA amplicons. A major advantage of our assay is the one-tube, isothermal nature of the method, which allows high-throughput applications for nucleic acid detection. The homogeneous real-time detection allows a closed-tube format of the assay, avoiding any postamplification handling of amplified material and therefore minimizing the risk of contamination of subsequent reactions. The assay has a detection range of 10(3) to 10(9) HBV DNA copies/ml of plasma or serum (6 logs), with good reproducibility and precision. Compared with other HBV DNA assays, our assay provides good sensitivity, a wide dynamic range, and high-throughput applicability, making it a viable alternative to those based on other amplification or detection methods.

  20. Evaluation of nucleic acid sequence based amplification using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-NASBA) in quantitative detection of Aspergillus 18S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Park, Chulmin; Kwon, Eun-Young; Shin, Na-Young; Choi, Su-Mi; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We attempted to apply fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology to nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (FRET-NASBA) on the platform of the LightCycler system to detect Aspergillus species. Primers and probes for the Aspergillus 18S rRNA were newly designed to avoid overlapping with homologous sequences of human 18s rRNA. NASBA using molecular beacon (MB) showed non-specific results which have been frequently observed from controls, although it showed higher sensitivity (10(-2) amol) than the FRET. FRET-NASBA showed a sensitivity of 10(-1) amol and a high fidelity of reproducibility from controls. As FRET technology was successfully applied to the NASBA assay, it could contribute to diverse development of the NASBA assay. These results suggest that FRET-NASBA could replace previous NASBA techniques in the detection of Aspergillus.

  1. Development of Real-Time Multiplex Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in Respiratory Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Loens, K.; Beck, T.; Ursi, D.; Overdijk, M.; Sillekens, P.; Goossens, H.; Ieven, M.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time multiplex isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) was developed to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens using the NucliSens Basic Kit (bioMérieux, Boxtel, The Netherlands). Oligonucleotide primers were derived from the M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila 16S rRNA. For real-time detection, molecular beacons were used. Specificity was established on a panel of bacterial strains. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined by testing dilutions of wild-type in vitro-generated RNA in water and dilutions of reference strains in lysis buffer or added to pools of respiratory specimens. Subsequently, a limited number of M. pneumoniae-, C. pneumoniae-, and L. pneumophila-positive and -negative clinical specimens were analyzed. Specific detection of the 16S rRNA of the three organisms was achieved. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex NASBA on spiked respiratory specimens was slightly diminished compared to the results obtained with the single-target (mono) real-time assays. We conclude that the proposed real-time multiplex NASBA assay, although less sensitive than the real-time mono NASBA assay, is a promising tool for the detection of M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens, regarding handling, speed, and number of samples that can be analyzed in a single run. PMID:18032625

  2. Comparative detection of rotavirus RNA by conventional RT-PCR, TaqMan RT-PCR and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qiu-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo; Tan, Hua; Wu, Bi-Mei; Feng, Zi-Li; Wang, Qi; Lin, Ji-Can; Yang, Ze

    2015-03-01

    Rotavirus is one of the major viral pathogens leading to diarrhea. Diagnosis has been conducted by either traditional cultural, serological methods or molecular biology techniques, which include RT-PCR and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). However, their differences regarding accuracy and sensitivity remain unknown. In this study, an in-house conventional RT-PCR assay and more importantly, an in-house real-time NASBA (RT-NASBA) were established, and compared with a commercial TaqMan RT-PCR assay. The results showed that all of these methods were able to detect and distinguish rotavirus from other diarrhea viruses with a 100% concordance rate during the course of an evaluation on 20 clinical stool samples. However, RT-NASBA was much quicker than the other two methods. More importantly, the limit of detection of RT-NASBA could reach seven copies per reaction and was one to two logs lower than that of conventional RT-PCR and TaqMan RT-PCR. These results indicate that this in-house assay was more sensitive, and thus could be used as an efficient diagnosis tool for rotavirus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct comparison among three different assays for the detection of rotavirus. These findings would provide implication for the rational selection of diagnosis tool for rotavirus.

  3. Quantitation of HIV-1 RNA viral load using nucleic acid sequence based amplification methodology and comparison with other surrogate markers for disease progression.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, R; Pinho, J R

    1998-01-01

    In this study, HIV-1 viral blood quantitation determined by Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) was compared with other surrogate disease progression markers (antigen p24, CD4/CD8 cell counts and beta-2 microglobulin) in 540 patients followed up at São Paulo, SP, Brazil. HIV-1 RNA detection was statistically associated with the presence of antigen p24, but the viral RNA was also detected in 68% of the antigen p24 negative samples, confirming that NASBA is much more sensitive than the determination of antigen p24. Regarding other surrogate markers, no statistically significant association with the detection of viral RNA was found. The reproducibility of this viral load assay was assessed by 14 runs of the same sample, using different reagents batches. Viral load values in this sample ranged from 5.83 to 6.27 log (CV = 36%), less than the range (0.5 log) established to the determination of significant viral load changes. PMID:9698880

  4. Development of conventional and real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assays for detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Loens, K; Beck, T; Goossens, H; Ursi, D; Overdijk, M; Sillekens, P; Ieven, M

    2006-04-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) was applied to the detection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae 16S rRNA by using the NucliSens basic kit (bioMérieux, Boxtel, The Netherlands). The assay was originally developed as a conventional NASBA assay with electrochemiluminescence detection and was subsequently adapted to a real-time NASBA format by using a molecular beacon. C. pneumoniae RNA prepared from a plasmid construct was used to assess the analytical sensitivity of the assay. The sensitivity of the NASBA assay was 10 molecules of in vitro wild-type C. pneumoniae RNA and 0.1 inclusion-forming unit (IFU) of C. pneumoniae. In spiked respiratory specimens, the sensitivity of the C. pneumoniae NASBA assay varied between 0.1 and 1 IFU/100 mul sample, depending on the type of specimen. Finally, conventional and real-time NASBA were applied to respiratory specimens previously tested by PCR. A 100% concordance between the test results was obtained.

  5. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Park, Steven; Warn, Peter; Shrief, Raghdaa; Harrison, Elizabeth; Perlin, David S

    2010-04-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate the early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). A real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) method was investigated by use of an inhalational rat model of IPA. Immunosuppressed male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus spores for an hour in an aerosol chamber. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lung tissues, and whole blood were collected from five infected rats at 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postinfection and five uninfected rats at the end of the experiment. Total nucleic acid (TNA) was extracted on an easyMAG instrument. A primer-molecular beacon set targeting 28S rRNA was designed to detect Aspergillus spp. The results were compared to those of quantitative PCR (qPCR) (18S rDNA) and quantitative culture. The analytical sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was <1 CFU/assay. A linear range of detection was demonstrated over 5 log units of conidia (10 to 10(5) spores). Both NASBA and qPCR showed a progressive increase in lung tissue burdens, while the CFU counts were stable over time. The fungal burdens in BAL fluid were more variable and not indicative of a progressive infection. The results of both real-time assays correlated well for both sample types (r = 0.869 and P < 0.0001 for lung tissue, r = 0.887 and P < 0.0001 for BAL fluid). For all whole-blood specimens, NASBA identified Aspergillus-positive samples in the group from which samples were collected at 72 h postinfection (three of five samples) and the group from which samples were collected at 96 h postinfection (five of five samples), but no positive results were obtained by culture or PCR. Real-time NASBA is highly sensitive and useful for the detection of Aspergillus in an experimental model of IPA. PMID:20129972

  6. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Park, Steven; Warn, Peter; Shrief, Raghdaa; Harrison, Elizabeth; Perlin, David S

    2010-04-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of Aspergillus from clinical samples may facilitate the early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). A real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) method was investigated by use of an inhalational rat model of IPA. Immunosuppressed male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus spores for an hour in an aerosol chamber. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, lung tissues, and whole blood were collected from five infected rats at 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postinfection and five uninfected rats at the end of the experiment. Total nucleic acid (TNA) was extracted on an easyMAG instrument. A primer-molecular beacon set targeting 28S rRNA was designed to detect Aspergillus spp. The results were compared to those of quantitative PCR (qPCR) (18S rDNA) and quantitative culture. The analytical sensitivity of the real-time NASBA assay was <1 CFU/assay. A linear range of detection was demonstrated over 5 log units of conidia (10 to 10(5) spores). Both NASBA and qPCR showed a progressive increase in lung tissue burdens, while the CFU counts were stable over time. The fungal burdens in BAL fluid were more variable and not indicative of a progressive infection. The results of both real-time assays correlated well for both sample types (r = 0.869 and P < 0.0001 for lung tissue, r = 0.887 and P < 0.0001 for BAL fluid). For all whole-blood specimens, NASBA identified Aspergillus-positive samples in the group from which samples were collected at 72 h postinfection (three of five samples) and the group from which samples were collected at 96 h postinfection (five of five samples), but no positive results were obtained by culture or PCR. Real-time NASBA is highly sensitive and useful for the detection of Aspergillus in an experimental model of IPA.

  7. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification is more convenient than real-time PCR for quantification of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Petra; Wolters, Liselotte; Schoone, Gerard; Schallig, Henk; Sillekens, Peter; Hermsen, Rob; Sauerwein, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Determination of the number of malaria parasites by routine or even expert microscopy is not always sufficiently sensitive for detailed quantitative studies on the population dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum, such as intervention or vaccine trials. To circumvent this problem, two more sensitive assays, real-time quantitative nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (QT-NASBA) and real-time quantitative PCR (QT-PCR) were compared for quantification of P. falciparum parasites. QT-NASBA was adapted to molecular beacon real-time detection technology, which enables a reduction of the time of analysis and of contamination risk while retaining the specificity and sensitivity of the original assay. Both QT-NASBA and QT-PCR have a sensitivity of 20 parasites/ml of blood, but QT-PCR requires a complicated DNA extraction procedure and the use of 500 microl of venous blood to achieve this sensitivity, compared to 50 microl of finger prick blood for real-time QT-NASBA. Both techniques show a significant correlation to microscopic parasite counts, and the quantification results of the two real-time assays are significantly correlated for in vitro as well as in vivo samples. However, in comparison to real-time QT-PCR, the results of real-time QT-NASBA can be obtained 12 h earlier, with relatively easy RNA extraction and use of finger prick blood samples. The prospective development of multiplex QT-NASBA for detection of various P. falciparum developmental stages increases the value of QT-NASBA for malaria studies. Therefore, for studies requiring sensitive and accurate detection of P. falciparum parasites in large numbers of samples, the use of real-time QT-NASBA is preferred over that of real-time QT-PCR.

  8. Rapid real-time nucleic Acid sequence-based amplification-molecular beacon platform to detect fungal and bacterial bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanan; Park, Steven; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Ginocchio, Christine C; Veyret, Raphaël; Laayoun, Ali; Troesch, Alain; Perlin, David S

    2009-07-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Successful patient outcomes are diminished by a failure to rapidly diagnose these infections and initiate appropriate therapy. A rapid and reliable diagnostic platform of high sensitivity is needed for the management of patients with BSIs. The combination of an RNA-dependent nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and molecular beacon (NASBA-MB) detection system in multiplex format was developed to rapidly detect medically important BSI organisms. Probes and primers representing pan-gram-negative, pan-gram-positive, pan-fungal, pan-Candida, and pan-Aspergillus organisms were established utilizing 16S and 28S rRNA targets for bacteria and fungi, respectively. Two multiplex panels were developed to rapidly discriminate bacterial or fungal infections at the subkingdom/genus level with a sensitivity of 1 to 50 genomes. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of this platform by evaluating 570 clinical samples from a tertiary-care hospital group using blood bottle samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and Youden's index values for pan-gram-positive detection and pan-gram-negative detection were 99.7%, 100%, 0.997 and 98.6%, 95.9%, 0.945, respectively. The positive predictive values (PPV) and the negative predictive values (NPV) for these two probes were 100, 90.7, and 99.4, 99.4, respectively. Pan-fungal and pan-Candida probes showed 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV, and the pan-Aspergillus probe showed 100% NPV. Robust signals were observed for all probes in the multiplex panels, with signal detection in <15 min. The multiplex real-time NASBA-MB assay provides a valuable platform for the rapid and specific diagnosis of bloodstream pathogens, and reliable pathogen identification and characterization can be obtained in under 3 h.

  9. Evaluation of the NucliSens Basic Kit for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Genital Tract Specimens Using Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, J. B.; Song, X.; Chong, S.; Faught, M.; Salonga, T.; Kapala, J.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new RNA amplification and detection kit, the NucliSens Basic Kit (Organon Teknika), for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in genitourinary specimens. The Basic Kit provides an open platform for RNA amplification and detection and contains isolation reagents for nucleic acid extraction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reagents (enzymes and buffers), and a generic ruthenium-labeled probe for electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of amplified product. Using freshly purified and titrated stocks of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae and in vitro-generated RNA transcripts for sensitivity determinations, the Basic Kit detected 1 inclusion-forming unit of C. trachomatis, 1 CFU of N. gonorrhoeae, and 100 RNA molecules of 16S rRNA for both bacteria. The clinical performance of the Basic Kit was evaluated by testing a total of 250 specimens for N. gonorrhoeae by culture and NASBA and a total of 96 specimens for C. trachomatis by PCR and NASBA. The Basic Kit detected 139 of 142 N. gonorrhoeae culture-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 73 of 74 culture-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 97.9 and 98.7%, respectively. For C. trachomatis, the Basic Kit detected 24 of 24 PCR-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 71 of 72 PCR-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 98.6%, respectively. The Basic Kit also detected specimens containing both N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis, using a multiplex NASBA assay using primers for both bacteria. The NucliSens Basic Kit offers a versatile platform for the development of sensitive RNA detection assays for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:11283067

  10. Principles of quantitation of viral loads using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification in combination with homogeneous detection using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Weusten, Jos J A M; Carpay, Wim M; Oosterlaken, Tom A M; van Zuijlen, Martien C A; van de Wiel, Paul A

    2002-03-15

    For quantitative NASBA-based viral load assays using homogeneous detection with molecular beacons, such as the NucliSens EasyQ HIV-1 assay, a quantitation algorithm is required. During the amplification process there is a constant growth in the concentration of amplicons to which the beacon can bind while generating a fluorescence signal. The overall fluorescence curve contains kinetic information on both amplicon formation and beacon binding, but only the former is relevant for quantitation. In the current paper, mathematical modeling of the relevant processes is used to develop an equation describing the fluorescence curve as a function of the amplification time and the relevant kinetic parameters. This equation allows reconstruction of RNA formation, which is characterized by an exponential increase in concentrations as long as the primer concentrations are not rate limiting and by linear growth over time after the primer pool is depleted. During the linear growth phase, the actual quantitation is based on assessing the amplicon formation rate from the viral RNA relative to that from a fixed amount of calibrator RNA. The quantitation procedure has been successfully applied in the NucliSens EasyQ HIV-1 assay.

  11. Development of a quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Sidoti, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Piasentin Alessio, Elsa; Astegiano, Sara; Gasparini, Giorgio; Cavallo, Rossana

    2012-03-01

    Evidence demonstrating that human rhinovirus (HRV) disease is not exclusively limited to the upper airways and may cause lower respiratory complications, together with the frequency of HRV infections and the increasing number of immunocompromised patients underline the need for rapid and accurate diagnosis of HRV infections. In this study, we developed the first quantitative real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay with an internal control using molecular beacon probes for selective and sensitive detection of human rhinovirus serotypes. We described a simple method to accurately quantify RNA target by computing the time to positivity (TTP) values for HRV RNA. Quantification capacity was assessed by plotting these TTP values against the starting number of target molecules. By using this simple method, we have significantly increased the diagnostic accuracy, precision, and trueness of real-time NASBA assay. Specificity of the method was verified in both in silico and experimental studies. Moreover, for assessment of clinical reactivity of the assay, NASBA has been validated on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Our quantitative NASBA assay was found to be very specific, accurate, and precise with high repeatability and reproducibility.

  12. Development of a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay that uses gag-based molecular beacons to distinguish between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C and C' infections in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ayele, Workenesh; Pollakis, Georgios; Abebe, Almaz; Fisseha, Bitew; Tegbaru, Belete; Tesfaye, Girma; Mengistu, Yohannes; Wolday, Dawit; van Gemen, Bob; Goudsmit, Jaap; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; de Baar, Michel P

    2004-04-01

    A gag-based molecular beacon assay utilizing real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification technology has been developed to differentiate between the two genetic subclusters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C (C and C') circulating in Ethiopia. Of 41 samples, 36 could be classified as C or C' by sequencing of the gag gene. All 36 isolates were correctly identified by the gag beacon test. Three isolates with genomes that were recombinant in gag were unambiguously typed as belonging to the C' subcluster. Further analysis revealed that these contained the most sequence homology with a reference subcluster C' sequence in the target region of the beacon and hence were correct for the analyzed region. For one sample, sequencing and gag molecular beacon results did not match, while another isolate could not be detected at all by the beacon assay. Overall, high levels of sensitivity and specificity were achieved for both beacons (90.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the C beacon and 100% sensitivity and 95.2% specificity for the C' beacon). The availability of a diagnostic test which can quickly and reliably discriminate between C and C' HIV-1 infections in Ethiopia is an important first step toward studying their respective biological characteristics. As the assay is specific to the Ethiopian HIV-1 subtype C epidemic, it will contribute to characterizing the circulating viruses in this population, thereby generating the information necessary for the development of a potential efficacious HIV-1 vaccine appropriate for the Ethiopian context.

  13. Bioanalytical applications of isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huimin; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The most popular in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including real-time PCR are costly and require thermocycling, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Highly efficient in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques using simple, portable and low-cost instruments are crucial in disease diagnosis, mutation detection and biodefense. Toward this goal, isothermal amplification techniques that represent a group of attractive in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques for bioanalysis have been developed. Unlike PCR where polymerases are easily deactivated by thermally labile constituents in a sample, some of the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as helicase-dependent amplification and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, enable the detection of bioanalytes with much simplified protocols and with minimal sample preparations since the entire amplification processes are performed isothermally. This review focuses on the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry. Starting off from their amplification mechanisms and significant properties, the adoption of isothermal amplification techniques in bioanalytical chemistry and their future perspectives are discussed. Representative examples illustrating the performance and advantages of each isothermal amplification technique are discussed along with some discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each technique.

  14. Isothermal Amplification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-11-25

    Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids is a simple process that rapidly and efficiently accumulates nucleic acid sequences at constant temperature. Since the early 1990s, various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isothermal amplification methods have been used for biosensing targets such as DNA, RNA, cells, proteins, small molecules, and ions. The applications of these techniques for in situ or intracellular bioimaging and sequencing have been amply demonstrated. Amplicons produced by isothermal amplification methods have also been utilized to construct versatile nucleic acid nanomaterials for promising applications in biomedicine, bioimaging, and biosensing. The integration of isothermal amplification into microsystems or portable devices improves nucleic acid-based on-site assays and confers high sensitivity. Single-cell and single-molecule analyses have also been implemented based on integrated microfluidic systems. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the isothermal amplification of nucleic acids encompassing work published in the past two decades. First, different isothermal amplification techniques are classified into three types based on reaction kinetics. Then, we summarize the applications of isothermal amplification in bioanalysis, diagnostics, nanotechnology, materials science, and device integration. Finally, several challenges and perspectives in the field are discussed. PMID:26551336

  15. Isothermal Amplification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-11-25

    Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids is a simple process that rapidly and efficiently accumulates nucleic acid sequences at constant temperature. Since the early 1990s, various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isothermal amplification methods have been used for biosensing targets such as DNA, RNA, cells, proteins, small molecules, and ions. The applications of these techniques for in situ or intracellular bioimaging and sequencing have been amply demonstrated. Amplicons produced by isothermal amplification methods have also been utilized to construct versatile nucleic acid nanomaterials for promising applications in biomedicine, bioimaging, and biosensing. The integration of isothermal amplification into microsystems or portable devices improves nucleic acid-based on-site assays and confers high sensitivity. Single-cell and single-molecule analyses have also been implemented based on integrated microfluidic systems. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the isothermal amplification of nucleic acids encompassing work published in the past two decades. First, different isothermal amplification techniques are classified into three types based on reaction kinetics. Then, we summarize the applications of isothermal amplification in bioanalysis, diagnostics, nanotechnology, materials science, and device integration. Finally, several challenges and perspectives in the field are discussed.

  16. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X. Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (105) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy. PMID:26340991

  17. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yusi; Li, Chunmei; Lu, Sijia; Zhou, Wenxiong; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X Sunney; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-09-22

    Whole-genome amplification (WGA) for next-generation sequencing has seen wide applications in biology and medicine when characterization of the genome of a single cell is required. High uniformity and fidelity of WGA is needed to accurately determine genomic variations, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and single-nucleotide variations (SNVs). Prevailing WGA methods have been limited by fluctuation of the amplification yield along the genome, as well as false-positive and -negative errors for SNV identification. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single-cell genomic DNA into a large number (10(5)) of picoliter aqueous droplets in oil. Containing only a few DNA fragments, each droplet is led to reach saturation of DNA amplification before demulsification such that the differences in amplification gain among the fragments are minimized. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle of eWGA with multiple displacement amplification (MDA), a popular WGA method. This easy-to-operate approach enables simultaneous detection of CNVs and SNVs in an individual human cell, exhibiting significantly improved amplification evenness and accuracy.

  18. A method for amplification of unknown flanking sequences based on touchdown PCR and suppression-PCR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; He, Dan; Li, Guangquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Lv, Huiying; Wang, Li

    2016-09-15

    Thermal asymmetric staggered PCR is the most widely used technique to obtain the flanking sequences. However, it has some limitations, including a low rate of positivity, and complex operation. In this study, a improved method of it was made based on suppression-PCR and touchdown PCR. The PCR fragment obtained by the amplification was used directly for sequencing after gel purification. Using this improved method, the positive rate of amplified flanking sequences of the ATMT mutants reached 99%. In addition, the time from DNA extraction to flanking sequence analysis was shortened to 2 days with about 6 dollars each sample. PMID:27393656

  19. A method for amplification of unknown flanking sequences based on touchdown PCR and suppression-PCR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; He, Dan; Li, Guangquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Lv, Huiying; Wang, Li

    2016-09-15

    Thermal asymmetric staggered PCR is the most widely used technique to obtain the flanking sequences. However, it has some limitations, including a low rate of positivity, and complex operation. In this study, a improved method of it was made based on suppression-PCR and touchdown PCR. The PCR fragment obtained by the amplification was used directly for sequencing after gel purification. Using this improved method, the positive rate of amplified flanking sequences of the ATMT mutants reached 99%. In addition, the time from DNA extraction to flanking sequence analysis was shortened to 2 days with about 6 dollars each sample.

  20. A universal DNA extraction and PCR amplification method for fungal rDNA sequence-based identification.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, A M; Fu, J; Herrera, M L; Wickes, B L

    2014-10-01

    Accurate identification of fungal pathogens using a sequence-based approach requires an extraction method that yields template DNA pure enough for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or other types of amplification. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and standardise a rapid, inexpensive DNA extraction protocol applicable to the major fungal phyla, which would yield sufficient template DNA pure enough for PCR and sequencing. A total of 519 clinical and culture collection strains, comprised of both yeast and filamentous fungi, were prepared using our extraction method to determine its applicability for PCR, which targeted the ITS and D1/D2 regions in a single PCR amplicon. All templates were successfully amplified and found to yield the correct strain identification when sequenced. This protocol could be completed in approximately 30 min and utilised a combination of physical and chemical extraction methods but did not require organic solvents nor ethanol precipitation. The method reduces the number of tube manipulations and yielded suitable template DNA for PCR amplification from all phyla that were tested.

  1. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Zhang, Kun

    2008-06-17

    Methods of reducing background during amplification of small amounts of nucleic acids employ careful analysis of sources of low level contamination. Ultraviolet light can be used to reduce nucleic acid contaminants in reagents and equipment. "Primer-dimer" background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6 picogram), E. coli cell (.about.5 femtogram) or Prochlorococcus cell (.about.3 femtogram).

  2. Non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Domingo, Gonzalo; Gerlach, Jay; Tang, Dennis; Harvey, Darrel; Talwar, Nick; Fichtenholz, Alex; van Lew, Bill; LaBarre, Paul

    2008-02-01

    We have developed components of a diagnostic disposable platform that has the dual purpose of providing molecular diagnostics at the point of care (POC) as well as stabilizing specimens for further analysis via a centralized surveillance system. This diagnostic is targeted for use in low-resource settings by minimally trained health workers. The disposable device does not require any additional instrumentation and will be almost as rapid and simple to use as a lateral flow strip test - yet will offer the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The low-cost integrated device is composed of three functional components: (1) a sample-processing subunit that generates clean and stabilized DNA from raw samples containing nucleic acids, (2) a NA amplification subunit, and (3) visual amplicon detection sub-unit. The device integrates chemical exothermic heating, temperature stabilization using phase-change materials, and isothermal nucleic acid amplification. The aim of developing this system is to provide pathogen detection with NAAT-level sensitivity in low-resource settings where there is no access to instrumentation. If a disease occurs, patients would be tested with the disposable in the field. A nucleic acid sample would be preserved within the spent disposable which could be sent to a central laboratory facility for further analysis if needed.

  3. Detection of North American eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses by nucleic acid amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Amy J; Martin, Denise A; Lanciotti, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    We have developed nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and TaqMan nucleic acid amplification assays for the rapid detection of North American eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and western equine encephalitis (WEE) viral RNAs from samples collected in the field and clinical samples. The sensitivities of these assays have been compared to that of virus isolation. While all three types of nucleic acid amplification assays provide rapid detection of viral RNAs comparable to the isolation of viruses in Vero cells, the TaqMan assays for North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs are the most sensitive. We have shown these assays to be specific for North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs by testing geographically and temporally distinct strains of EEE and WEE viruses along with a battery of related and unrelated arthropodborne viruses. In addition, all three types of nucleic acid amplification assays have been used to detect North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs from mosquito and vertebrate tissue samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and rapidity of nucleic acid amplification demonstrate the usefulness of NASBA, standard RT-PCR, and TaqMan assays, in both research and diagnostic settings, to detect North American EEE and WEE viral RNAs. PMID:12517876

  4. Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing in Suspected Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esernio-Jenssen, Debra; Barnes, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that site-specific cultures be obtained, when indicated, for sexually victimized children. Nucleic acid amplification testing is a highly sensitive and specific methodology for identifying sexually transmitted infections. Nucleic acid amplification tests are also less invasive than culture, and this…

  5. Microfluidic devices for nucleic acid (NA) isolation, isothermal NA amplification, and real-time detection.

    PubMed

    Mauk, Michael G; Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed; Bau, Haim H

    2015-01-01

    Molecular (nucleic acid)-based diagnostics tests have many advantages over immunoassays, particularly with regard to sensitivity and specificity. Most on-site diagnostic tests, however, are immunoassay-based because conventional nucleic acid-based tests (NATs) require extensive sample processing, trained operators, and specialized equipment. To make NATs more convenient, especially for point-of-care diagnostics and on-site testing, a simple plastic microfluidic cassette ("chip") has been developed for nucleic acid-based testing of blood, other clinical specimens, food, water, and environmental samples. The chip combines nucleic acid isolation by solid-phase extraction; isothermal enzymatic amplification such as LAMP (Loop-mediated AMPlification), NASBA (Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification), and RPA (Recombinase Polymerase Amplification); and real-time optical detection of DNA or RNA analytes. The microfluidic cassette incorporates an embedded nucleic acid binding membrane in the amplification reaction chamber. Target nucleic acids extracted from a lysate are captured on the membrane and amplified at a constant incubation temperature. The amplification product, labeled with a fluorophore reporter, is excited with a LED light source and monitored in situ in real time with a photodiode or a CCD detector (such as available in a smartphone). For blood analysis, a companion filtration device that separates plasma from whole blood to provide cell-free samples for virus and bacterial lysis and nucleic acid testing in the microfluidic chip has also been developed. For HIV virus detection in blood, the microfluidic NAT chip achieves a sensitivity and specificity that are nearly comparable to conventional benchtop protocols using spin columns and thermal cyclers.

  6. AcalPred: a sequence-based tool for discriminating between acidic and alkaline enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment.

  7. AcalPred: A Sequence-Based Tool for Discriminating between Acidic and Alkaline Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment. PMID:24130738

  8. Comparison of Three Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Bestetti, Arabella; Pierotti, Chiara; Terreni, Mariarosa; Zappa, Alessandra; Vago, Luca; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic reliabilities of three cytomegalovirus (CMV) nucleic acid amplification assays of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compared by using CSF samples from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with a postmortem histopathological diagnosis of CMV encephalitis (n = 15) or other central nervous system conditions (n = 16). By using a nested PCR assay, the quantitative COBAS AMPLICOR CMV MONITOR PCR, and the NucliSens CMV pp67 nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay, sensitivities were 93.3, 86.6, and 93.3%, respectively, and specificities were 93.7, 93.7, and 87.5%, respectively. The COBAS AMPLICOR assay revealed significantly higher CMV DNA levels in patients with diffuse ventriculoencephalitis than in patients with focal periventricular lesions. PMID:11230445

  9. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing a plurality of a nucleic acid array, comprising, in order, the steps of amplifying in situ nucleic acid molecules of a first randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array comprising a heterogeneous pool of nucleic acid molecules affixed to a support, transferring at least a subset of the nucleic acid molecules produced by such amplifying to a second support, and affixing the subset so transferred to the second support to form a second randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array, wherein the nucleic acid molecules of the second array occupy positions that correspond to those of the nucleic acid molecules from which they were amplified on the first array, so that the first array serves as a template to produce a plurality, is disclosed.

  10. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  11. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    SciTech Connect

    Ulanovsky, Levy; Raja, Mugasimangalam C.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  12. An integrated portable hand-held analyser for real-time isothermal nucleic acid amplification.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew C; Steimle, George; Ivanov, Stan; Holly, Mark; Fries, David P

    2007-08-29

    A compact hand-held heated fluorometric instrument for performing real-time isothermal nucleic acid amplification and detection is described. The optoelectronic instrument combines a Printed Circuit Board/Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (PCB/MEMS) reaction detection/chamber containing an integrated resistive heater with attached miniature LED light source and photo-detector and a disposable glass waveguide capillary to enable a mini-fluorometer. The fluorometer is fabricated and assembled in planar geometry, rolled into a tubular format and packaged with custom control electronics to form the hand-held reactor. Positive or negative results for each reaction are displayed to the user using an LED interface. Reaction data is stored in FLASH memory for retrieval via an in-built USB connection. Operating on one disposable 3 V lithium battery >12, 60 min reactions can be performed. Maximum dimensions of the system are 150 mm (h) x 48 mm (d) x 40 mm (w), the total instrument weight (with battery) is 140 g. The system produces comparable results to laboratory instrumentation when performing a real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reaction, and also displayed comparable precision, accuracy and resolution to laboratory-based real-time nucleic acid amplification instrumentation. A good linear response (R2 = 0.948) to fluorescein gradients ranging from 0.5 to 10 microM was also obtained from the instrument indicating that it may be utilized for other fluorometric assays. This instrument enables an inexpensive, compact approach to in-field genetic screening, providing results comparable to laboratory equipment with rapid user feedback as to the status of the reaction. PMID:17719904

  13. Acidic precipitation: a technical amplification of NAPAP's findings

    SciTech Connect

    Lefohn, A.S.; Krupa, S.V.

    1988-06-01

    In September 1987, NAPAP released a 4-volume, 925 page interim report that summarized the effects of acidic precipitation on crops, forests, aquatic ecosystems, visibility, and human health. Following the release of the report, APCA coordinated an international conference to provide a forum for the technical amplification of the conclusions reached in NAPAP's report. Scientists from the United States and Canada were invited to participate in the conference. The focus of the meeting was concerned only with the technical aspects of the NAPAP report. At the conference, there were important research concepts presented that may require further attention before definitive, bottom line statements can be made concerning the effects of acid precipitation on the environment. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the key technical points made at the conference and provide NAPAP with additional scientific inputs as it begins to prepare for its 1990 Final Assessment Report.

  14. Polyethersulfone improves isothermal nucleic acid amplification compared to current paper-based diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Linnes, J. C.; Rodriguez, N. M.; Liu, L.

    2016-01-01

    Devices based on rapid, paper-based, isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques have recently emerged with the potential to fill a growing need for highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostics throughout the world. As this field develops, such devices will require optimized materials that promote amplification and sample preparation. Herein, we systematically investigated isothermal nucleic acid amplification in materials currently used in rapid diagnostics (cellulose paper, glass fiber, and nitrocellulose) and two additional porous membranes with upstream sample preparation capabilities (polyethersulfone and polycarbonate). We compared amplification efficiency from four separate DNA and RNA targets (Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Influenza A H1N1) within these materials using two different isothermal amplification schemes, helicase dependent amplification (tHDA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and traditional PCR. We found that the current paper-based diagnostic membranes inhibited nucleic acid amplification when compared to membrane-free controls; however, polyethersulfone allowed for efficient amplification in both LAMP and tHDA reactions. Further, observing the performance of traditional PCR amplification within these membranes was not predicative of their effects on in situ LAMP and tHDA. Polyethersulfone is a new material for paper-based nucleic acid amplification, yet provides an optimal support for rapid molecular diagnostics for point-of-care applications. PMID:26906904

  15. Polyethersulfone improves isothermal nucleic acid amplification compared to current paper-based diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Linnes, J C; Rodriguez, N M; Liu, L; Klapperich, C M

    2016-04-01

    Devices based on rapid, paper-based, isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques have recently emerged with the potential to fill a growing need for highly sensitive point-of-care diagnostics throughout the world. As this field develops, such devices will require optimized materials that promote amplification and sample preparation. Herein, we systematically investigated isothermal nucleic acid amplification in materials currently used in rapid diagnostics (cellulose paper, glass fiber, and nitrocellulose) and two additional porous membranes with upstream sample preparation capabilities (polyethersulfone and polycarbonate). We compared amplification efficiency from four separate DNA and RNA targets (Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Influenza A H1N1) within these materials using two different isothermal amplification schemes, helicase dependent amplification (tHDA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and traditional PCR. We found that the current paper-based diagnostic membranes inhibited nucleic acid amplification when compared to membrane-free controls; however, polyethersulfone allowed for efficient amplification in both LAMP and tHDA reactions. Further, observing the performance of traditional PCR amplification within these membranes was not predicative of their effects on in situ LAMP and tHDA. Polyethersulfone is a new material for paper-based nucleic acid amplification, yet provides an optimal support for rapid molecular diagnostics for point-of-care applications. PMID:26906904

  16. Nucleic acid detection using G-quadruplex amplification methodologies.

    PubMed

    Roembke, Benjamin T; Nakayama, Shizuka; Sintim, Herman O

    2013-12-15

    In the last decade, there has been an explosion in the use of G-quadruplex labels to detect various analytes, including DNA/RNA, proteins, metals and other metabolites. In this review, we focus on strategies for the detection of nucleic acids, using G-quadruplexes as detection labels or as enzyme labels that amplify detection signals. Methods to detect other analytes are briefly mentioned. We highlight various strategies, including split G-quadruplex, hemin-G-quadruplex conjugates, molecular beacon G-quadruplex or inhibited G-quadruplex probes. The tandem use of G-quadruplex labels with various DNA-modifying enzymes, such as polymerases (used for rolling circle amplification), exonucleases and endonucleases, is also discussed. Some of the detection modalities that are discussed in this review include fluorescence, colorimetric, chemiluminescence, and electrochemical methods.

  17. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  18. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed. PMID:27600235

  19. In vitro amplification techniques for the detection of nucleic acids: new tools for the diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Persing, D H; Landry, M L

    1989-01-01

    The acceptance of nucleic acid probes as diagnostic tools for the clinical laboratory has been hampered by a number of factors, including laborious techniques and limited sensitivity. The focus of this review is on the recent development of amplification techniques to enhance the signal generated by nucleic acid-based detection systems. Three general areas are discussed: (1) amplification of target sequences using the polymerase chain reaction or the transcript amplification system, (2) amplification of the probe sequences using Q beta replicase, and (3) amplification of probe-generated signals with compound or "Christmas tree" probes. The hope of these new technologies is to simplify yet improve on the sensitivity of nucleic acid-based tests to enable them to attain a more prominent place in the diagnostic repertoire of the clinical laboratory.

  20. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use.

  1. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use. PMID:26706801

  2. Powerful Amplification Cascades of FRET-Based Two-Layer Nonenzymatic Nucleic Acid Circuits.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ke; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; Yang, Yanjing; Ying, Le; Wang, He; Xie, Nuli; Ou, Min; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acid circuits have played important roles in biological engineering and have increasingly attracted researchers' attention. They are primarily based on nucleic acid hybridizations and strand displacement reactions between nucleic acid probes of different lengths. Signal amplification schemes that do not rely on protein enzyme show great potential in analytical applications. While the single amplification circuit often achieves linear amplification that may not meet the need for detection of target in a very small amount, it is very necessary to construct cascade circuits that allow for larger amplification of inputs. Herein, we have successfully engineered powerful amplification cascades of FRET-based two-layer nonenzymatic nucleic acid circuits, in which the outputs of catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) activate hybridization chain reactions (HCR) circuits to induce repeated hybridization, allowing real-time monitoring of self-assembly process by FRET signal. The cascades can yield 50000-fold signal amplification with the help of the well-designed and high-quality nucleic acid circuit amplifiers. Subsequently, with coupling of structure-switching aptamer, as low as 200 pM adenosine is detected in buffer, as well as in human serum. To our knowledge, we have for the first time realized real-time monitoring adaptation of HCR to CHA circuits and achieved amplified detection of nucleic acids and small molecules with relatively high sensitivity. PMID:27142084

  3. A comparative study of three different nucleic acid amplification techniques combined with microchip electrophoresis for HPV16 E6/E7 mRNA detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanli; Lin, Xuexia; Lin, Luyao; Yi, Linglu; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Research towards nucleic acid amplification technologies for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6/E7 mRNA was carried out in combination with microchip electrophoresis (MCE). The approaches of nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA), one-step RT-PCR and two-step RT-PCR were successfully developed. NASBA was a simple enzymatic reaction, which directly amplified HPV16 mRNA by isothermal amplification, leaving out the complex and tedious operation. One-step RT-PCR simplified the amplification step, while two-step RT-PCR was more sensitive and less vulnerable to the interference. Furthermore, instead of gel electrophoresis, microchip electrophoresis (MCE) for RNA assay was employed to realize high-throughput and rapid analysis. Finally, the results show that PCR-based or NASBA-based mRNA tests are valuable for HPV mRNA assay, which can be potentially applied for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cervical and other anogenital carcinoma. PMID:26332096

  4. A comparative study of three different nucleic acid amplification techniques combined with microchip electrophoresis for HPV16 E6/E7 mRNA detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanli; Lin, Xuexia; Lin, Luyao; Yi, Linglu; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Research towards nucleic acid amplification technologies for detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6/E7 mRNA was carried out in combination with microchip electrophoresis (MCE). The approaches of nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA), one-step RT-PCR and two-step RT-PCR were successfully developed. NASBA was a simple enzymatic reaction, which directly amplified HPV16 mRNA by isothermal amplification, leaving out the complex and tedious operation. One-step RT-PCR simplified the amplification step, while two-step RT-PCR was more sensitive and less vulnerable to the interference. Furthermore, instead of gel electrophoresis, microchip electrophoresis (MCE) for RNA assay was employed to realize high-throughput and rapid analysis. Finally, the results show that PCR-based or NASBA-based mRNA tests are valuable for HPV mRNA assay, which can be potentially applied for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of cervical and other anogenital carcinoma.

  5. Miniaturized nucleic acid amplification systems for rapid and point-of-care diagnostics: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farhan; Hashsham, Syed A

    2012-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) genetic diagnostics critically depends on miniaturization and integration of sample processing, nucleic acid amplification, and detection systems. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays have extensively applied for the diagnosis of genetic markers of disease. Microfluidic chips for microPCR with different materials and designs have been reported. Temperature cycling systems with varying thermal masses and conductivities, thermal cycling times, flow-rates, and cross-sectional areas, have also been developed to reduce the nucleic acid amplification time. Similarly, isothermal amplification techniques (e.g., loop-mediated isothermal amplification or LAMP), which are still are emerging, have a better potential as an alternative to PCR for POC diagnostics. Isothermal amplification techniques have: (i) moderate incubation temperature leading to simplified heating and low power consumption, (ii) yield high amount of amplification products, which can be detected either visually or by simple detectors, (iii) allow direct genetic amplification from bacterial cells due to the superior tolerance to substances that typically inhibit PCR, (iv) have high specificity, and sensitivity, and (v) result in rapid detection often within 10-20 min. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of the advantages and limitations of microPCR and microLAMP systems for rapid and POC diagnostics. PMID:22704369

  6. A Simple, Low-Cost Platform for Real-Time Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    PubMed

    Craw, Pascal; Mackay, Ruth E; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Hudson, Chris; Branavan, Manoharanehru; Sadiq, S Tariq; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microfluidics and the introduction of isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays have resulted in a range of solutions for nucleic acid amplification tests suited for point of care and field use. However, miniaturisation of instrumentation for such assays has not seen such rapid advances and fluorescence based assays still depend on complex, bulky and expensive optics such as fluorescence microscopes, photomultiplier tubes and sensitive lens assemblies. In this work we demonstrate a robust, low cost platform for isothermal nucleic acid amplification on a microfluidic device. Using easily obtainable materials and commercial off-the-shelf components, we show real time fluorescence detection using a low cost photodiode and operational amplifier without need for lenses. Temperature regulation on the device is achieved using a heater fabricated with standard printed circuit board fabrication methods. These facile construction methods allow fabrications at a cost compatible with widespread deployment to resource poor settings. PMID:26389913

  7. A Simple, Low-Cost Platform for Real-Time Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Craw, Pascal; Mackay, Ruth E.; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Hudson, Chris; Branavan, Manoharanehru; Sadiq, S. Tariq; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microfluidics and the introduction of isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays have resulted in a range of solutions for nucleic acid amplification tests suited for point of care and field use. However, miniaturisation of instrumentation for such assays has not seen such rapid advances and fluorescence based assays still depend on complex, bulky and expensive optics such as fluorescence microscopes, photomultiplier tubes and sensitive lens assemblies. In this work we demonstrate a robust, low cost platform for isothermal nucleic acid amplification on a microfluidic device. Using easily obtainable materials and commercial off-the-shelf components, we show real time fluorescence detection using a low cost photodiode and operational amplifier without need for lenses. Temperature regulation on the device is achieved using a heater fabricated with standard printed circuit board fabrication methods. These facile construction methods allow fabrications at a cost compatible with widespread deployment to resource poor settings. PMID:26389913

  8. Instrument for Real-Time Digital Nucleic Acid Amplification on Custom Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Selck, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests that are coupled with a digital readout enable the absolute quantification of single molecules, even at ultralow concentrations. Digital methods are robust, versatile and compatible with many amplification chemistries including isothermal amplification, making them particularly invaluable to assays that require sensitive detection, such as the quantification of viral load in occult infections or detection of sparse amounts of DNA from forensic samples. A number of microfluidic platforms are being developed for carrying out digital amplification. However, the mechanistic investigation and optimization of digital assays has been limited by the lack of real-time kinetic information about which factors affect the digital efficiency and analytical sensitivity of a reaction. Commercially available instruments that are capable of tracking digital reactions in real-time are restricted to only a small number of device types and sample-preparation strategies. Thus, most researchers who wish to develop, study, or optimize digital assays rely on the rate of the amplification reaction when performed in a bulk experiment, which is now recognized as an unreliable predictor of digital efficiency. To expand our ability to study how digital reactions proceed in real-time and enable us to optimize both the digital efficiency and analytical sensitivity of digital assays, we built a custom large-format digital real-time amplification instrument that can accommodate a wide variety of devices, amplification chemistries and sample-handling conditions. Herein, we validate this instrument, we provide detailed schematics that will enable others to build their own custom instruments, and we include a complete custom software suite to collect and analyze the data retrieved from the instrument. We believe assay optimizations enabled by this instrument will improve the current limits of nucleic acid detection and quantification, improving our fundamental

  9. Relevance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for diagnosis of respiratory tract infections in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Ieven, M; Goossens, H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly receiving requests to perform nucleic acid amplification tests for the detection of a wide variety of infectious agents. In this paper, the efficiency of nucleic acid amplification techniques for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections is reviewed. In general, these techniques should be applied only for the detection of microorganisms for which available diagnostic techniques are markedly insensitive or nonexistent or when turnaround times for existing tests (e.g., viral culture) are much longer than those expected with amplification. This is the case for rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and hantaviruses causing a pulmonary syndrome, Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Coxiella burnetii. For Legionella spp. and fungi, contamination originating from the environment is a limiting factor in interpretation of results, as is the difficulty in differentiating colonization and infection. Detection of these agents in urine or blood by amplification techniques remains to be evaluated. In the clinical setting, there is no need for molecular diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii. At present, amplification methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis cannot replace the classical diagnostic techniques, due to their lack of sensitivity and the absence of specific internal controls for the detection of inhibitors of the reaction. Also, the results of interlaboratory comparisons are unsatisfactory. Furthermore, isolates are needed for susceptibility studies. Additional work remains to be done on sample preparation methods, comparison between different amplification methods, and analysis of results. The techniques can be useful for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis in particular circumstances, as well as the rapid detection of most rifampin-resistant isolates. The introduction of diagnostic amplification techniques into a clinical laboratory implies a level of proficiency for

  10. Fluorescence detection in Lab-on-a-chip systems using ultrafast nucleic acid amplification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gransee, Rainer; Schneider, Tristan; Elyorgun, Deniz; Strobach, Xenia; Schunck, Tobias; Gatscha, Theresia; Höth, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Today, nucleic amplification plays a key role in modern molecular biology allowing fast and specific laboratory diagnostics testing. An ultrafast microfluidic module (allowing 30 polymeric chain reaction (PCR) cycles in 6 minutes) based on an oscillating fluid plug concept was previously developed[1]. This system allows the amplification of native genomic deoxyribonucleic acid molecules (DNA) even from whole blood samples but still lacks some functionality compared to commercial bench top systems. This work presents the actual status of the renewed and advanced system, permitting the automated optical detection of not only the fluid plug position but also fluorescence detection. The system uses light emitting diodes (LED) for illumination and a low cost CMOS web-camera for optical detection. Image data processing allows the automated process control of the overall system components. Therefore, the system enables the performance of rapid and robust nucleic acid amplifications together with the integration of real time measurement technology. This allows the amplification and simultaneous quantification of the DNA molecules. The possibility to integrate swift nucleic amplification and optical detection into complex sample-to-answer analysis platforms opens up new pathways towards fast and transportable low-cost point of care devices.

  11. Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kamal G; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Buser, Joshua; Burton, Robert; LaBarre, Paul; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Weigl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters. PMID:26430883

  12. Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kamal G.; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Buser, Joshua; Burton, Robert; LaBarre, Paul; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Weigl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters. PMID:26430883

  13. NAIL: Nucleic Acid detection using Isotachophoresis and Loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Kimura, Kevin W; Posner, Jonathan D

    2015-04-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests are the gold standard for many infectious disease diagnoses due to high sensitivity and specificity, rapid operation, and low limits of detection. Despite the advantages of nucleic acid amplification tests, they currently offer limited point-of-care (POC) utility due to the need for complex instruments and laborious sample preparation. We report the development of the Nucleic Acid Isotachophoresis LAMP (NAIL) diagnostic device. NAIL uses isotachophoresis (ITP) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to extract and amplify nucleic acids from complex matrices in less than one hour inside of an integrated chip. ITP is an electrokinetic separation technique that uses an electric field and two buffers to extract and purify nucleic acids in a single step. LAMP amplifies nucleic acids at constant temperature and produces large amounts of DNA that can be easily detected. A mobile phone images the amplification results to eliminate the need for laser fluorescent detection. The device requires minimal user intervention because capillary valves and heated air chambers act as passive valves and pumps for automated fluid actuation. In this paper, we describe NAIL device design and operation, and demonstrate the extraction and detection of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 cells from whole milk samples. We use the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) limit of detection (LoD) definitions that take into account the variance from both positive and negative samples to determine the diagnostic LoD. According to the CLSI definition, the NAIL device has a limit of detection (LoD) of 1000 CFU mL(-1) for E. coli cells artificially inoculated into whole milk, which is two orders of magnitude improvement to standard tube-LAMP reactions with diluted milk samples and comparable to lab-based methods. The NAIL device potentially offers significant reductions in the complexity and cost of traditional nucleic acid diagnostics for POC applications

  14. NAIL: Nucleic Acid detection using Isotachophoresis and Loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Kimura, Kevin W; Posner, Jonathan D

    2015-04-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests are the gold standard for many infectious disease diagnoses due to high sensitivity and specificity, rapid operation, and low limits of detection. Despite the advantages of nucleic acid amplification tests, they currently offer limited point-of-care (POC) utility due to the need for complex instruments and laborious sample preparation. We report the development of the Nucleic Acid Isotachophoresis LAMP (NAIL) diagnostic device. NAIL uses isotachophoresis (ITP) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to extract and amplify nucleic acids from complex matrices in less than one hour inside of an integrated chip. ITP is an electrokinetic separation technique that uses an electric field and two buffers to extract and purify nucleic acids in a single step. LAMP amplifies nucleic acids at constant temperature and produces large amounts of DNA that can be easily detected. A mobile phone images the amplification results to eliminate the need for laser fluorescent detection. The device requires minimal user intervention because capillary valves and heated air chambers act as passive valves and pumps for automated fluid actuation. In this paper, we describe NAIL device design and operation, and demonstrate the extraction and detection of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 cells from whole milk samples. We use the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) limit of detection (LoD) definitions that take into account the variance from both positive and negative samples to determine the diagnostic LoD. According to the CLSI definition, the NAIL device has a limit of detection (LoD) of 1000 CFU mL(-1) for E. coli cells artificially inoculated into whole milk, which is two orders of magnitude improvement to standard tube-LAMP reactions with diluted milk samples and comparable to lab-based methods. The NAIL device potentially offers significant reductions in the complexity and cost of traditional nucleic acid diagnostics for POC applications.

  15. Sublimation of amino acids with enantiomeric excess amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Bellec, Aurelien

    The notion of chirality was first reported in 1848 by Pasteur, when he mechanically separated the two enantiomers of tartrate salts.[1] Amino acids are considered as the most important building blocks of life with sugars. On the Earth, the living systems are only composed of L- amino acids and D-sugars. Nowadays, the origin of homochirality on Earth is still unknown, and there are many theories trying to explain this phenomenon. Recently Cooks [2] and Feringa [3] reported that the sublimation of small amounts of L and D amino acid mixtures containing an excess of one of them leads to a huge enantiomeric excess (ee) enhancement of the sublimate. We reinvestigated these experiments to determine the rules leading to this enhancement. Starting from mixtures of L- and DL leucine we observed increasing and decreasing of the ee in function of the starting ratios. By the use of 13C derivatives, the origin of the sublimed enantiomers has been precised. Various parameters (L and D, or L and DL mixtures, dissolution in water before sublimation, . . . ) were studied. We also took into consideration the recently proposed hypothesis of the role played by the eutectic ee in the sublimation. [4] The application of these results to find an explanation of the enantiomeric excess in meteorites or in the Primitive Earth scenarios will be discussed. 1 Pasteur, L. Ann. Phys., 1848, 24, 442. 2 R. H. Perry, C. Wu, M. Nefliu, R. G. Cooks, Chem. Commun., 2007, 1071-1073. 3 S. P. Fletcher, R. B. C. Jagt, B. L. Feringa, Chem. Commun., 2007, 2578-2580. 4 D. G. Blackmond, M. Klussmannb Chem. Commun., 2007, 3990-3996.

  16. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  17. Guanine nanowire based amplification strategy: Enzyme-free biosensing of nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Huang, Yan Li; Ren, Wang; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-04-15

    Sensitive and specific detection of nucleic acids and proteins plays a vital role in food, forensic screening, clinical and environmental monitoring. There remains a great challenge in the development of signal amplification method for biomolecules detection. Herein, we describe a novel signal amplification strategy based on the formation of guanine nanowire for quantitative detection of nucleic acids and proteins (thrombin) at room temperature. In the presence of analytes and magnesium ions, the guanine nanowire could be formed within 10 min. Compared to the widely used single G-quadruplex biocatalytic label unit, the detection limits are improved by two orders of magnitude in our assay. The proposed enzyme-free method avoids fussy chemical label-ling process, complex programming task, and sophisticated equipment, which might provide an ideal candidate for the fabrication of selective and sensitive biosensing platform.

  18. Anchoring Transitions of Liquid Crystals for Optical Amplification of Phospholipid Oxidation Inhibition by Ascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the antioxidant property of ascorbic acid (AH) is effective for reducing oxidative stress of phospholipids. Herein, a liquid crystals (LCs)-based method was developed for the optical amplification of resistance to phospholipid oxidation by AH. Phospholipid peroxidation initiated by free radicals was monitored from a homeotropic-to-planar anchoring transition of LCs via polarized optical microscopy. Alternatively, consistent homeotropic anchoring of LCs was observed when the oxidation caused by free radicals was blocked by AH.

  19. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Based Method for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M.; Mauk, Michael G.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  20. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Column for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Liu, Changchun; Killawala, Chitvan; Sadik, Mohamed; Mauk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in many medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assessing disease progression, effectiveness of drug therapy, and emergence of drug-resistance. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires sophisticated and expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low resource settings. We describe a simple, low-cost, reactiondiffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. We model the process with the Fisher Kolmogoroff Petrovskii Piscounoff (FKPP) Equation and compare theoretical predictions with experimental observations. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at the point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. C.L. was supported by NIH/NIAID K25AI099160; M.S. was supported by the Pennsylvania Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority; C.K. and H.B. were funded, in part, by NIH/NIAID 1R41AI104418-01A1.

  1. Quantitative titration of nucleic acids by enzymatic amplification reactions run to saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Pannetier, C; Delassus, S; Darche, S; Saucier, C; Kourilsky, P

    1993-01-01

    In vitro enzymatic amplification of nucleic acids by PCR or other techniques is a very sensitive method to detect rare DNA segments. We present here a protocol that allows the rapid, sensitive and precise quantification of DNA molecules using PCR amplification run to saturation. The DNA (or cDNA) to be assayed is co-amplified with known amounts of an internal standard DNA. We show that the latter must be almost identical to the assayed DNA, otherwise quantification at the plateau is unreliable. The read-out of the amplification involves one or two additional oligonucleotides. Using fluorescent oligonucleotides as primers in run-off reactions together with an automated DNA sequencer, we could measure the level of expression of several genes, like the murine MHC class I H-2Kd or a specific T cell receptor beta chain transcript in the course of an immunization. mRNA levels were normalized by measuring in a similar manner the number of transcripts encoding the housekeeping gene HPRT. Finally, our procedure might allow the rapid analysis of a large number of samples at the same time, as illustrated by the simultaneous analysis of the mRNAs encoding the CD4 and CD8 murine T cell markers. PMID:8441670

  2. Amplification of fluorescently labelled DNA within gram-positive and acid-fast bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vaid, A; Bishop, A H

    1999-10-01

    Representative organisms from a variety of Gram-positive genera were subjected to varying regimes in order to optimise the intracellular amplification of DNA. The bacteria were subjected to treatments with paraformaldehyde, muramidases and mild acid hydrolysis to discover which regime made each organism permeable to the amplification reagents yet allowed retention of the fluorescein-labelled amplified products within the cell. Scanning electron micrographs were used to corroborate the effectiveness of the treatments, as seen by fluorescent photomicrographs, with the damage caused to the bacterial walls. A combination of mutanolysin and lysozyme was found most effective for Bacillus cereus, whereas permeabilisation of Streptomyces coelicolor, Lactococcus lactis and Clostridium sporogenes was most effective when exposed to lysozyme only. Surprisingly, direct amplification with no pre-treatment gave the brightest fluorescence in Mycobacterium phlei. Comparing the techniques of whole cell PCR, primed in situ labelling (PRINS), and cycle PRINS showed that under the conditions used the strongest intensity of fluorescence was obtained with in situ PCR; only L. lactis and M. phlei produced signals with cycle PRINS, fluorescence was not seen for any of the organisms with PRINS.

  3. Recombinase-based isothermal amplification of nucleic acids with self-avoiding molecular recognition systems (SAMRS).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Hoshika, Shuichi; Hutter, Daniel; Bradley, Kevin M; Benner, Steven A

    2014-10-13

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal method to amplify nucleic acid sequences without the temperature cycling that classical PCR uses. Instead of using heat to denature the DNA duplex, RPA uses recombination enzymes to swap single-stranded primers into the duplex DNA product; these are then extended using a strand-displacing polymerase to complete the cycle. Because RPA runs at low temperatures, it never forces the system to recreate base-pairs following Watson-Crick rules, and therefore it produces undesired products that impede the amplification of the desired product, complicating downstream analysis. Herein, we show that most of these undesired side products can be avoided if the primers contain components of a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS). Given the precision that is necessary in the recombination systems for them to function biologically, it is surprising that they accept SAMRS. SAMRS-RPA is expected to be a powerful tool within the range of amplification techniques available to scientists.

  4. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection. PMID:26202628

  5. Multiplex Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Diagnosis of Dengue Fever, Malaria, and Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Jesse J.; Abeynayake, Janaki; Balassiano, Ilana; Lefterova, Martina; Sahoo, Malaya K.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Vital-Brazil, Juliana Magalhães; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    Dengue, leptospirosis, and malaria are among the most common etiologies of systemic undifferentiated febrile illness (UFI) among travelers to the developing world, and these pathogens all have the potential to cause life-threatening illness in returned travelers. The current study describes the development of an internally controlled multiplex nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of dengue virus (DENV) and Leptospira and Plasmodium species, with a specific callout for Plasmodium falciparum (referred to as the UFI assay). During analytical evaluation, the UFI assay displayed a wide dynamic range and a sensitive limit of detection for each target, including all four DENV serotypes. In a clinical evaluation including 210 previously tested samples, the sensitivities of the UFI assay were 98% for DENV (58/59 samples detected) and 100% for Leptospira and malaria (65/65 and 20/20 samples, respectively). Malaria samples included all five Plasmodium species known to cause human disease. The specificity of the UFI assay was 100% when evaluated with a panel of 66 negative clinical samples. Furthermore, no amplification was observed when extracted nucleic acids from related pathogens were tested. Compared with whole-blood samples, the UFI assay remained positive for Plasmodium in 11 plasma samples from patients with malaria (parasitemia levels of 0.0037 to 3.4%). The syndrome-based design of the UFI assay, combined with the sensitivities of the component tests, represents a significant improvement over the individual diagnostic tests available for these pathogens. PMID:24671788

  6. Sensitive detection of nucleic acids with rolling circle amplification and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juan; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2010-11-01

    Detection of specific DNA sequences is important to molecular biology research and clinical diagnostics. To improve the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS), a variety of signal amplification methods has been developed, including Raman-active-dye, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology, molecular beacon, SERS-active substrates, and SERS-tag. However, the combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA) with SERS for nucleic acid detection has not been reported. Herein, we describe a new approach for nucleic acid detection by the combination of RCA reaction with SERS. Because of the binding of abundance repeated sequences of RCA products with gold nanoparticle (Au NP) and Rox-modified detection probes, SERS signal is significantly amplified and the detection limit of 10.0 pM might be achieved. The sensitivity of RCA-based SERS has increased by as much as 3 orders of magnitude as compared to PCR-based SERS and is also comparable with or even exceeds that of both RCA-based electrochemical and RCA-based fluorescent methods. This RCA-based SERS might discriminate perfect matched target DNA from 1-base mismatched DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and selectivity of RCA-based SERS makes it a potential tool for early diagnosis of gene-related disease and also offers a great promise for multiplexed assays with DNA microarrays.

  7. Application of Legionella pneumophila-specific quantitative real-time PCR combined with direct amplification and sequence-based typing in the diagnosis and epidemiological investigation of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Mentasti, M; Fry, N K; Afshar, B; Palepou-Foxley, C; Naik, F C; Harrison, T G

    2012-08-01

    The detection of Legionella pneumophila DNA in clinical specimens using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) combined with direct sequence-based typing (SBT) offers rapid confirmation and timely intervention in the investigation of cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD). We assessed the utility of a specific L. pneumophila qPCR assay targeting the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene and internal process control with three clinical specimen types from confirmed LD cases. The assay was completely specific for L. pneumophila, as demonstrated by positive results for 39/39 strains from all subspecies and 16 serogroups. No cross-reaction was observed with any of the 54 Legionella non-pneumophila (0/69 strains) or 21 non-Legionella (0/58 strains). All L. pneumophila culture-positive respiratory samples (81/81) were qPCR-positive. Of 80 culture-negative samples tested, 47 (58.8%) were qPCR-positive and none were inhibitory. PCR was significantly more sensitive than culture for samples taken ≤ 2 days of hospitalisation (94.7% vs. 79.6%), with the difference being even more marked for samples taken between 3 and 14 days (79.3% vs. 47.8%). Overall, the sensitivity of the qPCR was ∼30% greater than that of culture and direct typing on culture-negative PCR-positive samples resulted in full 7-allele profiles from 23/46, 5 to 6 alleles from 8/46 and ≥ 1 allele from 43/46 strains.

  8. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed with rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hanxu; Yan, Feng; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2012-08-21

    An ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of DNA is designed with quantum dots (QDs) as a signal tag by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) and rolling circle amplification (RCA). Upon the recognition of the molecular beacon (MB) to target DNA, the MB hybridizes with assistants and target DNA to form a ternary ''Y-junction''. The target DNA can be dissociated from the structure under the reaction of nicking endonuclease to initiate the next hybridization process. The template enhanced MB fragments further act as the primers of the RCA reaction to produce thousands of repeated oligonucleotide sequences, which can bind with oligonucleotide functionalized QDs. The attached signal tags can be easily read out by square-wave voltammetry after dissolving with acid. Because of the cascade signal amplification and the specific TEHP and RCA reaction, this newly designed protocol provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA down to the attomolar level (11 aM) with a linear range of 6 orders of magnitude (from 1 × 10(-17) to 1 × 10(-11) M) and can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfect matched target DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and specificity make this method a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  9. Enzymatic amplification of DNA/RNA hybrid molecular beacon signaling in nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Jacroux, Thomas; Rieck, Daniel C; Cui, Rong; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2013-01-15

    A rapid assay operable under isothermal or nonisothermal conditions is described, where the sensitivity of a typical molecular beacon (MB) system is improved by using thermostable RNase H to enzymatically cleave an MB composed of a DNA stem and an RNA loop (R/D-MB). On hybridization of the R/D-MB to target DNA, there was a modest increase in fluorescence intensity (~5.7× above background) due to an opening of the probe and a concomitant reduction in the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency. The addition of thermostable RNase H resulted in the cleavage of the RNA loop, which eliminated energy transfer. The cleavage step also released bound target DNA, enabling it to bind to another R/D-MB probe and rendering the approach a cyclic amplification scheme. Full processing of R/D-MBs maximized the fluorescence signal to the fullest extent possible (12.9× above background), resulting in an approximately 2- to 2.8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed isothermally at 50 °C following the addition of RNase H. The probe was also used to monitor real-time polymerase chain reactions by measuring enhancement of donor fluorescence on R/D-MB binding to amplified pUC19 template dilutions. Hence, the R/D-MB-RNase H scheme can be applied to a broad range of nucleic acid amplification methods.

  10. Amplification of the IMP dehydrogenase gene in Chinese hamster cells resistant to mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Collart, F R; Huberman, E

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was analyzed in Chinese hamster V79 cell variants that exhibit different degrees of resistance to the cytotoxic effect of mycophenolic acid, a specific inhibitor of IMPDH. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with an IMPDH antiserum revealed a 14- to 27-fold increase in the amount of enzyme in the mycophenolic acid-resistant cells. The antiserum was also used to screen for a phage containing the IMPDH cDNA sequence from a lambda gt11 expression library. Northern blot (RNA blot) analyses of total cellular and poly(A)+ RNA showed that an IMPDH cDNA probe hybridized to a 2.2-kilobase transcript, the amount of which was associated with increased resistance. Southern blotting with the probe indicated an amplification of the IMPDH gene in the mycophenolic acid-resistant cells. Our findings suggest that the acquired mycophenolic acid resistance of the V79 cell variants is associated with increases in the amount and activity of IMPDH and the number of IMPDH gene copies. Images PMID:2890098

  11. Miniaturized PCR chips for nucleic acid amplification and analysis: latest advances and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of performing fast and small-volume nucleic acid amplification and analysis on a single chip has attracted great interest. Devices based on this idea, referred to as micro total analysis, microfluidic analysis, or simply ‘Lab on a chip’ systems, have witnessed steady advances over the last several years. Here, we summarize recent research on chip substrates, surface treatments, PCR reaction volume and speed, architecture, approaches to eliminating cross-contamination and control and measurement of temperature and liquid flow. We also discuss product-detection methods, integration of functional components, biological samples used in PCR chips, potential applications and other practical issues related to implementation of lab-on-a-chip technologies. PMID:17576684

  12. Molecular Assay for Detection of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Cultures and Clinical Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Specimens.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S W; Martin, I; Demczuk, W; Bharat, A; Hoang, L; Wylie, J; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B; Tyrrell, G; Horsman, G; Haldane, D; Garceau, R; Wong, T; Mulvey, M R

    2015-11-01

    We developed a real-time PCR assay to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with ciprofloxacin resistance in specimens submitted for nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). All three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) targets produced high sensitivity and specificity values. The presence of ≥2 SNPs was sufficient to predict ciprofloxacin resistance in an organism. PMID:26292300

  13. Molecular Assay for Detection of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Cultures and Clinical Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S. W.; Martin, I.; Demczuk, W.; Bharat, A.; Hoang, L.; Wylie, J.; Allen, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Tyrrell, G.; Horsman, G.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Wong, T.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a real-time PCR assay to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with ciprofloxacin resistance in specimens submitted for nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). All three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) targets produced high sensitivity and specificity values. The presence of ≥2 SNPs was sufficient to predict ciprofloxacin resistance in an organism. PMID:26292300

  14. Immunocytochemistry versus nucleic acid amplification in fine needle aspirates and tissues of extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Madhu Mati; Budhwar, Puja; Jain, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Background: Immunocytochemistry (ICC) is an established routine diagnostic adjunct to cytology and histology for tumor diagnosis but has received little attention for diagnosis of tuberculosis. Aims: To have an objective method of direct visualization of mycobacteria or their products in clinical extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) specimens, immunocytochemical localization of M. tuberculosis antigen by staining with species specific monoclonal antibody to 38-kDa antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Materials and Methods: Immunostaining with specific monoclonal antibody to 38-kDa antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was done in fresh and archival fine needle aspirates and tissue granulomata of 302 cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and was compared with the molecular diagnostic i.e., nucleic amplification and conventional [Cytomorphology, Ziehl Neelsen (ZN) staining and culture] tests and 386 controls. Results: Diagnostic indices by Bayesian analysis for all types of archival and fresh material varied from 64 to 76% in nucleic acid amplification (NAA) and 96 to 98% in ICC. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic indices of ZN staining and/ or ICC in fresh or archival material whereas the sensitivity of NAA differed significantly in fresh versus archival material both in cytology (71.4% vs 52.1%) and histology (51.1% vs 38.8%). ICC can be easily used on archival smears and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections with almost equal sensitivity and specificity as with fresh material, in contrast to NAA which showed significant difference in test results on archival and fresh material. Conclusions: Low detection sensitivity of MTB DNA in archival material from known tuberculous cases showed the limitation of in-house NAA-based molecular diagnosis. ICC was found to be sensitive, specific and a better technique than NAA and can be used as an adjunct to conventional morphology and ZN staining for the diagnosis of EPTB in tissue

  15. Digital isothermal quantification of nucleic acids via simultaneous chemical initiation of recombinase polymerase amplification reactions on SlipChip.

    PubMed

    Shen, Feng; Davydova, Elena K; Du, Wenbin; Kreutz, Jason E; Piepenburg, Olaf; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, digital quantitative detection of nucleic acids was achieved at the single-molecule level by chemical initiation of over one thousand sequence-specific, nanoliter isothermal amplification reactions in parallel. Digital polymerase chain reaction (digital PCR), a method used for quantification of nucleic acids, counts the presence or absence of amplification of individual molecules. However, it still requires temperature cycling, which is undesirable under resource-limited conditions. This makes isothermal methods for nucleic acid amplification, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), more attractive. A microfluidic digital RPA SlipChip is described here for simultaneous initiation of over one thousand nL-scale RPA reactions by adding a chemical initiator to each reaction compartment with a simple slipping step after instrument-free pipet loading. Two designs of the SlipChip, two-step slipping and one-step slipping, were validated using digital RPA. By using the digital RPA SlipChip, false-positive results from preinitiation of the RPA amplification reaction before incubation were eliminated. End point fluorescence readout was used for "yes or no" digital quantification. The performance of digital RPA in a SlipChip was validated by amplifying and counting single molecules of the target nucleic acid, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) genomic DNA. The digital RPA on SlipChip was also tolerant to fluctuations of the incubation temperature (37-42 °C), and its performance was comparable to digital PCR on the same SlipChip design. The digital RPA SlipChip provides a simple method to quantify nucleic acids without requiring thermal cycling or kinetic measurements, with potential applications in diagnostics and environmental monitoring under resource-limited settings. The ability to initiate thousands of chemical reactions in parallel on the nanoliter scale using solvent-resistant glass devices is likely to be useful for a broader

  16. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid—based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids. PMID:20401537

  17. Entropy Beacon: A Hairpin-Free DNA Amplification Strategy for Efficient Detection of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yifan; Cui, Liang; Peng, Ruizi; Zhao, Zilong; Qiu, Liping; Chen, Huapei; Jin, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Here, we propose an efficient strategy for enzyme- and hairpin-free nucleic acid detection called an entropy beacon (abbreviated as Ebeacon). Different from previously reported DNA hybridization/displacement-based strategies, Ebeacon is driven forward by increases in the entropy of the system, instead of free energy released from new base-pair formation. Ebeacon shows high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 5 pM target DNA in buffer and 50 pM in cellular homogenate. Ebeacon also benefits from the hairpin-free amplification strategy and zero-background, excellent thermostability from 20 °C to 50 °C, as well as good resistance to complex environments. In particular, based on the huge difference between the breathing rate of a single base pair and two adjacent base pairs, Ebeacon also shows high selectivity toward base mutations, such as substitution, insertion, and deletion and, therefore, is an efficient nucleic acid detection method, comparable to most reported enzyme-free strategies.

  18. Enhanced nucleic acid amplification with blood in situ by wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM)

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Reyes, Roberto; Park, Tu San; You, David J.; Song, Jae-Young; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    There are many challenges facing the use of molecular biology to provide pertinent information in a timely, cost effective manner. Wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM) is an emerging format for conducting molecular biology with unique characteristics to address these challenges. To demonstrate the use of WDM, an apparatus was designed and assembled to automate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a reprogrammable platform. WDM minimizes thermal resistance by convective heat transfer to a constantly moving droplet in direct contact with heated silicone oil. PCR amplification of the GAPDH gene was demonstrated at a speed of 8.67 sec/cycle. Conventional PCR was shown to be inhibited by the presence of blood. WDM PCR utilizes molecular partitioning of nucleic acids and other PCR reagents from blood components, within the water-in-oil droplet, to increase PCR reaction efficiency with blood in situ. The ability to amplify nucleic acids in the presence of blood simplifies pre-treatment protocols towards true point-of-care diagnostic use. The 16s rRNA hypervariable regions V3 and V6 were amplified from Klebsiella pneumoniae genomic DNA with blood in situ. The detection limit of WDM PCR was 1 ng/µL or 105 genomes/µL with blood in situ. The application of WDM for rapid, automated detection of bacterial DNA from whole blood may have an enormous impact on the clinical diagnosis of infections in bloodstream or chronic wound/ulcer, and patient safety and morbidity. PMID:24140832

  19. Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR): A novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Chen, Zeliang; Yuan, Jing; Huang, Liuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method only requires one pair of primers and one enzyme, termed Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR) with high specificity, efficiency, and rapidity under isothermal condition. The recombinant plasmid of blaNDM-1 was imported to Escherichia coli BL21, and selected as the microbial target. PSR method employs a Bst DNA polymerase and a pair of primers designed targeting the blaNDM-1 gene sequence. The forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are reverse to each other at their 5’ end (Nr and N), whereas their 3’ end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The PSR method was performed at a constant temperature 61 °C–65 °C, yielding a complicated spiral structure. PSR assay was monitored continuously in a real-time turbidimeter instrument or visually detected with the aid of a fluorescent dye (SYBR Greenı), and could be finished within 1 h with a high accumulation of 109 copies of the target and a fine sensitivity of 6 CFU per reaction. Clinical evaluation was also conducted using PSR, showing high specificity of this method. The PSR technique provides a convenient and cost-effective alternative for clinical screening, on-site diagnosis and primary quarantine purposes. PMID:26220251

  20. Individual donor nucleic acid amplification testing for detection of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Mathew, John; Pfahler, Wolfram; Ma, Dongling; Valinsky, Jay; Prince, Alfred M; Andrus, Linda

    2005-10-01

    We have developed an economical, high-throughput nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) for blood-borne viruses, suitable for use in the screening of plasma samples from individual blood donors. This assay system includes a semiautomated procedure, using 96-well glass fiber plates for the extraction of viral nucleic acids from plasma and "universal beacon" technology which permits the detection of all genotypes of highly variable viruses (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus). In this detection system, two fluorescent- detection technologies were employed successfully in a single tube: molecular beacon for West Nile virus (WNV) detection using a 6-carboxyfluorescein fluorophore and TaqMan for internal control detection using a VIC fluorophore. To establish proof of concept, we focused on the development of a robust individual donor NAT for WNV. The assay showed no reactivity to 15 other viruses tested or to 420 blood donor samples from the WNV pre-epidemic season. No cross-contamination was observed on an alternating positive-/negative-well test. The sensitivity (limit of detection, 95%) of the assay for WNV is between 3.79 and 16.3 RNA copies/ml, depending on which material was used as a standard. The assay detected all positive blood donation samples identified by the Roche WNV NAT. The assay can be performed qualitatively for screening and quantitatively for confirmation.

  1. Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR): A novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Dong, Derong; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Chen, Zeliang; Yuan, Jing; Huang, Liuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method only requires one pair of primers and one enzyme, termed Polymerase Spiral Reaction (PSR) with high specificity, efficiency, and rapidity under isothermal condition. The recombinant plasmid of blaNDM-1 was imported to Escherichia coli BL21, and selected as the microbial target. PSR method employs a Bst DNA polymerase and a pair of primers designed targeting the blaNDM-1 gene sequence. The forward and reverse Tab primer sequences are reverse to each other at their 5' end (Nr and N), whereas their 3' end sequences are complementary to their respective target nucleic acid sequences. The PSR method was performed at a constant temperature 61 °C-65 °C, yielding a complicated spiral structure. PSR assay was monitored continuously in a real-time turbidimeter instrument or visually detected with the aid of a fluorescent dye (SYBR Greenı), and could be finished within 1 h with a high accumulation of 10(9) copies of the target and a fine sensitivity of 6 CFU per reaction. Clinical evaluation was also conducted using PSR, showing high specificity of this method. The PSR technique provides a convenient and cost-effective alternative for clinical screening, on-site diagnosis and primary quarantine purposes. PMID:26220251

  2. NASBA: A detection and amplification system uniquely suited for RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sooknanan, R.; Malek, L.T.

    1995-06-01

    The invention of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) has revolutionized our ability to amplify and manipulate a nucleic acid sequence in vitro. The commercial rewards of this revolution have driven the development of other nuclei acid amplification and detection methodologies. This has created an alphabet soup of technologies that use different amplification methods, including NASBA (nucleic acid sequence-based amplification), LCR (ligase chain reaction), SDA (strand displacement amplification), QBR (Q-beta replicase), CPR (cycling probe reaction), and bDNA (branched DNA). Despite the differences in their processes, these amplification systems can be separated into two broad categories based on how they achieve their goal: sequence-based amplification systems, such as PCR, NASBA, and SDA, amplify a target nucleic acid sequence. Signal-based amplification systems, such as LCR, QBR, CPR and bDNA, amplify or alter a signal from a detection reaction that is target-dependent. While the various methods have relative strengths and weaknesses, only NASBA offers the unique ability to homogeneously amplify an RNA analyte in the presence of homologous genomic DNA under isothermal conditions. Since the detection of RNA sequences almost invariably measures biological activity, it is an excellent prognostic indicator of activities as diverse as virus production, gene expression, and cell viability. The isothermal nature of the reaction makes NASBA especially suitable for large-scale manual screening. These features extend NASBA`s application range from research to commercial diagnostic applications. Field test kits are presently under development for human diagnostics as well as the burgeoning fields of food and environmental diagnostic testing. These developments suggest future integration of NASBA into robotic workstations for high-throughput screening as well. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  3. A colorimetric biosensor for detection of attomolar microRNA with a functional nucleic acid-based amplification machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Cheng, Wei; Yan, Yurong; Zhang, Ye; Yin, Yibing; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2016-01-01

    A functional nucleic acid-based amplification machine was designed for simple and label-free ultrasensitive colorimetric biosensing of microRNA (miRNA). The amplification machine was composed of a complex of trigger template and C-rich DNA modified molecular beacon (MB) and G-rich DNA (GDNA) as the probe, polymerase and nicking enzyme, and a dumbbell-shaped amplification template. The presence of target miRNA triggered MB mediated strand displacement to cyclically release nicking triggers, which led to a toehold initiated rolling circle amplification to produce large amounts of GDNAs. The formed GDNAs could stack with hemin to form G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme, a well-known horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mimic, for catalyzing a colorimetric reaction. The modified MB improved the stringent target recognition and reduced background signal. The proposed sensing strategy showed very high sensitivity and selectivity with a wide dynamic range from 10 aM to 1.0 nM, and enabled successful visual analysis of trace amount of miRNA in real sample by the naked eye. This rapid and highly efficient signal amplification strategy provided a simple and sensitive platform for miRNA detection. It would be a versatile and powerful tool for clinical molecular diagnostics.

  4. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  5. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings.

  6. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  7. Early detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in BACTEC MGIT cultures using nucleic acid amplification.

    PubMed

    Lin, S Y; Hwang, S C; Yang, Y C; Wang, C F; Chen, Y H; Chen, T C; Lu, P L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the application of nucleic acid amplification (NAA) in liquid cultures for the early detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The Cobas TaqMan MTB test, IS6110 real-time PCR, and hsp65 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis were used to detect BACTEC MGIT 960 (MGIT) cultures on days 3, 5, 7, and 14. The procedure was initially tested with a reference strain, H37Rv (ATCC 27294). Subsequently, 200 clinical specimens, including 150 Acid Fast bacillus (AFB) smear-positive and 50 AFB smear-negative samples, were examined. The Cobas TaqMan MTB test and IS6110-based PCR analysis were able to detect M. tuberculosis after 1 day when the inoculum of H37Rv was >3 x 10(-2) CFU/ml. After a 5-day incubation in the MGIT system, all three NAA assays had a positive detection regardless of the inoculum size. After a 1-day incubation of the clinical specimens in the MGIT system, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for the Cobas TaqMan MTB assay were 70.2%, 100%, 100%, and 82.3% respectively. For IS6110-based PCR analysis, these values were 63.1%, 100%, 100%, and 78.9%, and were 88.1%, 100%, 100%, and 92.1% respectively for hsp65 PCR-RFLP analysis. After a 3-day incubation, the specificity and PPV were 100% for all three NAA tests; the Cobas TaqMan MTB assay had the best sensitivity (97.6%) and NPV (98.3%). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for conventional culture analysis were 98.8%, 100%, 100%, and 99.1%. Thus, NAA may be useful for the early detection of M. tuberculosis after 3 days in MGIT.

  8. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: The structural analysis of protein sequences based on the quasi-amino acids code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Tang, Xu-Qing; Xu, Zhen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins and their interactions in a cell. With the successful completion of the Human Genome Project, it comes the postgenome era when the proteomics technology is emerging. This paper studies protein molecule from the algebraic point of view. The algebraic system (Σ, +, *) is introduced, where Σ is the set of 64 codons. According to the characteristics of (Σ, +, *), a novel quasi-amino acids code classification method is introduced and the corresponding algebraic operation table over the set ZU of the 16 kinds of quasi-amino acids is established. The internal relation is revealed about quasi-amino acids. The results show that there exist some very close correlations between the properties of the quasi-amino acids and the codon. All these correlation relationships may play an important part in establishing the logic relationship between codons and the quasi-amino acids during the course of life origination. According to Ma F et al (2003 J. Anhui Agricultural University 30 439), the corresponding relation and the excellent properties about amino acids code are very difficult to observe. The present paper shows that (ZU, ⊕, otimes) is a field. Furthermore, the operational results display that the codon tga has different property from other stop codons. In fact, in the mitochondrion from human and ox genomic codon, tga is just tryptophane, is not the stop codon like in other genetic code, it is the case of the Chen W C et al (2002 Acta Biophysica Sinica 18(1) 87). The present theory avoids some inexplicable events of the 20 kinds of amino acids code, in other words it solves the problem of 'the 64 codon assignments of mRNA to amino acids is probably completely wrong' proposed by Yang (2006 Progress in Modern Biomedicine 6 3).

  9. Successful Combination of Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Diagnostics and Targeted Deferred Neisseria gonorrhoeae Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wind, Carolien M.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are recommended for the diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae infections because of their superior sensitivity. Increasing NAAT use causes a decline in crucial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance data, which rely on culture. We analyzed the suitability of the ESwab system for NAAT diagnostics and deferred targeted N. gonorrhoeae culture to allow selective and efficient culture based on NAAT results. We included patients visiting the STI Clinic Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 2013. Patient characteristics and urogenital and rectal samples for direct N. gonorrhoeae culture, standard NAAT, and ESwab were collected. Standard NAAT and NAAT on ESwab samples were performed using the Aptima Combo 2 assay for N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis. Two deferred N. gonorrhoeae cultures were performed on NAAT-positive ESwab samples after storage at 4°C for 1 to 3 days. We included 2,452 samples from 1,893 patients. In the standard NAAT, 107 samples were N. gonorrhoeae positive and 284 were C. trachomatis positive. The sensitivities of NAAT on ESwab samples were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 75 to 90%) and 87% (95% CI, 82 to 90%), respectively. ESwab samples were available for 98 of the gonorrhea-positive samples. Of these, 82% were positive in direct culture and 69% and 56% were positive in the 1st and 2nd deferred cultures, respectively (median storage times, 27 and 48 h, respectively). Deferred culture was more often successful in urogenital samples or when the patient had symptoms at the sampling site. Deferred N. gonorrhoeae culture of stored ESwab samples is feasible and enables AMR surveillance. To limit the loss in NAAT sensitivity, we recommend obtaining separate samples for NAAT and deferred culture. PMID:25832300

  10. A Fully Integrated Paperfluidic Molecular Diagnostic Chip for the Extraction, Amplification, and Detection of Nucleic Acids from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Natalia M.; Wong, Winnie S.; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps onto a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in under 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings. PMID:26785636

  11. Detection of Salmonella invA by isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Emiko; Makungu, Chitwambi; Yabe, John; Sinkala, Patson; Nambota, Andrew; Isogai, Hiroshi; Fukushi, Hideto; Silungwe, Manda; Mubita, Charles; Syakalima, Michelo; Hang'ombe, Bernard Mudenda; Kozaki, Shunji; Yasuda, Jun

    2005-01-01

    The isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICAN) is a new isothermal DNA amplification method composed of exo Bca DNA polymerase, RNaseH and DNA-RNA chimeric primers. We detected invA of Salmonella from chicken carcasses, egg yolk and cattle fecal samples. Fifty-three of 59 isolates were invA-positive in ICAN-chromatostrip detection. The result was consistent with those obtained by standard PCR. Salmonella invA was detected in 12 of 14 carcass rinses by ICAN, while in 7 of 14 rinses by standard PCR. These results indicate that ICAN is an efficient, sensitive and simple system to detect invA of Salmonella species in developing countries such as Zambia.

  12. Simple and rapid preparation of infected plant tissue extracts for PCR amplification of virus, viroid, and MLO nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Levy, L; Lee, I M; Hadidi, A

    1994-10-01

    A rapid, simple method for preparing plant tissues infected with viruses, viroids, or MLOs using a commercial product known as Gene Releaser is described. The Gene Releaser polymeric matrix method produced plant extracts suitable for PCR amplification without the use of organic solvents, ethanol precipitation, or additional nucleic acid purification techniques. Modification of maceration methods and/or extraction buffers resulted in the PCR amplification of potato spindle tuber, apple scar skin, and dapple apple viroids, as well as, genomic segments of plum pox potyvirus, grapevine virus B, grapevine leafroll-associated virus III, and elm yellows MLO. These pathogens were amplified from tissue of woody and herbaceous hosts such as peach, apricot, apple, grapevine, elm, periwinkle and potato. The application of this product for use with intractable tissue avoids lengthy and laborious extraction procedures. In our hands, about 20 samples could be prepared for PCR or RT-PCR in 1-2 h versus 1-3 days. PMID:7868647

  13. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2015-10-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 10(2) to 4.30 × 10(3) IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(-) or IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(+)), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection.

  14. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Knabbe, C.; Dreier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 102 to 4.30 × 103 IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA+/IgM+/IgG− or IgA+/IgM+/IgG+), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection. PMID:26202109

  15. Signal amplification architecture for electrochemical aptasensor based on network-like thiocyanuric acid/gold nanoparticle/ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengbo; Li, Lidong; Tian, Yu; Mu, Xiaojiao; Guo, Lin

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we described signal amplification architecture for electronic aptamer-based sensor (E-AB), which is applicable to a wide range of aptamers. Herein, we only take lysozyme as the representative sensing target. The amplification method was based on the network of thiocyanuric acid (TCA)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with ssDNA. The binding event can be detected by a decrease in the integrated charge of the surface-bound [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) which electrostatically absorbed onto the negatively charged phosphate backbones of DNA. In the presence of target molecules, a large amount of TCA/AuNP/ssDNA network associated with [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) would be removed from the electrode surface, leading to a significant decrease of redox current. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) signals of [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) provides quantitative measures of the concentrations of lysozyme, with a linear calibration ranging from 5 pM to 1 nM and a detection limit is 0.1 pM. The detection limit of the proposed sensor is one order of magnitude and three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the detection limits in the absence of TCA (5 pM) and in the absence of TCA/AuNP/ssDNA network (0.5 nM). This amplification method is promising for broad potential application in clinic assay and various protein analysis.

  16. 2D-MH: A web-server for generating graphic representation of protein sequences based on the physicochemical properties of their constituent amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Cheng; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-11-01

    Introduction of graphic representation for biological sequences can provide intuitive overall pictures as well as useful insights for performing large-scale analysis. Here, a new two-dimensional graph, called "2D-MH", is proposed to represent protein sequences. It is formed by incorporating the information of the side-chain mass of each of the constituent amino acids and its hydrophobicity. The graphic curve thus generated is featured by (1) an one-to-one correspondence relation without circuit or degeneracy, (2) better reflecting the innate structure of the protein sequence, (3) clear visibility in displaying the similarity of protein sequences, (4) more sensitive for the mutation sites important for drug targeting, and (5) being able to be used as a metric for the "evolutionary distance" of a protein from one species to the other. It is anticipated that the presented graphic method may become a useful vehicle for large-scale analysis of the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age. As a web-server, 2D-MH is freely accessible at http://icpr.jci.jx.cn/bioinfo/pplot/2D-MH, by which one can easily generate the two-dimensional graphs for any number of protein sequences and compare the evolutionary distances between them.

  17. Label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing by tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the achievement of its simple and sensitive detection with high confidence is very essential for biological studies and diagnostic purposes. Herein, a label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA was developed by using a tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme releasing amplification strategy. Upon sensing of the nucleic acid analyte for the assembled hairpin-like probe DNA on the electrode, the DNA polymerase guided the target recycling and simultaneously triggered the lambda exonuclease cleavage, accompanied by the cascade recycling of the released new complementary strand and the amplified liberation of the G-rich sequence of the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 by the generated hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme was used for the signal readout and further amplification toward target response. Such tandem functional operation by DNA polymerase, lambda exonuclease and DNAzyme endows the developed biosensor with a high sensitivity and also a high confidence. A low detection limit of 5 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. It also exhibits the distinct advantages of simplicity in probe design and biosensor fabrication, and label-free electrochemical detection, thus may offer a promising avenue for the applications in disease diagnosis and clinical biomedicine. PMID:26513289

  18. Label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing by tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the achievement of its simple and sensitive detection with high confidence is very essential for biological studies and diagnostic purposes. Herein, a label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA was developed by using a tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme releasing amplification strategy. Upon sensing of the nucleic acid analyte for the assembled hairpin-like probe DNA on the electrode, the DNA polymerase guided the target recycling and simultaneously triggered the lambda exonuclease cleavage, accompanied by the cascade recycling of the released new complementary strand and the amplified liberation of the G-rich sequence of the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 by the generated hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme was used for the signal readout and further amplification toward target response. Such tandem functional operation by DNA polymerase, lambda exonuclease and DNAzyme endows the developed biosensor with a high sensitivity and also a high confidence. A low detection limit of 5 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. It also exhibits the distinct advantages of simplicity in probe design and biosensor fabrication, and label-free electrochemical detection, thus may offer a promising avenue for the applications in disease diagnosis and clinical biomedicine.

  19. Point-of-care multiplexed assays of nucleic acids using microcapillary-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Lu; Sun, Jiashu; Liu, Yulei; Ma, Xingjie; Cui, Shangjin; Ma, Liying; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-07-15

    This report demonstrates a straightforward, robust, multiplexed and point-of-care microcapillary-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (cLAMP) for assaying nucleic acids. This assay integrates capillaries (glass or plastic) to introduce and house sample/reagents, segments of water droplets to prevent contamination, pocket warmers to provide heat, and a hand-held flashlight for a visual readout of the fluorescent signal. The cLAMP system allows the simultaneous detection of two RNA targets of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from multiple plasma samples, and achieves a high sensitivity of two copies of standard plasmid. As few nucleic acid detection methods can be wholly independent of external power supply and equipment, our cLAMP holds great promise for point-of-care applications in resource-poor settings. PMID:24937125

  20. On-Chip Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification on Flow-Based Chemiluminescence Microarray Analysis Platform for the Detection of Viruses and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunze, A; Dilcher, M; Abd El Wahed, A; Hufert, F; Niessner, R; Seidel, M

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an on-chip isothermal nucleic acid amplification test (iNAAT) for the multiplex amplification and detection of viral and bacterial DNA by a flow-based chemiluminescence microarray. In a principle study, on-chip recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) on defined spots of a DNA microarray was used to spatially separate the amplification reaction of DNA from two viruses (Human adenovirus 41, Phi X 174) and the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis, which are relevant for water hygiene. By establishing the developed assay on the microarray analysis platform MCR 3, the automation of isothermal multiplex-amplification (39 °C, 40 min) and subsequent detection by chemiluminescence imaging was realized. Within 48 min, the microbes could be identified by the spot position on the microarray while the generated chemiluminescence signal correlated with the amount of applied microbe DNA. The limit of detection (LOD) determined for HAdV 41, Phi X 174, and E. faecalis was 35 GU/μL, 1 GU/μL, and 5 × 10(3) GU/μL (genomic units), which is comparable to the sensitivity reported for qPCR analysis, respectively. Moreover the simultaneous amplification and detection of DNA from all three microbes was possible. The presented assay shows that complex enzymatic reactions like an isothermal amplification can be performed in an easy-to-use experimental setup. Furthermore, iNAATs can be potent candidates for multipathogen detection in clinical, food, or environmental samples in routine or field monitoring approaches.

  1. Chip-based device for parallel sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of nucleic acid subsequences

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Colston, Jr, Billy W.

    2016-08-09

    An apparatus for chip-based sorting, amplification, detection, and identification of a sample having a planar substrate. The planar substrate is divided into cells. The cells are arranged on the planar substrate in rows and columns. Electrodes are located in the cells. A micro-reactor maker produces micro-reactors containing the sample. The micro-reactor maker is positioned to deliver the micro-reactors to the planar substrate. A microprocessor is connected to the electrodes for manipulating the micro-reactors on the planar substrate. A detector is positioned to interrogate the sample contained in the micro-reactors.

  2. Validation of Internal Controls for Extraction and Amplification of Nucleic Acids from Enteric Viruses in Water Samples ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kitajima, Masaaki; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Nol, Chea; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors that reduce viral nucleic acid extraction efficiency and interfere with cDNA synthesis and/or polymerase activity affect the molecular detection of viruses in aquatic environments. To overcome these significant problems, we developed a methodology for assessing nucleic acid yields and DNA amplification efficiencies for environmental water samples. This involved adding particles of adenovirus type 5 and murine norovirus and newly developed primer-sharing controls, which are amplified with the same primer pairs and result in the same amplicon sizes as the targets, to these samples. We found that nucleic acid loss during the extraction process, rather than reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) inhibition, more significantly attributed to underestimation of the presence of viral genomes in the environmental water samples tested in this study. Our success rate for satisfactorily amplifying viral RNAs and DNAs by RT-PCR was higher than that for obtaining adequate nucleic acid preparations. We found that inhibitory properties were greatest when we used larger sample volumes. A magnetic silica bead-based RNA extraction method effectively removed inhibitors that interfere with viral nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the inhibitory properties of environmental water samples by using both control virus particles and primer-sharing controls. PMID:21602369

  3. Validation of internal controls for extraction and amplification of nucleic acids from enteric viruses in water samples.

    PubMed

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kitajima, Masaaki; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Nol, Chea; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-07-01

    Inhibitors that reduce viral nucleic acid extraction efficiency and interfere with cDNA synthesis and/or polymerase activity affect the molecular detection of viruses in aquatic environments. To overcome these significant problems, we developed a methodology for assessing nucleic acid yields and DNA amplification efficiencies for environmental water samples. This involved adding particles of adenovirus type 5 and murine norovirus and newly developed primer-sharing controls, which are amplified with the same primer pairs and result in the same amplicon sizes as the targets, to these samples. We found that nucleic acid loss during the extraction process, rather than reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) inhibition, more significantly attributed to underestimation of the presence of viral genomes in the environmental water samples tested in this study. Our success rate for satisfactorily amplifying viral RNAs and DNAs by RT-PCR was higher than that for obtaining adequate nucleic acid preparations. We found that inhibitory properties were greatest when we used larger sample volumes. A magnetic silica bead-based RNA extraction method effectively removed inhibitors that interfere with viral nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the inhibitory properties of environmental water samples by using both control virus particles and primer-sharing controls.

  4. A novel, sensitive and label-free loop-mediated isothermal amplification detection method for nucleic acids using luminophore dyes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Wei, Sim Xiao; Ying, Jean Liew Zhi; Safavieh, Mohammadali; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-12-15

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has been widely rendered for nucleic acid testing. Here, we integrate loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with ECL technique for DNA detection and quantification. The target LAMP DNA bound electrostatically with [Ru(bpy)3](+2) on the carbon electrode surface, and an ECL reaction was triggered by tripropylamine (TPrA) to yield luminescence. We illustrated this method as a new and highly sensitive strategy for the detection of sequence-specific DNA from different meat species at picogram levels. The proposed strategy renders the signal amplification capacities of TPrA and combines LAMP with inherently high sensitivity of the ECL technique, to facilitate the detection of low quantities of DNA. By leveraging this technique, target DNA of Sus scrofa (pork) meat was detected as low as 1pg/µL (3.43×10(-1)copies/µL). In addition, the proposed technique was applied for detection of Bacillus subtilis DNA samples and detection limit of 10pg/µL (2.2×10(3)copies/µL) was achieved. The advantages of being isothermal, sensitive and robust with ability for multiplex detection of bio-analytes makes this method a facile and appealing sensing modality in hand-held devices to be used at the point-of-care (POC). PMID:27393827

  5. CdTe amplification nanoplatforms capped with thioglycolic acid for electrochemical aptasensing of ultra-traces of ATP.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Farzin, Leila; Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh; Shanehsaz, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    A "signal off" voltammetric aptasensor was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of ultra-low levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). For this purpose, a new strategy based on the principle of recognition-induced switching of aptamers from DNA/DNA duplex to DNA/target complex was designed using thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as the signal amplifying nano-platforms. Owing to the small size, high surface-to-volume ratio and good conductivity, quantum dots were immobilized on the electrode surface for signal amplification. In this work, methylene blue (MB) adsorbed to DNA was used as a sensitive redox reporter. The intensity of voltammetric signal of MB was found to decrease linearly upon ATP addition over a concentration range of 0.1nM to 1.6μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9924. Under optimized conditions, the aptasensor was able to selectively detect ATP with a limit of detection of 45pM at 3σ. The results also demonstrated that the QDs-based amplification strategy could be feasible for ATP assay and presented a potential universal method for other small biomolecular aptasensors. PMID:27612836

  6. Loop mediated isothermal amplification combined with nucleic acid lateral flow strip for diagnosis of cyprinid herpes virus-3.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Hatem; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2010-02-01

    An improved loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cyprinid herpes virus-3 (CyHV-3), also known as koi herpes virus (KHV), was developed. The lower detection limit of the CyHV-3-LAMP assay is 10 fg DNA which equivalent to 30 copies of CyHV-3 genome. Nucleic acid lateral flow assay was used for visual detection of the LAMP products. The LAMP- nucleic acid lateral flow assay relies on DNA hybridization technology and antigen-antibody reactions in combination with LAMP. For application of this assay, the biotinylated LAMP product was hybridized with a FITC-labelled specific probe for 5 min. The resulting DNA complex could be visualised as purple band at the strip test line within 5 min of sample exposure. The nucleic acid lateral flow analysis of the LAMP product was equivalent in sensitivity but more rapid than the conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. The combination of LAMP assay with the nucleic acid lateral flow analysis can simplify the diagnosis and screening of CyHV-3 as it is simple, requires very little training, does not require specialized equipment such as a thermal cycler, the results are read visually with no need to run a gel and has a high sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed by rolling circle amplification and catalytic hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiling; Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Wenbo

    2015-02-11

    An ultrasensitive protocol for fluorescent detection of DNA is designed by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) with Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) and Catalytic Hairpin Assembly (CHA), showing a remarkable amplification efficiency.

  8. Nucleic Acid Amplification Based Diagnostic of Lyme (Neuro-)borreliosis – Lost in the Jungle of Methods, Targets, and Assays?

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory based diagnosis of infectious diseases usually relies on culture of the disease causing micro-organism, followed by identification and susceptibility testing. Since Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, requires very specific culture conditions (e.g. specific liquid media, long term cul-ture) traditional bacteriology is often not done on a routine basis. Instead, confirmation of the clinical diagnosis needs ei-ther indirect techniques (like serology or measurement of cellular activity in the presence of antigens) or direct but culture independent techniques, like microscopy or nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT), with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) being the most frequently applied NAT method in routine laboratories. NAT uses nucleic acids of the disease causing micro-organism as template for amplification, isolated from various sources of clinical specimens. Although the underlying principle, adoption of the enzymatic process running during DNA duplication prior to prokaryotic cell division, is comparatively easy, a couple of ‘pitfalls’ is associated with the technique itself as well as with interpretation of the results. At present, no commercial, CE-marked and sufficiently validated PCR assay is available. A number of homebrew assays have been published, which are different in terms of target (i.e. the gene targeted by the amplification primers), method (nested PCR, PCR followed by hybridization, real-time PCR) and validation criteria. Inhibitory compounds may lead to false negative results, if no appropriate internal control is included. Carry-over of amplicons, insufficient handling and workflow and/or insufficiently validated targets/primers may result in false positive results. Different targets may yield different analytical sensitivity, depending, among other factors, of the redundancy of a target gene in the genome. Per-formance characteristics (e.g. analytical sensitivity and

  9. Nucleic Acid Amplification Based Diagnostic of Lyme (Neuro-)borreliosis - Lost in the Jungle of Methods, Targets, and Assays?

    PubMed

    Nolte, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory based diagnosis of infectious diseases usually relies on culture of the disease causing micro-organism, followed by identification and susceptibility testing. Since Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, requires very specific culture conditions (e.g. specific liquid media, long term cul-ture) traditional bacteriology is often not done on a routine basis. Instead, confirmation of the clinical diagnosis needs ei-ther indirect techniques (like serology or measurement of cellular activity in the presence of antigens) or direct but culture independent techniques, like microscopy or nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT), with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) being the most frequently applied NAT method in routine laboratories. NAT uses nucleic acids of the disease causing micro-organism as template for amplification, isolated from various sources of clinical specimens. Although the underlying principle, adoption of the enzymatic process running during DNA duplication prior to prokaryotic cell division, is comparatively easy, a couple of 'pitfalls' is associated with the technique itself as well as with interpretation of the results. At present, no commercial, CE-marked and sufficiently validated PCR assay is available. A number of homebrew assays have been published, which are different in terms of target (i.e. the gene targeted by the amplification primers), method (nested PCR, PCR followed by hybridization, real-time PCR) and validation criteria. Inhibitory compounds may lead to false negative results, if no appropriate internal control is included. Carry-over of amplicons, insufficient handling and workflow and/or insufficiently validated targets/primers may result in false positive results. Different targets may yield different analytical sensitivity, depending, among other factors, of the redundancy of a target gene in the genome. Per-formance characteristics (e.g. analytical sensitivity and

  10. Implementation of Oral and Rectal Gonococcal and Chlamydial Nucleic Acid Amplification-Based Testing as a Component of Local Health Department Activities.

    PubMed

    Nall, Jennifer; Barr, Breona; McNeil, Candice J; Bachmann, Laura H

    2016-10-01

    From January 1, 2014, to May 31, 2015, 452 individuals received extragenital nucleic acid amplification-based Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis testing through public health venues. Seventy-four individuals (16%) tested positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and/or Chlamydia trachomatis at an extragenital site and 40 (54%) would not have been effectively diagnosed and treated in the absence of extragenital testing.

  11. Nucleic acid amplification in vitro: detection of sequences with low copy numbers and application to diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Guatelli, J C; Gingeras, T R; Richman, D D

    1989-01-01

    The enzymatic amplification of specific nucleic acid sequences in vitro has revolutionized the use of nucleic acid hybridization assays for viral detection. With this method, the copy number of a pathogen-specific sequence is increased several orders of magnitude before detection is attempted. The sensitivity and specificity of detection are thus markedly improved. Mullis and Faloona devised the first method of sequence amplification in vitro, the polymerase chain reaction (K.B. Mullis and F.A. Faloona, Methods Enzymol. 155:355-350, 1987). By this method, synthetic oligonucleotide primers direct repeated, target-specific, deoxyribonucleic acid-synthetic reactions, resulting in an exponential increase in the amount of the specific target sequence. The application of sequence amplification to viral detection was initially performed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and human T-cell lymphoma virus type I. In principle, however, this approach can be applied to the detection of any deoxyribonucleic or ribonucleic acid virus; the only requirement is that sufficient nucleotide sequence data exist to allow the synthesis of target-specific oligonucleotide primers. The use of target amplification in vitro will permit a variety of studies of viral pathogenesis which have not been feasible because of the low copy number of the viral nucleic acids in infected material. This approach is particularly applicable to the study of human retroviral infections, which are chronic and persistent and are characterized by low titers of virus in tissues. In addition, target amplification in vitro will facilitate the development of new methods of sequence detection, which will be useful for rapid viral diagnosis in the clinical laboratory. PMID:2650862

  12. On-Chip Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification on Flow-Based Chemiluminescence Microarray Analysis Platform for the Detection of Viruses and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kunze, A; Dilcher, M; Abd El Wahed, A; Hufert, F; Niessner, R; Seidel, M

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an on-chip isothermal nucleic acid amplification test (iNAAT) for the multiplex amplification and detection of viral and bacterial DNA by a flow-based chemiluminescence microarray. In a principle study, on-chip recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) on defined spots of a DNA microarray was used to spatially separate the amplification reaction of DNA from two viruses (Human adenovirus 41, Phi X 174) and the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis, which are relevant for water hygiene. By establishing the developed assay on the microarray analysis platform MCR 3, the automation of isothermal multiplex-amplification (39 °C, 40 min) and subsequent detection by chemiluminescence imaging was realized. Within 48 min, the microbes could be identified by the spot position on the microarray while the generated chemiluminescence signal correlated with the amount of applied microbe DNA. The limit of detection (LOD) determined for HAdV 41, Phi X 174, and E. faecalis was 35 GU/μL, 1 GU/μL, and 5 × 10(3) GU/μL (genomic units), which is comparable to the sensitivity reported for qPCR analysis, respectively. Moreover the simultaneous amplification and detection of DNA from all three microbes was possible. The presented assay shows that complex enzymatic reactions like an isothermal amplification can be performed in an easy-to-use experimental setup. Furthermore, iNAATs can be potent candidates for multipathogen detection in clinical, food, or environmental samples in routine or field monitoring approaches. PMID:26624222

  13. Development and comparison of a rapid isothermal nucleic acid amplification test for typing of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 on a portable fluorescence detector.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yanhong; McCarthy, Kaitlin; Kong, Huimin; Lemieux, Bertrand

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a rapid and simple molecular test, the IsoGlow HSV Typing assay, for the detection and typing of herpes simplex virus (type 1 and 2) from genital or oral lesions. Clinical samples suspended in viral transport mediums are simply diluted and then added to a helicase-dependent amplification master mix. The amplification and detection were performed on a portable fluorescence detector called the FireFly instrument. Detection of amplification products is based on end-point analysis using cycling probe technology. An internal control nucleic acid was included in the amplification master mix to monitor the presence of amplification inhibitors in the samples. Because the device has only two fluorescence detection channels, two strategies were developed and compared to detect the internal control template: internal control detected by melting curve analysis using a dual-labeled probe, versus internal control detection using end-point fluorescence release by a CPT probe at a lower temperature. Both have a total turnaround time of about 1 hour. Clinical performance relative to herpes viral culture was evaluated using 176 clinical specimens. Both formats of the IsoGlow HSV typing assay had sensitivities comparable to that of the Food and Drug Administration-cleared IsoAmp HSV (BioHelix Corp., Beverly MA) test and specificity for the two types of HSV comparable to that of ELVIS HSV (Diagnostic Hybrids, Athens, OH).

  14. fM to aM nucleic acid amplification for molecular diagnostics in a non-stick-coated metal microfluidic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoliang; Huang, Qin; Ma, Li; Luo, Xianbo; Pang, Biao; Zhang, Zhixin; Wang, Ruliang; Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Ye, Jiancheng

    2014-12-05

    A sensitive DNA isothermal amplification method for the detection of DNA at fM to aM concentrations for pathogen identification was developed using a non-stick-coated metal microfluidic bioreactor. A portable confocal optical detector was utilized to monitor the DNA amplification in micro- to nanoliter reaction assays in real-time, with fluorescence collection near the optical diffraction limit. The non-stick-coated metal microfluidic bioreactor, with a surface contact angle of 103°, was largely inert to bio-molecules, and DNA amplification could be performed in a minimum reaction volume of 40 nL. The isothermal nucleic acid amplification for Mycoplasma pneumoniae identification in the non-stick-coated microfluidic bioreactor could be performed at a minimum DNA template concentration of 1.3 aM, and a detection limit of three copies of genomic DNA was obtained. This microfluidic bioreactor offers a promising clinically relevant pathogen molecular diagnostic method via the amplification of targets from only a few copies of genomic DNA from a single bacterium.

  15. Microfluidic lab-on-a-foil for nucleic acid analysis based on isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Sascha; Weber, Patrick; Focke, Max; Faltin, Bernd; Hoffmann, Jochen; Müller, Claas; Mark, Daniel; Roth, Günter; Munday, Peter; Armes, Niall; Piepenburg, Olaf; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2010-04-01

    For the first time we demonstrate a self-sufficient lab-on-a-foil system for the fully automated analysis of nucleic acids which is based on the recently available isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The system consists of a novel, foil-based centrifugal microfluidic cartridge including prestored liquid and dry reagents, and a commercially available centrifugal analyzer for incubation at 37 degrees C and real-time fluorescence detection. The system was characterized with an assay for the detection of the antibiotic resistance gene mecA of Staphylococcus aureus. The limit of detection was <10 copies and time-to-result was <20 min. Microfluidic unit operations comprise storage and release of liquid reagents, reconstitution of lyophilized reagents, aliquoting the sample into < or = 30 independent reaction cavities, and mixing of reagents with the DNA samples. The foil-based cartridge was produced by blow-molding and sealed with a self-adhesive tape. The demonstrated system excels existing PCR based lab-on-a-chip platforms in terms of energy efficiency and time-to-result. Applications are suggested in the field of mobile point-of-care analysis, B-detection, or in combination with continuous monitoring systems. PMID:20300675

  16. Microfluidic lab-on-a-foil for nucleic acid analysis based on isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Sascha; Weber, Patrick; Focke, Max; Faltin, Bernd; Hoffmann, Jochen; Müller, Claas; Mark, Daniel; Roth, Günter; Munday, Peter; Armes, Niall; Piepenburg, Olaf; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2010-04-01

    For the first time we demonstrate a self-sufficient lab-on-a-foil system for the fully automated analysis of nucleic acids which is based on the recently available isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The system consists of a novel, foil-based centrifugal microfluidic cartridge including prestored liquid and dry reagents, and a commercially available centrifugal analyzer for incubation at 37 degrees C and real-time fluorescence detection. The system was characterized with an assay for the detection of the antibiotic resistance gene mecA of Staphylococcus aureus. The limit of detection was <10 copies and time-to-result was <20 min. Microfluidic unit operations comprise storage and release of liquid reagents, reconstitution of lyophilized reagents, aliquoting the sample into < or = 30 independent reaction cavities, and mixing of reagents with the DNA samples. The foil-based cartridge was produced by blow-molding and sealed with a self-adhesive tape. The demonstrated system excels existing PCR based lab-on-a-chip platforms in terms of energy efficiency and time-to-result. Applications are suggested in the field of mobile point-of-care analysis, B-detection, or in combination with continuous monitoring systems.

  17. A collaborative study to establish the 1st WHO International Standard for human cytomegalovirus for nucleic acid amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Jacqueline F; Heath, Alan B; Minor, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Variability in the performance of nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT)-based assays presents a significant problem in the diagnosis and management of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Here we describe a collaborative study to evaluate the suitability of candidate reference materials to harmonize HCMV viral load measurements in a wide range of NAT assays. Candidate materials comprised lyophilized Merlin virus, liquid Merlin virus, liquid AD169 virus, and purified HCMV Merlin DNA cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome. Variability in the laboratory mean HCMV concentrations determined for virus samples across the different assays was 2 log10. Variability for the purified DNA sample was higher (>3 log10). The agreement between laboratories was markedly improved when the potencies of the liquid virus samples were expressed relative to the lyophilized virus candidate. In contrast, the agreement between laboratories for the purified DNA sample was not improved. Results indicated the suitability of the lyophilized Merlin virus preparation as the 1st WHO International Standard for HCMV for NAT. It was established in October 2010, with an assigned potency of 5 × 10(6) International Units (IU) (NIBSC code 09/162). It is intended to be used to calibrate secondary references, used in HCMV NAT assays, in IU. PMID:27179913

  18. Nucleic acid-amplification testing for hepatitis B in cornea donors.

    PubMed

    Fornés, Maria Gema; Jiménez, Maria Angustias; Eisman, Marcela; Gómez Villagrán, Jose Luis; Villalba, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Careful donor selection and implementation of tests of appropriate sensitivity and specificity are of paramount importance for minimizing the risk of transmitting infectious diseases from donors to corneal allograft recipients. Reported cases of viral transmission with corneal grafts are very unusual. Nevertheless potential virus transmission through the engraftment cannot be ruled out. According to European Guideline 2006/17/EC, screening for antibodies for Hepatitis B core antigen (anti HBc) is mandatory, and when this test is positive, some criteria must be established before using corneas. Despite the continuous progress in screening tests, donors carrying an occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) can cause transplant-transmitted hepatitis B. To date, Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) is not an obligatory assay in corneal tissue setting neither in our country nor in the rest of European countries. Herein, we report three cornea donors that were rejected with the diagnosis of OBI through the testing of sensitive NAT and the serological profile of Hepatitis B virus. The aim of this report is to emphasize the need to include NAT in new reviews of EU Tissues and Cells Directives in order to increase level of security in tissue donation as well as not to reject a high number of donors with isolated profile of anti HBc in geographical areas with high prevalence of Hepatitis B, that could be rejected without a true criterion of Hepatitis B infection. PMID:26685699

  19. Genomic detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by nucleic acid amplification test in a frequent platelet donor during the pre-seroconversion period.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2011-11-01

    Since serological donor-screening tests for HIV were introduced in 1985, the safety of donated blood components has improved dramatically. However, these tests do not completely prevent the risk of transfusion-associated HIV infection related to the use of blood donated during the pre-seroconversion window period. Testing based on nucleic acid amplification is being implemented to screen for HIV-infected blood donated during this period, which has reduced the probability of transmitting HIV through transfusion by shortening the window period. This article describes a case of acute HIV-1 infection, detected using a nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) in a repeat blood donor who donated during the pre-seroconversion window period and whose antigen and anti-HIV antibody expression was observed after molecular marker detection. In addition, the possible route of infection is discussed based on the patient's history, and finally, the need for NAT technology for blood donor screening is emphasized.

  20. Multiplex, Rapid, and Sensitive Isothermal Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence by Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Multiple Cross Displacement Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Lijuan; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA), which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5' end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labeled at the 5' end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5' end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 min, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here, we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism. PMID:27242766

  1. Development of Lentivirus-Based Reference Materials for Ebola Virus Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology-Based Assays.

    PubMed

    Mattiuzzo, Giada; Ashall, James; Doris, Kathryn S; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Nicolson, Carolyn; Wilkinson, Dianna E; Harvey, Ruth; Almond, Neil; Anderson, Robert; Efstathiou, Stacey; Minor, Philip D; Page, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The 2013-present Ebola virus outbreak in Western Africa has prompted the production of many diagnostic assays, mostly based on nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAT). The calibration and performance assessment of established assays and those under evaluation requires reference materials that can be used in parallel with the clinical sample to standardise or control for every step of the procedure, from extraction to the final qualitative/quantitative result. We have developed safe and stable Ebola virus RNA reference materials by encapsidating anti sense viral RNA into HIV-1-like particles. The lentiviral particles are replication-deficient and non-infectious due to the lack of HIV-1 genes and Envelope protein. Ebola virus genes were subcloned for encapsidation into two lentiviral preparations, one containing NP-VP35-GP and the other VP40 and L RNA. Each reference material was formulated as a high-titre standard for use as a calibrator for secondary or internal standards, and a 10,000-fold lower titre preparation to serve as an in-run control. The preparations have been freeze-dried to maximise stability. These HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials were suitable for use with in-house and commercial quantitative RT-PCR assays and with digital RT-PCR. The HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials are stable at up to 37°C for two weeks, allowing the shipment of the material worldwide at ambient temperature. These results support further evaluation of the HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials as part of an International collaborative study for the establishment of the 1st International Standard for Ebola virus RNA.

  2. Development of Lentivirus-Based Reference Materials for Ebola Virus Nucleic Acid Amplification Technology-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Mattiuzzo, Giada; Ashall, James; Doris, Kathryn S.; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Nicolson, Carolyn; Wilkinson, Dianna E.; Harvey, Ruth; Almond, Neil; Anderson, Robert; Efstathiou, Stacey; Minor, Philip D.; Page, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The 2013-present Ebola virus outbreak in Western Africa has prompted the production of many diagnostic assays, mostly based on nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAT). The calibration and performance assessment of established assays and those under evaluation requires reference materials that can be used in parallel with the clinical sample to standardise or control for every step of the procedure, from extraction to the final qualitative/quantitative result. We have developed safe and stable Ebola virus RNA reference materials by encapsidating anti sense viral RNA into HIV-1-like particles. The lentiviral particles are replication-deficient and non-infectious due to the lack of HIV-1 genes and Envelope protein. Ebola virus genes were subcloned for encapsidation into two lentiviral preparations, one containing NP-VP35-GP and the other VP40 and L RNA. Each reference material was formulated as a high-titre standard for use as a calibrator for secondary or internal standards, and a 10,000-fold lower titre preparation to serve as an in-run control. The preparations have been freeze-dried to maximise stability. These HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials were suitable for use with in-house and commercial quantitative RT-PCR assays and with digital RT-PCR. The HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials are stable at up to 37°C for two weeks, allowing the shipment of the material worldwide at ambient temperature. These results support further evaluation of the HIV-Ebola virus RNA reference materials as part of an International collaborative study for the establishment of the 1st International Standard for Ebola virus RNA. PMID:26562415

  3. Quantitative real-time PCR method with internal amplification control to quantify cyclopiazonic acid producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Werning, María L; Rodríguez, Mar; Bermúdez, Elena; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-12-01

    A quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) method that includes an internal amplification control (IAC) to quantify cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-producing molds in foods has been developed. A specific primer pair (dmaTF/dmaTR) and a TaqMan probe (dmaTp) were designed on the basis of dmaT gene which encodes the enzyme dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase involved in the biosynthesis of CPA. The IAC consisted of a 105 bp chimeric DNA fragment containing a region of the hly gene of Listeria monocytogenes. Thirty-two mold reference strains representing CPA producers and non-producers of different mold species were used in this study. All strains were tested for CPA production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the designed qPCR method was demonstrated by the high linear relationship of the standard curves relating to the dmaT gene copy numbers and the Ct values obtained from the different CPA producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocol to quantify CPA-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 1-4 log cfu/g in the different food matrices. The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g. This qPCR protocol including an IAC showed good efficiency to quantify CPA-producing molds in naturally contaminated foods avoiding false negative results. This method could be used to monitor the CPA producers in the HACCP programs to prevent the risk of CPA formation throughout the food chain. PMID:22986206

  4. Quantitative real-time PCR method with internal amplification control to quantify cyclopiazonic acid producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Werning, María L; Rodríguez, Mar; Bermúdez, Elena; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-12-01

    A quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) method that includes an internal amplification control (IAC) to quantify cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-producing molds in foods has been developed. A specific primer pair (dmaTF/dmaTR) and a TaqMan probe (dmaTp) were designed on the basis of dmaT gene which encodes the enzyme dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase involved in the biosynthesis of CPA. The IAC consisted of a 105 bp chimeric DNA fragment containing a region of the hly gene of Listeria monocytogenes. Thirty-two mold reference strains representing CPA producers and non-producers of different mold species were used in this study. All strains were tested for CPA production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the designed qPCR method was demonstrated by the high linear relationship of the standard curves relating to the dmaT gene copy numbers and the Ct values obtained from the different CPA producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocol to quantify CPA-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 1-4 log cfu/g in the different food matrices. The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g. This qPCR protocol including an IAC showed good efficiency to quantify CPA-producing molds in naturally contaminated foods avoiding false negative results. This method could be used to monitor the CPA producers in the HACCP programs to prevent the risk of CPA formation throughout the food chain.

  5. Evaluation of six commercial nucleic acid amplification tests for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and other Neisseria species.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Unemo, Magnus; Limnios, Athena E; Hogan, Tiffany R; Hjelmevoll, Stig-Ove; Garland, Susanne M; Tapsall, John

    2011-10-01

    Molecular detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in extragenital samples may result in false-positive results due to cross-reaction with commensal Neisseria species or Neisseria meningitidis. This study examined 450 characterized clinical culture isolates, comprising 216 N. gonorrhoeae isolates and 234 isolates of nongonococcal Neisseria species (n = 218) and 16 isolates of other closely related bacteria, with six commercial nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The six NAATs tested were Gen-Probe APTIMA COMBO 2 and APTIMA GC, Roche COBAS Amplicor CT/NG and COBAS 4800 CT/NG tests, BD ProbeTec GC Qx amplified DNA assay, and Abbott RealTime CT/NG test. All assays except COBAS Amplicor CT/NG test where four (1.9%) isolates were not detected showed a positive result with all N. gonorrhoeae isolates (n = 216). Among the 234 nongonococcal isolates examined, initial results from all assays displayed some false-positive results due to cross-reactions. Specifically, the COBAS Amplicor and ProbeTec tests showed the highest number of false-positive results, detecting 33 (14.1%) and 26 (11%) nongonococcal Neisseria isolates, respectively. On the first testing, APTIMA COMBO 2, APTIMA GC, Abbott RealTime, and Roche COBAS 4800 showed lower level of cross-reactions with five (2.1%), four (1.7%), two (1%), and two (1%) of the isolates showing low-level positivity, respectively. Upon retesting of these nine nongonococcal isolates using freshly cultured colonies, none were positive by the APTIMA COMBO 2, Abbott RealTime, or COBAS 4800 test. In conclusion, the COBAS Amplicor and ProbeTec tests displayed high number of false-positive results, while the remaining NAATs showed only sporadic low-level false-positive results. Supplementary testing for confirmation of N. gonorrhoeae NAATs remains recommended with all samples tested, in particular those from extragenital sites.

  6. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acid by coupling an autonomous cascade target replication and enzyme/gold nanoparticle-based post-amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Wei, Wenji; Wang, Yanqun; Fang, Li; Wang, Li; Li, Feng

    2016-06-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the development of isothermal and ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor is very essential for biological studies and medical diagnostics. Herein, the autonomous cascade DNA replication strategy was effectively married with the enzyme/gold nanoparticle-based post-amplification strategy to promote the detection performance toward target DNA. A hairpin DNA probe (HP) is designed that consists of an overhang at 3'-end as the recognition unit for target DNA, a recognition site for nicking endonuclease, and an alkane spacer to terminate polymerization reaction. The autonomous DNA replication-scission-displacement reaction operated by the nicking endonuclease/KF polymerase induced the autocatalytic opening of HP, which was then specifically bound by the enzyme/gold nanoparticles for further dual-signal amplification toward target-related sensing events. A low detection limit of 0.065 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. The proposed biosensor could be also easily regenerated for target detection. The developed biosensor creates an opportunity for the effective coupling of the target replication with post-amplification strategies and thus opens a promising avenue for the detection of nucleic acid with low abundance in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine.

  7. Flow-through Capture and in Situ Amplification Can Enable Rapid Detection of a Few Single Molecules of Nucleic Acids from Several Milliliters of Solution.

    PubMed

    Schlappi, Travis S; McCalla, Stephanie E; Schoepp, Nathan G; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-08-01

    Detecting nucleic acids (NAs) at zeptomolar concentrations (few molecules per milliliter) currently requires expensive equipment and lengthy processing times to isolate and concentrate the NAs into a volume that is amenable to amplification processes, such as PCR or LAMP. Shortening the time required to concentrate NAs and integrating this procedure with amplification on-device would be invaluable to a number of analytical fields, including environmental monitoring and clinical diagnostics. Microfluidic point-of-care (POC) devices have been designed to address these needs, but they are not able to detect NAs present in zeptomolar concentrations in short time frames because they require slow flow rates and/or they are unable to handle milliliter-scale volumes. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally investigate a flow-through capture membrane that solves this problem by capturing NAs with high sensitivity in a short time period, followed by direct detection via amplification. Theoretical predictions guided the choice of physical parameters for a chitosan-coated nylon membrane; these predictions can also be applied generally to other capture situations with different requirements. The membrane is also compatible with in situ amplification, which, by eliminating an elution step enables high sensitivity and will facilitate integration of this method into sample-to-answer detection devices. We tested a wide range of combinations of sample volumes and concentrations of DNA molecules using a capture membrane with a 2 mm radius. We show that for nucleic acid detection, this approach can concentrate and detect as few as ∼10 molecules of DNA with flow rates as high as 1 mL/min, handling samples as large as 50 mL. In a specific example, this method reliably concentrated and detected ∼25 molecules of DNA from 50 mL of sample. PMID:27429181

  8. Reporter-triggered isothermal exponential amplification strategy in ultrasensitive homogeneous label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ji; Zhang, De-Wen; Zhang, Fang-Ting; Yuan, Fang; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2014-06-14

    A simple and novel reporter-triggered isothermal exponential amplification reaction (R-EXPAR) integrated with a miniaturized electrochemical device was developed, which achieved excellent improvement (five orders of magnitude) of sensitivity toward reporter, G-quadruplex. This R-EXPAR strategy has been successfully implemented to construct a homogeneous label-free electrochemical sensor for ultrasensitive DNA detection.

  9. Label-free and sensitive fluorescence detection of nucleic acid, based on combination of a graphene oxid /SYBR green I dye platform and polymerase assisted signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao; Xing, Da

    2012-12-01

    A new label-free isothermal fluorescence amplification detection for nucleic acid has been developed. In this paper, we first developed a novel sensitive and specific detection platform with an unmodified hairpin probe (HP) combination of the graphene oxid (GO)/ SYBR green I dye (SG), which was relied on the selective principle of adsorption and the high quenching efficiency of GO. Then for the application of this new strategy, we used Mirco RNA-21 (Mir-21) as the target to evaluate this working principle of our design. When the target was hybridizing with the HP and inducing its conformation of change, an efficient isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction was activating to assist the first signal amplification. In this format, the formed complex conformation of DNA would interact with its high affinity dye, then detached from the surface of GO after incubating with the platform of GO/intercalating dye. This reaction would accompany with obvious fluorescence recovery, and accomplish farther signal enhancement by a mass of intercalating dye inserting into the minor groove of the long duplex replication product. By taking advantage of the multiple amplification of signal, this method exerted substantial enhancement in sensitivity and could be used for rapid and selective detection of Mir-21 with attomole range. It is expected that this cost-effective GO based sensor might hold considerable potential to apply in bioanalysis studies.

  10. Multiplex, Rapid, and Sensitive Isothermal Detection of Nucleic-Acid Sequence by Endonuclease Restriction-Mediated Real-Time Multiple Cross Displacement Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Dongxin; Luo, Lijuan; Li, Hua; Cao, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2016-01-01

    We have devised a novel isothermal amplification technology, termed endonuclease restriction-mediated real-time multiple cross displacement amplification (ET-MCDA), which facilitated multiplex, rapid, specific and sensitive detection of nucleic-acid sequences at a constant temperature. The ET-MCDA integrated multiple cross displacement amplification strategy, restriction endonuclease cleavage and real-time fluorescence detection technique. In the ET-MCDA system, the functional cross primer E-CP1 or E-CP2 was constructed by adding a short sequence at the 5′ end of CP1 or CP2, respectively, and the new E-CP1 or E-CP2 primer was labeled at the 5′ end with a fluorophore and in the middle with a dark quencher. The restriction endonuclease Nb.BsrDI specifically recognized the short sequence and digested the newly synthesized double-stranded terminal sequences (5′ end short sequences and their complementary sequences), which released the quenching, resulting on a gain of fluorescence signal. Thus, the ET-MCDA allowed real-time detection of single or multiple targets in only a single reaction, and the positive results were observed in as short as 12 min, detecting down to 3.125 fg of genomic DNA per tube. Moreover, the analytical specificity and the practical application of the ET-MCDA were also successfully evaluated in this study. Here, we provided the details on the novel ET-MCDA technique and expounded the basic ET-MCDA amplification mechanism. PMID:27242766

  11. Direct RNA detection without nucleic acid purification and PCR: Combining sandwich hybridization with signal amplification based on branched hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a convenient, robust and low-cost RNA detection system suitable for high-throughput applications. This system uses a highly specific sandwich hybridization to capture target RNA directly onto solid support, followed by on-site signal amplification via 2-dimensional, branched hybridizing chain polymerization through toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction. The assay uses SYBR Green to detect targets at concentrations as low as 1 pM, without involving nucleic acid purification or any enzymatic reaction, using ordinary oligonucleotides without modification or labeling. The system was demonstrated in the detection of malaria RNA in blood and GAPDH gene expression in cell lysate.

  12. Point of care nucleic acid detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with isothermal RNA amplification based paper biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxing; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2014-09-01

    Food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes have been recognized as a major cause of human infections worldwide, leading to substantial health problems. Food-borne pathogen identification needs to be simpler, cheaper and more reliable than the current traditional methods. Here, we have constructed a low-cost paper biosensor for the detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with the naked eye. In this study, an effective isothermal amplification method was used to amplify the hlyA mRNA gene, a specific RNA marker in Listeria monocytogenes. The amplification products were applied to the paper biosensor to perform a visual test, in which endpoint detection was performed using sandwich hybridization assays. When the RNA products migrated along the paper biosensor by capillary action, the gold nanoparticles accumulated at the designated Test line and Control line. Under optimized experimental conditions, as little as 0.5 pg/μL genomic RNA from Listeria monocytogenes could be detected. The whole assay process, including RNA extraction, amplification, and visualization, can be completed within several hours. The developed method is suitable for point-of-care applications to detect food-borne pathogens, as it can effectively overcome the false-positive results caused by amplifying nonviable Listeria monocytogenes.

  13. A Simple, Inexpensive Device for Nucleic Acid Amplification without Electricity—Toward Instrument-Free Molecular Diagnostics in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    LaBarre, Paul; Hawkins, Kenneth R.; Gerlach, Jay; Wilmoth, Jared; Beddoe, Andrew; Singleton, Jered; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular assays targeted to nucleic acid (NA) markers are becoming increasingly important to medical diagnostics. However, these are typically confined to wealthy, developed countries; or, to the national reference laboratories of developing-world countries. There are many infectious diseases that are endemic in low-resource settings (LRS) where the lack of simple, instrument-free, NA diagnostic tests is a critical barrier to timely treatment. One of the primary barriers to the practicality and availability of NA assays in LRS has been the complexity and power requirements of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) instrumentation (another is sample preparation). Methodology/Principal Findings In this article, we investigate the hypothesis that an electricity-free heater based on exothermic chemical reactions and engineered phase change materials can successfully incubate isothermal NA amplification assays. We assess the heater's equivalence to commercially available PCR instruments through the characterization of the temperature profiles produced, and a minimal method comparison. Versions of the prototype for several different isothermal techniques are presented. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that an electricity-free heater based on exothermic chemical reactions and engineered phase change materials can successfully incubate isothermal NA amplification assays, and that the results of those assays are not significantly different from ones incubated in parallel in commercially available PCR instruments. These results clearly suggest the potential of the non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification (NINA) heater for molecular diagnostics in LRS. When combined with other innovations in development that eliminate power requirements for sample preparation, cold reagent storage, and readout, the NINA heater will comprise part of a kit that should enable electricity-free NA testing for many important analytes. PMID:21573065

  14. Linear light-scattering of gold nanostars for versatile biosensing of nucleic acids and proteins using exonuclease III as biocatalyst to signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sai; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Ye, Jiayan; Dong, Ying

    2015-09-15

    Gold nanomaterials promise a wide range of potential applications in chemical and biological sensing, imaging, and catalysis. In this paper, we demonstrate a facile method for room-temperature synthesis of gold nanostars (AuNSs) with a size of ~50 nm via seeded growth. Significantly, the AuNSs are found to have high light-scattering properties, which are successfully used as labels for sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids and proteins by using exonuclease III (Exo III) as a biocatalyst. For DNA detection, the binding of targets to the functionalized AuNS probes leads to the Exo III-stimulated cascade recycling amplification. As a result, a large amount of AuNSs are released from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into solution, providing a greatly enhanced light-scattering signal for amplified sensing process. Moreover, a binding-induced DNA three-way junction (DNA TWJ) is introduced to thrombin detection, in which the binding of two aptamers to thrombin triggers assembly of the DNA motifs and initiates the subsequent DNA strand displacement reaction (SDR) and Exo III-assisted cascade recycling amplification. The detection limits of 89 fM and 5.6 pM are achieved for DNA and thrombin, respectively, which are comparable to or even exceed that of the reported isothermal amplification methods. It is noteworthy that based on the DNA TWJ strategy the sequences are independent on target proteins. Additionally, the employment of MNPs in the assays can not only simplify the operations but also improve the detection sensitivity. Therefore, the proposed amplified light-scattering assay with high sensitivity and selectivity, acceptable accuracy, and satisfactory versatility of analytes provides various applications in bioanalysis.

  15. Detection of Vibrio cholerae by isothermal cross-priming amplification combined with nucleic acid detection strip analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Du, Xin-Jun; Guan, Chun; Li, Ping; Zheng, Wen-Jie; Wang, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a water- and food-borne human pathogen, and V. cholerae serotypes O1 and O139 have attracted attention because of their severe pathogenesis. However, non-O1, non-O139 cholera vibrios (NCVs) were also recently recognized as having virulence properties. In this study, we developed a cross-priming amplification (CPA) method for the detection of all serotypes of V. cholerae. The specificity of the CPA method was tested using a panel of 60 different bacterial strains. All of the V. cholerae strains showed positive results, and 41 other types of bacteria gave negative results. The limit of detection of the CPA method was 79.28 fg of genomic DNA, 4.2 × 10(2) CFU/ml for bacteria in pure culture, and 5.6 CFU per 25 g of sample with pre-enrichment. This method showed a higher sensitivity than the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method did and was more convenient to perform. These results indicate that the CPA method can be used for the rapid preliminary screening of V. cholerae.

  16. Sequence-based identification of legionella.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Rodney M

    2013-01-01

    Legionella strains are considered biologically inert with respect to traditional identification schemes. Various phenotypic alternatives have been attempted but all have lacked resolution as additional species have been added to what is proving to be a large genus. Only sequence-based schemes have the required resolution to confidently speciate or recognize potentially novel strains. The mip gene target is the most comprehensive currently available, with the added advantage of a Web-based analysis tool. Other gene targets are available for most if not all species, the best of which target 16S rRNA, rpoB, rnpB, or proA genes. One or several of these should be used to confirm important strains or clarify apparent novelness. The increased resolution of these sequence-based schemes has recognized many new species, and many more remain to be characterized. I provide a mip analysis of 44 such strains along with the recognized species, and a SplitsTree network analysis of recognized species and 20 novel strains for which sequence for the five targets is available.

  17. Nucleotide and Predicted Amino Acid Sequence-Based Analysis of the Avian Metapneumovirus Type C Cell Attachment Glycoprotein Gene: Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Epidemiology of U.S. Pneumoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rene; Lwamba, Humphrey M.; Kapczynski, Darrell R.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Seal, Bruce S.

    2003-01-01

    A serologically distinct avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) was isolated in the United States after an outbreak of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) in February 1997. The newly recognized U.S. virus was subsequently demonstrated to be genetically distinct from European subtypes and was designated aMPV serotype C (aMPV/C). We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the cell attachment glycoprotein (G) of aMPV/C (Colorado strain and three Minnesota isolates) and predicted amino acid sequence by sequencing cloned cDNAs synthesized from intracellular RNA of aMPV/C-infected cells. The nucleotide sequence comprised 1,321 nucleotides with only one predicted open reading frame encoding a protein of 435 amino acids, with a predicted Mr of 48,840. The structural characteristics of the predicted G protein of aMPV/C were similar to those of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) attachment G protein, including two mucin-like regions (heparin-binding domains) flanking both sides of a CX3C chemokine motif present in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. Comparison of the deduced G-protein amino acid sequence of aMPV/C with those of aMPV serotypes A, B, and D, as well as hRSV revealed overall predicted amino acid sequence identities ranging from 4 to 16.5%, suggesting a distant relationship. However, G-protein sequence identities ranged from 72 to 97% when aMPV/C was compared to other members within the aMPV/C subtype or 21% for the recently identified human MPV (hMPV) G protein. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide changes were greater than one in the G gene when comparing the more recent Minnesota isolates to the original Colorado isolate. Epidemiologically, this indicates positive selection among U.S. isolates since the first outbreak of TRT in the United States. PMID:12682171

  18. A regulatory gene (ccaR) required for cephamycin and clavulanic acid production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: amplification results in overproduction of both beta-lactam compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Llarena, F J; Liras, P; Rodríguez-García, A; Martín, J F

    1997-01-01

    A regulatory gene (ccaR), located within the cephamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus, is linked to a gene (blp) encoding a protein similar to a beta-lactamase-inhibitory protein. Expression of ccaR is required for cephamycin and clavulanic acid biosynthesis in S. clavuligerus. The ccaR-encoded protein resembles the ActII-ORF4, RedD, AfsR, and DnrI regulatory proteins of other Streptomyces species, all of which share several motifs. Disruption of ccaR by targeted double recombination resulted in the loss of the ability to synthesize cephamycin and clavulanic acid. Complementation of the disrupted mutant with ccaR restored production of both secondary metabolites. ccaR was expressed as a monocistronic transcript at 24 and 48 h in S. clavuligerus cultures (preceding the phase of antibiotic accumulation), but no transcript hybridization signals were observed at 72 or 96 h. This expression pattern is consistent with those of regulatory proteins required for antibiotic biosynthesis. Amplification of ccaR in S. clavuligerus resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the production of cephamycin and clavulanic acid. PMID:9068654

  19. Non-Instrumented Nucleic Acid Amplification (NINA) for Rapid Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum Race 3 Biovar 2

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Ryo; LaBarre, Paul; Singleton, Jered; Beddoe, Andy; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Alvarez, Anne M.; Jenkins, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of a non-instrumented device for the implementation of a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) based assay for the select-agent bacterial-wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2. Heat energy is generated within the device by the exothermic hydration of calcium oxide, and the reaction temperature is regulated by storing latent energy at the melting temperature of a renewable lipid-based engineered phase-change material. Endpoint detection of the LAMP reaction is achieved without opening the reaction tube by observing the fluorescence of an innovative FRET-based hybridization probe with a simple custom fluorometer. Non-instrumented devices could maintain reactions near the design temperature of 63°C for at least an hour. Using this approach DNA extracted from the pathogen could be detected at fewer than ten copies within a 25 μL reaction mix, illustrating the potential of these technologies for simple, powerful agricultural diagnostics in the field. Furthermore, the assay was just as reliable when implemented in a tropical environment at 31°C as it was when implemented in an air-conditioned lab maintained at 22°C, illustrating the potential value of the technology for field conditions in the tropics and subtropics. PMID:25485176

  20. Illumina sequencing-based analyses of bacterial communities during short-chain fatty-acid production from food waste and sewage sludge fermentation at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weixiao; Chen, Hong; Yan, ShuHai; Su, Jianqiang

    2014-09-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) can be produced by primary and waste activated sludge anaerobic fermentation. The yield and product spectrum distribution of SCFAs can be significantly affected by different initial pH values. However, most studies have focused on the physical and chemical aspects of SCFA production by waste activated sludge fermentation at different pH values. Information on the bacterial community structures during acidogenic fermentation is limited. In this study, comparisons of the bacterial communities during the co-substrate fermentation of food wastes and sewage sludge at different pH values were performed using the barcoded Illumina paired-end sequencing method. The results showed that different pH environments harbored a characteristic bacterial community, including sequences related to Lactobacillus, Prevotella, Mitsuokella, Treponema, Clostridium, and Ureibacillus. The most abundant bacterial operational taxonomic units in the different pH environments were those related to carbohydrate-degrading bacteria, which are associated with constituents of co-substrate fermentation. Further analyses showed that during organic matter fermentation, a core microbiota composed of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes existed. Comparison analyses revealed that the bacterial community during fermentation was significantly affected by the pH, and that the diverse product distribution was related to the shift in bacterial communities.

  1. Comparison of an rRNA‐based and DNA‐based nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jon L; Schachter, Julius; Moncada, Jeanne; Habte, Dereje; Zerihun, Mulat; House, Jenafir I; Zhou, Zhaoxia; Hong, Kevin C; Maxey, Kathryn; Gaynor, Bruce D; Lietman, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim The World Health Organisation (WHO) hopes to achieve global elimination of trachoma, still the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide, in part through mass antibiotic treatment. DNA‐based nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are currently used to evaluate the success of treatment programmes by measuring the prevalence of C trachomatis infection. Some believe that newer ribosomal RNA (rRNA)‐based tests may be much more sensitive since bacterial rRNA is present in amounts up to 10 000 times that of genomic DNA. Others believe that rRNA‐based tests are instead less sensitive but more specific, due to the presence of dead or subviable organisms that the test may not detect. This study compares an rRNA‐based test to a DNA‐based test for the detection of ocular C trachomatis infection in children living in trachoma‐endemic villages. Methods An rRNA‐based amplification test and DNA‐based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on swab specimens taken from the right upper tarsal conjunctiva of 56 children aged 0–10 years living in two villages in Amhara, Ethiopia. Results The rRNA‐based test detected ocular C trachomatis infection in 35 (63%) subjects compared with 22 (39%) detected by PCR (McNemar's test, p = 0.0002). The rRNA‐based test gave positive results for all subjects that were positive by PCR, and also detected infection in 13 (23%) additional subjects. Conclusion The rRNA‐based test appears to have significantly greater sensitivity than PCR for the detection of ocular chlamydial infection in children in trachoma‐endemic villages. Using the rRNA‐based test, we may be able to detect infection that was previously missed with PCR. Past studies using DNA‐based tests to assess prevalence of infectious trachoma following antibiotic treatment may have underestimated the true prevalence of infection. PMID:17050583

  2. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  3. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully.

  4. DNA extraction, preservation, and amplification.

    PubMed

    Knebelsberger, Thomas; Stöger, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of DNA barcoding as a routine practice in biodiversity research is strongly dependent on the quality of the source material, DNA extraction method, and selection of adequate primers in combination with optimized polymerase chain reaction (PCR) conditions. For the isolation of nucleic acids, silica-gel membrane methods are to be favored because they are easy to handle, applicable for high sample throughput, relatively inexpensive, and provide high DNA quality, quantity, and purity which are pre-requisites for successful PCR amplification and long-term storage of nucleic acids in biorepositories, such as DNA banks. In this section, standard protocols and workflow schemes for sample preparation, DNA isolation, DNA storage, PCR amplification, PCR product quality control, and PCR product cleanup are proposed and described in detail. A PCR troubleshooting and primer design section may help to solve problems that hinder successful amplification of the desired barcoding gene region.

  5. Enrichment, amplification, and sequence-based typing of Salmonella enterica and other foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection and characterization of foodborne pathogens typically involves microbiological enrichment with subsequent isolation and identification of a pure culture; this is ideally followed by strain typing which provides information critical to outbreak and source investigations. Pulsed-field gel e...

  6. Enzymatic electrochemical detection of epidemic-causing Vibrio cholerae with a disposable oligonucleotide-modified screen-printed bisensor coupled to a dry-reagent-based nucleic acid amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Choo Yee; Ang, Geik Yong; Chan, Kok Gan; Banga Singh, Kirnpal Kaur; Chan, Yean Yean

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we developed a nucleic acid-sensing platform in which a simple, dry-reagent-based nucleic acid amplification assay is combined with a portable multiplex electrochemical genosensor. Preparation of an amplification reaction mix targeting multiple DNA regions of interest is greatly simplified because the lyophilized reagents need only be reconstituted with ultrapure water before the DNA sample is added. The presence of single or multiple target DNAs causes the corresponding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) amplicons to be generated and tagged with a fluorescein label. The fluorescein-labeled ssDNA amplicons are then analyzed using capture probe-modified screen-printed gold electrode bisensors. Enzymatic amplification of the hybridization event is achieved through the catalytic production of electroactive α-naphthol by anti-fluorescein-conjugated alkaline phosphatase. The applicability of this platform as a diagnostic tool is demonstrated with the detection of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139, which are associated with cholera epidemics and pandemics. The platform showed excellent diagnostic sensitivity and specificity (100%) when challenged with 168 spiked stool samples. The limit of detection was low (10 colony-forming units/ml) for both toxigenic V. cholerae serogroups. A heat stability assay revealed that the dry-reagent amplification reaction mix was stable at temperatures of 4-56 °C, with an estimated shelf life of seven months. The findings of this study highlight the potential of combining a dry-reagent-based nucleic acid amplification assay with an electrochemical genosensor in a more convenient, sensitive, and sequence-specific detection strategy for multiple target nucleic acids.

  7. Hybrid Chirped Pulse Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Barty, C P J

    2002-05-07

    We present a novel chirped pulse amplification method which combines optical parametric amplification and laser amplification. We have demonstrated this hybrid CPA concept with a combination of beta-barium borate and Ti:sapphire. High-efficiency, multi-terawatt compatible amplification is achieved without gain narrowing and without electro-optic modulators using a simple commercial pump laser.

  8. [Viral safety of biologicals: evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) assay and development of concentration method of HCV for sensitive detection by NAT].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    The most important issue for the safety of biological products and blood products derived from human sources is how to prevent transmission of infectious agents. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence. HCV is mainly transmitted by exposure to blood and highly infectious during the early window period with extremely low viral loads. Therefore it is important to develop more sensitive detection methods for HCV. In the case of blood products, both serological test and nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) are required to detect HCV. Since NAT is highly sensitive, establishment of a new standard is required for validation of NAT assay. NAT guideline and establishment of the standard for HCV RNA and HCV genotype panel is introduced in this review. On the other hand, to enhance the sensitivity of virus detection by NAT, a novel viral concentration method using polyethyleneimine (PEI)-conjugated magnetic beads (PEI beads) was developed. PEI beads concentration method is applicable to a wide range of viruses including HCV. Studies using the national standard for HCV RNA, HCV genotype panel and seroconversion panel, suggest that virus concentration method using PEI-beads is useful for improvement of the sensitivity of HCV detection by NAT and applicable to donor screening for HCV.

  9. Point-Counterpoint: A Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Streptococcus pyogenes Should Replace Antigen Detection and Culture for Detection of Bacterial Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Kirn, Thomas J; Thomson, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have frequently been the standard diagnostic approach when specific infectious agents are sought in a clinic specimen. They can be applied for specific agents such as S. pyogenes, or commercial multiplex NAATs for detection of a variety of pathogens in gastrointestinal, bloodstream, and respiratory infections may be used. NAATs are both rapid and sensitive. For many years, S. pyogenes testing algorithms used a rapid and specific group A streptococcal antigen test to screen throat specimens, followed, in some clinical settings, by a throat culture for S. pyogenes to increase the sensitivity of its detection. Now S. pyogenes NAATs are being used with increasing frequency. Given their accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use, should they replace antigen detection and culture for the detection of bacterial pharyngitis? Bobbi Pritt and Robin Patel of the Mayo Clinic, where S. pyogenes NAATs have been used for well over a decade with great success, will explain the advantages of this approach, while Richard (Tom) Thomson and Tom Kirn of the NorthShore University HealthSystem will discuss their concerns about this approach to diagnosing bacterial pharyngitis.

  10. Arabidopsis Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzyme2 Is a Negative Regulator of the Salicylic Acid-Mediated Feedback Amplification Loop for Defense Responses1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Huoi; Moeder, Wolfgang; Yoshioka, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    The triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) superfamily represents a group of enzymes that is characterized by their ability to hydrolyze a range of tripolyphosphate substrates. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) encodes three TTM genes, AtTTM1, AtTTM2, and AtTTM3. Although AtTTM3 has previously been reported to have tripolyphosphatase activity, recombinantly expressed AtTTM2 unexpectedly exhibited pyrophosphatase activity. AtTTM2 knockout mutant plants exhibit an enhanced hypersensitive response, elevated pathogen resistance against both virulent and avirulent pathogens, and elevated accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) upon infection. In addition, stronger systemic acquired resistance compared with wild-type plants was observed. These enhanced defense responses are dependent on SA, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4, and NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. Despite their enhanced pathogen resistance, ttm2 plants did not display constitutively active defense responses, suggesting that AtTTM2 is not a conventional negative regulator but a negative regulator of the amplification of defense responses. The transcriptional suppression of AtTTM2 by pathogen infection or treatment with SA or the systemic acquired resistance activator benzothiadiazole further supports this notion. Such transcriptional regulation is conserved among TTM2 orthologs in the crop plants soybean (Glycine max) and canola (Brassica napus), suggesting that TTM2 is involved in immunity in a wide variety of plant species. This indicates the possible usage of TTM2 knockout mutants for agricultural applications to generate pathogen-resistant crop plants. PMID:25185123

  11. Selective adsorption and chiral amplification of amino acids in vermiculite clay-implications for the origin of biochirality.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Donald G; Fitz, Daniel; Jakschitz, T; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-01-21

    Smectite clays are hydrated layer silicates that, like micas, occur naturally in abundance. Importantly, they have readily modifiable interlayer spaces that provide excellent sites for nanochemistry. Vermiculite is one such smectite clay and in the presence of small chain-length alkyl-NH(3)Cl ions forms sensitive, 1-D ordered model clay systems with expandable nano-pore inter-layer regions. These inter-layers readily adsorb organic molecules. n-Propyl NH(3)Cl vermiculite clay gels were used to determine the adsorption of alanine, lysine and histidine by chiral HPLC. The results show that during reaction with fresh vermiculite interlayers, significant chiral enrichment of either L- and D-enantiomers occurs depending on the amino acid. Chiral enrichment of the supernatant solutions is up to about 1% per pass. In contrast, addition to clay interlayers already reacted with amino acid solutions resulted in little or no change in D/L ratio during the time of the experiment. Adsorption of small amounts of amphiphilic organic molecules in clay inter-layers is known to produce Layer-by-Layer or Langmuir-Blodgett films. Moreover atomistic simulations show that self-organization of organic species in clay interlayers is important. These non-centrosymmetric, chirally active nanofilms may cause clays to act subsequently as chiral amplifiers, concentrating organic material from dilute solution and having different adsorption energetics for D- and L-enantiomers. The additional role of clays in RNA oligomerization already postulated by Ferris and others, together with the need for the organization of amphiphilic molecules and lipids noted by Szostak and others, suggests that such chiral separation by clays in lagoonal environments at normal biological temperatures might also have played a significant role in the origin of biochirality.

  12. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Elkin, Chris

    2006-05-09

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  13. Concordance study between one-step nucleic acid amplification and morphologic techniques to detect lymph node metastasis in papillary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    del Carmen, Sofía; Gatius, Sonia; Franch-Arcas, Guzmán; Baena, José Antonio; Gonzalez, Oscar; Zafon, Carlos; Cuevas, Dolors; Valls, Joan; Pérez, Angustias; Martinez, Mercedes; Ros, Susana; Macías, Carmen García; Iglesias, Carmela; Matías-Guiu, Xavier; de Álava, Enrique

    2016-02-01

    Tumor resection in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is often accompanied by lymph node (LN) removal of the central and lateral cervical compartments. One-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) is a polymerase chain reaction-based technique that quantifies cytokeratin 19 (CK19) messenger RNA copies. Our aim is to assess the value of OSNA in detection of LN metastases in PTC, in comparison with imprints and microscopic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. A total of 387 LNs from 37 patients were studied. From each half LN, 2 imprints were taken and analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and CK19 immunostaining. One half of the LN was submitted to OSNA and one half to FFPE processing and H&E and CK19 staining. For concordance analysis, every single LN was considered as a case. A group of 11 cases with discordant results between OSNA and H&E/CK19 FFPE sections were subjected to additional FFPE serial sectioning and H&E and CK19 staining. We found a high degree of concordance between the assays used, with sensitivities ranging from 0.81 to 0.95, and specificities ranging from 0.87 and 0.98. OSNA allowed upstaging of patients from pN0 to pN1, in comparison with standard pathologic analysis. Identification of a metastatic LN with more than 15000 CK19 messenger RNA copies predicted the presence of a second LN with macrometastasis (<5000 copies). In summary, the study shows that OSNA application in sentinel or suspicious LN may be helpful in assessing nodal status in PTC patients.

  14. Evaluation of a viral microarray based on simultaneous extraction and amplification of viral nucleotide acid for detecting human herpesviruses and enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Duan, Chunhong; Zhang, Chunxiu; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Rui; Zhou, Jiajing; Gai, Zhongtao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a viral microarray based assay was developed to detect the human herpesviruses and enteroviruses associated with central nervous system infections, including herpes simplex virus type 1, type 2 (HSV1 and HSV2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), enterovirus 71 (EV71), coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16) and B 5(CB5). The DNA polymerase gene of human herpesviruses and 5'-untranslated region of enteroviruses were selected as the targets to design primers and probes. Human herpesviruses DNA and enteroviruses RNA were extracted simultaneously by using a guanidinium thiocyanate acid buffer, and were subsequently amplified through a biotinylated asymmetry multiplex RT-PCR with the specific primer of enteroviruses. In total, 90 blood samples and 49 cerebrospinal fluids samples with suspected systemic or neurological virus infections were investigated. Out of 139 samples, 66 were identified as positive. The specificities of this multiplex RT-PCR microarray assay were over 96% but the sensitivities were various from 100% for HSV1, HSV2, EV71 and CB5, 95.83% for CMV, 80% for EBV to 71.43% for CA16 in comparison with reference standards of TaqMan qPCR/qRT-PCR. The high Kappa values (>0.90) from HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EV71 and CB5 were obtained, indicating almost perfect agreement in term of the 5 viruses detection. But lower Kappa values for EBV (0.63) and CA16 (0.74) displayed a moderate to substantial agreement. This study provides an innovation of simultaneous extraction, amplification, hybridization and detection of DNA viruses and RNA viruses with simplicity and specificity, and demonstrates a potential clinical utility for a variety of viruses' detection.

  15. Establishment of the 1st World Health Organization International Standard for Plasmodium falciparum DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Padley, David J; Heath, Alan B; Sutherland, Colin; Chiodini, Peter L; Baylis, Sally A

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to harmonize results for the detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA by nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays, a World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative study was performed, evaluating a series of candidate standard preparations. Methods Fourteen laboratories from 10 different countries participated in the collaborative study. Four candidate preparations based upon blood samples parasitaemic for P. falciparum were evaluated in the study. Sample AA was lyophilized, whilst samples BB, CC and DD were liquid/frozen preparations. The candidate standards were tested by each laboratory at a range of dilutions in four independent assays, using both qualitative and quantitative NAT-based assays. The results were collated and analysed statistically. Results Twenty sets of data were returned from the participating laboratories and used to determine the mean P. falciparum DNA content for each sample. The mean log10 "equivalents"/ml were 8.51 for sample AA, 8.45 for sample BB, 8.35 for sample CC, and 5.51 for sample DD. The freeze-dried preparation AA, was examined by accelerated thermal degradation studies and found to be highly stable. Conclusion On the basis of the collaborative study, the freeze-dried material, AA (NIBSC code No. 04/176) was established as the 1st WHO International Standard for P. falciparum DNA NAT-based assays and has been assigned a potency of 109 International Units (IU) per ml. Each vial contains 5 × 108 IU, equivalent to 0.5 ml of material after reconstitution. PMID:18652656

  16. Influenza A virus drift variants reduced the detection sensitivity of a commercial multiplex nucleic acid amplification assay in the season 2014/15.

    PubMed

    Huzly, Daniela; Korn, Klaus; Bierbaum, Sibylle; Eberle, Björn; Falcone, Valeria; Knöll, Antje; Steininger, Philipp; Panning, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The influenza season 2014/15 was dominated by drift variants of influenza A(H3N2), which resulted in a reduced vaccine effectiveness. It was not clear if the performance of commercial nucleic-acid-based amplification (NAT) assays for the detection of influenza was affected. The purpose of this study was to perform a real-life evaluation of two commercial NAT assays. During January-April 2015, we tested a total of 665 samples from patients with influenza-like illness using the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21, a commercial multiplex kit, (cohorts 1 and 2, n = 563 patients) and the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay (cohort 3, n = 102 patients), a single-use cartridge system. An in-house influenza real-time RT-PCR (cohort 1) and the RealStar Influenza RT-PCR 1.0 Kit (cohort 2 and 3) served as reference tests. Compared to the reference assay, an overall agreement of 95.9 % (cohort 1), 95 % (cohort 2), and 98 % (cohort 3) was achieved. A total of 24 false-negative results were observed using the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit. No false-negative results occurred using the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay. The Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit and the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay had sensitivities of 90.7 % and 100 % and specificities of 100 % and 94.1 %, respectively, compared to the RealStar 1.0 kit. Upon modification of the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit, the sensitivity increased to 97.3 %. Influenza virus strains circulating during the 2014/15 season reduced the detection sensitivity of a commercial NAT assay, and continuous monitoring of test performance is therefore necessary. PMID:27316440

  17. HIV Screening via Fourth-Generation Immunoassay or Nucleic Acid Amplification Test in the United States: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Elisa F.

    2011-01-01

    Background At least 10% of the 56,000 annual new HIV infections in the United States are caused by individuals with acute HIV infection (AHI). It unknown whether the health benefits and costs of routine nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) are justified, given the availability of newer fourth-generation immunoassay tests. Methods Using a dynamic HIV transmission model instantiated with U.S. epidemiologic, demographic, and behavioral data, I estimated the number of acute infections identified, HIV infections prevented, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, and the cost-effectiveness of alternative screening strategies. I varied the target population (everyone aged 15-64, injection drug users [IDUs] and men who have sex with men [MSM], or MSM only), screening frequency (annually, or every six months), and test(s) utilized (fourth-generation immunoassay only, or immunoassay followed by pooled NAAT). Results Annual immunoassay testing of MSM reduces incidence by 9.5% and costs <$10,000 per QALY gained. Adding pooled NAAT identifies 410 AHI per year, prevents 9.6% of new cases, costs $92,000 per QALY gained, and remains <$100,000 per QALY gained in settings where undiagnosed HIV prevalence exceeds 4%. Screening IDUs and MSM annually with fourth-generation immunoassay reduces incidence by 13% with cost-effectiveness <$10,000 per QALY gained. Increasing the screening frequency to every six months reduces incidence by 11% (MSM only) or 16% (MSM and IDUs) and costs <$20,000 per QALY gained. Conclusions Pooled NAAT testing every 12 months of MSM and IDUs in the United States prevents a modest number of infections, but may be cost-effective given sufficiently high HIV prevalence levels. However, testing via fourth-generation immunoassay every six months prevents a greater number of infections, is more economically efficient, and may obviate the benefits of acute HIV screening via NAAT. PMID:22110698

  18. MYCN Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Maisa; Caminada de Toledo, Silvia Regina; Monteiro Caran, Eliana Maria; de Seixas, Maria Teresa; de Martino Lee, Maria Lucia; de Campos Vieira Abib, Simone; Vianna, Sonia Maria Rossi; Schettini, Sergio Thomaz; Anderson Duffles Andrade, Joyce

    1999-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the second most common solid tumor occurring in children. Amplification of the MYCN oncogene is associated with poor prognosis. To identify neuroblastoma tumors with MYCN amplification, we studied the number of copies of MYCN in interphase cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 20 neuroblastoma patients. MYCN amplification appeared in 7 tumor specimens. Interphase and metaphase studies showed a tumor cell population with both forms of amplification, double minutes and homogeneously staining regions, in two patients. These patients showed a smaller tumor cell subpopulation with the presence of more than one homogeneously staining region, suggesting that gene amplification was undergoing karyotype evolution. PMID:10550298

  19. Nucleotide Sequence-Based Multitarget Identification

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagamoorthy, T.; Mulatz, Kirk; Hodkinson, Roger

    2003-01-01

    MULTIGEN technology (T. Vinayagamoorthy, U.S. patent 6,197,510, March 2001) is a modification of conventional sequencing technology that generates a single electropherogram consisting of short nucleotide sequences from a mixture of known DNA targets. The target sequences may be present on the same or different nucleic acid molecules. For example, when two DNA targets are sequenced, the first and second sequencing primers are annealed to their respective target sequences, and then a polymerase causes chain extension by the addition of new deoxyribose nucleotides. Since the electrophoretic separation depends on the relative molecular weights of the truncated molecules, the molecular weight of the second sequencing primer was specifically designed to be higher than the combined molecular weight of the first sequencing primer plus the molecular weight of the largest truncated molecule generated from the first target sequence. Thus, the series of truncated molecules produced by the second sequencing primer will have higher molecular weights than those produced by the first sequencing primer. Hence, the truncated molecules produced by these two sequencing primers can be effectively separated in a single lane by standard gel electrophoresis in a single electropherogram without any overlapping of the nucleotide sequences. By using sequencing primers with progressively higher molecular weights, multiple short DNA sequences from a variety of targets can be determined simultaneously. We describe here the basic concept of MULTIGEN technology and three applications: detection of sexually transmitted pathogens (Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum), detection of contaminants in meat samples (coliforms, fecal coliforms, and Escherichia coli O157:H7), and detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human N-acetyltransferase (NAT1) gene (S. Fronhoffs et al., Carcinogenesis 22:1405-1412, 2001). PMID:12843076

  20. Terabit Nyquist PDM-32QAM signal transmission with training sequence based time domain channel estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Dan; Ding, Rui; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2014-09-22

    We propose a time domain structure of channel estimation for coherent optical communication systems, which employs training sequence based equalizer and is transparent to arbitrary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) formats. Enabled with this methodology, 1.02 Tb/s polarization division multiplexed 32 QAM Nyquist pulse shaping signal with a net spectral efficiency of 7.46 b/s/Hz is transmitted over standard single-mode fiber link with Erbium-doped fiber amplifier only amplification. After 1190 km transmission, the average bit-error rate is lower than the 20% hard-decision forward error correction threshold of 1.5 × 10(-2). The transmission distance can be extended to 1428 km by employing intra-subchannel nonlinear compensation with the digital back-propagation method.

  1. Towards Engineered Processes for Sequencing-Based Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Love, J Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Sequencing-based analysis of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of metastatic cancer and improve clinical care. Technologies exist to enrich, identify, recover, and sequence single cells, but to enable systematic routine analysis of single CTCs from a range of cancer patients, there is a need to establish processes that efficiently integrate these specific operations. Such engineered processes should address challenges associated with the yield and viability of enriched CTCs, the robust identification of candidate single CTCs with minimal degradation of DNA, the bias in whole-genome amplification, and the efficient handling of candidate single CTCs or their amplified DNA products. Advances in methods for single-cell analysis and nanoscale technologies suggest opportunities to overcome these challenges, and could create integrated platforms that perform several of the unit operations together. Ultimately, technologies should be selected or adapted for optimal performance and compatibility in an integrated process. PMID:24839591

  2. Sensitivity of individual-donation and minipool nucleic acid amplification test options in detecting window period and occult hepatitis B virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Marion; Coleman, Charl; Mitchel, Josephine; Reddy, Ravi; van Drimmelen, Harry; Ficket, Tracy; Lelie, Nico

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several comparison studies showed that the Ultrio assay (Novartis Diagnostics) used in individual-donation nucleic acid amplification testing (ID-NAT) format was as sensitive as the TaqScreen assay (Roche) on minipools of six donations (MP6), but the sensitivity of HBV DNA detection has been improved in the new Ultrio Plus version of the assay. A head-to-head comparison study was designed to compare the clinical sensitivity of the Ultrio and Ultrio Plus assay in ID, MP4, and MP8 formats using TaqScreen MP6 as a reference assay. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Plasma samples of 107 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative, HBV ID-NAT (Ultrio) positive-yield samples and 29 HBV DNA–negative, HBsAg-positive samples were used for comparison of NAT options in replicate testing of dilutions. Viral loads and relative sensitivities were determined by probit analysis against the Eurohep standard. RESULTS Ultrio Plus detected a significantly (p < 0.00001) higher proportion of replicate assays on HBV NAT yields (77%) than Ultrio ID (62%) and TaqScreen MP6 (47%), whereas Ultrio Plus MP4 and MP8 detected 53 and 41%, respectively. On HBsAg-yield samples missed by Ultrio screening, the reactivity rate increased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 23% in Ultrio to 65% in Ultrio Plus and further to 72% (p = 0.10) in the TaqScreen assay. The overall improvement factor of the analytical sensitivity offered by the target enhancer reagent in the Ultrio Plus assay was 2.5 (2.0–3.1)-fold on the Ultrio yield samples, but 43 (11–350)-fold on the HBsAg yields. In ID-NAT format the analytical sensitivity of TaqScreen relative to Ultrio Plus was 2.0 (1.0–4.2), 0.9 (0.7–1.3), and 1.6 (0.9–3.0) on the Eurohep standard, HBV NAT–, and HBsAg-yield samples respectively. CONCLUSION The clinical sensitivity of the currently available commercial NAT methods is mainly driven by the pool size. PMID:23621791

  3. CRYSTALP2: sequence-based protein crystallization propensity prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kurgan, Lukasz; Razib, Ali A; Aghakhani, Sara; Dick, Scott; Mizianty, Marcin; Jahandideh, Samad

    2009-01-01

    Background Current protocols yield crystals for <30% of known proteins, indicating that automatically identifying crystallizable proteins may improve high-throughput structural genomics efforts. We introduce CRYSTALP2, a kernel-based method that predicts the propensity of a given protein sequence to produce diffraction-quality crystals. This method utilizes the composition and collocation of amino acids, isoelectric point, and hydrophobicity, as estimated from the primary sequence, to generate predictions. CRYSTALP2 extends its predecessor, CRYSTALP, by enabling predictions for sequences of unrestricted size and provides improved prediction quality. Results A significant majority of the collocations used by CRYSTALP2 include residues with high conformational entropy, or low entropy and high potential to mediate crystal contacts; notably, such residues are utilized by surface entropy reduction methods. We show that the collocations provide complementary information to the hydrophobicity and isoelectric point. Tests on four datasets show that CRYSTALP2 outperforms several existing sequence-based predictors (CRYSTALP, OB-score, and SECRET). CRYSTALP2's accuracy, MCC, and AROC range between 69.3 and 77.5%, 0.39 and 0.55, and 0.72 and 0.79, respectively. Our predictions are similar in quality and are complementary to the predictions of the most recent ParCrys and XtalPred methods. Our results also suggest that, as work in protein crystallization continues (thereby enlarging the population of proteins with known crystallization propensities), the prediction quality of the CRYSTALP2 method should increase. The prediction model and the datasets used in this contribution can be downloaded from . Conclusion CRYSTALP2 provides relatively accurate crystallization propensity predictions for a given protein chain that either outperform or complement the existing approaches. The proposed method can be used to support current efforts towards improving the success rate in obtaining

  4. Identification of the new HLA-DRB1{sup *}0812 allele detected by sequencing based typing

    SciTech Connect

    Versluis, L.F.; Zwan, A.W. van der; Tilanus, M.G.J.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.; Berg-Loonen, E.M. van den

    1996-12-31

    HLA-DRB typing by polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming (PCR-SSP) and sequencing based typing (SBT) was studied within the framework of the Antigen and Haplotype Society 11 and the Sequencing Based Typing Component of the Twelfth International HLA workshop. Sequencing was performed as described by McGinnis and co-workers in 1995 on coded samples, including most DR2 subtypes, resulting in high resolution HLA-DR typing. Sequences were compared with a database containing 107 DRB1, four DRB3, and five DRB5 alleles in a similar way as described for HLA-DPB. One sample showed a new DR8 sequence, indicating the presence of a new allele. This individual (4390) is of Indonesian origin. The specific amplification of the DR8 allele and subsequent sequencing resulted in a sequence which did not match the database and new polymorphism was identified. The complementary strand was sequenced and confirmed the presence of a new DRB1 allele. Cloning and subsequent sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction fragment resulted in confirmation of the direct sequence data. Later this variant was officially named DRB1{sup *}0812. The complete nucleotide sequence of exon 2 of this new allele is shown. This allele differs from DRB1{sup *}0810 by one nucleotide at codon 85, resulting in an alanine (GTT), whereas DRB1{sup *}0810 carries a valine (GCT). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Evaluation of a field-portable DNA microarray platform and nucleic acid amplification strategies for the detection of arboviruses, arthropods, and bloodmeals.

    PubMed

    Grubaugh, Nathan D; Petz, Lawrence N; Melanson, Vanessa R; McMenamy, Scott S; Turell, Michael J; Long, Lewis S; Pisarcik, Sarah E; Kengluecha, Ampornpan; Jaichapor, Boonsong; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S

    2013-02-01

    Highly multiplexed assays, such as microarrays, can benefit arbovirus surveillance by allowing researchers to screen for hundreds of targets at once. We evaluated amplification strategies and the practicality of a portable DNA microarray platform to analyze virus-infected mosquitoes. The prototype microarray design used here targeted the non-structural protein 5, ribosomal RNA, and cytochrome b genes for the detection of flaviviruses, mosquitoes, and bloodmeals, respectively. We identified 13 of 14 flaviviruses from virus inoculated mosquitoes and cultured cells. Additionally, we differentiated between four mosquito genera and eight whole blood samples. The microarray platform was field evaluated in Thailand and successfully identified flaviviruses (Culex flavivirus, dengue-3, and Japanese encephalitis viruses), differentiated between mosquito genera (Aedes, Armigeres, Culex, and Mansonia), and detected mammalian bloodmeals (human and dog). We showed that the microarray platform and amplification strategies described here can be used to discern specific information on a wide variety of viruses and their vectors.

  6. Evaluation of a Field-Portable DNA Microarray Platform and Nucleic Acid Amplification Strategies for the Detection of Arboviruses, Arthropods, and Bloodmeals

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Petz, Lawrence N.; Melanson, Vanessa R.; McMenamy, Scott S.; Turell, Michael J.; Long, Lewis S.; Pisarcik, Sarah E.; Kengluecha, Ampornpan; Jaichapor, Boonsong; O'Guinn, Monica L.; Lee, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Highly multiplexed assays, such as microarrays, can benefit arbovirus surveillance by allowing researchers to screen for hundreds of targets at once. We evaluated amplification strategies and the practicality of a portable DNA microarray platform to analyze virus-infected mosquitoes. The prototype microarray design used here targeted the non-structural protein 5, ribosomal RNA, and cytochrome b genes for the detection of flaviviruses, mosquitoes, and bloodmeals, respectively. We identified 13 of 14 flaviviruses from virus inoculated mosquitoes and cultured cells. Additionally, we differentiated between four mosquito genera and eight whole blood samples. The microarray platform was field evaluated in Thailand and successfully identified flaviviruses (Culex flavivirus, dengue-3, and Japanese encephalitis viruses), differentiated between mosquito genera (Aedes, Armigeres, Culex, and Mansonia), and detected mammalian bloodmeals (human and dog). We showed that the microarray platform and amplification strategies described here can be used to discern specific information on a wide variety of viruses and their vectors. PMID:23249687

  7. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  8. Collaborative study for establishment of a European Pharmacopoei Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) for B19 virus DNA testing of plasma pools by nucleic acid amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C M; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the collaborative study was to calibrate the B19 DNA content of a candidate Biological Reference Preparation (BRP) that is intended to be used for the validation of the analytical procedure, as threshold control and/or as quantitative reference material in the Nucleic Acid Amplification Technique (NAT) test of plasma pools for detection of B19 contamination. The candidate BRP was calibrated against the 1st International Standard for B19 DNA NAT assays. According to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph Human anti-D immunoglobulin, the threshold control needs to have a titre of 10( 4) IU/ml of B19 virus DNA. The lyophilised candidate BRP was prepared from 0.5 ml aliquots of a plasma pool spiked with B19 virus. The B19 virus originated from a "B19 virus window phase" blood donation (anti-B19 negative, B19-DNA high titre positive) and was diluted in a plasma pool tested negative by both serological and NAT assays for Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 to obtain a B19-DNA concentration level in the range of 10( 6) copies/ml. The residual water content of the lyophilised candidate BRP was determined as 0.98 +/- 0.65% (mean +/- relative standard deviation). Sixteen laboratories (Official Medicine Control Laboratories, manufacturers of plasma derivatives, NAT test laboratories and NAT kit manufacturers) from nine countries participated. Participants were requested to test the candidate BRP and the International Standard (99/800) in four independent test runs on different days using their in-house qualitative and/or quantitative NAT methods. Sixteen laboratories reported results. Thirteen laboratories reported results from qualitative assays and 5 laboratories reported results from quantitative assays. Two laboratories reported results from both types of assay. For the qualitative assays a weighted combined potency of 5.64 log( 10) IU/ml with 95 per cent confidence limits of +/- 0.17 log( 10) which corresponds to 67 to 150

  9. Reproducibility and quantitation of amplicon sequencing-based detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; Zhi, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Yi-Huei; Tu, Qichao; Xie, Jianping; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng

    2011-08-01

    To determine the reproducibility and quantitation of the amplicon sequencing-based detection approach for analyzing microbial community structure, a total of 24 microbial communities from a long-term global change experimental site were examined. Genomic DNA obtained from each community was used to amplify 16S rRNA genes with two or three barcode tags as technical replicates in the presence of a small quantity (0.1% wt/wt) of genomic DNA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as the control. The technical reproducibility of the amplicon sequencing-based detection approach is quite low, with an average operational taxonomic unit (OTU) overlap of 17.2%±2.3% between two technical replicates, and 8.2%±2.3% among three technical replicates, which is most likely due to problems associated with random sampling processes. Such variations in technical replicates could have substantial effects on estimating β-diversity but less on α-diversity. A high variation was also observed in the control across different samples (for example, 66.7-fold for the forward primer), suggesting that the amplicon sequencing-based detection approach could not be quantitative. In addition, various strategies were examined to improve the comparability of amplicon sequencing data, such as increasing biological replicates, and removing singleton sequences and less-representative OTUs across biological replicates. Finally, as expected, various statistical analyses with preprocessed experimental data revealed clear differences in the composition and structure of microbial communities between warming and non-warming, or between clipping and non-clipping. Taken together, these results suggest that amplicon sequencing-based detection is useful in analyzing microbial community structure even though it is not reproducible and quantitative. However, great caution should be taken in experimental design and data interpretation when the amplicon sequencing-based detection approach is used for quantitative

  10. Application of 2D graphic representation of protein sequence based on Huffman tree method.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhao-Hui; Feng, Jun; Qi, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ling

    2012-05-01

    Based on Huffman tree method, we propose a new 2D graphic representation of protein sequence. This representation can completely avoid loss of information in the transfer of data from a protein sequence to its graphic representation. The method consists of two parts. One is about the 0-1 codes of 20 amino acids by Huffman tree with amino acid frequency. The amino acid frequency is defined as the statistical number of an amino acid in the analyzed protein sequences. The other is about the 2D graphic representation of protein sequence based on the 0-1 codes. Then the applications of the method on ten ND5 genes and seven Escherichia coli strains are presented in detail. The results show that the proposed model may provide us with some new sights to understand the evolution patterns determined from protein sequences and complete genomes.

  11. Sequence-based analysis of the microbial composition of water kefir from multiple sources.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Alan J; O'Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Cotter, Paul D

    2013-11-01

    Water kefir is a water-sucrose-based beverage, fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast to produce a final product that is lightly carbonated, acidic and that has a low alcohol percentage. The microorganisms present in water kefir are introduced via water kefir grains, which consist of a polysaccharide matrix in which the microorganisms are embedded. We aimed to provide a comprehensive sequencing-based analysis of the bacterial population of water kefir beverages and grains, while providing an initial insight into the corresponding fungal population. To facilitate this objective, four water kefirs were sourced from the UK, Canada and the United States. Culture-independent, high-throughput, sequencing-based analyses revealed that the bacterial fraction of each water kefir and grain was dominated by Zymomonas, an ethanol-producing bacterium, which has not previously been detected at such a scale. The other genera detected were representatives of the lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria. Our analysis of the fungal component established that it was comprised of the genera Dekkera, Hanseniaspora, Saccharomyces, Zygosaccharomyces, Torulaspora and Lachancea. This information will assist in the ultimate identification of the microorganisms responsible for the potentially health-promoting attributes of these beverages.

  12. Enzymatic signal amplification of molecular beacons for sensitive DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Chu, Yizhuo; Lee, Benjamin Yi-Hung; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2008-04-01

    Molecular beacons represent a new family of fluorescent probes for nucleic acids, and have found broad applications in recent years due to their unique advantages over traditional probes. Detection of nucleic acids using molecular beacons has been based on hybridization between target molecules and molecular beacons in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio. The stoichiometric hybridization, however, puts an intrinsic limitation on detection sensitivity, because one target molecule converts only one beacon molecule to its fluorescent form. To increase the detection sensitivity, a conventional strategy has been target amplification through polymerase chain reaction. Instead of target amplification, here we introduce a scheme of signal amplification, nicking enzyme signal amplification, to increase the detection sensitivity of molecular beacons. The mechanism of the signal amplification lies in target-dependent cleavage of molecular beacons by a DNA nicking enzyme, through which one target DNA can open many beacon molecules, giving rise to amplification of fluorescent signal. Our results indicate that one target DNA leads to cleavage of hundreds of beacon molecules, increasing detection sensitivity by nearly three orders of magnitude. We designed two versions of signal amplification. The basic version, though simple, requires that nicking enzyme recognition sequence be present in the target DNA. The extended version allows detection of target of any sequence by incorporating rolling circle amplification. Moreover, the extended version provides one additional level of signal amplification, bringing the detection limit down to tens of femtomolar, nearly five orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional hybridization assay.

  13. Molecular beacon-based junction probes for efficient detection of nucleic acids via a true target-triggered enzymatic recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rong-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Huang, Yan; Lu, Dan-Qing; Tan, Weihong; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the development of a new molecular beacon-based junction sensing system with highly sensitive DNA detection and a strong capability to identify SNPs. The single linear probe typically labels the midsection of the oligonucleotide, but our next-generation junction sensing system uses a hairpin-structured MB with labels on each end of the oligonucleotide to maintain the cleaving activity of our newly designed ssDNA-cleaved endonuclease, Nt.BbvCI, rather than the typical dsDNA-cleaved endonuclease. These design improvements guarantee a true and efficient target-triggered enzymatic recycling amplification process in our sensing system. They also afford a faster and more sensitive response toward target DNA than the first-generation junction sensing system.

  14. A modified PCR protocol for consistent amplification of fatty acid desaturase (FAD) alleles in marker-assisted backcross breeding for high oleic trait in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High oleic acid, such as is found in olive oil, is desirable for the healthy cholesterol-lowering benefits. The oxidative stability of the oil with high oleic acid also gives longer “shelve life” for peanut products. These benefits drive the breeding effort toward developing high oleic peanuts worl...

  15. Quantum Feedback Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Quantum amplification is essential for various quantum technologies such as communication and weak-signal detection. However, its practical use is still limited due to inevitable device fragility that brings about distortion in the output signal or state. This paper presents a general theory that solves this critical issue. The key idea is simple and easy to implement: just a passive feedback of the amplifier's auxiliary mode, which is usually thrown away. In fact, this scheme makes the controlled amplifier significantly robust, and furthermore it realizes the minimum-noise amplification even under realistic imperfections. Hence, the presented theory enables the quantum amplification to be implemented at a practical level. Also, a nondegenerate parametric amplifier subjected to a special detuning is proposed to show that, additionally, it has a broadband nature.

  16. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2010-09-28

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  17. Label-free and ratiometric detection of nuclei acids based on graphene quantum dots utilizing cascade amplification by nicking endonuclease and catalytic G-quadruplex DNAzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Fang, Xin; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Hu, Xue-Lian; Li, Zai-Jun

    2016-07-15

    Herein, we report a ratiometric fluorescence assay based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the ultrasensitive DNA detection by coupling the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for cascade signal amplifications. With o-phenylenediamine acted as the substrate of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme, whose oxidization product (that is, 2,3-diaminophenazine, DAP) quenched the fluorescence intensity of GQDs (at 460nm) obviously, accompanied with the emergence of a new emission of DAP (at 564nm). The ratiometric signal variations at the emission wavelengths of 564 and 460nm (I564/I460) were utilized for label-free, sensitive, and selective detection of target DNA. Utilizing the nicking endonuclease assisted target recycling and the G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme biocatalysis for amplified cascade generation of DAP, the proposed bioassay exhibited high sensitivity toward target DNA with a detection limit of 30fM. The method also had additional advantages such as facile preparation and easy operation.

  18. Questioning cochlear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Marcel; Versteegh, Corstiaen P. C.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years ago it was hypothesized that motile processes inject mechanical energy into cochlear traveling waves. This mechanical amplification, alternatively described as negative damping, is invoked to explain both the sensitivity and the nonlinear compression of cochlear responses. There is a recent trend to present cochlear amplification as an established fact, even though the evidence is at most circumstantial and several thorny problems have remained unresolved. We analyze several of these issues, and present new basilar membrane recordings that allowed us to quantify cochlear energy flow. Specifically, we address the following questions: (1) Does auditory sensitivity require narrowband amplification? (2) Has the "RC problem" (lowpass filtering of outer hair cell receptor potential) been resolved? (3) Can OHC motility improve auditory sensitivity? (4) Is there a net power gain between neighboring locations on the basilar membrane? The analyses indicate that mechanical amplification in the cochlea is neither necessary nor useful, and that realizing it by known forms of motility would reduce sensitivity rather than enhance it. Finally, our experimental data show that the peaking of the traveling wave is realized by focusing the acoustic energy rather than amplifying it. (Abbreviations. BM: basilar membrane; CF: characteristic frequency; IHC: inner hair cell; ME: middle ear; MT; mechanotransducer; OHC: outer hair cell; SPL: sound pressure level.)

  19. On soliton amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.; Randall, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper considers a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation that permits wave amplification or damping. A 'terminal similarity' solution is identified for large times in amplified systems. Numerical results are given which confirm that the terminal similarity solution is a valid local approximation for mu t sufficiently large and positive, even though the approximation is not uniformly valid in space.

  20. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  1. Amplification-Free Detection of Circulating microRNA Biomarkers from Body Fluids Based on Fluorogenic Oligonucleotide-Templated Reaction between Engineered Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes: Application to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Gavin A D; Shibakawa, Akifumi; Patel, Hinesh; Sita-Lumsden, Ailsa; Zivi, Andrea; Rama, Nona; Bevan, Charlotte L; Ladame, Sylvain

    2016-08-16

    Highly abundant in cells, microRNAs (or miRs) play a key role as regulators of gene expression. A proportion of them are also detectable in biofluids making them ideal noninvasive biomarkers for pathologies in which miR levels are aberrantly expressed, such as cancer. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are engineered uncharged oligonucleotide analogues capable of hybridizing to complementary nucleic acids with high affinity and high specificity. Herein, novel PNA-based fluorogenic biosensors have been designed and synthesized that target miR biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa). The sensing strategy is based on oligonucleotide-templated reactions where the only miR of interest serves as a matrix to catalyze an otherwise highly unfavorable fluorogenic reaction. Validated in vitro using synthetic RNAs, these newly developed biosensors were then shown to detect endogenous concentrations of miR in human blood samples without the need for any amplification step and with minimal sample processing. This low-cost, quantitative, and versatile sensing technology has been technically validated using gold-standard RT-qPCR. Compared to RT-qPCR however, this enzyme-free, isothermal blood test is amenable to incorporation into low-cost portable devices and could therefore be suitable for widespread public screening. PMID:27498854

  2. Species specific identification of spore-producing microbes using the gene sequence of small acid-soluble spore coat proteins for amplification based diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    PCR (polymerase chain reaction) primers for the detection of certain Bacillus species, such as Bacillus anthracis. The primers specifically amplify only DNA found in the target species and can distinguish closely related species. Species-specific PCR primers for Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus globigii and Clostridium perfringens are disclosed. The primers are directed to unique sequences within sasp (small acid soluble protein) genes.

  3. Hybrid chirped-pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Igor; Ebbers, Christopher A; Barty, C P J

    2002-09-15

    Conversion efficiency in optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification is limited by spatiotemporal characteristics of the pump pulse. We have demonstrated a novel hybrid chirped-pulse amplification scheme that uses a single pump pulse and combines optical parametric amplification and laser amplification to achieve high gain, high conversion efficiency, and high prepulse contrast without utilization of electro-optic modulators. We achieved an overall conversion efficiency of 37% from the hybrid amplification system at a center wavelength of 820nm. Generation of multiterawatt pulses is possible by use of this simple method and commercial Q -switched pump lasers.

  4. Light amplification using semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, R.D.

    1987-06-01

    During the summer of 1953, John von Neumann discussed his ideas concerning light amplification using semiconductors with Edward Teller. In September of that year, von Neumann sent a manuscript containing his ideas and calculations on this subject to Teller for his comments. To the best of our knowledge, von Neumann did not take time to work further on these ideas, and the manuscript remained unpublished. These previously unpublished writings of John von Neumann on the subject of light amplification in semiconductors are printed as a service to the laser community. While von Neumann's original manuscript and his letter to Teller are available to anyone who visits the Library of Congress, it is much more convenient to have this paper appear in an archival journal.

  5. Flux amplification in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodestro, Lynda; Hooper, E. B.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Wood, R. D.; McLean, H. S.

    2007-11-01

    Flux amplification---the ratio of poloidal flux enclosed between the magnetic and geometric axes to that between the separatrix and the geometric axis---is a key measure of efficiency for edge-current-driven spheromaks. With the new, modular capacitor bank, permitting flexible programming of the gun current, studies of flux amplification under various drive scenarios can be performed. Analysis of recent results of pulsed operation with the new bank finds an efficiency ˜ 0.2, in selected shots, of the conversion of gun energy to confined magnetic energy during the pulses, and suggests a route toward sustained efficiency at 0.2. Results of experiments, a model calculation of field build-up, and NIMROD simulations exploring this newly suggested scenario will be presented.

  6. Gravitomagnetic amplification in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2010-02-15

    Magnetic fields interact with gravitational waves in various ways. We consider the coupling between the Weyl and the Maxwell fields in cosmology and study the effects of the former on the latter. The approach is fully analytical and the results are gauge invariant. We show that the nature and the outcome of the gravitomagnetic interaction depends on the electric properties of the cosmic medium. When the conductivity is high, gravitational waves reduce the standard (adiabatic) decay rate of the B field, leading to its superadiabatic amplification. In poorly conductive environments, on the other hand, Weyl-curvature distortions can result into the resonant amplification of large-scale cosmological magnetic fields. Driven by the gravitational waves, these B fields oscillate with an amplitude that is found to diverge when the wavelengths of the two sources coincide. We present technical and physical aspects of the gravitomagnetic interaction and discuss its potential implications.

  7. Amplification of an MFS transporter encoding gene penT significantly stimulates penicillin production and enhances the sensitivity of Penicillium chrysogenum to phenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Xu, Xinxin; Liu, Gang

    2012-11-20

    Penicillin is historically important as the first discovered drug against bacterial infections in human. Although the penicillin biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanism have been well studied in Penicillium chrysogenum, the compartmentation and molecular transport of penicillin or its precursors are still poorly understood. In search of the genomic database, more than 830 open reading frames (ORFs) were found to encode transmembrane proteins of P. chrysogenum. In order to investigate their roles on penicillin production, one of them (penT) was selected and cloned. The deduced protein of penT belongs to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and contains 12 transmembrane spanning domains (TMS). During fermentation, the transcription of penT was greatly induced by penicillin precursors phenylacetic acid (PAA) and phenoxyacetic acid (POA). Knock-down of penT resulted in significant decrease of penicillin production, while over-expression of penT under the promoter of trpC enhanced the penicillin production. Introduction of an additional penT in the wild-type strain of P. chrysogenum doubled the penicillin production and enhanced the sensitivity of P. chrysogenum to the penicillin precursors PAA or POA. These results indicate that penT stimulates penicillin production probably through enhancing the translocation of penicillin precursors across fungal cellular membrane.

  8. Mass spectrometry signal amplification for ultrasensitive glycoprotein detection using gold nanoparticle as mass tag combined with boronic acid based isolation strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minbo; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Yawei; Yang, Pengyuan; Lu, Haojie

    2013-07-25

    We describe a novel method for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of intact glycoproteins without enzymatic pretreatment which was commonly used in proteomic research. This method is based on using gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as signal tag in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) analysis combined with boronic acid assisted isolation strategy. Briefly speaking, target glycoproteins were firstly isolated from sample solution with boronic acid functionalized magnetic microparticles, and then the surface modified gold nanoparticles were added to covalently bind to the glycoproteins. After that, these AuNP tagged glycoproteins were eluted from magnetic microparticles and applied to LDI-MS analysis. The mass signal of AuNP rather than that of glycoprotein was detected and recorded in this strategy. Through data processing of different standard glycoproteins, we have demonstrated that the signal of AuNP could be used to quantitatively represent glycoprotein. This method allows femtomolar detection of intact glycoproteins. We believe that the successful validation of this method on three different kinds of glycoproteins suggests the potential use for tracking trace amount of target glycoproteins in real biological samples in the near future.

  9. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  10. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  11. Performance of self-collected penile-meatal swabs compared to clinician-collected urethral swabs for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Mycoplasma genitalium by nucleic acid amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Dize, Laura; Barnes, Perry; Barnes, Mathilda; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Marsiglia, Vincent; Duncan, Della; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2016-10-01

    Men were enrolled in a study to assess the performance and acceptability of self-collected penile meatal swabs as compared to clinician-collected urethral swabs for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We expected penile-meatal swabs to perform favorably to urethral swabs for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) detection by nucleic acid amplification assays (NAATs). Of 203 swab pairs tested; for CT, penile-meatal swab sensitivity was 96.8% and specificity was 98.8%. NG sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 98.9%, respectively. For TV, sensitivity was 85.0% and specificity was 96.7%. For MG sensitivity and specificity were 79.3% and 99.4%, respectively. No significant statistical differences between sample type accuracy (CT: P=0.625; NG: P=0.248; TV: P=0.344; and MG: P=0.070) existed. Most men, 90.1%, reported self-collection of penile-meatal swabs as "Very Easy" or "Easy". Self-collected penile-meatal swabs appeared acceptable for NAAT STI detection and an acceptable collection method by men. PMID:27497595

  12. Sequencing based typing for genetic polymorphisms in exons, 2, 3 and 4 of the MICA gene.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Y; Ota, M; Ando, H; Saito, S; Mizuki, N; Kera, J; Bahram, S; Nose, Y; Inoko, H

    1999-08-01

    We have established a sequencing based typing (SBT) method for detection of genetic polymorphism in the exon 2 to 4 domains of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA) and applied it to allele typing of 130 healthy Japanese individuals. A 2.2-kb segment including exons 2, 3 and 4 of the MICA gene was amplified by a pair of generic primers followed by cycle sequencing using exon-specific nested primers. In total, 8 alleles were observed in a Japanese population and the most frequent allele was MICA008 with the gene frequency of 30.8%. MICA009 was the second most frequent (16.5%), while the rarest one was MICA007 (1.2%). MICA alleles displayed strong linkage equilibria with HLA-B antigens (i.e. MICA008 with B7, B48, B60 and B61; MICA009 with B51 and B52; MICA002 with B35, B39, B58 and B67; MICA004 with B44, MICA007 with B13 and B27; MICA010 with B46, B62 and B48, MICA012 with B54, B55, B56 and B59; MICA019 and B70, B71 and B62). Recently, the B48 haplotype has been reported to lack the entire MICA gene by a large-scale deletion in a Japanese population. Among 8 serologically B48 homozygous individuals, 4 were found to represent this MICA null allele as assessed by no polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using MICA-specific primers, while the remaining four possessed the intact MICA gene with MICA008 or MICA010.

  13. Sequence-Based Typing of Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    Seltsam, Axel; Doescher, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Summary In the last two decades, all but one of the genes encoding the 30 blood group systems present on red blood cells have been identified. This body of knowledge has permitted the application of molecular techniques to characterize the common blood group antigens and to elucidate the background for some of the variant phenotypes. DNA sequencing methodology was developed in the late 1970s and has become one of the most widely used techniques in molecular biology. In the field of immunohematology, this method is currently used by specialized laboratories to elucidate the molecular basis of unusual blood group phenotypes that cannot be defined by serology and genotyping. Because of the heterogeneity of the blood groups on both the antigen and the genetic level, special knowledge of the biology of blood group systems is needed to design sequencing strategies and interpret sequence data. This review summarizes the technical and immunohematologic expertise that is required when applying sequence-based typing for characterization of human blood groups. PMID:21113262

  14. Whole genome sequence-based serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Lennkh, Anna; Murer, Andrea; Springer, Burkhard; Blaschitz, Marion; Indra, Alexander; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Ruppitsch, Werner; Sensen, Christoph W

    2016-10-10

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is currently becoming the method of choice for characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in national reference laboratories (NRLs). WGS is superior with regards to accuracy, resolution and analysis speed in comparison to several other methods including serotyping, PCR, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and multivirulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST), which have been used thus far for the characterization of bacterial isolates (and are still important tools in reference laboratories today) to control and prevent listeriosis, one of the major sources of foodborne diseases for humans. Backward compatibility of WGS to former methods can be maintained by extraction of the respective information from WGS data. Serotyping was the first subtyping method for L. monocytogenes capable of differentiating 12 serovars and national reference laboratories still perform serotyping and PCR-based serogrouping as a first level classification method for Listeria monocytogenes surveillance. Whole genome sequence based core genome MLST analysis of a L. monocytogenes collection comprising 172 isolates spanning all 12 serotypes was performed for serogroup determination. These isolates clustered according to their serotypes and it was possible to group them either into the IIa, IIc, IVb or IIb clusters, respectively, which were generated by minimum spanning tree (MST) and neighbor joining (NJ) tree data analysis, demonstrating the power of the new approach.

  15. Coherent white light amplification

    DOEpatents

    Jovanovic, Igor; Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-05-25

    A system for coherent simultaneous amplification of a broad spectral range of light that includes an optical parametric amplifier and a source of a seed pulse is described. A first angular dispersive element is operatively connected to the source of a seed pulse. A first imaging telescope is operatively connected to the first angular dispersive element and operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier. A source of a pump pulse is operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier. A second imaging telescope is operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier and a second angular dispersive element is operatively connected to the second imaging telescope.

  16. Camera-based ratiometric fluorescence transduction of nucleic acid hybridization with reagentless signal amplification on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots as donors.

    PubMed

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2014-10-21

    Paper-based diagnostic assays are gaining increasing popularity for their potential application in resource-limited settings and for point-of-care screening. Achievement of high sensitivity with precision and accuracy can be challenging when using paper substrates. Herein, we implement the red-green-blue color palette of a digital camera for quantitative ratiometric transduction of nucleic acid hybridization on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A nonenzymatic and reagentless means of signal enhancement for QD-FRET assays on paper substrates is based on the use of dry paper substrates for data acquisition. This approach offered at least a 10-fold higher assay sensitivity and at least a 10-fold lower limit of detection (LOD) as compared to hydrated paper substrates. The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to assemble a transduction interface that consisted of immobilized QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) served as donors with Cy3 as an acceptor. A hybridization event that brought the Cy3 acceptor dye in close proximity to the surface of immobilized gQDs was responsible for a FRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye, which served as an analytical signal. A hand-held UV lamp was used as an excitation source and ratiometric analysis using an iPad camera was possible by a relative intensity analysis of the red (Cy3 photoluminescence (PL)) and green (gQD PL) color channels of the digital camera. For digital imaging using an iPad camera, the LOD of the assay in a sandwich format was 450 fmol with a dynamic range spanning 2 orders of magnitude, while an epifluorescence microscope detection platform offered a LOD of 30 fmol and a dynamic range spanning 3 orders of magnitude. The selectivity of the hybridization assay was demonstrated by detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism at a contrast ratio of 60:1. This work provides an

  17. Antibiotic Selection Pressure Determination through Sequence-Based Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Matthias; El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Huson, Daniel H; Schütz, Monika; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Peter, Silke

    2015-12-01

    The human gut forms a dynamic reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Treatment with antimicrobial agents has a significant impact on the intestinal resistome and leads to enhanced horizontal transfer and selection of resistance. We have monitored the development of intestinal ARGs over a 6-day course of ciprofloxacin (Cp) treatment in two healthy individuals by using sequenced-based metagenomics and different ARG quantification methods. Fixed- and random-effect models were applied to determine the change in ARG abundance per defined daily dose of Cp as an expression of the respective selection pressure. Among various shifts in the composition of the intestinal resistome, we found in one individual a strong positive selection for class D beta-lactamases which were partly located on a mobile genetic element. Furthermore, a trend to a negative selection has been observed with class A beta-lactamases (-2.66 hits per million sample reads/defined daily dose; P = 0.06). By 4 weeks after the end of treatment, the composition of ARGs returned toward their initial state but to a different degree in both subjects. We present here a novel analysis algorithm for the determination of antibiotic selection pressure which can be applied in clinical settings to compare therapeutic regimens regarding their effect on the intestinal resistome. This information is of critical importance for clinicians to choose antimicrobial agents with a low selective force on their patients' intestinal ARGs, likely resulting in a diminished spread of resistance and a reduced burden of hospital-acquired infections with multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:26369961

  18. Sequence-based classification using discriminatory motif feature selection.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Sen, Saunak; Segal, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Most existing methods for sequence-based classification use exhaustive feature generation, employing, for example, all k-mer patterns. The motivation behind such (enumerative) approaches is to minimize the potential for overlooking important features. However, there are shortcomings to this strategy. First, practical constraints limit the scope of exhaustive feature generation to patterns of length ≤ k, such that potentially important, longer (> k) predictors are not considered. Second, features so generated exhibit strong dependencies, which can complicate understanding of derived classification rules. Third, and most importantly, numerous irrelevant features are created. These concerns can compromise prediction and interpretation. While remedies have been proposed, they tend to be problem-specific and not broadly applicable. Here, we develop a generally applicable methodology, and an attendant software pipeline, that is predicated on discriminatory motif finding. In addition to the traditional training and validation partitions, our framework entails a third level of data partitioning, a discovery partition. A discriminatory motif finder is used on sequences and associated class labels in the discovery partition to yield a (small) set of features. These features are then used as inputs to a classifier in the training partition. Finally, performance assessment occurs on the validation partition. Important attributes of our approach are its modularity (any discriminatory motif finder and any classifier can be deployed) and its universality (all data, including sequences that are unaligned and/or of unequal length, can be accommodated). We illustrate our approach on two nucleosome occupancy datasets and a protein solubility dataset, previously analyzed using enumerative feature generation. Our method achieves excellent performance results, with and without optimization of classifier tuning parameters. A Python pipeline implementing the approach is available at

  19. Antibiotic Selection Pressure Determination through Sequence-Based Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Huson, Daniel H.; Schütz, Monika; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Peter, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The human gut forms a dynamic reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Treatment with antimicrobial agents has a significant impact on the intestinal resistome and leads to enhanced horizontal transfer and selection of resistance. We have monitored the development of intestinal ARGs over a 6-day course of ciprofloxacin (Cp) treatment in two healthy individuals by using sequenced-based metagenomics and different ARG quantification methods. Fixed- and random-effect models were applied to determine the change in ARG abundance per defined daily dose of Cp as an expression of the respective selection pressure. Among various shifts in the composition of the intestinal resistome, we found in one individual a strong positive selection for class D beta-lactamases which were partly located on a mobile genetic element. Furthermore, a trend to a negative selection has been observed with class A beta-lactamases (−2.66 hits per million sample reads/defined daily dose; P = 0.06). By 4 weeks after the end of treatment, the composition of ARGs returned toward their initial state but to a different degree in both subjects. We present here a novel analysis algorithm for the determination of antibiotic selection pressure which can be applied in clinical settings to compare therapeutic regimens regarding their effect on the intestinal resistome. This information is of critical importance for clinicians to choose antimicrobial agents with a low selective force on their patients' intestinal ARGs, likely resulting in a diminished spread of resistance and a reduced burden of hospital-acquired infections with multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:26369961

  20. Antibiotic Selection Pressure Determination through Sequence-Based Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Matthias; El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Huson, Daniel H; Schütz, Monika; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Peter, Silke

    2015-12-01

    The human gut forms a dynamic reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Treatment with antimicrobial agents has a significant impact on the intestinal resistome and leads to enhanced horizontal transfer and selection of resistance. We have monitored the development of intestinal ARGs over a 6-day course of ciprofloxacin (Cp) treatment in two healthy individuals by using sequenced-based metagenomics and different ARG quantification methods. Fixed- and random-effect models were applied to determine the change in ARG abundance per defined daily dose of Cp as an expression of the respective selection pressure. Among various shifts in the composition of the intestinal resistome, we found in one individual a strong positive selection for class D beta-lactamases which were partly located on a mobile genetic element. Furthermore, a trend to a negative selection has been observed with class A beta-lactamases (-2.66 hits per million sample reads/defined daily dose; P = 0.06). By 4 weeks after the end of treatment, the composition of ARGs returned toward their initial state but to a different degree in both subjects. We present here a novel analysis algorithm for the determination of antibiotic selection pressure which can be applied in clinical settings to compare therapeutic regimens regarding their effect on the intestinal resistome. This information is of critical importance for clinicians to choose antimicrobial agents with a low selective force on their patients' intestinal ARGs, likely resulting in a diminished spread of resistance and a reduced burden of hospital-acquired infections with multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  1. Evidence of high-elevation amplification versus Arctic amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qixiang; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Mengben

    2016-01-01

    Elevation-dependent warming in high-elevation regions and Arctic amplification are of tremendous interest to many scientists who are engaged in studies in climate change. Here, using annual mean temperatures from 2781 global stations for the 1961-2010 period, we find that the warming for the world's high-elevation stations (>500 m above sea level) is clearly stronger than their low-elevation counterparts; and the high-elevation amplification consists of not only an altitudinal amplification but also a latitudinal amplification. The warming for the high-elevation stations is linearly proportional to the temperature lapse rates along altitudinal and latitudinal gradients, as a result of the functional shape of Stefan-Boltzmann law in both vertical and latitudinal directions. In contrast, neither altitudinal amplification nor latitudinal amplification is found within the Arctic region despite its greater warming than lower latitudes. Further analysis shows that the Arctic amplification is an integrated part of the latitudinal amplification trend for the low-elevation stations (≤500 m above sea level) across the entire low- to high-latitude Northern Hemisphere, also a result of the mathematical shape of Stefan-Boltzmann law but only in latitudinal direction. PMID:26753547

  2. Nomogram including the total tumoral load in the sentinel nodes assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification as a new factor for predicting nonsentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Isabel T; Espinosa-Bravo, Martin; Rodrigo, Maxi; Amparo Viguri Diaz, Maria; Hardisson, David; Sagasta, Amaia; Dueñas, Basilio; Peg, Vicente

    2014-09-01

    Several models have been developed to predict non-sentinel nodes (NSLN) metastasis in patients with a positive sentinel node (SLN) that incorporates a standard pathology examination of the SLN. It has been reported that total tumoral load (TTL) in the SLNs assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) is a predictive factor for additional NSLN metastasis in the axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The objective was to develop a nomogram that predicts patient´s risk of additional NSLN metastasis incorporating TTL in the SLNs assessed by OSNA. Six hundred and ninety-seven consecutive patients with positive SLN evaluation by OSNA and a completion ALND were recruited. Pathologic features of the primary tumor and SLN metastases, including TTL were collected. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors predictive of non-SLN metastasis. A nomogram was developed with these variables and validated in an external cohort. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, tumor size, number of affected SLN, Her2 overexpression, lymphovascular invasion, and TTL were each associated with the likelihood of additional NSLN metastasis (p < 0.05). The overall predictive accuracy of the nomogram, as measured by the AUC was 0.7552 (95 %CI 0.7159-0.7945). When applied to the external cohort the nomogram was accurate with an AUC = 0.678 (95 %CI 0.621-0.736). This novel nomogram that incorporates TTL assessed by OSNA performs well and may help clinicians to make decisions about ALND for individual patients. Moreover, the standardization of pathologic assessment by OSNA may help to achieve interinstitutional reproducibility among nomograms. PMID:25164972

  3. Gene promoter hypermethylation is found in sentinel lymph nodes of breast cancer patients, in samples identified as positive by one-step nucleic acid amplification of cytokeratin 19 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sánchez, E; Pernaut-Leza, E; Mendaza, S; Cordoba, A; Vicente-Garcia, F; Monreal-Santesteban, I; Vizcaino, J Pérez; De Cerio, M J Díaz; Perez-Janices, N; Blanco-Luquin, I; Escors, D; Ulazia-Garmendia, A; Guerrero-Setas, D

    2016-07-01

    We analysed the promoter methylation status of five genes, involved in adhesion (EPB41L3, TSLC-1), apoptosis (RASSF1, RASSF2) or angiogenesis (TSP-1), in intraoperative sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy samples from patients with breast cancer, that had been processed by the one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) technique. SLN resection is performed to estimate the risk of tumour cells in the clinically negative axilla, to avoid unnecessary axillary lymph node dissection. OSNA is currently one of the eligible molecular methods for detecting tumour cells in SLNs. It is based on the quantitative evaluation of cytokeratin 19 mRNA which allows distinguishing between macrometastasis, micrometastasis and isolated tumour cells, on the basis of the quantity of tumour cells present. There have been no prior studies on the question whether or not samples processed by OSNA can be used for further molecular studies, including epigenetic abnormalities which are some of the most important molecular alterations in breast cancer. Genomic DNA was extracted from samples obtained from 50 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer. The content of tumour cells in SLNs was evaluated by OSNA, and the promoter methylation status of the selected genes was analysed by methylation-specific PCR. All were found to be hypermethylated to a variable degree, and RASSF1 hypermethylation was significantly associated with macrometastasis, micrometastasis and isolated tumour cells (p = 0.002). We show that samples used for OSNA are suitable for molecular studies, including gene promoter methylation. These samples provide a new source of material for the identification of additional biomarkers. PMID:27097811

  4. Comparison of sequencing-based methods to profile DNA methylation and identification of monoallelic epigenetic modifications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of DNA methylation patterns relies increasingly on sequencing-based profiling methods. The four most frequently used sequencing-based technologies are the bisulfite-based methods MethylC-seq and reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), and the enrichment-based techniques methylat...

  5. SFM: A novel sequence-based fusion method for disease genes identification and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2015-10-21

    The identification of disease genes from human genome is of great importance to improve diagnosis and treatment of disease. Several machine learning methods have been introduced to identify disease genes. However, these methods mostly differ in the prior knowledge used to construct the feature vector for each instance (gene), the ways of selecting negative data (non-disease genes) where there is no investigational approach to find them and the classification methods used to make the final decision. In this work, a novel Sequence-based fusion method (SFM) is proposed to identify disease genes. In this regard, unlike existing methods, instead of using a noisy and incomplete prior-knowledge, the amino acid sequence of the proteins which is universal data has been carried out to present the genes (proteins) into four different feature vectors. To select more likely negative data from candidate genes, the intersection set of four negative sets which are generated using distance approach is considered. Then, Decision Tree (C4.5) has been applied as a fusion method to combine the results of four independent state-of the-art predictors based on support vector machine (SVM) algorithm, and to make the final decision. The experimental results of the proposed method have been evaluated by some standard measures. The results indicate the precision, recall and F-measure of 82.6%, 85.6% and 84, respectively. These results confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method.

  6. Identification of Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Coccidioides species by repetitive-sequence-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Pounder, June I; Hansen, Dewey; Woods, Gail L

    2006-08-01

    The performance of repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) using the DiversiLab system for identification of Coccidioides species, Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Histoplasma capsulatum was assessed by comparing data obtained to colony morphology and microscopic characteristics and to nucleic acid probe results. DNA from cultures of 23 Coccidioides, 24 B. dermatitidis, 24 H. capsulatum, 3 Arthrographis, and 2 Malbranchea isolates was extracted using a microbial DNA isolation kit as recommended by Bacterial Barcodes, Inc. Rep-PCR and probe results agreed for 97.2% of the dimorphic fungi when > or =85% similarity was used as the criterion for identification. Two H. capsulatum isolates were not identified, but no isolates were misidentified. From 43 of those cultures (15 Coccidioides, 14 B. dermatitidis, 14 H. capsulatum, 3 Arthrographis, and 2 Malbranchea), DNA also was extracted using an IDI lysis kit, a simpler method. Rep-PCR and probe results agreed for 97.7% of the dimorphic fungi when a criterion of > or =90% similarity was used for identification. One H. capsulatum isolate could not be identified; no isolates were misidentified. Using > or =85% similarity for identification resulted in one misidentification. These data suggest that the DiversiLab system can be used to identify Coccidioides and B. dermatitidis and, possibly, H. capsulatum isolates. PMID:16891521

  7. Sequence-Based Prediction of Type III Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Brandmaier, Stefan; Kleine, Frederick; Tischler, Patrick; Heinz, Eva; Behrens, Sebastian; Niinikoski, Antti; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a key mechanism for host cell interaction used by a variety of bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and animals including humans. The TTSS represents a molecular syringe with which the bacteria deliver effector proteins directly into the host cell cytosol. Despite the importance of the TTSS for bacterial pathogenesis, recognition and targeting of type III secreted proteins has up until now been poorly understood. Several hypotheses are discussed, including an mRNA-based signal, a chaperon-mediated process, or an N-terminal signal peptide. In this study, we systematically analyzed the amino acid composition and secondary structure of N-termini of 100 experimentally verified effector proteins. Based on this, we developed a machine-learning approach for the prediction of TTSS effector proteins, taking into account N-terminal sequence features such as frequencies of amino acids, short peptides, or residues with certain physico-chemical properties. The resulting computational model revealed a strong type III secretion signal in the N-terminus that can be used to detect effectors with sensitivity of ∼71% and selectivity of ∼85%. This signal seems to be taxonomically universal and conserved among animal pathogens and plant symbionts, since we could successfully detect effector proteins if the respective group was excluded from training. The application of our prediction approach to 739 complete bacterial and archaeal genome sequences resulted in the identification of between 0% and 12% putative TTSS effector proteins. Comparison of effector proteins with orthologs that are not secreted by the TTSS showed no clear pattern of signal acquisition by fusion, suggesting convergent evolutionary processes shaping the type III secretion signal. The newly developed program EffectiveT3 (http://www.chlamydiaedb.org) is the first universal in silico prediction program for the identification of novel TTSS effectors. Our findings will

  8. Combined use of real-time PCR and nested sequence-based typing in survey of human Legionella infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, T; Zhou, H; Ren, H; Shi, W; Jin, H; Jiang, X; Xu, Y; Zhou, M; Li, J; Wang, J; Shao, Z; Xu, X

    2016-07-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is a globally distributed systemic infectious disease. The burden of LD in many regions is still unclear, especially in Asian countries including China. A survey of Legionella infection using real-time PCR and nested sequence-based typing (SBT) was performed in two hospitals in Shanghai, China. A total of 265 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) specimens were collected from hospital A between January 2012 and December 2013, and 359 sputum specimens were collected from hospital B throughout 2012. A total of 71 specimens were positive for Legionella according to real-time PCR focusing on the 5S rRNA gene. Seventy of these specimens were identified as Legionella pneumophila as a result of real-time PCR amplification of the dotA gene. Results of nested SBT revealed high genetic polymorphism in these L. pneumophila and ST1 was the predominant sequence type. These data revealed that the burden of LD in China is much greater than that recognized previously, and real-time PCR may be a suitable monitoring technology for LD in large sample surveys in regions lacking the economic and technical resources to perform other methods, such as urinary antigen tests and culture methods. PMID:26790498

  9. [Recombinase Polymerase Amplification and its Applications in Parasite Detection].

    PubMed

    ZHENG, Wen-bin; WU, Yao-dong; MA, Jian-gang; ZHU, Xing-quan; ZHOU, Dong-hui

    2015-10-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a recently -developed isothermal nucleic-acid-amplification technology that is based on the nucleic acid replication mechanism in T4 bacteriophage. With this technique, nucleic-acid templates can be amplified to measurable levels within 20 min at 37-42 °C. The. RPA process has high sensitivity and specificity, and is simple to operate, thus nucleic acids can be detected rapidly in non-laboratory conditions. Since its development in 2006, the RPA technique has been applied in agriculture, food safety, medicine, transgene detection, etc. In this review, we will give an overview on the research progress of RPA and its application in parasite detection.

  10. [Recombinase Polymerase Amplification and its Applications in Parasite Detection].

    PubMed

    ZHENG, Wen-bin; WU, Yao-dong; MA, Jian-gang; ZHU, Xing-quan; ZHOU, Dong-hui

    2015-10-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a recently -developed isothermal nucleic-acid-amplification technology that is based on the nucleic acid replication mechanism in T4 bacteriophage. With this technique, nucleic-acid templates can be amplified to measurable levels within 20 min at 37-42 °C. The. RPA process has high sensitivity and specificity, and is simple to operate, thus nucleic acids can be detected rapidly in non-laboratory conditions. Since its development in 2006, the RPA technique has been applied in agriculture, food safety, medicine, transgene detection, etc. In this review, we will give an overview on the research progress of RPA and its application in parasite detection. PMID:26931046

  11. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal. Specifically, the analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix can be a boronic acid moiety.

  12. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  13. Tidal amplification of seabed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, D. G.; Brubaker, J. M.

    2010-09-01

    Because solar irradiance decreases approximately exponentially with depth in the sea, the increase in irradiance at the seabed from mid to low tide is greater than the decrease from mid to high tide. Summed over a day, this can lead to a net amplification of seabed irradiance in tidal waters compared to nontidal waters with the same mean depth and transparency. In this paper, this effect is quantified by numerical and analytical integration of the Lambert-Beer equation to derive the ratio of daily total seabed irradiance with and without a tide. Greatest amplification occurs in turbid water with large tidal range and low tide occurring at noon. The theoretical prediction is tested against observations of seabed irradiance in the coastal waters of North Wales where tidal amplification of seabed light by up to a factor of 7 is both observed and predicted. Increasing the strength of tidal currents tends to increase the turbidity of the water and hence reduce the light reaching the seabed, but this effect is made less by increasing tidal amplification, especially when low water is in the middle of the day. The ecological implications of tidal amplification are discussed. The productivity of benthic algae will be greater than that predicted by simple models which calculate seabed irradiance using the mean depth of water alone. Benthic algae are also able to live at greater depths in tidal waters than in nontidal waters with the same transparency.

  14. Gene amplification and insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Bass, Chris; Field, Linda M

    2011-08-01

    Pesticide resistance in arthropods has been shown to evolve by two main mechanisms, the enhanced production of metabolic enzymes, which bind to and/or detoxify the pesticide, and mutation of the target protein, which makes it less sensitive to the pesticide. One route that leads to enhanced metabolism is the duplication or amplification of the structural gene(s) encoding the detoxifying enzyme, and this has now been described for the three main families (esterases, glutathione S-transferases and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases) implicated in resistance. More recently, a direct or indirect role for gene duplication or amplification has been described for target-site resistance in several arthropod species. This mini-review summarises the involvement of gene duplication/amplification in the insecticide/acaricide resistance of insect and mite pests and highlights recent developments in this area in relation to P450-mediated and target-site resistance.

  15. Reliable amplification of actin genes facilitates deep-level phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Voigt, K; Wöstemeyer, J

    2000-09-01

    The gene for actin as a highly conserved and functionally essential genetic element is developing into a major tool for phylogenetic analysis within a broad organismic range. We therefore propose a set of universally applicable primers that allow reliable amplification of actin genes. For primer construction the amino acid sequences of 57 actin genes comprising fungi, animals, plants and protists were analysed, aligned and used for the definition of six well-conserved regions which are suitable as priming sites in PCR amplification experiments. Ten primers were designed for specific in vitro amplification of actin gene fragments from a wide range of microorganisms. The corresponding gene fragments provide a strong basis to isolate nearly complete actin genes for further molecular characterization and for establishing phylogenies based on actin gene trees.

  16. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Evans, Emrys W.; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Wallace, Mark I.; MacKenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor.

  17. Method for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2015-06-02

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  18. Apparatus for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2012-05-08

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  19. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  20. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  1. Sequence-based evidence for major histocompatibility complex-disassortative mating in a colonial seabird

    PubMed Central

    Juola, Frans A.; Dearborn, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a polymorphic gene family associated with immune defence, and it can play a role in mate choice. Under the genetic compatibility hypothesis, females choose mates that differ genetically from their own MHC genotypes, avoiding inbreeding and/or enhancing the immunocompetence of their offspring. We tested this hypothesis of disassortative mating based on MHC genotypes in a population of great frigatebirds (Fregata minor) by sequencing the second exon of MHC class II B. Extensive haploid cloning yielded two to four alleles per individual, suggesting the amplification of two genes. MHC similarity between mates was not significantly different between pairs that did (n = 4) or did not (n = 42) exhibit extra-pair paternity. Comparing all 46 mated pairs to a distribution based on randomized re-pairings, we observed the following (i): no evidence for mate choice based on maximal or intermediate levels of MHC allele sharing (ii), significantly disassortative mating based on similarity of MHC amino acid sequences, and (iii) no evidence for mate choice based on microsatellite alleles, as measured by either allele sharing or similarity in allele size. This suggests that females choose mates that differ genetically from themselves at MHC loci, but not as an inbreeding-avoidance mechanism. PMID:21613297

  2. A DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification-bridged two-stage exonuclease III-assisted recycling strategy for label-free multi-amplified biosensing of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Cui, Hui; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2015-01-26

    An autonomous DNA nanomachine based on rolling circle amplification (RCA)-bridged two-stage exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced recycling amplification (Exo III-RCA-Exo III) was developed for label-free and highly sensitive homogeneous multi-amplified detection of DNA combined with sensitive fluorescence detection technique. According to the configuration, the analysis of DNA is accomplished by recognizing the target to a unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) that integrates target-binding and signal transducer within one multifunctional design, followed by the target-binding of UMB in duplex DNA removed stepwise by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and autonomous generation of the primer that initiate RCA process with a rational designed padlock DNA. The RCA products containing thousands of repeated catalytic sequences catalytically hybridize with a hairpin reporter probe that includes a "caged" inactive G-quadruplex sequence (HGP) and were then detected by Exo III-assisted recycling amplification, liberating the active G-quadruplex and generating remarkable ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex fluorescence signals with the help of zinc(II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX). The proposed strategy showed a wide dynamic range over 7 orders of magnitude with a low limit of detection of 0.51 aM. In addition, this designed protocol can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and holds a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  3. Multicenter evaluation of a sequence-based protocol for subtyping Shiga toxins and standardizing Stx nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Flemming; Teel, Louise D; Beutin, Lothar; Piérard, Denis; Buvens, Glenn; Karch, Helge; Mellmann, Alexander; Caprioli, Alfredo; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Morabito, Stefano; Strockbine, Nancy A; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; Sanchez, Maria; Persson, Søren; O'Brien, Alison D

    2012-09-01

    When Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains emerged as agents of human disease, two types of toxin were identified: Shiga toxin type 1 (Stx1) (almost identical to Shiga toxin produced by Shigella dysenteriae type 1) and the immunologically distinct type 2 (Stx2). Subsequently, numerous STEC strains have been characterized that express toxins with variations in amino acid sequence, some of which confer unique biological properties. These variants were grouped within the Stx1 or Stx2 type and often assigned names to indicate that they were not identical in sequence or phenotype to the main Stx1 or Stx2 type. A lack of specificity or consistency in toxin nomenclature has led to much confusion in the characterization of STEC strains. Because serious outcomes of infection have been attributed to certain Stx subtypes and less so with others, we sought to better define the toxin subtypes within the main Stx1 and Stx2 types. We compared the levels of relatedness of 285 valid sequence variants of Stx1 and Stx2 and identified common sequences characteristic of each of three Stx/Stx1 and seven Stx2 subtypes. A novel, simple PCR subtyping method was developed, independently tested on a battery of 48 prototypic STEC strains, and improved at six clinical and research centers to test the reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity of the PCR. Using a consistent schema for nomenclature of the Stx toxins and stx genes by phylogenetic sequence-based relatedness of the holotoxin proteins, we developed a typing approach that should obviate the need to bioassay each newly described toxin and that predicts important biological characteristics. PMID:22760050

  4. Sequencing-based typing reveals new insight in HLA-DPA1 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rozemuller, E H; Bouwens, A G; van Oort, E; Versluis, L F; Marsh, S G; Bodmer, J G; Tilanus, M G

    1995-01-01

    An HLA-DPA1 sequencing-based typing (SBT) system has been developed to identify DPA1 alleles. Up to now eight DPA1 alleles have been defined. Six can be discriminated based upon exon 2 polymorphism. The three subtypes of DPA1*01: DPA1*0101, DPA1*0102 and DPA1*0103, have identical exon 2 sequences but show differences in exon 4. Exon 4 sequences were known for only the three DPA1*01 subtypes and for DPA1*0201. We now present additional sequence information for exon 4 and the unknown segments at the 3' end of exon 2. Additionally with the use of this sequencing technique it is also possible to identify previously unidentified polymorphism. We have studied the exon 2 and exon 4 polymorphism of DPA1 in 40 samples which include all known DPA1 alleles. A new allele, DPA1*01 new, was identified which differs by one nucleotide in exon 2 from DPA1*0103, resulting in an aspartic acid at codon 28. The DPA1*01 subtypes DPA1*0101 and DPA1*0102 could not be confirmed in samples which previously were used to define these subtypes, and consequently they do not exist. The exon 4 sequence of DPA1*0201 is corrected based on sequence data of DAUDI, the cell line in which DPA1*0202 was originally defined. The exon 4 regions of the remaining four alleles were resolved: the exon 4 regions of the alleles DPA1*02021 and DPA1*02022 were found to be identical to the--corrected--DPA1*0201 whereas the exon 4 region of DPA1*0301 differs by one nucleotide compared to DPA1*0103. The DPA1*0401 exon 4 region differs by one nucleotide compared to the corrected DPA1*0201.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Multicenter evaluation of a sequence-based protocol for subtyping Shiga toxins and standardizing Stx nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Flemming; Teel, Louise D; Beutin, Lothar; Piérard, Denis; Buvens, Glenn; Karch, Helge; Mellmann, Alexander; Caprioli, Alfredo; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Morabito, Stefano; Strockbine, Nancy A; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; Sanchez, Maria; Persson, Søren; O'Brien, Alison D

    2012-09-01

    When Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains emerged as agents of human disease, two types of toxin were identified: Shiga toxin type 1 (Stx1) (almost identical to Shiga toxin produced by Shigella dysenteriae type 1) and the immunologically distinct type 2 (Stx2). Subsequently, numerous STEC strains have been characterized that express toxins with variations in amino acid sequence, some of which confer unique biological properties. These variants were grouped within the Stx1 or Stx2 type and often assigned names to indicate that they were not identical in sequence or phenotype to the main Stx1 or Stx2 type. A lack of specificity or consistency in toxin nomenclature has led to much confusion in the characterization of STEC strains. Because serious outcomes of infection have been attributed to certain Stx subtypes and less so with others, we sought to better define the toxin subtypes within the main Stx1 and Stx2 types. We compared the levels of relatedness of 285 valid sequence variants of Stx1 and Stx2 and identified common sequences characteristic of each of three Stx/Stx1 and seven Stx2 subtypes. A novel, simple PCR subtyping method was developed, independently tested on a battery of 48 prototypic STEC strains, and improved at six clinical and research centers to test the reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity of the PCR. Using a consistent schema for nomenclature of the Stx toxins and stx genes by phylogenetic sequence-based relatedness of the holotoxin proteins, we developed a typing approach that should obviate the need to bioassay each newly described toxin and that predicts important biological characteristics.

  6. Distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers for multilocus phylogeography of the soybean- and rice-infecting fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A series of multilocus sequence-based nuclear DNA markers was developed to infer the phylogeographical history of the Basidiomycetous fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA infecting rice and soybean worldwide. The strategy was based on sequencing of cloned genomic DNA fragments (previously used as RFLP probes) and subsequent screening of fungal isolates to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ten primer pairs were designed based on these sequences, which resulted in PCR amplification of 200-320 bp size products and polymorphic sequences in all markers analyzed. By direct sequencing we identified both homokaryon and heterokaryon (i.e. dikaryon) isolates at each marker. Cloning the PCR products effectively estimated the allelic phase from heterokaryotic isolates. Information content varied among markers from 0.5 to 5.9 mutations per 100 bp. Thus, the former RFLP codominant probes were successfully converted into six distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers. Rather than discarding low polymorphism loci, the combination of these distinctively variable anonymous nuclear markers would constitute an asset for the unbiased estimate of the phylogeographical parameters such as population sizes and divergent times, providing a more reliable species history that shaped the current population structure of R. solani AG-1 IA. PMID:21637462

  7. Microwave amplification with nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Massel, F; Heikkilä, T T; Pirkkalainen, J-M; Cho, S U; Saloniemi, H; Hakonen, P J; Sillanpää, M A

    2011-12-15

    The sensitive measurement of electrical signals is at the heart of modern technology. According to the principles of quantum mechanics, any detector or amplifier necessarily adds a certain amount of noise to the signal, equal to at least the noise added by quantum fluctuations. This quantum limit of added noise has nearly been reached in superconducting devices that take advantage of nonlinearities in Josephson junctions. Here we introduce the concept of the amplification of microwave signals using mechanical oscillation, which seems likely to enable quantum-limited operation. We drive a nanomechanical resonator with a radiation pressure force, and provide an experimental demonstration and an analytical description of how a signal input to a microwave cavity induces coherent stimulated emission and, consequently, signal amplification. This generic scheme, which is based on two linear oscillators, has the advantage of being conceptually and practically simpler than the Josephson junction devices. In our device, we achieve signal amplification of 25 decibels with the addition of 20 quanta of noise, which is consistent with the expected amount of added noise. The generality of the model allows for realization in other physical systems as well, and we anticipate that near-quantum-limited mechanical microwave amplification will soon be feasible in various applications involving integrated electrical circuits.

  8. Chronic centrosome amplification without tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vitre, Benjamin; Holland, Andrew J.; Kulukian, Anita; Shoshani, Ofer; Hirai, Maretoshi; Wang, Yin; Maldonado, Marcus; Cho, Thomas; Boubaker, Jihane; Swing, Deborah A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Evans, Sylvia M.; Fuchs, Elaine; Cleveland, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Centrosomes are microtubule-organizing centers that facilitate bipolar mitotic spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Recognizing that centrosome amplification is a common feature of aneuploid cancer cells, we tested whether supernumerary centrosomes are sufficient to drive tumor development. To do this, we constructed and analyzed mice in which centrosome amplification can be induced by a Cre-recombinase–mediated increase in expression of Polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4). Elevated Plk4 in mouse fibroblasts produced supernumerary centrosomes and enhanced the expected mitotic errors, but proliferation continued only after inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. Increasing Plk4 levels in mice with functional p53 produced centrosome amplification in liver and skin, but this did not promote spontaneous tumor development in these tissues or enhance the growth of chemically induced skin tumors. In the absence of p53, Plk4 overexpression generated widespread centrosome amplification, but did not drive additional tumors or affect development of the fatal thymic lymphomas that arise in animals lacking p53. We conclude that, independent of p53 status, supernumerary centrosomes are not sufficient to drive tumor formation. PMID:26578792

  9. Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA®): a novel isothermal DNA amplification technology demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity for a single molecule of target analyte.

    PubMed

    Hoser, Mark J; Mansukoski, Hannu K; Morrical, Scott W; Eboigbodin, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that they do not require thermal cycling or sophisticated laboratory equipment. However, non-target-dependent amplification has limited the sensitivity of isothermal technologies and complex probes are usually required to distinguish between non-specific and target-dependent amplification. Here, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA). SIBA technology is resistant to non-specific amplification, is able to detect a single molecule of target analyte, and does not require target-specific probes. The technology relies on the recombinase-dependent insertion of an invasion oligonucleotide (IO) into the double-stranded target nucleic acid. The duplex regions peripheral to the IO insertion site dissociate, thereby enabling target-specific primers to bind. A polymerase then extends the primers onto the target nucleic acid leading to exponential amplification of the target. The primers are not substrates for the recombinase and are, therefore unable to extend the target template in the absence of the IO. The inclusion of 2'-O-methyl RNA to the IO ensures that it is not extendible and that it does not take part in the extension of the target template. These characteristics ensure that the technology is resistant to non-specific amplification since primer dimers or mis-priming are unable to exponentially amplify. Consequently, SIBA is highly specific and able to distinguish closely-related species with single molecule sensitivity in the absence of complex probes or sophisticated laboratory equipment. Here, we describe this technology in detail and demonstrate its use for the detection of Salmonella.

  10. Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA®): A Novel Isothermal DNA Amplification Technology Demonstrating High Specificity and Sensitivity for a Single Molecule of Target Analyte

    PubMed Central

    Hoser, Mark J.; Mansukoski, Hannu K.; Morrical, Scott W.; Eboigbodin, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that they do not require thermal cycling or sophisticated laboratory equipment. However, non-target-dependent amplification has limited the sensitivity of isothermal technologies and complex probes are usually required to distinguish between non-specific and target-dependent amplification. Here, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA). SIBA technology is resistant to non-specific amplification, is able to detect a single molecule of target analyte, and does not require target-specific probes. The technology relies on the recombinase-dependent insertion of an invasion oligonucleotide (IO) into the double-stranded target nucleic acid. The duplex regions peripheral to the IO insertion site dissociate, thereby enabling target-specific primers to bind. A polymerase then extends the primers onto the target nucleic acid leading to exponential amplification of the target. The primers are not substrates for the recombinase and are, therefore unable to extend the target template in the absence of the IO. The inclusion of 2′-O-methyl RNA to the IO ensures that it is not extendible and that it does not take part in the extension of the target template. These characteristics ensure that the technology is resistant to non-specific amplification since primer dimers or mis-priming are unable to exponentially amplify. Consequently, SIBA is highly specific and able to distinguish closely-related species with single molecule sensitivity in the absence of complex probes or sophisticated laboratory equipment. Here, we describe this technology in detail and demonstrate its use for the detection of Salmonella. PMID:25419812

  11. [Identification of a novel HLA allele, HLA-DRB1*03:80, by sequencing-based typing].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiang-Min; Zhang, Yi; Zhuang, Yun-Long; Song, Yong-Hong; Qiao, Wen-Ben; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Chuan-Fu

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to identify a novel HLA-DRB1 allele from a Chinese potential hemopoietic stem cell donor of Northeast China. A rare HLA-DRB1 allele was initially detected by Luminex PCR-SSO typing, then the sample was sequenced by sequence-based typing (SBT) and the alignments of sample's alleles was identified by single allele-specific sequencing strategy. The results revealed the existence of a new allele which differs from the closest matching allele DRB1*03:06 by a single nucleotide substitution at position 239, where C→G in exon 2, resulting in an amino acid exchange from Thr to Arg at codon 51. It is concluded that a novel allele has been confirmed and its name DRB1*03:80 is officially assigned by the WHO Nomenclature Committee in February 2012.

  12. Optical chirped beam amplification and propagation

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-10-12

    A short pulse laser system uses dispersive optics in a chirped-beam amplification architecture to produce high peak power pulses and high peak intensities without the potential for intensity dependent damage to downstream optical components after amplification.

  13. Sequence dependence of isothermal DNA amplification via EXPAR

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jifeng; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Ramírez-Borrero, Alissa J.; Hintze, Arend; Adami, Christoph; Niemz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification is becoming increasingly important for molecular diagnostics. Therefore, new computational tools are needed to facilitate assay design. In the isothermal EXPonential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), template sequences with similar thermodynamic characteristics perform very differently. To understand what causes this variability, we characterized the performance of 384 template sequences, and used this data to develop two computational methods to predict EXPAR template performance based on sequence: a position weight matrix approach with support vector machine classifier, and RELIEF attribute evaluation with Naïve Bayes classification. The methods identified well and poorly performing EXPAR templates with 67–70% sensitivity and 77–80% specificity. We combined these methods into a computational tool that can accelerate new assay design by ruling out likely poor performers. Furthermore, our data suggest that variability in template performance is linked to specific sequence motifs. Cytidine, a pyrimidine base, is over-represented in certain positions of well-performing templates. Guanosine and adenosine, both purine bases, are over-represented in similar regions of poorly performing templates, frequently as GA or AG dimers. Since polymerases have a higher affinity for purine oligonucleotides, polymerase binding to GA-rich regions of a single-stranded DNA template may promote non-specific amplification in EXPAR and other nucleic acid amplification reactions. PMID:22416064

  14. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same.

  15. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  16. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength.

  17. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  18. Spheromak Impedance and Current Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Hua, D D; Stallard, B W

    2002-01-31

    It is shown that high current amplification can be achieved only by injecting helicity on the timescale for reconnection, {tau}{sub REC}, which determines the effective impedance of the spheromak. An approximate equation for current amplification is: dI{sub TOR}{sup 2}/dt {approx} I{sup 2}/{tau}{sub REC} - I{sub TOR}{sup 2}/{tau}{sub closed} where I is the gun current, I{sub TOR} is the spheromak toroidal current and {tau}{sub CLOSED} is the ohmic decay time of the spheromak. Achieving high current amplification, I{sub TOR} >> I, requires {tau}{sub REC} <<{tau}{sub CLOSED}. For resistive reconnection, this requires reconnection in a cold zone feeding helicity into a hot zone. Here we propose an impedance model based on these ideas in a form that can be implemented in the Corsica-based helicity transport code. The most important feature of the model is the possibility that {tau}{sub REC} actually increases as the spheromak temperature increases, perhaps accounting for the ''voltage sag'' observed in some experiments, and a tendency toward a constant ratio of field to current, B {proportional_to} I, or I{sub TOR} {approx} I. Program implications are discussed.

  19. Rolling circle amplification detection of RNA and DNA

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Pattee, Melissa S.; Attix, Cristina M.; Tucker, James D.

    2004-08-31

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been useful for detecting point mutations in isolated nucleic acids, but its application in cytological preparations has been problematic. By pretreating cells with a combination of restriction enzymes and exonucleases, we demonstrate RCA in solution and in situ to detect gene copy number and single base mutations. It can also detect and quantify transcribed RNA in individual cells, making it a versatile tool for cell-based assays.

  20. Magnetism Teaching Sequences Based on an Inductive Approach for First-Year Thai University Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narjaikaew, Pattawan; Emarat, Narumon; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Cowie, Bronwen

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the impact on student motivation and understanding of magnetism of teaching sequences based on an inductive approach. The study was conducted in large lecture classes. A pre- and post-Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism was conducted with just fewer than 700 Thai undergraduate science students, before and after…

  1. Microgel Tethering For Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaoguang

    Molecular diagnostics (MDx) have radically changed the process of clinical microbial identification based on identifying genetic information, MDx approaches are both specific and fast. They can identify microbes to the species and strain level over a time scale that can be as short as one hour. With such information clinicians can administer the most effective and appropriate antimicrobial treatment at an early time point with substantial implications both for patient well-being and for easing the burden on the health-care system. Among the different MDx approaches, such as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and mass spectrometry, point-of-care MDx platforms are drawing particular interest due to their low cost, robustness, and wide application. This dissertation develops a novel MDx technology platform capable of high target amplification and detection performance. For nucleic acid target detection, we fabricate an array of electron-beam-patterned microgels on a standard glass microscope slide. The microgels can be as small as a few hundred nanometers. The unique way of energy deposition during electron-beam lithography provides the microgels with a very diffuse water -gel interface that enables them to not only serve as substrates to immobilize DNA probes but do so while preserving them in a highly hydrated environment that optimizes their performance. Benefiting from the high spatial resolution provided by such techniques as position-sensitive microspotting and dip-pen nanolithography, multiple oligonucleotide probes known as molecular beacons (MBs) can be patterned on microgels. Furthermore, nucleic acid target amplification can be conducted in direct contact with the microgel-tethered detection array. Specifically, we use an isothermal RNA amplification reaction - nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA). ssRNA amplicons of from the NASBA reaction can directly hybridize with microgel-tethered MBs, and the

  2. Capture and Direct Amplification of DNA on Chitosan Microparticles in a Single PCR-Optimal Solution.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Kunal R; Nanayakkara, Imaly A; Cao, Weidong; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; White, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    While nucleic acid amplification tests have great potential as tools for rapid diagnostics, complicated sample preparation requirements inhibit their use in near-patient diagnostics and low-resource-setting applications. Recent advancements in nucleic acid purification have leveraged pH-modulated charge switching polymers to reduce the number of steps required for sample preparation. The polycation chitosan (pKa 6.4) has been used to efficiently purify DNA by binding nucleic acids in acidic buffers and then eluting them at a pH higher than 8.0. Though it is an improvement over conventional methods, this multistep procedure has not transformed the application of nucleic acid amplification assays. Here we describe a simpler approach using magnetic chitosan microparticles that interact with DNA in a manner that has not been reported before. The microparticles capture DNA at a pH optimal for PCR (8.5) just as efficiently as at low pH. Importantly, the captured DNA is still accessible by polymerase, enabling direct amplification from the microparticles. We demonstrate quantitative PCR from DNA captured on the microparticles, thus eliminating nearly all of the sample preparation steps. We anticipate that this new streamlined method for preparing DNA for amplification will greatly expand the diagnostic applications of nucleic acid amplification tests.

  3. SPARSE: quadratic time simultaneous alignment and folding of RNAs without sequence-based heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Will, Sebastian; Otto, Christina; Miladi, Milad; Möhl, Mathias; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA-Seq experiments have revealed a multitude of novel ncRNAs. The gold standard for their analysis based on simultaneous alignment and folding suffers from extreme time complexity of O(n6). Subsequently, numerous faster ‘Sankoff-style’ approaches have been suggested. Commonly, the performance of such methods relies on sequence-based heuristics that restrict the search space to optimal or near-optimal sequence alignments; however, the accuracy of sequence-based methods breaks down for RNAs with sequence identities below 60%. Alignment approaches like LocARNA that do not require sequence-based heuristics, have been limited to high complexity (≥ quartic time). Results: Breaking this barrier, we introduce the novel Sankoff-style algorithm ‘sparsified prediction and alignment of RNAs based on their structure ensembles (SPARSE)’, which runs in quadratic time without sequence-based heuristics. To achieve this low complexity, on par with sequence alignment algorithms, SPARSE features strong sparsification based on structural properties of the RNA ensembles. Following PMcomp, SPARSE gains further speed-up from lightweight energy computation. Although all existing lightweight Sankoff-style methods restrict Sankoff’s original model by disallowing loop deletions and insertions, SPARSE transfers the Sankoff algorithm to the lightweight energy model completely for the first time. Compared with LocARNA, SPARSE achieves similar alignment and better folding quality in significantly less time (speedup: 3.7). At similar run-time, it aligns low sequence identity instances substantially more accurate than RAF, which uses sequence-based heuristics. Availability and implementation: SPARSE is freely available at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/SPARSE. Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25838465

  4. Simple System for Isothermal DNA Amplification Coupled to Lateral Flow Detection

    PubMed Central

    Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Klaue, Yvonne; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease diagnosis in point-of-care settings can be greatly improved through integrated, automated nucleic acid testing devices. We have developed an early prototype for a low-cost system which executes isothermal DNA amplification coupled to nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection in a mesofluidic cartridge attached to a portable instrument. Fluid handling inside the cartridge is facilitated through one-way passive valves, flexible pouches, and electrolysis-driven pumps, which promotes a compact and inexpensive instrument design. The closed-system disposable prevents workspace amplicon contamination. The cartridge design is based on standard scalable manufacturing techniques such as injection molding. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that enables efficient heat transfer. We have demonstrated as proof of principle the amplification and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) genomic DNA in the cartridge, using either Loop Mediated Amplification (LAMP) or the Exponential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), both coupled to NALF detection. We envision that a refined version of this cartridge, including upstream sample preparation coupled to amplification and detection, will enable fully-automated sample-in to answer-out infectious disease diagnosis in primary care settings of low-resource countries with high disease burden. PMID:23922706

  5. Weak value amplification considered harmful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Christopher; Combes, Joshua

    2014-03-01

    We show using statistically rigorous arguments that the technique of weak value amplification does not perform better than standard statistical techniques for the tasks of parameter estimation and signal detection. We show that using all data and considering the joint distribution of all measurement outcomes yields the optimal estimator. Moreover, we show estimation using the maximum likelihood technique with weak values as small as possible produces better performance for quantum metrology. In doing so, we identify the optimal experimental arrangement to be the one which reveals the maximal eigenvalue of the square of system observables. We also show these conclusions do not change in the presence of technical noise.

  6. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  7. Thermoacoustic amplification of photoacoustic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnen, F. G. C.; Dongen, J. v.; Reuss, J.; Harren, F. J. M.

    1996-06-01

    The thermoacoustic effect is used to amplify the photoacoustic signal induced by trace gas absorption of CO2 laser radiation. The acoustic wave pattern in a thermoacoustic amplifier coupled to a photoacoustic cell is represented in terms of electric transmission lines. Predictions of this model have resulted in a prototype thermoacoustic-photoacoustic (TAPA) detector to get a better understanding of this combination. The photoacoustic signal strength of the TAPA cell was linear with the trace gas density in the cell. Within this study we observed for the TAPA cell a higher PA signal than generated by a normal PA cell. Design criteria for better thermoacoustic amplification of photoacoustic signal are discussed.

  8. EASE-MM: Sequence-Based Prediction of Mutation-Induced Stability Changes with Feature-Based Multiple Models.

    PubMed

    Folkman, Lukas; Stantic, Bela; Sattar, Abdul; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2016-03-27

    Protein engineering and characterisation of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) require accurate prediction of protein stability changes (ΔΔGu) induced by single amino acid substitutions. Here, we have developed a new prediction method called Evolutionary, Amino acid, and Structural Encodings with Multiple Models (EASE-MM), which comprises five specialised support vector machine (SVM) models and makes the final prediction from a consensus of two models selected based on the predicted secondary structure and accessible surface area of the mutated residue. The new method is applicable to single-domain monomeric proteins and can predict ΔΔGu with a protein sequence and mutation as the only inputs. EASE-MM yielded a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.53-0.59 in 10-fold cross-validation and independent testing and was able to outperform other sequence-based methods. When compared to structure-based energy functions, EASE-MM achieved a comparable or better performance. The application to a large dataset of human germline non-synonymous SNVs showed that the disease-causing variants tend to be associated with larger magnitudes of ΔΔGu predicted with EASE-MM. The EASE-MM web-server is available at http://sparks-lab.org/server/ease. PMID:26804571

  9. Lidar measurements of atmospheric backscattering amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, V. A.; Razenkov, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    Results of long-term continuous measurements of the atmospheric backscattering amplification coefficient on a 2-km-long near-ground path with the use of a two-channel micropulse lidar based on a waveguide laser are presented. It is shown that the backscattering amplification coefficient has a pronounced daily variation. In the night and in the afternoon, atmospheric backscattering amplification is maximal and the amplification coefficient can exceed 2. The amplification is low or absent in morning and evening hours at neutral temperature stratification in the near-ground layer of the atmosphere. The backscattering amplification coefficient increases with an increase in the structure constant of the air refracting index and variance of the image jitter of the illumination spot created by the probing laser beam on the wall of a 2-km-distant building.

  10. Single Cell Transcriptome Amplification with MALBAC

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Longzhi; Tang, Fuchou; Xie, X. Sunney

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Multiple Annealing and Looping-Based Amplification Cycles (MALBAC) has been developed for whole genome amplification of an individual cell, relying on quasilinear instead of exponential amplification to achieve high coverage. Here we adapt MALBAC for single-cell transcriptome amplification, which gives consistently high detection efficiency, accuracy and reproducibility. With this newly developed technique, we successfully amplified and sequenced single cells from 3 germ layers from mouse embryos in the early gastrulation stage, and examined the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program among cells in the mesoderm layer on a single-cell level. PMID:25822772

  11. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions. PMID:25362284

  12. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  13. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  14. Trophic amplification of climate warming

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Richard R.; Beaugrand, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems can alternate suddenly between contrasting persistent states due to internal processes or external drivers. It is important to understand the mechanisms by which these shifts occur, especially in exploited ecosystems. There have been several abrupt marine ecosystem shifts attributed either to fishing, recent climate change or a combination of these two drivers. We show that temperature has been an important driver of the trophodynamics of the North Sea, a heavily fished marine ecosystem, for nearly 50 years and that a recent pronounced change in temperature established a new ecosystem dynamic regime through a series of internal mechanisms. Using an end-to-end ecosystem approach that included primary producers, primary, secondary and tertiary consumers, and detritivores, we found that temperature modified the relationships among species through nonlinearities in the ecosystem involving ecological thresholds and trophic amplifications. Trophic amplification provides an alternative mechanism to positive feedback to drive an ecosystem towards a new dynamic regime, which in this case favours jellyfish in the plankton and decapods and detritivores in the benthos. Although overfishing is often held responsible for marine ecosystem degeneration, temperature can clearly bring about similar effects. Our results are relevant to ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM), seen as the way forward to manage exploited marine ecosystems. PMID:19740882

  15. Trophic amplification of climate warming.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Richard R; Beaugrand, Gregory

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystems can alternate suddenly between contrasting persistent states due to internal processes or external drivers. It is important to understand the mechanisms by which these shifts occur, especially in exploited ecosystems. There have been several abrupt marine ecosystem shifts attributed either to fishing, recent climate change or a combination of these two drivers. We show that temperature has been an important driver of the trophodynamics of the North Sea, a heavily fished marine ecosystem, for nearly 50 years and that a recent pronounced change in temperature established a new ecosystem dynamic regime through a series of internal mechanisms. Using an end-to-end ecosystem approach that included primary producers, primary, secondary and tertiary consumers, and detritivores, we found that temperature modified the relationships among species through nonlinearities in the ecosystem involving ecological thresholds and trophic amplifications. Trophic amplification provides an alternative mechanism to positive feedback to drive an ecosystem towards a new dynamic regime, which in this case favours jellyfish in the plankton and decapods and detritivores in the benthos. Although overfishing is often held responsible for marine ecosystem degeneration, temperature can clearly bring about similar effects. Our results are relevant to ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM), seen as the way forward to manage exploited marine ecosystems.

  16. Sequence-based characterization of the eight SLA loci in Korean native pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y J; Cho, K H; Kim, M J; Smith, D M; Ho, C S; Jung, K C; Jin, D I; Park, C S; Jeon, J T; Lee, J H

    2008-08-01

    Eight swine leucocyte antigen (SLA) gene (SLA-1, SLA-2, SLA-3, SLA-6, DRA, DRB1, DQA, DQB1) alleles were identified using sequence-based typing method in three Korean native pigs used for breeding at the National Institute of Animal Science in Korea. Six new alleles in class I genes and three new alleles in class II genes have been identified in this breed and can give valuable information for xenotransplantation and disease resistance.

  17. Sequence-based characterization of five SLA loci in Asian wild boars.

    PubMed

    Jung, W Y; Choi, N R; Seo, D W; Lim, H T; Ho, C S; Lee, J H

    2014-10-01

    Two swine leucocyte antigen (SLA) class I (SLA-1 and SLA-2) and three class II (DRB1, DQB1 and DQA) genes were investigated for their diversity in Asian wild boars using a sequence-based typing method. A total of 15 alleles were detected at these loci, with eleven being novel. The findings provide one of the first glimpses of the SLA allelic diversity and architecture in the wild boar populations.

  18. Structure- and Sequence-Based Function Prediction for Non-Homologous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    The structural genomics projects have been accumulating an increasing number of protein structures, many of which remain functionally unknown. In parallel effort to experimental methods, computational methods are expected to make a significant contribution for functional elucidation of such proteins. However, conventional computational methods that transfer functions from homologous proteins do not help much for these uncharacterized protein structures because they do not have apparent structural or sequence similarity with the known proteins. Here, we briefly review two avenues of computational function prediction methods, i.e. structure-based methods and sequence-based methods. The focus is on our recently developments of local structure-based methods and sequence-based methods, which can effectively extract function information from distantly related proteins. Two structure-based methods, Pocket-Surfer and Patch-Surfer, identify similar known ligand binding sites for pocket regions in a query protein without using global protein fold similarity information. Two sequence-based methods, PFP and ESG, make use of weakly similar sequences that are conventionally discarded in homology based function annotation. Combined together with experimental methods we hope that computational methods will make leading contribution in functional elucidation of the protein structures. PMID:22270458

  19. Clostridium difficile testing algorithms using glutamate dehydrogenase antigen and C. difficile toxin enzyme immunoassays with C. difficile nucleic acid amplification testing increase diagnostic yield in a tertiary pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kaede V; McGowan, Karin L

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of the rapid C. diff Quik Chek Complete's glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (GDH) and toxin A/B (CDT) tests in two algorithmic approaches for a tertiary pediatric population: algorithm 1 entailed initial testing with GDH/CDT followed by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and algorithm 2 entailed GDH/CDT followed by cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) for adjudication of discrepant GDH-positive/CDT-negative results. A true positive (TP) was defined as positivity by CCNA or positivity by LAMP plus another test (GDH, CDT, or the Premier C. difficile toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay [P-EIA]). A total of 141 specimens from 141 patients yielded 27 TPs and 19% prevalence. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 56%, 100%, 100%, and 90% for P-EIA and 81%, 100%, 100%, and 96% for both algorithm 1 and algorithm 2. In summary, GDH-based algorithms detected C. difficile infections with superior sensitivity compared to P-EIA. The algorithms allowed immediate reporting of half of all TPs, but LAMP or CCNA was required to confirm the presence or absence of toxigenic C. difficile in GDH-positive/CDT-negative specimens.

  20. Chirality Amplification in Tactoids of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an effective chirality amplification based on the long-range forces, extending over the scales of tens of micrometers, much larger than the single molecule (nanometer) scale. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) that represent water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as amino acid L-alanine and limonene added to the droplets of LCLC lead to chiral amplification characterized by an increase of optical activity by a factor of 103 - 104. This effect allows one to discriminate and detect the absolute configuration of chiral molecules in an aqueous system, thus opening new possibilities in biosensing and other biological applications.

  1. Approaches towards molecular amplification for sensing.

    PubMed

    Goggins, Sean; Frost, Christopher G

    2016-06-01

    Diagnostic assays that rely on molecular interactions have come a long way; from initial reversible detection systems towards irreversible reaction indicator-based methods. More recently, the emergence of innovative molecular amplification methodologies has revolutionised sensing, allowing diagnostic assays to achieve ultra-low limits of detection. There have been a significant number of molecular amplification approaches developed over recent years to accommodate the wide variety of analytes that require sensitive detection. To celebrate this achievement, this comprehensive critical review has been compiled to give a broad overview of the many different approaches used to attain amplification in sensing with an aim to inspire the next generation of diagnostic assays looking to achieve the ultimate detection limit. This review has been created with the focus on how each conceptually unique molecular amplification methodology achieves amplification, not just its sensitivity, while highlighting any key processes. Excluded are any references that were not found to contain an obvious molecular amplifier or amplification component, or that did not use an appropriate signal readout that could be incorporated into a sensing application. Additionally, methodologies where amplification is achieved through advances in instrumentation are also excluded. Depending upon the type of approach employed, amplification strategies are divided into four categories: target, label, signal or receptor amplification. More recent, more complex protocols combine a number of approaches and are therefore categorised by which amplification component described within was considered as the biggest advancement. The advantages and disadvantages of each methodology are discussed along with any limits of detection, if stated in the original article. Any subsequent use of the methodology within sensing or any other application is also mentioned to draw attention to its practicality. The importance of

  2. The MDM2 gene amplification database.

    PubMed Central

    Momand, J; Jung, D; Wilczynski, S; Niland, J

    1998-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is inactivated in human tumors by several distinct mechanisms. The best characterized inactivation mechanisms are: (i) gene mutation; (ii) p53 protein association with viral proteins; (iii) p53 protein association with the MDM2 cellular oncoprotein. The MDM2 gene has been shown to be abnormally up-regulated in human tumors and tumor cell lines by gene amplification, increased transcript levels and enhanced translation. This communication presents a brief review of the spectrum of MDM2 abnormalities in human tumors and compares the tissue distribution of MDM2 amplification and p53 mutation frequencies. In this study, 3889 samples from tumors or xenografts from 28 tumor types were examined for MDM2 amplification from previously published sources. The overall frequency of MDM2 amplification in these human tumors was 7%. Gene amplification was observed in 19 tumor types, with the highest frequency observed in soft tissue tumors (20%), osteosarcomas (16%) and esophageal carcinomas (13%). Tumors which showed a higher incidence of MDM2 amplification than p53 mutation were soft tissue tumors, testicular germ cell cancers and neuro-blastomas. Data from studies where both MDM2 amplification and p53 mutations were analyzed within the same samples showed that mutations in these two genes do not generally occur within the same tumor. In these studies, 29 out of a total of 33 MDM2 amplification-positive tumors had wild-type p53. We hypothesize that heretofore uncharacterized carcinogens favor MDM2 amplification over p53 mutations in certain tumor types. A database listing the MDM2 gene amplifications is available on the World Wide Web at http://www. infosci.coh.org/mdm2 . Charts of MDM2 amplification frequencies and comparisons with p53 genetic alterations are also available at this Web site. PMID:9671804

  3. Evolutionary history of black grouse major histocompatibility complex class IIB genes revealed through single locus sequence-based genotyping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplications are frequently observed in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) of many species, and as a consequence loci belonging to the same MHC class are often too similar to tell apart. In birds, single locus genotyping of MHC genes has proven difficult due to concerted evolution homogenizing sequences at different loci. But studies on evolutionary history, mode of selection and heterozygosity correlations on the MHC cannot be performed before it is possible to analyse duplicated genes separately. In this study we investigate the architecture and evolution of the MHC class IIB genes in black grouse. We developed a sequence-based genotyping method for separate amplification of the two black grouse MHC class IIB genes BLB1 and BLB2. Based on this approach we are able to study differences in structure and selection between the two genes in black grouse and relate these results to the chicken MHC structure and organization. Results Sequences were obtained from 12 individuals and separated into alleles using the software PHASE. We compared nucleotide diversity measures and employed selection tests for BLB1 and BLB2 to explore their modes of selection. Both BLB1 and BLB2 are transcribed and display classic characteristics of balancing selection as predicted for expressed MHC class IIB genes. We found evidence for both intra- and interlocus recombination or gene conversion, as well as indication for positive but differential selection at both loci. Moreover, the two loci appear to be linked. Phylogenetic analyses revealed orthology of the black grouse MHC class IIB genes to the respective BLB loci in chicken. Conclusions The results indicate that the duplication of the BLB gene occurred before the species divergence into black grouse, chicken and pheasant. Further, we conclude that BLB1 and BLB2 in black grouse are subjected to homogenizing concerted evolution due to interlocus genetic exchange after species divergence. The loci are in linkage

  4. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  5. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same. PMID:26348227

  6. An integrated lateral flow assay for effective DNA amplification and detection at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-10

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been extensively explored in nucleic acid testing (NAT) for medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. However, the amount of target nucleic acid in a raw sample is usually too low to be directly detected by LFAs, necessitating the process of amplification. Even though cost-effective paper-based amplification techniques have been introduced, they have always been separately performed from LFAs, hence increasing the risk of reagent loss and cross-contaminations. To date, integrating paper-based nucleic acid amplification into colorimetric LFA in a simple, portable and cost-effective manner has not been introduced. Herein, we developed an integrated LFA with the aid of a specially designed handheld battery-powered system for effective amplification and detection of targets in resource-poor settings. Interestingly, using the integrated paper-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-LFA, we successfully performed highly sensitive and specific target detection, achieving a detection limit of as low as 3 × 10(3) copies of target DNA, which is comparable to the conventional tube-based LAMP-LFA in an unintegrated format. The device may serve in conjunction with a simple paper-based sample preparation to create a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer diagnostic device for point-of-care testing (POCT) in the near future. PMID:27010033

  7. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Evans, Emrys W; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A; Wallace, Mark I; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor. PMID:27001735

  8. Linking Arctic amplification and local feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-11-01

    Climate simulations show that as the Earth warms, the Arctic warms more than the average global warming. However, models differ on how much more the Arctic warms, and although scientists have proposed a variety of mechanisms to explain the Arctic warming amplification, there is no consensus on the main reasons for it. To shed light on this issue, Hwang et al. investigated the relationship between Arctic amplification and poleward energy transport and local Arctic feedbacks, such as changes in cloud cover or ice loss, across a group of models. The researchers noted that differences in atmospheric energy transport did not explain the ranges of polar amplification; rather, models with more amplification showed less energy transport into high latitudes. The authors found that decreasing energy transport is due to a coupled relationship between Arctic amplification and energy transport: Arctic amplification reduces the equator-to-pole temperature gradient, which strongly decreases energy transport. They suggest that this coupled relationship should be taken into account in studies of Arctic amplification. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL048546, 2011)

  9. Cochlear amplification, outer hair cells and prestin

    PubMed Central

    Dallos, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical amplification of acoustic signals is apparently a common feature of vertebrate auditory organs. In non-mammalian vertebrates amplification is produced by stereociliary processes, related to the mechanotransducer channel complex and probably to the phenomenon of fast adaptation. The extended frequency range of the mammalian cochlea has likely co-evolved with a novel hair cell type, the outer hair cell and its constituent membrane protein, prestin. Cylindrical outer hair cells are motile and their somatic length changes are voltage driven and powered by prestin. One of the central outstanding problems in mammalian cochlear neurobiology is the relation between the two amplification processes. PMID:18809494

  10. Reproducible Analysis of Sequencing-Based RNA Structure Probing Data with User-Friendly Tools.

    PubMed

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Sidiropoulos, Nikolaos; Vinther, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    RNA structure-probing data can improve the prediction of RNA secondary and tertiary structure and allow structural changes to be identified and investigated. In recent years, massive parallel sequencing has dramatically improved the throughput of RNA structure probing experiments, but at the same time also made analysis of the data challenging for scientists without formal training in computational biology. Here, we discuss different strategies for data analysis of massive parallel sequencing-based structure-probing data. To facilitate reproducible and standardized analysis of this type of data, we have made a collection of tools, which allow raw sequencing reads to be converted to normalized probing values using different published strategies. In addition, we also provide tools for visualization of the probing data in the UCSC Genome Browser and for converting RNA coordinates to genomic coordinates and vice versa. The collection is implemented as functions in the R statistical environment and as tools in the Galaxy platform, making them easily accessible for the scientific community. We demonstrate the usefulness of the collection by applying it to the analysis of sequencing-based hydroxyl radical probing data and comparing different normalization strategies.

  11. Study design requirements for RNA sequencing-based breast cancer diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mer, Arvind Singh; Klevebring, Daniel; Grönberg, Henrik; Rantalainen, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing-based molecular characterization of tumors provides information required for individualized cancer treatment. There are well-defined molecular subtypes of breast cancer that provide improved prognostication compared to routine biomarkers. However, molecular subtyping is not yet implemented in routine breast cancer care. Clinical translation is dependent on subtype prediction models providing high sensitivity and specificity. In this study we evaluate sample size and RNA-sequencing read requirements for breast cancer subtyping to facilitate rational design of translational studies. We applied subsampling to ascertain the effect of training sample size and the number of RNA sequencing reads on classification accuracy of molecular subtype and routine biomarker prediction models (unsupervised and supervised). Subtype classification accuracy improved with increasing sample size up to N = 750 (accuracy = 0.93), although with a modest improvement beyond N = 350 (accuracy = 0.92). Prediction of routine biomarkers achieved accuracy of 0.94 (ER) and 0.92 (Her2) at N = 200. Subtype classification improved with RNA-sequencing library size up to 5 million reads. Development of molecular subtyping models for cancer diagnostics requires well-designed studies. Sample size and the number of RNA sequencing reads directly influence accuracy of molecular subtyping. Results in this study provide key information for rational design of translational studies aiming to bring sequencing-based diagnostics to the clinic. PMID:26830453

  12. SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R; Krogh, Anders; Vinther, Jeppe

    2015-05-01

    Selective 2' Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) is an accurate method for probing of RNA secondary structure. In existing SHAPE methods, the SHAPE probing signal is normalized to a no-reagent control to correct for the background caused by premature termination of the reverse transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES-based selection of cDNA-RNA hybrids on streptavidin beads effectively removes the large majority of background signal present in SHAPE probing data and that sequencing-based SHAPES data contain the same amount of RNA structure data as regular sequencing-based SHAPE data obtained through normalization to a no-reagent control. Moreover, the selection efficiently enriches for probed RNAs, suggesting that the SHAPES strategy will be useful for applications with high-background and low-probing signal such as in vivo RNA structure probing.

  13. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the rapid detection of Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas; Burke, Patricia; Smalley, Helen B; Gillies, Liz; Longhurst, Denise; Vipond, Barry; Hobbs, Glyn

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmissible, pathogenic bacterium and a significant cause of nongonococcal urethritis in both men and women. Due to the difficulty of the culture of M. genitalium from clinical samples, the laboratory diagnosis of M. genitalium infection is almost exclusively carried out using nucleic acid amplification tests. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification technology, utilising a set of 4 primers specific to 6 distinct regions of the target DNA sequence, in order to amplify target DNA in a highly specific and rapid manner. A LAMP assay was designed to the pdhD gene of M. genitalium, and the limit of detection of the assay was determined as 10 fg of M. genitalium genomic DNA, equating to ~16 copies of the M. genitalium genome, which was equally sensitive as a gold standard 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction assay. PMID:26072150

  14. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis by isothermal ramification amplification method: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wandi; Cohenford, Menashi; Lentrichia, Brian; Isenberg, Henry D; Simson, Elkin; Li, Hengjin; Yi, Jizu; Zhang, David Y

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Effective screening for this agent can facilitate prompt treatment and prevent its sequelae. The recent introduction of liquid-based cytology has made possible the simultaneous screening of cervical intraepithelial lesions and detection of C. trachomatis in a single collection vial. In this study we determined whether cytological fluid could support DNA-based amplification for the detection of C. trachomatis. Three methods were compared, including ramification amplification (RAM), real-time PCR with molecular beacon, and Abbott's ligase chain reaction (LCx). RAM is a novel, recently introduced, isothermal DNA amplification technique that utilizes a circular probe for target detection and achieves exponential amplification through the mechanism of primer extension, strand displacement, and ramification. Our results show that RAM can detect as few as 10 C. trachomatis elementary bodies in less than 2 h, comparable to results with real-time PCR. Thirty clinical specimens collected in PreservCyt solution were tested by LCx, real-time PCR, and RAM. Among 30 specimens, 15 were positive by PCR and LCx and 14 were positive by RAM. One specimen missed by RAM had an inadequate amount of residual cellular material. Our results show that nucleic acid amplification methods can serve to detect C. trachomatis and presumably other sexually transmitted agents in cytological fluid and that the RAM assay can be an alternative to PCR and LCx because of its simplicity and isothermal amplification.

  15. Balanced amplification: a new mechanism of selective amplification of neural activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brendan K; Miller, Kenneth D

    2009-02-26

    In cerebral cortex, ongoing activity absent a stimulus can resemble stimulus-driven activity in size and structure. In particular, spontaneous activity in cat primary visual cortex (V1) has structure significantly correlated with evoked responses to oriented stimuli. This suggests that, from unstructured input, cortical circuits selectively amplify specific activity patterns. Current understanding of selective amplification involves elongation of a neural assembly's lifetime by mutual excitation among its neurons. We introduce a new mechanism for selective amplification without elongation of lifetime: "balanced amplification." Strong balanced amplification arises when feedback inhibition stabilizes strong recurrent excitation, a pattern likely to be typical of cortex. Thus, balanced amplification should ubiquitously contribute to cortical activity. Balanced amplification depends on the fact that individual neurons project only excitatory or only inhibitory synapses. This leads to a hidden feedforward connectivity between activity patterns. We show in a detailed biophysical model that this can explain the cat V1 observations.

  16. A Simple Structure for Signal Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wan-Xiang; Gu, Chang-Gui; Liang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    It has been found that a triple-node feed-forward motif has a function of signal amplification, where two input nodes receive the external weak signal and jointly modulate the response of the third output node [Liang et al., Phys. Rev. E 88 (2013) 012910]. We here show that the signal amplification can be further enhanced by adding a link between the two input nodes in the feed-forward motif. We further reveal that the coupling strength of the link regulates the enhancement of signal amplification in the modified feed-forward motif. We finally analyze the mechanism of signal amplification of such simple structure. Supported by the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning under Grant No. QD2015016, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11505114 and 11305078

  17. Can Anomalous Amplification be Attained without Postselection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Rincón, Julián; Liu, Wei-Tao; Viza, Gerardo I.; Howell, John C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a parameter estimation technique based on performing joint measurements of a weak interaction away from the weak-value-amplification approximation. Two detectors are used to collect full statistics of the correlations between two weakly entangled degrees of freedom. Without discarding of data, the protocol resembles the anomalous amplification of an imaginary-weak-value-like response. The amplification is induced in the difference signal of both detectors allowing robustness to different sources of technical noise, and offering in addition the advantages of balanced signals for precision metrology. All of the Fisher information about the parameter of interest is collected. A tunable phase controls the strength of the amplification response. We experimentally demonstrate the proposed technique by measuring polarization rotations in a linearly polarized laser pulse. We show that in the presence of technical noise the effective sensitivity and precision of a split detector is increased when compared to a conventional continuous-wave balanced detection technique.

  18. The spatial pattern of cochlear amplification.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A N; Nin, Fumiaki; Reichenbach, Tobias; Uthaiah, Revathy C; Hudspeth, A J

    2012-12-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss, which stems primarily from the failure of mechanosensory hair cells, changes the traveling waves that transmit acoustic signals along the cochlea. However, the connection between cochlear mechanics and the amplificatory function of hair cells remains unclear. Using an optical technique that permits the targeted inactivation of prestin, a protein of outer hair cells that generates forces on the basilar membrane, we demonstrate that these forces interact locally with cochlear traveling waves to achieve enormous mechanical amplification. By perturbing amplification in narrow segments of the basilar membrane, we further show that a cochlear traveling wave accumulates gain as it approaches its peak. Analysis of these results indicates that cochlear amplification produces negative damping that counters the viscous drag impeding traveling waves; targeted photoinactivation locally interrupts this compensation. These results reveal the locus of amplification in cochlear traveling waves and connect the characteristics of normal hearing to molecular forces.

  19. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  20. The Spatial Pattern of Cochlear Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan A.N.; Nin, Fumiaki; Reichenbach, Tobias; Uthaiah, Revathy C.; Hudspeth, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensorineural hearing loss, which stems primarily from the failure of mechanosensory hair cells, changes the traveling waves that transmit acoustic signals along the cochlea. However, the connection between cochlear mechanics and the amplificatory function of hair cells remains unclear. Using an optical technique that permits the targeted inactivation of prestin, a protein of outer hair cells that generates forces on the basilar membrane, we demonstrate that these forces interact locally with cochlear traveling waves to achieve enormous mechanical amplification. By perturbing amplification in narrow segments of the basilar membrane, we further show that a cochlear traveling wave accumulates gain as it approaches its peak. Analysis of these results indicates that cochlear amplification produces negative damping that counters the viscous drag impeding traveling waves; targeted photoinactivation locally interrupts this compensation. These results reveal the locus of amplification in cochlear traveling waves and connect the characteristics of normal hearing to molecular forces. PMID:23217746

  1. Coupled isothermal polynucleotide amplification and translation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A cell-free system for polynucleotide amplification and translation is disclosed. Also disclosed are methods for using the system and a composition which allows the various components of the system to function under a common set of reaction conditions.

  2. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  3. Rolling circle amplification of metazoan mitochondrialgenomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Lindberg, D.R.; Boore, J.L.

    2005-07-31

    Here we report the successful use of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the amplification of complete metazoan mt genomes to make a product that is amenable to high-throughput genome sequencing techniques. The benefits of RCA over PCR are many and with further development and refinement of RCA, the sequencing of organellar genomics will require far less time and effort than current long PCR approaches.

  4. Onshore seismic amplifications due to bathymetric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Castellanos, A.; Carbajal-Romero, M.; Flores-Guzmán, N.; Olivera-Villaseñor, E.; Kryvko, A.

    2016-08-01

    We perform numerical calculations for onshore seismic amplifications, taking into consideration the effect of bathymetric features on the propagation of seismic movements. To this end, the boundary element method is applied. Boundary elements are employed to irradiate waves and, consequently, force densities can be obtained for each boundary element. From this assumption, Huygens’ principle is applied, and since the diffracted waves are built at the boundary from which they are radiated, this idea is equivalent to Somigliana’s representation theorem. The application of boundary conditions leads to a linear system being obtained (Fredholm integral equations). Several numerical models are analyzed, with the first one being used to verify the proposed formulation, and the others being used to estimate onshore seismic amplifications due to the presence of bathymetric features. The results obtained show that compressional waves (P-waves) generate onshore seismic amplifications that can vary from 1.2 to 5.2 times the amplitude of the incident wave. On the other hand, the shear waves (S-waves) can cause seismic amplifications of up to 4.0 times the incident wave. Furthermore, an important result is that in most cases the highest seismic amplifications from an offshore earthquake are located on the shoreline and not offshore, despite the seafloor configuration. Moreover, the influence of the incident angle of seismic waves on the seismic amplifications is highlighted.

  5. Amplification uncertainty relation for probabilistic amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Ryo

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, quantum amplification limit refers to the property of inevitable noise addition on canonical variables when the field amplitude of an unknown state is linearly transformed through a quantum channel. Recent theoretical studies have determined amplification limits for cases of probabilistic quantum channels or general quantum operations by specifying a set of input states or a state ensemble. However, it remains open how much excess noise on canonical variables is unavoidable and whether there exists a fundamental trade-off relation between the canonical pair in a general amplification process. In this paper we present an uncertainty-product form of amplification limits for general quantum operations by assuming an input ensemble of Gaussian-distributed coherent states. It can be derived as a straightforward consequence of canonical uncertainty relations and retrieves basic properties of the traditional amplification limit. In addition, our amplification limit turns out to give a physical limitation on probabilistic reduction of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen uncertainty. In this regard, we find a condition that probabilistic amplifiers can be regarded as local filtering operations to distill entanglement. This condition establishes a clear benchmark to verify an advantage of non-Gaussian operations beyond Gaussian operations with a feasible input set of coherent states and standard homodyne measurements.

  6. [Advance in loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique and its applications in point-of-care testing platforms].

    PubMed

    Guan, Li; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel in vitro nucleic acid amplification method conducted under isothermal conditions with the advantages of high specificity, sensitivity, rapidity and easy detection. Since it was established in 2000, it has been widely applied in various fields of analytical science including the diagnosis of a variety of pathogens, identification of embryo sex, detection of genetically modified organisms and cancer gene identification. Additionally, significant progress has been made in the optimization of the LAMP method, such as accelerated reactions, simplified sample processing, the realization of multiplex amplification, and the enhanced specificity of reaction and detection methods. LAMP technology also shows much potential to be adopted as part of point-of-care testing platforms by the micromation, automation and integration with other technologies such as Lab-on-a-Chip and digital nucleic acid amplification. This review summarizes the latest advances in the LAMP technique and its applications in developing point-of-care testing platforms.

  7. A sequence-based approach for prediction of CsrA/RsmA targets in bacteria with experimental validation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prajna R.; Jia, Tao; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Kerkering, Thomas M.; Morris, Elizabeth R.; Searle, Mark S.; Heeb, Stephan; Rao, Jayasimha; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2014-01-01

    CsrA/RsmA homologs are an extensive family of ribonucleic acid (RNA)-binding proteins that function as global post-transcriptional regulators controlling important cellular processes such as secondary metabolism, motility, biofilm formation and the production and secretion of virulence factors in diverse bacterial species. While direct messenger RNA binding by CsrA/RsmA has been studied in detail for some genes, it is anticipated that there are numerous additional, as yet undiscovered, direct targets that mediate its global regulation. To assist in the discovery of these targets, we propose a sequence-based approach to predict genes directly regulated by these regulators. In this work, we develop a computer code (CSRA_TARGET) implementing this approach, which leads to predictions for several novel targets in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The predicted targets in other bacteria, specifically Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Pectobacterium carotovorum and Legionella pneumophila, also include global regulators that control virulence in these pathogens, unraveling intricate indirect regulatory roles for CsrA/RsmA. We have experimentally validated four predicted RsmA targets in P. aeruginosa. The sequence-based approach developed in this work can thus lead to several testable predictions for direct targets of CsrA homologs, thereby complementing and accelerating efforts to unravel global regulation by this important family of proteins. PMID:24782516

  8. Molecular identification of veterinary yeast isolates by use of sequence-based analysis of the D1/D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Garner, Cherilyn D; Starr, Jennifer K; McDonough, Patrick L; Altier, Craig

    2010-06-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods-traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit-showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population.

  9. Molecular Identification of Veterinary Yeast Isolates by Use of Sequence-Based Analysis of the D1/D2 Region of the Large Ribosomal Subunit▿

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Cherilyn D.; Starr, Jennifer K.; McDonough, Patrick L.; Altier, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Conventional methods of yeast identification are often time-consuming and difficult; however, recent studies of sequence-based identification methods have shown promise. Additionally, little is known about the diversity of yeasts identified from various animal species in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we examined three methods of identification by using 109 yeast samples isolated during a 1-year period from veterinary clinical samples. Comparison of the three methods—traditional substrate assimilation, fatty acid profile analysis, and sequence-based analysis of the region spanning the D1 and D2 regions (D1/D2) of the large ribosomal subunit—showed that sequence analysis provided the highest percent identification among the three. Sequence analysis identified 87% of isolates to the species level, whereas substrate assimilation and fatty acid profile analysis identified only 54% and 47%, respectively. Less-stringent criteria for identification increased the percentage of isolates identified to 98% for sequence analysis, 62% for substrate assimilation, and 55% for fatty acid profile analysis. We also found that sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region provided further identification for 36% of yeast not identified to the species level by D1/D2 sequence analysis. Additionally, we identified a large variety of yeast from animal sources, with at least 30 different species among the isolates tested, and with the majority not belonging to the common Candida spp., such as C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and the C. parapsilosis group. Thus, we determined that sequence analysis of the D1/D2 region was the best method for identification of the variety of yeasts found in a veterinary population. PMID:20392917

  10. Advances in nucleic acid-based detection methods.

    PubMed Central

    Wolcott, M J

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory techniques based on nucleic acid methods have increased in popularity over the last decade with clinical microbiologists and other laboratory scientists who are concerned with the diagnosis of infectious agents. This increase in popularity is a result primarily of advances made in nucleic acid amplification and detection techniques. Polymerase chain reaction, the original nucleic acid amplification technique, changed the way many people viewed and used nucleic acid techniques in clinical settings. After the potential of polymerase chain reaction became apparent, other methods of nucleic acid amplification and detection were developed. These alternative nucleic acid amplification methods may become serious contenders for application to routine laboratory analyses. This review presents some background information on nucleic acid analyses that might be used in clinical and anatomical laboratories and describes some recent advances in the amplification and detection of nucleic acids. PMID:1423216

  11. Study on multiple-hops performance of MOOC sequences-based optical labels for OPS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Qiu, Kun; Ma, Chunli

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we utilize a new study method that is under independent case of multiple optical orthogonal codes to derive the probability function of MOOCS-OPS networks, discuss the performance characteristics for a variety of parameters, and compare some characteristics of the system employed by single optical orthogonal code or multiple optical orthogonal codes sequences-based optical labels. The performance of the system is also calculated, and our results verify that the method is effective. Additionally it is found that performance of MOOCS-OPS networks would, negatively, be worsened, compared with single optical orthogonal code-based optical label for optical packet switching (SOOC-OPS); however, MOOCS-OPS networks can greatly enlarge the scalability of optical packet switching networks.

  12. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  13. A novel baseline hepatitis B virus sequencing-based strategy for predicting adefovir antiviral response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Shan, Xuefeng; Huang, Yao; Deng, Haijun; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Chen, Juan; Tang, Ni; Shan, You-Lan; Guo, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ailong

    2015-07-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is used as first-line monotherapy or rescue therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. In this study, we sought to identify nucleotide changes in the reverse transcriptase (RT) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) at baseline and explore their predictive value for ADV antiviral response. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) was utilized to determine HBV genetic variability within the RT region at baseline and during a 48-week ADV therapy. According to the viral load at the end of ADV treatment, all patients were classified into responders (HBV DNA level reduction of ⩾ 3 log 10 IU/mL) and suboptimal responders (HBV DNA level reduction of <3 log 10 IU/mL). Based on UDPS data at baseline, we identified 11 nucleotide substitutions whose combination frequency was significantly associated with the antiviral response among 36 CHB patients in the study group. However, the baseline distribution and frequency of rt181 and rt236 substitutions known to confer ADV resistance was a poor predictor for the antiviral response. Compared with baseline serum HBeAg, HBV-DNA and ALT levels, the baseline HBV sequence-based model showed higher predictive accuracy for ADV response. In an independent cohort of 31 validation patients with CHB, the sequence-based model provided greater predictive potency than the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT and the HBeAg/HBV-DNA/ALT/sequence combinations. Taken together, we confirm the presence of ADV resistance variants in treatment-naïve patients and firstly unravel the predictive value of the baseline mutations in the HBV RT region for ADV antiviral response.

  14. Capture and Amplification by Tailing and Switching (CATS)

    PubMed Central

    Turchinovich, Andrey; Surowy, Harald; Serva, Andrius; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies have paved the way into new areas of research including individualized medicine. However, sequencing of trace amounts of DNA or RNA still remains a major challenge, especially for degraded nucleic acids like circulating DNA. This together with high cost and time requirements impedes many important applications of MPS in medicine and fundamental science. We have established a fast, cheap and highly efficient protocol called ‘Capture and Amplification by Tailing and Switching’ (CATS) to directly generate ready-to-sequence libraries for MPS from nanogram and picogram quantities of both DNA and RNA. Furthermore, those DNA libraries are strand-specific, can be prepared within 2–3 h and do not require preliminary sample amplification steps. To exemplify the capacity of the technique, we have generated and sequenced DNA libraries from hundred-picogram amounts of circulating nucleic acids isolated from human blood plasma, one nanogram of mRNA-enriched total RNA from cultured cells and few nanograms of bisulfite-converted DNA. The approach for DNA library preparation from minimal and fragmented input described here will find broad application in diverse research areas such as translational medicine including therapy monitoring, prediction, prognosis and early detection of various human disorders and will permit high-throughput DNA sequencing from previously inaccessible material such as minute forensic and archeological samples. PMID:24922482

  15. Nanofluidic redox cycling amplification for the selective detection of catechol.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Bernhard; Zevenbergen, Marcel; Lemay, Serge

    2008-02-15

    We have developed a chip-based nanofluidic device to amplify the electrochemical signal of catechols by orders of magnitude. The amplification is based on rapid redox cycling between plane parallel electrodes inside a nanochannel. We show that it is possible to monitor the signal of only a few hundred molecules residing in the active area of the nanofluidic sensor. Furthermore, due to the nanochannel design, the sensor is immune to interference by molecules undergoing irreversible redox reactions. We demonstrate the selectivity of the device by detecting catechol in the presence of ascorbic acid, whose oxidized form is only stable for a short time. The interference of ascorbic acid is usually a challenge in the detection of catecholamines in biological samples.

  16. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David S; McNerney, Ruth; Teng Low, Hwee; Leader, Brandon Troy; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Meyer, Jessica C; O'Sullivan, Denise M; Brooks, David G; Piepenburg, Olaf; Forrest, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Improved access to effective tests for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) has been designated a public health priority by the World Health Organisation. In high burden TB countries nucleic acid based TB tests have been restricted to centralised laboratories and specialised research settings. Requirements such as a constant electrical supply, air conditioning and skilled, computer literate operators prevent implementation of such tests in many settings. Isothermal DNA amplification technologies permit the use of simpler, less energy intensive detection platforms more suited to low resource settings that allow the accurate diagnosis of a disease within a short timeframe. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) is a rapid, low temperature isothermal DNA amplification reaction. We report here RPA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) DNA in <20 minutes at 39 °C. Assays for two MTC specific targets were investigated, IS6110 and IS1081. When testing purified MTC genomic DNA, limits of detection of 6.25 fg (IS6110) and 20 fg (IS1081)were consistently achieved. When testing a convenience sample of pulmonary specimens from suspected TB patients, RPA demonstrated superior accuracy to indirect fluorescence microscopy. Compared to culture, sensitivities for the IS1081 RPA and microscopy were 91.4% (95%CI: 85, 97.9) and 86.1% (95%CI: 78.1, 94.1) respectively (n = 71). Specificities were 100% and 88.6% (95% CI: 80.8, 96.1) respectively. For the IS6110 RPA and microscopy sensitivities of 87.5% (95%CI: 81.7, 93.2) and 70.8% (95%CI: 62.9, 78.7) were obtained (n = 90). Specificities were 95.4 (95% CI: 92.3,98.1) and 88% (95% CI: 83.6, 92.4) respectively. The superior specificity of RPA for detecting tuberculosis was due to the reduced ability of fluorescence microscopy to distinguish Mtb complex from other acid fast bacteria. The rapid nature of the RPA assay and its low energy requirement compared to other amplification technologies suggest RPA-based TB assays

  17. Detection of infections with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus by analyses of dried blood spots - performance characteristics of the ARCHITECT system and two commercial assays for nucleic acid amplification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, dried blood spots (DBS) are primarily used to obtain diagnostic access to risk collectives such as intravenous drug users, who are prone to infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Before DBS analyses can be used in this diagnostic context, however, a comprehensive evaluation of its performance characteristics must be conducted. To the best of our knowledge, the current study presents for the first time such essential data for the Abbott ARCHITECT system, which is currently the worldwide leading platform in this field of infection diagnostics. Methods The investigation comprised 1,762 paired serum/DBS samples and a total of 3,524 determinations with the Abbott ARCHITECT HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and HIV-1-p24-antigen/anti-HIV 1/2 assays as well as with the artus HBV LC PCR and VERSANT HCV RNA qualitative (TMA) tests. Results In the context of DBS testing, a specificity of 100% was recorded for the seven serological and molecular biological assays. The analytical sensitivity of HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV, HIV-1-p24-antigen/anti-HIV 1/2, HBV DNA, and HCV RNA detections in DBS eluates was 98.6%, 97.1%, 97.5%, 97.8%, 100%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. Discussion/conclusions The results obtained indicate that it is today possible to reliably detect HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and HIV-1-p24 antigen/anti-HIV 1/2 with state-of-the-art analytical systems such as the Abbott ARCHITECT in DBS eluates even when a comparatively high elution volume of 1,000 μl is used. They also provide evidence for the inherent analytical limits of DBS testing, which primarily concern the anti-HBc/anti-HBs system for individuals with HIV infections and nucleic acid tests with relatively low analytical sensitivity. PMID:23497102

  18. A mathematical approach to estimate the efficacy of individual-donation and minipool nucleic acid amplification test options in preventing transmission risk by window period and occult hepatitis B virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Marion; van Drimmelen, Harry; Coleman, Charl; Mitchel, Josephine; Reddy, Ravi; Lelie, Nico

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensitivity data from a head-to-head comparison study in South Africa were used to compare the efficacy of the Ultrio Plus assay in individual-donation (ID) and minipool (MP)4 and MP8 formats with that of TaqScreen MP6 in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission risk. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The replicate nucleic acid test (NAT) results on 106 HBV NAT (Ultrio)-yield samples and 29 HBV DNA (Ultrio)-negative, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive samples were used to determine the viral load in copies/mL against the Eurohep HBV standard by probit analysis. Random viral load distributions were established in 32 pre-HBsAg window period (WP), 15 post-HBsAg WP, and 56 occult HBV infection (OBI) donations. Regression analysis of log viral load and Poisson distribution statistics of infectious HBV particles in blood components was used to predict infectivity and efficacy of NAT options in removing HBV transmission risk. RESULTS For red blood cell transfusions (20 mL of plasma), the modeling predicted an Ultrio Plus ID-NAT efficacy of 68 and 83% in removing WP and (antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen–negative) OBI transmission risk, respectively, compared to 52 and 49% by TaqScreen MP6. For 200 mL of fresh-frozen plasma the estimated efficacy levels by these ID- and MP6-NAT options reduced to 57 and 44% for WP and to 67 and 34% for OBI donations, respectively. CONCLUSION The efficacy of the currently available commercial NAT systems in reducing HBV transmission risk is mainly driven by the pool size and the transfusion plasma volume. The modeled OBI transmission risk and NAT efficacy levels were in line with those recently reported in three lookback studies and give more insight in the incremental safety provided by HBsAg and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen testing of ID-NAT screened blood. PMID:24749834

  19. Remote fiber sensors and optical amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, M. J.; Coelho, Thiago V. N.; Carvalho, Joel P.; Santos, J. L.; Guerreiro, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work discusses remote fiber sensors enabled by optical amplification. Continuous wave numerical modeling based on the propagation of pumps and signal lasers coupled to optical fibers explores Raman amplification schemes to predict the sensor's behavior. Experimental analyses report the results to a temperature remote optical sensor with 50 km distance between the central unit and the sensor head. An electrical interrogation scheme is used due to their low cost and good time response. Different architectures in remote sensor systems are evaluated, where diffraction gratings are the sensor element. A validation of calculated results is performed by experimental analyses and, as an application, the noise generated by Raman amplification in the remote sensors systems is simulated applying such numerical modeling. The analyses of sensors systems based on diffraction gratings requires optical broadband sources to interrogate the optical sensor unit, mainly in long period gratings that shows a characteristic rejection band. Therefore, the sensor distance is limited to a few kilometers due to the attenuation in optical fibers. Additional attenuation is introduced by the sensor element. Hence, to extend the distance in the optical sensor system, the optical amplification system is needed to compensate the losses in the optical fibers. The Raman amplification technology was selected mainly due to the flexibility in the gain bandwidth. The modeling can be applied to sensor systems that monitor sites located at long distances, or in places that the access is restricted due to harsh environment conditions in such cases conventional sensors are relatively fast deteriorated.

  20. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, Petr; Dubey, Manvendra K; Lesins, Glen; Wang, Muyin

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  1. Parametric Amplification of Scattered Atom Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Mun, Jongchul; Boyd, Micah; Streed, Erik W.; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Pritchard, David E.

    2006-01-20

    We have observed parametric generation and amplification of ultracold atom pairs. A {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate was loaded into a one-dimensional optical lattice with quasimomentum k{sub 0} and spontaneously scattered into two final states with quasimomenta k{sub 1} and k{sub 2}. Furthermore, when a seed of atoms was first created with quasimomentum k{sub 1} we observed parametric amplification of scattered atoms pairs in states k{sub 1} and k{sub 2} when the phase-matching condition was fulfilled. This process is analogous to optical parametric generation and amplification of photons and could be used to efficiently create entangled pairs of atoms. Furthermore, these results explain the dynamic instability of condensates in moving lattices observed in recent experiments.

  2. Amplification, Redundancy, and Quantum Chernoff Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Riedel, C. Jess; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2014-04-01

    Amplification was regarded, since the early days of quantum theory, as a mysterious ingredient that endows quantum microstates with macroscopic consequences, key to the "collapse of the wave packet," and a way to avoid embarrassing problems exemplified by Schrödinger's cat. Such a bridge between the quantum microworld and the classical world of our experience was postulated ad hoc in the Copenhagen interpretation. Quantum Darwinism views amplification as replication, in many copies, of the information about quantum states. We show that such amplification is a natural consequence of a broad class of models of decoherence, including the photon environment we use to obtain most of our information. This leads to objective reality via the presence of robust and widely accessible records of selected quantum states. The resulting redundancy (the number of copies deposited in the environment) follows from the quantum Chernoff information that quantifies the information transmitted by a typical elementary subsystem of the environment.

  3. Amplification, redundancy, and quantum Chernoff information.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Michael; Riedel, C Jess; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2014-04-11

    Amplification was regarded, since the early days of quantum theory, as a mysterious ingredient that endows quantum microstates with macroscopic consequences, key to the "collapse of the wave packet," and a way to avoid embarrassing problems exemplified by Schrödinger's cat. Such a bridge between the quantum microworld and the classical world of our experience was postulated ad hoc in the Copenhagen interpretation. Quantum Darwinism views amplification as replication, in many copies, of the information about quantum states. We show that such amplification is a natural consequence of a broad class of models of decoherence, including the photon environment we use to obtain most of our information. This leads to objective reality via the presence of robust and widely accessible records of selected quantum states. The resulting redundancy (the number of copies deposited in the environment) follows from the quantum Chernoff information that quantifies the information transmitted by a typical elementary subsystem of the environment.

  4. Optical amplification enhancement in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, R.; Leonetti, M.; Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Galisteo-Lopez, J. F.; Lopez, C.; Conti, C.

    2011-02-15

    Improving and controlling the efficiency of a gain medium is one of the most challenging problems of laser research. By measuring the gain length in an opal-based photonic crystal doped with laser dye, we demonstrate that optical amplification is more than twenty-fold enhanced along the {Gamma}-K symmetry directions of the face-centered-cubic photonic crystal. These results are theoretically explained by directional variations of the density of states, providing a quantitative connection between density of the states and light amplification.

  5. Parametric Amplification For Detecting Weak Optical Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Chien; Chakravarthi, Prakash

    1996-01-01

    Optical-communication receivers of proposed type implement high-sensitivity scheme of optical parametric amplification followed by direct detection for reception of extremely weak signals. Incorporates both optical parametric amplification and direct detection into optimized design enhancing effective signal-to-noise ratios during reception in photon-starved (photon-counting) regime. Eliminates need for complexity of heterodyne detection scheme and partly overcomes limitations imposed on older direct-detection schemes by noise generated in receivers and by limits on quantum efficiencies of photodetectors.

  6. Centrosome amplification is correlated with ploidy divergence, but not with MYCN amplification, in neuroblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Naoki; Kasai, Fumio; Haruta, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Akira; Kikuta, Atsushi; Kato, Koji; Nakadate, Hisaya; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Ploidy is an important biologic feature defining heterogeneous neuroblastoma. To clarify whether centrosome amplification is correlated with ploidy status or MYCN amplification, we examined centrosomes by immunostaining, and ploidy and MYCN copy numbers by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 27 neuroblastomas. There were 8 infant triploid, 9 infant diploid, and 10 childhood diploid tumors. Ploidy divergence, defined as a mixed population of cells with trisomy 1, cells with tetrasomy 1, and/or cells with pentasomy 1 in diploid tumors and that of cells with tetrasomy 1 and cells with pentasomy 1 in triploid tumors, each occupying more than 5% of cells, was found in 78% of infant diploid tumors, but not in triploid and childhood diploid tumors (P<0.0001). Childhood and infant diploid tumors had higher incidences of centrosome amplification than infant triploid tumors (P=0.0001 and 0.07, respectively). While both infant and childhood diploid tumors share a high incidence of centrosome amplification, only infant diploid tumors showed ploidy divergence, implying the presence of cytokinesis failure. These findings suggest that centrosome amplification found in cells of infant diploid tumors and that found in cells of childhood diploid tumors may be generated by different mechanisms. MYCN amplification was not correlated with centrosome amplification in sporadic neuroblastomas. PMID:19061778

  7. A dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA methyltransferase activity based on strand displacement amplification and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanling; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-15

    DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays a critical role in many biological processes and has been regarded as a predictive cancer biomarker and a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential for early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Here, we developed a dual amplification fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity based on strand displacement amplification (SDA) and DNAzyme amplification. A trifunctional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe was designed including a methylation site for DNA MTase recognition, a complementary sequence of 8-17 DNAzyme for synthesizing DNAzyme, and a nicking site for nicking enzyme cleavage. Firstly, the trifunctional dsDNA probe was methylated by DNA MTase to form the methylated dsDNA. Subsequently, HpaII restriction endonuclease specifically cleaved the residue of unmethylated dsDNA. Next, under the action of polymerase and nicking enzyme, the methylared dsDNA initiated SDA, releasing numbers of 8-17 DNAzymes. Finally, the released 8-17 DNAzymes triggered DNAzyme amplification reaction to induce a significant fluorescence enhancement. This strategy could detect DNA MTase activity as low as 0.0082U/mL. Additionally, the strategy was successfully applied for evaluating the inhibitions of DNA MTase using two anticancer drugs, 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The results indicate the proposed strategy has a potential application in early cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  8. Molecular Zipper: a fluorescent probe for real-time isothermal DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jizu; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, David Y

    2006-01-01

    Rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and ramification amplification (RAM, also known as hyperbranched RCA) are isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies that have gained a great application in in situ signal amplification, DNA and protein microarray assays, single nucleotide polymorphism detection, as well as clinical diagnosis. Real-time detection of RCA or RAM products has been a challenge because of most real-time detection systems, including Taqman and Molecular Beacon, are designed for thermal cycling-based DNA amplification technology. In the present study, we describe a novel fluorescent probe construct, termed molecular zipper, which is specially designed for quantifying target DNA by real-time monitoring RAM reactions. Our results showed that the molecular zipper has very low background fluorescence due to the strong interaction between two strands. Once it is incorporated into the RAM products its double strand region is opened by displacement, therefore, its fluorophore releases a fluorescent signal. Applying the molecular zipper in RAM assay, we were able to detect as few as 10 molecules within 90 min reaction. A linear relationship was observed between initial input of targets and threshold time (R2 = 0.985). These results indicate that molecular zipper can be applied to real-time monitoring and qualification of RAM reaction, implying an amenable method for automatic RAM-based diagnostic assays.

  9. Molecular Zipper: a fluorescent probe for real-time isothermal DNA amplification

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jizu; Zhang, Wandi; Zhang, David Y.

    2006-01-01

    Rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and ramification amplification (RAM, also known as hyperbranched RCA) are isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies that have gained a great application in in situ signal amplification, DNA and protein microarray assays, single nucleotide polymorphism detection, as well as clinical diagnosis. Real-time detection of RCA or RAM products has been a challenge because of most real-time detection systems, including Taqman and Molecular Beacon, are designed for thermal cycling-based DNA amplification technology. In the present study, we describe a novel fluorescent probe construct, termed molecular zipper, which is specially designed for quantifying target DNA by real-time monitoring RAM reactions. Our results showed that the molecular zipper has very low background fluorescence due to the strong interaction between two strands. Once it is incorporated into the RAM products its double strand region is opened by displacement, therefore, its fluorophore releases a fluorescent signal. Applying the molecular zipper in RAM assay, we were able to detect as few as 10 molecules within 90 min reaction. A linear relationship was observed between initial input of targets and threshold time (R2 = 0.985). These results indicate that molecular zipper can be applied to real-time monitoring and qualification of RAM reaction, implying an amenable method for automatic RAM-based diagnostic assays. PMID:16822854

  10. Application of Sequence-based Methods in Human MicrobialEcology

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Li; Rubin, Edward M.; Bristow, James

    2005-08-29

    Ecologists studying microbial life in the environment have recognized the enormous complexity of microbial diversity for many years, and the development of a variety of culture-independent methods, many of them coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing, has allowed this diversity to be explored in ever greater detail. Despite the widespread application of these new techniques to the characterization of uncultivated microbes and microbial communities in the environment, their application to human health and disease has lagged behind. Because DNA based-techniques for defining uncultured microbes allow not only cataloging of microbial diversity, but also insight into microbial functions, investigators are beginning to apply these tools to the microbial communities that abound on and within us, in what has aptly been called the second Human Genome Project. In this review we discuss the sequence-based methods for microbial analysis that are currently available and their application to identify novel human pathogens, improve diagnosis of known infectious diseases, and to advance understanding of our relationship with microbial communities that normally reside in and on the human body.

  11. M-Sequence-Based Single-Chip UWB-Radar Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmec, M.; Helbig, M.; Herrmann, R.; Rauschenbach, P.; Sachs, J.; Schilling, K.

    The article deals with a fully monolithically integrated single-chip M-sequence-based UWB-radar sensor, its architecture, selected design aspects and first measurement results performed on wafer and with packaged IC modules. The discussed chip is equipped with one transmitter and two receivers. The IC was designed and manufactured in commercially available high-performance 0.25 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology (f t = 110 GHz). Due to the combination of fast digital and broadband analogue system blocks in one chip, special emphasis has been placed on the electrical isolation of these functional structures. The manufactured IC is enclosed in a low-cost QFN (quad flat-pack no-leads) package and mounted on a PCB permitting the creation of MIMO-sensor arrays by cascading a number of modules. In spite of its relatively high complexity, the sensor head features a compact design (chip size of 2 × 1 mm2, QFN package size 5 × 5 mm2) and moderate power consumption (below 1 W at -3 V supply). The assembled transceiver chip can handle signals in the frequency range from near DC up to 18 GHz. This leads to an impulse response (IRF) of FWHD ≈ 50 ps (full width at half duration).

  12. A multi gene sequence-based phylogeny of the Musaceae (banana) family

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The classification of the Musaceae (banana) family species and their phylogenetic inter-relationships remain controversial, in part due to limited nucleotide information to complement the morphological and physiological characters. In this work the evolutionary relationships within the Musaceae family were studied using 13 species and DNA sequences obtained from a set of 19 unlinked nuclear genes. Results The 19 gene sequences represented a sample of ~16 kb of genome sequence (~73% intronic). The sequence data were also used to obtain estimates for the divergence times of the Musaceae genera and Musa sections. Nucleotide variation within the sample confirmed the close relationship of Australimusa and Callimusa sections and showed that Eumusa and Rhodochlamys sections are not reciprocally monophyletic, which supports the previous claims for the merger between the two latter sections. Divergence time analysis supported the previous dating of the Musaceae crown age to the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary (~ 69 Mya), and the evolution of Musa to ~50 Mya. The first estimates for the divergence times of the four Musa sections were also obtained. Conclusions The gene sequence-based phylogeny presented here provides a substantial insight into the course of speciation within the Musaceae. An understanding of the main phylogenetic relationships between banana species will help to fine-tune the taxonomy of Musaceae. PMID:21496296

  13. Efficient Targeted Next Generation Sequencing-Based Workflow for Differential Diagnosis of Alport-Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Gábor; Kalmár, Tibor; Endreffy, Emőke; Ondrik, Zoltán; Iványi, Béla; Rikker, Csaba; Haszon, Ibolya; Túri, Sándor; Sinkó, Mária; Bereczki, Csaba; Maróti, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is an inherited type IV collagen nephropathies characterized by microscopic hematuria during early childhood, the development of proteinuria and progression to end-stage renal disease. Since choosing the right therapy, even before the onset of proteinuria, can delay the onset of end-stage renal failure and improve life expectancy, the earliest possible differential diagnosis is desired. Practically, this means the identification of mutation(s) in COL4A3-A4-A5 genes. We used an efficient, next generation sequencing based workflow for simultaneous analysis of all three COL4A genes in three individuals and fourteen families involved by AS or showing different level of Alport-related symptoms. We successfully identified mutations in all investigated cases, including 14 unpublished mutations in our Hungarian cohort. We present an easy to use unified clinical/diagnostic terminology and workflow not only for X-linked but for autosomal AS, but also for Alport-related diseases. In families where a diagnosis has been established by molecular genetic analysis, the renal biopsy may be rendered unnecessary. PMID:26934356

  14. Next-generation sequencing-based molecular diagnosis of 82 retinitis pigmentosa probands from Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hui; Li, Yumei; Alexander, Sharon; Wang, Keqing; Willoughby, Colin E.; Zaneveld, Jacques E.; Jiang, Lichun; Soens, Zachry T.; Earle, Philip; Simpson, David

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal disorders characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration. An accurate molecular diagnosis is essential for disease characterization and clinical prognoses. A retinal capture panel that enriches 186 known retinal disease genes, including 55 known RP genes, was developed. Targeted next-generation sequencing was performed for a cohort of 82 unrelated RP cases from Northern Ireland, including 46 simplex cases and 36 familial cases. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 49 probands, including 28 simplex cases and 21 familial cases, achieving a solving rate of 60 %. In total, 65 pathogenic mutations were found, and 29 of these were novel. Interestingly, the molecular information of 12 probands was neither consistent with their initial inheritance pattern nor clinical diagnosis. Further clinical reassessment resulted in a refinement of the clinical diagnosis in 11 patients. This is the first study to apply next-generation sequencing-based, comprehensive molecular diagnoses to a large number of RP probands from Northern Ireland. Our study shows that molecular information can aid clinical diagnosis, potentially changing treatment options, current family counseling and management. PMID:25472526

  15. Sequence-Based Pronunciation Variation Modeling for Spontaneous ASR Using a Noisy Channel Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Hansjörg; Sakti, Sakriani; Hori, Chiori; Kashioka, Hideki; Nakamura, Satoshi; Minker, Wolfgang

    The performance of English automatic speech recognition systems decreases when recognizing spontaneous speech mainly due to multiple pronunciation variants in the utterances. Previous approaches address this problem by modeling the alteration of the pronunciation on a phoneme to phoneme level. However, the phonetic transformation effects induced by the pronunciation of the whole sentence have not yet been considered. In this article, the sequence-based pronunciation variation is modeled using a noisy channel approach where the spontaneous phoneme sequence is considered as a “noisy” string and the goal is to recover the “clean” string of the word sequence. Hereby, the whole word sequence and its effect on the alternation of the phonemes will be taken into consideration. Moreover, the system not only learns the phoneme transformation but also the mapping from the phoneme to the word directly. In this study, first the phonemes will be recognized with the present recognition system and afterwards the pronunciation variation model based on the noisy channel approach will map from the phoneme to the word level. Two well-known natural language processing approaches are adopted and derived from the noisy channel model theory: Joint-sequence models and statistical machine translation. Both of them are applied and various experiments are conducted using microphone and telephone of spontaneous speech.

  16. Improving protein structure prediction using multiple sequence-based contact predictions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sitao; Szilagyi, Andras; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Although residue-residue contact maps dictate the topology of proteins, sequence-based ab initio contact predictions have been found little use in actual structure prediction due to the low accuracy. We developed a composite set of nine SVM-based contact predictors which are used in I-TASSER simulation in combination with sparse template contact restraints. When testing the strategy on 273 non-homologous targets, remarkable improvements of I-TASSER models were observed for both easy and hard targets, with P-value by student s t-test below 0.00001 and 0.001, respectively. In several cases, TM-score increases by >30%, which essentially converts “non-foldable” targets into “foldable” ones. In CASP9, I-TASSER employed ab initio contact predictions, and generated models for 26 FM targets with a GDT-score 16% and 44% higher than the second and third best servers from other groups, respectively. These findings demonstrate a new avenue to improve the accuracy of protein structure prediction especially for free-modeling targets. PMID:21827953

  17. Sequence-based physical mapping of complex genomes by whole genome profiling.

    PubMed

    van Oeveren, Jan; de Ruiter, Marjo; Jesse, Taco; van der Poel, Hein; Tang, Jifeng; Yalcin, Feyruz; Janssen, Antoine; Volpin, Hanne; Stormo, Keith E; Bogden, Robert; van Eijk, Michiel J T; Prins, Marcel

    2011-04-01

    We present whole genome profiling (WGP), a novel next-generation sequencing-based physical mapping technology for construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs of complex genomes, using Arabidopsis thaliana as an example. WGP leverages short read sequences derived from restriction fragments of two-dimensionally pooled BAC clones to generate sequence tags. These sequence tags are assigned to individual BAC clones, followed by assembly of BAC contigs based on shared regions containing identical sequence tags. Following in silico analysis of WGP sequence tags and simulation of a map of Arabidopsis chromosome 4 and maize, a WGP map of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia was constructed de novo using a six-genome equivalent BAC library. Validation of the WGP map using the Columbia reference sequence confirmed that 350 BAC contigs (98%) were assembled correctly, spanning 97% of the 102-Mb calculated genome coverage. We demonstrate that WGP maps can also be generated for more complex plant genomes and will serve as excellent scaffolds to anchor genetic linkage maps and integrate whole genome sequence data.

  18. Efficient Targeted Next Generation Sequencing-Based Workflow for Differential Diagnosis of Alport-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Endreffy, Emőke; Ondrik, Zoltán; Iványi, Béla; Rikker, Csaba; Haszon, Ibolya; Túri, Sándor; Sinkó, Mária; Bereczki, Csaba; Maróti, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is an inherited type IV collagen nephropathies characterized by microscopic hematuria during early childhood, the development of proteinuria and progression to end-stage renal disease. Since choosing the right therapy, even before the onset of proteinuria, can delay the onset of end-stage renal failure and improve life expectancy, the earliest possible differential diagnosis is desired. Practically, this means the identification of mutation(s) in COL4A3-A4-A5 genes. We used an efficient, next generation sequencing based workflow for simultaneous analysis of all three COL4A genes in three individuals and fourteen families involved by AS or showing different level of Alport-related symptoms. We successfully identified mutations in all investigated cases, including 14 unpublished mutations in our Hungarian cohort. We present an easy to use unified clinical/diagnostic terminology and workflow not only for X-linked but for autosomal AS, but also for Alport-related diseases. In families where a diagnosis has been established by molecular genetic analysis, the renal biopsy may be rendered unnecessary. PMID:26934356

  19. iACP: a sequence-based tool for identifying anticancer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui; Feng, Pengmian; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer remains a major killer worldwide. Traditional methods of cancer treatment are expensive and have some deleterious side effects on normal cells. Fortunately, the discovery of anticancer peptides (ACPs) has paved a new way for cancer treatment. With the explosive growth of peptide sequences generated in the post genomic age, it is highly desired to develop computational methods for rapidly and effectively identifying ACPs, so as to speed up their application in treating cancer. Here we report a sequence-based predictor called iACP developed by the approach of optimizing the g-gap dipeptide components. It was demonstrated by rigorous cross-validations that the new predictor remarkably outperformed the existing predictors for the same purpose in both overall accuracy and stability. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a publicly accessible web-server for iACP has been established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iACP, by which users can easily obtain their desired results. PMID:26942877

  20. Portable nucleic acid thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Almassian, David R; Cockrell, Lisa M; Nelson, William M

    2013-11-21

    A nucleic acid thermal cycler is considered to be portable if it is under ten pounds, easily carried by one individual, and battery powered. Nucleic acid amplification includes both polymerase chain reaction (e.g. PCR, RT-PCR) and isothermal amplification (e.g. RPA, HDA, LAMP, NASBA, RCA, ICAN, SMART, SDA). There are valuable applications for portable nucleic acid thermocyclers in fields that include clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, and veterinary testing. A system that is portable allows for the distributed detection of targets at the point of care and a reduction of the time from sample to answer. The designer of a portable nucleic acid thermocycler must carefully consider both thermal control and the detection of amplification. In addition to thermal control and detection, the designer may consider the integration of a sample preparation subsystem with the nucleic acid thermocycler. There are a variety of technologies that can achieve accurate thermal control and the detection of nucleic acid amplification. Important evaluation criteria for each technology include maturity, power requirements, cost, sensitivity, speed, and manufacturability. Ultimately the needs of a particular market will lead to user requirements that drive the decision between available technologies.

  1. Method Of Signal Amplification In Multi-Chromophore Luminescence Sensors

    DOEpatents

    Levitsky, Igor A.; Krivoshlykov, Sergei G.

    2004-02-03

    A fluorescence-based method for highly sensitive and selective detection of analyte molecules is proposed. The method employs the energy transfer between two or more fluorescent chromophores in a carefully selected polymer matrix. In one preferred embodiment, signal amplification has been achieved in the fluorescent sensing of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) using two dyes, 3-aminofluoranthene (AM) and Nile Red (NR), in a hydrogen bond acidic polymer matrix. The selected polymer matrix quenches the fluorescence of both dyes and shifts dye emission and absorption spectra relative to more inert matrices. Upon DMMP sorption, the AM fluorescence shifts to the red at the same time the NR absorption shifts to the blue, resulting in better band overlap and increased energy transfer between chromophores. In another preferred embodiment, the sensitive material is incorporated into an optical fiber system enabling efficient excitation of the dye and collecting the fluorescent signal form the sensitive material on the remote end of the system. The proposed method can be applied to multichromophore luminescence sensor systems incorporating N-chromophores leading to N-fold signal amplification and improved selectivity. The method can be used in all applications where highly sensitive detection of basic gases, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), Sarin, Soman and other chemical warfare agents having basic properties, is required, including environmental monitoring, chemical industry and medicine.

  2. DNA Extraction and Amplification from Contemporary Polynesian Bark-Cloth

    PubMed Central

    Moncada, Ximena; Payacán, Claudia; Arriaza, Francisco; Lobos, Sergio; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Paper mulberry has been used for thousands of years in Asia and Oceania for making paper and bark-cloth, respectively. Museums around the world hold valuable collections of Polynesian bark-cloth. Genetic analysis of the plant fibers from which the textiles were made may answer a number of questions of interest related to provenance, authenticity or species used in the manufacture of these textiles. Recovery of nucleic acids from paper mulberry bark-cloth has not been reported before. Methodology We describe a simple method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable DNA from small samples of contemporary Polynesian bark-cloth (tapa) using two types of nuclear markers. We report the amplification of about 300 bp sequences of the ITS1 region and of a microsatellite marker. Conclusions Sufficient DNA was retrieved from all bark-cloth samples to permit successful PCR amplification. This method shows a means of obtaining useful genetic information from modern bark-cloth samples and opens perspectives for the analyses of small fragments derived from ethnographic materials. PMID:23437166

  3. Shock wave amplification by fabric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thom, C. G.; Cronin, D. S.

    2009-04-01

    It has been shown that, when exposed to air shock waves, soft materials such as fabrics can lead to amplification of the peak pressure measured on a reflecting surface behind the fabric. This occurs for a wide range of fabric configurations, including those used in soft-ballistic protection. The goal of this study was to validate a numerical model to develop an improved understanding of this phenomenon and investigate different fabric parameters, including density, permeability and standoff, and their influence on blast amplification. The investigation of fabric parameters was carried out using numerical simulations in an explicit finite element code with coupled fluid-structure interaction. The benefit of this method was the ability to isolate individual parameters. The model predicted similar trends to existing experimental data, though the numerically predicted peak pressures were consistently higher than the experimental values. The parametric study showed that low permeability fabrics result in the highest pressure amplifications. At areal densities on the order 100 g/m2, typical of single layer fabrics, amplification also increased with areal density for low permeability materials.

  4. Quantum Amplification by Superradiant Emission of Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Yuan, Luqi; Scully, Marlan O.

    2013-10-01

    A laser generates light through stimulated emission of radiation and requires population inversion. Quantum interference can yield lasing without inversion. However, such phase-sensitive quantum amplification still requires some atomic population in the excited state. Here, we present a new kind of quantum amplifier based on collective superradiant emission which does not need any population in the excited state. We show that parametric resonance between the driving (e.g., infrared) field and collective superradiant oscillations of the atomic polarization can yield light amplification at high (e.g., XUV) frequencies. To achieve gain, one must suppress a time-dependent Stark shift caused by the driving field. The resulting superradiant amplifier is many orders of magnitude more efficient than the usual nonlinear multiphoton excitation and holds promise for a new kind of generator of high-frequency coherent radiation. In addition to a detailed analytical analysis, confirmed by numerical simulations, we provide a physically appealing explanation of the quantum amplification by superradiant emission of radiation (QASER) operation in terms of coupled classical oscillators. We also present an experiment that demonstrates the QASER amplification mechanism in an electronic circuit, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first experimental demonstration of the difference combination resonance.

  5. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950-2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor. PMID:27538725

  6. Topographic amplification across a taiwanese ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Claire; Meunier, Patrick; Burtin, Arnaud; Marc, Odin; Weian Chao, Vvn; Wu, Yih-Min; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    A line of 6 broadband seismometers have been deployed across a ridge in the Hualien County (Eastern Taiwan) in order to study topographic amplification. Since March 2015, the network has been continuously recording waves incoming from the Taiwanese regional seismicity. The hill is well approximated by a triangular topography of 3600m in length by 900m in height. We present a preliminary analysis performed over a dozen of earthquakes selected from the Seismic Taiwanese catalog (CWBSN). We show that most of the Uphill records exhibit a systematic amplification of seismic waves (peak to peak of particle velocity) in the relevant frequency band [0.5-2Hz]. By contrast, energy within the larger frequency band [6-20Hz] reflects local site effects induced by the soil layer. We report amplification ratios ranging from ranging from 1.2 to 3 and from 1.8 to 4 for P and S waves respectively. We show that amplification processes at the top strongly depend on the parameter α defined as the angle between the azimuth of incoming wave and the azimuth of the ridge divide.

  7. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-08-19

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950-2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor.

  8. Modeling of the Princeton Raman Amplification Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Min Sup; Lindberg, Ryan; Wurtele, Jonathan; Cheng, W.; Avitzour, Y.; Ping, Y.; Suckewer, S.; Fisch, N. J.

    2004-11-01

    We numerically model the Princeton experiments on Raman amplification [1] using averaged-PIC (aPIC) [2] and 3-wave codes. Recently, there has been a series of experimental results performed in Princeton University [3]. Amplification factors up to 500 in intensity were obtained using a subpicosecond pulse propagating in a 3mm plasma. The plasma was created using a gas jet. The intensity of the amplified pulse exceeds the intensity of the pump pulse, indicating that the process of Raman amplification is in the nonlinear regime. Comparisons are made between 3-wave models, kinetic models and the experimental data. It is found that better agreement is achieved when kinetic effects are included. Discussion of the influence of a range of potentially deleterious phenomena such as density inhomogeneity, particle trapping, ionization, and pump depletion by noise amplification will be examined. References [1] V.M. Malkin, G. Shvets, and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol.82, 1999. [2] M.S. Hur, G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele, R. Lindberg, to appear in Phys. Plasmas. [3] Y. Ping, et al., Phys. Rev. E vol. 66, 2002; Phys. Rev. E vol. 67, 2003;

  9. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950–2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor. PMID:27538725

  10. Desert Amplification in a Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liming

    2016-08-01

    Here I analyze the observed and projected surface temperature anomalies over land between 50°S-50°N for the period 1950–2099 by large-scale ecoregion and find strongest warming consistently and persistently seen over driest ecoregions such as the Sahara desert and the Arabian Peninsula during various 30-year periods, pointing to desert amplification in a warming climate. This amplification enhances linearly with the global mean greenhouse gases(GHGs) radiative forcing and is attributable primarily to a stronger GHGs-enhanced downward longwave radiation forcing reaching the surface over drier ecoregions as a consequence of a warmer and thus moister atmosphere in response to increasing GHGs. These results indicate that desert amplification may represent a fundamental pattern of global warming associated with water vapor feedbacks over land in low- and mid- latitudes where surface warming rates depend inversely on ecosystem dryness. It is likely that desert amplification might involve two types of water vapor feedbacks that maximize respectively in the tropical upper troposphere and near the surface over deserts, with both being very dry and thus extremely sensitive to changes of water vapor.

  11. Site amplifications for generic rock sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Joyner, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Seismic shear-wave velocity as a function of depth for generic rock sites has been estimated from borehole data and studies of crustal velocities, and these velocities have been used to compute frequency-dependent amplifications for zero attenuation for use in simulations of strong ground motion. We define a generic rock site as one whose velocity at shallow depths equals the average of those from the rock sites sampled by the borehole data. Most of the boreholes are in populated areas; for that reason, the rock sites sampled are of particular engineering significance. We consider two generic rock sites: rock, corresponding to the bulk of the borehole data, and very hard rock, such as is found in glaciated regions in large areas of eastern North America or in portions of western North America. The amplifications on rock sites can be in excess of 3.5 at high frequencies, in contrast to the amplifications of less than 1.2 on very hard rock sites. The consideration of unattenuated amplification alone is computationally convenient, but what matters for ground-motion estimation is the combined effect of amplification and attenuation. For reasonable values of the attenuation parameter K0, the combined effect of attenuation and amplification for rock sites peaks between about 2 and 5 Hz with a maximum level of less than 1.8. The combined effect is about a factor of 1.5 at 1 Hz and is less than unity for frequencies in the range of 10 to 20 Hz (depending on K0). Using these amplifications, we find provisional values of about ???? = 70 bars and K0 = 0.035 sec for rock sites in western North America by fitting our empirically determined response spectra for an M 6.5 event to simulated values. The borehole data yield shear velocities (V??30) of 618 and 306 m/sec for "rock" and "soil" sites, respectively, when averaged over the upper 30 m. From this, we recommend that V??30 equals 620 and 310 m/sec for applications requiring the average velocity for rock and soil sites in

  12. Portable pH-inspired electrochemical detection of DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Wang, Rui; Wang, Liu; Ying, Yibin

    2014-08-01

    A portable and label-free pH-mediated electrochemical method for the detection of DNA amplification is described. With protons released as readouts, DNA amplifications were detected in real-time or at the end-point.

  13. Rapid microfluidic thermal cycler for nucleic acid amplification

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Vafai, Kambiz

    2015-10-27

    A system for thermal cycling a material to be thermal cycled including a microfluidic heat exchanger; a porous medium in the microfluidic heat exchanger; a microfluidic thermal cycling chamber containing the material to be thermal cycled, the microfluidic thermal cycling chamber operatively connected to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at first temperature; a first system for transmitting the working fluid at first temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at a second temperature, a second system for transmitting the working fluid at second temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a pump for flowing the working fluid at the first temperature from the first system to the microfluidic heat exchanger and through the porous medium; and flowing the working fluid at the second temperature from the second system to the heat exchanger and through the porous medium.

  14. Centrifugal Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acid Amplification and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Baogang; Peng, Niancai; Li, Lei; Li, Zheng; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Zengming; Wang, Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    We report here the development of a rapid PCR microfluidic system comprising a double-shaft turntable and centrifugal-based disc that rapidly drives the PCR mixture between chambers set at different temperatures, and the bidirectional flow improved the space utilization of the disc. Three heating resistors and thermistors maintained uniform, specific temperatures for the denaturation, annealing, and extension steps of the PCR. Infrared imaging showed that there was little thermal interference between reaction chambers; the system enabled the cycle number and reaction time of each step to be independently adjusted. To validate the function and efficiency of the centrifugal microfluidic system, a 350-base pair target gene from the hepatitis B virus was amplified and quantitated by fluorescence detection. By optimizing the cycling parameters, the reaction time was reduced to 32 min as compared to 120 min for a commercial PCR machine. DNA samples with concentrations ranging from 10 to 106 copies/mL could be quantitatively analyzed using this system. This centrifugal-based microfluidic platform is a useful system and possesses industrialization potential that can be used for portable diagnostics. PMID:26556354

  15. Detection and Characterization of Viral Species/Subspecies Using Isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) Assays.

    PubMed

    Glais, Laurent; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Numerous molecular-based detection protocols include an amplification step of the targeted nucleic acids. This step is important to reach the expected sensitive detection of pathogens in diagnostic procedures. Amplifications of nucleic acid sequences are generally performed, in the presence of appropriate primers, using thermocyclers. However, the time requested to amplify molecular targets and the cost of the thermocycler machines could impair the use of these methods in routine diagnostics. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technique allows rapid (short-term incubation of sample and primers in an enzymatic mixture) and simple (isothermal) amplification of molecular targets. RPA protocol requires only basic molecular steps such as extraction procedures and agarose gel electrophoresis. Thus, RPA can be considered as an interesting alternative to standard molecular-based diagnostic tools. In this paper, the complete procedures to set up an RPA assay, applied to detection of RNA (Potato virus Y, Potyvirus) and DNA (Wheat dwarf virus, Mastrevirus) viruses, are described. The proposed procedure allows developing species- or subspecies-specific detection assay.

  16. Detection and Characterization of Viral Species/Subspecies Using Isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) Assays.

    PubMed

    Glais, Laurent; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Numerous molecular-based detection protocols include an amplification step of the targeted nucleic acids. This step is important to reach the expected sensitive detection of pathogens in diagnostic procedures. Amplifications of nucleic acid sequences are generally performed, in the presence of appropriate primers, using thermocyclers. However, the time requested to amplify molecular targets and the cost of the thermocycler machines could impair the use of these methods in routine diagnostics. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technique allows rapid (short-term incubation of sample and primers in an enzymatic mixture) and simple (isothermal) amplification of molecular targets. RPA protocol requires only basic molecular steps such as extraction procedures and agarose gel electrophoresis. Thus, RPA can be considered as an interesting alternative to standard molecular-based diagnostic tools. In this paper, the complete procedures to set up an RPA assay, applied to detection of RNA (Potato virus Y, Potyvirus) and DNA (Wheat dwarf virus, Mastrevirus) viruses, are described. The proposed procedure allows developing species- or subspecies-specific detection assay. PMID:25981257

  17. Comparison of Two Multilocus Sequence Based Genotyping Schemes for Leptospira Species

    PubMed Central

    Boonsilp, Siriphan; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Nalam, Kishore; Spratt, Brian G.; Aanensen, David M.; Smythe, Lee D.; Ahmed, Niyaz; Feil, Edward J.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Several sequence based genotyping schemes have been developed for Leptospira spp. The objective of this study was to genotype a collection of clinical and reference isolates using the two most commonly used schemes and compare and contrast the results. Methods and Findings A total of 48 isolates consisting of L. interrogans (n = 40) and L. kirschneri (n = 8) were typed by the 7 locus MLST scheme described by Thaipadungpanit et al., and the 6 locus genotyping scheme described by Ahmed et al., (termed 7L and 6L, respectively). Two L. interrogans isolates were not typed using 6L because of a deletion of three nucleotides in lipL32. The remaining 46 isolates were resolved into 21 sequence types (STs) by 7L, and 30 genotypes by 6L. Overall nucleotide diversity (based on concatenated sequence) was 3.6% and 2.3% for 7L and 6L, respectively. The D value (discriminatory ability) of 7L and 6L were comparable, i.e. 92.0 (95% CI 87.5–96.5) vs. 93.5 (95% CI 88.6–98.4). The dN/dS ratios calculated for each locus indicated that none were under positive selection. Neighbor joining trees were reconstructed based on the concatenated sequences for each scheme. Both trees showed two distinct groups corresponding to L. interrogans and L. kirschneri, and both identified two clones containing 10 and 7 clinical isolates, respectively. There were six instances in which 6L split single STs as defined by 7L into closely related clusters. We noted two discrepancies between the trees in which the genetic relatedness between two pairs of strains were more closely related by 7L than by 6L. Conclusions This genetic analysis indicates that the two schemes are comparable. We discuss their practical advantages and disadvantages. PMID:22087342

  18. A new trilocus sequence-based multiplex-PCR to detect major Acinetobacter baumannii clones.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natacha; Picão, Renata Cristina; Cerqueira-Alves, Morgana; Uehara, Aline; Barbosa, Lívia Carvalho; Riley, Lee W; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-08-01

    A collection of 163 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates detected in a large Brazilian hospital, was potentially related with the dissemination of four clonal complexes (CC): 113/79, 103/15, 109/1 and 110/25, defined by University of Oxford/Institut Pasteur multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. The urge of a simple multiplex-PCR scheme to specify these clones has motivated the present study. The established trilocus sequence-based typing (3LST, for ompA, csuE and blaOXA-51-like genes) multiplex-PCR rapidly identifies international clones I (CC109/1), II (CC118/2) and III (CC187/3). Thus, the system detects only one (CC109/1) out of four main CC in Brazil. We aimed to develop an alternative multiplex-PCR scheme to detect these clones, known to be present additionally in Africa, Asia, Europe, USA and South America. MLST, performed in the present study to complement typing our whole collection of isolates, confirmed that all isolates belonged to the same four CC detected previously. When typed by 3LST-based multiplex-PCR, only 12% of the 163 isolates were classified into groups. By comparative sequence analysis of ompA, csuE and blaOXA-51-like genes, a set of eight primers was designed for an alternative multiplex-PCR to distinguish the five CC 113/79, 103/15, 109/1, 110/25 and 118/2. Study isolates and one CC118/2 isolate were blind-tested with the new alternative PCR scheme; all were correctly clustered in groups of the corresponding CC. The new multiplex-PCR, with the advantage of fitting in a single reaction, detects five leading A. baumannii clones and could help preventing the spread in healthcare settings.

  19. Resolution of Ambiguous HLA Genotyping in Korean by Multi-Group-Specific Sequence-Based Typing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongjung; Yoon, Cha Eun; Kwon, Oh-Joong; Kim, Yu-Seun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a multi-group-specific sequence-based typing (SBT) method for resolving ambiguous results from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping. Materials and Methods A total of 50 samples that showed ambiguous genotypes for at least two HLA loci from HLA-A, -B, -C and -DRB1 by the conventional SBT assay were evaluated using a new SBT test, the AVITA plus assay. The most likely HLA genotypes for the respective samples considering allele frequencies in Korean were concordant between the AVITA and conventional SBT assays. Results An average of 3.3 loci among the HLA-A, -B, -C and -DRB1 loci per sample gave results with two or more possible allele combinations with the conventional SBT, and 48 (96.0%) out of 50 showed reduced numbers of possible genotypes for at least one HLA locus with the AVITA. A total of 41, 43, 42, and 38 cases among the 50 samples showed ambiguous results for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 typing by the conventional SBT, respectively. The average numbers of possible allele combinations for the respective four HLA loci were 8.2, 6.7, 5.9, and 3.2, and they were reduced to 1.5, 2.2, 4.4, and 1.8, respectively, by the AVITA. Ambiguity was resolved by the AVITA in 33 (80.5%), 31 (72.1%), 17 (40.5%) and 28 (73.7%) samples among the ambiguous cases from the conventional SBT for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 typing, respectively. Conclusion The multi-group-specific SBT method considerably reduced the number of ambiguous results, and thus may be useful for accurate HLA typing in clinical laboratories. PMID:24954331

  20. Molecular basis for specificity in the druggable kinome: sequence-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianping; Zhang, Xi

    2007-01-01

    Motivation Rational design of kinase inhibitors remains a challenge partly because there is no clear delineation of the molecular features that direct the pharmacological impact towards clinically relevant targets. Standard factors governing ligand affinity, such as potential for intermolecular hydrophobic interactions or for intermolecular hydrogen bonding do not provide good markers to assess cross reactivity. Thus, a core question in the informatics of drug design is what type of molecular similarity among targets promotes promiscuity and what type of molecular difference governs specificity. This work answers the question for a sizable screened sample of the human pharmacokinome including targets with unreported structure. Results We show that drug design aimed at promoting pairwise interactions between ligand and kinase target actually fosters promiscuity because of the high conservation of the partner groups on or around the ATP-binding site of the kinase. Alternatively, we focus on a structural marker that may be reliably determined from sequence and measures dehydration propensities mostly localized on the loopy regions of kinases. Based on this marker, we construct a sequence-based kinase classifier that enables the accurate prediction of pharmacological differences. Our indicator is a micro-environmental descriptor that quantifies the propensity for water exclusion around preformed polar pairs. The results suggest that targeting polar dehydration patterns heralds a new generation of drugs that enable a tighter control of specificity than designs aimed at promoting ligand–kinase pairwise interactions. Availability The predictor of polar hot spots for dehydration propensity, or solvent-accessible hydrogen bonds in soluble proteins, named YAPView, may be freely downloaded from the University of Chicago website http://protlib.uchicago.edu/dloads.html PMID:17255140

  1. Frequency of HLA-A alleles in the Syrian population genotyped by sequence-based typing.

    PubMed

    Madania, A; Ghoury, I; Al-Ashkar, W; Nweder, S; Zarzour, H

    2014-10-01

    HLA-A molecules are highly polymorphic. Their accurate typing at a high-resolution level is crucial for successful organ, bone marrow and cord blood transplantation. Furthermore, several HLA alleles have been involved in susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, allergies, cancers and inflammations. In order to determine common HLA-A alleles in Syria and their frequencies, sequence-based typing (SBT) was used to genotype HLA-A alleles at high resolution (four digit level) among one hundred and thirty randomly selected Syrian individuals. Exons 2, 3 and 4 of the HLA-A gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sbt-engine software was used for allele assignment. Ambiguities were solved using group-specific sequencing primers (GSSPs). We could identify 32 different HLA-A alleles which were divided into 3 groups: high frequency (approximately 10%, A*01:01; A*24:02; A*03:01; A*02:01), moderate frequency (approximately 3%, such as A*02:05, A*31:01 and A*33:01), and low frequency (approximately 1%, such as A*02:11, A*29:01, A*02:02 and A*36:01). Homozygosity rate was higher than expected (11.5% vs. 7.15%). For high frequency alleles, our results show similarity to neighbouring countries. However, 15 alleles (such as A*02:04, A*02:06, A*02:11 and A*02:17) found in our cohort in low frequencies were never reported in some or all neighbouring countries. This is the first report on HLA-A allele frequencies in Syria. In spite of the relatively low number of tested subjects, our results revealed a high degree of diversity, with 32 different alleles, reflecting the high ethnic heterogeneity of the Syrian population. The identification of alleles rarely or never reported in neighbouring countries indicates a higher genetic diversity in Syria.

  2. MICA polymorphism in a population from north Morocco, Metalsa Berbers, using sequence-based typing.

    PubMed

    Piancatelli, Daniela; Del Beato, Tiziana; Oumhani, Khadija; El Aouad, Rajae; Adorno, Domenico

    2005-08-01

    The MICA gene encodes a family of nonclassical major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Data on MICA polymorphism in different populations are still limited. In the present study, MICA allele frequencies (af) were assessed in 82 unrelated healthy individuals from a Moroccan Berber population named Metalsa (ME) by means of sequence-based typing of exons 2, 3, 4, and 5. In consideration of the linkage disequilibrium existing between MICA and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles, MICA/HLA-B, MICA/HLA-Cw, and MICA/HLA-A haplotype frequencies (hf) were estimated. A wide allelic distribution including 16 different MICA alleles was found in ME. The most common MICA alleles were MICA*00801 (af = 0.268), *004 (0.232), *00902 (0.140), *00901 (0.085), and *00901 (0.073). The most common MICA/HLA-B haplotypes were MICA*004-B*4403 and MICA*009-B*50 (hf = 0.113 for both these haplotypes). Some known MICA and HLA-B associations were confirmed in this population. Noteworthy was the high frequency of MICA*009 (af = 0.226); the high frequency of B*50 found in ME (af = 0.114) permitted us to evidence the associations of MICA*00902 with B*5001 (hf = 0.068) or *5002 (hf = 0.045), whereas MICA*00901 was mainly associated with B*5101 (hf = 0.038), which corresponds to the previously described association MICA*009/A6-HLA-B*51. This study extends the previous knowledge on MICA polymorphism to a North African white population and may have implications for disease associations and transplantation.

  3. SEQMINER: An R-Package to Facilitate the Functional Interpretation of Sequence-Based Associations.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaowei; Liu, Dajiang J

    2015-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enabled the study of a comprehensive catalogue of genetic variants for their impact on various complex diseases. Numerous consortia studies of complex traits have publically released their summary association statistics, which have become an invaluable resource for learning the underlying biology, understanding the genetic architecture, and guiding clinical translations. There is great interest in the field in developing novel statistical methods for analyzing and interpreting results from these genotype-phenotype association studies. One popular platform for method development and data analysis is R. In order to enable these analyses in R, it is necessary to develop packages that can efficiently query files of summary association statistics, explore the linkage disequilibrium structure between variants, and integrate various bioinformatics databases. The complexity and scale of sequence datasets and databases pose significant computational challenges for method developers. To address these challenges and facilitate method development, we developed the R package SEQMINER for annotating and querying files of sequence variants (e.g., VCF/BCF files) and summary association statistics (e.g., METAL/RAREMETAL files), and for integrating bioinformatics databases. SEQMINER provides an infrastructure where novel methods can be distributed and applied to analyzing sequence datasets in practice. We illustrate the performance of SEQMINER using datasets from the 1000 Genomes Project. We show that SEQMINER is highly efficient and easy to use. It will greatly accelerate the process of applying statistical innovations to analyze and interpret sequence-based associations. The R package, its source code and documentations are available from http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/seqminer and http://seqminer.genomic.codes/. PMID:26394715

  4. SEQMINER: An R-Package to Facilitate the Functional Interpretation of Sequence-Based Associations.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaowei; Liu, Dajiang J

    2015-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enabled the study of a comprehensive catalogue of genetic variants for their impact on various complex diseases. Numerous consortia studies of complex traits have publically released their summary association statistics, which have become an invaluable resource for learning the underlying biology, understanding the genetic architecture, and guiding clinical translations. There is great interest in the field in developing novel statistical methods for analyzing and interpreting results from these genotype-phenotype association studies. One popular platform for method development and data analysis is R. In order to enable these analyses in R, it is necessary to develop packages that can efficiently query files of summary association statistics, explore the linkage disequilibrium structure between variants, and integrate various bioinformatics databases. The complexity and scale of sequence datasets and databases pose significant computational challenges for method developers. To address these challenges and facilitate method development, we developed the R package SEQMINER for annotating and querying files of sequence variants (e.g., VCF/BCF files) and summary association statistics (e.g., METAL/RAREMETAL files), and for integrating bioinformatics databases. SEQMINER provides an infrastructure where novel methods can be distributed and applied to analyzing sequence datasets in practice. We illustrate the performance of SEQMINER using datasets from the 1000 Genomes Project. We show that SEQMINER is highly efficient and easy to use. It will greatly accelerate the process of applying statistical innovations to analyze and interpret sequence-based associations. The R package, its source code and documentations are available from http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/seqminer and http://seqminer.genomic.codes/.

  5. LncDisease: a sequence based bioinformatics tool for predicting lncRNA-disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junyi; Ma, Ruixia; Ma, Wei; Chen, Ji; Yang, Jichun; Xi, Yaguang; Cui, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    LncRNAs represent a large class of noncoding RNA molecules that have important functions and play key roles in a variety of human diseases. There is an urgent need to develop bioinformatics tools as to gain insight into lncRNAs. This study developed a sequence-based bioinformatics method, LncDisease, to predict the lncRNA-disease associations based on the crosstalk between lncRNAs and miRNAs. Using LncDisease, we predicted the lncRNAs associated with breast cancer and hypertension. The breast-cancer-associated lncRNAs were studied in two breast tumor cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The qRT-PCR results showed that 11 (91.7%) of the 12 predicted lncRNAs could be validated in both breast cancer cell lines. The hypertension-associated lncRNAs were further evaluated in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated with angiotensin II (Ang II). The qRT-PCR results showed that 3 (75.0%) of the 4 predicted lncRNAs could be validated in Ang II-treated human VSMCs. In addition, we predicted 6 diseases associated with the lncRNA GAS5 and validated 4 (66.7%) of them by literature mining. These results greatly support the specificity and efficacy of LncDisease in the study of lncRNAs in human diseases. The LncDisease software is freely available on the Software Page: http://www.cuilab.cn/. PMID:26887819

  6. Electricity-free amplification and detection for molecular point-of-care diagnosis of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jered; Osborn, Jennifer L; Lillis, Lorraine; Hawkins, Kenneth; Guelig, Dylan; Price, Will; Johns, Rachel; Ebels, Kelly; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard; LaBarre, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, the lack of decentralized molecular diagnostic testing and sparse access to centralized medical facilities can present a critical barrier to timely diagnosis, treatment, and subsequent control and elimination of infectious diseases. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, including reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), are well-suited for decentralized point-of-care molecular testing in minimal infrastructure laboratories since they significantly reduce the complexity of equipment and power requirements. Despite reduced complexity, however, there is still a need for a constant heat source to enable isothermal nucleic acid amplification. This requirement poses significant challenges for laboratories in developing countries where electricity is often unreliable or unavailable. To address this need, we previously developed a low-cost, electricity-free heater using an exothermic reaction thermally coupled with a phase change material. This heater achieved acceptable performance, but exhibited considerable variability. Furthermore, as an enabling technology, the heater was an incomplete diagnostic solution. Here we describe a more precise, affordable, and robust heater design with thermal standard deviation <0.5°C at operating temperature, a cost of approximately US$.06 per test for heater reaction materials, and an ambient temperature operating range from 16°C to 30°C. We also pair the heater with nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF)-detection for a visual readout. To further illustrate the utility of the electricity-free heater and NALF-detection platform, we demonstrate sensitive and repeatable detection of HIV-1 with a ß-actin positive internal amplification control from processed sample to result in less than 80 minutes. Together, these elements are building blocks for an electricity-free platform capable of isothermal amplification and detection of a variety of pathogens.

  7. Electricity-Free Amplification and Detection for Molecular Point-of-Care Diagnosis of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Jered; Osborn, Jennifer L.; Lillis, Lorraine; Hawkins, Kenneth; Guelig, Dylan; Price, Will; Johns, Rachel; Ebels, Kelly; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard; LaBarre, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, the lack of decentralized molecular diagnostic testing and sparse access to centralized medical facilities can present a critical barrier to timely diagnosis, treatment, and subsequent control and elimination of infectious diseases. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, including reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), are well-suited for decentralized point-of-care molecular testing in minimal infrastructure laboratories since they significantly reduce the complexity of equipment and power requirements. Despite reduced complexity, however, there is still a need for a constant heat source to enable isothermal nucleic acid amplification. This requirement poses significant challenges for laboratories in developing countries where electricity is often unreliable or unavailable. To address this need, we previously developed a low-cost, electricity-free heater using an exothermic reaction thermally coupled with a phase change material. This heater achieved acceptable performance, but exhibited considerable variability. Furthermore, as an enabling technology, the heater was an incomplete diagnostic solution. Here we describe a more precise, affordable, and robust heater design with thermal standard deviation <0.5°C at operating temperature, a cost of approximately US$.06 per test for heater reaction materials, and an ambient temperature operating range from 16°C to 30°C. We also pair the heater with nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF)-detection for a visual readout. To further illustrate the utility of the electricity-free heater and NALF-detection platform, we demonstrate sensitive and repeatable detection of HIV-1 with a ß-actin positive internal amplification control from processed sample to result in less than 80 minutes. Together, these elements are building blocks for an electricity-free platform capable of isothermal amplification and detection of a variety of pathogens. PMID:25426953

  8. Multiplex Strand Invasion Based Amplification (mSIBA) assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Eboigbodin, Kevin E; Hoser, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests have become a common method for diagnosis of STIs due to their improved sensitivity over immunoassays and traditional culture-based methods. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because they do not require sophisticated instruments needed for thermal cycling of PCR. We recently reported a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, Strand Invasion-Based Amplification (SIBA), which exhibited high analytical sensitivity and specificity for amplification of DNA. However, because the reactions were detected using an intercalating dye, this method was only suitable for amplifying a single genomic target. Here, we report the development of multiplexed SIBA (mSIBA) that allows simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and an internal control in the same reaction tube. SIBA is compatible with probes, allowing the detection of multiple DNA targets in the same reaction tube. The IC was developed to assess the quality of the isolated DNA and the integrity of the enzyme system, as well as to test oligonucleotides. The mSIBA assay retained high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CT and NG. The development of mSIBA enables rapid screening for CT and NG within point-of-care or central laboratory settings. PMID:26837460

  9. Post-Fragmentation Whole Genome Amplification-Based Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benardini, James; LaDuc, Myron T.; Langmore, John

    2011-01-01

    This innovation is derived from a proprietary amplification scheme that is based upon random fragmentation of the genome into a series of short, overlapping templates. The resulting shorter DNA strands (<400 bp) constitute a library of DNA fragments with defined 3 and 5 termini. Specific primers to these termini are then used to isothermally amplify this library into potentially unlimited quantities that can be used immediately for multiple downstream applications including gel eletrophoresis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), comparative genomic hybridization microarray, SNP analysis, and sequencing. The standard reaction can be performed with minimal hands-on time, and can produce amplified DNA in as little as three hours. Post-fragmentation whole genome amplification-based technology provides a robust and accurate method of amplifying femtogram levels of starting material into microgram yields with no detectable allele bias. The amplified DNA also facilitates the preservation of samples (spacecraft samples) by amplifying scarce amounts of template DNA into microgram concentrations in just a few hours. Based on further optimization of this technology, this could be a feasible technology to use in sample preservation for potential future sample return missions. The research and technology development described here can be pivotal in dealing with backward/forward biological contamination from planetary missions. Such efforts rely heavily on an increasing understanding of the burden and diversity of microorganisms present on spacecraft surfaces throughout assembly and testing. The development and implementation of these technologies could significantly improve the comprehensiveness and resolving power of spacecraft-associated microbial population censuses, and are important to the continued evolution and advancement of planetary protection capabilities. Current molecular procedures for assaying spacecraft-associated microbial burden and diversity have

  10. AFB (Acid-Fast Bacillus) Smear and Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mycobacteria Smear; Mycobacteria Culture; TB NAAT Formal name: Acid-Fast Bacillus Smear and Culture and Sensitivity; Mycobacteria tuberculosis Nucleic Acid Amplification Test Related tests: TB Screening Tests ; Bacterial ...

  11. Flux variability scanning based on enforced objective flux for identifying gene amplification targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to reduce time and efforts to develop microbial strains with better capability of producing desired bioproducts, genome-scale metabolic simulations have proven useful in identifying gene knockout and amplification targets. Constraints-based flux analysis has successfully been employed for such simulation, but is limited in its ability to properly describe the complex nature of biological systems. Gene knockout simulations are relatively straightforward to implement, simply by constraining the flux values of the target reaction to zero, but the identification of reliable gene amplification targets is rather difficult. Here, we report a new algorithm which incorporates physiological data into a model to improve the model’s prediction capabilities and to capitalize on the relationships between genes and metabolic fluxes. Results We developed an algorithm, flux variability scanning based on enforced objective flux (FVSEOF) with grouping reaction (GR) constraints, in an effort to identify gene amplification targets by considering reactions that co-carry flux values based on physiological omics data via “GR constraints”. This method scans changes in the variabilities of metabolic fluxes in response to an artificially enforced objective flux of product formation. The gene amplification targets predicted using this method were validated by comparing the predicted effects with the previous experimental results obtained for the production of shikimic acid and putrescine in Escherichia coli. Moreover, new gene amplification targets for further enhancing putrescine production were validated through experiments involving the overexpression of each identified targeted gene under condition-controlled batch cultivation. Conclusions FVSEOF with GR constraints allows identification of gene amplification targets for metabolic engineering of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of desired bioproducts. The algorithm was validated through the

  12. A sequence-based hybrid predictor for identifying conformationally ambivalent regions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteins are dynamic macromolecules which may undergo conformational transitions upon changes in environment. As it has been observed in laboratories that protein flexibility is correlated to essential biological functions, scientists have been designing various types of predictors for identifying structurally flexible regions in proteins. In this respect, there are two major categories of predictors. One category of predictors attempts to identify conformationally flexible regions through analysis of protein tertiary structures. Another category of predictors works completely based on analysis of the polypeptide sequences. As the availability of protein tertiary structures is generally limited, the design of predictors that work completely based on sequence information is crucial for advances of molecular biology research. Results In this article, we propose a novel approach to design a sequence-based predictor for identifying conformationally ambivalent regions in proteins. The novelty in the design stems from incorporating two classifiers based on two distinctive supervised learning algorithms that provide complementary prediction powers. Experimental results show that the overall performance delivered by the hybrid predictor proposed in this article is superior to the performance delivered by the existing predictors. Furthermore, the case study presented in this article demonstrates that the proposed hybrid predictor is capable of providing the biologists with valuable clues about the functional sites in a protein chain. The proposed hybrid predictor provides the users with two optional modes, namely, the high-sensitivity mode and the high-specificity mode. The experimental results with an independent testing data set show that the proposed hybrid predictor is capable of delivering sensitivity of 0.710 and specificity of 0.608 under the high-sensitivity mode, while delivering sensitivity of 0.451 and specificity of 0.787 under the high

  13. Acceleration amplifications in nif structures subjected to earthquake base motions

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, D

    1999-11-29

    NIF technical staff have questioned the possibility of obtaining acceleration amplifications (i.e. amplification of the ground acceleration values) in a structure which are significantly higher than the acceleration amplification exhibited across the period range in the input response spectrum. This note utilizes a simple example to illustrate that the acceleration amplification resulting from the dynamic response of a structural system can indeed be significantly higher than the amplifications indicated in the response spectrum, and that the GEMINI program is computing the appropriate acceleration levels for a simple MDOF system.

  14. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach. PMID:19736969

  15. Amplification effects in optomechanics via weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Tao; Song, He-Shan

    2014-07-01

    We revisit the scheme of single-photon weak-coupling optomechanics using postselection, proposed by Pepper, Ghobadi, Jeffrey, Simon, and Bouwmeester [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 023601 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.023601], by analyzing the exact solution of the dynamical evolution. Positive and negative amplification effects of the displacement of the mirror's position can be generated when the Kerr phase is considered. This effect occurs when the postselected state of the photon is orthogonal to the initial state, which cannot be explained by the usual weak measurement results. The amplification effect can be further modulated by a phase shifter, and the maximal displacement state can appear within a short evolution time.

  16. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  17. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  18. Quantification of HIV-1 DNA using real-time recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-06-17

    Although recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) has many advantages for the detection of pathogenic nucleic acids in point-of-care applications, RPA has not yet been implemented to quantify sample concentration using a standard curve. Here, we describe a real-time RPA assay with an internal positive control and an algorithm that analyzes real-time fluorescence data to quantify HIV-1 DNA. We show that DNA concentration and the onset of detectable amplification are correlated by an exponential standard curve. In a set of experiments in which the standard curve and algorithm were used to analyze and quantify additional DNA samples, the algorithm predicted an average concentration within 1 order of magnitude of the correct concentration for all HIV-1 DNA concentrations tested. These results suggest that quantitative RPA (qRPA) may serve as a powerful tool for quantifying nucleic acids and may be adapted for use in single-sample point-of-care diagnostic systems.

  19. Quantum amplification effect in a horizon fluctuation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Mohammad H.

    2010-05-15

    The appearance of a few unevenly spaced bright flashes of light on top of Hawking radiation is the sign of the amplification effect in black hole horizon fluctuations. Previous studies on this problem suffer from the lack of considering all emitted photons in the theoretical spectroscopy of these fluctuations. In this paper, we include all of the physical transition weights and present a consistent intensity formula. This modifies a black hole radiation pattern.

  20. Host range, amplification and arboviral disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Weaver, S C

    2005-01-01

    Etiologic agents of arboviral diseases are primarily zoonotic pathogens that are maintained in nature in cycles involving arthropod transmission among a variety of susceptible reservoir hosts. In the simplest form of human exposure, spillover occurs from the enzootic cycle when humans enter zoonotic foci and/or enzootic amplification increases circulation near humans. Examples include Eastern (EEEV) and Western equine encephalitis viruses (WEEV), as well as West Nile (WNV), St. Louis encephalitis (SLEV) and Yellow fever viruses. Spillover can involve direct transmission to humans by primary enzootic vectors (e.g. WNV, SLEV and WEEV) and/or bridge vectors with more catholic feeding preferences that include humans (e.g. EEEV). Some viruses, such as Rift Valley fever, Japanese encephalitis and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV) undergo secondary amplification involving replication in livestock animals, resulting in greater levels of spillover to humans in rural settings. In the case of VEEV, secondary amplification involves equines and requires adaptive mutations in enzootic strains that allow for efficient viremia production. Two of the most important human arboviral pathogens, Yellow fever and dengue viruses (DENV), have gone one step further and adopted humans as their amplification hosts, allowing for urban disease. The ancestral forms of DENV, sylvatic viruses transmitted among nonhuman primate reservoir hosts by arboreal mosquitoes, adapted to efficiently infect the urban mosquito vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus during the past few thousand years as civilizations arose. Comparative studies of the sylvatic and urban forms of DENV may elucidate the evolution of arboviral virulence and the prospects for DENV eradication should effective vaccines be implemented.

  1. Chirped-pulse amplification with narrowband pulses.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Messerly, M J; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate a compact hyperdispersion stretcher and compressor pair that permit chirped-pulse amplification in Nd:YAG. We generate 750 mJ, 0.2 nm FWHM, 10 Hz pulses recompressed to an 8 ps near-transform-limited duration. The dispersion-matched pulse compressor and stretcher impart a chirp of 7300 ps/nm, in a 3 m x 1 m footprint.

  2. Chirped-pulse amplification with narrowband pulses.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Messerly, M J; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrate a compact hyperdispersion stretcher and compressor pair that permit chirped-pulse amplification in Nd:YAG. We generate 750 mJ, 0.2 nm FWHM, 10 Hz pulses recompressed to an 8 ps near-transform-limited duration. The dispersion-matched pulse compressor and stretcher impart a chirp of 7300 ps/nm, in a 3 m x 1 m footprint. PMID:20634869

  3. Optically Controlled Signal Amplification for DNA Computation.

    PubMed

    Prokup, Alexander; Hemphill, James; Liu, Qingyang; Deiters, Alexander

    2015-10-16

    The hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and fuel-catalyst cycles have been applied to address the problem of signal amplification in DNA-based computation circuits. While they function efficiently, these signal amplifiers cannot be switched ON or OFF quickly and noninvasively. To overcome these limitations, a light-activated initiator strand for the HCR, which enabled fast optical OFF → ON switching, was developed. Similarly, when a light-activated version of the catalyst strand or the inhibitor strand of a fuel-catalyst cycle was applied, the cycle could be optically switched from OFF → ON or ON → OFF, respectively. To move the capabilities of these devices beyond solution-based operations, the components were embedded in agarose gels. Irradiation with customizable light patterns and at different time points demonstrated both spatial and temporal control. The addition of a translator gate enabled a spatially activated signal to travel along a predefined path, akin to a chemical wire. Overall, the addition of small light-cleavable photocaging groups to DNA signal amplification circuits enabled conditional control as well as fast photocontrol of signal amplification. PMID:25621535

  4. Thermoelectric amplification of phonons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dompreh, K. A.; Mensah, N. G.; Mensah, S. Y.; Fosuhene, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Amplification of acoustic in-plane phonons due to an external temperature gradient (∇T) in single-layer graphene (SLG) was studied theoretically. The threshold temperature gradient (∇ T ) 0 g and the threshold voltage (V T ) 0 g in SLG were evaluated. For T = 77 K , the calculated value for (∇ T ) 0 g = 746.8 K / cm and (V T ) 0 g = 6.6 mV . The calculation was done in the hypersound regime. Further, the dependence of the normalized amplification ( Γ / Γ 0 ) on the frequency ω q and ∇ T / T were evaluated numerically and presented graphically. The calculated threshold temperature gradient (V T ) 0 g for SLG was higher than that obtained for homogeneous semiconductors (n-InSb) (∇ T ) 0 hom ≈ 10 3 K / cm , superlattices (∇ T ) 0 S L ≈ 384 K / cm , and cylindrical quantum wire (∇ T ) 0 c q w ≈ 10 2 K / cm . This makes SLG a much better material for thermoelectric phonon amplification.

  5. A Sweet Spot for Molecular Diagnostics: Coupling Isothermal Amplification and Strand Exchange Circuits to Glucometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yan; Hughes, Randall A.; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.; Li, Bingling

    2015-06-01

    Strand exchange nucleic acid circuitry can be used to transduce isothermal nucleic acid amplification products into signals that can be readable on an off-the-shelf glucometer. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is limited by the accumulation of non-specific products, but nucleic acid circuitry can be used to probe and distinguish specific amplicons. By combining this high temperature isothermal amplification method with a thermostable invertase, we can directly transduce Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Zaire Ebolavirus templates into glucose signals, with a sensitivity as low as 20-100 copies/μl, equating to atto-molar (or low zepto-mole). Virus from cell lysates and synthetic templates could be readily amplified and detected even in sputum or saliva. An OR gate that coordinately triggered on viral amplicons further guaranteed fail-safe virus detection. The method describes has potential for accelerating point-of-care applications, in that biological samples could be applied to a transducer that would then directly interface with an off-the-shelf, approved medical device.

  6. A Sweet Spot for Molecular Diagnostics: Coupling Isothermal Amplification and Strand Exchange Circuits to Glucometers

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yan; Hughes, Randall A.; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.; Li, Bingling

    2015-01-01

    Strand exchange nucleic acid circuitry can be used to transduce isothermal nucleic acid amplification products into signals that can be readable on an off-the-shelf glucometer. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is limited by the accumulation of non-specific products, but nucleic acid circuitry can be used to probe and distinguish specific amplicons. By combining this high temperature isothermal amplification method with a thermostable invertase, we can directly transduce Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Zaire Ebolavirus templates into glucose signals, with a sensitivity as low as 20–100 copies/μl, equating to atto-molar (or low zepto-mole). Virus from cell lysates and synthetic templates could be readily amplified and detected even in sputum or saliva. An OR gate that coordinately triggered on viral amplicons further guaranteed fail-safe virus detection. The method describes has potential for accelerating point-of-care applications, in that biological samples could be applied to a transducer that would then directly interface with an off-the-shelf, approved medical device. PMID:26050646

  7. Gene amplification system based on double rolling-circle replication as a model for oncogene-type amplification.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takaaki; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Gene amplification contributes to a variety of biological phenomena, including malignant progression and drug resistance. However, details of the molecular mechanisms remain to be determined. Here, we have developed a gene amplification system in yeast and mammalian cells that is based on double rolling-circle replication (DRCR). Cre-lox system is used to efficiently induce DRCR utilizing a recombinational process coupled with replication. This system shows distinctive features seen in amplification of oncogenes and drug-resistance genes: (i) intra- and extrachromosomal amplification, (ii) intensive chromosome rearrangement and (iii) scattered-type amplification resembling those seen in cancer cells. This system can serve as a model for amplification of oncogenes and drug-resistance genes, and improve amplification systems used for making pharmaceutical proteins in mammalian cells.

  8. Ultrasensitive Visual Detection of HIV DNA Biomarkers via a Multi-amplification Nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Long, Yuyin; Zhou, Cuisong; Wang, Congmin; Cai, Honglian; Yin, Cuiyun; Yang, Qiufang; Xiao, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Methodologies to detect disease biomarkers at ultralow concentrations can potentially improve the standard of living. A facile and label-free multi-amplification strategy is proposed for the ultrasensitive visual detection of HIV DNA biomarkers in real physiological media. This multi-amplification strategy not only exhibits a signficantly low detection limit down to 4.8 pM but also provides a label-free, cost-effective and facile technique for visualizing a few molecules of nucleic acid analyte with the naked eye. Importantly, the biosensor is capable of discriminating single-based mismatch lower than 5.0 nM in human serum samples. Moreover, the visual sensing platform exhibits excellent specificity, acceptable reusability and a long-term stability. All these advantages could be attributed to the nanofibrous sensing platform that 1) has a high surface-area-to-volume provided by electrospun nanofibrous membrane, and 2) combines glucose oxidase (GOx) biocatalysis, DNAzyme-catalyzed colorimetric reaction and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) recycling amplification together. This multi-amplification nanoplatform promises label-free and visual single-based mismatch DNA monitoring with high sensitivity and specificity, suggesting wide applications that range from virus detection to genetic disease diagnosis. PMID:27032385

  9. Chirality amplification and detection by tactoids of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-10-01

    Detection of chiral molecules requires amplification of chirality to measurable levels. Typically, amplification mechanisms are considered at the microscopic scales of individual molecules and their aggregates. Here we demonstrate chirality amplification and visualization of structural handedness in water solutions of organic molecules that extends over the scale of many micrometers. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) formed in water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. The nematic LCLC coexists with its isotropic counterpart, forming elongated tactoids; the spatial confinement causes a structural twist even when the material is nonchiral. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as the amino acid l-alanine and limonene transform the racemic array of left- and right-twisted tactoids into a homochiral set. The left and right chiral enantiomers are readily distinguished from each other as the induced structural handedness is visualized through a simple polarizing microscope observation. The effect is important for developing our understanding of chirality amplification mechanisms; it also might open up new possibilities in biosensing. PMID:26238525

  10. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10-18 mol l-1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  11. Ultrasensitive Visual Detection of HIV DNA Biomarkers via a Multi-amplification Nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Long, Yuyin; Zhou, Cuisong; Wang, Congmin; Cai, Honglian; Yin, Cuiyun; Yang, Qiufang; Xiao, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Methodologies to detect disease biomarkers at ultralow concentrations can potentially improve the standard of living. A facile and label-free multi-amplification strategy is proposed for the ultrasensitive visual detection of HIV DNA biomarkers in real physiological media. This multi-amplification strategy not only exhibits a signficantly low detection limit down to 4.8 pM but also provides a label-free, cost-effective and facile technique for visualizing a few molecules of nucleic acid analyte with the naked eye. Importantly, the biosensor is capable of discriminating single-based mismatch lower than 5.0 nM in human serum samples. Moreover, the visual sensing platform exhibits excellent specificity, acceptable reusability and a long-term stability. All these advantages could be attributed to the nanofibrous sensing platform that 1) has a high surface-area-to-volume provided by electrospun nanofibrous membrane, and 2) combines glucose oxidase (GOx) biocatalysis, DNAzyme-catalyzed colorimetric reaction and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) recycling amplification together. This multi-amplification nanoplatform promises label-free and visual single-based mismatch DNA monitoring with high sensitivity and specificity, suggesting wide applications that range from virus detection to genetic disease diagnosis.

  12. All Three Rows of Outer Hair Cells Are Required for Cochlear Amplification.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian auditory system, the three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs) located in the cochlea are thought to increase the displacement amplitude of the organ of Corti. This cochlear amplification is thought to contribute to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and sharp frequency selectivity of the hearing system. Recent studies have shown that traumatic stimuli, such as noise exposure and ototoxic acid, cause functional loss of OHCs in one, two, or all three rows. However, the degree of decrease in cochlear amplification caused by such functional losses remains unclear. In the present study, a finite element model of a cross section of the gerbil cochlea was constructed. Then, to determine effects of the functional losses of OHCs on the cochlear amplification, changes in the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) due to the functional losses of OHCs were calculated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM decreases significantly when a single row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification. PMID:26295049

  13. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-01

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10‑18 mol l‑1 for t-DNA has been achieved.

  14. Ultrasensitive Visual Detection of HIV DNA Biomarkers via a Multi-amplification Nanoplatform

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yuyin; Zhou, Cuisong; Wang, Congmin; Cai, Honglian; Yin, Cuiyun; Yang, Qiufang; Xiao, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Methodologies to detect disease biomarkers at ultralow concentrations can potentially improve the standard of living. A facile and label-free multi-amplification strategy is proposed for the ultrasensitive visual detection of HIV DNA biomarkers in real physiological media. This multi-amplification strategy not only exhibits a signficantly low detection limit down to 4.8 pM but also provides a label-free, cost-effective and facile technique for visualizing a few molecules of nucleic acid analyte with the naked eye. Importantly, the biosensor is capable of discriminating single-based mismatch lower than 5.0 nM in human serum samples. Moreover, the visual sensing platform exhibits excellent specificity, acceptable reusability and a long-term stability. All these advantages could be attributed to the nanofibrous sensing platform that 1) has a high surface-area-to-volume provided by electrospun nanofibrous membrane, and 2) combines glucose oxidase (GOx) biocatalysis, DNAzyme-catalyzed colorimetric reaction and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) recycling amplification together. This multi-amplification nanoplatform promises label-free and visual single-based mismatch DNA monitoring with high sensitivity and specificity, suggesting wide applications that range from virus detection to genetic disease diagnosis. PMID:27032385

  15. Ultrasensitive DNA detection based on two-step quantitative amplification on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mingliang; Liu, Xia; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, Guofu; Shui, Lingling

    2016-08-19

    Sensitive detection of a specific deoxyribo nucleic acid (DNA) sequence is important for biomedical applications. In this report, a two-step amplification strategy is developed based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to achieve ultrasensitive DNA fluorescence detection. The first level amplification is obtained from multiple binding sites on MNPs to achieve thousands of probe DNA molecules on one nanoparticle surface. The second level amplification is gained by enzymatic reaction to achieve fluorescence signal enhancement. MNPs functionalized by probe DNA (DNAp) are bound to target DNA (t-DNA) molecules with a ratio of 1:1 on a substrate with capture DNA (DNAc). After the MNPs with DNAp are released from the substrate, alkaline phosphatase (AP) is labelled to MNPs via hybridization reaction between DNAp on MNPs and detection DNAs (DNAd) with AP. The AP on MNPs catalyses non-fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) to fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) with high intensity. Finally, fluorescence intensity of the 4-MU is detected by a conventional fluorescence spectrophotometer. With this two-step amplification strategy, the limit of detection (LOD) of 2.8 × 10(-18) mol l(-1) for t-DNA has been achieved. PMID:27378514

  16. An isothermal amplification reactor with an integrated isolation membrane for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Geva, Eran; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Curtis, Kelly; Owen, S. Michele; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    A simple, point of care, inexpensive, disposable cassette for the detection of nucleic acids extracted from pathogens was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette utilizes a single reaction chamber for isothermal amplification of nucleic acids. The chamber is equipped with an integrated, flow-through, Flinders Technology Associates (Whatman FTA®) membrane for the isolation, concentration, and purification of DNA and/or RNA. The nucleic acids captured by the membrane are used directly as templates for amplification without elution, thus simplifying the cassette’s flow control. The FTA membrane also serves another critical role—enabling the removal of inhibitors that dramatically reduce detection sensitivity. Thermal control is provided with a thin film heater external to the cassette. The amplification process was monitored in real time with a portable, compact fluorescent reader. The utility of the integrated, single-chamber cassette was demonstrated by detecting the presence of HIV-1 in oral fluids. The HIV RNA was reverse transcribed and subjected to loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (LAMP). A detection limit of less than 10 HIV particles was demonstrated. The cassette is particularly suitable for resource poor regions, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply. The cassette can be readily modified to detect nucleic acids associated with other pathogens borne in saliva, urine, and other body fluids as well as in water and food. PMID:21455542

  17. Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Sano, Takeshi; Misasi, John; Hatch, Anson; Cantor, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

  18. On the role of temperature feedbacks for Arctic amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithan, Felix; Mauritsen, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    The amplification of global climate changes at the poles is a well-known feature of the climate system mentioned already by Arrhenius (1896). It has been linked to the surface-albedo feedback, changes in atmospheric and oceanic heat convergence, water vapour and cloud feedbacks and the albedo effect of black carbon on snow (Serreze and Barry, 2011). We here focus on the role of temperature feedbacks, which have received rather little attention in recent debates. The basic temperature feedback is the Planck feedback or the increase in the Earth's blackbody radiation due to a uniform temperature increase. Since the blackbody radiation scales with the fourth power of temperature, stronger warming is necessary in cold regions to balance a globally uniform radiative forcing. The second temperature feedback is caused by changes in the vertical atmospheric temperature structure: In the Tropics, deep convection leads to warming aloft being larger than at the surface, which causes a greater increase in outgoing longwave radiation compared a vertically uniform forcing and thus constitutes a negative feedback mechanism. In the Arctic, where warming is amplified at the surface, the lapse-rate feedback is positive (Wetherald and Manabe, 1975). We use CMIP5 model output and radiative Kernels to investigate the zonal distribution of temperature feedbacks. Arrhenius, S. (1896). On the influence of carbonic acid in the air upon the temperature of the ground Philos. Mag. J. Sci., 5, pp. 237-276 Serreze, M.C. and Barry, R.G. (2011) . Processes and impacts of Arctic amplification: A research synthesis, Global and Planetary Change, 77(1-2), pp. 85-96 Wetherald, R. and Manabe, S. (1975). The effects of changing the solar constant on the climate of a general circulation model. J. Atmos. Sci., 23 pp 2044-2059

  19. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnostics of Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Patel, Pranav; Faye, Oumar; Thaloengsok, Sasikanya; Heidenreich, Doris; Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Manopwisedjaroen, Khajohnpong; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Sall, Amadou A.; Hufert, Frank T.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 2.5 billion people are exposed to the risk of contracting dengue fever (DF). Early diagnosis of DF helps to diminish its burden on public health. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase amplification assays (RT-PCR) are the standard method for molecular detection of the dengue virus (DENV). Real-time RT-PCR analysis is not suitable for on-site screening since mobile devices are large, expensive, and complex. In this study, two RT-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assays were developed to detect DENV1-4. Methodology/Principal Findings Using two quantitative RNA molecular standards, the analytical sensitivity of a RT-RPA targeting the 3´non-translated region of DENV1-4 was found to range from 14 (DENV4) to 241 (DENV1-3) RNA molecules detected. The assay was specific and did not cross detect other Flaviviruses. The RT-RPA assay was tested in a mobile laboratory combining magnetic-bead based total nucleic acid extraction and a portable detection device in Kedougou (Senegal) and in Bangkok (Thailand). In Kedougou, the RT-RPA was operated at an ambient temperature of 38°C with auxiliary electricity tapped from a motor vehicle and yielded a clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98% (n=31) and 100% (n=23), respectively. While in the field trial in Bangkok, the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 72% (n=90) and 100%(n=41), respectively. Conclusions/Significance During the first 5 days of infection, the developed DENV1-4 RT-RPA assays constitute a suitable accurate and rapid assay for DENV diagnosis. Moreover, the use of a portable fluorescence-reading device broadens its application potential to the point-of-care for outbreak investigations. PMID:26075598

  20. A phaseguided passive batch microfluidic mixing chamber for isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Hakenberg, Sydney; Hügle, Matthias; Weidmann, Manfred; Hufert, Frank; Dame, Gregory; Urban, Gerald A

    2012-11-01

    With a view to developing a rapid pathogen detection system utilizing isothermal nucleic acid amplification, the necessary micro-mixing step is innovatively implemented on a chip. Passive laminar flow mixing of two 6.5 μl batches differing in viscosity is performed within a microfluidic chamber. This is achieved with a novel chip space-saving phaseguide design which allows, for the first time, the complete integration of a passive mixing structure into a target chamber. Sequential filling of batches prior to mixing is demonstrated. Simulation predicts a reduction of diffusive mixing time from hours down to one minute. A simple and low-cost fabrication method is used which combines dry film resist technology and direct wafer bonding. Finally, an isothermal nucleic acid detection assay is successfully implemented where fluorescence results are measured directly from the chip after a one minute mixing sequence. In combination with our previous work, this opens up the way towards a fully integrated pathogen detection system in a lab-on-a-chip format. PMID:22952055

  1. Electrochemical immunosensor with aptamer-based enzymatic amplification.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kejun; Kang, Yan; Zhao, Jing-Jin; Liu, Ya-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2008-07-01

    An electrochemical immunosensor is reported by using aptamer-based enzymatic amplification with immunoglobulin E (IgE) as the model analyte. In this method, the IgE antibody is covalently immobilized as the capture probe on the gold electrode via a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine. After the target is captured, the biotinylated anti-IgE aptamer is used as the detection probe. The specific interaction of streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase to the surface-bound biotinylated detection probe mediates a catalytic reaction of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate substrate to produce a reducing agent ascorbic acid. Then silver ions in the solution can be reduced, leading to the deposition of metallic silver on the electrode surface. The amount of deposited silver, which is determined by the amount of IgE target bound on the electrode surface, can be quantified using the stripping voltammetry. The results obtained demonstrated that the electrochemical immunosensor possesses high specificity and a wide dynamic range with a low detection limit that possibly arises from the combination of the highly specific aptamer and the highly sensitive stripping determination of enzymatically deposited silver.

  2. Highly Efficient Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Savtchenk, Regina; Alexeeva, Irina; Rohwer, Robert G.; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) provides faithful replication of mammalian prions in vitro and has numerous applications in prion research. However, the low efficiency of conversion of PrPC into PrPSc in PMCA limits the applicability of PMCA for many uses including structural studies of infectious prions. It also implies that only a small sub-fraction of PrPC may be available for conversion. Here we show that the yield, rate, and robustness of prion conversion and the sensitivity of prion detection are significantly improved by a simple modification of the PMCA format. Conducting PMCA reactions in the presence of Teflon beads (PMCAb) increased the conversion of PrPC into PrPSc from ∼10% to up to 100%. In PMCAb, a single 24-hour round consistently amplified PrPSc by 600-700-fold. Furthermore, the sensitivity of prion detection in one round (24 hours) increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Using serial PMCAb, a 1012-fold dilution of scrapie brain material could be amplified to the level detectible by Western blotting in 3 rounds (72 hours). The improvements in amplification efficiency were observed for the commonly used hamster 263K strain and for the synthetic strain SSLOW that otherwise amplifies poorly in PMCA. The increase in the amplification efficiency did not come at the expense of prion replication specificity. The current study demonstrates that poor conversion efficiencies observed previously have not been due to the scarcity of a sub-fraction of PrPC susceptible to conversion nor due to limited concentrations of essential cellular cofactors required for conversion. The new PMCAb format offers immediate practical benefits and opens new avenues for developing fast ultrasensitive assays and for producing abundant quantities of PrPSc in vitro. PMID:21347353

  3. Host suppression and bioinformatics for sequence-based characterization of unknown pathogens.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; Misra, Milind; Meagher, Robert J.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Kaiser, Julia N.

    2009-11-01

    Bioweapons and emerging infectious diseases pose formidable and growing threats to our national security. Rapid advances in biotechnology and the increasing efficiency of global transportation networks virtually guarantee that the United States will face potentially devastating infectious disease outbreaks caused by novel ('unknown') pathogens either intentionally or accidentally introduced into the population. Unfortunately, our nation's biodefense and public health infrastructure is primarily designed to handle previously characterized ('known') pathogens. While modern DNA assays can identify known pathogens quickly, identifying unknown pathogens currently depends upon slow, classical microbiological methods of isolation and culture that can take weeks to produce actionable information. In many scenarios that delay would be costly, in terms of casualties and economic damage; indeed, it can mean the difference between a manageable public health incident and a full-blown epidemic. To close this gap in our nation's biodefense capability, we will develop, validate, and optimize a system to extract nucleic acids from unknown pathogens present in clinical samples drawn from infected patients. This system will extract nucleic acids from a clinical sample, amplify pathogen and specific host response nucleic acid sequences. These sequences will then be suitable for ultra-high-throughput sequencing (UHTS) carried out by a third party. The data generated from UHTS will then be processed through a new data assimilation and Bioinformatic analysis pipeline that will allow us to characterize an unknown pathogen in hours to days instead of weeks to months. Our methods will require no a priori knowledge of the pathogen, and no isolation or culturing; therefore it will circumvent many of the major roadblocks confronting a clinical microbiologist or virologist when presented with an unknown or engineered pathogen.

  4. Virus testing by PCR and RT-PCR amplification in berry fruit.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Stuart; McGavin, Wendy; Tzanetakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Berry fruit crops are prone to infection by a wide range of viruses, with the list expanding every year, primarily because of the expansion of the crops to new geographic regions. Although some methods allow for virus detection in a nonspecific manner, the advent of cheap and effective nucleic acid sequencing technologies has allowed for the development of species-specific tests. This chapter describes methods for extraction of nucleic acids for molecular testing from a range of different berry fruit crops and lists oligonucleotide primers that have been developed for amplification of a large number of berry fruit viruses.

  5. Raman Amplification in Plasma: Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, John; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2009-01-22

    The impact of thermal effects on Raman amplification in plasma is investigated theoretically. It is shown that damping and the shift in plasma resonance at finite temperature can alter the evolution of the amplified pulse and lead to pulse compression which is not predicted by the cold plasma model. Although thermal effects can lead to a reduction in the efficiency of the interaction, this can be ameliorated by using a chirped pump. In this case thermal effects can be beneficial and suppress the development of the train of pulses that develops behind the amplified pulse, as observed in the cold plasma model.

  6. Internal entanglement amplification by external interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Uri; Huang Zhen; Kais, Sabre

    2007-07-15

    We propose a scheme to control the level of entanglement between two fixed spin-1/2 systems by interaction with a third particle. For specific designs, entanglement is shown to be 'pumped' into the system from the surroundings even when the spin-spin interaction within the system is small or nonexistent. The effect of the external particle on the system is introduced by including a dynamic spinor in the Hamiltonian. Controlled amplification of the internal entanglement to its maximum value is demonstrated. The possibility of entangling noninteracting spins in a stationary state is also demonstrated by coupling each one of them to a flying qubit in a quantum wire.

  7. SITE AMPLIFICATION OF EARTHQUAKE GROUND MOTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, Walter W.

    1986-01-01

    When analyzing the patterns of damage in an earthquake, physical parameters of the total earthquake-site-structure system are correlated with the damage. Soil-structure interaction, the cause of damage in many earthquakes, involves the frequency-dependent response of both the soil-rock column and the structure. The response of the soil-rock column (called site amplification) is controversial because soil has strain-dependent properties that affect the way the soil column filters the input body and surface seismic waves, modifying the amplitude and phase spectra and the duration of the surface ground motion.

  8. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  9. Whole Genome Amplification from Blood Spot Samples.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Karina Meden

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome amplification is an invaluable technique when working with DNA extracted from blood spots, as the DNA obtained from this source often is too limited for extensive genetic analysis. Two techniques that amplify the entire genome are common. Here, both are described with focus on the benefits and drawbacks of each system. However, in order to obtain the best possible WGA result the quality of input DNA extracted from the blood spot is essential, but also time consumption, flexibility in format and elution volume and price of the technology are factors influencing system choice. Here, three DNA extraction techniques are described and the above aspects are compared between the systems.

  10. Magnetic flux amplification by Lenz lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, J.; Pirota, K. R.; Teixeira, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Tailoring magnetic flux distribution is highly desirable in a wide range of applications such as magnetic sensors and biomedicine. In this paper we study the manipulation of induced currents in passive devices in order to engineer the distribution of magnetic flux intensity in a given region. We propose two different approaches, one based on especially designed wire loops (Lenz law) and the other based on solid conductive pieces (eddy currents). The gain of such devices is mainly determined by geometry giving perspective of high amplification. We consistently modeled, simulated, and executed the proposed devices. Doubled magnetic flux intensity is demonstrated experimentally for a moderate aspect ratio.

  11. Amplification of curvature perturbations in cyclic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Liu Zhiguo; Piao Yunsong

    2010-12-15

    We analytically and numerically show that through the cycles with nonsingular bounce, the amplitude of curvature perturbation on a large scale will be amplified and the power spectrum will redden. In some sense, this amplification will eventually destroy the homogeneity of the background, which will lead to the ultimate end of cycles of the global universe. We argue that for the model with increasing cycles, it might be possible that a fissiparous multiverse will emerge after one or several cycles, in which the cycles will continue only at corresponding local regions.

  12. Lidar measurements of backscatter amplification in a surface atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, Victor A.; Razenkov, Igor A.

    2015-11-01

    The results of long-term continuous measurements of the atmospheric backscattering amplification on an atmospheric surface path 2 km long with a two-channel micropulse lidar based on waveguide laser are presented. It is shown that the backscatter amplification coefficient has the pronounced diurnal behavior. In the day and night time, the atmospheric backscattering amplification is maximal and the amplification coefficient can exceed two. The amplification is low or absent in the morning and evening hours at the neutral temperature stratification in the atmospheric surface layer. The backscattering amplification coefficient increases with an increase of the structure constant of the refractive index of air, as well as with an increase of random wander of optical image of the probing laser beam spot at the distance 2 km from the lidar.

  13. Comparison of sensor structures for the signal amplification of surface plasmon resonance immunoassay using enzyme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Tsung; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing has been successfully applied for the label-free detection of a broad range of bioanalytes ranging from bacteria, cell, exosome, protein and nucleic acids. When it comes to the detection of small molecules or analytes found at low concentration, amplification schemes are desirable to enhance binding signals and in turn increase sensitivity. A number of SPR signal amplification schemes have been developed and validated; however, little effort has been devoted to understanding the effect of the SPR sensor structures on the amplification of binding signals and therefore on the overall sensing performance. The physical phenomenon of long-range SPR (LRSPR) relies on the propagation of coupled surface plasmonic waves on the opposite sides of a nanoscale-thick noble metal film suspended between two dielectrics with similar refractive indices. Importantly, as compared with commonly used conventional SPR (cSPR), LRSPR is not only characterized by a longer penetration depth of the plasmonic waves in the analyzed medium but also by a greater sensitivity to bulk refractive index changes. In this work, an immunoassay signal amplification platform based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed precipitation was utilized to investigate the sensing performance with regards to cSPR and LRSPR. The enzymatic precipitation of 3, 3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB)/H2O2 was used to amplify SPR signals. The structure-function relationship of cSPR and LRSPR sensors is presented for both standard refractometric measurements and the enzymatic precipitation scheme. Experimental data shows that despite its inherent higher sensitivity to bulk refractive index changes and higher figure of merit, LRSPR was characterized by a lower angular sensitivity in the model enzymatic amplification scheme used here.

  14. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates

    PubMed Central

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10–90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content. PMID:27271574

  15. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    PubMed

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  16. Direct amplification of casework bloodstains using the Promega PowerPlex(®) 21 PCR amplification system.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kerryn; Crowle, Damian; Scott, Pam

    2014-09-01

    A significant number of evidence items submitted to Forensic Science Service Tasmania (FSST) are blood swabs or bloodstained items. Samples from these items routinely undergo phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol organic extraction and quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) testing prior to PowerPlex(®) 21 amplification. This multi-step process has significant cost and timeframe implications in a fiscal climate of tightening government budgets, pressure towards improved operating efficiencies, and an increasing emphasis on rapid techniques better supporting intelligence-led policing. Direct amplification of blood and buccal cells on cloth and Whatman FTA™ card with PowerPlex(®) 21 has already been successfully implemented for reference samples, eliminating the requirement for sample pre-treatment. Scope for expanding this method to include less pristine casework blood swabs and samples from bloodstained items was explored in an endeavour to eliminate lengthy DNA extraction, purification and qPCR steps for a wider subset of samples. Blood was deposited onto a range of substrates including those historically found to inhibit STR amplification. Samples were collected with micro-punch, micro-swab, or both. The potential for further fiscal savings via reduced volume amplifications was assessed by amplifying all samples at full and reduced volume (25 and 13μL). Overall success rate data showed 80% of samples yielded a complete profile at reduced volume, compared to 78% at full volume. Particularly high success rates were observed for the blood on fabric/textile category with 100% of micro-punch samples yielding complete profiles at reduced volume and 85% at full volume. Following the success of this trial, direct amplification of suitable casework blood samples has been implemented at reduced volume. Significant benefits have been experienced, most noticeably where results from crucial items have been provided to police investigators prior to interview of

  17. Induction of gene amplification in Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Human erythrocytic in vitro cultures of Honduras I strain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been stressed stepwise with increasing concentrations of methotrexate (MTX), a folate antagonist. This selection has produced a strain that is 450 times more resistant to the drug than the original culture. Uptake of sublethal doses of radiolabeled MTX by infected red blood cells was 6-36 times greater in the resistant cultures than in the nonresistant controls. DNA isolated from all of the parasites was probed by hybridization with /sup 35/S-labeled DNA derived from a clone of the yeast thymidylate synthetase (TS) gene. This showed 50 to 100 times more increased hybridization of the TS probe to the DNA from the resistant parasites is direct evidence of gene amplification because DHFR and TS are actually one and the same bifunctional enzyme in P. falciparum. Hence, the evidence presented indicates that induced resistance of the malaria parasite to MTX in this case is due to overproduction of DHFR resulting from amplification of the DHFR-TS gene.

  18. Boosting riboswitch efficiency by RNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Emadpour, Masoumeh; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2015-05-26

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors that regulate gene expression in response to binding of small molecules. Although they conceptually represent simple on/off switches and, therefore, hold great promise for biotechnology and future synthetic biology applications, the induction of gene expression by natural riboswitches after ligand addition or removal is often only moderate and, consequently, the achievable expression levels are not very high. Here, we have designed an RNA amplification-based system that strongly improves the efficiency of riboswitches. We have successfully implemented the method in a biological system for which currently no efficient endogenous tools for inducible (trans)gene expression are available: the chloroplasts of higher plants. We further show that an HIV antigen whose constitutive expression from the chloroplast genome is deleterious to the plant can be inducibly expressed under the control of the RNA amplification-enhanced riboswitch (RAmpER) without causing a mutant phenotype, demonstrating the potential of the method for the production of proteins and metabolites that are toxic to the host cell. PMID:25824954

  19. Primordial magnetic field amplification from turbulent reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra E-mail: kandus@uesc.br

    2010-08-01

    We analyze the possibility of primordial magnetic field amplification by a stochastic large scale kinematic dynamo during reheating. We consider a charged scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. During inflation this field is assumed to be in its vacuum state. At the transition to reheating the state of the field changes to a many particle/anti-particle state. We characterize that state as a fluid flow of zero mean velocity but with a stochastic velocity field. We compute the scale-dependent Reynolds number Re(k), and the characteristic times for decay of turbulence, t{sub d} and pair annihilation t{sub a}, finding t{sub a} << t{sub d}. We calculate the rms value of the kinetic helicity of the flow over a scale L and show that it does not vanish. We use this result to estimate the amplification factor of a seed field from the stochastic kinematic dynamo equations. Although this effect is weak, it shows that the evolution of the cosmic magnetic field from reheating to galaxy formation may well be more complex than as dictated by simple flux freezing.

  20. Boosting riboswitch efficiency by RNA amplification

    PubMed Central

    Emadpour, Masoumeh; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors that regulate gene expression in response to binding of small molecules. Although they conceptually represent simple on/off switches and, therefore, hold great promise for biotechnology and future synthetic biology applications, the induction of gene expression by natural riboswitches after ligand addition or removal is often only moderate and, consequently, the achievable expression levels are not very high. Here, we have designed an RNA amplification-based system that strongly improves the efficiency of riboswitches. We have successfully implemented the method in a biological system for which currently no efficient endogenous tools for inducible (trans)gene expression are available: the chloroplasts of higher plants. We further show that an HIV antigen whose constitutive expression from the chloroplast genome is deleterious to the plant can be inducibly expressed under the control of the RNA amplification-enhanced riboswitch (RAmpER) without causing a mutant phenotype, demonstrating the potential of the method for the production of proteins and metabolites that are toxic to the host cell. PMID:25824954

  1. Experimental noiseless linear amplification using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joseph; Boston, Allen; Palsson, Matthew; Pryde, Geoff

    2016-09-01

    The viability of quantum communication schemes rely on sending quantum states of light over long distances. However, transmission loss can degrade the signal strength, adding noise. Heralded noiseless amplification of a quantum signal can provide a solution by enabling longer direct transmission distances and by enabling entanglement distillation. The central idea of heralded noiseless amplification—a conditional modification of the probability distribution over photon number of an optical quantum state—is suggestive of a parallel with weak measurement: in a weak measurement, learning partial information about an observable leads to a conditional back-action of a commensurate size. Here we experimentally investigate the application of weak, or variable-strength, measurements to the task of heralded amplification, by using a quantum logic gate to weakly couple a small single-optical-mode quantum state (the signal) to an ancilla photon (the meter). The weak measurement is carried out by choosing the measurement basis of the meter photon and, by conditioning on the meter outcomes, the signal is amplified. We characterise the gain of the amplifier as a function of the measurement strength, and use interferometric methods to show that the operation preserves the coherence of the signal.

  2. A PARAMETER STUDY FOR BAROCLINIC VORTEX AMPLIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert; Lyra, Wladimir E-mail: klahr@mpia.de

    2013-03-10

    Recent studies have shown that baroclinic vortex amplification is strongly dependent on certain factors, namely, the global entropy gradient, the efficiency of thermal diffusion and/or relaxation as well as numerical resolution. We conduct a comprehensive study of a broad range and combination of various entropy gradients, thermal diffusion and thermal relaxation timescales via local shearing sheet simulations covering the parameter space relevant for protoplanetary disks. We measure the Reynolds stresses as a function of our control parameters and see that there is angular momentum transport even for entropy gradients as low as {beta} = -dln s/dln r = 1/2. Values we expect in protoplanetary disks are between {beta} = 0.5-2.0 The amplification-rate of the perturbations, {Gamma}, appears to be proportional to {beta}{sup 2} and thus proportional to the square of the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency ({Gamma}{proportional_to}{beta}{sup 2}{proportional_to}N {sup 2}). The saturation level of Reynolds stresses, on the other hand, seems to be proportional to {beta}{sup 1/2}. This highlights the importance of baroclinic effects even for the low entropy gradients expected in protoplanetary disks.

  3. Optimization of noncollinear optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, D. N.; Rothardt, J.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.

    2007-02-01

    Noncollinearly phase-matched optical parametric amplifiers (NOPAs) - pumped with the green light of a frequency doubled Yb-doped fiber-amplifier system 1, 2 - permit convenient generation of ultrashort pulses in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) 3. The broad bandwidth of the parametric gain via the noncollinear pump configuration allows amplification of few-cycle optical pulses when seeded with a spectrally flat, re-compressible signal. The short pulses tunable over a wide region in the visible permit transcend of frontiers in physics and lifescience. For instance, the resulting high temporal resolution is of significance for many spectroscopic techniques. Furthermore, the high magnitudes of the peak-powers of the produced pulses allow research in high-field physics. To understand the demands of noncollinear optical parametric amplification using a fiber pump source, it is important to investigate this configuration in detail 4. An analysis provides not only insight into the parametric process but also determines an optimal choice of experimental parameters for the objective. Here, the intention is to design a configuration which yields the shortest possible temporal pulse. As a consequence of this analysis, the experimental setup could be optimized. A number of aspects of optical parametric amplifier performance have been treated analytically and computationally 5, but these do not fully cover the situation under consideration here.

  4. Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind

    2015-01-01

    The Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification (SOCLBA) project will provide a capability to amplify a laser beam that is received in a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) located in a satellite in low Earth orbit. It will also improve the pointing procedure between Earth and spacecraft terminals. The technology uses laser arrays to strengthen the reflected laser beam from the spacecraft. The results of first year's work (2014) show amplification factors of 60 times the power of the signal beam. MMRs are mirrors that reflect light beams back to the source. In space optical communications, a high-powered laser interrogator beam is directed from the ground to a satellite. Within the satellite, the beam is redirected back to ground using the MMR. In the MMR, the beam passes through modulators, which encode a data signal onto the returning beam. MMRs can be used in small spacecraft for optical communications. The SOCLBA project is significant to NASA and small spacecraft due to its application to CubeSats for optical data transmission to ground stations, as well as possible application to spacecraft for optical data transmission.

  5. Cofactory: sequence-based prediction of cofactor specificity of Rossmann folds.

    PubMed

    Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Blom, Nikolaj; Feist, Adam M; Brunak, Søren; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl

    2014-09-01

    Obtaining optimal cofactor balance to drive production is a challenge in metabolically engineered microbial production strains. To facilitate identification of heterologous enzymes with desirable altered cofactor requirements from native content, we have developed Cofactory, a method for prediction of enzyme cofactor specificity using only primary amino acid sequence information. The algorithm identifies potential cofactor binding Rossmann folds and predicts the specificity for the cofactors FAD(H2), NAD(H), and NADP(H). The Rossmann fold sequence search is carried out using hidden Markov models whereas artificial neural networks are used for specificity prediction. Training was carried out using experimental data from protein-cofactor structure complexes. The overall performance was benchmarked against an independent evaluation set obtaining Matthews correlation coefficients of 0.94, 0.79, and 0.65 for FAD(H2), NAD(H), and NADP(H), respectively. The Cofactory method is made publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/Cofactory.

  6. Probing signal amplification by reversible exchange using an NMR flow system

    PubMed Central

    Mewis, Ryan E; Atkinson, Kevin D; Cowley, Michael J; Duckett, Simon B; Green, Gary G R; Green, Richard A; Highton, Louise A R; Kilgour, David; Lloyd, Lyrelle S; Lohman, Joost A B; Williamson, David C

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization methods are used in NMR to overcome its inherent sensitivity problem. Herein, the biologically relevant target nicotinamide is polarized by the hyperpolarization technique signal amplification by reversible exchange. We illustrate how the polarization transfer field, and the concentrations of parahydrogen, the polarization-transfer-catalyst and substrate can be used to maximize signal amplification by reversible exchange effectiveness by reference to the first-order spin system of this target. The catalyst is shown to be crucial in this process, first by facilitating the transfer of hyperpolarization from parahydrogen to nicotinamide and then by depleting the resulting polarized states through further interaction. The 15 longitudinal one, two, three and four spin order terms produced are rigorously identified and quantified using an automated flow apparatus in conjunction with NMR pulse sequences based on the only parahydrogen spectroscopy protocol. The rates of build-up of these terms were shown to follow the order four∼three > two > single spin; this order parallels their rates of relaxation. The result of these competing effects is that the less-efficiently formed single-spin order terms dominate at the point of measurement with the two-spin terms having amplitudes that are an order of magnitude lower. We also complete further measurements to demonstrate that 13C NMR spectra can be readily collected where the long-lived quaternary 13C signals appear with significant intensity. These are improved upon by using INEPT. In summary, we dissect the complexity of this method, highlighting its benefits to the NMR community and its applicability for high-sensitivity magnetic resonance imaging detection in the future. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24801201

  7. Optofluidic analysis system for amplification-free, direct detection of Ebola infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, H.; Parks, J. W.; Wall, T. A.; Stott, M. A.; Stambaugh, A.; Alfson, K.; Griffiths, A.; Mathies, R. A.; Carrion, R.; Patterson, J. L.; Hawkins, A. R.; Schmidt, H.

    2015-09-01

    The massive outbreak of highly lethal Ebola hemorrhagic fever in West Africa illustrates the urgent need for diagnostic instruments that can identify and quantify infections rapidly, accurately, and with low complexity. Here, we report on-chip sample preparation, amplification-free detection and quantification of Ebola virus on clinical samples using hybrid optofluidic integration. Sample preparation and target preconcentration are implemented on a PDMS-based microfluidic chip (automaton), followed by single nucleic acid fluorescence detection in liquid-core optical waveguides on a silicon chip in under ten minutes. We demonstrate excellent specificity, a limit of detection of 0.2 pfu/mL and a dynamic range of thirteen orders of magnitude, far outperforming other amplification-free methods. This chip-scale approach and reduced complexity compared to gold standard RT-PCR methods is ideal for portable instruments that can provide immediate diagnosis and continued monitoring of infectious diseases at the point-of-care.

  8. Recombinase polymerase amplification: Emergence as a critical molecular technology for rapid, low-resource diagnostics.

    PubMed

    James, Ameh; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal molecular diagnostics are bridging the technology gap between traditional diagnostics and polymerase chain reaction-based methods. These new techniques enable timely and accurate testing, especially in settings where there is a lack of infrastructure to support polymerase chain reaction facilities. Despite this, there is a significant lack of uptake of these technologies in developing countries where they are highly needed. Among these novel isothermal technologies, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) holds particular potential for use in developing countries. This rapid nucleic acid amplification approach is fast, highly sensitive and specific, and amenable to countries with a high burden of infectious diseases. Implementation of RPA technology in developing countries is critically required to assess limitations and potentials of the diagnosis of infectious disease, and may help identify impediments that prevent adoption of new molecular technologies in low resource- and low skill settings. This review focuses on approaching diagnosis of infectious disease with RPA.

  9. Recombinase polymerase amplification: Emergence as a critical molecular technology for rapid, low-resource diagnostics.

    PubMed

    James, Ameh; Macdonald, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal molecular diagnostics are bridging the technology gap between traditional diagnostics and polymerase chain reaction-based methods. These new techniques enable timely and accurate testing, especially in settings where there is a lack of infrastructure to support polymerase chain reaction facilities. Despite this, there is a significant lack of uptake of these technologies in developing countries where they are highly needed. Among these novel isothermal technologies, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) holds particular potential for use in developing countries. This rapid nucleic acid amplification approach is fast, highly sensitive and specific, and amenable to countries with a high burden of infectious diseases. Implementation of RPA technology in developing countries is critically required to assess limitations and potentials of the diagnosis of infectious disease, and may help identify impediments that prevent adoption of new molecular technologies in low resource- and low skill settings. This review focuses on approaching diagnosis of infectious disease with RPA. PMID:26517245

  10. Coordinated movement of the three rows of outer hair cells is essential for cochlear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The process known as cochlear amplification is realized by coordinated movement of the outer hair cells (OHCs) in response to changes in their membrane potential. In this process, the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) is thought to be increased, thereby leading to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range and sharp frequency selectivity of our hearing. Unfortunately, however, OHCs are vulnerable to noise exposure, ototoxic acid, aging and so on. Previous studies have shown that exposure to intense noise causes functional loss of OHCs from the innermost row (i.e., close to the modiolus) to the outermost row (i.e., close to the cochlear wall). On the contrary, by other traumatic stimuli such as ototoxic acid, aging and ischemia, such loss of OHCs has been reported to occur from the outermost row toward the innermost row. However, how the cochlear amplification changes when coordinated movement of OHCs is impaired, that is when the OHCs in one, two or all three rows have become dysfunctional, remains unclear. In the present study, therefore, a finite element (FE) model of the gerbil cochlea, which takes the motility of OHCs into account, was developed based on our previous FE model. Using this model, changes in the displacement amplitude of the BM due to the functional loss of OHCs in one, two or all three rows were investigated and the effects of incoordination of the three rows of OHCs on cochlear amplification were estimated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM significantly decreased when either the innermost row or the outermost row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification.

  11. CRYSpred: accurate sequence-based protein crystallization propensity prediction using sequence-derived structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mizianty, Marcin J; Kurgan, Lukasz A

    2012-01-01

    Relatively low success rates of X-ray crystallography, which is the most popular method for solving proteins structures, motivate development of novel methods that support selection of tractable protein targets. This aspect is particularly important in the context of the current structural genomics efforts that allow for a certain degree of flexibility in the target selection. We propose CRYSpred, a novel in-silico crystallization propensity predictor that uses a set of 15 novel features which utilize a broad range of inputs including charge, hydrophobicity, and amino acid composition derived from the protein chain, and the solvent accessibility and disorder predicted from the protein sequence. Our method outperforms seven modern crystallization propensity predictors on three, independent from training dataset, benchmark test datasets. The strong predictive performance offered by the CRYSpred is attributed to the careful design of the features, utilization of the comprehensive set of inputs, and the usage of the Support Vector Machine classifier. The inputs utilized by CRYSpred are well-aligned with the existing rules-of-thumb that are used in the structural genomics studies. PMID:21919861

  12. CRYSpred: accurate sequence-based protein crystallization propensity prediction using sequence-derived structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mizianty, Marcin J; Kurgan, Lukasz A

    2012-01-01

    Relatively low success rates of X-ray crystallography, which is the most popular method for solving proteins structures, motivate development of novel methods that support selection of tractable protein targets. This aspect is particularly important in the context of the current structural genomics efforts that allow for a certain degree of flexibility in the target selection. We propose CRYSpred, a novel in-silico crystallization propensity predictor that uses a set of 15 novel features which utilize a broad range of inputs including charge, hydrophobicity, and amino acid composition derived from the protein chain, and the solvent accessibility and disorder predicted from the protein sequence. Our method outperforms seven modern crystallization propensity predictors on three, independent from training dataset, benchmark test datasets. The strong predictive performance offered by the CRYSpred is attributed to the careful design of the features, utilization of the comprehensive set of inputs, and the usage of the Support Vector Machine classifier. The inputs utilized by CRYSpred are well-aligned with the existing rules-of-thumb that are used in the structural genomics studies.

  13. Signal Amplification of Bioassay Using Zinc Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Chad L.

    An emerging trend in the analytical detection sciences is the employment of nanomaterials for bioassay signal transduction to identify analytes critical to public health. These nanomaterials have been specifically investigated for applications which require identification of trace levels of cells, proteins, or other molecules that can have broad ranging impacts to human health in fields such as clinical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, food and drink control, and the prevention of bioterrorism. Oftentimes these nanoparticle-based signal transduction or amplification approaches offer distinct advantages over conventional methods such as increased sensitivity, rapidity, or stability. The biological application of nanoparticles however, does suffer from drawbacks that have limited more widespread adoption of these techniques. Some of these drawbacks are, high cost and toxicity, arduous synthesis methods, functionalization and bioconjugation challenges, and laboratory disposal and environmental hazard issues, all of which have impeded the progression of this technology in some way or another. This work aims at developing novel techniques that offer solutions to a number of these hurdles through the development of new nanoparticle-based signal transduction approaches and the description of a previously undescribed nanomaterial. Zinc-based nanomaterials offer the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations that are encountered when other nanomaterials are employed for bioassay signal transduction. On the other hand, the biological application of zinc nanomaterials has been difficult because in general their fluorescence is in the blue range and the reported quantum yields are usually too low for highly sensitive applications. The advantages of using zinc nanomaterials for biological applications, such as reduced toxicity, simple synthesis, low cost, and straightforward functionalization strategies contribute to the research interest in their application as

  14. Solid-state Raman image amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmes, Lonnie Kirkland

    Amplification of low-light-level optical images is important for extending the range of lidar systems that image and detect objects in the atmosphere and underwater. The use of range-gating to produce images of particular range bins is also important in minimizing the image degradation due to light that is scattered backward from aerosols, smoke, or water along the imaging path. For practical lidar systems that must be operated within sight of unprotected observers, eye safety is of the utmost importance. This dissertation describes a new type of eye-safe, range-gated lidar sensing element based on Solid-state Raman Image Amplification (SSRIA) in a solid- state optical crystal. SSRIA can amplify low-level images in the eye-safe infrared at 1.556 μm with gains up to 106 with the addition of only quantum- limited noise. The high gains from SSRIA can compensate for low quantum efficiency detectors and can reduce the need for detector cooling. The range-gate of SSRIA is controlled by the pulsewidth of the pump laser and can be as short as 30-100 cm, using pump pulses of 2-6.7 nsec FWHM. A rate equation theoretical model is derived to help in the design of short pulsed Raman lasers. A theoretical model for the quantum noise properties of SSRIA is presented. SSRIA results in higher SNR images throughout a broad range of incident light levels, in contrast to the increasing noise factor with reduced gain in image intensified CCD's. A theoretical framework for the optical resolution of SSRIA is presented and it is shown that SSRIA can produce higher resolution than ICCD's. SSRIA is also superior in rejecting unwanted sunlight background, further increasing image SNR. Lastly, SSRIA can be combined with optical pre-filtering to perform optical image processing functions such as high-pass filtering and automatic target detection/recognition. The application of this technology to underwater imaging, called Marine Raman Image Amplification (MARIA) is also discussed. MARIA

  15. Evaluation of the Potential Impact of Ebola Virus Genomic Drift on the Efficacy of Sequence-Based Candidate Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Andersen, Kristian G.; Gire, Stephen; Park, Daniel J.; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E.; Wohl, Shirlee; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Until recently, Ebola virus (EBOV) was a rarely encountered human pathogen that caused disease among small populations with extraordinarily high lethality. At the end of 2013, EBOV initiated an unprecedented disease outbreak in West Africa that is still ongoing and has already caused thousands of deaths. Recent studies revealed the genomic changes this particular EBOV variant undergoes over time during human-to-human transmission. Here we highlight the genomic changes that might negatively impact the efficacy of currently available EBOV sequence-based candidate therapeutics, such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs), and antibodies. Ten of the observed mutations modify the sequence of the binding sites of monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13F6, MAb 1H3, MAb 6D8, MAb 13C6, and siRNA EK-1, VP24, and VP35 targets and might influence the binding efficacy of the sequence-based therapeutics, suggesting that their efficacy should be reevaluated against the currently circulating strain. PMID:25604787

  16. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Mathew D.; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A.; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G.; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G.; Davis, Stephen R.; Spelman, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  17. Sequence-based association and selection scans identify drug resistance loci in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Valim, Clarissa; Ribacke, Ulf; Van Tyne, Daria; Galinsky, Kevin; Galligan, Meghan; Becker, Justin S.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wiegand, Roger C.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Through rapid genetic adaptation and natural selection, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite—the deadliest of those that cause malaria—is able to develop resistance to antimalarial drugs, thwarting present efforts to control it. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a critical hypothesis-generating tool for understanding how this occurs. However, in P. falciparum, the limited amount of linkage disequilibrium hinders the power of traditional array-based GWAS. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility and power improvements gained by using whole-genome sequencing for association studies. We analyzed data from 45 Senegalese parasites and identified genetic changes associated with the parasites’ in vitro response to 12 different antimalarials. To further increase statistical power, we adapted a common test for natural selection, XP-EHH (cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity), and used it to identify genomic regions associated with resistance to drugs. Using this sequence-based approach and the combination of association and selection-based tests, we detected several loci associated with drug resistance. These loci included the previously known signals at pfcrt, dhfr, and pfmdr1, as well as many genes not previously implicated in drug-resistance roles, including genes in the ubiquitination pathway. Based on the success of the analysis presented in this study, and on the demonstrated shortcomings of array-based approaches, we argue for a complete transition to sequence-based GWAS for small, low linkage-disequilibrium genomes like that of P. falciparum. PMID:22826220

  18. Sequence-based analysis of the bacterial and fungal compositions of multiple kombucha (tea fungus) samples.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Alan J; O'Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Cotter, Paul D

    2014-04-01

    Kombucha is a sweetened tea beverage that, as a consequence of fermentation, contains ethanol, carbon dioxide, a high concentration of acid (gluconic, acetic and lactic) as well as a number of other metabolites and is thought to contain a number of health-promoting components. The sucrose-tea solution is fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast embedded within a cellulosic pellicle, which forms a floating mat in the tea, and generates a new layer with each successful fermentation. The specific identity of the microbial populations present has been the focus of attention but, to date, the majority of studies have relied on culture-based analyses. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the kombucha microbiota we have carried out the first culture-independent, high-throughput sequencing analysis of the bacterial and fungal populations of 5 distinct pellicles as well as the resultant fermented kombucha at two time points. Following the analysis it was established that the major bacterial genus present was Gluconacetobacter, present at >85% in most samples, with only trace populations of Acetobacter detected (<2%). A prominent Lactobacillus population was also identified (up to 30%), with a number of sub-dominant genera, not previously associated with kombucha, also being revealed. The yeast populations were found to be dominated by Zygosaccharomyces at >95% in the fermented beverage, with a greater fungal diversity present in the cellulosic pellicle, including numerous species not identified in kombucha previously. Ultimately, this study represents the most accurate description of the microbiology of kombucha to date.

  19. Chirped pulse amplification: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Maine, P.; Strickland, D.; Pessot, M.; Squier, J.; Bado, P.; Mourou, G.; Harter, D.

    1988-01-01

    Short pulses with ultrahigh peak powers have been generated in Nd: glass and Alexandrite using the Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) technique. This technique has been successful in producing picosecond terawatt pulses with a table-top laser system. In the near future, CPA will be applied to large laser systems such as NOVA to produce petawatt pulses (1 kJ in a 1 ps pulse) with focused intensities exceeding 10/sup /plus/21/ W/cm/sup 2/. These pulses will be associated with electric fields in excess of 100 e/a/sub o//sup 2/ and blackbody energy densities equivalent to 3 /times/ 10/sup 10/ J/cm/sup 3/. This petawatt source will have important applications in x-ray laser research and will lead to fundamentally new experiments in atomic, nuclear, solid-state, plasma, and high-energy density physics. A review of present and future designs are discussed. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Amplification sans bruit d'images optiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigan, S.; Delaubert, V.; Lopez, L.; Treps, N.; Maitre, A.; Fabre, C.

    2004-11-01

    Nous utilisons un Oscillateur Paramétrique Optique (OPO) pompé sous le seuil dans le but d'amplifier une image multimode transverse sans dégradation du rapport signal à bruit. Le dispositif expérimental met en œuvre un OPO de type II triplement résonant et semi-confocal pour le faisceau amplifié. L'existence d'effets quantiques lors de l'amplification multimode dans un tel dispositif a été montrée expérimentalement. Plus généralement, ceci nous a amené à étudier les propriétés quantiques transverses des faisceaux lumineux amplifiés. Une telle étude peut trouver des applications non seulement en imagerie, mais également dans le traitement quantique de l'information.

  1. Parametric amplification by coupled flux qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Rehák, M.; Neilinger, P.; Grajcar, M.; Oelsner, G.; Hübner, U.; Meyer, H.-G.; Il'ichev, E.

    2014-04-21

    We report parametric amplification of a microwave signal in a Kerr medium formed from superconducting qubits. Two mutually coupled flux qubits, embedded in the current antinode of a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator, are used as a nonlinear element. Shared Josephson junctions provide the qubit-resonator coupling, resulting in a device with a tunable Kerr constant (up to 3 × 10{sup −3}) and a measured gain of about 20 dB. This arrangement represents a unit cell which can be straightforwardly extended to a quasi one-dimensional quantum metamaterial with large tunable Kerr nonlinearity, providing a basis for implementation of wide-band travelling wave parametric amplifiers.

  2. Dispersion compensation in chirped pulse amplification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A.

    2014-07-15

    A chirped pulse amplification system includes a laser source providing an input laser pulse along an optical path. The input laser pulse is characterized by a first temporal duration. The system also includes a multi-pass pulse stretcher disposed along the optical path. The multi-pass pulse stretcher includes a first set of mirrors operable to receive input light in a first plane and output light in a second plane parallel to the first plane and a first diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher also includes a second set of mirrors operable to receive light diffracted from the first diffraction grating and a second diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher further includes a reflective element operable to reflect light diffracted from the second diffraction grating. The system further includes an amplifier, a pulse compressor, and a passive dispersion compensator disposed along the optical path.

  3. Beyond the diffraction limit via optical amplification.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé N; Ribak, Erez N

    2016-07-15

    In a previous article [Astron. Astrophys.561, A118 (2014)], we suggested a method to overcome the diffraction limit behind a telescope. We discuss and extend recent numerical simulations and test whether it is indeed possible to use photon amplification to enhance the angular resolution of a telescope or a microscope beyond the diffraction limit. An essential addition is the proposal to select events with an above-average ratio of stimulated to spontaneous photons. The analysis shows that the diffraction limit of a telescope is surpassed by a factor of 10 for an amplifier gain of 200, if the analysis is restricted to a tenth of the incoming astronomical photons. A gain of 70 is sufficient with a hundredth of the photons. More simulations must be performed to account for the bunching of spontaneous photons. PMID:27420490

  4. Optimizing biased semiconductor superlattices for terahertz amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Xiaoli; Wang, Dawei; Wu, Zhaoxin; Dignam, M. M.

    2014-08-11

    Over the past 15 yr or more, researchers have been trying to achieve gain for electromagnetic fields in the terahertz frequency region using biased semiconductor superlattices, but with little success. In this work, we employ our model of the excitonic states in biased GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As semiconductor superlattices to find the optimal structures for amplification of terahertz radiation. In particular, we determine the optimum well width, barrier width, and bias field for terahertz fields with frequencies ranging from 1 to 4 terahertz. We find that gain coefficients on the order of 40 cm{sup −1} should be achievable over most of this frequency range.

  5. Integrated Amplification Microarrays for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Bryant, Lexi; Griesemer, Sara B.; Gu, Rui; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Kukhtin, Alexander; Parker, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Cynthia; George, Kirsten St.; Cooney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This overview describes microarray-based tests that combine solution-phase amplification chemistry and microarray hybridization within a single microfluidic chamber. The integrated biochemical approach improves microarray workflow for diagnostic applications by reducing the number of steps and minimizing the potential for sample or amplicon cross-contamination. Examples described herein illustrate a basic, integrated approach for DNA and RNA genomes, and a simple consumable architecture for incorporating wash steps while retaining an entirely closed system. It is anticipated that integrated microarray biochemistry will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of microarray consumables, equipment, and workflow, which in turn will enable a broader spectrum of users to exploit the intrinsic multiplexing power of microarrays for infectious disease diagnostics.

  6. Nonlinear amplification of instabilities with longitudinal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jürgen; Boguslavski, Kirill; Schlichting, Sören

    2012-04-01

    We study the dynamics of nonequilibrium instabilities in anisotropically expanding systems. The most prominent example of such a system is the “glasma” in the context of relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments, where the expansion is a consequence of approximately boost-invariant initial conditions. Here we consider the problem of parametric resonance in scalar N-component quantum field theories with boost-invariant initial conditions, which is similar in spirit. We find that many aspects of the dynamics can be treated analytically by introducing a generalized conformal time. Primary instabilities, which are described by the linearized evolution equations, are seen to lead to a secondary regime of amplifications with strongly enhanced growth rates due to nonlinear corrections. For the secondary instabilities we present a power-counting scheme for weak coupling, and discuss their role for the question of isotropization and the establishment of an equation of state.

  7. Whole genome amplification in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying-ming; Wang, Ning; Li, Lei; Jin, Fan

    2011-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) refers to a procedure for genetically analyzing embryos prior to implantation, improving the chance of conception for patients at high risk of transmitting specific inherited disorders. This method has been widely used for a large number of genetic disorders since the first successful application in the early 1990s. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) are the two main methods in PGD, but there are some inevitable shortcomings limiting the scope of genetic diagnosis. Fortunately, different whole genome amplification (WGA) techniques have been developed to overcome these problems. Sufficient DNA can be amplified and multiple tasks which need abundant DNA can be performed. Moreover, WGA products can be analyzed as a template for multi-loci and multi-gene during the subsequent DNA analysis. In this review, we will focus on the currently available WGA techniques and their applications, as well as the new technical trends from WGA products.

  8. Principles of Whole-Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Zbigniew Tadeusz; Kirsch, Stefan; Polzer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular biology relies on large amounts of high-quality genomic DNA. However, in a number of clinical or biological applications this requirement cannot be met, as starting material is either limited (e.g., preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) or analysis of minimal residual cancer) or of insufficient quality (e.g., formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples or forensics). As a consequence, in order to obtain sufficient amounts of material to analyze these demanding samples by state-of-the-art modern molecular assays, genomic DNA has to be amplified. This chapter summarizes available technologies for whole-genome amplification (WGA), bridging the last 25 years from the first developments to currently applied methods. We will especially elaborate on research application, as well as inherent advantages and limitations of various WGA technologies.

  9. Gene amplification in Rhynchosciara salivary gland chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Glover, D M; Zaha, A; Stocker, A J; Santelli, R V; Pueyo, M T; De Toledo, S M; Lara, F J

    1982-01-01

    Late in the fourth larval instar, several regions of the Rhynchosciara americana salivary gland chromosomes undergo "DNA puffing." We have constructed a library of cloned cDNAs synthesized from poly(A)+RNA isolated from salivary glands during the period of development when the DNA puffs are active. From this library we have studied clones representative of three genes active during this period but not active at earlier developmental periods of the gland. One of these genes is not amplified during the developmental process and encodes a 0.6-kilobase RNA molecule. The other two genes are located within the DNA-puff sites C3 and C8 and encode 1.25-kilobase and 1.95-kilobase RNA molecules, respectively. We estimate from the quantitation of transfer hybridization experiments that each of these genes undergoes 16-fold amplification during DNA puffing. Images PMID:6953439

  10. Short-pulse amplification by strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Jia, Qing; Mikhailova, Julia M.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-08-01

    We examine the feasibility of strongly coupled stimulated Brillouin scattering as a mechanism for the plasma-based amplification of sub-picosecond pulses. In particular, we use fluid theory and particle-in-cell simulations to compare the relative advantages of Raman and Brillouin amplification over a broad range of achievable parameters.

  11. Amplification of seismic waves by the Seattle basin, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Brocher, T.M.; Weaver, C.S.; Creager, K.C.; Snelson, C.M.; Crosson, R.S.; Miller, K.C.; Trehu, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Recordings of the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi (Taiwan) earthquake, two local earthquakes, and five blasts show seismic-wave amplification over a large sedimentary basin in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. For weak ground motions from the Chi-Chi earthquake, the Seattle basin amplified 0.2- to 0.8-Hz waves by factors of 8 to 16 relative to bedrock sites west of the basin. The amplification and peak frequency change during the Chi-Chi coda: the initial S-wave arrivals (0-30 sec) had maximum amplifications of 12 at 0.5-0.8 Hz, whereas later arrivals (35-65 sec) reached amplifications of 16 at 0.3-0.5 Hz. Analysis of local events in the 1.0- to 10.0-Hz frequency range show fourfold amplifications for 1.0-Hz weak ground motion over the Seattle basin. Amplifications decrease as frequencies increase above 1.0 Hz, with frequencies above 7 Hz showing lower amplitudes over the basin than at bedrock sites. Modeling shows that resonance in low-impedance deposits forming the upper 550 m of the basin beneath our profile could cause most of the observed amplification, and the larger amplification at later arrival times suggests surface waves also play a substantial role. These results emphasize the importance of shallow deposits in determining ground motions over large basins.

  12. Explanatory Model for Sound Amplification in a Stethoscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, H.; Volfson, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we suggest an original physical explanatory model that explains the mechanism of the sound amplification process in a stethoscope. We discuss the amplification of a single pulse, a continuous wave of certain frequency, and finally we address the resonant frequencies. It is our belief that this model may provide students with…

  13. Mutualism breakdown by amplification of Wolbachia genes.

    PubMed

    Chrostek, Ewa; Teixeira, Luis

    2015-02-01

    Most insect species are associated with vertically transmitted endosymbionts. Because of the mode of transmission, the fitness of these symbionts is dependent on the fitness of the hosts. Therefore, these endosymbionts need to control their proliferation in order to minimize their cost for the host. The genetic bases and mechanisms of this regulation remain largely undetermined. The maternally inherited bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are the most common endosymbionts of insects, providing some of them with fitness benefits. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia wMelPop is a unique virulent variant that proliferates massively in the hosts and shortens their lifespan. The genetic bases of wMelPop virulence are unknown, and their identification would allow a better understanding of how Wolbachia levels are regulated. Here we show that amplification of a region containing eight Wolbachia genes, called Octomom, is responsible for wMelPop virulence. Using Drosophila lines selected for carrying Wolbachia with different Octomom copy numbers, we demonstrate that the number of Octomom copies determines Wolbachia titers and the strength of the lethal phenotype. Octomom amplification is unstable, and reversion of copy number to one reverts all the phenotypes. Our results provide a link between genotype and phenotype in Wolbachia and identify a genomic region regulating Wolbachia proliferation. We also prove that these bacteria can evolve rapidly. Rapid evolution by changes in gene copy number may be common in endosymbionts with a high number of mobile elements and other repeated regions. Understanding wMelPop pathogenicity and variability also allows researchers to better control and predict the outcome of releasing mosquitoes transinfected with this variant to block human vector-borne diseases. Our results show that transition from a mutualist to a pathogen may occur because of a single genomic change in the endosymbiont. This implies that there must be constant selection on

  14. Magnetic field amplification in young galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, J.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Klessen, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Universe at present is highly magnetized, with fields of a few 10-5 G and coherence lengths greater than 10 kpc in typical galaxies like the Milky Way. We propose that the magnetic field was already amplified to these values during the formation and the early evolution of galaxies. Turbulence in young galaxies is driven by accretion, as well as by supernova (SN) explosions of the first generation of stars. The small-scale dynamo can convert the turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy and amplify very weak primordial seed fields on short timescales. Amplification takes place in two phases: in the kinematic phase the magnetic field grows exponentially, with the largest growth rate on the smallest nonresistive scale. In the following nonlinear phase the magnetic energy is shifted toward larger scales until the dynamo saturates on the turbulent forcing scale. To describe the amplification of the magnetic field quantitatively, we modeled the microphysics in the interstellar medium (ISM) of young galaxies and determined the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo. We estimated the resulting saturation field strengths and dynamo timescales for two turbulent forcing mechanisms: accretion-driven turbulence and SN-driven turbulence. We compare them to the field strength that is reached when only stellar magnetic fields are distributed by SN explosions. We find that the small-scale dynamo is much more efficient in magnetizing the ISM of young galaxies. In the case of accretion-driven turbulence, a magnetic field strength on the order of 10-6 G is reached after a time of 24-270 Myr, while in SN-driven turbulence the dynamo saturates at field strengths of typically 10-5 G after only 4-15 Myr. This is considerably shorter than the Hubble time. Our work can help for understanding why present-day galaxies are highly magnetized.

  15. Rapid detection of Plasmodium falciparum with isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification and lateral flow analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nucleic acid amplification is the most sensitive and specific method to detect Plasmodium falciparum. However the polymerase chain reaction remains laboratory-based and has to be conducted by trained personnel. Furthermore, the power dependency for the thermocycling process and the costly equipment necessary for the read-out are difficult to cover in resource-limited settings. This study aims to develop and evaluate a combination of isothermal nucleic acid amplification and simple lateral flow dipstick detection of the malaria parasite for point-of-care testing. Methods A specific fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of P. falciparum was amplified in 10 min at a constant 38°C using the isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) method. With a unique probe system added to the reaction solution, the amplification product can be visualized on a simple lateral flow strip without further labelling. The combination of these methods was tested for sensitivity and specificity with various Plasmodium and other protozoa/bacterial strains, as well as with human DNA. Additional investigations were conducted to analyse the temperature optimum, reaction speed and robustness of this assay. Results The lateral flow RPA (LF-RPA) assay exhibited a high sensitivity and specificity. Experiments confirmed a detection limit as low as 100 fg of genomic P. falciparum DNA, corresponding to a sensitivity of approximately four parasites per reaction. All investigated P. falciparum strains (n = 77) were positively tested while all of the total 11 non-Plasmodium samples, showed a negative test result. The enzymatic reaction can be conducted under a broad range of conditions from 30-45°C with high inhibitory concentration of known PCR inhibitors. A time to result of 15 min from start of the reaction to read-out was determined. Conclusions Combining the isothermal RPA and the lateral flow detection is an approach to improve molecular diagnostic for P. falciparum in

  16. Hendra virus detection using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Foord, Adam J; Middleton, Deborah; Heine, Hans G

    2012-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic paramyxovirus endemic in Australian Pteropus bats (fruit bats or flying foxes). Although bats appear to be unaffected by the virus, HeV can spread from fruit bats to horses, causing severe disease. Human infection results from close contact with the blood, body fluids and tissues of infected horses. HeV is a biosecurity level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen, with a high case-fatality rate in humans and horses. Current assays for HeV detection require complex instrumentation and are generally time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay to detect nucleic acid from all known HeV strains in horses without the requirement for complex laboratory equipment. A LAMP assay targeting a conserved region of the HeV P-gene was combined with a Lateral Flow Device (LFD) for detection of amplified product. All HeV isolates, the original HeV isolated in 1994 as well as the most recent isolates from 2011 were detected. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the HeV-LAMP assay was equal to a TaqMan assay developed previously. Significantly, these assays detected HeV in horses before clinical signs were observed. The combined LAMP-LFD procedure is a sensitive method suitable for HeV diagnosis in a resource-limited situation or where rapid test results are critical.

  17. Recovery and STR amplification of DNA from RFLP membranes.

    PubMed

    Steadman, Shelly A; McDonald, J David; Andrews, John S; Watson, Nigel D

    2008-03-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques were utilized in the forensic DNA community until the mid 1990s when less labor-intensive polymerase chain reaction short tandem repeat (PCR STR) techniques became available. During the transition from RFLP technology to PCR-based STR platforms, a method for comparing RFLP profiles to STR profiles was not developed. While the preferred approach for applying new technology to old cases would be to analyze the original biological stain, this is not always possible. For unsolved cases that previously underwent RFLP analysis, the only DNA remaining may be restriction cut and bound to nylon membranes. These studies investigate several methods for obtaining STR profiles from membrane bound DNA, including removal of bound DNA with bases, acids, detergents, various chemicals, and conventional cell extraction solutions. Direct multiplex STR amplification of template in the membrane-bound state was also explored. A partial STR profile was obtained from DNA that was recovered from an archived membrane using conventional extraction buffer components, indicating promise for recovering useful STR information from RFLP membranes that have been maintained in long-term frozen storage. PMID:18366567

  18. Hendra virus detection using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Foord, Adam J; Middleton, Deborah; Heine, Hans G

    2012-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic paramyxovirus endemic in Australian Pteropus bats (fruit bats or flying foxes). Although bats appear to be unaffected by the virus, HeV can spread from fruit bats to horses, causing severe disease. Human infection results from close contact with the blood, body fluids and tissues of infected horses. HeV is a biosecurity level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen, with a high case-fatality rate in humans and horses. Current assays for HeV detection require complex instrumentation and are generally time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay to detect nucleic acid from all known HeV strains in horses without the requirement for complex laboratory equipment. A LAMP assay targeting a conserved region of the HeV P-gene was combined with a Lateral Flow Device (LFD) for detection of amplified product. All HeV isolates, the original HeV isolated in 1994 as well as the most recent isolates from 2011 were detected. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the HeV-LAMP assay was equal to a TaqMan assay developed previously. Significantly, these assays detected HeV in horses before clinical signs were observed. The combined LAMP-LFD procedure is a sensitive method suitable for HeV diagnosis in a resource-limited situation or where rapid test results are critical. PMID:22327143

  19. Single cell genome amplification accelerates identification of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway from a complex microbial assemblage.

    PubMed

    Grindberg, Rashel V; Ishoey, Thomas; Brinza, Dumitru; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Coates, R Cameron; Liu, Wei-ting; Gerwick, Lena; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pevzner, Pavel; Lasken, Roger; Gerwick, William H

    2011-04-12

    Filamentous marine cyanobacteria are extraordinarily rich sources of structurally novel, biomedically relevant natural products. To understand their biosynthetic origins as well as produce increased supplies and analog molecules, access to the clustered biosynthetic genes that encode for the assembly enzymes is necessary. Complicating these efforts is the universal presence of heterotrophic bacteria in the cell wall and sheath material of cyanobacteria obtained from the environment and those grown in uni-cyanobacterial culture. Moreover, the high similarity in genetic elements across disparate secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways renders imprecise current gene cluster targeting strategies and contributes sequence complexity resulting in partial genome coverage. Thus, it was necessary to use a dual-method approach of single-cell genomic sequencing based on multiple displacement amplification (MDA) and metagenomic library screening. Here, we report the identification of the putative apratoxin. A biosynthetic gene cluster, a potent cancer cell cytotoxin with promise for medicinal applications. The roughly 58 kb biosynthetic gene cluster is composed of 12 open reading frames and has a type I modular mixed polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS) organization and features loading and off-loading domain architecture never previously described. Moreover, this work represents the first successful isolation of a complete biosynthetic gene cluster from Lyngbya bouillonii, a tropical marine cyanobacterium renowned for its production of diverse bioactive secondary metabolites.

  20. Clinical application of somatosensory amplification in psychosomatic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Barsky, Arthur J

    2007-01-01

    Many patients with somatoform disorders are frequently encountered in psychosomatic clinics as well as in primary care clinics. To assess such patients objectively, the concept of somatosensory amplification may be useful. Somatosensory amplification refers to the tendency to experience a somatic sensation as intense, noxious, and disturbing. It may have a role in a variety of medical conditions characterized by somatic symptoms that are disproportionate to demonstrable organ pathology. It may also explain some of the variability in somatic symptomatology found among different patients with the same serious medical disorder. It has been assessed with a self-report questionnaire, the Somatosensory Amplification Scale. This instrument was developed in a clinical setting in the U.S., and the reliability and validity of the Japanese and Turkish versions have been confirmed as well. Many studies have attempted to clarify the specific role of somatosensory amplification as a pathogenic mechanism in somatization. It has been reported that somatosensory amplification does not correlate with heightened sensitivity to bodily sensations and that emotional reactivity exerts its influence on somatization via a negatively biased reporting style. According to our recent electroencephalographic study, somatosensory amplification appears to reflect some aspects of long-latency cognitive processing rather than short-latency interoceptive sensitivity. The concept of somatosensory amplification can be useful as an indicator of somatization in the therapy of a broad range of disorders, from impaired self-awareness to various psychiatric disorders. It also provides useful information for choosing appropriate pharmacological or psychological therapy. While somatosensory amplification has a role in the presentation of somatic symptoms, it is closely associated with other factors, namely, anxiety, depression, and alexithymia that may also influence the same. The specific role of

  1. One-tube real-time isothermal amplification assay to identify and distinguish human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes A, B, and C and circulating recombinant forms AE and AG.

    PubMed

    de Baar, M P; Timmermans, E C; Bakker, M; de Rooij, E; van Gemen, B; Goudsmit, J

    2001-05-01

    To halt the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epidemic requires interventions that can prevent transmission of numerous HIV-1 subtypes. The most frequently transmitted viruses belong to the subtypes A, B, and C and the circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) AE and AG. A fast one-tube assay that identifies and distinguishes among subtypes A, B, and C and CRFs AE and AG of HIV-1 was developed. The assay amplifies a part of the gag gene sequence of the genome of all currently known HIV-1 subtypes and can identify and distinguish among the targeted subtypes as the reaction proceeds, because of the addition of subtype-specific molecular beacons with multiple fluorophores. The combination of isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and molecular beacons is a new approach in the design of real-time assays. To obtain a sufficiently specific assay, we developed a new strategy in the design of molecular beacons, purposely introducing mismatches in the molecular beacons. The subtype A and CRF AG isolates reacted with the same molecular beacon. We tested the specificity and sensitivity of the assay on a panel of the culture supernatant of 34 viruses encompassing all HIV-1 subtypes: subtypes A through G, CRF AE and AG, a group O isolate, and a group N isolate. Assay sensitivity on this panel was 92%, with 89% correct subtype identification relative to sequence analysis. A linear relationship was found between the amount of input RNA in the reaction mixture and the time that the reaction became positive. The lower detection level of the assay was approximately 10(3) copies of HIV-1 RNA per reaction. In 38% of 50 serum samples from HIV-1-infected individuals with a detectable amount of virus, we could identify subtype sequences with a specificity of 94% by using sequencing and phylogenetic analysis as the "gold standard." In conclusion, we showed the feasibility of the approach of using multiple molecular beacons labeled with different fluorophores in

  2. An investigation of PCR inhibition using Plexor(®) -based quantitative PCR and short tandem repeat amplification.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robyn E; Duncan, George; McCord, Bruce R

    2014-11-01

    A common problem in forensic DNA typing is PCR inhibition resulting in allele dropout and peak imbalance. In this paper, we have utilized the Plexor(®) real-time PCR quantification kit to evaluate PCR inhibition. This is performed by adding increasing concentrations of various inhibitors and evaluating changes in melt curves and PCR amplification efficiencies. Inhibitors examined included calcium, humic acid, collagen, phenol, tannic acid, hematin, melanin, urea, bile salts, EDTA, and guanidinium thiocyanate. Results were plotted and modeled using mathematical simulations. In general, we found that PCR inhibitors that bind DNA affect melt curves and CT takeoff points while those that affect the Taq polymerase tend to affect the slope of the amplification curve. Mixed mode effects were also visible. Quantitative PCR results were then compared with subsequent STR amplification using the PowerPlex(®) 16 HS System. The overall results demonstrate that real-time PCR can be an effective method to evaluate PCR inhibition and predict its effects on subsequent STR amplifications.

  3. Advancing allele group-specific amplification of the complete HLA-C gene--isolation of novel alleles from three allele groups (C*04, C*07 and C*08).

    PubMed

    Cisneros, E; Martínez-Pomar, N; Vilches, M; Martín, P; de Pablo, R; Nuñez Del Prado, N; Nieto, A; Matamoros, N; Moraru, M; Vilches, C

    2013-10-01

    A variety of strategies have been designed for sequence-based HLA typing (SBT) and for the isolation of new human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, but unambiguous characterization of complete genomic sequences remains a challenge. We recently reported a simple method for the group-specific amplification (GSA) and sequencing of a full-length C*04 genomic sequence in isolation from the accompanying allele. Here we build on this strategy and present homologous methods that enable the isolation of HLA-C alleles belonging to another two allele groups. Using this approach, which can be applied to sequence-based typing in some clinical settings, we have successfully characterized three novel HLA-C alleles (C*04:128, C*07:01:01:02, and C*08:62).

  4. Multiplex isothermal solid-phase recombinase polymerase amplification for the specific and fast DNA-based detection of three bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kersting, Sebastian; Rausch, Valentina; Bier, Frank F; von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of an on-chip RPA (recombinase polymerase amplification) with simultaneous multiplex isothermal amplification and detection on a solid surface. The isothermal RPA was applied to amplify specific target sequences from the pathogens Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Salmonella enterica and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using genomic DNA. Additionally, a positive plasmid control was established as an internal control. The four targets were amplified simultaneously in a quadruplex reaction. The amplicon is labeled during on-chip RPA by reverse oligonucleotide primers coupled to a fluorophore. Both amplification and spatially resolved signal generation take place on immobilized forward primers bount to expoxy-silanized glass surfaces in a pump-driven hybridization chamber. The combination of microarray technology and sensitive isothermal nucleic acid amplification at 38 °C allows for a multiparameter analysis on a rather small area. The on-chip RPA was characterized in terms of reaction time, sensitivity and inhibitory conditions. A successful enzymatic reaction is completed in <20 min and results in detection limits of 10 colony-forming units for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica and 100 colony-forming units for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The results show this method to be useful with respect to point-of-care testing and to enable simplified and miniaturized nucleic acid-based diagnostics. FigureThe combination of multiplex isothermal nucleic acid amplification with RPA and spatially-resolved signal generation on specific immobilized oligonucleotides.

  5. SFAPS: an R package for structure/function analysis of protein sequences based on informational spectrum method.

    PubMed

    Deng, Su-Ping; Huang, De-Shuang

    2014-10-01

    The R package SFAPS has been developed for structure/function analysis of protein sequences based on information spectrum method. The informational spectrum method employs the electron-ion interaction potential parameter as the numerical representation for the protein sequence, and obtains the characteristic frequency of a particular protein interaction after computing the Discrete Fourier Transform for protein sequences. The informational spectrum method is often used to analyze protein sequences, so we developed this software tool, which is implemented as an add-on package to the freely available and widely used statistical language R. Our package is distributed as open source code for Linux, Unix and Microsoft Windows. It is released under the GNU General Public License. The R package along with its source code and additional material are freely available at http://mlsbl.tongji.edu.cn/DBdownload.asp.

  6. GMO detection in food and feed through screening by visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Li, Rong; Quan, Sheng; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin; Yang, Litao

    2015-06-01

    Isothermal DNA/RNA amplification techniques are the primary methodology for developing on-spot rapid nucleic acid amplification assays, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique has been developed and applied in the detection of foodborne pathogens, plant/animal viruses, and genetically modified (GM) food/feed contents. In this study, one set of LAMP assays targeting on eight frequently used universal elements, marker genes, and exogenous target genes, such as CaMV35S promoter, FMV35S promoter, NOS, bar, cry1Ac, CP4 epsps, pat, and NptII, were developed for visual screening of GM contents in plant-derived food samples with high efficiency and accuracy. For these eight LAMP assays, their specificity was evaluated by testing commercial GM plant events and their limits of detection were also determined, which are 10 haploid genome equivalents (HGE) for FMV35S promoter, cry1Ac, and pat assays, as well as five HGE for CaMV35S promoter, bar, NOS terminator, CP4 epsps, and NptII assays. The screening applicability of these LAMP assays was further validated successfully using practical canola, soybean, and maize samples. The results suggested that the established visual LAMP assays are applicable and cost-effective for GM screening in plant-derived food samples. PMID:25822163

  7. Whole Genome Amplification of Plasma-Circulating DNA Enables Expanded Screening for Allelic Imbalance in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Harris, Lyndsay; Mamon, Harvey; Kulke, Matthew H.; Liu, Wei-Hua; Zhu, Penny; Mike Makrigiorgos, G.

    2006-01-01

    Apoptotic and necrotic tumor cells release DNA into plasma, providing an accessible tumor biomarker. Tumor-released plasma-circulating DNA can be screened for tumor-specific genetic changes, including mutation, methylation, or allelic imbalance. However, technical problems relating to the quantity and quality of DNA collected from plasma hinder downstream genetic screening and reduce biomarker detection sensitivity. Here, we present a new methodology, blunt-end ligation-mediated whole genome amplification (BL-WGA), that efficiently amplifies small apoptotic fragments (<200 bp) as well as intermediate and large necrotic fragments (>5 kb) and enables reliable high-throughput analysis of plasma-circulating DNA. In a single-tube reaction, purified double-stranded DNA was blunted with T4 DNA polymerase, self-ligated or cross-ligated with T4 DNA ligase and amplified via random primer-initiated multiple displacement amplification. Using plasma DNA from breast cancer patients and normal controls, we demonstrate that BL-WGA amplified the plasma-circulating genome by ∼1000-fold. Of 25 informative polymorphic sites screened via polymerase chain reaction-denaturating high-performance liquid chromatography, 24 (95%) were correctly determined by BL-WGA to be allelic retention or imbalance compared to 44% by multiple displacement amplification. By enabling target magnification and application of high-throughput genome analysis, BL-WGA improves sensitivity for detection of circulating tumor-specific biomarkers from bodily fluids or for recovery of nucleic acids from suboptimally stored specimens. PMID:16436631

  8. Detection of the food allergen celery via loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique.

    PubMed

    Zahradnik, Celine; Martzy, Roland; Mach, Robert L; Krska, Rudolf; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Brunner, Kurt

    2014-11-01

    Since 2005, celery and celery products have to be labeled according to Directive 2003/89/EC due to their allergenic potential. In order to provide a DNA-based, rapid and simple detection method suitable for high-throughput analysis, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the detection of celery (Apium graveolens) was developed. The assay was tested for specificity for celery since closely related species also hold food relevance. The limit of detection (LOD) for spiked food samples was found to be as low as 7.8 mg of dry celery powder per kilogram. An evaluation of different amplification and detection platforms was performed to show reliable detection independent from the instrument used for amplification (thermal cycler or heating block) and detection mechanisms (real-time fluorescence detection, agarose gel electrophoresis or nucleic acid staining). The analysis of 10 commercial food samples representing diverse and complex food matrices, and a false-negative rate of 0% for approximately 24 target copies or 0.08 ng celery DNA for three selected food matrices show that LAMP has the potential to be used as an alternative strategy for the detection of allergenic celery. The performance of the developed LAMP assay turned out to be equal or superior to the best available PCR assay for the detection of celery in food products.

  9. GMO detection in food and feed through screening by visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Li, Rong; Quan, Sheng; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin; Yang, Litao

    2015-06-01

    Isothermal DNA/RNA amplification techniques are the primary methodology for developing on-spot rapid nucleic acid amplification assays, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique has been developed and applied in the detection of foodborne pathogens, plant/animal viruses, and genetically modified (GM) food/feed contents. In this study, one set of LAMP assays targeting on eight frequently used universal elements, marker genes, and exogenous target genes, such as CaMV35S promoter, FMV35S promoter, NOS, bar, cry1Ac, CP4 epsps, pat, and NptII, were developed for visual screening of GM contents in plant-derived food samples with high efficiency and accuracy. For these eight LAMP assays, their specificity was evaluated by testing commercial GM plant events and their limits of detection were also determined, which are 10 haploid genome equivalents (HGE) for FMV35S promoter, cry1Ac, and pat assays, as well as five HGE for CaMV35S promoter, bar, NOS terminator, CP4 epsps, and NptII assays. The screening applicability of these LAMP assays was further validated successfully using practical canola, soybean, and maize samples. The results suggested that the established visual LAMP assays are applicable and cost-effective for GM screening in plant-derived food samples.

  10. Equipment-free incubation of recombinase polymerase amplification reactions using body heat.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The development of isothermal amplification platforms for nucleic acid detection has the potential to increase access to molecular diagnostics in low resource settings; however, simple, low-cost methods for heating samples are required to perform reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that human body heat may be harnessed to incubate recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) reactions for isothermal amplification of HIV-1 DNA. After measuring the temperature of mock reactions at 4 body locations, the axilla was chosen as the ideal site for comfortable, convenient incubation. Using commonly available materials, 3 methods for securing RPA reactions to the body were characterized. Finally, RPA reactions were incubated using body heat while control RPA reactions were incubated in a heat block. At room temperature, all reactions with 10 copies of HIV-1 DNA and 90% of reactions with 100 copies of HIV-1 DNA tested positive when incubated with body heat. In a cold room with an ambient temperature of 10 degrees Celsius, all reactions containing 10 copies or 100 copies of HIV-1 DNA tested positive when incubated with body heat. These results suggest that human body heat may provide an extremely low-cost solution for incubating RPA reactions in low resource settings.

  11. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Lindsay Christine

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature for an axisymmetric cone geometry were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. The DAKOTA optimization software package was then used to optimize the geometry to maximize the amplification of waves at first mode frequencies and to minimize the amplification of the waves at second mode frequencies, as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. This was accomplished by allowing all geometric parameters in the sensitivity study to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. During this process, boundary layer edge properties were recorded to investigate any correlations. Results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose or an axisymmetric cone with a high degree of concave curvature under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will cause the largest amplification of first mode instability waves.

  12. Mechanism of Gene Amplification via Yeast Autonomously Replicating Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  13. Sequence-Based Identification of Mycobacterium Species Using the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Identification System

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Leonard, Debra G. B.; Pan, Xai; Musser, James M.; Berman, Richard E.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Sequencing Kit (PE Applied Biosystems), a 500-bp sequence-based identification system, for its ability to identify clinical Mycobacterium isolates. The organism identity was determined by comparing the 16S rDNA sequence to the MicroSeq database, which consists primarily of type strain sequences. A total of 113 isolates (18 different species), previously recovered and identified by routine methods from two clinical laboratories, were analyzed by the MicroSeq method. Isolates with discordant results were analyzed by hsp65 gene sequence analysis and in some cases repeat phenotypic identification, AccuProbe rRNA hybridization (Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, Calif.), or high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. For 93 (82%) isolates, the MicroSeq identity was concordant with the previously reported identity. For 18 (16%) isolates, the original identification was discordant with the MicroSeq identification. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 7 (six unique sequences) were originally misidentified by phenotypic analysis or the AccuProbe assay but were correctly identified by the MicroSeq assay. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 11 (seven unique sequences) were unusual species that were difficult to identify by phenotypic methods and, in all but one case, by molecular methods. The remaining two isolates (2%) failed definitive phenotypic identification, but the MicroSeq assay was able to definitively identify one of these isolates. The MicroSeq identification system is an accurate and rapid method for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. PMID:10618095

  14. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  15. Novel Chemical Amplification System in Azide/Phenolic Resin-Based Negative Resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Emiko; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Michiaki; Hayashi, Nobuaki

    1989-08-01

    A novel chemical amplification system based on an azide/phenolic resin-based negative resist is described. The new resist, which consists of an azide, a phenolic resin matrix, and a carboxylic acid, can be developed in aqueous alkaline solutions. Electron-beam exposure of this resist results in the production of a primary amine. In a subsequent post-exposure baking step, the primary amine catalyzes decarboxylation of the carboxylic acid. Additionally, the decarboxylation product acts as an aqueous alkaline dissolution inhibitor in the exposed areas. On the other hand, the carboxylic acid remaining in the unexposed areas promotes the dissolution rate of those areas. The new resist shows non-swelling pattern-formation by using the aqueous alkaline developer, and the sensitivity to electron beams is about three times higher than that of MRS.

  16. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    DOEpatents

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  17. Low cost extraction and isothermal amplification of DNA for infectious diarrhea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10(-2) pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health.

  18. Low cost extraction and isothermal amplification of DNA for infectious diarrhea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10(-2) pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health. PMID:23555883

  19. Factors influencing Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay outcomes at point of care.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Siverson, Joshua; Lee, Arthur; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Lehman, Dara A; Boyle, David S

    2016-04-01

    Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) can be used to detect pathogen-specific DNA or RNA in under 20 min without the need for complex instrumentation. These properties enable its potential use in resource limited settings. However, there are concerns that deviations from the manufacturer's protocol and/or storage conditions could influence its performance in low resource settings. RPA amplification relies upon viscous crowding agents for optimal nucleic acid amplification, and thus an interval mixing step after 3-6 min of incubation is recommended to distribute amplicons and improve performance. In this study we used a HIV-1 RPA assay to evaluate the effects of this mixing step on assay performance. A lack of mixing led to a longer time to amplification and inferior detection signal, compromising the sensitivity of the assay. However lowering the assay volume from 50 μL to 5 μL showed similar sensitivity with or without mixing. We present the first peer-reviewed study that assesses long term stability of RPA reagents without a cold chain. Reagents stored at -20 °C, and 25 °C for up to 12 weeks were able to detect 10 HIV-1 DNA copies. Reagents stored at 45 °C for up to 3 weeks were able to detect 10 HIV-1 DNA copies, with reduced sensitivity only after >3 weeks at 45 °C. Together our results show that reducing reaction volumes bypassed the need for the mixing step and that RPA reagents were stable even when stored for 3 weeks at very high temperatures.

  20. Factors influencing Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay outcomes at point of care.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Siverson, Joshua; Lee, Arthur; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Lehman, Dara A; Boyle, David S

    2016-04-01

    Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) can be used to detect pathogen-specific DNA or RNA in under 20 min without the need for complex instrumentation. These properties enable its potential use in resource limited settings. However, there are concerns that deviations from the manufacturer's protocol and/or storage conditions could influence its performance in low resource settings. RPA amplification relies upon viscous crowding agents for optimal nucleic acid amplification, and thus an interval mixing step after 3-6 min of incubation is recommended to distribute amplicons and improve performance. In this study we used a HIV-1 RPA assay to evaluate the effects of this mixing step on assay performance. A lack of mixing led to a longer time to amplification and inferior detection signal, compromising the sensitivity of the assay. However lowering the assay volume from 50 μL to 5 μL showed similar sensitivity with or without mixing. We present the first peer-reviewed study that assesses long term stability of RPA reagents without a cold chain. Reagents stored at -20 °C, and 25 °C for up to 12 weeks were able to detect 10 HIV-1 DNA copies. Reagents stored at 45 °C for up to 3 weeks were able to detect 10 HIV-1 DNA copies, with reduced sensitivity only after >3 weeks at 45 °C. Together our results show that reducing reaction volumes bypassed the need for the mixing step and that RPA reagents were stable even when stored for 3 weeks at very high temperatures. PMID:26854117

  1. A general solution for opening double-stranded DNA for isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is the core technology of molecular biology and genetic engineering. Various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, most of these methods can only detect single stranded nucleic acid. Herein, we put forward a simple solution for opening double-stranded DNA for isothermal detection methods. The strategy employs recombination protein from E. coli (RecA) to form nucleoprotein complex with single-stranded DNA, which could scan double-stranded template for homologous sites. Then, the nucleoprotein can invade the double-stranded template to form heteroduplex in the presence of ATP, resulting in the strand exchange. The ATP regeneration system could be eliminated by using high concentration of ATP, and the 3′-OH terminal of the invasion strand can be recognized by other DNA modifying enzymes such as DNA polymerase or DNA ligase. Moreover, dATP was found to be a better cofactor for RecA, which make the system more compatible to DNA polymerase. The method described here is a general solution to open dsDNA, serving as a platform to develop more isothermal nucleic acids detection methods for real DNA samples based on it. PMID:27687498

  2. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  3. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  4. Small Sample Whole-Genome Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, C A; Nguyen, C P; Wheeler, E K; Sorensen, K J; Arroyo, E S; Vrankovich, G P; Christian, A T

    2005-09-20

    Many challenges arise when trying to amplify and analyze human samples collected in the field due to limitations in sample quantity, and contamination of the starting material. Tests such as DNA fingerprinting and mitochondrial typing require a certain sample size and are carried out in large volume reactions; in cases where insufficient sample is present whole genome amplification (WGA) can be used. WGA allows very small quantities of DNA to be amplified in a way that enables subsequent DNA-based tests to be performed. A limiting step to WGA is sample preparation. To minimize the necessary sample size, we have developed two modifications of WGA: the first allows for an increase in amplified product from small, nanoscale, purified samples with the use of carrier DNA while the second is a single-step method for cleaning and amplifying samples all in one column. Conventional DNA cleanup involves binding the DNA to silica, washing away impurities, and then releasing the DNA for subsequent testing. We have eliminated losses associated with incomplete sample release, thereby decreasing the required amount of starting template for DNA testing. Both techniques address the limitations of sample size by providing ample copies of genomic samples. Carrier DNA, included in our WGA reactions, can be used when amplifying samples with the standard purification method, or can be used in conjunction with our single-step DNA purification technique to potentially further decrease the amount of starting sample necessary for future forensic DNA-based assays.

  5. KASER: Knowledge Amplification by Structured Expert Randomization.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Stuart H; Murthy, S N Jayaram; Smith, Michael H; Trajković, Ljiljana

    2004-12-01

    In this paper and attached video, we present a third-generation expert system named Knowledge Amplification by Structured Expert Randomization (KASER) for which a patent has been filed by the U.S. Navy's SPAWAR Systems Center, San Diego, CA (SSC SD). KASER is a creative expert system. It is capable of deductive, inductive, and mixed derivations. Its qualitative creativity is realized by using a tree-search mechanism. The system achieves creative reasoning by using a declarative representation of knowledge consisting of object trees and inheritance. KASER computes with words and phrases. It possesses a capability for metaphor-based explanations. This capability is useful in explaining its creative suggestions and serves to augment the capabilities provided by the explanation subsystems of conventional expert systems. KASER also exhibits an accelerated capability to learn. However, this capability depends on the particulars of the selected application domain. For example, application domains such as the game of chess exhibit a high degree of geometric symmetry. Conversely, application domains such as the game of craps played with two dice exhibit no predictable pattern, unless the dice are loaded. More generally, we say that domains whose informative content can be compressed to a significant degree without loss (or with relatively little loss) are symmetric. Incompressible domains are said to be asymmetric or random. The measure of symmetry plus the measure of randomness must always sum to unity.

  6. Active amplification by critical oscillators in hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julicher, Frank

    2004-03-01

    The ear posesses exquisit abilities to detect sounds over a wide range of frequencies with an extraordinary dynamic range. From the faintest sounds that we hear to the loudest noises, the sound pressure varies over twelve orders of magnitude. It has been first proposed by Thomas Gold in 1948 that passive resonating elements alone cannot explain these abilities of the ear. The observation, that the ears of seemingly all vertebrates exhibit spontaneous sound emissions, so called oto-acoustic emissions, adds evidence to the idea that hearing is based on active mechanisms for signal amplification and detection which for different species are based on the same principles. It has been suggested that the active properties and the observed nonlinearities in the ear's response can be explained by assuming that the cochlea contains dynamical systems operating in the vicinity of the critical point of an oscillating instability. A sound stimulus excites deformations of the basilar membrane which travel along the choclea towards the apex. The combination of this travelling wave with properties of critical oscillators leads to a scenario where sound excites nonlinear waves in the cochlea. The large dynamic range of hearing then results from compressive power law responses of these nonlinear excitations.

  7. A PCR amplification method without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongwei; Xu, Haiyue; Zhao, Chunjiang; Sulaiman, Yiming; Wu, Changxin

    2011-02-01

    To develop a simple and inexpensive method for direct PCR amplification of animal DNA from tissues, we optimized different components and their concentration in lysis buffer systems. Finally, we acquired the optimized buffer system composed of 10 mmol tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-Cl (pH 8.0), 2 mmol ethylene diamine tetraacetic (EDTA) (pH 8.0), 0.2 mol NaCl and 200 μg/mL Proteinase K. Interestingly, the optimized buffer is also very effective when working with common human sample types, including blood, buccal cells and hair. The direct PCR method requires fewer reagents (Tris-Cl, EDTA, Protease K and NaCl) and less incubation time (only 35 min). The cost of treating every sample is less than $0.02, and all steps can be completed on a thermal cycler in a 96-well format. So, the proposed method will significantly improve high-throughput PCR-based molecular assays in animal systems and in common human sample types.

  8. Macroscopic Velocity Amplification in Stacked Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Srividya; White, Gary

    2015-04-01

    When a small sphere rests atop a larger sphere (for example, a basketball with a tennis ball balanced on top), and both are released from a height, the resulting ``velocity amplification'' of the small sphere when the pair rebound from a hard floor, is a staple of the physics demonstration toolkit--usually impressive, sometimes dangerous. While this phenomenon has been studied in the literature in some detail, we set out to explore this effect by constructing a device involving stacked disks falling in a plane, fashioned after an online design by Wayne Peterson of Brigham Young University. When two disks, stacked edge to edge atop one another and confined to a vertical plane, are dropped, the top disk rebounds to a much greater height than it started from, as expected. In this talk, we report on experiments conducted by dropping the disks and recording the heights to which they rise on rebound, and the comparison of these results with our theoretical predictions and computer simulations. Frances E. Walker Fellowship.

  9. Small sample whole-genome amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Christine; Nguyen, Christine; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Karen; Arroyo, Erin; Vrankovich, Greg; Christian, Allen

    2005-11-01

    Many challenges arise when trying to amplify and analyze human samples collected in the field due to limitations in sample quantity, and contamination of the starting material. Tests such as DNA fingerprinting and mitochondrial typing require a certain sample size and are carried out in large volume reactions; in cases where insufficient sample is present whole genome amplification (WGA) can be used. WGA allows very small quantities of DNA to be amplified in a way that enables subsequent DNA-based tests to be performed. A limiting step to WGA is sample preparation. To minimize the necessary sample size, we have developed two modifications of WGA: the first allows for an increase in amplified product from small, nanoscale, purified samples with the use of carrier DNA while the second is a single-step method for cleaning and amplifying samples all in one column. Conventional DNA cleanup involves binding the DNA to silica, washing away impurities, and then releasing the DNA for subsequent testing. We have eliminated losses associated with incomplete sample release, thereby decreasing the required amount of starting template for DNA testing. Both techniques address the limitations of sample size by providing ample copies of genomic samples. Carrier DNA, included in our WGA reactions, can be used when amplifying samples with the standard purification method, or can be used in conjunction with our single-step DNA purification technique to potentially further decrease the amount of starting sample necessary for future forensic DNA-based assays.

  10. Targeting helicase-dependent amplification products with an electrochemical genosensor for reliable and sensitive screening of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Moura-Melo, Suely; Miranda-Castro, Rebeca; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Dos Santos Junior, J Ribeiro; da Silva Fonseca, Rosana A; Lobo-Castañón, Maria Jesús

    2015-08-18

    Cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and their use in food and feed is constantly expanding; thus, the question of informing consumers about their presence in food has proven of significant interest. The development of sensitive, rapid, robust, and reliable methods for the detection of GMOs is crucial for proper food labeling. In response, we have experimentally characterized the helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) and sequence-specific detection of a transgene from the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S Promoter (CaMV35S), inserted into most transgenic plants. HDA is one of the simplest approaches for DNA amplification, emulating the bacterial replication machinery, and resembling PCR but under isothermal conditions. However, it usually suffers from a lack of selectivity, which is due to the accumulation of spurious amplification products. To improve the selectivity of HDA, which makes the detection of amplification products more reliable, we have developed an electrochemical platform targeting the central sequence of HDA copies of the transgene. A binary monolayer architecture is built onto a thin gold film where, upon the formation of perfect nucleic acid duplexes with the amplification products, these are enzyme-labeled and electrochemically transduced. The resulting combined system increases genosensor detectability up to 10(6)-fold, allowing Yes/No detection of GMOs with a limit of detection of ∼30 copies of the CaMV35S genomic DNA. A set of general utility rules in the design of genosensors for detection of HDA amplicons, which may assist in the development of point-of-care tests, is also included. The method provides a versatile tool for detecting nucleic acids with extremely low abundance not only for food safety control but also in the diagnostics and environmental control areas. PMID:26198403

  11. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests.

  12. Reading Out Single-Molecule Digital RNA and DNA Isothermal Amplification in Nanoliter Volumes with Unmodified Camera Phones.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Karymov, Mikhail A; Begolo, Stefano; Selck, David A; Zhukov, Dmitriy V; Jue, Erik; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-03-22

    Digital single-molecule technologies are expanding diagnostic capabilities, enabling the ultrasensitive quantification of targets, such as viral load in HIV and hepatitis C infections, by directly counting single molecules. Replacing fluorescent readout with a robust visual readout that can be captured by any unmodified cell phone camera will facilitate the global distribution of diagnostic tests, including in limited-resource settings where the need is greatest. This paper describes a methodology for developing a visual readout system for digital single-molecule amplification of RNA and DNA by (i) selecting colorimetric amplification-indicator dyes that are compatible with the spectral sensitivity of standard mobile phones, and (ii) identifying an optimal ratiometric image-process for a selected dye to achieve a readout that is robust to lighting conditions and camera hardware and provides unambiguous quantitative results, even for colorblind users. We also include an analysis of the limitations of this methodology, and provide a microfluidic approach that can be applied to expand dynamic range and improve reaction performance, allowing ultrasensitive, quantitative measurements at volumes as low as 5 nL. We validate this methodology using SlipChip-based digital single-molecule isothermal amplification with λDNA as a model and hepatitis C viral RNA as a clinically relevant target. The innovative combination of isothermal amplification chemistry in the presence of a judiciously chosen indicator dye and ratiometric image processing with SlipChip technology allowed the sequence-specific visual readout of single nucleic acid molecules in nanoliter volumes with an unmodified cell phone camera. When paired with devices that integrate sample preparation and nucleic acid amplification, this hardware-agnostic approach will increase the affordability and the distribution of quantitative diagnostic and environmental tests. PMID:26900709

  13. Targeting helicase-dependent amplification products with an electrochemical genosensor for reliable and sensitive screening of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Moura-Melo, Suely; Miranda-Castro, Rebeca; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Dos Santos Junior, J Ribeiro; da Silva Fonseca, Rosana A; Lobo-Castañón, Maria Jesús

    2015-08-18

    Cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and their use in food and feed is constantly expanding; thus, the question of informing consumers about their presence in food has proven of significant interest. The development of sensitive, rapid, robust, and reliable methods for the detection of GMOs is crucial for proper food labeling. In response, we have experimentally characterized the helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) and sequence-specific detection of a transgene from the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S Promoter (CaMV35S), inserted into most transgenic plants. HDA is one of the simplest approaches for DNA amplification, emulating the bacterial replication machinery, and resembling PCR but under isothermal conditions. However, it usually suffers from a lack of selectivity, which is due to the accumulation of spurious amplification products. To improve the selectivity of HDA, which makes the detection of amplification products more reliable, we have developed an electrochemical platform targeting the central sequence of HDA copies of the transgene. A binary monolayer architecture is built onto a thin gold film where, upon the formation of perfect nucleic acid duplexes with the amplification products, these are enzyme-labeled and electrochemically transduced. The resulting combined system increases genosensor detectability up to 10(6)-fold, allowing Yes/No detection of GMOs with a limit of detection of ∼30 copies of the CaMV35S genomic DNA. A set of general utility rules in the design of genosensors for detection of HDA amplicons, which may assist in the development of point-of-care tests, is also included. The method provides a versatile tool for detecting nucleic acids with extremely low abundance not only for food safety control but also in the diagnostics and environmental control areas.

  14. Universal probe amplification: multiplex screening technologies for genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Hun; Park, Ki Soo; Lee, Kyungmee; Jang, Hyowon; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve multiplex screening of genetic variations, multiplex amplification of target genomic DNA is necessary. Universal amplification technology meets this requirement by simultaneously amplifying a number of different regions within the target genomic DNA using a single pair of universal primers and thus eliminating the limitations associated with the use of multiple pairs of primers. We comprehensively review universal probe amplification and its use with multiplex technologies for the identification of the most representative genetic variation, i. e. single nucleotide polymorphisms. The progress and key issues relating to universal probe amplification are discussed and the representative technologies are summarized with an emphasis on their application for the identification of susceptibility to human diseases.

  15. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  16. Three-dimensional Simulation of Backward Raman Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Balakin; G.M. Fraiman; N.J. Fisch

    2005-11-12

    Three-dimensional (3-D) simulations for the Backward Raman Amplification (BRA) are presented. The images illustrate the effects of pump depletion, pulse diffraction, non-homogeneous plasma density, and plasma ionization.

  17. Nonlinearity management in fiber transmission systems with hybrid amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ania-Castañón, J. D.; Nasieva, I. O.; Kurukitkoson, N.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Borsier, C.; Pincemin, E.

    2004-04-01

    Nonlinearity management in transmission lines with periodic dispersion compensation and hybrid Raman-Erbium doped fiber amplification is studied both analytically and numerically. Different transmission/compensating fiber pairs are considered, with particular focus on the SMF/DCF case.

  18. Preliminary Lidar Experiment to Study the Backscatter Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.

    2016-06-01

    Long-term continuous measurements for detection relative backscatter amplification on a horizontal path of 2 km long are performed by using a specific micro pulse lidar. The laser beam path is limited by a solid obstacle. The lidar is located next to an ultrasonic anemometer that measures 3D wind velocity and temperature; the laser spot on the obstacle is observed by using a telephoto lens. The results showed that the backscatter amplification has a clear diurnal variation. Moreover, the backscatter amplification was completely absent in the morning and evening under neutral stratification in the atmospheric surface layer. At night and in the daytime there was a significant increase of the backscatter amplification coefficient.

  19. Backward Raman amplification of broad-band pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, A. A.; Dodin, I. Y.; Fraiman, G. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2016-08-01

    A reduced fluid model of Raman backscattering is proposed that describes backward Raman amplification (BRA) of pulses with duration τ0 comparable to or even smaller than the plasma period 2 π/ωp . At such a small τ0, a seed pulse can be amplified even if it has the same frequency as the pump (which is technologically advantageous), as opposed to that satisfying the Raman resonance condition. Using our theoretical model, we numerically calculate the BRA efficiency for such pulses as a function of τ0 and show that it remains reasonably high up to τ0≈2 π/ωp . We also show that using short seed pulses in BRA makes the amplification less sensitive to quasistatic inhomogeneities of the plasma density. Amplification can persist even when the density perturbations are large enough to violate the commonly known condition of resonant amplification.

  20. Studies of nondegenerate, quasi-phase-matched optical parametric amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2004-03-18

    We have performed extensive numerical studies of quasi-phase-matched optical parametric amplification with the aim to improve its nondegenerate spectral bandwidth. Our multi-section fan-out design calculations indicate a 35-fold increase in spectral bandwidth.