Science.gov

Sample records for acid signaling molecules

  1. Oxidized fatty acids as inter-kingdom signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Carolina H; Kock, Johan L F

    2014-01-20

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to "listen" and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  2. Phenolic acids act as signaling molecules in plant-microbe symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Santi M; Chakraborty, Dipjyoti

    2010-01-01

    Phenolic acids are the main polyphenols made by plants. These compounds have diverse functions and are immensely important in plant-microbe interactions/symbiosis. Phenolic compounds act as signaling molecules in the initiation of legumerhizobia symbioses, establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses and can act as agents in plant defense. Flavonoids are a diverse class of polyphenolic compounds that have received considerable attention as signaling molecules involved in plant-microbe interactions compared to the more widely distributed, simple phenolic acids; hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, which are both derived from the general phenylpropanoid pathway. This review describes the well-known roles attributed to phenolic compounds as nod gene inducers of legume-rhizobia symbioses, their roles in induction of the GmGin1 gene in fungus for establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, their roles in inducing vir gene expression in Agrobacterium, and their roles as defense molecules operating against soil borne pathogens that could have great implications for rhizospheric microbial ecology. Amongst plant phenolics we have a lack of knowledge concerning the roles of phenolic acids as signaling molecules beyond the relatively well-defined roles of flavonoids. This may be addressed through the use of plant mutants defective in phenolic acids biosynthesis or knock down target genes in future investigations. PMID:20400851

  3. Oxalic acid: a signal molecule for fungus-feeding bacteria of the genus Collimonas?

    PubMed

    Rudnick, M B; van Veen, J A; de Boer, W

    2015-10-01

    Mycophagous (=fungus feeding) soil bacteria of the genus Collimonas have been shown to colonize and grow on hyphae of different fungal hosts as the only source of energy and carbon. The ability to exploit fungal nutrient resources might require a strategy for collimonads to sense fungi in the soil matrix. Oxalic acid is ubiquitously secreted by soil fungi, serving different purposes. In this study, we investigated the possibility that collimonads might use oxalic acid secretion to localize a fungal host and move towards it. We first confirmed earlier indications that collimonads have a very limited ability to use oxalic acid as growth substrate. In a second step, with using different assays, we show that oxalic acid triggers bacterial movement in such a way that accumulation of cells can be expected at micro-sites with high free oxalic acid concentrations. Based on these observations we propose that oxalic acid functions as a signal molecule to guide collimonads to hyphal tips, the mycelial zones that are most sensitive for mycophagous bacterial attack.

  4. Oleamide: a fatty acid amide signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system?

    PubMed

    Hiley, C Robin; Hoi, Pui Man

    2007-01-01

    Oleamide (cis-9,10-octadecenoamide), a fatty acid primary amide discovered in the cerebrospinal fluid of sleep-deprived cats, has a variety of actions that give it potential as a signaling molecule, although these actions have not been extensively investigated in the cardiovascular system. The synthetic pathway probably involves synthesis of oleoylglycine and then conversion to oleamide by peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM); breakdown of oleamide is by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Oleamide interacts with voltage-gated Na(+) channels and allosterically with GABA(A) and 5-HT(7) receptors as well as having cannabinoid-like actions. The latter have been suggested to be due to potentiation of the effects of endocannabinoids such as anandamide by inhibiting FAAH-mediated hydrolysis. This might underlie an "entourage effect" whereby co-released endogenous nonagonist congeners of endocannabinoids protect the active molecule from hydrolysis by FAAH. However, oleamide has direct agonist actions at CB(1) cannabinoid receptors and also activates the TRPV1 vanilloid receptor. Other actions include inhibition of gap-junctional communication, and this might give oleamide a role in myocardial development. Many of these actions are absent from the trans isomer of 9,10-octadecenoamide. One of the most potent actions of oleamide is vasodilation. In rat small mesenteric artery the response does not involve CB(1) cannabinoid receptors but another pertussis toxin-sensitive, G protein-coupled receptor, as yet unidentified. This receptor is sensitive to rimonabant and O-1918, an antagonist at the putative "abnormal-cannabidiol" or endothelial "anandamide" receptors. Vasodilation is mediated by endothelium-derived nitric oxide, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization, and also through activation of TRPV1 receptors. A physiological role for oleamide in the heart and circulation has yet to be demonstrated, as has production by cells of the cardiovascular system, but

  5. Microfluidic study of the chemotactic response of Escherichia coli to amino acids, signaling molecules and secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Krisztina; Sipos, Orsolya; Valkai, Sándor; Gombai, Éva; Hodula, Orsolya; Kerényi, Ádám; Ormos, Pál; Galajda, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing and chemotaxis both affect bacterial behavior on the population level. Chemotaxis shapes the spatial distribution of cells, while quorum sensing realizes a cell-density dependent gene regulation. An interesting question is if these mechanisms interact on some level: Does quorum sensing, a density dependent process, affect cell density itself via chemotaxis? Since quorum sensing often spans across species, such a feedback mechanism may also exist between multiple species. We constructed a microfluidic platform to study these questions. A flow-free, stable linear chemical gradient is formed in our device within a few minutes that makes it suitable for sensitive testing of chemoeffectors: we showed that the amino acid lysine is a weak chemoattractant for Escherichia coli, while arginine is neutral. We studied the effect of quorum sensing signal molecules of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on E. coli chemotaxis. Our results show that N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (oxo-C12-HSL) and N-(butryl)-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) are attractants. Furthermore, we tested the chemoeffector potential of pyocyanin and pyoverdine, secondary metabolites under a quorum sensing control. Pyocyanin is proved to be a weak attractant while pyoverdine are repellent. We demonstrated the usability of the device in co-culturing experiments, where we showed that various factors released by P. aeruginosa affect the dynamic spatial rearrangement of a neighboring E. coli population, while surface adhesion of the cells is also modulated. PMID:26339306

  6. The Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid Increases Metabolic Activity and Reverts Persister Cells to an Antimicrobial-Susceptible State

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Aleksey; Planzos, Penny; Zelaya, Hector M.

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells, which are tolerant to antimicrobials, contribute to biofilm recalcitrance to therapeutic agents. In turn, the ability to kill persister cells is believed to significantly improve efforts in eradicating biofilm-related, chronic infections. While much research has focused on elucidating the mechanism(s) by which persister cells form, little is known about the mechanism or factors that enable persister cells to revert to an active and susceptible state. Here, we demonstrate that cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA), a fatty acid signaling molecule, is able to change the status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli persister cells from a dormant to a metabolically active state without an increase in cell number. This cell awakening is supported by an increase of the persister cells' respiratory activity together with changes in protein abundance and increases of the transcript expression levels of several metabolic markers, including acpP, 16S rRNA, atpH, and ppx. Given that most antimicrobials target actively growing cells, we also explored the effect of cis-DA on enhancing antibiotic efficacy in killing persister cells due to their inability to keep a persister cell state. Compared to antimicrobial treatment alone, combinational treatments of persister cell subpopulations with antimicrobials and cis-DA resulted in a significantly greater decrease in cell viability. In addition, the presence of cis-DA led to a decrease in the number of persister cells isolated. We thus demonstrate the ability of a fatty acid signaling molecule to revert bacterial cells from a tolerant phenotype to a metabolically active, antimicrobial-sensitive state. PMID:25192989

  7. The role of acidic organelles in the development of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni and their response to signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Al-Adhami, B H; Noble, C; Sharaf, O; Thornhill, J; Doenhoff, M J; Kusel, R

    2005-03-01

    The cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni become transformed into schistosomula during host skin penetration. We have found that large acidophilic compartments are detected in schistosomula but not in cercariae or in any other stages of the parasite by use of the fluorescent dye LysoTracker, a dye specific for mammalian lysosomes. Some of these large acidic compartments incorporated monodansylcadaverine, a specific dye for autophagosomes. We have used potent inhibitors (wortmannin and 3-methyladenine) and a potent inducer (starvation) of autophagy to show that the pathway to the formation of the acidic compartments requires specific molecular signals from the environment and from the genome. Certain doses of ultraviolet light inhibited significantly the formation of the acidic compartments, which may indicate disruption of the lysosome/autophagosome pathway. We have also defined two proteins that are commonly associated with lysosomes and autophagosomes in mammalian cells, the microtubule-associated membrane protein (MAP-LC3) and lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1), in extracts of schistosomula. We suggest that the autophagy pathway could be developed in transformed schistosomula.

  8. Signaling Molecules: Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a signaling molecule as well as a cytoprotectant. It modulates neurotransmission, regulates vascular tone, and protects various tissues and organs, including neurons, the heart, and kidneys, from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury. H2S is produced from l-cysteine by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) along with cysteine aminotransferase. Recent Advances: In addition to these enzymes, we recently identified a novel pathway to produce H2S from d-cysteine, which involves d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) along with 3MST. These enzymes are localized in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. However, some enzymes translocate to organelles under specific conditions. Moreover, H2S-derived potential signaling molecules such as polysulfides and HSNO have been identified. Critical Issues: The physiological stimulations, which trigger the production of H2S and its derivatives and maintain their local levels, remain unclear. Future Directions: Understanding the regulation of the H2S production and H2S-derived signaling molecules and the specific stimuli that induce their release will provide new insights into the biology of H2S and therapeutic development in diseases involving these substances. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 362–376. PMID:24800864

  9. Mitochondrial metabolites: undercover signalling molecules

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are one of most characterized metabolic hubs of the cell. Here, crucial biochemical reactions occur and most of the cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is produced. In addition, mitochondria act as signalling platforms and communicate with the rest of the cell by modulating calcium fluxes, by producing free radicals, and by releasing bioactive proteins. It is emerging that mitochondrial metabolites can also act as second messengers and can elicit profound (epi)genetic changes. This review describes the many signalling functions of mitochondrial metabolites under normal and stress conditions, focusing on metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We provide a new framework for understanding the role of mitochondrial metabolism in cellular pathophysiology. PMID:28382199

  10. Exogenous adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate behaves as a signal molecule in plants; it augments metabolism of phenylpropanoids and salicylic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Nuc, Katarzyna; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Cells contain various congeners of the canonical nucleotides. Some of these accumulate in cells under stress and may function as signal molecules. Their cellular levels are enzymatically controlled. Previously, we demonstrated a signaling function for diadenosine polyphosphates and cyclic nucleotides in Arabidopsis thaliana and grape, Vitis vinifera. These compounds increased the expression of genes for and the specific activity of enzymes of phenylpropanoid pathways resulting in the accumulation of certain products of these pathways. Here, we show that adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate, whose level can be controlled by HIT-family proteins, induced similar effects. This natural nucleotide, when added to A. thaliana seedlings, activated the genes for phenylalanine:ammonia lyase, 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, chalcone synthase, cinnamoyl-coenzyme A:NADP oxidoreductase and isochorismate synthase, which encode proteins catalyzing key reactions of phenylpropanoid pathways, and caused accumulation of lignins, anthocyanins and salicylic acid. Adenosine 5'-phosphofluoridate, a synthetic congener of adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate, behaved similarly. The results allow us to postulate that adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate should be considered as a novel signaling molecule.

  11. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule-Associated Polysialic Acid Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning by Restraining the Signaling through GluN2B-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Senkov, Oleg; Grebenyuk, Sergei; Robinson, Catrina; Xiao, Mei-Fang; Stummeyer, Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Engel, Andreas K.; Feig, Larry; Semyanov, Alexey; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is the predominant carrier of α2,8 polysialic acid (PSA) in the mammalian brain. Abnormalities in PSA and NCAM expression are associated with schizophrenia in humans and cause deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning in mice. Here, we show that PSA inhibits opening of recombinant NMDA receptors composed of GluN1/2B (NR1/NR2B) or GluN1/2A/2B (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) but not of GluN1/2A (NR1/NR2A) subunits. Deficits in NCAM/PSA increase GluN2B-mediated transmission and Ca2+ transients in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. In line with elevation of GluN2B-mediated transmission, defects in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region and contextual fear memory in NCAM/PSA-deficient mice are abrogated by application of a GluN2B-selective antagonist. Furthermore, treatment with the glutamate scavenger glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, ablation of Ras-GRF1 (a mediator of GluN2B signaling to p38 MAPK), or direct inhibition of hyperactive p38 MAPK can restore impaired synaptic plasticity in brain slices lacking PSA/NCAM. Thus, PSA carried by NCAM regulates plasticity and learning by inhibition of the GluN2B-Ras-GRF1-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. These findings implicate carbohydrates carried by adhesion molecules in modulating NMDA receptor signaling in the brain and demonstrate reversibility of cognitive deficits associated with ablation of a schizophrenia-related adhesion molecule. PMID:20237287

  12. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide acts as a downstream signal molecule in salicylic acid-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Xie, Lin-Run; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2015-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, is a small phenolic compound with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development, and the acquisition of stress tolerance. In recent years, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been found to have similar functions, but cross talk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. In this study, pretreatment of maize seedlings with SA improved the survival percentage of seedlings under heat stress, indicating that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings. In addition, treatment with SA enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, which in turn induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. Interestingly, SA-induced heat tolerance was enhanced by addition of NaHS, a H2S donor, but weakened by specific inhibitors of H2S biosynthesis DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and its scavenger hydroxylamine (HT). Furthermore, pretreatment with paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), inhibitors of SA biosynthesis, had no significant effect on NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings. Similarly, significant change in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H), the key enzymes in SA biosynthesis, and the content of endogenous SA, was not observed in maize seedlings by NaHS treatment. All of the above-mentioned results suggest that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings, and H2S might be a novel downstream signal molecule in SA-induced heat tolerance.

  14. Signalling properties of lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Durieux, M E; Lynch, K R

    1993-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is the simplest natural phospholipid, primarily known as a membrane component and metabolic intermediate. However, a remarkable variety of biological effects of this compound have come to light, seemingly pointing to an additional role for LPA as a signalling molecule. In this review, Marcel Durieux and Kevin Lynch integrate the recent information that indicates that LPA could be an intercellular messenger, possibly acting through a G protein-coupled receptor, and with a role in cell growth and motility.

  15. Polypetide signaling molecules in plant development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intercellular communication mediated by small signaling molecules is a key mechanism for coordinating plant growth and development. In the past few years, polypeptide signals have been shown to play prominent roles in processes as diverse as shoot and root meristem maintenance, vascular differentiat...

  16. Effects of terbium (III) on signaling molecules in horseradish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Zhang, Xuanbo; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth elements, especially terbium (Tb), are high-valence heavy metal elements that accumulate in the environment, and they show toxic effects on plants. Signaling molecules regulate many physiological and biochemical processes in plants. How rare earth elements affect signaling molecules remains largely unknown. In the present study, the effects of Tb(3+) on some extracellular and intracellular signaling molecules (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, auxin, H2O2, and Ca(2+)) in horseradish leaves were investigated by using high-performance liquid chromatography, X-ray energy spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy, and Tb(3+) was sprayed on the surface of leaves. Tb(3+) treatment decreased the auxin and gibberellic acid contents and increased the abscisic acid content. These changes in the contents of phytohormones (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, and auxin) triggered excessive production of intracellular H2O2. Consequently, the increase in H2O2 content stimulated the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and the release of Ca(2+) from Ca(2+) stores, leading to Ca(2+) overload and the resulting inhibition of physiological and biochemical processes. The effects outlined above were more evident with increasing the concentration of Tb(3+) sprayed on horseradish leaves. Our data provide a possible underlying mechanism of Tb(3+) action on plants.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  18. Modulation of Pb-induced stress in Prosopis shoots through an interconnected network of signaling molecules, phenolic compounds and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zafari, Somaieh; Sharifi, Mohsen; Ahmadian Chashmi, Najmeh; Mur, Luis A J

    2016-02-01

    Lead (Pb) is a hazardous heavy metal present in the environment which elicits oxidative stress in plants. To characterize the physiological and biochemical basis of Pb tolerance, Prosopis farcta seedlings were exposed to Hoagland's solutions at six different Pb concentrations (0, 80, 160, 320, 400 and 480 μM) for different periods of time. As expected, application of Pb significantly increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content. In response, P. farcta deployed the antioxidative defence mechanisms with significantly higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), enzymes related to H2O2 removal, and also the increases in proline as a solute marker of stress. Increases were observed in nitric oxide (NO) production which could also act in triggering defense functions to detoxify Pb. Enhanced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity at early days of exposure to Pb was correlated with increases in phenolic compounds. Significant increases in phenolic acids and flavonoids; daidzein, vitexin, ferulic acid and salicylic acid were observed with Pb treatment. Furthermore, the stress effects were followed by changes in free amino acid content and composition. Aspartic acid and glycine content was increased but glutamic acid significantly decreased. It is likely that stress signal transduction by NO and H2O2 mediated defence responses to Pb by coordination of antioxidative system and metabolic pathways of phenylpropanoid and amino acids.

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide: A Signal Molecule in Plant Cross-Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Min, Xiong; Zhou, Zhi-Hao

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been considered as merely a toxic by product of cell metabolism, but nowadays is emerging as a novel gaseous signal molecule, which participates in seed germination, plant growth and development, as well as the acquisition of stress tolerance including cross-adaptation in plants. Cross-adaptation, widely existing in nature, is the phenomenon in which plants expose to a moderate stress can induce the resistance to other stresses. The mechanism of cross-adaptation is involved in a complex signal network consisting of many second messengers such as Ca2+, abscisic acid, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, as well as their crosstalk. The cross-adaptation signaling is commonly triggered by moderate environmental stress or exogenous application of signal molecules or their donors, which in turn induces cross-adaptation by enhancing antioxidant system activity, accumulating osmolytes, synthesizing heat shock proteins, as well as maintaining ion and nutrient balance. In this review, based on the current knowledge on H2S and cross-adaptation in plant biology, H2S homeostasis in plant cells under normal growth conditions; H2S signaling triggered by abiotic stress; and H2S-induced cross-adaptation to heavy metal, salt, drought, cold, heat, and flooding stress were summarized, and concluded that H2S might be a candidate signal molecule in plant cross-adaptation. In addition, future research direction also has been proposed. PMID:27833636

  20. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  1. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  2. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  3. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, R.I.

    1998-04-21

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use. 2 figs.

  4. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  5. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  6. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  7. Elucidation of signaling molecules involved in ergosterol perception in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Dadakova, Katerina; Klempova, Jitka; Jendrisakova, Tereza; Lochman, Jan; Kasparovsky, Tomas

    2013-12-01

    Ergosterol, a principal compound of the fungal plasma membrane, is regarded as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. In the present study, the role of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and spermine signaling pathways after ergosterol elicitation were evaluated. SA, JA and spermine production, as well as accumulation of transcripts for a lipoxygenase (NaLOX3) gene, the phenylalanine-ammonia lyase gene, selected pathogenesis-related genes (PR1, PR5), and peroxidase tPOXC1 were determined in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) in response to ergosterol elicitation. To understand the sequence of the signaling cascade, several representative steps involved in the synthesis of crucial signaling molecules were targeted using specific inhibitors. SA signaling pathway, together with calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and nitric oxide, was demonstrated to play an important role in the induction of defense-related genes following ergosterol treatment. The results suggested that nitric oxide participates in defense-related gene activation following ergosterol treatment but does not directly participate in activation of reactive oxygen species production. The induction of PR5 and tPOXC1 transcripts was found to be not fully dependent on calmodulin/Ca2+ and SA signaling, contrary to the PR1a transcript. A possible candidate for this SA-independent pathway is the spermine pathway, as elevated spermine levels were detected following ergosterol treatment.

  8. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  9. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W; Williamson, Valerie M; Schroeder, Frank C; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-07-23

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture.

  10. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J.; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W.; Williamson, Valerie M.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture. PMID:26203561

  11. Ferulic acid exerts its antidiabetic effect by modulating insulin-signalling molecules in the liver of high-fat diet and fructose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Akilavalli; Chinnaiyan, Mayilvanan; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2015-08-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic phytochemical known for its antidiabetic property The present study is designed to evaluate the mechanism behind its antidiabetic property in high-fat and fructose-induced type 2 diabetic adult male rats. Animals were divided into 5 groups: (i) control, (ii) diabetic control, (iii) diabetic animals treated with FA (50 mg/(kg body weight · day)(-1), orally) for 30 days, (iv) diabetic animals treated with metformin (50 mg/(kg body weight · day)(-1), orally) for 30 days, and (v) control rats treated with FA. FA treatment to diabetic animals restored blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose tolerance, and insulin tolerance to normal range. Hepatic glycogen concentration, activity of glycogen synthase, and glucokinase were significantly decreased, whereas activity of glycogen phosphorylase and enzymes of gluconeogenesis (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase)) were increased in diabetic animals and FA restored these to normal levels similar to that of metformin. FA improved the insulin signalling molecules and reduced the negative regulators of insulin signalling. The messenger RNA of gluconeogenic enzyme genes (PEPCK and G6Pase) and the interaction between forkhead transcription factor-O1 and promoters of gluconeogenic enzyme genes (PEPCK and G6Pase) was reduced significantly by ferulic acid. It is concluded from the present study that FA treatment to type 2 diabetic rats improves insulin sensitivity and hepatic glycogenesis but inhibits gluconeogenesis and negative regulators of insulin signalling to maintain normal glucose homeostasis.

  12. Nanoconstructions Based on Spatially Ordered Nucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    Different strategies for the design of nanoconstructions whose building blocks are both linear molecules of double-stranded nucleic acids and nucleic acid molecules fixed in the spatial structure of particles of liquid-crystalline dispersions are described.

  13. Carbon Monoxide as a Signaling Molecule in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Liao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous molecule, has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants, due to its ability to trigger a series of physiological reactions. This article provides a brief update on the synthesis of CO, its physiological functions in plant growth and development, as well as its roles in abiotic stress tolerance such as drought, salt, ultraviolet radiation, and heavy metal stress. CO has positive effects on seed germination, root development, and stomatal closure. Also, CO can enhance plant abiotic stress resistance commonly through the enhancement of antioxidant defense system. Moreover, CO shows cross talk with other signaling molecules including NO, phytohormones (IAA, ABA, and GA) and other gas signaling molecules (H2S, H2, CH4). PMID:27200045

  14. Simple Signaling Molecules for Inductive Bone Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Stephen J.; Deng, Meng; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Doty, Stephen B.; Lo, Kevin W. H.; Khan, Yusuf M.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2014-01-01

    With greater than 500,000 orthopaedic procedures performed in the United States each year requiring a bone graft, the development of novel graft materials is necessary. We report that some porous polymer/ceramic composite scaffolds possess intrinsic osteoinductivity as shown through their capacity to induce in vivo host osteoid mineralization and in vitro stem cell osteogenesis making them attractive synthetic bone graft substitutes. It was discovered that certain low crystallinity ceramics partially dissociate into simple signaling molecules (i.e., calcium and phosphate ions) that induce stem cells to endogenously produce their own osteoinductive proteins. Review of the literature has uncovered a variety of simple signaling molecules (i.e., gases, ions, and redox reagents) capable of inducing other desirable stem cell differentiation through endogenous growth factor production. Inductive simple signaling molecules, which we have termed inducerons, represent a paradigm shift in the field of regenerative engineering where they can be utilized in place of recombinant protein growth factors. PMID:25019622

  15. Single-Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics in Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H PETER.

    2004-08-22

    We have demonstrated the application of single-molecule imaging and ultrafast spectroscopy to probe protein conformational dynamics in solution and in lipid bilayers. Dynamic protein-protein interactions involve significant conformational motions that initiate chain reactions leading to specific cellular responses. We have carried out a single molecule study of dynamic protein-protein interactions in a GTPase intracellular signaling protein Cdc42 in complex with a downstream effector protein, WASP. We were able to probe hydrophobic interactions significant to Cdc42/WASP recognition. Single molecule fluorescence intensity and polarization measurements have revealed the dynamic and inhomogeneous nature of protein-protein interactions within the Cdc42/WASP complex that is characterized by structured distributions of conformational fluctuation rates. Conducting a single-molecule fluorescence anisotropy study of calmodulin (CaM), a regulatory protein for calcium-dependent cell signaling, we were able to probe CaM conformational dynamics at a wide time scale. In this study, CaM contains a site-specifically inserted tetra-cysteine motif that reacted with FlAsH, a biarsenic fluorescein derivative that can be rotationally locked to the host protein. The study provided direct characterization of the nanosecond motions of CaM tethered to a biologically compatible surface under physiological buffer solution. The unique technical approaches are applicable of studying single-molecule dynamics of protein conformational motions and protein-protein interactions at a wide time range without the signal convolution of probe-dye molecule motions

  16. Recent advances in understanding carotenoid-derived signaling molecules in regulating plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids (C40) are synthesized in plastids and perform numerous important functions in these organelles. In addition, carotenoids can be processed into smaller signaling molecules that regulate various phases of the plant's life cycle. Besides the relatively well-studied phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA) and strigolactones (SLs), additional carotenoid-derived signaling molecules have been discovered and shown to regulate plant growth and development. As a few excellent reviews summarized recent research on ABA and SLs, this mini review will focus on progress made on identification and characterization of the emerging carotenoid-derived signals. Overall, a better understanding of carotenoid-derived signaling molecules has immediate applications in improving plant biomass production which in turn will have far reaching impacts on providing food, feed, and fuel for the growing world population.

  17. Recent Advances in Developing Small Molecules Targeting Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maolin; Yu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids participate in a large number of biological processes. However, current approaches for small molecules targeting protein are incompatible with nucleic acids. On the other hand, the lack of crystallization of nucleic acid is the limiting factor for nucleic acid drug design. Because of the improvements in crystallization in recent years, a great many structures of nucleic acids have been reported, providing basic information for nucleic acid drug discovery. This review focuses on the discovery and development of small molecules targeting nucleic acids. PMID:27248995

  18. Involvement of secondary messengers and small organic molecules in auxin perception and signaling.

    PubMed

    Di, Dong-Wei; Zhang, Caiguo; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-06-01

    Auxin is a major phytohormone involved in most aspects of plant growth and development. Generally, auxin is perceived by three distinct receptors: TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESISTANT1-Auxin/INDOLE ACETIC ACID, S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2A and AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN1. The auxin perception is regulated by a variety of secondary messenger molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, calcium, cyclic GMP, cyclic AMP, inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol and by physiological pH. In addition, some small organic molecules, including inositol hexakisphosphate, yokonolide B, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, toyocamycin and terfestatin A, are involved in auxin signaling. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress in understanding the functions of these secondary messengers and small organic molecules, which are now thoroughly demonstrated to be pervasive and important in auxin perception and signal transduction.

  19. Interactive endogenous small molecule (gaseous) signaling: implications for teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fukuto, Jon M; Collins, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Dioxygen (O2) is an exogenously supplied gas with a number of properties that make it valuable as a biological source of energy and as a result much of life has become dependent on this molecule. Nitric oxide (NO), carbon dioxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are small molecules that are sometimes in a gaseous state and that can be either exogenously or endogenously supplied. The chemistry of these four molecules allows them to share some common biological targets and signal transduction pathways as well as providing for unique aspects to the biochemistry of each one. Dioxygen can be teratogenic either in excess (hyperoxia) or in deficiency (hypoxia). Although there is a great deal known about the chemistry and physiology of dioxygen, the mechanisms by which it induces toxic endpoints, such as teratogenesis, are unknown. This review examines some fundamental concepts of these four signaling molecules and considers some of the molecular targets and pathways by which they interact. The information regarding the teratogenicity of either excess or deficiency of the four gases is summarized. Interaction information is generally unavailable for teratogenicity endpoints with the four gases and also a mechanistic understanding of the toxicodynamics of the compounds is lacking. Although it could be theoretically predicted that certain interactions would be additive, for example carbon monoxide and hypoxia, based on the physiological role of these molecules, the data is unavailable. Consequently, these small (gaseous) signaling molecules have been demonstrated to interact with respect to signaling pathways, but whether this indicates a similar result for teratogenesis remains unevaluated.

  20. More than a signal: non-signaling properties of quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Boulette, Megan L; Whiteley, Marvin

    2009-05-01

    Quorum sensing in bacteria serves as an example of the adaptation of single-celled organisms to engage in cooperative group behaviors. This phenomenon is much more widespread than originally thought, with many different species 'speaking' through various secreted small molecules. Despite some variation in signaling molecules, the principles of quorum sensing are conserved across a wide range of organisms. Small molecules, secreted into the environment, are detected by neighbors who respond by altering gene expression and, as a consequence, behavior. However, it is not known whether these systems evolved specifically for this purpose, or even if their role is exclusive to information trafficking. Rather, clues exist that many quorum sensing molecules function as more than just signals. Here, we discuss non-signaling roles for quorum sensing molecules in such important processes as nutrient scavenging, ultrastructure modification and competition.

  1. Agrobacterium tumefaciens responses to plant-derived signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nathoo, Naeem; Klimov, Eugene; Yuan, Ze-Chun

    2014-01-01

    As a special phytopathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes plant tumors also known as crown galls. The complexity of Agrobacterium-plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely attributed to its evolved capabilities of precise recognition and response to plant-derived chemical signals. Agrobacterium perceives plant-derived signals to activate its virulence genes, which are responsible for transferring and integrating its Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from its Tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid into the plant nucleus. The expression of T-DNA in plant hosts leads to the production of a large amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), cytokinin (CK), and opines. IAA and CK stimulate plant growth, resulting in tumor formation. Agrobacterium utilizes opines as nutrient sources as well as signals in order to activate its quorum sensing (QS) to further promote virulence and opine metabolism. Intriguingly, Agrobacterium also recognizes plant-derived signals including γ-amino butyric acid and salicylic acid (SA) to activate quorum quenching that reduces the level of QS signals, thereby avoiding the elicitation of plant defense and preserving energy. In addition, Agrobacterium hijacks plant-derived signals including SA, IAA, and ethylene to down-regulate its virulence genes located on the Ti plasmid. Moreover, certain metabolites from corn (Zea mays) also inhibit the expression of Agrobacterium virulence genes. Here we outline the responses of Agrobacterium to major plant-derived signals that impact Agrobacterium-plant interactions.

  2. Role of chrysin on expression of insulin signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, Kottireddy; Sravanthi, Koora; Shaker, Ivvala Anand; Ponnulakshmi, Rajagopal; Selvaraj, Jayaraman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently available drugs are unsuccessful for the treatment of tye-2 diabetes due to their adverseside-effects. Hence, a search for novel drugs, especially ofplant origin, continues. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid, natural component of traditional medicinal herbs, present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts that hasbeen used in traditional medicine around the world to treat numerous ailments. Objective: The present study was aimed to identify the protective role of chrysin on the expression of insulin-signaling molecules in the skeletal muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rats. Materials and Methods: The oral effective dose of chrysin (100 mg/kg body weight) was given once a day until the end of the study (30 days post-induction of diabetes) to high fat diet-induced diabetic rats. At the end of the experimental period, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, serum lipid profile, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and free radical generation, as well as the levels of insulin signaling molecules and tissue glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle were assessed. Results: Diabetic rats showed impaired glucose tolerance and impairment in insulin signaling molecules (IR, IRS-1, p-IRS-1Tyr632, p- AktThr308), glucose transporter subtype 4 [GLUT4] proteins and glycogen concentration. Serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and free radical generation were found to be increased in diabetic control rats. The treatment with chrysin normalized the altered levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and insulin signaling molecules as well as GLUT4 proteins. Conclusion: Our present findings indicate that chrysin improves glycemic control through activation of insulin signal transduction in the gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic male rats. PMID:26834424

  3. Small molecule modulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Mook, Robert A; Chen, Minyong; Lu, Jiuyi; Barak, Larry S; Lyerly, H Kim; Chen, Wei

    2013-04-01

    The Wnt signal transduction pathway is dysregulated in many highly prevalent diseases, including cancer. Unfortunately, drug discovery efforts have been hampered by the paucity of targets and drug-like lead molecules amenable to drug discovery. Recently, we reported the FDA-approved anthelmintic drug Niclosamide inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling by a unique mechanism, though the target responsible remains unknown. We interrogated the mechanism and structure-activity relationships to understand drivers of potency and to assist target identification efforts. We found inhibition of Wnt signaling by Niclosamide appears unique among the structurally-related anthelmintic agents tested and found the potency and functional response was dependent on small changes in the chemical structure of Niclosamide. Overall, these findings support efforts to identify the target of Niclosamide inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the discovery of potent and selective modulators to treat human disease.

  4. TSH Receptor Signaling Abrogation by a Novel Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Rauf; Realubit, Ronald B.; Karan, Charles; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2016-01-01

    Pathological activation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is caused by thyroid-stimulating antibodies in patients with Graves’ disease (GD) or by somatic and rare genomic mutations that enhance constitutive activation of the receptor influencing both G protein and non-G protein signaling. Potential selective small molecule antagonists represent novel therapeutic compounds for abrogation of such abnormal TSHR signaling. In this study, we describe the identification and in vitro characterization of a novel small molecule antagonist by high-throughput screening (HTS). The identification of the TSHR antagonist was performed using a transcription-based TSH-inhibition bioassay. TSHR-expressing CHO cells, which also expressed a luciferase-tagged CRE response element, were optimized using bovine TSH as the activator, in a 384 well plate format, which had a Z score of 0.3–0.6. Using this HTS assay, we screened a diverse library of ~80,000 compounds at a final concentration of 16.7 μM. The selection criteria for a positive hit were based on a mean signal threshold of ≥50% inhibition of control TSH stimulation. The screening resulted in 450 positive hits giving a hit ratio of 0.56%. A secondary confirmation screen against TSH and forskolin – a post receptor activator of adenylyl cyclase – confirmed one TSHR-specific candidate antagonist molecule (named VA-K-14). This lead molecule had an IC50 of 12.3 μM and a unique chemical structure. A parallel analysis for cell viability indicated that the lead inhibitor was non-cytotoxic at its effective concentrations. In silico docking studies performed using a TSHR transmembrane model showed the hydrophobic contact locations and the possible mode of inhibition of TSHR signaling. Furthermore, this molecule was capable of inhibiting TSHR stimulation by GD patient sera and monoclonal-stimulating TSHR antibodies. In conclusion, we report the identification of a novel small molecule TSHR inhibitor, which has

  5. Silicon technology compatible photonic molecules for compact optical signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Barea, Luis A. M. Vallini, Felipe; Jarschel, Paulo F.; Frateschi, Newton C.

    2013-11-11

    Photonic molecules (PMs) based on multiple inner coupled microring resonators allow to surpass the fundamental constraint between the total quality factor (Q{sub T}), free spectral range (FSR), and resonator size. In this work, we use a PM that presents doublets and triplets resonance splitting, all with high Q{sub T}. We demonstrate the use of the doublet splitting for 34.2 GHz signal extraction by filtering the sidebands of a modulated optical signal. We also demonstrate that very compact optical modulators operating 2.75 times beyond its resonator linewidth limit may be obtained using the PM triplet splitting, with separation of ∼55 GHz.

  6. Composition for detection of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS), which is secreted by fibroblastic cells in culture, preferably tendon cells, and which provides a means by which the cells self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  7. Gram-Negative Bacterial Sensors for Eukaryotic Signal Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Veron, Wilfried; Chapalain, Annelise; Madi, Amar; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Dagorn, Audrey; Connil, Nathalie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Ample evidence exists showing that eukaryotic signal molecules synthesized and released by the host can activate the virulence of opportunistic pathogens. The sensitivity of prokaryotes to host signal molecules requires the presence of bacterial sensors. These prokaryotic sensors, or receptors, have a double function: stereospecific recognition in a complex environment and transduction of the message in order to initiate bacterial physiological modifications. As messengers are generally unable to freely cross the bacterial membrane, they require either the presence of sensors anchored in the membrane or transporters allowing direct recognition inside the bacterial cytoplasm. Since the discovery of quorum sensing, it was established that the production of virulence factors by bacteria is tightly growth-phase regulated. It is now obvious that expression of bacterial virulence is also controlled by detection of the eukaryotic messengers released in the micro-environment as endocrine or neuro-endocrine modulators. In the presence of host physiological stress many eukaryotic factors are released and detected by Gram-negative bacteria which in return rapidly adapt their physiology. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can bind elements of the host immune system such as interferon-γ and dynorphin and then through quorum sensing circuitry enhance its virulence. Escherichia coli sensitivity to the neurohormones of the catecholamines family appears relayed by a recently identified bacterial adrenergic receptor. In the present review, we will describe the mechanisms by which various eukaryotic signal molecules produced by host may activate Gram-negative bacteria virulence. Particular attention will be paid to Pseudomonas, a genus whose representative species, P. aeruginosa, is a common opportunistic pathogen. The discussion will be particularly focused on the pivotal role played by these new types of pathogen sensors from the sensing to the transduction mechanism involved in

  8. Observation of an electrical signal from a single molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Arooj; Shaheen, Noor; Dobiszewski, Kyle; Kanwal, Alokik; Farrow, Reginald; Thomas, Gordon

    We have attached a folded protein molecule to the tip of a carbon nanotube using electrophoresis. We have then measured the electrons produced when the protein catalyzes a series of reactions. As an initial example of the reactions, we have used the catalysis by glucose-oxidase of glucose. We can show that the characteristic dynamic signals from the molecule scale with the glucose concentration. The molecule on the carbon nanotube tip is stable with respect to time under controlled conditions. The signals also indicate the glucose diffusion as its concentration is locally depleted at the nanotube by the catalysis. We use a second carbon nanotube with a laccase molecule on its tip to complete the circuit with an oxygen reaction. In a previous stage of this process, the other end of the nanotube is attached with a low-impedance electrical connection to a Ti thin film and the measuring circuitry. This work is an early step toward investigating the feasibility of an implantable glucose monitor to help treat diabetes.

  9. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  10. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases.

  11. Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Voronkov, Andrey; Krauss, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a branch of a functional network that dates back to the first metazoans and it is involved in a broad range of biological systems including stem cells, embryonic development and adult organs. Deregulation of components involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in a wide spectrum of diseases including a number of cancers and degenerative diseases. The key mediator of Wnt signaling, β-catenin, serves several cellular functions. It functions in a dynamic mode at multiple cellular locations, including the plasma membrane, where β-catenin contributes to the stabilization of intercellular adhesive complexes, the cytoplasm where β-catenin levels are regulated and the nucleus where β-catenin is involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin interactions. Central effectors of β-catenin levels are a family of cysteine-rich secreted glycoproteins, known as Wnt morphogens. Through the LRP5/6-Frizzled receptor complex, Wnts regulate the location and activity of the destruction complex and consequently intracellular β- catenin levels. However, β-catenin levels and their effects on transcriptional programs are also influenced by multiple other factors including hypoxia, inflammation, hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling, and the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The broad implications of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in development, in the adult body and in disease render the pathway a prime target for pharmacological research and development. The intricate regulation of β-catenin at its various locations provides alternative points for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23016862

  12. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  13. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  14. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  15. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling in Cholestasis, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport, and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug, and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport, and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration, and carcinogenesis.

  16. Extracellular Signals induce Glycoprotein M6a Clustering of Lipid-rafts and associated Signaling Molecules.

    PubMed

    Honda, Atsuko; Ito, Yasuyuki; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Matsushita, Natsuki; Nozumi, Motohiro; Tabata, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Kosei; Igarashi, Michihiro

    2017-03-08

    Lipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. To examine how signaling protein complexes are clustered in rafts, we focused on the functions of glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing mouse neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a GPM6a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a, i.e., Rufy3, Rap2, and Tiam2/STEF, accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation in neuronal development. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of neuronal polarity determination. Thus, GPM6a acts as a signal transducer that responds to extracellular signals.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTLipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. We focused on glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of polarity determination

  17. Detection of a New Interstellar Molecule: Thiocyanic Acid HSCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.; Brünken, S.; Gottlieb, C. A.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P.

    2009-09-01

    A new interstellar molecule, HSCN (thiocyanic acid), an energetic isomer of the well-known species HNCS, has been detected toward Sgr B2(N) with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope. Eight rotational transitions in the Ka = 0 ladder were observed in the 2 mm and 3 mm bands. Five consecutive transitions in the 3 mm band are unblended, but three in the 2 mm band are partially masked by lines of other molecules. The peak intensity of all eight transitions are well described by a rotational temperature that is in very good agreement with that of many other molecules in this source. The line width and radial velocity of HSCN match closely with those of the ground state isomer HNCS (isothiocyanic acid), HNCO (isocyanic acid), and HOCN (cyanic acid); preliminary maps indicate that all four molecules are similarly distributed in Sgr B2. Although HSCN is calculated to lie over 3000 K higher in energy than HNCS, its column density of 1.3 × 1013 cm-2 in Sgr B2(N) is only three times lower than that of HNCS. The fractional abundances of HSCN and HNCS relative to H2 are 4.5 × 10-12 and 1.1 × 10-11. By analogy with the isomeric pair HCN and HNC, these two sulfur-bearing isomers are plausibly formed from a common cation precursor.

  18. Hard and soft acids and bases: small molecules.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2009-08-03

    The operational chemical hardness has been determined for the hydride, chloride, and fluoride derivatives of the anionic atomic bases of the second period. Of interest is the identification of the structure and associated processes that give rise to hard-soft behavior in small molecules. The Pearson Principle of Hard and Soft Acids and Bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. Similar to the case for atoms, the molecule's responding electrons have been identified as the structure giving rise to hard-soft behavior, and a relaxation described by a modified Slater model has been identified as the associated process. The responding electrons are the molecule's valence electrons that are not undergoing electron transfer in an acid-base interaction. However, it has been demonstrated that chemical hardness is a local property, and only those responding electrons that are associated with the base's binding atom directly impact chemical hardness.

  19. Cross-talk in abscisic acid signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2002-01-01

    "Cross-talk" in hormone signaling reflects an organism's ability to integrate different inputs and respond appropriately, a crucial function at the heart of signaling network operation. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in bud and seed dormancy, growth regulation, leaf senescence and abscission, stomatal opening, and a variety of plant stress responses. This review summarizes what is known about ABA signaling in the control of stomatal opening and seed dormancy and provides an overview of emerging knowledge about connections between ABA, ethylene, sugar, and auxin synthesis and signaling.

  20. [Microspeciation of amphoteric molecules of unusual acid-base properties].

    PubMed

    Kóczián, Kristóf

    2007-01-01

    The phisico-chemical properties of bio- and drug molecules greatly influence their interactions in the body and strongly effect the mechanism of drug action. Among these properties, macroscopic and site-specific protonation constants are of crucial importance. Latter one is the tool to calculate the relative concentration of the various microspecies in the compartments of the body at different pH values, and also, it is the versatile parameter to improve the pharmacokinetic properties of a new molecule in a particular family of drugs. In the present thesis work, the microspeciation of three molecules of great pharmaceutical importance and unusual acid-base properties, were carried out. The microconstants of tenoxicam, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, were described, introducing a novel deductive method using Hammett constants. For this purpose, a total of 8 tenoxicam and piroxicam derivatives were synthesised. To the best of our knowledge, the log k(N)O microconstant of tenoxicam obtained thus is the lowest enolate basicity value, which, however, can be well explained by the effects of the intramolecular environment. The developed evaluation procedure is suitable for microconstant determination of compounds in other molecule families. Besides, prodrug-type compounds and analogues similar to the structures of selective COX-2 isoenzyme inhibitors were synthesised. The other two molecules studied, the 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-cephalosporanic acid, the core molecules of the two most important beta-lactam antibiotic-types were derivatised and investigated by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. The NMR-pH titration on the parent compounds and their ester derivatives, combined with in situ pH-measurements allowed the microspeciation of these easily decomposing molecules. One of the protonation constant of 7-ACA (log kN(O) = 4.12), to the best of our knowledge, is the least non-aromatic basic amino-site among the natural compounds.

  1. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  2. Extraction, purification and identification of bacterial signal molecules based on N‐acyl homoserine lactones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhua; Quan, Chunshan; Wang, Xue; Zhao, Pengchao; Fan, Shengdi

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacteria possess an extraordinary repertoire for intercellular communication and social behaviour. This repertoire for bacterial communication, termed as quorum sensing (QS), depends on specific diffusible signal molecules. There are many different kinds of signal molecules in the bacterial community. Among those signal molecules, N‐acyl homoserine lactones (HSLs, in other publications also referred to as AHLs, acy‐HSLs etc.) are often employed as QS signal molecules for many Gram‐negative bacteria. Due to the specific structure and tiny amount of those HSL signal molecules, the characterization of HSLs has been the subject of extensive investigations in the last decades and has become a paradigm for bacteria intercellular signalling. In this article, different methods, including extraction, purification and characterization of HSLs, are reviewed. The review provides an insight into identification and characterization of new HSLs and other signal molecules for bacterial intercellular communication. PMID:21375695

  3. Exporters for Production of Amino Acids and Other Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Lothar

    2016-11-11

    Microbes are talented catalysts to synthesize valuable small molecules in their cytosol. However, to make full use of their skills - and that of metabolic engineers - the export of intracellularly synthesized molecules to the culture medium has to be considered. This step is as essential as is each step for the synthesis of the favorite molecule of the metabolic engineer, but is frequently not taken into account. To export small molecules via the microbial cell envelope, a range of different types of carrier proteins is recognized to be involved, which are primary active carriers, secondary active carriers, or proteins increasing diffusion. Relevant export may require just one carrier as is the case with L-lysine export by Corynebacterium glutamicum or involve up to four carriers as known for L-cysteine excretion by Escherichia coli. Meanwhile carriers for a number of small molecules of biotechnological interest are recognized, like for production of peptides, nucleosides, diamines, organic acids, or biofuels. In addition to carriers involved in amino acid excretion, such carriers and their impact on product formation are described, as well as the relatedness of export carriers which may serve as a hint to identify further carriers required to improve product formation by engineering export.

  4. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  5. Abscisic Acid: a versatile phytohormone in plant signaling and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Vives, Vicente; Zandalinas, Sara I; Manzi, Matias; Sanchez-Perez, Ana M; Perez-Clemente, Rosa M; Arbona, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants cannot escape from adverse conditions and, therefore, they have developed complex responses to the changing environment. Plant responses to abiotic cues involve changes in metabolism, photosynthesis, gene expression, ion levels, etc., and must be perfectly coordinated by phytohormones. The abscisic acid (ABA) is the main phytohormone involved in abiotic stress responses although it is nowadays clear that its signaling pathways are not isolated but interconnected with other hormone signals in complex networks. This article revises molecular mechanisms involved in the crosstalks of ABA with other phytohormones in response to different physiological processes. Moreover, ABA is not a molecule exclusive from plants but it can be found in many other organisms including bacteria, algae, fungi, animals, etc. Interestingly, it can be synthesized and secreted by a variety of human cells. These aspects that confer to the ABA a range of ubiquitous molecule will be also revised in this article.

  6. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abetov, Danysh; Mustapova, Zhanar; Saliev, Timur; Bulanin, Denis; Batyrbekov, Kanat; Gilman, Charles P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of oncologists worldwide is to understand and then intervene in the primary tumor initiation and propagation mechanisms. This is essential to allow targeted elimination of cancer cells without altering normal mitotic cells. Currently, there are two main rival theories describing the process of tumorigenesis. According to the Stochastic Model, potentially any cell, once defunct, is capable of initiating carcinogenesis. Alternatively the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) Model posits that only a small fraction of undifferentiated tumor cells are capable of triggering carcinogenesis. Like healthy stem cells, CSCs are also characterized by a capacity for self-renewal and the ability to generate differentiated progeny, possibly mediating treatment resistance, thus leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Moreover, molecular signaling profiles are similar between CSCs and normal stem cells, including Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways. Therefore, development of novel chemotherapeutic agents and proteins (e.g., enzymes and antibodies) specifically targeting CSCs are attractive pharmaceutical candidates. This article describes small molecule inhibitors of stem cell pathways Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, and their recent chemotherapy clinical trials.

  7. Modulation of Nitro-fatty Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vitturi, Dario A.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Stewart, Nicolas A.; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Kensler, Thomas W.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation, characterized by the activation of both resident and infiltrated immune cells, is accompanied by increased production of oxidizing and nitrating species. Nitrogen dioxide, the proximal nitrating species formed under these conditions, reacts with unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitroalkene derivatives. These electrophilic products modulate protein function via post-translational modification of susceptible nucleophilic amino acids. Nitroalkenes react with Keap1 to instigate Nrf2 signaling, activate heat shock response gene expression, and inhibit NF-κB-mediated signaling, inducing net anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective metabolic responses. We report the purification and characterization of a NADPH-dependent liver enzyme that reduces the nitroalkene moiety of nitro-oleic acid, yielding the inactive product nitro-stearic acid. Prostaglandin reductase-1 (PtGR-1) was identified as a nitroalkene reductase by protein purification and proteomic studies. Kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, immunological and molecular biology approaches as well as clinical analyses confirmed this identification. Overexpression of PtGR-1 in HEK293T cells promoted nitroalkene metabolism to inactive nitroalkanes, an effect that abrogated the Nrf2-dependent induction of heme oxygenase-1 expression by nitro-oleic acid. These results situate PtGR-1 as a critical modulator of both the steady state levels and signaling activities of fatty acid nitroalkenes in vivo. PMID:23878198

  8. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  9. History of gymnemic acid, a molecule that does not exist. .

    PubMed

    Zarrelli, Armando; Romanucci, Valeria; Gravante, Raffaele; Di Marino, Cinzia; Di Fabio, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    In the literature there are hundreds of articles, the first dating back to 1866 and the last to 2014, on gymnemic acid, isolated from Gymnnema sylvestre, from its isolation to the determination of its biological activities. Gymnemic acid has a CAS number but its structure is not specified. Studies during the second half of the 1970s clearly demonstrated that what was being referred to as gymnemic acid is actually a very complex mixture of dozens of substances, belonging to different classes of natural compounds. This plant, whose infusions or complex mixtures of its metabolites are the basis for many formulas sold in pharmacies and by herbalists, has anti-diabetic and slimming effects. It is certainly misleading to talk about gymnemic acid as a specific molecule. There may be doubts about the exact composition of the products, and consequently about their origin and the claimed effects.

  10. Integrating Retinoic Acid Signaling with Brain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tuanlian; Wagner, Elisabeth; Drager, Ursula C.

    2009-01-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) regulates the transcription of about a 6th of the human genome. Compelling evidence indicates a role of RA in cognitive activities, but its integration with the molecular mechanisms of higher brain functions is not known. Here we describe the properties of RA signaling in the mouse, which point to…

  11. Biotic inactivation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal molecule.

    PubMed

    Soh, Eliza Ye-Chen; Chhabra, Siri R; Halliday, Nigel; Heeb, Stephan; Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Fetzner, Susanne; Cámara, Miguel; Chan, Kok-Gan; Williams, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) regulates the production of secondary metabolites, many of which are antimicrobials that impact on polymicrobial community composition. Consequently, quenching QS modulates the environmental impact of P. aeruginosa. To identify bacteria capable of inactivating the QS signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), a minimal medium containing PQS as the sole carbon source was used to enrich a Malaysian rainforest soil sample. This yielded an Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain (Q19) that inactivated PQS, yielding a new fluorescent compound (I-PQS) confirmed as PQS-derived using deuterated PQS. The I-PQS structure was elucidated using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as 2-heptyl-2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-dione (HHQD). Achromobacter xylosoxidans Q19 oxidized PQS congeners with alkyl chains ranging from C1 to C5 and also N-methyl PQS, yielding the corresponding 2-hydroxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline-3,4-diones, but was unable to inactivate the PQS precursor HHQ. This indicates that the hydroxyl group at position 3 in PQS is essential and that A. xylosoxidans inactivates PQS via a pathway involving the incorporation of oxygen at C2 of the heterocyclic ring. The conversion of PQS to HHQD also occurred on incubation with 12/17 A. xylosoxidans strains recovered from cystic fibrosis patients, with P. aeruginosa and with Arthrobacter, suggesting that formation of hydroxylated PQS may be a common mechanism of inactivation.

  12. Visual Map Development: Bidirectional Signaling, Bifunctional Guidance Molecules, and Competition

    PubMed Central

    Feldheim, David A.; O’Leary, Dennis D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Topographic maps are a two-dimensional representation of one neural structure within another and serve as the main strategy to organize sensory information. The retina’s projection via axons of retinal ganglion cells to midbrain visual centers, the optic tectum/superior colliculus, is the leading model to elucidate mechanisms of topographic map formation. Each axis of the retina is mapped independently using different mechanisms and sets of axon guidance molecules expressed in gradients to achieve the goal of representing a point in the retina onto a point within the target. An axon’s termination along the temporal-nasal mapping axis is determined by opposing gradients of EphAs and ephrin-As that act through their forward and reverse signaling, respectively, within the projecting axons, each of which inhibits interstitial branching, cooperating with a branch-promoting activity, to generate topographic specific branching along the shaft of the parent axons that overshoot their correct termination zone along the anterior-posterior axis of the target. The dorsal-ventral termination position is then determined using a gradient of ephrin-B that can act as a repellent or attractant depending on the ephrin-B concentration relative to EphB levels on the interstitial branches to guide them along the medial-lateral axis of the target to their correct termination zone, where they arborize. In both cases, axon-axon competition results in axon mapping based on relative rather than absolute levels of repellent or attractant activity. The map is subsequently refined through large-scale pruning driven in large part by patterned retinal activity. PMID:20880989

  13. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors and retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived morphogen controlling important developmental processes in vertebrates, and more generally in chordates, including axial patterning and tissue formation and differentiation. In the embryo, endogenous RA levels are controlled by RA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and the RA signal is transduced by two retinoid receptors: the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Both RAR and RXR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and mainly act as heterodimers to activate the transcription of target genes in the presence of their ligand, all-trans RA. This signaling pathway was long thought to be a chordate innovation, however, recent findings of gene homologs involved in RA signaling in the genomes of a wide variety of non-chordate animals, including ambulacrarians (sea urchins and acorn worms) and lophotrochozoans (annelids and mollusks), challenged this traditional view and suggested that the RA signaling pathway might have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously thought. In this chapter, we discuss the evolutionary history of the RA signaling pathway, and more particularly of the RARs, which might have experienced independent gene losses and duplications in different animal lineages. In sum, the available data reveal novel insights into the origin of the RA signaling pathway as well as into the evolutionary history of the RARs.

  14. Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family Receptor Homologs in New World Monkey Cytomegaloviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Farré, Domènec; Martínez-Vicente, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Throughout evolution, large DNA viruses have been usurping genes from their hosts to equip themselves with proteins that restrain host immune defenses. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family (SLAMF) receptors are involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, which occurs upon engagement with their ligands via homotypic or heterotypic interactions. Here we report a total of seven SLAMF genes encoded by the genomes of two cytomegalovirus (CMV) species, squirrel monkey CMV (SMCMV) and owl monkey CMV (OMCMV), that infect New World monkeys. Our results indicate that host genes were captured by retrotranscription at different stages of the CMV-host coevolution. The most recent acquisition led to S1 in SMCMV. S1 is a SLAMF6 homolog with an amino acid sequence identity of 97% to SLAMF6 in its ligand-binding N-terminal Ig domain. We demonstrate that S1 is a cell surface glycoprotein capable of binding to host SLAMF6. Furthermore, the OMCMV genome encodes A33, an LY9 (SLAMF3) homolog, and A43, a CD48 (SLAMF2) homolog, two soluble glycoproteins which recognize their respective cellular counterreceptors and thus are likely to be viral SLAMF decoy receptors. In addition, distinct copies of further divergent CD48 homologs were found to be encoded by both CMV genomes. Remarkably, all these molecules display a number of unique features, including cytoplasmic tails lacking characteristic SLAMF signaling motifs. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel immune evasion mechanism in which incorporation of host SLAMF receptors that retain their ligand-binding properties enables viruses to interfere with SLAMF functions and to supply themselves with convenient structural molds for expanding their immunomodulatory repertoires. IMPORTANCE The way in which viruses shape their genomes under the continual selective pressure exerted by the host immune system is central for their survival. Here, we report that New World monkey cytomegaloviruses

  15. L-Ascorbic Acid: A Multifunctional Molecule Supporting Plant Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is as essential to plants as it is to animals. Ascorbic acid functions as a major redox buffer and as a cofactor for enzymes involved in regulating photosynthesis, hormone biosynthesis, and regenerating other antioxidants. Ascorbic acid regulates cell division and growth and is involved in signal transduction. In contrast to the single pathway responsible for ascorbic acid biosynthesis in animals, plants use multiple pathways to synthesize ascorbic acid, perhaps reflecting the importance of this molecule to plant health. Given the importance of ascorbic acid to human nutrition, several technologies have been developed to increase the ascorbic acid content of plants through the manipulation of biosynthetic or recycling pathways. This paper provides an overview of these approaches as well as the consequences that changes in ascorbic acid content have on plant growth and function. Discussed is the capacity of plants to tolerate changes in ascorbic acid content. The many functions that ascorbic acid serves in plants, however, will require highly targeted approaches to improve their nutritional quality without compromising their health. PMID:24278786

  16. Endogenous molecules stimulating N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA).

    PubMed

    Tai, Tatsuya; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Uyama, Toru; Masuda, Kim; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Houchi, Hitoshi; Ueda, Natsuo

    2012-05-16

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays the central role in the degradation of bioactive N-acylethanolamines such as the endocannabinoid arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) in brain and peripheral tissues. A lysosomal enzyme referred to as N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) catalyzes the same reaction with preference to palmitoylethanolamide, an endogenous analgesic and neuroprotective substance, and is therefore expected as a potential target of therapeutic drugs. In the in vitro assays thus far performed, the maximal activity of NAAA was achieved in the presence of both nonionic detergent (Triton X-100 or Nonidet P-40) and the SH reagent dithiothreitol. However, endogenous molecules that might substitute for these synthetic compounds remain poorly understood. Here, we examined stimulatory effects of endogenous phospholipids and thiol compounds on recombinant NAAA. Among different phospholipids tested, choline- or ethanolamine-containing phospholipids showed potent effects, and 1 mM phosphatidylcholine increased NAAA activity by 6.6-fold. Concerning endogenous thiol compounds, dihydrolipoic acid at 0.1-1 mM was the most active, causing 8.5-9.0-fold stimulation. These results suggest that endogenous phospholipids and dihydrolipoic acid may contribute in keeping NAAA active in lysosomes. Even in the presence of phosphatidylcholine and dihydrolipoic acid, however, the preferential hydrolysis of palmitoylethanolamide was unaltered. We also investigated a possible compensatory induction of NAAA mRNA in brain and other tissues of FAAH-deficient mice. However, NAAA expression levels in all the tissues examined were not significantly altered from those in wild-type mice.

  17. Abscisic acid: biosynthesis, inactivation, homoeostasis and signalling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Park, Youngmin; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes during plant growth and abiotic stress responses. The endogenous ABA level is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms involving biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and signal transduction pathways. This complex regulatory network may target multiple levels, including transcription, translation and post-translational regulation of genes involved in ABA responses. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, catabolism and transport have been characterized. The local ABA concentration is critical for initiating ABA-mediated signalling during plant development and in response to environmental changes. In this chapter we discuss the mechanisms that regulate ABA biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and homoeostasis. We also present the findings of recent research on ABA perception by cellular receptors, and ABA signalling in response to cellular and environmental conditions.

  18. Development of Inhibitors of Salicylic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Kurimoto, Tetsuya; Seo, Eun-kyung; Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Asami, Tadao

    2015-08-19

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays important roles in the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. Determining the mechanism of SAR will extend our understanding of plant defenses against pathogens. We recently reported that PAMD is an inhibitor of SA signaling, which suppresses the expression of the pathogenesis-related PR genes and is expected to facilitate the understanding of SA signaling. However, PAMD strongly inhibits plant growth. To minimize the side effects of PAMD, we synthesized a number of PAMD derivatives, and identified compound 4 that strongly suppresses the expression of the PR genes with fewer adverse effects on plant growth than PAMD. We further showed that the adverse effects on plant growth were partially caused the stabilization of DELLA, which is also related to the pathogen responses. These results indicate that compound 4 would facilitate our understanding of SA signaling and its cross talk with other plant hormones.

  19. A modular library of small molecule signals regulates social behaviors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Jagan; von Reuss, Stephan H; Bose, Neelanjan; Zaslaver, Alon; Mahanti, Parag; Ho, Margaret C; O'Doherty, Oran G; Edison, Arthur S; Sternberg, Paul W; Schroeder, Frank C

    2012-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans is an important model for the study of social behaviors. Recent investigations have shown that a family of small molecule signals, the ascarosides, controls population density sensing and mating behavior. However, despite extensive studies of C. elegans aggregation behaviors, no intraspecific signals promoting attraction or aggregation of wild-type hermaphrodites have been identified. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that the known ascarosides are accompanied by a series of derivatives featuring a tryptophan-derived indole moiety. Behavioral assays demonstrate that these indole ascarosides serve as potent intraspecific attraction and aggregation signals for hermaphrodites, in contrast to ascarosides lacking the indole group, which are repulsive. Hermaphrodite attraction to indole ascarosides depends on the ASK amphid sensory neurons. Downstream of the ASK sensory neuron, the interneuron AIA is required for mediating attraction to indole ascarosides instead of the RMG interneurons, which previous studies have shown to integrate attraction and aggregation signals from ASK and other sensory neurons. The role of the RMG interneuron in mediating aggregation and attraction is thought to depend on the neuropeptide Y-like receptor NPR-1, because solitary and social C. elegans strains are distinguished by different npr-1 variants. We show that indole ascarosides promote attraction and aggregation in both solitary and social C. elegans strains. The identification of indole ascarosides as aggregation signals reveals unexpected complexity of social signaling in C. elegans, which appears to be based on a modular library of ascarosides integrating building blocks derived from lipid β-oxidation and amino-acid metabolism. Variation of modules results in strongly altered signaling content, as addition of a tryptophan-derived indole unit to repellent ascarosides produces strongly attractive indole ascarosides. Our findings show that the library of

  20. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid sequence detection by single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A; Shera, E.B.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There has been considerable interest in the development of very sensitive clinical diagnostic techniques over the last few years. Many pathogenic agents are often present in extremely small concentrations in clinical samples, especially at the initial stages of infection, making their detection very difficult. This project sought to develop a new technique for the detection and accurate quantification of specific bacterial and viral nucleic acid sequences in clinical samples. The scheme involved the use of novel hybridization probes for the detection of nucleic acids combined with our recently developed technique of single-molecule electrophoresis. This project is directly relevant to the DOE`s Defense Programs strategic directions in the area of biological warfare counter-proliferation.

  1. The multifaceted roles of the interspecies signalling molecule indole in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria utilize signal molecules to ensure their survival in environmental niches, and indole is an interspecies and interkingdom signalling molecule, which is widespread in the natural environment. In this study, we sought to identify novel roles of indole in soil-borne bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was found not to synthesize indole and to degrade it rapidly. The addition of exogenous indole dose-dependently inhibited A. tumefaciens growth and decreased its motility. Surprisingly, indole markedly increased A. tumefaciens biofilm formation on polystyrene, glass and nylon membrane surfaces and enhanced its antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptional analysis showed that indole markedly up-regulated several biofilm-related (celA, cheA, exoR, phoB, flgE, fliR and motA), stress-related genes (clpB, dnaK, gsp, gyrB, marR and soxR) and efflux genes (emrA, norM, and Atu2551) in A. tumefaciens, which partially explained the increased biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. In contrast, the plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid did not affect biofilm formation, antibiotic tolerance or gene expression. Interestingly, indole was found to exhibit several similarities with antibiotics, as it inhibited the growth of non-indole-producing bacteria, whereas these bacteria countered its effects by rapidly degrading indole, and by enhancing biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance.

  2. Conserved nematode signaling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes, which are ubiquitous in soil and are estimated to cause $100 B of agricultural damage annually, produce novel, highly conserved small sugar-based molecules call ascarosides. Ascarosides play critical roles in nematode development and behavior. We report here that plants recognize these un...

  3. Anti-inflammatory signaling actions of electrophilic nitro-arachidonic acid in vascular cells and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Trostchansky, Andrés; Rubbo, Homero

    2017-03-01

    Nitrated derivatives of unsaturated fatty acids (nitro-fatty acids) are being formed and detected in human plasma, cell membranes and tissue, triggering signaling cascades via covalent and reversible post-translational modifications of nucleophilic amino acids in transcriptional regulatory proteins. Arachidonic acid (AA) represents a precursor of potent signaling molecules, i.e., prostaglandins and thromboxanes through enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative pathways. Arachidonic acid can be nitrated by reactive nitrogen species leading to the formation of nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA). A critical issue is the influence of NO2-AA on prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases, modulating inflammatory processes through redirection of AA metabolism and signaling. In this prospective article, we describe the key chemical and biochemical actions of NO2-AA in vascular and astrocytes. This includes the ability of NO2-AA to mediate unique redox signaling anti-inflammatory actions along with its therapeutic potential.

  4. Single-Molecule Imaging of Signal Transduction via GPI-Anchored Receptors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been drawing extensive attention as a signaling platform. To investigate molecular interactions in lipid rafts, we often need to observe molecules in the plasma membranes of living cells because chemical fixation and subsequent immunostaining with divalent or multivalent antibodies may change the location of the target molecules. In this chapter, we describe how to examine dynamics of raft-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored receptors and interactions of the receptors with downstream signaling molecules by single-particle tracking or single-molecule imaging techniques.

  5. Comparative metabolomics reveals biogenesis of ascarosides, a modular library of small-molecule signals in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    von Reuss, Stephan H; Bose, Neelanjan; Srinivasan, Jagan; Yim, Joshua J; Judkins, Joshua C; Sternberg, Paul W; Schroeder, Frank C

    2012-01-25

    In the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, a family of endogenous small molecules, the ascarosides function as key regulators of developmental timing and behavior that act upstream of conserved signaling pathways. The ascarosides are based on the dideoxysugar ascarylose, which is linked to fatty-acid-like side chains of varying lengths derived from peroxisomal β-oxidation. Despite the importance of ascarosides for many aspects of C. elegans biology, knowledge of their structures, biosynthesis, and homeostasis remains incomplete. We used an MS/MS-based screen to profile ascarosides in C. elegans wild-type and mutant metabolomes, which revealed a much greater structural diversity of ascaroside derivatives than previously reported. Comparison of the metabolomes from wild-type and a series of peroxisomal β-oxidation mutants showed that the enoyl CoA-hydratase MAOC-1 serves an important role in ascaroside biosynthesis and clarified the functions of two other enzymes, ACOX-1 and DHS-28. We show that, following peroxisomal β-oxidation, the ascarosides are selectively derivatized with moieties of varied biogenetic origin and that such modifications can dramatically affect biological activity, producing signaling molecules active at low femtomolar concentrations. Based on these results, the ascarosides appear as a modular library of small-molecule signals, integrating building blocks from three major metabolic pathways: carbohydrate metabolism, peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids, and amino acid catabolism. Our screen further demonstrates that ascaroside biosynthesis is directly affected by nutritional status and that excretion of the final products is highly selective.

  6. Endogenous Molecules Stimulating N-Acylethanolamine-Hydrolyzing Acid Amidase (NAAA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) plays the central role in the degradation of bioactive N-acylethanolamines such as the endocannabinoid arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide) in brain and peripheral tissues. A lysosomal enzyme referred to as N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) catalyzes the same reaction with preference to palmitoylethanolamide, an endogenous analgesic and neuroprotective substance, and is therefore expected as a potential target of therapeutic drugs. In the in vitro assays thus far performed, the maximal activity of NAAA was achieved in the presence of both nonionic detergent (Triton X-100 or Nonidet P-40) and the SH reagent dithiothreitol. However, endogenous molecules that might substitute for these synthetic compounds remain poorly understood. Here, we examined stimulatory effects of endogenous phospholipids and thiol compounds on recombinant NAAA. Among different phospholipids tested, choline- or ethanolamine-containing phospholipids showed potent effects, and 1 mM phosphatidylcholine increased NAAA activity by 6.6-fold. Concerning endogenous thiol compounds, dihydrolipoic acid at 0.1–1 mM was the most active, causing 8.5–9.0-fold stimulation. These results suggest that endogenous phospholipids and dihydrolipoic acid may contribute in keeping NAAA active in lysosomes. Even in the presence of phosphatidylcholine and dihydrolipoic acid, however, the preferential hydrolysis of palmitoylethanolamide was unaltered. We also investigated a possible compensatory induction of NAAA mRNA in brain and other tissues of FAAH-deficient mice. However, NAAA expression levels in all the tissues examined were not significantly altered from those in wild-type mice. PMID:22860206

  7. Difficulties in Laboratory Studies and Astronomical Observations of Organic Molecules: Hydroxyacetone and Lactic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apponi, A. J.; Brewster, M. A.; Hoy, J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2006-01-01

    For the past 35 years, radio astronomy has revealed a rich organic chemistry in the interstellar gas, which is exceptionally complex towards active star-forming regions. New solar systems condense out of this gas and may influence the evolution of life on newly formed planets. Much of the biologically important functionality is present among the some 130 gas-phase molecules found to date, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, amines, amides and even the simplest sugar - glycolaldehyde. Still, many unidentified interstellar radio signals remain, and their identification relies on further laboratory study. The molecules hydroxyacetone and lactic acid are relatively small organic molecules, but possess rather complex rotational spectra owing to their high asymmetry. Hydroxyacetone is particularly problematic because it possess a very low barrier to internal rotation, and exhibits strong coupling of the free-rotor states with the overall rotation of the molecule. As in the case of acetamide, a full decomposition method was employed to order the resultant eigenstates onto normal asymmetric top eigenvectors.

  8. Stomatal density is controlled by a mesophyll-derived signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Kajita, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Aya; Hokoyama, Mayumi; Nakamura-Miura, Touko; Mizuno, Satoko; Masuda, Yuichi; Irie, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Yuki; Takada, Shinobu; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Sakagami, Youji

    2010-01-01

    Stomata are composed of a pair of guard cells and a pore between them, and their density and positions are regulated by developmental and environmental signals. In a screen in which we overexpressed many genes coding for putative secretory proteins one by one in Arabidopsis, we identified a gene named STOMAGEN, which increases stomatal density when overexpressed. The STOMAGEN gene encodes a small peptide with a putative secretory signal sequence at its N-terminus and is expressed preferentially in mesophyll cells. This peptide belongs to the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) family of the cysteine-rich peptides superfamily. The mature form was a 45-amino-acid peptide (stomagen) with three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Stomagen treatment at very low concentrations, as low as 10 nM, increased the stomatal density of wild-type Arabidopsis plants. We propose that stomagen is a mesophyll-to-epidermis signaling molecule that positively regulates stomatal density. We also suggest that stomagen increases stomatal density by competing with negative regulators EPF1 and EPF2 for the receptor-like protein TOO MANY MOUTHS.

  9. Significant immunomodulatory effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules: possible link in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Boontham, Pisake; Robins, Adrian; Chandran, Palanichamy; Pritchard, David; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Chuthapisith, Suebwong; McKechnie, Alasdair; Rowlands, Brian J; Eremin, Oleg

    2008-12-01

    Pathogenic bacteria use quorum-sensing signal molecules to co-ordinate the expression of virulence genes. Animal-based studies have demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of quorum-sensing signal molecules. In the present study, we have examined the impact of these molecules on normal human immune function in vitro and compared this with immune changes in patients with sepsis where quorum-sensing signal molecules were detected in the sera of patients. Quorum-sensing signal molecules inhibited normal dendritic cell and T-cell activation and proliferation, and down-regulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on dendritic cells; in MLDCRs (mixed lymphocyte dendritic cell reactions), secretion of IL (interleukin)-4 and IL-10 was enhanced, but TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha), IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma) and IL-6 was reduced. Quorum-sensing signal molecules induced apoptosis in dendritic cells and CD4(+) cells, but not CD8(+) cells. Dendritic cells from patients with sepsis were depleted and ex vivo showed defective expression of co-stimulatory molecules and dysfunctional stimulation of allogeneic T-lymphocytes. Enhanced apoptosis of dendritic cells and differential CD4(+) Th1/Th2 (T-helper 1/2) cell apoptotic rate, and modified Th1/Th2 cell cytokine profiles in MLDCRs were also demonstrated in patients with sepsis. The pattern of immunological changes in patients with sepsis mirrors the effects of quorum-sensing signal molecules on responses of immune cells from normal individuals in vitro, suggesting that quorum-sensing signal molecules should be investigated further as a cause of immune dysfunction in sepsis.

  10. Interferon: signal molecules involved in its antiviral effect.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, S N; Cernescu, C; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M

    1989-01-01

    A major problem concerning interferon (IFN)-cell interaction is the second messenger system that transduces the IFN signal. We discuss the evidences existing in literature and our arguments which suggest that the antiviral effect of IFNs alpha and beta are mediated by a membrane mechanism including a phospholipase C dependent hydrolysis of phosphoinositides. The resulting two second messengers: diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate and subsequent, separate but interacting, signal pathways: activation of protein kinase C and ionic events are tested in respect with the antiviral effect of IFN.

  11. Role of the DIP Molecules in DCC Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    signaling mediators, we used the DCC cytoplasmic domain as the bait in yeast interaction trap screening. Thirteen DCC interacting proteins (DIPs) were...cycle arrest by flow cytometry and Cdkl kinase assay. "* Establish tetracycline -inducible hsina and FKBP12 expression cell lines. "* Monitor

  12. Modulation of Host Biology by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules: Messengers or Traitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells sense their population density and respond accordingly by producing various signal molecules to the surrounding environments thereby trigger a plethora of gene expression. This regulatory pathway is termed quorum sensing (QS). Plenty of bacterial virulence factors are controlled by QS or QS-mediated regulatory systems and QS signal molecules (QSSMs) play crucial roles in bacterial signaling transduction. Moreover, bacterial QSSMs were shown to interfere with host cell signaling and modulate host immune responses. QSSMs not only regulate the expression of bacterial virulence factors but themselves act in the modulation of host biology that can be potential therapeutic targets.

  13. Modulation of Host Biology by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules: Messengers or Traitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Chia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells sense their population density and respond accordingly by producing various signal molecules to the surrounding environments thereby trigger a plethora of gene expression. This regulatory pathway is termed quorum sensing (QS). Plenty of bacterial virulence factors are controlled by QS or QS-mediated regulatory systems and QS signal molecules (QSSMs) play crucial roles in bacterial signaling transduction. Moreover, bacterial QSSMs were shown to interfere with host cell signaling and modulate host immune responses. QSSMs not only regulate the expression of bacterial virulence factors but themselves act in the modulation of host biology that can be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26617576

  14. Altered retinoic acid signalling underpins dentition evolution.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Yann; Samarut, Eric; Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Bernard, Laure; Borday-Birraux, Véronique; Sadier, Alexa; Labbé, Catherine; Viriot, Laurent; Laudet, Vincent

    2015-03-07

    Small variations in signalling pathways have been linked to phenotypic diversity and speciation. In vertebrates, teeth represent a reservoir of adaptive morphological structures that are prone to evolutionary change. Cyprinid fish display an impressive diversity in tooth number, but the signals that generate such diversity are unknown. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA) availability influences tooth number size in Cyprinids. Heterozygous adult zebrafish heterozygous for the cyp26b1 mutant that encodes an enzyme able to degrade RA possess an extra tooth in the ventral row. Expression analysis of pharyngeal mesenchyme markers such as dlx2a and lhx6 shows lateral, anterior and dorsal expansion of these markers in RA-treated embryos, whereas the expression of the dental epithelium markers dlx2b and dlx3b is unchanged. Our analysis suggests that changes in RA signalling play an important role in the diversification of teeth in Cyprinids. Our work illustrates that through subtle changes in the expression of rate-limiting enzymes, the RA pathway is an active player of tooth evolution in fish.

  15. Xanthomonas campestris cell–cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell–cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell–cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  16. Xanthomonas campestris cell-cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-11-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell-cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell-cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery.

  17. Structure-activity analysis of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal molecule.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, James; Bowden, Steven D; Galloway, Warren R J D; Spring, David R; Welch, Martin

    2010-07-01

    We synthesized a range of PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone) analogues and tested them for their ability to stimulate MvfR-dependent pqsA transcription, MvfR-independent pyoverdine production, and membrane vesicle production. The structure-activity profile of the PQS analogues was different for each of these phenotypes. Certain inactive PQS analogues were also found to strongly synergize PQS-dependent pyoverdine production.

  18. Role of the DIP Molecules in DCC Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    signaling mediators, we used the DCC cytoplasmic domain as bait in yeast interaction trap screening. Thirteen DCC interacting proteins (DIPs) were...as cell cycle arrest by flow cytometry and Cdkl kinase assay. "* Establish tetracycline -inducible hsina and FKBP12 expression cell lines. "* Monitor...data not shown). DIP13 was expressed using a tetracycline -inducible system in tumor cells (Fig. 5). Forced expression of DIP 13 induced apoptosis (Fig

  19. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  20. Nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategy for biochemical analysis: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Qing, Taiping; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Wen, Li; Shangguan, Jingfang; Mao, Zhengui; Lei, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their highly efficient catalytic effects and substrate specificity, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are applied as 'nano-tools' for manipulating different nucleic acid substrates both in the test-tube and in living organisms. In addition to the function as molecular scissors and molecular glue in genetic engineering, the application of nucleic acid tool enzymes in biochemical analysis has also been extensively developed in the past few decades. Used as amplifying labels for biorecognition events, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are mainly applied in nucleic acids amplification sensing, as well as the amplification sensing of biorelated variations of nucleic acids. With the introduction of aptamers, which can bind different target molecules, the nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategies can also be used to sense non-nucleic targets (e.g., ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells). This review describes and discusses the amplification strategies of nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors for biochemical analysis applications. Various analytes, including nucleic acids, ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells, are reviewed briefly. This work also addresses the future trends and outlooks for signal amplification in nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors.

  1. Where are signal molecules likely to be located in anaerobic granular sludge?

    PubMed

    Feng, Huajun; Ding, Yangcheng; Wang, Meizhen; Zhou, Guanglan; Zheng, Xin; He, Hongzhen; Zhang, Xueqin; Shen, Dongsheng; Shentu, Jiali

    2014-03-01

    Quorum sensing is a concentration-sensing mechanism that plays a vital role in sludge granulation. In this study, the regularities of distribution of different signal molecules, including intra- and interspecific signal molecules (diffusible signal factor, DSF), interspecific signal molecules (autoinducter-2, AI-2) and intraspecific signal molecules (acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs), from three types of anaerobic granular sludge were investigated. The results showed that 70-90% of DSF was distributed in sludge, while AI-2 in the Water phase accounted for over 80% of the total content. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between DSF and AI-2, which played opposite roles in granulation. Moreover, more than 55% of short and medium acyl chain AHLs tended to spread in aqueous water, while the long acyl chain AHLs were closer to granular sludge than the short and medium acyl chain AHLs. With the exception of one type of sludge, the percentage of long acyl chain AHLs in the sludge phase was greater than 70%. The different distributions of signal molecules were primarily determined based on their physicochemical properties, including molecular weight and solubility in water or organic solutions. In addition, the basic properties of sludge, such as the granular level or the production of EPS, were closely related to the diversity, distribution and concentration of signal molecules. As a medium in granulation, extracellular polymeric substances production was regulated by different signal molecules from different parts of anaerobic granular sludge. This study provides a foundation for investigation of quorum sensing in the system of anaerobic granular sludge.

  2. Melatonin as a signal molecule triggering defense responses against pathogen attack in Arabidopsis and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-10-01

    Melatonin plays pleiotropic roles in both animals and plants. The possible role of melatonin in plant innate immune responses was recently discovered. As an initial study, we employed Arabidopsis to determine whether melatonin is involved in defense against the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. The application of a 10 μM concentration of melatonin on Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves induced various pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, as well as a series of defense genes activated by salicylic acid (SA) and ethylene (ET), two key factors involved in plant defense response, compared to mock-treated leaves. The induction of these defense-related genes in melatonin-treated Arabidopsis matched an increase in resistance against the bacterium by suppressing its multiplication about ten-fold relative to the mock-treated Arabidopsis. Like melatonin, N-acetylserotonin also plays a role in inducing a series of defense genes, although serotonin does not. Furthermore, melatonin-induced PR genes were almost completely or partially suppressed in the npr1, ein2, and mpk6 Arabidopsis mutants, indicative of SA and ET dependency in melatonin-induced plant defense signaling. This suggests that melatonin may be a novel defense signaling molecule in plant-pathogen interactions.

  3. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    PubMed Central

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickaël; Sauer, Jørgen; Sullivan, John T.; Maolanon, Nicolai; Vinther, Maria; Lorentzen, Andrea; Madsen, Esben B.; Jensen, Knud J.; Roepstorff, Peter; Thirup, Søren; Ronson, Clive W.; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides called Nod factors function as primary rhizobial signal molecules triggering legumes to develop new plant organs: root nodules that host the bacteria as nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 5 (NFR5) and Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1) bind Nod factor directly at high-affinity binding sites. Both receptor proteins were posttranslationally processed when expressed as fusion proteins and extracted from purified membrane fractions of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis thaliana. The N-terminal signal peptides were cleaved, and NFR1 protein retained its in vitro kinase activity. Processing of NFR5 protein was characterized by determining the N-glycosylation patterns of the ectodomain. Two different glycan structures with identical composition, Man3XylFucGlcNAc4, were identified by mass spectrometry and located at amino acid positions N68 and N198. Receptor–ligand interaction was measured by using ligands that were labeled or immobilized by application of chemoselective chemistry at the anomeric center. High-affinity ligand binding was demonstrated with both solid-phase and free solution techniques. The Kd values obtained for Nod factor binding were in the nanomolar range and comparable to the concentration range sufficient for biological activity. Structure-dependent ligand specificity was shown by using chitin oligosaccharides. Taken together, our results suggest that ligand recognition through direct ligand binding is a key step in the receptor-mediated activation mechanism leading to root nodule development in legumes. PMID:22859506

  4. Sustained release carrier for adenosine triphosphate as signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Wischke, Christian; Weigel, Judith; Bulavina, Larisa; Lendlein, Andreas

    2014-12-10

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a molecule with a fascinating variety of intracellular and extracellular biological functions that go far beyond energy metabolism. Due to its limited passive diffusion through biological membranes, controlled release systems may allow to interact with ATP-mediated extracellular processes. In this study, two release systems were explored to evaluate the capacity for either long-term or short-term release: (i) Poly[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] (PLGA) implant rods were capable of ATP release over days to weeks, depending on the PLGA molecular weight and end-group capping, but were also associated with partial hydrolytic degradation of ATP to ADP and AMP, but not adenosine. (ii) Thermosensitive methylcellulose hydrogels with a gelation occurring at body temperature allowed combining adjustable loading levels and the capacity for injection, with injection forces less than 50N even for small 27G needles. Finally, a first in vitro study illustrated purinergic-triggered response of primary murine microglia to ATP released from hydrogels, demonstrating the potential relevance for biomedical applications.

  5. All-optical signal processing at 10 GHz using a photonic crystal molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Junay, Alexandra; De Rossi, Alfredo; Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano; Ménager, Loic; Peter Reithmaier, Johann

    2013-11-04

    We report on 10 GHz operation of an all-optical gate based on an Indium Phosphide Photonic Crystal Molecule. Wavelength conversion and all-optical mixing of microwave signals are demonstrated using the 2 mW output of a mode locked diode laser. The spectral separation of the optical pump and signal is crucial in suppressing optical cross-talk.

  6. Hydrogen sulphide in cardiovascular system: A cascade from interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Jie; Cai, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-05-15

    As a gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulphide exerts its extensive physiological and pathophysiological effects in mammals. The interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules forms a cascade that modulates cellular functions and homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the signalling mechanism underlying the effect of hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and metabolism as well as the biological relevance to human diseases.

  7. Coherent (photon) vs incoherent (current) detection of multidimensional optical signals from single molecules in open junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Hua, Weijie; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-06-07

    The nonlinear optical response of a current-carrying single molecule coupled to two metal leads and driven by a sequence of impulsive optical pulses with controllable phases and time delays is calculated. Coherent (stimulated, heterodyne) detection of photons and incoherent detection of the optically induced current are compared. Using a diagrammatic Liouville space superoperator formalism, the signals are recast in terms of molecular correlation functions which are then expanded in the many-body molecular states. Two dimensional signals in benzene-1,4-dithiol molecule show cross peaks involving charged states. The correlation between optical and charge current signal is also observed.

  8. [From endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus: a secretory pathway controlled by signal molecules].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiasheng; Luo, Jianhong; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2013-07-01

    Protein transport from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi apparatus has long been known to be a central process for protein quality control and sorting. Recent studies have revealed that a large number of signal molecules are involved in regulation of membrane trafficking through ER, ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and Golgi apparatus. These molecules can significantly change the transport rate of proteins by regulating vesicle budding and fusion. Protein transport from ER to Golgi apparatus is not only controlled by signal pathways triggered from outside the cell, it is also regulated by feedback signals from the transport pathway.

  9. Amplification of single molecule translocation signal using β-strand peptide functionalized nanopores.

    PubMed

    Liebes-Peer, Yael; Rapaport, Hanna; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2014-07-22

    Changes in ionic current flowing through nanopores due to binding or translocation of single biopolymer molecules enable their detection and characterization. It is, however, much more challenging to detect small molecules due to their rapid and small signal signature. Here we demonstrate the use of de novo designed peptides for functionalization of nanopores that enable the detection of a small analytes at the single molecule level. The detection relies on cooperative peptide conformational change that is induced by the binding of the small molecule to a receptor domain on the peptide. This change results in alteration of the nanopore effective diameter and hence induces current perturbation signal. On the basis of this approach, we demonstrate here the detection of diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate (paraoxon), a poisonous organophosphate molecule. Paraoxon binding is induced by the incorporation of the catalytic triad of acetylcholine esterase in the hydrophilic domain of a short amphiphilic peptide and promotes β-sheet assembly of the peptide both in solution and for peptide molecules immobilized on solid surfaces. Nanopores coated with this peptide allowed the detection of paraoxon at the single molecule level revealing two binding arrangements. This unique approach, hence, provides the ability to study interactions of small molecules with the corresponding engineered receptors at the single molecule level. Furthermore, the suggested versatile platform may be used for the development of highly sensitive small analytes sensors.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide in plants: from dissipation of excess sulfur to signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Alexander; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-09-15

    Sulfur is essential in all organisms for the synthesis of amino acids cysteine and methionine and as an active component of numerous co-factors and prosthetic groups. However, only plants, algae, fungi, and some prokaryotes are capable of using the abundant inorganic source of sulfur, sulfate. Plants take sulfate up, reduce it, and assimilate into organic compounds with cysteine being the first product of the pathway and a donor of reduced sulfur for synthesis of other S-containing compounds. Cysteine is formed in a reaction between sulfide, derived from reduction of sulfite and an activated amino acid acceptor, O-acetylserine. Sulfide is thus an important intermediate in sulfur metabolism, but numerous other functions in plants has been revealed. Hydrogen sulfide can serve as an alternative source of sulfur for plants, which may be significant in anaerobic conditions of waterlogged soils. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen sulfide have been detected from many plant species. Since the amount of H2S discharged correlated with sulfate supply to the plants, the emissions were considered a mechanism for dissipation of excess sulfur. Significant hydrogen sulfide emissions were also observed in plants infected with pathogens, particularly with fungi. H2S thus seems to be part of the widely discussed sulfur-induced-resistance/sulfur-enhanced-defense. Recently, however, more evidence has emerged for a role for H2S in regulation and signaling. Sulfide stabilizes the cysteine synthase complex, increasing so the synthesis of its acceptor O-acetylserine. H2S has been implicating in regulation of plant stress response, particularly draught stress. There are more and more examples of processes regulated by H2S in plants being discovered, and hydrogen sulfide is emerging as an important signaling molecule, similar to its role in the animal and human world. How similar the functions, and homeostasis of H2S are in these diverse organisms, however, remains to be elucidated.

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Murine Embryos Lacking Endogenous Retinoic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paschaki, Marie; Schneider, Carole; Rhinn, Muriel; Thibault-Carpentier, Christelle; Dembélé, Doulaye; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active derivative of the liposoluble vitamin A (retinol), acts as an important signaling molecule during embryonic development, regulating phenomenons as diverse as anterior-posterior axial patterning, forebrain and optic vesicle development, specification of hindbrain rhombomeres, pharyngeal arches and second heart field, somitogenesis, and differentiation of spinal cord neurons. This small molecule directly triggers gene activation by binding to nuclear receptors (RARs), switching them from potential repressors to transcriptional activators. The repertoire of RA-regulated genes in embryonic tissues is poorly characterized. We performed a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of murine wild-type and Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 null-mutant (Raldh2−/−) embryos — unable to synthesize RA from maternally-derived retinol — using Affymetrix DNA microarrays. Transcriptomic changes were analyzed in two embryonic regions: anterior tissues including forebrain and optic vesicle, and posterior (trunk) tissues, at early stages preceding the appearance of overt phenotypic abnormalities. Several genes expected to be downregulated under RA deficiency appeared in the transcriptome data (e.g. Emx2, Foxg1 anteriorly, Cdx1, Hoxa1, Rarb posteriorly), whereas reverse-transcriptase-PCR and in situ hybridization performed for additional selected genes validated the changes identified through microarray analysis. Altogether, the affected genes belonged to numerous molecular pathways and cellular/organismal functions, demonstrating the pleiotropic nature of RA-dependent events. In both tissue samples, genes upregulated were more numerous than those downregulated, probably due to feedback regulatory loops. Bioinformatic analyses highlighted groups (clusters) of genes displaying similar behaviors in mutant tissues, and biological functions most significantly affected (e.g. mTOR, VEGF, ILK signaling in forebrain tissues; pyrimidine and purine metabolism

  12. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php.

  13. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  14. Extracellular signal molecule(s) involved in the carbon starvation response of marine Vibrio sp. strain S14.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Ostling, J; Charlton, T; de Nys, R; Takayama, K; Kjelleberg, S

    1998-01-01

    The role of exogenous metabolites as putative signal molecules mediating and/or regulating the carbon starvation adaptation program in Vibrio sp. strain S14 was investigated. Addition of the stationary-phase supernatant extract (SSE) of Vibrio sp. strain S14 to logarithmic-phase cells resulted in a significant number of carbon starvation-induced proteins being up-regulated. Halogenated furanones, putative antagonists of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), inhibited the synthesis of proteins specifically induced upon carbon starvation. The effect of the furanone was the opposite of that caused by SSE with respect to the up- and down-regulation of protein expression, indicating that both the furanone and the putative signalling molecules were acting on the same regulatory pathway. Culturability was rapidly lost when Vibrio sp. strain S14 was starved in the presence of the furanone at a low concentration. The furanone also had a negative effect on the ability of carbon-starved cells to mount resistance against UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide exposure. The SSE of Vibrio sp. strain S14 had the ability to provide cross-protection against the loss in viability caused by the furanone. We have further demonstrated that the SSE taken from low- as well as high-cell-density cultures of Vibrio sp. strain S14 induced luminescence in Vibrio harveyi. Taken together, the results in this report provide evidence that Vibrio sp. strain S14 produces extracellular signalling metabolites during carbon and energy starvation and that these molecules play an important role in the expression of proteins crucial to the development of starvation- and stress-resistant phenotypes.

  15. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Chang; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Roh, Tae-Young; Park, Jihwan; Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  16. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Maschinot, C A; Pace, J R; Hadden, M K

    2015-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds.

  17. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  18. Switching off key signaling survival molecules to switch on the resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Denise Alves; Vago, Juliana Priscila; Athayde, Rayssa Maciel; Reis, Alesandra Corte; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological response of the immune system to injury or infection but may become chronic. In general, inflammation is self-limiting and resolves by activating a termination program named resolution of inflammation. It has been argued that unresolved inflammation may be the basis of a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases. Resolution of inflammation is an active process that is fine-tuned by the production of proresolving mediators and the shutdown of intracellular signaling molecules associated with cytokine production and leukocyte survival. Apoptosis of leukocytes (especially granulocytes) is a key element in the resolution of inflammation and several signaling molecules are thought to be involved in this process. Here, we explore key signaling molecules and some mediators that are crucial regulators of leukocyte survival in vivo and that may be targeted for therapeutic purposes in the context of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  19. Super-resolution Analysis of TCR-Dependent Signaling: Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barr, Valarie A; Yi, Jason; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) comprises methods that produce super-resolution images from molecular locations of single molecules. These techniques mathematically determine the center of a diffraction-limited spot produced by a fluorescent molecule, which represents the most likely location of the molecule. Only a small cohort of well-separated molecules is visualized in a single image, and then many images are obtained from a single sample. The localizations from all the images are combined to produce a super-resolution picture of the sample. Here we describe the application of two methods, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), to the study of signaling microclusters in T cells.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman signal for terbium single-molecule magnets grafted on graphene.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Manuel; Candini, Andrea; Urdampilleta, Matias; Reserbat-Plantey, Antoine; Bellini, Valerio; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Marty, Laëtitia; Ruben, Mario; Affronte, Marco; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Bendiab, Nedjma

    2010-12-28

    We report the preparation and characterization of monolayer graphene decorated with functionalized single-molecule magnets (SMMs). The grafting ligands provide a homogeneous and selective deposition on graphene. The grafting is characterized by combined Raman microspectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electron transport measurements. We observe a surface-enhanced Raman signal that allowed us to study the grafting down to the limit of a few isolated molecules. The weak interaction through charge transfer is in agreement with ab initio DFT calculations. Our results indicate that both molecules and graphene are essentially intact and the interaction is driven by van der Waals forces.

  1. Signal Molecules Mediate the Impact of the Earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa on Growth, Development and Defence of the Plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Puga-Freitas, Ruben; Barot, Sébastien; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Blouin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Earthworms have generally a positive impact on plant growth, which is often attributed to a trophic mechanism: namely, earthworms increase the release of mineral nutrients from soil litter and organic matter. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed since the discovery of a signal molecule (Indole Acetic Acid) in earthworm faeces. In this study, we used methodologies developed in plant science to gain information on ecological mechanisms involved in plant-earthworm interaction, by looking at plant response to earthworm presence at a molecular level. First, we looked at plant overall response to earthworm faeces in an in vitro device where only signal molecules could have an effect on plant growth; we observed that earthworms were inducing positive or negative effects on different plant species. Then, using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with an impaired auxin transport, we demonstrated the potential of earthworms to stimulate root growth and to revert the dwarf mutant phenotype. Finally, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence and absence of earthworms; we found that genes modulated in the presence of earthworms are known to respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, or to the application of exogenous hormones. A comparison of our results with other studies found in databases revealed strong analogies with systemic resistance, induced by signal molecules emitted by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and/or elicitors emitted by non-virulent pathogens. Signal molecules such as auxin and ethylene, which are considered as major in plant-microorganisms interactions, can also be of prior importance to explain plant-macroinvertebrates interactions. This could imply revisiting ecological theories which generally stress on the role of trophic relationships. PMID:23226498

  2. Nitro-fatty acids in plant signaling: New key mediators of nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Padilla, María N; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies in animal systems have shown that NO can interact with fatty acids to generate nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs). They are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species and unsaturated fatty acids, and are considered novel mediators of cell signaling based mainly on a proven anti-inflammatory response. Although these signaling mediators have been described widely in animal systems, NO2-FAs have scarcely been studied in plants. Preliminary data have revealed the endogenous presence of free and protein-adducted NO2-FAs in extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), which appear to be contributing to the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet. Importantly, new findings have displayed the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development. Furthermore, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant-defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing the chaperone network and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Thus, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions, highlighting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the plant-protection mechanism. Finally, the potential of NO2-Ln as a NO donor has recently been described both in vitro and in vivo. Jointly, this ability gives NO2-Ln the potential to act as a signaling molecule by the direct release of NO, due to its capacity to induce different changes mediated by NO or NO-related molecules such as nitration and S-nitrosylation, or by the electrophilic capacity of these molecules through a nitroalkylation mechanism. Here, we describe the current state of the art regarding the advances performed in the field of NO2-FAs in plants and their implication in plant

  3. Detection, purification and characterisation of quorum-sensing signal molecules in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brelles-Mariño, G; Bedmar, E J

    2001-10-04

    Quorum sensing (also called autoinduction) is a term that describes an environmental sensing system that allows bacteria to monitor their own population density. Autoinduction relies upon the interaction of a small diffusible signal molecule (the autoinducer) with a transcriptional activator protein to couple gene expression with cell population density. These signal molecules diffuse from bacterial cells and accumulate in the environment as a function of cell growth. Once a threshold concentration is reached, these signals serve as co-inducers to regulate the transcription of (a) set(s) of target genes. In Gram-negative bacteria, most autoinducers belong to the family of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). The detection of AHLs (or AHL-like activities) has been greatly facilitated by the development of sensitive bioassays that allow fast screening of microorganisms for diffusible signal molecules. AHL or diketopiperazine-mediated cell-cell signalling play roles in regulating different bacterial functions, such as antibiotic biosynthesis, production of virulence factors, exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, bacterial swarming, plasmid conjugal transfer and transition into the stationary phase. Several bacterial species that interact with plants produce AHL-like compounds. In this review, we will summarise the current knowledge about the detection, characterisation and purification of quorum-sensing molecules from plant-associated bacteria. We will also discuss some of the future prospects and biotechnological applications of autoinducers.

  4. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-04

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics.

  5. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  6. The use of small molecule probes to study spatially separated stimulus-induced signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Glöckner, Christian; Stowe, G. Neil; Kang, Young J.; Tobias, Peter S.; Mathison, John C.; Ulevitch, Richard J.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Janda, Kim D.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous activation of signaling pathways requires dynamic assembly of higher-order protein complexes at the cytoplasmic domains of membrane-associated receptors in a stimulus-specific manner. Here, using the paradigm of cellular activation through cytokine and innate immune receptors, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle application of small molecule probes for the dissection of receptor-proximal signaling processes, such as activation of the transcription factor NF- B and the protein kinase p38. PMID:22300658

  7. Signaling molecules and pathways regulating the fate of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Kokkinaki, Maria; Dym, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process that involves the division and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are a subpopulation of type A spermatogonia resting on the basement membrane in the mammalian testis. Self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are the foundation of normal spermatogenesis, and thus a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in the SSCs is of paramount importance for the regulation of spermatogenesis and may eventually lead to novel targets for male contraception as well as for gene therapy of male infertility and testicular cancer. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms is also of great interest to a better understanding of SSC aging and for developing novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases in view of the recent work demonstrating the pluripotent potential of the SSC. Progress has recently been made in elucidating the signaling molecules and pathways that determine cell fate decisions of SSCs. In this review, we first address the morphological features, phenotypic characteristics, and the potential of SSCs. And then we focus on the recent advances in defining the key signaling molecules and crucial signaling pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. The association of aberrant expression of signaling molecules and cascades with abnormal spermatogenesis and testicular cancer are also discussed. Finally we point out potential future directions to pursue in research on signaling pathways of SSCs. PMID:19263492

  8. Enhancement of Raman scattering signal of a few molecules using photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. M.; Parit, M. K.; Laha, R.; Dantham, V. R.

    2016-05-01

    Now a days, single molecule surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SMSERS) has become a fascinating tool for studying the structural properties, static and dynamic events of single molecules (instead of ensemble average), with the help of efficient plasmonic nanostructures. This is extremely useful in the field of proteomics because the structural properties of protein molecules are heterogeneous. Even though, SMSERS provides wealthy information about single molecules, it demands high quality surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. So far, a very few researchers succeeded in demonstrating the single molecule Raman scattering using conventional SERS technique. However, the experimental S/N of the Raman signal has been found to be very poor. Recently, with the help of photonic nanojet of an optical microsphere, we were able to enhance the SERS signal of a few molecules adsorbed on the SERS substrates (gold symmetric and asymmetric nanodimers and trimers dispersed on a glass slide). Herein, we report a few details about photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique, a few experimental results and a detailed theoretical study on symmetric and asymmetric nanosphere dimers to understand the dependence of localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength of a nanodimer on the nanogap size and polarization of the excitation light.

  9. Acupuncture Alters Expression of Insulin Signaling Related Molecules and Improves Insulin Resistance in OLETF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To determine effect of acupuncture on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and to evaluate expression of insulin signaling components. Rats were divided into three groups: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, OLETF rats, and acupuncture+OLETF rats. Acupuncture was subcutaneously applied to Neiguan (PC6), Zusanli (ST36), and Sanyinjiao (SP6); in contrast, acupuncture to Shenshu (BL23) was administered perpendicularly. For Neiguan (PC6) and Zusanli (ST36), needles were connected to an electroacupuncture (EA) apparatus. Fasting blood glucose (FPG) was measured by glucose oxidase method. Plasma fasting insulin (FINS) and serum C peptide (C-P) were determined by ELISA. Protein and mRNA expressions of insulin signaling molecules were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. OLETF rats exhibit increased levels of FPG, FINS, C-P, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which were effectively decreased by acupuncture treatment. mRNA expressions of several insulin signaling related molecules IRS1, IRS2, Akt2, aPKCζ, and GLUT4 were decreased in OLETF rats compared to SD controls. Expression of these molecules was restored back to normal levels upon acupuncture administration. PI3K-p85α was increased in OLETF rats; this increase was also reversed by acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture improves insulin resistance in OLETF rats, possibly via regulating expression of key insulin signaling related molecules. PMID:27738449

  10. A density-dependent switch drives stochastic clustering and polarization of signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Jilkine, Alexandra; Angenent, Sigurd B; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2011-11-01

    Positive feedback plays a key role in the ability of signaling molecules to form highly localized clusters in the membrane or cytosol of cells. Such clustering can occur in the absence of localizing mechanisms such as pre-existing spatial cues, diffusional barriers, or molecular cross-linking. What prevents positive feedback from amplifying inevitable biological noise when an un-clustered "off" state is desired? And, what limits the spread of clusters when an "on" state is desired? Here, we show that a minimal positive feedback circuit provides the general principle for both suppressing and amplifying noise: below a critical density of signaling molecules, clustering switches off; above this threshold, highly localized clusters are recurrently generated. Clustering occurs only in the stochastic regime, suggesting that finite sizes of molecular populations cannot be ignored in signal transduction networks. The emergence of a dominant cluster for finite numbers of molecules is partly a phenomenon of random sampling, analogous to the fixation or loss of neutral mutations in finite populations. We refer to our model as the "neutral drift polarity model." Regulating the density of signaling molecules provides a simple mechanism for a positive feedback circuit to robustly switch between clustered and un-clustered states. The intrinsic ability of positive feedback both to create and suppress clustering is a general mechanism that could operate within diverse biological networks to create dynamic spatial organization.

  11. Single-Molecule Study of Protein-Protein Interaction Dynamics in a Cell Signaling System

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xin; Nalbant, Perihan; Toutchkine, Alexei; Hu, Dehong; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-01-15

    We report a combined single-molecule fluorescence and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of protein-protein interactions in a GTP-binding intracellular signaling protein Cdc42 in complex with a downstream effector protein WASP. A 13- kDa WASP fragment which binds only the activated GTP-loaded Cdc42 was labeled with a novel solvatochromic dye and used to probe hydrophobic interactions significant to Cdc42/WASP recognition. Our single-molecule fluorescence measurements have shown conformational fluctuations of the protein complex and suggested multiple conformational states at a wide range of time scales might be involved in protein interaction dynamics. Single-molecule experiments have revealed the dynamic disorder or protein-protein interactions within the Cdc42/WASP complex, which may be important for regulating downstream signaling events.

  12. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  13. Olive oils modulate fatty acid content and signaling protein expression in apolipoprotein E knockout mice brain.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Regina; Navarro, María A; Vögler, Oliver; Perona, Javier S; Osada, Jesús; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis contributes to disruption of neuronal signaling pathways by producing lipid-dependent modifications of brain plasma membranes, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether long-term (11 weeks) consumption of refined- (ROO) and pomace- (POO) olive oil modulated the fatty acid composition and the levels of membrane signaling proteins in the brain of apolipoprotein E (apoE) knockout (KO) mice, an animal model of atherosclerosis. Both of these oils are rich in bioactive molecules with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. ROO and POO long-term consumption increased the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), particularly of oleic acid, while reducing the level of the saturated fatty acids (SFAs) palmitic and stearic acid. As a result, the MUFA:SFA ratio was higher in apoE KO mice brain fed with ROO and POO. Furthermore, both oils reduced the level of arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid, suggesting a decrease in the generation of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. Finally, ROO and POO induced an increase in the density of membrane proteins implicated in both the Galphas/PKA and Galphaq/PLCbeta1/PKCalpha signaling pathways. The combined effects of long-term ROO and POO consumption on fatty acid composition and the level of signaling proteins involved in PKA and PKC activation, suggest positive effects on neuroinflammation and brain function in apoE KO mice brain, and convert these oils into promising functional foods in diseases involving apoE deficiency.

  14. Potato signal molecules that activate pectate lyase synthesis in Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, Nadezhda; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Petrova, Olga; Gogolev, Yuri

    2013-07-01

    A new type of plant-derived signal molecules that activate extracellular pectate lyase activity in phytopathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 was revealed. These compounds were characterized and partially purified by means of several approaches including RT-PCR analysis, luminescence bioassay and HPLC fractionation. They were smaller than 1 kDa, thermoresistant, nonproteinaceous, hydrophilic, and slightly negatively charged molecules. Using gene expression analysis and bacterial biosensor assay the mode of activity of revealed compounds was studied. The possibility of their action through quorum sensing- and KdgR-mediated pathways was analyzed.

  15. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  16. Rhizosphere ecology of lumichrome and riboflavin, two bacterial signal molecules eliciting developmental changes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Dakora, Felix D.; Matiru, Viviene N.; Kanu, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Lumichrome and riboflavin are novel molecules from rhizobial exudates that stimulate plant growth. Reported studies have revealed major developmental changes elicited by lumichrome at very low nanomolar concentrations (5 nM) in plants, which include early initiation of trifoliate leaves, expansion of unifoliate and trifoliate leaves, increased stem elongation and leaf area, and consequently greater biomass accumulation in monocots and dicots. But higher lumichrome concentration (50 nM) depressed root development and reduced growth of unifoliate and second trifoliate leaves. While the mechanisms remain unknown, it is possible that lumichrome released by rhizobia induced the biosynthesis of classical phytohormones that caused the observed developmental changes in plants. We also showed in earlier studies that applying either 10 nM lumichrome, 10 nM ABA, or 10 ml of infective rhizobial cells (0.2 OD600) to roots of monocots and dicots for 44 h produced identical effects, which included decreased stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration in Bambara groundnut, soybean, and maize, increased stomatal conductance and transpiration in cowpea and lupin, and elevated root respiration in maize (19% by rhizobia and 20% by lumichrome). Greater extracellular exudation of lumichrome, riboflavin and indole acetic acid by N2-fixing rhizobia over non-fixing bacteria is perceived to be an indication of their role as symbiotic signals. This is evidenced by the increased concentration of lumichrome and riboflavin in the xylem sap of cowpea and soybean plants inoculated with infective rhizobia. In fact, greater xylem concentration of lumichrome in soybean and its correspondingly increased accumulation in leaves was found to result in dramatic developmental changes than in cowpea. Furthermore, lumichrome and riboflavin secreted by soil rhizobia are also known to function as (i) ecological cues for sensing environmental stress, (ii) growth factors for microbes, plants, and humans, (iii

  17. Methods for the study of signaling molecules in membrane lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Insel, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    Lipid rafts and caveolae are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane that concentrate components of certain signal transduction pathways. Interest in and exploration of these microdomains has grown in recent years, especially after the discovery of the biochemical marker of caveolae, caveolin, and the recognition that caveolin interacts with many different signaling molecules via its scaffolding domain. There are three major types of caveolins (1, 2, and 3), with some selectivity in their expression in different tissues. Results assessing lipid raft/caveolae co-localization of molecules in signal transduction pathways have provided support for the idea that signaling components are compartmentalized or preassembled together. This chapter describes nondetergent- and detergent-based methods for isolating lipid rafts and caveolae for biochemical studies. We also describe a method for immunoisolation (using antibodies to caveolins) of detergent-insoluble membranes that selectively isolates caveolae vs lipid rafts. Together, these methods are useful for assessment of the role of lipid rafts and caveolae in transmembrane signaling.

  18. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation.

  19. Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling by Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of cell signaling pathways as well as many bacterial and viral infection processes. As such, they define critical targets for drug development against diseases such as cancer, arthritis, obesity, AIDS and many others. Until now, the clinical inhibition of protein-protein interactions and signaling has been accomplished with the use of antibodies or soluble versions of receptor molecules. Small molecule replacements of these therapeutic agents have been extremely difficult to develop; either the necessary potency has been hard to achieve or the expected biological effect has not been obtained. In this presentation, we show that a rigorous thermodynamic approach that combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a unique platform for the identification and optimization of small molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in the development of cell entry inhibitors of HIV-1 using this approach will be discussed.

  20. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-07

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  1. Hydroxamic acid – A novel molecule for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Saha, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxamic acid is a potent moiety not only in the field of cancer therapy but also as a mutagenic agent. Among the various derivatives of hydroxamic acid, SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) is considered as a potent anticancer agent. Scientists from the different corner synthesized different hydroxamic acid moieties with some straight chain oxazole, thiadiazole, biphenyl moieties in the terminal position. Acetylation and deacetylation of histones of the core proteins of nucleosomes in chromatin play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. The level of acetylation of histones is established and maintained by two classes of enzymes, histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylases, which have been identified as transcriptional coactivators and transcriptional corepressors, respectively. There is increasing evidence that aberrant histone acetylation has been linked to various malignant diseases. Great efforts are currently underway for the design of more potent and less toxic candidates for the treatment of cancer. In recent years, hydroxamic acid derivatives have attracted increasing attention for their potential as highly efficacious in combating various etiological factors associated with cancer. Our main intention to draw an attention is that this single functional moiety has not only fit in the receptor but also create a diversified activity. PMID:22837956

  2. Presence of quorum sensing signal molecules in minced beef stored under various temperature and packaging conditions.

    PubMed

    Blana, Vasiliki A; Nychas, George-John E

    2014-03-03

    The presence of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) and autoinducer-2 (AI-2)-like activity was observed in meat stored under various temperatures (0, 5, 10 and 15°C) and packaging (air, modified atmospheres and modified atmospheres with oregano essential oil) conditions, and correlated with the ephemeral spoilage organisms that comprise the microbial community generally associated with this product. Quorum sensing signal molecules were found to be affected by the packaging conditions e.g. temperature and atmosphere used for meat preservation as a consequence of the development of a distinct microbial community. AHL signal molecules were detected at all incubation temperatures in minced beef samples, both stored aerobically and under modified atmospheres, when both pseudomonads and Enterobacteriaceae populations ranged from 10(7) to 10(9)CFU/g, but no signal molecules were detected in minced beef stored under modified atmospheres in the presence of volatile compounds of oregano essential oil, where both these groups failed to grow in high numbers. Additionally, no significant AI-2 activity was observed in the tested cell-free meat extracts (CFME), regardless of the indigenous bacterial populations. The presence of N-(β-ketocaproyl)-homoserine lactone was confirmed with TLC analysis of CFME.

  3. 2-Fatty acrylic acids: new highly derivatizable lipophilic platform molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the incorporation of an alpha-methylene unit into fatty acid skeletons. Since the new olefin is conjugated with the carboxylate, it is susceptible to 1,4- (Michael) additions. We have used multifunctional thiols and amines for additions at the methylene. The resulting products ...

  4. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Stephen R; Li, Rui; Dhahbi, Joseph M; Yamakawa, Amy; Sauer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI) receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and protein kinase C (PKC). If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  5. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, Part I: Gallic acid as model molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) and its derivatives are a group of biomolecules (polyphenols) obtained from plants. They have effects which are potentially beneficial to heath, for example they are antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antibacterial, as recently investigated in many fields such as medicine, food and plant sciences. The main drawbacks of these molecules are both low stability and bioavailability. In this research work the opportunity to graft GA to bioactive glasses is investigated, in order to deliver the undamaged biological molecule into the body, using the biomaterial surfaces as a localized carrier. GA was considered for functionalization since it is a good model molecule for polyphenols and presents several interesting biological activities, like antibacterial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Two different silica based bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2), with different reactivity, were employed as substrates. UV photometry combined with the Folin&Ciocalteu reagent was adopted to test the concentration of GA in uptake solution after functionalization. This test verified how much GA consumption occurred with surface modification and it was also used on solid samples to test the presence of GA on functionalized glasses. XPS and SEM-EDS techniques were employed to characterize the modification of material surface properties and functional group composition before and after functionalization.

  6. Structural Conservation of Ligand Binding Reveals a Bile Acid-like Signaling Pathway in Nematodes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Motola, Daniel L.; Gelmedin, Verena; Hawdon, John; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Bile acid-like molecules named dafachronic acids (DAs) control the dauer formation program in Caenorhabditis elegans through the nuclear receptor DAF-12. This mechanism is conserved in parasitic nematodes to regulate their dauer-like infective larval stage, and as such, the DAF-12 ligand binding domain has been identified as an important therapeutic target in human parasitic hookworm species that infect more than 600 million people worldwide. Here, we report two x-ray crystal structures of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum DAF-12 ligand binding domain in complex with DA and cholestenoic acid (a bile acid-like metabolite), respectively. Structure analysis and functional studies reveal key residues responsible for species-specific ligand responses of DAF-12. Furthermore, DA binds to DAF-12 mechanistically and is structurally similar to bile acids binding to the mammalian bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor. Activation of DAF-12 by cholestenoic acid and the cholestenoic acid complex structure suggest that bile acid-like signaling pathways have been conserved in nematodes and mammals. Together, these results reveal the molecular mechanism for the interplay between parasite and host, provide a structural framework for DAF-12 as a promising target in treating nematode parasitism, and provide insight into the evolution of gut parasite hormone-signaling pathways. PMID:22170062

  7. Stardust and the Molecules of Life (Why are the Amino Acids Left-Handed?)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2010-04-02

    A mechanism for creating and selecting amino acid chirality is identified, and subsequent chemical replication and galactic mixing that would populate the galaxy with the predominant species will be described. This involves: (1) the spin of the {sup 14}N in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules from which amino acids might be formed, coupling to the chirality of the molecules; (2) the neutrinos emitted from the supernova, together with magnetic field from the nascent neutron star or black hole from the supernova selectively destroying one orientation of the {sup 14}N, thereby selecting the chirality associated with the other {sup 14}N orientation; (3) amplification by chemical evolution, by which the molecules replicate on a relatively short timescale; and (4) galactic mixing on a longer timescale mixing the selected molecules throughout the galaxy.

  8. Palmitate induces insulin resistance in human HepG2 hepatocytes by enhancing ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of key insulin signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Megumi; Maeda, Ayumi; Tani, Shuji; Akagawa, Mitsugu

    2015-01-15

    Obesity-associated insulin resistance is a major pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. High concentrations of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) are involved in the etiology of obesity-associated insulin resistance. However, the detailed mechanism by which FFAs contribute to the development of insulin resistance is not yet fully understood. We investigated the molecular basis of insulin resistance elicited by FFAs using the human hepatocyte cell line HepG2. Among major human FFAs, palmitate markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of key insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and Akt, indicating that palmitate is the principal inducer of insulin resistance. We revealed that palmitate facilitates ubiquitination of the key insulin signaling molecules, and subsequently elicits their proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of ubiquitination by the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 inhibitor PYR41 significantly prevents palmitate-inducible insulin resistance but not by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying that ubiquitinated signaling molecules may be dysfunctional. In conclusion, inhibition of ubiquitination of the key insulin signaling molecules may be a potential strategy for preventing and treating obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  9. Hyaluronic Acid--an "Old" Molecule with "New" Functions: Biosynthesis and Depolymerization of Hyaluronic Acid in Bacteria and Vertebrate Tissues Including during Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tsepilov, R N; Beloded, A V

    2015-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid is an evolutionarily ancient molecule commonly found in vertebrate tissues and capsules of some bacteria. Here we review modern data regarding structure, properties, and biological functions of hyaluronic acid in mammals and Streptococcus spp. bacteria. Various aspects of biogenesis and degradation of hyaluronic acid are discussed, biosynthesis and degradation metabolic pathways for glycosaminoglycan together with involved enzymes are described, and vertebrate and bacterial hyaluronan synthase genes are characterized. Special attention is given to the mechanisms underlying the biological action of hyaluronic acid as well as the interaction between polysaccharide and various proteins. In addition, all known signaling pathways involving hyaluronic acid are outlined. Impaired hyaluronic acid metabolism, changes in biopolymer molecular weight, hyaluronidase activity, and enzyme isoforms often accompany carcinogenesis. The interaction between cells and hyaluronic acid from extracellular matrix that may be important during malignant change is discussed. An expected role for high molecular weight hyaluronic acid in resistance of naked mole rat to oncologic diseases and the protective role of hyaluronic acid in bacteria are discussed.

  10. Identification of quorum sensing signal molecules and oligolignols associated with watermark disease in willow (Salix sp.).

    PubMed

    Huvenne, Hanneke; Goeminne, Geert; Maes, Martine; Messens, Eric

    2008-09-01

    The bacterium Brenneria salicis is the causal agent of watermark disease in willow. This work shows the importance of in situ studies and high-resolution separation of biological samples with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry to unambiguously identify molecular compounds associated with this disease. Approximately 40 oligolignols accumulated in wood sap of watermark diseased willow, and are indicative for degradation of the xylem cell wall, of which 15 were structurally assigned based on an earlier study. Many bacteria are known to produce and release quorum sensing signal molecules that switch on the expression of specific, sometimes pathogenic functions. Two quorum sensing signal molecules, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(hexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, were present in 4/1 ratios in diseased wood and in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis at 0.13-1.2 microM concentrations, and absent in healthy wood and in low-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis. Although it is not a proof, it can be an indication for involvement of quorum sensing in B. salicis pathogenesis. Cyclic dipeptides were present at high concentrations in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis, but not in situ, and were found not to be involved in quorum sensing signaling, therefore, the attribution of quorum signal properties to cyclic dipeptides isolated from in vitro cultures of pathogenic bacteria should be reconsidered.

  11. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with strong acid molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Viggiano, A.A.; Paulson, J.F.; Henchman, M.J.

    1986-06-15

    Using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, we have determined (at variously 300 and 570 K) the dissociative attachment coefficients ..beta.. for the reactions of electrons with the common acids HNO/sub 3/ (producing NO/sup -//sub 2/) and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (HSO/sup -//sub 4/), the superacids FSO/sub 3/H (FSO/sup -//sub 3/), CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/H (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), ClSO/sub 3/H (ClSO/sup -//sub 3/,Cl/sup -/), the acid anhydride (CF/sub 3/SO/sub 2/)/sub 2/O (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), and the halogen halides HBr (Br/sup -/) and HI (I/sup -/). The anions formed in the reactions are those given in the parentheses. The reactions with HF and HCl were investigated, but did not occur at a measurable rate since they are very endothermic. Dissociative attachment is rapid for the common acids, the superacids, and the anhydride, the measured ..beta.. being appreciable fractions of the theoretical maximum ..beta.. for such reactions, ..beta../sub max/. The HI reaction is very fast ( ..beta..approx...beta../sub max/) but the HBr reaction occurs much more slowly because it is significantly endothermic. The data indicate that the extreme acidity of the (Bronsted-type) superacids has its equivalence in the very efficient gas-phase dissociative attachment which these species undergo when reacting with free electrons. The anions of the superacids generated in these reactions, notably FSO/sup -//sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/, are very stable (unreactive) implying exceptionally large electron affinities for the FSO/sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/ radicals.

  12. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  13. Possible involvement of undissociated acid molecules in the acid response of the chorda tympani nerve of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, K; Shimizu, Y; Watanabe, K; Tonosaki, K

    2000-05-01

    To test whether undissociated acid is capable of exciting the chorda tympani nerves in rats, we have used buffered acid solutions as taste stimuli. These solutions were prepared by adding alkali to weak acids, such as acetic acid, so that the proportion of undissociated and dissociated acids was varied whereas keeping the total acid concentration constant. When acetic acid solutions, adjusted to wide ranges of pH by NaOH, were applied to the tongue, the response magnitude of the chorda tympani nerves was not varied systematically with pH changes. However, if the sodium effect was eliminated by amiloride or replacement of cation by potassium or Tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane; NH(2)C(CH(2)OH)(3) (Tris-base), the chorda tympani response was reduced systematically as pH increased. Similar results were obtained with citric acid and ascorbic acid. This pH-dependent change in taste nerve response to acid cannot be solely attributed to the proton gradient because the response magnitude induced by hydrogen itself, which was estimated from responses to strong acids, was much smaller than that by equi-pH acetic acid ( approximately 85%). Thus we cannot explain the pH-dependent responses of the chorda tympani nerves to weak acids unless effects of undissociated acid molecules are postulated. It is therefore concluded that undissociated acids in weak acid solutions can be a stimulant to taste receptor cells.

  14. Differential Immune Modulatory Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hooi, Doreen S. W.; Bycroft, Barrie W.; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Williams, Paul; Pritchard, David I.

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa releases a spectrum of well-regulated virulence factors, controlled by intercellular communication (quorum sensing) and mediated through the production of small diffusible quorum-sensing signal molecules (QSSM). We hypothesize that QSSM may in fact serve a dual purpose, also allowing bacterial colonization via their intrinsic immune-modulatory capacity. One class of signal molecule, the N-acylhomoserine lactones, has pleiotropic effects on eukaryotic cells, particularly those involved in host immunity. In the present study, we have determined the comparative effects of two chemically distinct and endobronchially detectable QSSM, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4 (1H)-quinolone or the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), on human leukocytes exposed to a series of stimuli designed to detect differential immunological activity in vitro. 3-Oxo-C12-HSL and PQS displayed differential effects on the release of interleukin-2 (IL-2) when human T cells were activated via the T-cell receptor and CD28 (a costimulatory molecule). 3-Oxo-C12-HSL inhibited cell proliferation and IL-2 release; PQS inhibited cell proliferation without affecting IL-2 release. Both molecules inhibited cell proliferation and the release of IL-2 following mitogen stimulation. Furthermore, in the presence of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, 3-oxo-C12-HSL inhibited tumor necrosis factor alpha release from human monocytes, as reported previously (K. Tateda et al., Infect. Immun. 64:37-43, 1996), whereas PQS did not inhibit in this assay. These data highlight the presence of two differentially active immune modulatory QSSM from P. aeruginosa, which are detectable endobronchially and may be active at the host/pathogen interface during infection with P. aeruginosa, should the bronchial airway lymphoid tissues prove to be accessible to QSSM. PMID:15501777

  15. Differential immune modulatory activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Doreen S W; Bycroft, Barrie W; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Williams, Paul; Pritchard, David I

    2004-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa releases a spectrum of well-regulated virulence factors, controlled by intercellular communication (quorum sensing) and mediated through the production of small diffusible quorum-sensing signal molecules (QSSM). We hypothesize that QSSM may in fact serve a dual purpose, also allowing bacterial colonization via their intrinsic immune-modulatory capacity. One class of signal molecule, the N-acylhomoserine lactones, has pleiotropic effects on eukaryotic cells, particularly those involved in host immunity. In the present study, we have determined the comparative effects of two chemically distinct and endobronchially detectable QSSM, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4 (1H)-quinolone or the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), on human leukocytes exposed to a series of stimuli designed to detect differential immunological activity in vitro. 3-Oxo-C12-HSL and PQS displayed differential effects on the release of interleukin-2 (IL-2) when human T cells were activated via the T-cell receptor and CD28 (a costimulatory molecule). 3-Oxo-C12-HSL inhibited cell proliferation and IL-2 release; PQS inhibited cell proliferation without affecting IL-2 release. Both molecules inhibited cell proliferation and the release of IL-2 following mitogen stimulation. Furthermore, in the presence of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, 3-oxo-C12-HSL inhibited tumor necrosis factor alpha release from human monocytes, as reported previously (K. Tateda et al., Infect. Immun. 64:37-43, 1996), whereas PQS did not inhibit in this assay. These data highlight the presence of two differentially active immune modulatory QSSM from P. aeruginosa, which are detectable endobronchially and may be active at the host/pathogen interface during infection with P. aeruginosa, should the bronchial airway lymphoid tissues prove to be accessible to QSSM.

  16. Small molecule inhibitors of the hedgehog signaling pathway for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jeong In; Kim, Hyoung Rae; Park, Haeil; Kim, Sang Kyum; Lee, Jongkook

    2012-08-01

    Over the past decade, the Hedgehog signaling pathway has attracted considerable interest because the pathway plays important roles in the tumorigenesis of several types of cancer as well as developmental processes. It has also been observed that Hedgehog signaling regulates the proliferation and self-renewal of cancer stem cells. A great number of Hedgehog pathway inhibitors have been discovered through small molecule screens and subsequent medicinal chemistry efforts. Among the inhibitors, several Smo antagonists have reached the clinical trial phase. It has been proved that the inhibition of Hedgehog signaling with Smo antagonists is beneficial to cancer patients with basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. In this review, we provide an overview of Hedgehog pathway inhibitors with focusing on the preclinical and/or clinical efficacy and molecular mechanisms of these inhibitors.

  17. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules in micro- and nano-fluidics.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Sarah M; Zec, Helena C; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2016-03-07

    Nucleic acid analysis has enhanced our understanding of biological processes and disease progression, elucidated the association of genetic variants and disease, and led to the design and implementation of new treatment strategies. These diverse applications require analysis of a variety of characteristics of nucleic acid molecules: size or length, detection or quantification of specific sequences, mapping of the general sequence structure, full sequence identification, analysis of epigenetic modifications, and observation of interactions between nucleic acids and other biomolecules. Strategies that can detect rare or transient species, characterize population distributions, and analyze small sample volumes enable the collection of richer data from biosamples. Platforms that integrate micro- and nano-fluidic operations with high sensitivity single molecule detection facilitate manipulation and detection of individual nucleic acid molecules. In this review, we will highlight important milestones and recent advances in single molecule nucleic acid analysis in micro- and nano-fluidic platforms. We focus on assessment modalities for single nucleic acid molecules and highlight the role of micro- and nano-structures and fluidic manipulation. We will also briefly discuss future directions and the current limitations and obstacles impeding even faster progress toward these goals.

  18. Algal swimming velocities signal fatty acid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Travis J; Hondzo, Miki; Mashek, Mara T; Mashek, Douglas G; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The use of microalgae for biofuel production will be beneficial to society if we can produce biofuels at large scales with minimal mechanical energy input in the production process. Understanding micro-algal physiological responses under variable environmental conditions in bioreactors is essential for the optimization of biofuel production. We demonstrate that measuring micro-algal swimming speed provides information on culture health and total fatty acid accumulation. Three strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were grown heterotrophically on acetate and subjected to various levels of nitrogen starvation. Other nutrient levels were explored to determine their effect on micro-algal kinetics. Swimming velocities were measured with two-dimensional micro-particle tracking velocimetry. The results show an inverse linear relationship between normalized total fatty acid mass versus swimming speed of micro-algal cells. Analysis of RNA sequencing data confirms these results by demonstrating that the biological processes of cell motion and the generation of energy precursors are significantly down-regulated. Experiments demonstrate that changes in nutrient concentration in the surrounding media also affect swimming speed. The findings have the potential for the in situ and indirect assessment of lipid content by measuring micro-algal swimming kinetics.

  19. Signalling of abscisic acid to regulate plant growth.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelbach, A; Iten, M; Grill, E

    1998-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth control is a fundamental response of plants to adverse environmental cues. The linkage between ABA perception and growth control is currently being unravelled by using different experimental approaches such as mutant analysis and microinjection experiments. So far, two protein phosphatases, ABI1 and ABI2, cADPR, pH, and Ca2+ have been identified as main components of the ABA signalling pathway. Here, the ABA signal transduction pathway is compared to signalling cascades from yeast and mammalian cells. A model for a bifurcated ABA signal transduction pathway exerting a positive and negative control mechanism is proposed. PMID:9800207

  20. Paradigm shift in discovering next-generation anti-infective agents: targeting quorum sensing, c-di-GMP signaling and biofilm formation in bacteria with small molecules.

    PubMed

    Sintim, Herman O; Smith, Jacqueline A I; Wang, Jingxin; Nakayama, Shizuka; Yan, Lei

    2010-06-01

    Small molecules that can attenuate bacterial toxin production or biofilm formation have the potential to solve the bacteria resistance problem. Although several molecules, which inhibit bacterial cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing), biofilm formation and toxin production, have been discovered, there is a paucity of US FDA-approved drugs that target these processes. Here, we review the current understanding of quorum sensing in important pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and provide examples of experimental molecules that can inhibit both known and unknown targets in bacterial virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Structural data for protein targets that are involved in both quorum sensing and cyclic diguanylic acid signaling are needed to aid the development of molecules with drug-like properties in order to target bacterial virulence factors production and biofilm formation.

  1. Single-Molecule Studies of Nucleic Acid Interactions Using Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanunu, Meni; Soni, Gautam V.; Meller, Amit

    This chapter presents biophysical studies of single biopolymers using nanopores. Starting from the fundamental process of voltage-driven biopolymer translocation, the understanding of which is a prerequisite for virtually all nanopore applications, the chapter describes recent experiments that resolve nucleic acid structure and its interaction with enzymes, such as exonucleases and polymerases. It then outlines progress made with solid-state nanopores fabricated in ultrathin membranes and discusses experiments describing biopolymer dynamics in synthetic pores. The chapter concludes with a discussion on some of the main challenges facing nanopore technology, as well as on some of the future prospects associated with nanopore-based tools.

  2. Nitro-Fatty Acids in Plant Signaling: Nitro-Linolenic Acid Induces the Molecular Chaperone Network in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, María N.; Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Luque, Francisco; Melguizo, Manuel; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Peñas-Sanjuán, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species derived of nitric oxide (NO) and unsaturated fatty acids. In animal systems, NO2-FAs are considered novel signaling mediators of cell function based on a proven antiinflammatory response. Nevertheless, the interaction of NO with fatty acids in plant systems has scarcely been studied. Here, we examine the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in Arabidopsis and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant’s development by mass spectrometry. The observed levels of this NO2-FA at picomolar concentrations suggested its role as a signaling effector of cell function. In fact, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing heat shock proteins and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that NO2-Ln was also involved in the response to oxidative stress conditions, mainly depicted by H2O2, reactive oxygen species, and oxygen-containing compound responses, with a high induction of ascorbate peroxidase expression. Closely related to these results, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions such as wounding or exposure to salinity, cadmium, and low temperature, thus validating the outcomes found by RNA-seq technology. Jointly, to our knowledge, these are the first results showing the endogenous presence of NO2-Ln in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and supporting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the defense mechanism against different abiotic-stress situations. PMID:26628746

  3. Competitive Adsorption of Naphthenic Acids and Polyaromatic Molecules at a Toluene-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Teklebrhan, Robel B; Jian, Cuiying; Choi, Phillip; Xu, Zhenghe; Sjöblom, Johan

    2016-12-22

    The early-stage competitive co-adsorption of interfacially active naphthenic acids (NAs) and polyaromatic (PA) molecules to a toluene-water interface from the bulk toluene phase was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The NA molecules studied had the same polar functional group but different cycloaliphatic nonpolar tails, and a perylene bisimide (PBI)-based molecule was used as a representative PA compound. The results from our simulations suggest that the size and structural features of NA molecules greatly influence the interfacial activity of PA molecules and partitioning of NA molecules at the toluene-water interface. At low concentrations of PA (∼2.3 wt %) and NA (∼0.4 wt %) molecules, NA molecules containing large cycloaliphatic rings (e.g., four rings) or with a very long aliphatic tail (e.g., carbon chain length of 14) were observed to impede the migration of PA molecules to the interface, whereas small NA molecules containing two cycloaliphatic rings had little effect on the adsorption of PA molecules at the toluene-water interface. At high NA concentrations, the adsorption of PA molecules (∼5.75-17.25 wt %) was greatly hindered by the presence of small NA molecules (∼1.6-4.8 wt %) due to the solvation of PA nanoaggregates in the bulk. Adsorption mechanisms of PA and NA molecules at toluene-water interfaces were clarified through a detailed analysis on the interactions among different species in the system. The results obtained from this work provide insights into designing appropriate chemical demulsifiers or co-demulsifiers for breaking water-in-oil emulsions of great industrial applications.

  4. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  5. Label-free electrochemical lead (II) aptasensor using thionine as the signaling molecule and graphene as signal-enhancing platform.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Gao, Cai; He, Suyu; Wang, Qingxiang; Wu, Aiqun

    2016-07-15

    A label-free and highly sensitive electrochemical aptasensor for Pb(2+) was constructed using thionine (TH) as the signaling molecule and graphene (GR) as the signal-enhancing platform. The electrochemical sensing interface was fabricated by stepwise assembly of GR and TH on the lead (II) specific aptamer (LSA) modified electrode. Upon interaction with Pb(2+), the aptamer probe on the sensor underwent conformational switch from a single-stranded DNA form to the G-quadruplex structure, causing the GR with assembled TH released from the electrode surface into solution. As a result, the electrochemical signal of TH on the aptasensor was substantially reduced. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the attenuation of peak currents presented a good linear relationship with the logarithm of Pb(2+) concentrations over the range from 1.6×10(-13) to 1.6×10(-10)M. The detection limit was estimated to be 3.2×10(-14)M. The aptasensor also exhibited good regenerability, excellent selectivity, and acceptable reproducibility, indicating promising application in environment monitoring of lead.

  6. Carbon Monoxide, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Nitric Oxide as Signaling Molecules in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianrico; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) used to be thought of simply as lethal and (for H2S) smelly gaseous molecules; now they are known to have important signaling functions in the gastrointestinal tract. CO and H2S, which are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by different enzymes, regulate smooth muscle membrane potential and tone, transmit signals from enteric nerves and can regulate the immune system. The pathways that produce nitric oxide (NO) H2S and CO interact—each can inhibit and potentiate the level and activity of the other. However, there are significant differences between these molecules, such as in half-lives; CO is more stable and therefore able to have effects distal to the site of production, whereas NO and H2S are short lived and act only close to sites of production. We review their signaling functions in the luminal gastrointestinal tract and discuss how their pathways interact. We also describe other physiologic functions of CO and H2S and how they might be used as therapeutic agents. PMID:24798417

  7. Carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, and nitric oxide as signaling molecules in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Gianrico; Szurszewski, Joseph H

    2014-08-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) used to be thought of simply as lethal and (for H2S) smelly gaseous molecules; now they are known to have important signaling functions in the gastrointestinal tract. CO and H2S, which are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by different enzymes, regulate smooth muscle membrane potential and tone, transmit signals from enteric nerves, and can regulate the immune system. The pathways that produce nitric oxide, H2S, and CO interact; each can inhibit and potentiate the level and activity of the other. However, there are significant differences between these molecules, such as in half-lives; CO is more stable and therefore able to have effects distal to the site of production, whereas nitric oxide and H2S are short lived and act only close to sites of production. We review their signaling functions in the luminal gastrointestinal tract and discuss how their pathways interact. We also describe other physiological functions of CO and H2S and how they might be used as therapeutic agents.

  8. High throughput screening technology and the small molecules modulating aging related signals.

    PubMed

    Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Luhong; Wang, Ling; Xiao, Hengyi

    2012-03-01

    Aging and its related diseases are severe issues in modern society. Many efforts have been made to understand the mechanisms of aging and to find the ways to prevent age-related diseases. Identifying the compounds targeting aging-related signals is a challenging work because there are so many proteins and signals involved. Recently, alone with the progresses in high throughput screening (HTS) technology, increasing numbers of small molecules targeting aging-related pathologic processes have been identified. In this review, we introduce the basic workflow, classification and assay strategies of HTS technology, and sort out known small molecules identified via HTS technology by their roles in aging related diseases, such as neural degenerative diseases, diabetes and tumors. Given the fact that application of HTS on aging research is still at an early stage, we also summarize the cellular mechanisms about aging process, paralleled with the compounds which can modulate the functions of proteins important for aging signals. Finally, we briefly discuss some advanced HTS technologies for their potent applications on the discovery of anti-aging compounds. The main purpose of this review is to provide updated and useful information to those who are interested in pharmacology and HTS technology, but not familiar with aging biology, or vice versa.

  9. Discovering small molecules that promote cardiomyocyte generation by modulating Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Terri T.; Rellinger, Eric J.; Mukherjee, Amrita; Stephens, Lauren; Thorne, Cutris A; Kim, Kwangho; Hu, Jiangyong; Xie, Shuying; Lee, Ethan; Marnett, Larry; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K.; Zhong, Tao P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We have developed a robust in vivo small molecule screen that modulates heart size and cardiomyocyte generation in zebrafish. Three structurally-related compounds (Cardionogen-1 to -3) identified from our screen enlarge the size of the developing heart via myocardial hyperplasia. Increased cardiomyocyte number in Cardionogen-treated embryos is due to expansion of cardiac progenitor cells. In zebrafish embryos and murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, Cardionogen treatment promotes cardiogenesis during and after gastrulation, whereas inhibits heart formation before gastrulation. Cardionogen-induced effects can be antagonized by increasing Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity. We demonstrate that Cardionogen inhibits Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcription in murine ES cells and zebrafish embryos. Cardionogen can rescue Wnt8-induced cardiomyocyte deficiency and heart-specific phenotypes during development. These findings demonstrate that in vivo small molecule screens targeted on heart size can discover compounds with cardiomyogenic effects and identify underlying target pathways. PMID:22195568

  10. Characterization of signaling function and expression of HLA class I molecules in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Courtney; Santi, Mariarita; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cornelison, Robert; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2011-01-01

    Although known for the important function in the immune system, MHC class I molecules are increasingly ascribed an alternative role in modifying signal transduction. In medulloblastoma, HLA class I molecules are associated with poor prognosis, and can induce ERK1/2 activation upon engagement with ligands that bind to incompletely assembled complexes (so called open conformers). We here demonstrate that ERK1/2 activation in medulloblastoma can occur in the absence of endogenously synthesized β2m, formally excluding involvement of closed HLA class conformation. In addition, several experimental observations suggest that heterogeneity of HLA class I expression may be a reflection of the status of original cells before transformation, rather than a consequence of immune-based selection of HLA-loss mutants. These results contribute to our understanding of an immune system-independent role of HLA class I in the pathology of medulloblastoma, and cancer in general. PMID:20811766

  11. Old concepts, new molecules and current approaches applied to the bacterial nucleotide signalling field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Signalling nucleotides are key molecules that help bacteria to rapidly coordinate cellular pathways and adapt to changes in their environment. During the past 10 years, the nucleotide signalling field has seen much excitement, as several new signalling nucleotides have been discovered in both eukaryotic and bacterial cells. The fields have since advanced quickly, aided by the development of important tools such as the synthesis of modified nucleotides, which, combined with sensitive mass spectrometry methods, allowed for the rapid identification of specific receptor proteins along with other novel genome-wide screening methods. In this review, we describe the principle concepts of nucleotide signalling networks and summarize the recent work that led to the discovery of the novel signalling nucleotides. We also highlight current approaches applied to the research in the field as well as resources and methodological advances aiding in a rapid identification of nucleotide-specific receptor proteins. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672152

  12. Saturated fatty-acids regulate retinoic acid signaling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty-acid-binding protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L.; Noy, Noa

    2015-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes, and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5 which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer. PMID:26592976

  13. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    PubMed

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-11-23

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer.

  14. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  15. Dissection of the cis-2-decenoic acid signaling network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using microarray technique

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani-Badi, Azadeh; Sepehr, Shayesteh; Fallahi, Hossein; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use quorum-sensing (QS) signaling to regulate the expression of factors contributing to virulence and persistence. Bacteria produce signals of different chemical classes. The signal molecule, known as diffusible signal factor (DSF), is a cis-unsaturated fatty acid that was first described in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris. Previous works have shown that human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also synthesizes a structurally related molecule, characterized as cis-2-decenoic acid (C10: Δ2, CDA) that induces biofilm dispersal by multiple types of bacteria. Furthermore, CDA has been shown to be involved in inter-kingdom signaling that modulates fungal behavior. Therefore, an understanding of its signaling mechanism could suggest strategies for interference, with consequences for disease control. To identify the components of CDA signaling pathway in this pathogen, a comparative transcritpome analysis was conducted, in the presence and absence of CDA. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for differentially expressed (DE) genes with known function was then constructed by STRING and Cytoscape. In addition, the effects of CDA in combination with antimicrobial agents on the biofilm surface area and bacteria viability were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and digital image analysis. Microarray analysis identified 666 differentially expressed genes in the presence of CDA and gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that in P. aeruginosa, CDA mediates dispersion of biofilms through signaling pathways, including enhanced motility, metabolic activity, virulence as well as persistence at different temperatures. PPI data suggested that a cluster of five genes (PA4978, PA4979, PA4980, PA4982, PA4983) is involved in the CDA synthesis and perception. Combined treatments using both CDA and antimicrobial agents showed that following exposure of the biofilms to CDA, remaining cells on the surface were easily removed and killed by

  16. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics.

  17. Ketogenic essential amino acids replacement diet ameliorated hepatosteatosis with altering autophagy-associated molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ling; Kanasaki, Megumi; He, Jianhua; Kitada, Munehiro; Nagao, Kenji; Jinzu, Hiroko; Noguchi, Yasushi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Ketogenic amino acid (KAA) replacement diet has been shown to cure hepatic steatosis, a serious liver disease associated with diverse metabolic defects. In this study, we investigated the effects of KAA replacement diet on nutrition sensing signaling pathway and analyzed whether induction of hepatic autophagy was involved. Mice are fed with high fat diet (HFD) or KAA replacement in high-fat diet (30% fat in food; HFD)-fed (HFD(KAAR)) and sacrificed at 8, 12, 16 weeks after initiation of experimental food. Hepatic autophagy was analyzed in protein expression of several autophagy-associated molecules and in light chain-3 green fluorescent protein (LC-3 GFP) transgenic mice. HFD(KAAR) showed increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and enhanced liver kinase B1 (LKB1) expression compared to control HFD-fed mice. The KAA-HFD-induced activation of AMPK was associated with an increased protein expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), decreased forkhead box protein O3a (Foxo3a) level, and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylation compared with the HFD-fed mice. The intervention study revealed that a KAA-replacement diet also ameliorated all the established metabolic and autophagy defects in the HFD-fed mice, suggesting that a KAA-replacement diet can be used therapeutically in established diseases. These results indicate that KAA replacement in food could be a novel strategy to combat hepatic steatosis and metabolic abnormalities likely involvement of an induction of autophagy.

  18. Single-Molecule Study of Protein-Protein Interaction Dynamics in a Cell Signaling System

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xin; Nalbant, Perihan; Toutchkine, Alexei; Hu, Dehong; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Lu, H. Peter

    2004-01-01

    We report a study on protein-protein noncovalent interactions in an intracellular signaling protein complex, using single-molecule spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP) fragment that binds only the activated intracellular signaling protein Cdc42 was labeled with a novel solvatochromic dye and used to probe hydrophobic interactions significant to Cdc42/WASP recognition. The study shows static and dynamic inhomogeneous conformational fluctuations of the protein complex that involve bound and loosely bound states. A two-coupled, two-state Markovian kinetic model is proposed for the conformational dynamics. Finally, the MD simulations explore the origin of these conformational states and associated conformational fluctuations in this protein-protein interaction system.

  19. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  20. Differential Targeting of Gβγ-Subunit Signaling with Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Tabetha M.; Mathews, Jennifer L.; Yuan, Chujun; Lehmann, David M.; Malik, Sundeep; Wu, Dianqing; Font, Jose L.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Smrcka, Alan V.

    2006-04-01

    G protein βγ subunits have potential as a target for therapeutic treatment of a number of diseases. We performed virtual docking of a small-molecule library to a site on Gβγ subunits that mediates protein interactions. We hypothesized that differential targeting of this surface could allow for selective modulation of Gβγ subunit functions. Several compounds bound to Gβγ subunits with affinities from 0.1 to 60 μM and selectively modulated functional Gβγ-protein-protein interactions in vitro, chemotactic peptide signaling pathways in HL-60 leukocytes, and opioid receptor-dependent analgesia in vivo. These data demonstrate an approach for modulation of G protein-coupled receptor signaling that may represent an important therapeutic strategy.

  1. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells. PMID:28250717

  2. Laser-triggered release of encapsulated molecules from polylactic-co-glycolic acid microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyasu, Kazumasa; Ishii, Atsuhiro; Umemoto, Taiga; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The controlled release of encapsulated molecules from a microcapsule is a promising method of targeted drug delivery. Laser-triggered methods for the release of encapsulated molecules have the advantage of spatial and temporal controllability. In this study, we demonstrated the release of encapsulated molecules from biodegradable polymer-based microcapsules using near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses. The polylactic-co-glycolic acid microcapsules encapsulating fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran molecules were fabricated using a dual-coaxial nozzle system. Irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses enhanced the release of the molecules from the microcapsules, which was accompanied by a decrease in the residual ratio of the microcapsules. The laser-induced modification of the surface of the shell of the microcapsules indicated the potential for sustained release as well as burst release.

  3. Methylglyoxal: An Emerging Signaling Molecule in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Tahsina S.; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Mostofa, Mohammad G.; Burritt, David J.; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenated short aldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) is produced in plants as a by-product of a number of metabolic reactions, including elimination of phosphate groups from glycolysis intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. MG is mostly detoxified by the combined actions of the enzymes glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II that together with glutathione make up the glyoxalase system. Under normal growth conditions, basal levels of MG remain low in plants; however, when plants are exposed to abiotic stress, MG can accumulate to much higher levels. Stress-induced MG functions as a toxic molecule, inhibiting different developmental processes, including seed germination, photosynthesis and root growth, whereas MG, at low levels, acts as an important signaling molecule, involved in regulating diverse events, such as cell proliferation and survival, control of the redox status of cells, and many other aspects of general metabolism and cellular homeostases. MG can modulate plant stress responses by regulating stomatal opening and closure, the production of reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium ion concentrations, the activation of inward rectifying potassium channels and the expression of many stress-responsive genes. MG appears to play important roles in signal transduction by transmitting and amplifying cellular signals and functions that promote adaptation of plants growing under adverse environmental conditions. Thus, MG is now considered as a potential biochemical marker for plant abiotic stress tolerance, and is receiving considerable attention by the scientific community. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding MG metabolism in plants under abiotic stress, and evaluate the concept of MG signaling. In addition, we will demonstrate the importance of giving consideration to MG metabolism and the glyoxalase system, when investigating plant adaptation and responses to various environmental stresses. PMID:27679640

  4. Small molecule stabilization of the KSR inactive state antagonizes oncogenic Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Neil S.; scopton, Alex P.; Dar, Arvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of the Ras–mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is an early event in many different cancers and a key driver of resistance to targeted therapies1. Sustained signalling through this pathway is caused most often by mutations in K-Ras, which biochemically favours the stabilization of active RAF signalling complexes2. Kinase suppressor of Ras (KSR) is a MAPK scaffold3–5 that is subject to allosteric regulation through dimerization with RAF6,7. Direct targeting of KSR could have important therapeutic implications for cancer; however, testing this hypothesis has been difficult owing to a lack of small-molecule antagonists of KSR function. Guided by KSR mutations that selectively suppress oncogenic, but not wild-type, Ras signalling, we developed a class of compounds that stabilize a previously unrecognized inactive state of KSR. These compounds, exemplified by APS-2-79, modulate KSR-dependent MAPK signalling by antagonizing RAF heterodimerization as well as the conformational changes required for phosphorylation and activation of KSR-bound MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase). Furthermore, APS-2-79 increased the potency of several MEK inhibitors specifically within Ras-mutant cell lines by antagonizing release of negative feedback signalling, demonstrating the potential of targeting KSR to improve the efficacy of current MAPK inhibitors. These results reveal conformational switching in KSR as a druggable regulator of oncogenic Ras, and further suggest co-targeting of enzymatic and scaffolding activities within Ras–MAPK signalling complexes as a therapeutic strategy for overcoming Ras-driven cancers. PMID:27556948

  5. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nievas, Fiorela L; Bogino, Pablo C; Giordano, Walter

    2016-05-06

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences of lab experiments allow these students to investigate biochemical problems whose solution is feasible within the context of their knowledge and experience. We previously designed and reported a programmed lab experiment that familiarizes microbiology students with techniques for detection and characterization of quorum-sensing (QS) and quorum-quenching (QQ) signal molecules. Here, we describe a sequence of experiments designed to expand the understanding and capabilities of biochemistry students using techniques for extraction and identification of QS and QQ signal molecules from peanut rhizospheric soil bacteria, including culturing and manipulation of bacteria under sterile conditions. The program provides students with an opportunity to perform useful assays, draw conclusions from their results, and discuss possible extensions of the study. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:256-262, 2016.

  6. Detection of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules in Edwardsiella ictaluri Ei-151.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Han, Yin; Tinh, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Hien, Nguyen Thi; Bossier, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae that causes enteric septicemia of catfish, which has become a significant problem in the aquaculture of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) in Vietnam. In this study, a bacterium designated as Ei-151 was isolated from diseased striped catfish and proved to be virulent. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing and phenotypic tests, the pathogenic bacterium was identified as Edw. ictaluri. The presence of quorum sensing signal molecules in Edw. ictaluri Ei-151 was detected with different biosensor strains. The results showed that Ei-151 produced at least three kinds of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules as detected with the biosensor Agrobacterium tumefaciens KYC55, and the AHLs fingerprint was similar to that of Edw. tarda. During its entire growth, the levels of AHLs and autoinducer-2 produced by Ei-151 peaked at the stationary phase (OD600 1.8), which suggested that both of them may function at the stationary phase. No Cholerae autoinducer-1-like activity (including Edw. ictaluri LMG7860(T)) was detected.

  7. Cross Talk between H2O2 and Interacting Signal Molecules under Plant Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ina; Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is an important cause of cellular damage. During stress conditions, plants have evolved regulatory mechanisms to adapt to various environmental stresses. One of the consequences of stress is an increase in the cellular concentration of reactive oxygen species, which is subsequently converted to H2O2. H2O2 is continuously produced as the byproduct of oxidative plant aerobic metabolism. Organelles with a high oxidizing metabolic activity or with an intense rate of electron flow, such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, or peroxisomes are major sources of H2O2 production. H2O2 acts as a versatile molecule because of its dual role in cells. Under normal conditions, H2O2 immerges as an important factor during many biological processes. It has been established that it acts as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks. In this review, we discuss potential roles of H2O2 and other signaling molecules during various stress responses. PMID:27200043

  8. Small molecule modulation of HH-GLI signaling: current leads, trials and tribulations.

    PubMed

    Mas, Christophe; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2010-09-01

    Many human sporadic cancers have been recently shown to require the activity of the Hedgehog-GLI pathway for sustained growth. The survival and expansion of cancer stem cells is also HH-GLI dependent. Here we review the advances on the modulation of HH-GLI signaling by small molecules. We focus on both natural compounds and synthetic molecules that target upstream pathway components, mostly SMOOTHENED, and those that target the last steps of the pathway, the GLI transcription factors. In this review we have sought to provide some bases for useful comparisons, listing original assays used and sources to facilitate comparisons of IC50 values. This area is a rapidly expanding field where biology, medicine and chemistry intersect, both in academia and industry. We also highlight current clinical trials, with positive results in early stages. While we have tried to be exhaustive regarding the molecules, not all data is in the public domain yet. Indeed, we have opted to avoid listing chemical structures but these can be easily found in the references given. Finally, we are hopeful that the best molecules will soon reach the patients but caution about the lack of investment on compounds that lack tight IP positions. While the market in developed nations is expected to compensate the investment and risk of making HH-GLI modulators, other sources or plans must be available for developing nations and poor patient populations. The promise of curing cancer recalls the once revered dream of El Dorado, which taught us that not everything that GLI-tters is gold.

  9. [Signaling pathway of meiosis induced by retinoic acid during spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Wu, Ying-Ji

    2013-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an oxidative metabolite of vitamin A (retinol, ROH) and plays an important role in the spermatogenesis (as in meiosis) of mammals. In mammalian testes, RA, in combination with its retinoic acid receptor (RAR), regulates the expressions of related target genes in various types of cells at different times. It activates meiosis by up-regulating the expressions of the genes that promote meiosis and down-regulate those that inhibit it during spermatogenesis in a specific stage. The results of researches on mammalian spermatogenesis have a great application value in reproductive biology, developmental biology, and reproductive engineering. Therefore, it is of considerable significance to study the signaling pathway of RA-induced meiosis during mammalian spermatogenesis. This article presents an introduction of the RA signal transduction system and its action mechanisms, as well as an overview on the signaling pathway of RA-activated meiosis during spermatogenesis.

  10. Detection and quantification of quinolone signalling molecule: a third quorum sensing molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by high performance-thin layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bala, Anju; Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2013-07-01

    Sophisticated network of quorum sensing involves the production of chemical signals which regulate the combined expression of virulence genes and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two well-characterized acyl homoserine lactone based las and rhl systems together with alkyl quinolone based Pseudomonas quinolone signalling (PQS) are fundamental components of this network. Third signalling molecule, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) is of paramount importance because of its interconnecting role in quorum sensing hierarchy in P. aeruginosa. Accurate detection of PQS molecule is very important to understand the involvement of this system in infection process of P. aeruginosa. In this study, high performance-thin layer chromatography (HP-TLC) method was developed for detection as well as quantification of PQS signal molecules in P. aeruginosa, which combines conventional method like TLC with sophisticated instrumentation. This method was validated using parameters like linearity, accuracy, precision, reproducibility and sensitivity. Intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision values were determined which were found to be within acceptable level and hence showed reproducibility. Measurement of PQS in the range of 0.01nmol indicated excellent sensitivity of this approach for quantifying PQS molecule. Automated sampling, rapid and simultaneous analysis of large number of samples and minimal errors make this method more suitable for analysis of PQS signalling molecules. Production of PQS was found to be strain dependent since variation in amount of PQS was observed among different P. aeruginosa isolates. Further, PQS production was also dependent on growth phase of P. aeruginosa with maximum production in late stationary phase.

  11. E3 ubiquitin ligases and abscisic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongxia

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in the regulation of nearly every aspect of plant growth and development. Protein ubiquitination involves the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to target proteins through a cascade catalyzed by three enzymes known as E1, E2 and E3. E3s are of particular interest as they confer substrate specificity during ubiquitination through their diverse substrate recognition domains. Recently, a number of E3s have been identified that actively participate in abscisic acid hormone biology, including regulation of biosynthesis, de-repression or activation of abscisic acid response and degradation of signaling components. In this review, we summarize recent exciting studies of the different types of E3s that target specific mediators of abscisic acid signaling or affect the plants response to the hormone. PMID:21364320

  12. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics.

  13. Activation of stress signaling molecules in bat brain during arousal from hibernation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonyong; Choi, Inho; Park, Kyoungsook

    2002-08-01

    Induction of glucose-regulated proteins (GRPs) is a ubiquitous intracellular response to stresses such as hypoxia, glucose starvation and acidosis. The induction of GRPs offers some protection against these stresses in vitro, but the specific role of GRPs in vivo remains unclear. Hibernating bats present a good in vivo model to address this question. The bats must overcome local high oxygen demand in tissue by severe metabolic stress during arousal thermogenesis. We used brain tissue of a temperate bat Rhinolopus ferrumequinum to investigate GRP induction by high metabolic oxygen demand and to identify associated signaling molecules. We found that during 30 min of arousal, oxygen consumption increased from nearly zero to 11.9/kg/h, which was about 8.7-fold higher than its active resting metabolic rate. During this time, body temperature rose from 7 degrees C to 35 degrees C, and levels of TNF-alpha and lactate in brain tissue increased 2-2.5-fold, indicating a high risk of oxygen shortage. Concomitantly, levels of GRP75, GRP78 and GRP94 increased 1.5-1.7-fold. At the same time, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activity increased 6.4-fold, and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activity decreased to a similar degree (6.1-fold). p38 MAPK activity was very low and remained unchanged during arousal. In addition, survival signaling molecules protein kinase B (Akt) and protein kinase C (PKC) were activated 3- and 5-fold, respectively, during arousal. Taken together, our results showed that bat brain undergoes high oxygen demand during arousal from hibernation. Up-regulation of GRP proteins and activation of JNK, PKCgamma and Akt may be critical for neuroprotection and the survival of bats during the repeated process.

  14. Syntheses of biodiesel precursors: sulfonic acid catalysts for condensation of biomass-derived platform molecules.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R; Bell, Alexis T

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis of transportation fuel from lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive solution to the green alternative-energy problem. The production of biodiesel, in particular, involves the process of upgrading biomass-derived small molecules to diesel precursors containing a specific carbon range (C11 -C23). Herein, a carbon-upgrading process utilizing an acid-catalyzed condensation of furanic platform molecules from biomass is described. Various types of sulfonic acid catalysts have been evaluated for this process, including biphasic and solid supported catalysts. A silica-bound alkyl sulfonic acid catalyst has been developed for promoting carbon-carbon bond formation of biomass-derived carbonyl compounds with 2-methylfuran. This hydrophobic solid acid catalyst exhibits activity and selectivity that are comparable to those of a soluble acid catalyst. The catalyst can be readily recovered and recycled, possesses appreciable hydrolytic stability in the presence of water, and retains its acidity over multiple reaction cycles. Application of this catalyst to biomass-derived platform molecules led to the synthesis of a variety of furanic compounds, which are potential biodiesel precursors.

  15. Trimethylamine as a probe molecule to differentiate acid sites in Y-FAU zeolite: FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Francisca Romero; Blasin-Aubé, Vanessa; Saussey, Jacques; Marie, Olivier; Daturi, Marco

    2006-07-06

    In heterogeneous catalysis acidity has a very important influence on activity and selectivity: correct determination of acidic properties is a base to improve industrial processes. The aim of this work was to study trimethylamine (TMA) as a probe molecule able to distinguish between the different Brønsted acid sites in zeolitic frameworks. Our work mainly focused on faujasite-type zeolites because the HY zeolite is one of the most used acidic catalysts in industrial processes. In this paper, typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species (formed in supercages) are detected in the HY zeolite. TMA interacting by hydrogen bonding with the acid sites located in the sodalite units is also observed. The wavenumbers of some typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species appear to depend on the acidic strength, and a complementary study with ZSM-5 and X-FAU samples confirms this proposition.

  16. Practical Calculation of Molecular Acidity with the Aid of a Reference Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Steven K; Liu, Shubin; Ayers, Paul W

    2011-02-24

    A set of linear free energy models are presented for determining the pK{sub a} values of amines, alcohols, and carboxylic acids. Models are determined from a series of pK{sub a} predictors, taken both from traditional natural atomic orbital analysis (NAO) and from a novel approach introduced here of using a reference molecule: an ammonium ion for amines and a hydrogen sulfide molecule for alcohols and carboxylic acids. Using these reference molecules, we calculate the barrier to proton transfer and show that a number of properties associated with the transition state are correlated with the pK{sub a}. By considering 38 predictors, we obtain a four-variable model for amines and a three-variable model for oxygen-containing compounds. The model for amines is based on 145 compounds and has a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.45 and R{sup 2} = 0.98. The oxygen set has 48 molecules: RMSE = 0.26, and R{sup 2} = 0.993. Similar, linear, and multilinear models are constructed after separating the sets into chemically similar categories: alcohols, carboxylic acids, and primary, secondary, tertiary, and aromatic amines. This separation gives simpler models with relatively low RMSE values, where the most important predictor of the pK{sub a} is the difference in energy between transferring the proton from the reference molecular base to the conjugate acid from the data set.

  17. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  18. Is L-lactate a novel signaling molecule in the brain?

    PubMed Central

    Mosienko, Valentina; Teschemacher, Anja G; Kasparov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    In the brain, L-lactate is produced by both neurons and astrocytes. There is no doubt that neurons use L-lactate as a supplementary fuel although the importance of this energy source is disputed. Irrespective of its caloric value, L-lactate might also have a signaling role in the brain. Here, we review several current hypotheses of L-lactate mediated signaling. Some proposed mechanisms require L-lactate entry into the neurons leading to a shift in ATP/ADP ratio or redox state. Others postulate interaction with either known receptor HCA1 (GPR81) or a novel, yet unidentified receptor. We argue that the sensitivity of any such mechanism has to match the concentration range of extracellular L-lactate, which is less than ~1.5 mmol/L under physiologic conditions. From that point of view, some of the proposed mechanisms require supraphysiologic levels of L-lactate and could be engaged during ischemia or seizures when L-lactate concentration rises dramatically. Currently, we do not know whether L-lactate production in the brain occurs in microdomains, which might create higher than average local concentrations. Nevertheless, it is clear that in the brain, as in the peripheral tissues, L-lactate is not only used as a source of energy but also acts as a signaling molecule. PMID:25920953

  19. Expression patterns of WNT/β-CATENIN signaling molecules during human tooth development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingmei; Li, Hanliang; Liu, Ying; Lin, Xin; Lin, Yao; Wang, Ye; Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yanding

    2014-10-01

    The WNT/β-CATENIN signaling has been demonstrated to play critical roles in mouse tooth development, but little is known about the status of these molecules in human embryonic tooth. In this study, expression patterns of WNT/β-CATENIN signaling components, including WNT ligands (WNT3, WNT5A), receptors (FZD4, FZD6, LRP5), transducers (β-CATENIN), transcription factors (TCF4, LEF1) and antagonists (DKK1, SOSTDC1) were investigated in human tooth germ at the bud, cap and bell stages by in situ hybridization. All these genes exhibited similar but slightly distinct expression patterns in human tooth germ in comparison with mouse. Furthermore the mRNA expression of these genes in incisors and molars at the bell stage was also examined by real-time PCR. Our results reveal the status of active WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in the human tooth germ and suggest these components may also play an essential role in the regulation of human tooth development.

  20. Sustained Small Molecule Delivery from Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels through Host-Guest Mediated Retention

    PubMed Central

    Mealy, Joshua E.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled and injectable hydrogels have many beneficial properties for the local delivery of therapeutics; however, challenges still exist in the sustained release of small molecules from these highly hydrated networks. Host-guest chemistry between cyclodextrin and adamantane has been used to create supramolecular hydrogels from modified polymers. Beyond assembly, this chemistry may also provide increased drug retention and sustained release through the formation of inclusion complexes between drugs and cyclodextrin. Here, we engineered a two-component system from adamantane-modified and β-cyclodextrin (CD)-modified hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural component of the extracellular matrix, to produce hydrogels that are both injectable and able to sustain the release of small molecules. The conjugation of cyclodextrin to HA dramatically altered its affinity for hydrophobic small molecules, such as tryptophan. This interaction led to lower molecule diffusivity and the release of small molecules for up to 21 days with release profiles dependent on CD concentration and drug-CD affinity. There was significant attenuation of release from the supramolecular hydrogels (~20% release in 24h) when compared to hydrogels without CD (~90% release in 24h). The loading of small molecules also had no effect on hydrogel mechanics or self-assembly properties. Finally, to illustrate this controlled delivery approach with clinically used small molecule pharmaceuticals, we sustained the release of two widely used drugs (i.e., doxycycline and doxorubicin) from these hydrogels. PMID:26693019

  1. Concepts of neuroendocrine cardiology and neuroendocrine immunology, chemistry and biology of signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Galoyan, Armen

    2010-12-01

    Discovery of neurosecretion of cardioactive neurohormones produced by hypothalamic nuclei (NSO and NPV), as well as the biosynthesis of several immunomodulators (signal molecules of the neuroendocrine immune system of brain), deciphering of their chemical structure and study of their biological properties led to the foundation of two important trends of neurobiology: neuroendocrine immunology and cardiology. Hormone formation by atrium ganglionary nerve cells and auriculum establishment of neurohumoral interactions between hypothalamic and atrium neurosecretion indicated the existence of the system neuroendocrine hypothalamus--endocrine heart. Study of their biological properties promoted creation of powerful neurohormonal preparations for the treatment of immune, cardio-vascular, neurodegenerative, infectious and tumor diseases. Concepts suggested by us on neuroendocrine cardiology and immunology, create large perspectives for development of the theory and its implementation in medicine.

  2. Peroxisomes as cell generators of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Palma, José M; del Río, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gaseous free radical with a wide range of direct and indirect actions in plant cells. However, the enzymatic sources of NO and its subcellular localization in plants are still under debate. Among the different subcellular compartments where NO has been found to be produced, peroxisomes are the best characterized since in these organelles it has been demonstrated the presence of NO and it has been biochemically characterized a L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity. This chapter summarizes the present knowledge of the NO metabolism and its derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in plant peroxisomes and how this gaseous free radical is involved in natural senescence, and is released to the cytosol under salinity stress conditions acting as a signal molecule.

  3. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  4. Investigation of pyridine carboxylic acids in CM2 carbonaceous chondrites: Potential precursor molecules for ancient coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-07-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  5. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  6. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We lso report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  7. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  8. Lipo-Chitin Oligosaccharides, Plant Symbiosis Signalling Molecules That Modulate Mammalian Angiogenesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, Michael A.; Bezos, Anna; Susanti; Marmuse, Laurence; Driguez, Hugues; Samain, Eric; Vauzeilles, Boris; Beau, Jean-Marie; Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; Rolfe, Barry G.; Schwörer, Ralf; Daines, Alison M.; Gresshoff, Peter M.; Parish, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides (LCOs) are signaling molecules required by ecologically and agronomically important bacteria and fungi to establish symbioses with diverse land plants. In plants, oligo-chitins and LCOs can differentially interact with different lysin motif (LysM) receptors and affect innate immunity responses or symbiosis-related pathways. In animals, oligo-chitins also induce innate immunity and other physiological responses but LCO recognition has not been demonstrated. Here LCO and LCO-like compounds are shown to be biologically active in mammals in a structure dependent way through the modulation of angiogenesis, a tightly-regulated process involving the induction and growth of new blood vessels from existing vessels. The testing of 24 LCO, LCO-like or oligo-chitin compounds resulted in structure-dependent effects on angiogenesis in vitro leading to promotion, or inhibition or nil effects. Like plants, the mammalian LCO biological activity depended upon the presence and type of terminal substitutions. Un-substituted oligo-chitins of similar chain lengths were unable to modulate angiogenesis indicating that mammalian cells, like plant cells, can distinguish between LCOs and un-substituted oligo-chitins. The cellular mode-of-action of the biologically active LCOs in mammals was determined. The stimulation or inhibition of endothelial cell adhesion to vitronectin or fibronectin correlated with their pro- or anti-angiogenic activity. Importantly, novel and more easily synthesised LCO-like disaccharide molecules were also biologically active and de-acetylated chitobiose was shown to be the primary structural basis of recognition. Given this, simpler chitin disaccharides derivatives based on the structure of biologically active LCOs were synthesised and purified and these showed biological activity in mammalian cells. Since important chronic disease states are linked to either insufficient or excessive angiogenesis, LCO and LCO-like molecules may have the

  9. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 replicate signaling pathways triggered by calorie restriction in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jesse J; Kenney, Renée Deehan; Gagne, David J; Frushour, Brian P; Ladd, William; Galonek, Heidi L; Israelian, Kristine; Song, Jeffrey; Razvadauskaite, Giedre; Lynch, Amy V; Carney, David P; Johnson, Robin J; Lavu, Siva; Iffland, Andre; Elliott, Peter J; Lambert, Philip D; Elliston, Keith O; Jirousek, Michael R; Milne, Jill C; Boss, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Background Calorie restriction (CR) produces a number of health benefits and ameliorates diseases of aging such as type 2 diabetes. The components of the pathways downstream of CR may provide intervention points for developing therapeutics for treating diseases of aging. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated as one of the key downstream regulators of CR in yeast, rodents, and humans. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 have been identified that exhibit efficacy in animal models of diseases typically associated with aging including type 2 diabetes. To identify molecular processes induced in the liver of mice treated with two structurally distinct SIRT1 activators, SIRT501 (formulated resveratrol) and SRT1720, for three days, we utilized a systems biology approach and applied Causal Network Modeling (CNM) on gene expression data to elucidate downstream effects of SIRT1 activation. Results Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 activators recapitulate many of the molecular events downstream of CR in vivo, such as enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis, improving metabolic signaling pathways, and blunting pro-inflammatory pathways in mice fed a high fat, high calorie diet. Conclusion CNM of gene expression data from mice treated with SRT501 or SRT1720 in combination with supporting in vitro and in vivo data demonstrates that SRT501 and SRT1720 produce a signaling profile that mirrors CR, improves glucose and insulin homeostasis, and acts via SIRT1 activation in vivo. Taken together these results are encouraging regarding the use of small molecule activators of SIRT1 for therapeutic intervention into type 2 diabetes, a strategy which is currently being investigated in multiple clinical trials. PMID:19284563

  10. Emergence of Hydrogen Sulfide as an Endogenous Gaseous Signaling Molecule in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Lefer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Long recognized as a malodorous and highly toxic gas, recent experimental studies have revealed that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced enzymatically in all mammalian species including man and exerts a number of critical actions to promote cardiovascular homeostasis and health. During the past 15 years, scientists have determined that H2S is produced by three endogenous enzymes and exerts powerful effects on endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nuclear transcription factors. These effects have been reported in multiple organ systems and the vast majority of data clearly indicate that H2S produced by the endogenous enzymes exerts cytoprotective actions. Recent preclinical studies investigating cardiovascular diseases have demonstrated that the administration of physiological or pharmacological levels of H2S attenuates myocardial injury, protects blood vessels, limits inflammation, and regulates blood pressure. H2S has emerged as a critical cardiovascular signaling molecule similar to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) with a profound impact on the heart and circulation (Figure 1). Our improved understanding of how H2S elicits protective actions, coupled with the very rapid development of novel H2S releasing agents, has resulted in heightened enthusiasm for the clinical translation of this ephemeral gaseous molecule. This review will examine our current state of knowledge regarding the actions of H2S within the cardiovascular system with an emphasis on the therapeutic potential and molecular crosstalk between H2S, NO, and CO. PMID:24526678

  11. Synemin acts as a regulator of signalling molecules during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara; Coletti, Dario; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Hourdé, Christophe; Joanne, Pierre; Gao-Li, Jacqueline; Blanc, Jocelyne; Ferry, Arnaud; Paulin, Denise; Xue, Zhigang; Agbulut, Onnik

    2014-11-01

    Synemin, a type IV intermediate filament (IF) protein, forms a bridge between IFs and cellular membranes. As an A-kinase-anchoring protein, it also provides temporal and spatial targeting of protein kinase A (PKA). However, little is known about its functional roles in either process. To better understand its functions in muscle tissue, we generated synemin-deficient (Synm(-) (/-)) mice. Synm(-) (/-) mice displayed normal development and fertility but showed a mild degeneration and regeneration phenotype in myofibres and defects in sarcolemma membranes. Following mechanical overload, Synm(-) (/-) mice muscles showed a higher hypertrophic capacity with increased maximal force and fatigue resistance compared with control mice. At the molecular level, increased remodelling capacity was accompanied by decreased myostatin (also known as GDF8) and atrogin (also known as FBXO32) expression, and increased follistatin expression. Furthermore, the activity of muscle-mass control molecules (the PKA RIIα subunit, p70S6K and CREB1) was increased in mutant mice. Finally, analysis of muscle satellite cell behaviour suggested that the absence of synemin could affect the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of these cells. Taken together, our results show that synemin is necessary to maintain membrane integrity and regulates signalling molecules during muscle hypertrophy.

  12. Retinoic Acid Signaling Affects Cortical Synchrony During Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Stéphanie; Franken, Paul; Dauvilliers, Yves; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.; Chambon, Pierre; Tafti, Mehdi

    2005-10-01

    Delta oscillations, characteristic of the electroencephalogram (EEG) of slow wave sleep, estimate sleep depth and need and are thought to be closely linked to the recovery function of sleep. The cellular mechanisms underlying the generation of delta waves at the cortical and thalamic levels are well documented, but the molecular regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate in the mouse that the gene encoding the retinoic acid receptor beta determines the contribution of delta oscillations to the sleep EEG. Thus, retinoic acid signaling, which is involved in the patterning of the brain and dopaminergic pathways, regulates cortical synchrony in the adult.

  13. Lactate as a Signaling Molecule That Regulates Exercise-Induced Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Nalbandian, Minas; Takeda, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Lactate (or its protonated form: lactic acid) has been studied by many exercise scientists. The lactate paradigm has been in constant change since lactate was first discovered in 1780. For many years, it was unfairly seen as primarily responsible for muscular fatigue during exercise and a waste product of glycolysis. The status of lactate has slowly changed to an energy source, and in the last two decades new evidence suggests that lactate may play a much bigger role than was previously believed: many adaptations to exercise may be mediated in some way by lactate. The mechanisms behind these adaptations are yet to be understood. The aim of this review is to present the state of lactate science, focusing on how this molecule may mediate exercise-induced adaptations. PMID:27740597

  14. Photodissociation of organic molecules in star-forming regions. II. Acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Santos, A. C. F.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2006-04-01

    Fragments from organic molecule dissociation (such as reactive ions and radicals) can form interstellar complex molecules like amino acids. The goal of this work is to experimentally study photoionization and photodissociation processes of acetic acid (CH3COOH), a glycine (NH2CH2COOH) precursor molecule, by soft X-ray photons. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline (100-310 eV). Mass spectra were obtained using the photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) method. Kinetic energy distribution and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections were also determined. We have found, among the channels leading to ionization, that only 4-6% of CH3COOH survive the strong ionization field. CH3CO^+, COOH+ and CH3+ ions are the main fragments, and the presence of the former may indicate that the production-destruction process of acetic acid in hot molecular cores (HMCs) could decrease the H2O abundance since the net result of this process converts H2O into OH + H^+. The COOH+ ion plays an important role in ion-molecule reactions to form large biomolecules like glycine.

  15. Conformational dynamics of nucleic acid molecules studied by PELDOR spectroscopy with rigid spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisner, T. F.; Marko, A.; Sigurdsson, S. Th.

    2015-03-01

    Nucleic acid molecules can adopt a variety of structures and exhibit a large degree of conformational flexibility to fulfill their various functions in cells. Here we describe the use of Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR or DEER) to investigate nucleic acid molecules where two cytosine analogs have been incorporated as spin probes. Because these new types of spin labels are rigid and incorporated into double stranded DNA and RNA molecules, there is no additional flexibility of the spin label itself present. Therefore the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between both spin labels encodes for the distance as well as for the mutual orientation between the spin labels. All of this information can be extracted by multi-frequency/multi-field PELDOR experiments, which gives very precise and valuable information about the structure and conformational flexibility of the nucleic acid molecules. We describe in detail our procedure to obtain the conformational ensembles and show the accuracy and limitations with test examples and application to double-stranded DNA.

  16. Conformational dynamics of nucleic acid molecules studied by PELDOR spectroscopy with rigid spin labels.

    PubMed

    Prisner, T F; Marko, A; Sigurdsson, S Th

    2015-03-01

    Nucleic acid molecules can adopt a variety of structures and exhibit a large degree of conformational flexibility to fulfill their various functions in cells. Here we describe the use of Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR or DEER) to investigate nucleic acid molecules where two cytosine analogs have been incorporated as spin probes. Because these new types of spin labels are rigid and incorporated into double stranded DNA and RNA molecules, there is no additional flexibility of the spin label itself present. Therefore the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between both spin labels encodes for the distance as well as for the mutual orientation between the spin labels. All of this information can be extracted by multi-frequency/multi-field PELDOR experiments, which gives very precise and valuable information about the structure and conformational flexibility of the nucleic acid molecules. We describe in detail our procedure to obtain the conformational ensembles and show the accuracy and limitations with test examples and application to double-stranded DNA.

  17. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  18. Signal-enhancer molecules encapsulated liposome as a valuable sensing and amplification platform combining the aptasensor for ultrasensitive ECL immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Zhuo, Ying; Xiang, Yun

    2011-06-15

    An innovatory ECL immunoassay strategy was proposed to detect the newly developing heart failure biomarker N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Firstly, this strategy used small molecules encapsulated liposome as immune label to construct a sandwich immune sensing platform for NT-proBNP. Then the ECL aptasensor was prepared to collect and detect the small molecules released from the liposome. Finally, based on the ECL signal changes caused by the small molecules, the ECL signal indirectly reflected the level of NT-proBNP antigen. In this experiment, the cocaine was chosen as the proper small molecule that can act as signal-enhancer to enhance the ECL of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+). The cocaine-encapsulated liposomes were successfully characterized by TEM. The quantificational calculation proved the ∼5.3×10(3) cocaine molecules per liposome enough to perform the assignment of signal amplification. The cocaine-binding ECL aptasensor further promoted the work aimed at amplifying signal. The performance of NT-proBNP assay by the proposed strategy exhibited high sensitivity and high specificities with a linear relationship over 0.01-500 ng mL(-1) range, and a detection limit down to 0.77 pg mL(-1).

  19. A density functional and ab initio investigation of the p-aminobenzoic acid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A. F.; Dávalos, J. Z.; de Brito, A. Naves

    2007-08-01

    The p-aminobenzoic acid (C 7H 7NO 2) molecule has been investigated at different levels of theory. DFT methods (B3LYP and PBE1PBE), second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and composite ab initio methods (G3MP2 and CBS) have been employed, in conjunction with large basis sets. Important informations on the electronic structure and thermochemistry of this molecule have been extracted, and the performance of the density functional and ab initio methods has been evaluated, based on the comparison of the calculated and the available experimental data.

  20. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-06

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment.

  1. MAGI-1 acts as a scaffolding molecule for NGF receptor-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Mizuno, Makoto; Nagata, Koh-ichi

    2013-10-01

    We have recently found that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted organization-1 (MAGI-1) was enriched in rat nervous tissues such as the glomeruli in olfactory bulb of adult rats and dorsal root entry zone in spinal cord of embryonic rats. In addition, we revealed the localization of MAGI-1 in the growth cone of the primary cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells. These results point out the possibility that MAGI-1 is involved in the regulation of neurite extension or guidance. In this study, we attempted to reveal the physiological role(s) of MAGI-1 in neurite extension. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of MAGI-1 caused inhibition of nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. To clarify the involvement of MAGI-1 in NGF-mediated signal pathway, we tried to identify binding partners for MAGI-1 and identified p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a low affinity NGF receptor, and Shc, a phosphotyrosine-binding adaptor. These three proteins formed an immunocomplex in PC12 cells. Knockdown as well as overexpression of MAGI-1 caused suppression of NGF-stimulated activation of the Shc-ERK pathway, which is supposed to play important roles in neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. These results indicate that MAGI-1 may act as a scaffolding molecule for NGF receptor-mediated signaling pathway.

  2. Intracellular light-induced release of signaling molecules from gold-coated liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Williams, Joshua D.; Romanowski, Marek

    2014-03-01

    The combination of laser light and composite nanovesicles enables unique opportunities for precise delivery to, and ondemand release of molecular compounds within, single cells at high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we demonstrate precise delivery and intracellular release of molecules from gold-coated liposomes via near infrared (NIR) light. The plasmon resonant gold shell provides a light-sensitive trigger for on-demand content release from thermosensitive liposomes. Two demonstrations of intracellular delivery and release from gold-coated liposomes are presented here. The first example uses microinjection to preload gold-coated liposomes into a single cell, followed by exposure to onresonant NIR laser light to trigger release of a fluorescent nuclear dye intracellularly. In the second delivery and release demonstration, gold-coated liposomes encapsulating inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous secondary messenger in cell signaling cascades, passively accumulate within cells via endocytosis. Exposure to on-resonant NIR laser wavelength of light induces rapid release of IP3 from the intracellular liposomes and subsequent activation of Ca2+ signaling at a single cell, monitored by changes in fluorescence intensity of a Ca 2+-sensitive dye.

  3. Dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules on sulfuric acid-water surfaces.

    PubMed

    Behr, P; Scharfenort, U; Ataya, K; Zellner, R

    2009-09-28

    A molecular beam technique has been used to study the dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules in collision with sulfuric acid-water surfaces. The experiments were performed by directing a nearly mono-energetic beam of HCl molecules onto a continuously renewed liquid film of 54-76 wt% sulfuric acid at temperatures between 213 K and 243 K. Deuterated sulfuric acid was used to separate sticking but non-reactive collisions from those that involved penetration through the phase boundary followed by dissociation and recombination with D+. The results indicate that the mass accommodation of HCl on sulfuric acid-water surfaces decreases sharply with increasing acidity over the concentration range 54-76 wt%. Using the capillary wave theory of mass accommodation this effect is explained by a change of the surface dynamics. Regarding the temperature dependence it is found that the mass accommodation of HCl increases with increasing temperature and is limited by the bulk phase viscosity and driven by the restoring forces of the surface tension. These findings imply that under atmospheric conditions the uptake of HCl from the gas phase depends crucially on the bulk phase parameters of the sulfuric acid aerosol.

  4. [The effect of spermine on acid-base equilibrium in DNA molecule].

    PubMed

    Slonitskiĭ, S V; Kuptsov, V Iu

    1990-01-01

    The influence of spermine (Sp) on the acid-induced predenaturational and denaturational transitions in the DNA molecule structure has been studied by means of circular dichroism, spectrophotometric and viscometric titration at supporting electrolyte concentration 10 mM NaCl. The data available indicate that at [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.60 (here [N] and [P] are molar concentrations of Sp nitrogen and DNA phosphours, respectively) the cooperative structural B----B(+)----S transitions are accompanied by the DNA double-helice winding. No competition for proton acceptor sites in the DNA molecule between H+ and Sp4+ cations has been observed when binding to neutral macromolecule. At 0.60 less than or equal to [N]/[P] less than or equal to 0.75 the displacement of the B----B(+)----S transitions midpoints to acidic pH region has been established. This is accompanied by DNA condensation and the appearance of differential scattering of circularly polarized light. The calculations carried out in the framework of the two-variable Manning theory have shown that the acid-induced reduction of the effective polyion charge density facilitates the Sp-induced DNA condensation. It has been shown that the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule is determined by local [H+] in the 2-3 A hydrated monolayer of the macromolecule. An adequate estimation of [H+] can be obtained on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzman approach. The data obtained are consistent with recently proposed hypothesis of polyelectrolyte invariance of the acid-base equilibrium in the DNA molecule.

  5. Jasmonic acid signaling modulates ozone-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Rao, M V; Lee, H; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Davis, K R

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and ethylene-dependent signaling pathways regulates plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress factors. Earlier studies demonstrated that ozone (O(3)) exposure activates a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death pathway in the Arabidopsis ecotype Cvi-0. We now have confirmed the role of SA and JA signaling in influencing O(3)-induced cell death. Expression of salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) in Cvi-0 reduced O(3)-induced cell death. Methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) pretreatment of Cvi-0 decreased O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) content and SA concentrations and completely abolished O(3)-induced cell death. Cvi-0 synthesized as much JA as did Col-0 in response to O(3) exposure but exhibited much less sensitivity to exogenous Me-JA. Analyses of the responses to O(3) of the JA-signaling mutants jar1 and fad3/7/8 also demonstrated an antagonistic relationship between JA- and SA-signaling pathways in controlling the magnitude of O(3)-induced HR-like cell death.

  6. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D.; McHugh, K.P.; Haynes, D.R.; Crotti, T.N.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  7. Identification of antisense nucleic acid hybridization sites in mRNA molecules with self-quenching fluorescent reporter molecules.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Lida K; Opalinska, Joanna B; Jordan, David; Pattanayak, Vikram; Greenham, Paul; Kalota, Anna; Robbins, Michelle; Vernovsky, Kathy; Rodriguez, Lesbeth C; Do, Bao T; Lu, Ponzy; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2005-02-17

    We describe a physical mRNA mapping strategy employing fluorescent self-quenching reporter molecules (SQRMs) that facilitates the identification of mRNA sequence accessible for hybridization with antisense nucleic acids in vitro and in vivo, real time. SQRMs are 20-30 base oligodeoxynucleotides with 5-6 bp complementary ends to which a 5' fluorophore and 3' quenching group are attached. Alone, the SQRM complementary ends form a stem that holds the fluorophore and quencher in contact. When the SQRM forms base pairs with its target, the structure separates the fluorophore from the quencher. This event can be reported by fluorescence emission when the fluorophore is excited. The stem-loop of the SQRM suggests that SQRM be made to target natural stem-loop structures formed during mRNA synthesis. The general utility of this method is demonstrated by SQRM identification of targetable sequence within c-myb and bcl-6 mRNA. Corresponding antisense oligonucleotides reduce these gene products in cells.

  8. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  9. Sugar-assisted kinetic resolution of amino acids and amplification of enantiomeric excess of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Armando; Sundén, Henrik; Xu, Yongmei; Ibrahem, Ismail; Zou, Weibiao; Engqvist, Magnus

    2006-07-17

    The origins of biological homochirality have intrigued researchers since Pasteur's discovery of the optical activity of biomolecules. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a novel alternative for the evolution of homochirality that is not based on autocatalysis and forges a direct relationship between the chirality of sugars and amino acids. This process provides a mechanism in which a racemic mixture of an amino acid can catalyze the formation of an optically active organic molecule in the presence of a sugar product of low enantiomeric excess.

  10. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  11. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, J.A.; Zika, R.G. ); Alexander, M. )

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of (2-{sup 14}C)glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of {sup 14}C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A{sub 330}. Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  12. Impact of a Cross-Kingdom Signaling Molecule of Candida albicans on Acinetobacter baumannii Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Kostoulias, Xenia; Murray, Gerald L.; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Kong, Jason B.; Bantun, Farkad; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Khoo, Chen Ai

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic human pathogen that has become highly problematic in the clinical environment. Novel therapies are desperately required. To assist in identifying new therapeutic targets, the antagonistic interactions between A. baumannii and the most common human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, were studied. We have observed that the C. albicans quorum-sensing molecule, farnesol, has cross-kingdom interactions, affecting the viability of A. baumannii. To gain an understanding of its mechanism, the transcriptional profile of A. baumannii exposed to farnesol was examined. Farnesol caused dysregulation of a large number of genes involved in cell membrane biogenesis, multidrug efflux pumps (AcrAB-like and AdeIJK-like), and A. baumannii virulence traits such as biofilm formation (csuA, csuB, and ompA) and motility (pilZ and pilH). We also observed a strong induction in genes involved in cell division (minD, minE, ftsK, ftsB, and ftsL). These transcriptional data were supported by functional assays showing that farnesol disrupts A. baumannii cell membrane integrity, alters cell morphology, and impairs virulence characteristics such as biofilm formation and twitching motility. Moreover, we showed that A. baumannii uses efflux pumps as a defense mechanism against this eukaryotic signaling molecule. Owing to its effects on membrane integrity, farnesol was tested to see if it potentiated the activity of the membrane-acting polymyxin antibiotic colistin. When coadministered, farnesol increased sensitivity to colistin for otherwise resistant strains. These data provide mechanistic understanding of the antagonistic interactions between diverse pathogens and may provide important insights into novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26482299

  13. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  14. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  15. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

  16. Utilization of Microwave Spectroscopy to Identify and Probe Reaction Dynamics of Hsno, a Crucial Biological Signaling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Matthew; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Stanton, John F.; Cummins, Christopher; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2016-06-01

    Thionitrous acid (HSNO), a potential key intermediate in biological signaling pathways, has been proposed to link NO and H2S biochemistries. Its existence and stability in vivo, however, remain controversial. By means of Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, we establish that HSNO is spontaneously formed in high concentration when NO and H2S gases are simply mixed at room temperature in the presence of metallic surfaces. Our measurements reveal that HSNO is formed with high efficiency by the reaction H2S and N2O3 to produce HSNO and HNO2, where N2O3 is a product of NO disproportionation. These studies also suggest that further reaction of HSNO with H2S may form HNO and HSSH. The length of the S--N bond has been derived to high precision from isotopic studies, and is found to be unusually long, 1.84 Å -- the longest S--N bond reported to date for an SNO compound. The present structural and reactivity investigations of this elusive molecule provide a firm fundation to better understand its physiological chemistry and propensity to undergo S--N bond homolysis in vivo.

  17. The toll-like receptor signaling molecule Myd88 contributes to pancreatic beta-cell homeostasis in response to injury.

    PubMed

    Bollyky, Paul L; Bice, Jeffrey B; Sweet, Ian R; Falk, Ben A; Gebe, John A; Clark, April E; Gersuk, Vivian H; Aderem, Alan; Hawn, Thomas R; Nepom, Gerald T

    2009-01-01

    Commensal flora and pathogenic microbes influence the incidence of diabetes in animal models yet little is known about the mechanistic basis of these interactions. We hypothesized that Myd88, an adaptor molecule in the Toll-like-receptor (TLR) pathway, regulates pancreatic beta-cell function and homeostasis. We first examined beta-cells histologically and found that Myd88-/- mice have smaller islets in comparison to C57Bl/6 controls. Myd88-/- mice were nonetheless normoglycemic both at rest and after an intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). In contrast, after low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) challenge, Myd88-/-mice had an abnormal IPGTT relative to WT controls. Furthermore, Myd88-/- mice suffer enhanced beta-cell apoptosis and have enhanced hepatic damage with delayed recovery upon low-dose STZ treatment. Finally, we treated WT mice with broad-spectrum oral antibiotics to deplete their commensal flora. In WT mice, low dose oral lipopolysaccharide, but not lipotichoic acid or antibiotics alone, strongly promoted enhanced glycemic control. These data suggest that Myd88 signaling and certain TLR ligands mediate a homeostatic effect on beta-cells primarily in the setting of injury.

  18. The Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Molecule Myd88 Contributes to Pancreatic Beta-Cell Homeostasis in Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bollyky, Paul L.; Bice, Jeffrey B.; Sweet, Ian R.; Falk, Ben A.; Gebe, John A.; Clark, April E.; Gersuk, Vivian H.; Aderem, Alan; Hawn, Thomas R.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2009-01-01

    Commensal flora and pathogenic microbes influence the incidence of diabetes in animal models yet little is known about the mechanistic basis of these interactions. We hypothesized that Myd88, an adaptor molecule in the Toll-like-receptor (TLR) pathway, regulates pancreatic β-cell function and homeostasis. We first examined β-cells histologically and found that Myd88−/− mice have smaller islets in comparison to C57Bl/6 controls. Myd88−/− mice were nonetheless normoglycemic both at rest and after an intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). In contrast, after low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) challenge, Myd88−/−mice had an abnormal IPGTT relative to WT controls. Furthermore, Myd88−/− mice suffer enhanced β-cell apoptosis and have enhanced hepatic damage with delayed recovery upon low-dose STZ treatment. Finally, we treated WT mice with broad-spectrum oral antibiotics to deplete their commensal flora. In WT mice, low dose oral lipopolysaccharide, but not lipotichoic acid or antibiotics alone, strongly promoted enhanced glycemic control. These data suggest that Myd88 signaling and certain TLR ligands mediate a homeostatic effect on β-cells primarily in the setting of injury. PMID:19357791

  19. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6).

  20. Yeast carboxypeptidase Y vacuolar targeting signal is defined by four propeptide amino acids

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The amino-terminal propeptide of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is necessary and sufficient for targeting this glycoprotein to the vacuole of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 16 amino acid stretch of the propeptide was subjected to region-directed mutagenesis using randomized oligonucleotides. Mutations altering any of four contiguous amino acids, Gln-Arg-Pro-Leu, resulted in secretion of the encoded CPY precursor (proCPY), demonstrating that these residues form the core of the vacuolar targeting signal. Cells that simultaneously synthesize both wild-type and sorting-defective forms of proCPY efficiently sort and deliver only the wild-type molecule to the vacuole. These results indicate that the PRC1 missorting mutations are cis-dominant, implying that the mutant forms of proCPY are secreted as a consequence of failing to interact with the sorting apparatus, rather than a general poisoning of the vacuolar protein targeting system. PMID:2199455

  1. Structure-based Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Wnt Signaling Inhibitors by Targeting the Cysteine-rich Domain of Frizzled*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Bao, Ju; Miller, Ami; Zhang, Chi; Wu, Jibo; Baday, Yiressy C.; Guibao, Cristina; Li, Lin; Wu, Dianqing; Zheng, Jie J.

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled is the earliest discovered glycosylated Wnt protein receptor and is critical for the initiation of Wnt signaling. Antagonizing Frizzled is effective in inhibiting the growth of multiple tumor types. The extracellular N terminus of Frizzled contains a conserved cysteine-rich domain that directly interacts with Wnt ligands. Structure-based virtual screening and cell-based assays were used to identify five small molecules that can inhibit canonical Wnt signaling and have low IC50 values in the micromolar range. NMR experiments confirmed that these compounds specifically bind to the Wnt binding site on the Frizzled8 cysteine-rich domain with submicromolar dissociation constants. Our study confirms the feasibility of targeting the Frizzled cysteine-rich domain as an effective way of regulating canonical Wnt signaling. These small molecules can be further optimized into more potent therapeutic agents for regulating abnormal Wnt signaling by targeting Frizzled. PMID:26504084

  2. Identification of small molecule compounds that inhibit the HIF-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the major hypoxia-regulated transcription factor that regulates cellular responses to low oxygen environments. HIF-1 is composed of two subunits: hypoxia-inducible HIF-1α and constitutively-expressed HIF-1β. During hypoxic conditions, HIF-1α heterodimerizes with HIF-1β and translocates to the nucleus where the HIF-1 complex binds to the hypoxia-response element (HRE) and activates expression of target genes implicated in cell growth and survival. HIF-1α protein expression is elevated in many solid tumors, including those of the cervix and brain, where cells that are the greatest distance from blood vessels, and therefore the most hypoxic, express the highest levels of HIF-1α. Therapeutic blockade of the HIF-1 signaling pathway in cancer cells therefore provides an attractive strategy for development of anticancer drugs. To identify small molecule inhibitors of the HIF-1 pathway, we have developed a cell-based reporter gene assay and screened a large compound library by using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. Results The assay is based upon a β-lactamase reporter under the control of a HRE. We have screened approximate 73,000 compounds by qHTS, with each compound tested over a range of seven to fifteen concentrations. After qHTS we have rapidly identified three novel structural series of HIF-1 pathway Inhibitors. Selected compounds in these series were also confirmed as inhibitors in a HRE β-lactamase reporter gene assay induced by low oxygen and in a VEGF secretion assay. Three of the four selected compounds tested showed significant inhibition of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation by western blot analysis. Conclusion The use of β-lactamase reporter gene assays, in combination with qHTS, enabled the rapid identification and prioritization of inhibitors specific to the hypoxia induced signaling pathway. PMID:20003191

  3. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate is a signaling molecule involved in miconazole resistance in sessile Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P A; Nelis, Hans J; Thevissen, Karin; Coenye, Tom

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells.

  4. Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Signaling Molecule Involved in Miconazole Resistance in Sessile Candida albicans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Nelis, Hans J.; Thevissen, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells. PMID:22354293

  5. Morphofunctional and signaling molecules overlap of the pineal gland and thymus: role and significance in aging.

    PubMed

    Paltsev, Michael A; Polyakova, Victoria O; Kvetnoy, Igor M; Anderson, George; Kvetnaia, Tatiana V; Linkova, Natalia S; Paltseva, Ekaterina M; Rubino, Rosa; De Cosmo, Salvatore; De Cata, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-03-15

    Deficits in neuroendocrine-immune system functioning, including alterations in pineal and thymic glands, contribute to aging-associated diseases. This study looks at ageing-associated alterations in pineal and thymic gland functioning evaluating common signaling molecules present in both human and animal pinealocytes and thymocytes: endocrine cell markers (melatonin, serotonin, pCREB, AANAT, CGRP, VIP, chromogranin А); cell renovation markers (p53, AIF, Ki67), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9) and lymphocytes markers (CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20). Pineal melatonin is decreased, as is one of the melatonin pathway synthesis enzymes in the thymic gland. A further similarity is the increased MMPs levels evident over age in both glands. Significant differences are evident in cell renovation processes, which deteriorate more quickly in the aged thymus versus the pineal gland. Decreases in the number of pineal B-cells and thymic T-cells were also observed over aging. Collected data indicate that cellular involution of the pineal gland and thymus show many commonalities, but also significant changes in aging-associated proteins. It is proposed that such ageing-associated alterations in these two glands provide novel pharmaceutical targets for the wide array of medical conditions that are more likely to emerge over the course of ageing.

  6. Morphofunctional and signaling molecules overlap of the pineal gland and thymus: role and significance in aging

    PubMed Central

    Paltsev, Michael A.; Polyakova, Victoria O.; Kvetnoy, Igor M.; Anderson, George; Kvetnaia, Tatiana V.; Linkova, Natalia S.; Paltseva, Ekaterina M.; Rubino, Rosa; De Cosmo, Salvatore; De Cata, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in neuroendocrine-immune system functioning, including alterations in pineal and thymic glands, contribute to aging-associated diseases. This study looks at ageing-associated alterations in pineal and thymic gland functioning evaluating common signaling molecules present in both human and animal pinealocytes and thymocytes: endocrine cell markers (melatonin, serotonin, pCREB, AANAT, CGRP, VIP, chromogranin A); cell renovation markers (p53, AIF, Ki67), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9) and lymphocytes markers (CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20). Pineal melatonin is decreased, as is one of the melatonin pathway synthesis enzymes in the thymic gland. A further similarity is the increased MMPs levels evident over age in both glands. Significant differences are evident in cell renovation processes, which deteriorate more quickly in the aged thymus versus the pineal gland. Decreases in the number of pineal B-cells and thymic T-cells were also observed over aging. Collected data indicate that cellular involution of the pineal gland and thymus show many commonalities, but also significant changes in aging-associated proteins. It is proposed that such ageing-associated alterations in these two glands provide novel pharmaceutical targets for the wide array of medical conditions that are more likely to emerge over the course of ageing. PMID:26943046

  7. Pharmacology of novel small-molecule tubulin inhibitors in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling.

    PubMed

    Phoa, Athena F; Browne, Stephen; Gurgis, Fadi M S; Åkerfeldt, Mia C; Döbber, Alexander; Renn, Christian; Peifer, Christian; Stringer, Brett W; Day, Bryan W; Wong, Chin; Chircop, Megan; Johns, Terrance G; Kassiou, Michael; Munoz, Lenka

    2015-12-15

    We recently reported that CMPD1, originally developed as an inhibitor of MK2 activation, primarily inhibits tubulin polymerisation and induces apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. In the present study we provide detailed pharmacological investigation of CMPD1 analogues with improved molecular properties. We determined their anti-cancer efficacy in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling, as deregulated EGFR often leads to chemoresistance. Eight analogues of CMPD1 with varying lipophilicity and basicity were synthesised and tested for efficacy in the cell viability assay using established glioblastoma cell lines and patient-derived primary glioblastoma cells. The mechanism of action for the most potent analogue 15 was determined using MK2 activation and tubulin polymerisation assays, together with the immunofluorescence analysis of the mitotic spindle formation. Apoptosis was analysed by Annexin V staining, immunoblotting analysis of bcl-2 proteins and PARP cleavage. The apoptotic activity of CMPD1 and analogue 15 was comparable across glioblastoma cell lines regardless of the EGFR status. Primary glioblastoma cells of the classical subtype that are characterized by enhanced EGFR activity were most sensitive to the treatment with CMPD1 and 15. In summary, we present mechanism of action for a novel small molecule tubulin inhibitor, compound 15 that inhibits tubulin polymerisation and mitotic spindle formation, induces degradation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 proteins and leads to apoptosis of glioblastoma cells. We also demonstrate that the enhanced EGFR activity does not decrease the efficacy of tubulin inhibitors developed in this study.

  8. Morbilliviruses Use Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecules (CD150) as Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuo, Hironobu; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    Morbilliviruses comprise measles virus, canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, and several other viruses that cause devastating human and animal diseases accompanied by severe immunosuppression and lymphopenia. Recently, we have shown that human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a cellular receptor for measles virus. In this study, we examined whether canine distemper and rinderpest viruses also use canine and bovine SLAMs, respectively, as cellular receptors. The Onderstepoort vaccine strain and two B95a (marmoset B cell line)-isolated strains of canine distemper virus caused extensive cytopathic effects in normally resistant CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells after expression of canine SLAM. The Ako vaccine strain of rinderpest virus produced strong cytopathic effects in bovine SLAM-expressing CHO cells. The data on entry with vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes bearing measles, canine distemper, or rinderpest virus envelope proteins were consistent with development of cytopathic effects in SLAM-expressing CHO cell clones after infection with the respective viruses, confirming that SLAM acts at the virus entry step (as a cellular receptor). Furthermore, most measles, canine distemper, and rinderpest virus strains examined could any use of the human, canine, and bovine SLAMs to infect cells. Our findings suggest that the use of SLAM as a cellular receptor may be a property common to most, if not all, morbilliviruses and explain the lymphotropism and immunosuppressive nature of morbilliviruses. PMID:11390585

  9. Fatty acid transduction of nitric oxide signaling. Nitrolinoleic acid is a hydrophobically stabilized nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, Francisco J; Baker, Paul R S; Giles, Gregory; Chumley, Phil; Batthyany, Carlos; Crawford, Jack; Patel, Rakesh P; Hogg, Neil; Branchaud, Bruce P; Lancaster, Jack R; Freeman, Bruce A

    2005-05-13

    The aqueous decay and concomitant release of nitric oxide (*NO) by nitrolinoleic acid (10-nitro-9,12-octadecadienoic acid and 12-nitro-9,12-octadecadienoic acid; LNO2) are reported. Mass spectrometric analysis of reaction products supports a modified Nef reaction as the mechanism accounting for the generation of *NO by the aqueous reactions of fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives. Nitrolinoleic acid is stabilized by an aprotic milieu, with LNO2 decay and *NO release strongly inhibited by phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol liposome membranes and detergents when present at levels above their critical micellar concentrations. The release of *NO from LNO2 was induced by UV photolysis and triiodide-based ozone chemiluminescence reactions currently used to quantify putative protein nitrosothiol and N-nitrosamine derivatives. This reactivity of LNO2 complicates the qualitative and quantitative analysis of biological oxides of nitrogen when applying UV photolysis and triiodide-based analytical systems to biological preparations typically abundant in nitrated fatty acids. The results reveal that nitroalkene derivatives of linoleic acid are pluripotent signaling mediators that act not only via receptor-dependent mechanisms, but also by transducing the signaling actions of *NO via pathways subject to regulation by the relative distribution of LNO2 to hydrophobic versus aqueous microenvironments.

  10. Retinoic acid signaling and the evolution of chordates.

    PubMed

    Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Holland, Linda Z; Laudet, Vincent; Schubert, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In chordates, which comprise urochordates, cephalochordates and vertebrates, the vitamin A-derived morphogen retinoic acid (RA) has a pivotal role during development. Altering levels of endogenous RA signaling during early embryology leads to severe malformations, mainly due to incorrect positional codes specifying the embryonic anteroposterior body axis. In this review, we present our current understanding of the RA signaling pathway and its roles during chordate development. In particular, we focus on the conserved roles of RA and its downstream mediators, the Hox genes, in conveying positional patterning information to different embryonic tissues, such as the endoderm and the central nervous system. We find that some of the control mechanisms governing RA-mediated patterning are well conserved between vertebrates and invertebrate chordates, such as the cephalochordate amphioxus. In contrast, outside the chordates, evidence for roles of RA signaling is scarce and the evolutionary origin of the RA pathway itself thus remains elusive. In sum, to fully understand the evolutionary history of the RA pathway, future research should focus on identification and study of components of the RA signaling cascade in non-chordate deuterostomes (such as hemichordates and echinoderms) and other invertebrates, such as insects, mollusks and cnidarians.

  11. Evolution of Abscisic Acid Synthesis and Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Felix; Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) mediates seed dormancy, controls seedling development and triggers tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought. Core ABA signaling components consist of a recently identified group of ABA receptor proteins of the PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/REGULATORY COMPONENT OF ABA RECEPTOR (RCAR) family that act as negative regulators of members of the PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C (PP2C) family. Inhibition of PP2C activity enables activation of SNF1-RELATED KINASE 2 (SnRK2) protein kinases, which target downstream components, including transcription factors, ion channels and NADPH oxidases. These and other components form a complex ABA signaling network. Here, an in depth analysis of the evolution of components in this ABA signaling network shows that (i) PYR/RCAR ABA receptor and ABF-type transcription factor families arose during land colonization of plants and are not found in algae and other species, (ii) ABA biosynthesis enzymes have evolved to plant- and fungal-specific forms, leading to different ABA synthesis pathways, (iii) existing stress signaling components, including PP2C phosphatases and SnRK kinases, were adapted for novel roles in this plant-specific network to respond to water limitation. In addition, evolutionarily conserved secondary structures in the PYR/RCAR ABA receptor family are visualized. PMID:21549957

  12. Evolution of abscisic acid synthesis and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Felix; Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-05-10

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) mediates seed dormancy, controls seedling development and triggers tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought. Core ABA signaling components consist of a recently identified group of ABA receptor proteins of the PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/REGULATORY COMPONENT OF ABA RECEPTOR (RCAR) family that act as negative regulators of members of the PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C (PP2C) family. Inhibition of PP2C activity enables activation of SNF1-RELATED KINASE 2 (SnRK2) protein kinases, which target downstream components, including transcription factors, ion channels and NADPH oxidases. These and other components form a complex ABA signaling network. Here, an in depth analysis of the evolution of components in this ABA signaling network shows that (i) PYR/RCAR ABA receptor and ABF-type transcription factor families arose during land colonization of plants and are not found in algae and other species, (ii) ABA biosynthesis enzymes have evolved to plant- and fungal-specific forms, leading to different ABA synthesis pathways, (iii) existing stress signaling components, including PP2C phosphatases and SnRK kinases, were adapted for novel roles in this plant-specific network to respond to water limitation. In addition, evolutionarily conserved secondary structures in the PYR/RCAR ABA receptor family are visualized.

  13. Convergence of Nitric Oxide and Lipid Signaling: Anti-Inflammatory Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul R.S.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; O’Donnell, Valerie B.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The signaling mediators nitric oxide (·NO) and oxidized lipids, once viewed to transduce metabolic and inflammatory information via discrete and independent pathways, are now appreciated as interdependent regulators of immune response and metabolic homeostasis. The interactions between these two classes of mediators result in reciprocal control of mediator sythesis that is strongly influenced by the local chemical environment. The relationship between the two pathways extends beyond co-regulation of ·NO and eicosanoid formation to converge via the nitration of unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitro derivatives (NO2-FA). These pluripotent signaling molecules are generated in vivo as an adaptive response to oxidative inflammatory conditions and manifest predominantly anti-inflammatory signaling reactions. These actions of NO2-FA are diverse, with these species serving as a potential chemical reserve of ·NO, reacting with cellular nucleophiles to post-translationally modify protein structure, function and localization. In this regard these species act as potent endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ. Functional consequences of these signaling mechanisms have been shown in multiple model systems, including the inhibition of platelet and neutrophil functions, induction of heme oxygenase-1, inhibition of LPS-induced cytokine release in monocytes, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in adipocytes and relaxation of pre-constricted rat aortic segments. These observations have propelled further in vitro and in vivo studies of mechanisms of NO2-FA signaling and metabolism, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this class of molecules as anti-inflammatory drug candidates. PMID:19200454

  14. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-02-23

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant's defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis.

  15. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant’s defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  16. Amino Acid Specific Effects on RNA Tertiary Interactions: Single-Molecule Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhigyan; Sung, Hsuan-Lei; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-10-10

    In light of the current models for an early RNA-based universe, the potential influence of simple amino acids on tertiary folding of ribozymal RNA into biochemically competent structures is speculated to be of significant evolutionary importance. In the present work, the folding-unfolding kinetics of a ubiquitous tertiary interaction motif, the GAAA tetraloop-tetraloop receptor (TL-TLR), is investigated by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy in the presence of natural amino acids both with (e.g., lysine, arginine) and without (e.g., glycine) protonated side chain residues. By way of control, we also investigate the effects of a special amino acid (e.g., proline) and amino acid mimetic (e.g., betaine) that contain secondary or quaternary amine groups rather than a primary amine group. This combination permits systematic study of amino acid induced (or amino acid like) RNA folding dynamics as a function of side chain complexity, pKa, charge state, and amine group content. Most importantly, each of the naturally occurring amino acids is found to destabilize the TL-TLR tertiary folding equilibrium, the kinetic origin of which is dominated by a decrease in the folding rate constant (kdock), also affected by a strongly amino acid selective increase in the unfolding rate constant (kundock). To further elucidate the underlying thermodynamics, single-molecule equilibrium constants (Keq) for TL-TLR folding have been probed as a function of temperature, which reveal an amino acid dependent decrease in both overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) and entropic cost (-TΔΔS° < 0) for the overall folding process. Temperature-dependent studies on the folding/unfolding kinetic rate constants reveal analogous amino acid specific changes in both enthalpy (ΔΔH(⧧)) and entropy (ΔΔS(⧧)) for accessing the transition state barrier. The maximum destabilization of the TL-TLR tertiary interaction is observed for arginine, which is consistent with early

  17. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity evaluation of gallic acid-mangiferin hybrid molecule.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang-yu; Deng, Jia-gang; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Ye-fei

    2013-12-01

    To improve the anti-tumor effects of gallic acid and mangiferin, a gallic acid-mangiferin hybrid molecule (GAMA) was synthesized from gallic acid with mangiferin in the presence of ionic liquid ChC1(choline chloride)·2SnC12. Chemical and spectroscopic methods, such as (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and HR-ESIMS were used for the structure identification of GA-MA. Using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, the in vitro anti-tumor effects were compared between GA-MA, gallic acid and mangiferin on human hepatoma HepG2, human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE, human lung cancer NCI-H460, human ovarian cancer SK-OV-3, and human cervical cancer Hela cells. The results showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of GA-MA on HepG2, CNE, NCI-H460, SK-OV-3, and Hela cells was significantly lower than that of gallic acid or mangiferin. This showed that GA-MA has a better in vitro anti-tumor effect than gallic acid and mangi-ferin.

  18. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications.

  19. Si Shen Wan Inhibits mRNA Expression of Apoptosis-Related Molecules in p38 MAPK Signal Pathway in Mice with Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-Mei; Huang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Feng; Tong, Wen-Ting; Wan, Pan-Ting; Huang, Min-Fang; Ye, Qing; Liu, Duan-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Si Shen Wan (SSW) is used to effectively treat ulcerative colitis (UC) as a formula of traditional Chinese medicine. To explore the mechanism of SSW-inhibited apoptosis of colonic epithelial cell, the study observed mRNA expression of apoptosis-related molecules in p38 MAPK signal pathway in colonic mucosa in colitis mice treated with SSW. Experimental colitis was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in mice; meanwhile, the mice were administrated daily either SSW (5 g/kg) or p38 MAPK inhibitor (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (physiological saline) for 10 days. While microscopical evaluation was observed, apoptosis rate of colonic epithelial cell and mRNA expression of apoptosis-related molecules were tested. Compared with colitis mice without treatment, SSW alleviated colonic mucosal injuries and decreased apoptosis rate of colonic epithelial cell, while the mRNA expressions of p38 MAPK, p53, caspase-3, c-jun, c-fos, Bax, and TNF-α were decreased in the colonic mucosa in colitis mice treated with SSW, and Bcl-2 mRNA and the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax were increased. The present study demonstrated that SSW inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-related molecules in p38 MAPK signal pathway to downregulate colonic epithelial cells apoptosis in colonic mucosa in mice with colitis. PMID:24223057

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  1. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Cantley, M D; McHugh, K P; Haynes, D R; Crotti, T N

    2012-10-19

    Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcRγ) and DNAX-activating protein 12kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin (β3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that FK506 treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced the expression of NFATc1, CathK, OSCAR, FcRγ, TREM2 and DAP12 during the terminal stage of osteoclast formation. VIVIT treatment significantly (p<0.05) decreased CathK, OSCAR, FcRγ, and AnnVIII, gene expression. This data suggest FK506 and VIVIT act differently in targeting the

  2. Cytokinins and auxin communicate nitrogen availability as long-distance signal molecules in pineapple (Ananas comosus).

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Vívian; Mercier, Helenice

    2007-11-01

    This work aimed at identifying a possible role of phytohormones in long-distance (root-shoot) signaling under nitrogen deficiency. Three-months old pineapple plants were transferred from Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium to nitrogen-free MS (-N). During the first 24h on -N, 20 plants were harvested every 4h. After 30 days in -N, the remaining plants were transferred back to regular MS (+N) and 20 plants harvested every 4h for the first 24h. Following the harvests, endogenous levels of nitrate (NO(3)(-)), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), isopentenyladenine (iP), isopentenyladenine riboside (iPR), zeatin (Z) and zeatin riboside (ZR) were analyzed in roots and leaves. In N-starved plants, the NO(3)(-) level dropped by 20% in roots between the first (4h) and the second harvest (8h). In leaves a reduction of 20% was found 4h later. Accumulation of IAA peaked in leaves at 16h. In roots, the accumulation of IAA only started at 16h while the leaf content was already in decline, which suggests that the hormone might have traveled from the leaves to the roots, communicating N-shortage. The contents of the four cytokinins were generally low in both, shoot and roots, and remained almost unchanged during the 24h of analysis. After N re-supply, roots showed a NO(3)(-) peak at 8h whereas the foliar concentration increased 4h later. Hormone levels in roots climaxed at 8h, this coinciding with the highest NO(3)(-) concentration. In leaf tissue, a dramatic accumulation was only observed for Z and ZR, and the peak was seen 4h later than in roots, suggesting that Z-type cytokinins might have traveled from the roots to the leaves. These findings provide evidence that there is a signaling pathway for N availability in pineapple plants, communicated upwards through cytokinins (N-supplemented plants) and downwards through auxin (N-starved plants).

  3. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode

    PubMed Central

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S.; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L.; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  4. Hydrothermal reactions of pyruvic acid: synthesis, selection, and self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Robert M; Deamer, David W

    2007-04-01

    Selection and self-assembly of organic compounds in aqueous phases must have been a primary process leading to emergent molecular complexity and ultimately to the origin of life. Facile reactions of pyruvic acid under hydrothermal conditions produce a complex mixture of larger organic molecules, some of which are amphiphiles that readily self-assemble into cell-sized vesicular structures. Chemical characterization of major components of this mixture reveals similarities to the suite of organic compounds present in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite, some of whose molecules also self-assemble into membranous vesicles. Physical properties of the products are thus relevant to understanding the prebiotic emergence of molecular complexity. These results suggest that a robust family of prebiotic reaction pathways produces similar products over a range of geochemical and astrochemical environments.

  5. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  6. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions.

  7. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  8. Influence of growth and transcriptional factors, and signaling molecules on early human pituitary development.

    PubMed

    Bazina, Mirna; Vukojevic, Katarina; Roje, Damir; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2009-08-01

    Development and differentiation of the human pituitary gland was investigated in 6 human conceptuses 6-9 postovulatory weeks old, using immunohistochemical technique to investigate appearance of different developmental factors, and immunofluorescent double staining technique with Ki-67 to investigate proliferation. In the developing human pituitary gland, different developmental factors appeared in temporally and spatially restricted patterns, thus contributing to formation of different parts of the gland: adenohypophysis, neurohypophysis and associated mesenchyme. Some growth factors were not primarily involved in cell proliferation (TGF-ss, BMP-2/4 and GATA), but in differentiation of pituitary cells: TGF-ss, BMP-2/4 and GATA probably contributed to differentiation of cells in the mesenchyme at earlier stages, while their influence on differentiation of specific cell types in the adenohypophysis increased with development. At later developmental stages, those factors also influenced the differentiation of cells in the neurohypophysis. FGF-8 and FGF-10 probably participated both in the growth and differentiation of pituitary cells: while FGF-8 could act during early developmental stages, FGF-10 participated in the same processes at later stages of pituitary development. Expression of EGF and VEGF indicated their involvement in proliferation of initially differentiated pituitary cells, and in subsequent differentiation of some cell types in the adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis. In the mesenchyme, expression of VEGF might be related to formation of new blood vessels as well. Precise patterns of appearance of growth and transcription factors, and signaling molecules in developing human pituitary gland seem to be important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and normal morphogenesis of the gland.

  9. Pharmacologic retinoid signaling and physiologic retinoic acid receptor signaling inhibit basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Lin; Fujimoto, Michele A.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) are highly susceptible to developing many BCCs as a result of a constitutive inactivating mutation in one allele of PATCHED 1, which encodes a tumor suppressor that is a major inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling. Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is a common feature of both hereditary and sporadic BCCs. Recently, we showed remarkable anti-BCC chemopreventive efficacy of tazarotene, a retinoid with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) β/γ specificity, in Ptch1 +/− mice when treatment was commenced before carcinogenic insults. In this study, we assessed whether the effect of tazarotene against BCC carcinogenesis is sustained after its withdrawal and whether tazarotene is effective against preexisting microscopic BCC lesions. We found that BCCs did not reappear for at least 5 months after topical drug treatment was stopped and that already developed, microscopic BCCs were susceptible to tazarotene inhibition. In vitro, tazarotene inhibited a murine BCC keratinocyte cell line, ASZ001, suggesting that its effect in vivo is by direct action on the actual tumor cells. Down-regulation of Gli1, a target gene of Hedgehog signaling and up-regulation of CRABPII, a target gene of retinoid signaling, were observed with tazarotene treatment. Finally, we investigated the effects of topical applications of other retinoid-related compounds on BCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Tazarotene was the most effective of the preparations studied, and its effect most likely was mediated by RARγ activation. Furthermore, inhibition of basal RAR signaling in the skin promoted BCC carcinogenesis, suggesting that endogenous RAR signaling restrains BCC growth. PMID:18483315

  10. Abscisic acid interacts antagonistically with salicylic acid signaling pathway in rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Kojima, Mikiko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Yoshida, Riichiro; Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Plant hormones play pivotal signaling roles in plant-pathogen interactions. Here, we report characterization of an antagonistic interaction of abscisic acid (ABA) with salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathways in the rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction. Exogenous application of ABA drastically compromised the rice resistance to both compatible and incompatible M. grisea strains, indicating that ABA negatively regulates both basal and resistance gene-mediated blast resistance. ABA markedly suppressed the transcriptional upregulation of WRKY45 and OsNPR1, the two key components of the SA signaling pathway in rice, induced by SA or benzothiadiazole or by blast infection. Overexpression of OsNPR1 or WRKY45 largely negated the enhancement of blast susceptibility by ABA, suggesting that ABA acts upstream of WRKY45 and OsNPR1 in the rice SA pathway. ABA-responsive genes were induced during blast infection in a pattern reciprocal to those of WRKY45 and OsPR1b in the compatible rice-blast interaction but only marginally in the incompatible one. These results suggest that the balance of SA and ABA signaling is an important determinant for the outcome of the rice-M. grisea interaction. ABA was detected in hyphae and conidia of M. grisea as well as in culture media, implying that blast-fungus-derived ABA could play a role in triggering ABA signaling at host infection sites.

  11. Polysialic acid of the neural cell adhesion molecule distinguishes small cell lung carcinoma from carcinoids.

    PubMed Central

    Komminoth, P.; Roth, J.; Lackie, P. M.; Bitter-Suermann, D.; Heitz, P. U.

    1991-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) exists in various types of neuroendocrine cells and their tumors. A typical feature of NCAM is polysialic acid, of which the chain length is developmentally regulated. The authors have performed a comparative immunohistochemical study on small cell lung carcinomas and bronchial as well as gastrointestinal carcinoids with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) 735 reactive with the long-chain form of polysialic acid. The small cell lung carcinomas, irrespective of their histological type, were positive for polysialic acid. Metastatic tumor cell complexes also exhibited immunostaining. The tumor cell-surface-associated immunostaining for polysialic acid was sensitive to endoneuraminidase. The mature and atypical bronchial and gastrointestinal carcinoids were not immunoreactive for polysialic acid. Cytoplasmic staining in groups of cells of carcinoids (2 of 28 cases) was due to nonspecific antibody binding, which could be prevented by increased ion strength. These data indicate that neuroendocrine tumors of the lung can be distinguished by their content of highly sialylated NCAM. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1651057

  12. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-05

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the parabanic acid molecule following VUV excitation and photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A. F.; Oliva, J. M.; Dávalos, J. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Photodissociation experiments have been performed for the parabanic acid (C 3H 2N 2O 3) molecule in vapor phase using time-of-flight mass spectrometry and synchrotron radiation in the VUV photon energy range. Electron ion coincidence (PEPICO) spectra and partial ion yields have been recorded as a function of the photon energy covering the 11-21 eV valence range region. The resulting photoionization products as well as proposed fragmentation pathways leading to those species are presented and discussed. Electronic structure computations for the neutral and ionic species were also carried out at the B3LYP/ aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory.

  14. Signal transducing molecules and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked proteins form a caveolin-rich insoluble complex in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    GPI-linked protein molecules become Triton-insoluble during polarized sorting to the apical cell surface of epithelial cells. These insoluble complexes, enriched in cholesterol, glycolipids, and GPI-linked proteins, have been isolated by flotation on sucrose density gradients and are thought to contain the putative GPI-sorting machinery. As the cellular origin and molecular protein components of this complex remain unknown, we have begun to characterize these low-density insoluble complexes isolated from MDCK cells. We find that these complexes, which represent 0.4-0.8% of the plasma membrane, ultrastructurally resemble caveolae and are over 150-fold enriched in a model GPI-anchored protein and caveolin, a caveolar marker protein. However, they exclude many other plasma membrane associated molecules and organelle-specific marker enzymes, suggesting that they represent microdomains of the plasma membrane. In addition to caveolin, these insoluble complexes contain a subset of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins and cytoplasmically-oriented signaling molecules, including: (a) GTP- binding proteins--both small and heterotrimeric; (b) annex II--an apical calcium-regulated phospholipid binding protein with a demonstrated role in exocytic fusion events; (c) c-Yes--an apically localized member of the Src family of non-receptor type protein- tyrosine kinases; and (d) an unidentified serine-kinase activity. As we demonstrate that caveolin is both a transmembrane molecule and a major phospho-acceptor component of these complexes, we propose that caveolin could function as a transmembrane adaptor molecule that couples luminal GPI-linked proteins with cytoplasmically oriented signaling molecules during GPI-membrane trafficking or GPI-mediated signal transduction events. In addition, our results have implications for understanding v- Src transformation and the actions of cholera and pertussis toxins on hetero-trimeric G proteins. PMID:8349730

  15. Basic Aspects of Tumor Cell Fatty Acid-Regulated Signaling and Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Lin, Yi-Hui; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Valentich, Mirta Ana; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin Ernesto; Pasqualini, Marìa Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and experimental research about the mechanisms by which fatty acids and their derivatives control specific gene expression involved during carcinogenesis. Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases (LOXs), cyclooxygenases (COXs), and cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450), seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. Their regulation may be carried out either through direct binding to DNA as peroxisome proliferator–activated receptors (PPARs) or via modulation in an indirect manner of signaling pathway molecules (e.g., protein kinase C [PKC]) and other transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B [NFκB] and sterol regulatory element binding protein [SREBP]). Knowledge of the mechanisms by which fatty acids control specific gene expression may identify important risk factors for cancer, and provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies for a better management of whole-body lipid metabolism. PMID:22048864

  16. Small molecule signaling agents: the integrated chemistry and biochemistry of nitrogen oxides, oxides of carbon, dioxygen, hydrogen sulfide, and their derived species.

    PubMed

    Fukuto, Jon M; Carrington, Samantha J; Tantillo, Dean J; Harrison, Jason G; Ignarro, Louis J; Freeman, Bruce A; Chen, Andrew; Wink, David A

    2012-04-16

    Several small molecule species formally known primarily as toxic gases have, over the past 20 years, been shown to be endogenously generated signaling molecules. The biological signaling associated with the small molecules NO, CO, H₂S (and the nonendogenously generated O₂), and their derived species have become a topic of extreme interest. It has become increasingly clear that these small molecule signaling agents form an integrated signaling web that affects/regulates numerous physiological processes. The chemical interactions between these species and each other or biological targets is an important factor in their roles as signaling agents. Thus, a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of these molecules is essential to understanding their biological/physiological utility. This review focuses on this chemistry and attempts to establish the chemical basis for their signaling functions.

  17. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  18. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis.

    PubMed

    Osberger, Thomas J; Rogness, Donald C; Kohrt, Jeffrey T; Stepan, Antonia F; White, M Christina

    2016-09-08

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four 'chiral pool' amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  19. Recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus and variation in its receptor, the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule, in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kazue; Suzuki, Rintaro; Maeda, Taro; Tsuda, Miwako; Abe, Erika; Yoshida, Takao; Endo, Yasuyuki; Okamura, Maki; Nagamine, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hanae; Ueda, Miya; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a receptor for morbilliviruses. To understand the recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus (CDV) in carnivores, we determined the nucleotide sequences of SLAMs of various carnivores and generated three-dimensional homology SLAM models. Thirty-four amino acid residues were found for the candidates binding to CDV on the interface of the carnivore SLAMs. SLAM of the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) were similar to those of other members of the suborder Caniformia, indicating that the animals in this group have similar sensitivity to dog CDV. However, they were different at nine positions from those of felids. Among the nine residues, four of domestic cat (Felis catus) SLAM (72, 76, 82, and 129) and three of lion (Panthera leo persica) SLAM (72, 82, and 129) were associated with charge alterations, suggesting that the felid interfaces have lower affinities to dog CDV. Only the residue at 76 was different between domestic cat and lion SLAM interfaces. The domestic cat SLAM had threonine at 76, whereas the lion SLAM had arginine, a positively charged residue like that of the dog SLAM. The cat SLAM with threonine is likely to have lower affinity to CDV-H and to confer higher resistance against dog CDV. Thus, the four residues (72, 76, 82, and 129) on carnivore SLAMs are important for the determination of affinity and sensitivity with CDV. Additionally, the CDV-H protein of felid strains had a substitution of histidine for tyrosine at 549 of dog CDV-H and may have higher affinity to lion SLAM. Three-dimensional model construction is a new risk assessment method of morbillivirus infectivity. Because the method is applicable to animals that have no information about virus infection, it is especially useful for morbillivirus risk assessment and wildlife conservation.

  20. Retinoic acid signalling centres in the avian embryo identified by sites of expression of synthesising and catabolising enzymes.

    PubMed

    Blentic, Aida; Gale, Emily; Maden, Malcolm

    2003-05-01

    Retinoic acid is an important signalling molecule in the developing embryo, but its precise distribution throughout development is very difficult to determine by available techniques. Examining the distribution of the enzymes by which it is synthesised by using in situ hybridisation is an alternative strategy. Here, we describe the distribution of three retinoic acid synthesising enzymes and one retinoic acid catabolic enzyme during the early stages of chick embryogenesis with the intention of identifying localized retinoic acid signalling regions. The enzymes involved are Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3, and Cyp26A1. Although some of these distributions have been described before, here we assemble them all in one species and several novel sites of enzyme expression are identified, including Hensen's node, the cardiac endoderm, the presumptive pancreatic endoderm, and the dorsal lens. This study emphasizes the dynamic pattern of expression of the enzymes that control the availability of retinoic acid as well as the role that retinoic acid plays in the development of many regions of the embryo throughout embryogenesis. This strategy provides a basis for understanding the phenotypes of retinoic acid teratology and retinoic acid-deficiency syndromes.

  1. Enzymatic Depletion of the Polysialic Acid Moiety Associated with the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Inhibits Antidepressant Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Steven R; Barha, Cindy K; Hamson, Dwayne K; Epp, Jonathan R; Chow, Carmen; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Rutishauser, Urs; Galea, Liisa Am

    2016-05-01

    Antidepressant drugs are too often ineffective, the exact mechanism of efficacy is still ambiguous, and there has been a paucity of novel targets for pharmacotherapy. In an attempt to understand the pathogenesis of depression and subsequently develop more efficacious antidepressant drugs, multiple theories have been proposed, including the modulation of neurotransmission, the upregulation of neurogenesis and neurotrophic factors, normalizing hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal reactivity, and the reduction of neuroinflammation; all of which have supporting lines of evidence. Therefore, an ideal molecular target for novel pharmaceutical intervention would function at the confluence of these theories. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) functions broadly, serving to mediate synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, neurotrophic factor signaling, and inflammatory signaling throughout the brain; all of which are associated with the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Moreover, the expression of PSA-NCAM is reduced by depression, and conversely enhanced by antidepressant treatment, particularly within the hippocampus. Here we demonstrate that selectively cleaving the polysialic acid moiety, using the bacteriophage-derived enzyme endoneuraminidase N, completely inhibits the antidepressant efficacy of the selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) in a chronic unpredictable stress model of depression. We also observe a corresponding attenuation of FLX-induced hippocampal neuroplasticity, including decreased hippocampal neurogenesis, synaptic density, and neural activation. These data indicate that PSA-NCAM-mediated neuroplasticity is necessary for antidepressant action; therefore PSA-NCAM represents an interesting, and novel, target for pharmacotherapy.

  2. Defective phosphatidic acid-phospholipase C signaling in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Dibrov, Elena; Austria, J Alejandro; Sahi, Nidhi; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2004-03-26

    The effects of exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) on Ca2+ transients and contractile activity were studied in cardiomyocytes isolated from chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In control cells, 25 microM PA induced a significant increase in active cell shortening and Ca2+ transients. PA increased IP3 generation in the control cardiomyocytes and its inotropic effects were blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In cardiomyocytes from diabetic rats, PA induced a 25% decrease in active cell shortening and no significant effect on Ca2+ transients. Basal and PA-induced IP3 generation in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes was 3-fold lower as compared to control cells. Sarcolemmal membrane PLC activity was impaired. Insulin treatment of the diabetic animals resulted in a partial recovery of PA responses. Our results, therefore, identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for heart dysfunction during diabetes.

  3. Resistance exercise volume affects myofibrillar protein synthesis and anabolic signalling molecule phosphorylation in young men

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Nicholas A; Holwerda, Andrew M; Selby, Keegan C; West, Daniel W D; Staples, Aaron W; Cain, Nathan E; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Potvin, James R; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine if any mechanistic differences exist between a single set (1SET) and multiple sets (i.e. 3 sets; 3SET) of resistance exercise by utilizing a primed constant infusion of [ring-13C6]phenylalanine to determine myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) and Western blot analysis to examine anabolic signalling molecule phosphorylation following an acute bout of resistance exercise. Eight resistance-trained men (24 ± 5 years, BMI = 25 ± 4 kg m−2) were randomly assigned to perform unilateral leg extension exercise at 70% concentric one repetition maximum (1RM) until volitional fatigue for 1SET or 3SET. Biopsies from the vastus lateralis were taken in the fasted state (Fast) and fed state (Fed; 20 g of whey protein isolate) at rest, 5 h Fed, 24 h Fast and 29 h Fed post-exercise. Fed-state MPS was transiently elevated above rest at 5 h for 1SET (2.3-fold) and returned to resting levels by 29 h post-exercise. However, the exercise induced increase in MPS following 3SET was superior in amplitude and duration as compared to 1SET at both 5 h (3.1-fold above rest) and 29 h post-exercise (2.3-fold above rest). Phosphorylation of 70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) demonstrated a coordinated increase with MPS at 5 h and 29 h post-exercise such that the extent of p70S6K phosphorylation was related to the MPS response (r = 0.338, P = 0.033). Phosphorylation of 90 kDa ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p90RSK) and ribosomal protein S6 (rps6) was similar for 1SET and 3SET at 24 h Fast and 29 h Fed, respectively. However, 3SET induced a greater activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2Bɛ (eIF2Bɛ) and rpS6 at 5 h Fed. These data suggest that 3SET of resistance exercise is more anabolic than 1SET and may lead to greater increases in myofibrillar protein accretion over time. PMID:20581041

  4. Nitric oxide in denitrification - an elusive signal molecule emitted from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. R.; Frostegard, A.

    2010-12-01

    Soils emit variable amounts of NO and N2O, with environmental consequences (atmosphere chemistry and global warming). Nitrification was for some time considered the main source of NO emission, but several investigations have indicated that denitrification may be a potent source as well. However, strong emission of NO from denitrifying organisms is in some conflict with common understanding of the role of NO in the regulation of denitrification, as based on paradigm model strains. NO appears to be an important signal molecule for denitrifying organisms by exerting a positive feedback on the expression of the genes coding for denitrification. On the other hand, a careful control of the NO concentrations at nanomolar concentrations has long been considered an essential fitness character for denitrifying organisms, since micromolar concentrations of NO is toxic to many organisms. For the same reason, organisms lacking genes encoding NO reductase (NOR) have been considered unfit for denitrification. This view is challenged by isolation of organisms whose primary product of denitrification is NO, either because they lack the genes for NO reductase, or because their synthesis of the denitrification proteome is extremely unbalanced, resulting in transient NO accumulation to micromolar concentrations when grown in pure culture. Such paralyzing NO concentrations are probably never reached in natural environments, however, due to diffusion and NO-absorption by adjacent organisms, be it by NOR or other NO scavenging enzymes. Hypothetically, the production of NO by denitrifying organisms may be an advantage by fending off nearby competitors. We have embarked on a comparative study of denitrification phenotypes regarding their denitrification gene expression and control of NO and N2O concentrations in response to anoxic spells. This includes model strains (Paracoccus denitrificans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and recently isolated strains within several genera. Some are found

  5. Conductometric simultaneous determination of acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid using orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, R; Ghasemi, J; Abdollahi, B

    2006-04-17

    A simultaneous conductometric titration method for determination of mixtures of acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid based on the multivariate calibration partial least squares is proposed. It is possible to obtain an adjustable model to relate squared concentration values of the mixtures used in the calibration range by conductance. The effect of orthogonal signal correction (OSC) as a preprocessing technique used to remove the information unrelated to the target variables is studied. The calibration model was build using conductometric titrations data of 16 mixtures of three acids. The concentration matrix was designed by a orthogonal design. The root mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP) for acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid with and without OSC were 0.08, 0.30 and 0.08, and 0.15, 0.40 and 0.18, respectively. The results obtained by OSC-PLS are better than the PLS and this indicate the successful application of the OSC filter as a good preprocessing method in multivariate calibration methods. The proposed procedure allows the simultaneous determination of these acids, in the synthetic mixtures.

  6. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  7. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  8. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and “receptor for advanced glycation endproduct” (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26807573

  9. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and "receptor for advanced glycation endproduct" (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis.

  10. Mouse nasal epithelial innate immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules require taste signaling components.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Chen, Bei; Redding, Kevin M; Margolskee, Robert F; Cohen, Noam A

    2014-08-01

    We previously observed that the human bitter taste receptor T2R38 is an important component of upper respiratory innate defense because it detects acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules secreted by Gram-negative bacteria. T2R38 activation in human sinonasal epithelial cells stimulates calcium and NO signals that increase mucociliary clearance, the major physical respiratory defense against inhaled pathogens. While mice do not have a clear T2R38 ortholog, they do have bitter taste receptors capable of responding to T2R38 agonists, suggesting that T2R-mediated innate immune mechanisms may be conserved in mice. We examined whether AHLs activate calcium and NO signaling in mouse nasal epithelial cells, and utilized pharmacology, as well as cells from knockout mice lacking important components of canonical taste signal transduction pathways, to determine if AHL-stimulated responses require taste signaling molecules. We found that AHLs stimulate calcium-dependent NO production that increases mucociliary clearance and thus likely serves an innate immune role against Gram-negative bacteria. These responses require PLCβ2 and TRPM5 taste signaling components, but not α-gustducin. These data suggest the mouse may be a useful model for further studies of T2R-mediated innate immunity.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 (DSM 46869), a degrader of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Christian; Birmes, Franziska S; Müller, Christine; Niewerth, Heiko; Winkler, Anika; Fetzner, Susanne; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-10-10

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 was isolated from soil and characterized as a degrader of the quorum sensing signal molecules 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, PQS) and 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The complete genome of R. erythropolis BG43 consists of a circular chromosome and three plasmids, one of them circular and two linear ones. In total, 6158 protein-coding regions were identified. With this genome sequence, the genetic basis of its quorum-quenching ability and possible biotechnological applications can be explored further.

  12. Degradation of bacterial quorum sensing signaling molecules by the microscopic yeast Trichosporon loubieri isolated from tropical wetland waters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-09-25

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast.

  13. Degradation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules by the Microscopic Yeast Trichosporon loubieri Isolated from Tropical Wetland Waters

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast. PMID:24072030

  14. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) display diverse and complex topologies and possess an impressive range of biological activities1,2 Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails the oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds pre-3 and post-assembly2. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis.4 However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized outside of nature.5 In this manuscript, we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C—H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-center chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins, and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C—H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four 'chiral pool' amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids (UAAs) representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C—H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different UAAs. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C—H oxidation to one containing a linear UAA. PMID:27479323

  15. Design and construction of novel molecular conjugates for signal amplification (I): conjugation of multiple horseradish peroxidase molecules to immunoglobulin via primary amines on lysine peptide chains.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Subhash

    2002-12-01

    Immunoconjugates are widely used for indirect detection of analytes (such as antibodies or antigens) in a variety of immunoassays. However, the availability of functional groups such as primary amines or free sulfhydryls in an immunoglobulin molecule is the limiting factor for optimal conjugation and, therefore, determines the sensitivity of an assay. In the present study, an N-terminal bromoacetylated 20 amino acid peptide containing 20 lysine residues was conjugated to N-succinimidyl-S-acetylthioacetate (SATA)-modified IgG or free sulfhydryl groups on 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA)-reduced IgG molecules via a thioether (S[bond]CH(2)CONH) linkage to introduce multiple reactive primary amines per IgG. These primary amines were then covalently coupled with maleimide-activated horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The poly-HRP-antibody conjugates thus generated demonstrated greater than 15-fold signal amplification upon reaction with orthophenyldiamine substrate. The poly-HRP-antibody conjugates efficiently detected human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 antibodies in plasma specimens with significantly higher sensitivity than conventionally prepared HRP-antibody conjugates in an HIV-1 solid-phase enzyme immunoassay and Western blot analysis. The signal amplification techniques reported here could have the potential for development of highly sensitive immunodiagnostic assay systems.

  16. Critical Role for an acidic amino acid region in platelet signaling by the HemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) containing receptor CLEC-2 (C-type lectin receptor-2).

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Sinha, Uma; Pandey, Anjali; Eble, Johannes A; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Watson, Steve P

    2013-02-15

    CLEC-2 is a member of new family of C-type lectin receptors characterized by a cytosolic YXXL downstream of three acidic amino acids in a sequence known as a hemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif). Dimerization of two phosphorylated CLEC-2 molecules leads to recruitment of the tyrosine kinase Syk via its tandem SH2 domains and initiation of a downstream signaling cascade. Using Syk-deficient and Zap-70-deficient cell lines we show that hemITAM signaling is restricted to Syk and that the upstream triacidic amino acid sequence is required for signaling. Using surface plasmon resonance and phosphorylation studies, we demonstrate that the triacidic amino acids are required for phosphorylation of the YXXL. These results further emphasize the distinct nature of the proximal events in signaling by hemITAM relative to ITAM receptors.

  17. AtWRKY22 promotes susceptibility to aphids and modulates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Karen J.; Wiegers, Gerrie L.; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; van Haarst, Jan C.; Kruijer, Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2016-01-01

    Aphids induce many transcriptional perturbations in their host plants, but the signalling cascades responsible and the effects on plant resistance are largely unknown. Through a genome-wide association (GWA) mapping study in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified WRKY22 as a candidate gene associated with feeding behaviour of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. The transcription factor WRKY22 is known to be involved in pathogen-triggered immunity, and WRKY22 gene expression has been shown to be induced by aphids. Assessment of aphid population development and feeding behaviour on knockout mutants and overexpression lines showed that WRKY22 increases susceptibility to M. persicae via a mesophyll-located mechanism. mRNA sequencing analysis of aphid-infested wrky22 knockout plants revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signalling and down-regulation of genes involved in plant growth and cell-wall loosening. In addition, mechanostimulation of knockout plants by clip cages up-regulated jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, resulting in substantial negative JA–SA crosstalk. Based on this and previous studies, WRKY22 is considered to modulate the interplay between the SA and JA pathways in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Its induction by aphids and its role in suppressing SA and JA signalling make WRKY22 a potential target for aphids to manipulate host plant defences. PMID:27107291

  18. A phenotypic screen in zebrafish identifies a novel small-molecule inducer of ectopic tail formation suggestive of alterations in non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling.

    PubMed

    Gebruers, Evelien; Cordero-Maldonado, María Lorena; Gray, Alexander I; Clements, Carol; Harvey, Alan L; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive model for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and characterization of pharmacologically active small molecules of natural origin. We carried out a zebrafish-based phenotypic screen of over 3000 plant-derived secondary metabolite extracts with the goal of identifying novel small-molecule modulators of the BMP and Wnt signaling pathways. One of the bioactive plant extracts identified in this screen - Jasminum gilgianum, an Oleaceae species native to Papua New Guinea - induced ectopic tails during zebrafish embryonic development. As ectopic tail formation occurs when BMP or non-canonical Wnt signaling is inhibited during the tail protrusion process, we suspected a constituent of this extract to act as a modulator of these pathways. A bioassay-guided isolation was carried out on the basis of this zebrafish phenotype, identifying para-coumaric acid methyl ester (pCAME) as the active compound. We then performed an in-depth phenotypic analysis of pCAME-treated zebrafish embryos, including a tissue-specific marker analysis of the secondary tails. We found pCAME to synergize with the BMP-inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 in inducing ectopic tails, and causing convergence-extension defects in compound-treated embryos. These results indicate that pCAME may interfere with non-canonical Wnt signaling. Inhibition of Jnk, a downstream target of Wnt/PCP signaling (via morpholino antisense knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with the kinase inhibitor SP600125) phenocopied pCAME-treated embryos. However, immunoblotting experiments revealed pCAME to not directly inhibit Jnk-mediated phosphorylation of c-Jun, suggesting additional targets of SP600125, and/or other pathways, as possibly being involved in the ectopic tail formation activity of pCAME. Further investigation of pCAME's mechanism of action will help determine this compound's pharmacological utility.

  19. SALDI-TOF-MS analyses of small molecules (citric acid, dexasone, vitamins E and A) using TiO2 nanocrystals as substrates.

    PubMed

    Popović, Iva A; Nešić, Maja; Vranješ, Mila; Šaponjić, Zoran; Petković, Marijana

    2016-10-01

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SALDI-TOF-MS) might be the method of choice for the analysis of low mass molecules (less than m/z 500). Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystals as a substrate for SALDI-TOF-MS improve the reproducibility of the signal intensities and prevent the fragmentation of some molecules upon laser irradiation, as we have previously shown. In addition, variously shaped and sized TiO2 nanocrystals/substrates for SALDI-MS could be used for quantification of small molecules, which are otherwise difficult to detect with the assistance of organic matrices. TiO2-assisted LDI-MS spectra could be acquired with excellent reproducibility and repeatability and with low detection limit. In the current study, we analysed the spectra of dexasone, citric acid, vitamin E and vitamin A acquired with TiO2 nanocrystals of various shapes and dimensions, i.e. the colloidal TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), TiO2 prolate nanospheroids (TiO2 PNSs) and TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). Various shapes and dimensions of substrates were used since these factors determine desorption and ionisation processes. The homogeneity on the target plate was compared based on signal-to-noise values of peaks of interest of analysed molecules as well as the within-day and day-to-day repeatability. In summary, the obtained results show that the applicability of individual TiO2 nanocrystals depends on the analyte. Signals which are acquired with the assistance of TiO2 PNSs have the highest sensitivity and reproducibility (the smallest standard deviation), even compared with those in the LDI mode. This implies that TiO2 PNSs could also be suitable for quantitative analyses of small molecules.

  20. Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in the Activation of Cellular Signals, Molecules, and Function.

    PubMed

    Indo, Hiroko P; Hawkins, Clare L; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Davies, Michael J; St Clair, Daret K; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Majima, Hideyuki J

    2017-02-08

    Mitochondria are a major source of intracellular energy and reactive oxygen species in cells, but are also increasingly being recognized as a controller of cell death. Here, we review evidence of signal transduction control by mitochondrial superoxide generation via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and GATA signaling pathways. We have also reviewed the effects of ROS on the activation of MMP and HIF. There is significant evidence to support the hypothesis that mitochondrial superoxide can initiate signaling pathways following transport into the cytosol. In this study, we provide evidence of TATA signal transductions by mitochondrial superoxide. Oxidative phosphorylation via the electron transfer chain, glycolysis, and generation of superoxide from mitochondria could be important factors in regulating signal transduction, cellular homeostasis, and cell death.

  1. Small molecules dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 inhibit myostatin/GDF8 signaling and promote functional myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horbelt, Daniel; Boergermann, Jan H; Chaikuad, Apirat; Alfano, Ivan; Williams, Eleanor; Lukonin, Ilya; Timmel, Tobias; Bullock, Alex N; Knaus, Petra

    2015-02-06

    GDF8, or myostatin, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted polypeptide growth factors. GDF8 is a potent negative regulator of myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. We found that GDF8 signaling was inhibited by the small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189. These compounds were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of BMP signaling by binding to the BMP type I receptors ALK1/2/3/6. We present the crystal structure of the type II receptor ActRIIA with dorsomorphin and demonstrate that dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 target GDF8 induced Smad2/3 signaling and repression of myogenic transcription factors. As a result, both inhibitors rescued myogenesis in myoblasts treated with GDF8. As revealed by quantitative live cell microscopy, treatment with dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 promoted the contractile activity of myotubular networks in vitro. We therefore suggest these inhibitors as suitable tools to promote functional myogenesis.

  2. Role of Ethylene and Its Cross Talk with Other Signaling Molecules in Plant Responses to Heavy Metal Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Thu, Nguyen Binh Anh; Hoang, Xuan Lan Thi; Asgher, Mohd; Khan, Nafees A.; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Excessive heavy metals (HMs) in agricultural lands cause toxicities to plants, resulting in declines in crop productivity. Recent advances in ethylene biology research have established that ethylene is not only responsible for many important physiological activities in plants but also plays a pivotal role in HM stress tolerance. The manipulation of ethylene in plants to cope with HM stress through various approaches targeting either ethylene biosynthesis or the ethylene signaling pathway has brought promising outcomes. This review covers ethylene production and signal transduction in plant responses to HM stress, cross talk between ethylene and other signaling molecules under adverse HM stress conditions, and approaches to modify ethylene action to improve HM tolerance. From our current understanding about ethylene and its regulatory activities, it is believed that the optimization of endogenous ethylene levels in plants under HM stress would pave the way for developing transgenic crops with improved HM tolerance. PMID:26246451

  3. Role of Ethylene and Its Cross Talk with Other Signaling Molecules in Plant Responses to Heavy Metal Stress.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, M Iqbal R; Thu, Nguyen Binh Anh; Hoang, Xuan Lan Thi; Asgher, Mohd; Khan, Nafees A; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-09-01

    Excessive heavy metals (HMs) in agricultural lands cause toxicities to plants, resulting in declines in crop productivity. Recent advances in ethylene biology research have established that ethylene is not only responsible for many important physiological activities in plants but also plays a pivotal role in HM stress tolerance. The manipulation of ethylene in plants to cope with HM stress through various approaches targeting either ethylene biosynthesis or the ethylene signaling pathway has brought promising outcomes. This review covers ethylene production and signal transduction in plant responses to HM stress, cross talk between ethylene and other signaling molecules under adverse HM stress conditions, and approaches to modify ethylene action to improve HM tolerance. From our current understanding about ethylene and its regulatory activities, it is believed that the optimization of endogenous ethylene levels in plants under HM stress would pave the way for developing transgenic crops with improved HM tolerance.

  4. Structural and vibrational spectroscopy investigation of the 5-[(diphenyl) amino] isophthalic acid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, M.; Şaş, E. Babur; Can, M.; Okur, S.; Icli, S.; Demic, S.

    2014-10-01

    The molecular structure and vibrations of 5-(diphenyl) amino] isophthalic acid (DPIFA) were investigated by different spectroscopic techniques (such as infrared and Raman). FT-IR, FT-Raman and dispersive Raman spectra were recorded in the solid phase. HOMO-LUMO analyses were performed. The theoretical calculations for the molecular structure and spectroscopic studies were performed with DFT (B3LYP) and 6-311G(d,p) basis set calculations using the Gaussian 09 program. After optimizing the geometry of the molecule, vibration wavenumbers and fundamental vibrations wavenumbers were assigned on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated with VEDA 4 program. The results of theoretical calculations for the spectra of the title compound were compared with the observed spectra.

  5. Identification of small molecule sulfonic acids as ecto-5'-Nucleotidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Raza, Rabia; Saeed, Aamer; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2012-11-01

    Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase inhibitors have great potential as anti-tumor agents. We have investigated biochemical properties of human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidases and characterized 19 small molecule sulfonic acid derivatives as potential inhibitors of ecto-5'-Nucleotidases. We identified 11 potent inhibitors of human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidases and checked their selectivity. Compound 10 (Sodium 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonate) with K(i) value of 0.66 μM and 19 (N-(4-sulfamoylphenylcarbamothioyl) pivalamide) with K(i) value of 0.78 μM were identified as the most potent inhibitors for human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidase, respectively. The present compounds have low molecular weights, water solubility and equal potency as compared to the reported inhibitors.

  6. Single-molecule FRET and crosslinking studies in structural biology enabled by noncanonical amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Swati; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary structural biology research promises more than just static snap-shots of molecular machineries. This goal is not just facilitated by combining different structural biology techniques, but also by new tools from the field of protein and genetic engineering, as well as from chemistry. Genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) through codon-suppression technology provides an excellent opportunity to probe biomolecules using different structural biology methods. In this article, we review the applications of ncAA incorporation into proteins for determining structural information through various techniques with the main focus on crosslinking mass spectrometry and single-molecule FRET-based techniques. Furthermore, advances and limitations of the incorporation of multiple ncAAs are discussed, with respect to design of an ideal host organism for modern and integrative structural biology research.

  7. Insulin Signaling in Liver and Adipose Tissues in Periparturient Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Asako; Kenéz, Ákos; Locher, Lena; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The glucose homeostasis in dairy cattle is very well controlled, in line with the metabolic adaptation during the periparturient period. Former studies showed that nicotinic acid (NA) lowered plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the expression of proteins involved in hepatic and adipose insulin signaling and protein expression of hepatic glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) were affected by dietary NA and dietary concentrate intake in periparturient dairy cows. Twenty pluriparous German Holstein cows were fed with the same diet from about 21 days before the expected calving date (d-21) to calving. After calving, cows were randomly assigned in 4 groups and fed with diets different in concentrate proportion (“HC” with 60:40% or “LC” with 30:70% concentrate-to-roughage ratio) and supplemented with NA (24 g/day) (NA) or without (CON) until d21. Biopsy samples were taken from the liver, subcutaneous (SCAT) and retroperitoneal (RPAT) adipose tissues at d-21 and d21. Protein expression of insulin signaling molecules (insulin receptor (INSR), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ)) and hepatic GLUT2 was measured by Western Blotting. The ratio of protein expression at d21/at d-21 was calculated and statistically evaluated for the effects of time and diet. Cows in HC had significantly higher dietary energy intake than cows in LC. In RPAT a decrease in PI3K and PKCζ expression was found in all groups, irrespectively of diet. In the liver, the GLUT2 expression was significantly lower in cows in NA compared with cows in CON. In conclusion, insulin signaling might be decreased in RPAT over time without any effect of diet. NA was able to modulate hepatic GLUT2 expression, but its physiological role is unclear. PMID:26766039

  8. Cyclic diguanylic acid behaves as a host molecule for planar intercalators.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Y C; Gao, Y G; Robinson, H; Sheldrick, G M; Sliedregt, L A; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Wang, A H

    1990-05-21

    Cyclic ribodiguanylic acid, c-(GpGp), is the endogenous effector regulator of cellulose synthase. Its three-dimensional structure from two different crystal forms (tetragonal and trigonal) has been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis at 1 A resolution. In both crystal forms, two independent c-(GpGp) molecules associate with each other to form a self-intercalated dimer. A hydrated cobalt ion is found to coordinate to two N7 atoms of adjacent guanines, forcing these two guanines to destack with a large dihedral angle (32 degrees), in the dimer of the tetragonal form. This metal coordination mechanism may be relevant to that of the anticancer drug cisplatin. Moreover, c-(GpGp) exhibits unusual spectral properties not seen in any other cyclic dinucleotide. It interacts with planar organic intercalator molecules in ways similar to double helical DNA. We propose a cage-like model consisting of a tetrameric c-(GpGp) aggregate in which a large cavity ('host') is generated to afford a binding site for certain planar intercalators ('guests').

  9. Changes in aggregation behavior of collagen molecules in solution with varying concentrations of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Xu, Songcheng; Shen, Lirui; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2016-11-01

    A critical aggregation concentration of 0.30-0.50mg/mL was previously obtained for type I collagen at 0.1M acetic acid (AA). In the present study, the aggregation behavior of collagen in solution (0.5mg/mL) in the presence of 0.1-2.0M AA was investigated. Circular dichroism showed that the three helix structure was maintained across the whole AA concentration range. However, the ratio of positive peak intensity over negative peak intensity varied depending on the conformational state of collagen aggregates. Ultra-sensitive differential scanning calorimetry revealed that transition temperatures Tm1 and Tm2 decreased by 8.35°C and 7.80°C, respectively, between 0.1M and 2.0M, indicating a possible relationship between the aggregation state and the thermal effect. The surrounding polarity of collagen molecules in solution containing pyrene was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, which demonstrated that disaggregation of collagen aggregates was enhanced with increasing AA concentration. This observation was correlated with changes in collagen fiber size observed by atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, collagen tyrosine residues were blue-shifted in an intrinsic fluorescence spectra, further indicating changes in aggregation behavior with increasing AA concentration. Finally, the dynamic response of collagen molecules to AA was analyzed by two-dimensional correlation fluorescence spectra.

  10. Intramolecular cyclization of aspartic acid residues assisted by three water molecules: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (l-Asp) are known to undergo spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions to form l-β-Asp, d-Asp, and d-β-Asp residues. The formation of these abnormal Asp residues in proteins may affect their three-dimensional structures and hence their properties and functions. Indeed, the reactions have been thought to contribute to aging and pathologies. Most of the above reactions of the l-Asp residues proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, a novel three-water-assisted mechanism is proposed for cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a gem-diol precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for an Asp-containing model compound (Ace-Asp-Nme, where Ace = acetyl and Nme = NHCH3). The three water molecules act as catalysts by mediating ‘long-range’ proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form (iminolization). Then, reorientation of a water molecule and a conformational change occur successively, followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen on the carboxyl carbon of the Asp side chain to form the gem-diol species. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  11. Regulation of PI-3-Kinase and Akt Signaling in T Lymphocytes and Other Cells by TNFR Family Molecules

    PubMed Central

    So, Takanori; Croft, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt (protein kinase B) is a common response triggered by a range of membrane-bound receptors on many cell types. In T lymphocytes, the PI3K-Akt pathway promotes clonal expansion, differentiation, and survival of effector cells and suppresses the generation of regulatory T cells. PI3K activation is tightly controlled by signals through the T cell receptor (TCR) and the co-stimulatory receptor CD28, however sustained and periodic signals from additional co-receptors are now being recognized as critical contributors to the activation of this pathway. Accumulating evidence suggests that many members of the Tumor Necrosis Factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, TNFR2 (TNFRSF1B), OX40 (TNFRSF4), 4-1BB (TNFRSF9), HVEM (TNFRSF14), and DR3 (TNFRSF25), that are constitutive or inducible on T cells, can directly or indirectly promote activity in the PI3K-Akt pathway. We discuss recent data which suggests that ligation of one TNFR family molecule organizes a signalosome, via TNFR-associated factor (TRAF) adapter proteins in T cell membrane lipid microdomains, that results in the subsequent accumulation of highly concentrated depots of PI3K and Akt in close proximity to TCR signaling units. We propose this may be a generalizable mechanism applicable to other TNFR family molecules that will result in a quantitative contribution of these signalosomes to enhancing and sustaining PI3K and Akt activation triggered by the TCR. We also review data that other TNFR molecules, such as CD40 (TNFRSF5), RANK (TNFRSF11A), FN14 (TNFRSF12A), TACI (TNFRSF13B), BAFFR (TNFRSF13C), and NGFR (TNFRSF16), contribute to the activation of this pathway in diverse cell types through a similar ability to recruit PI3K or Akt into their signaling complexes. PMID:23760533

  12. Small-molecule probe using dual signals to monitor leucine aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hey Young; Shim, So Hee; Baek, Luck Ju; Hong, Jong-In

    2011-04-15

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are widely distributed in organisms from bacteria to humans, and play crucial roles in cell maintenance and cell growth. Thus, assays for LAP are necessary for measuring its activity and inhibitor potency. In this Letter, we report a small-molecule probe which exhibits colorimetric and fluorogenic changes according to LAP activity.

  13. NFAM1, an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing molecule that regulates B cell development and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Arase, Hisashi; Takeuchi, Arata; Yamasaki, Sho; Shiina, Ritsuko; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Sakurai, Daiju; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Arase, Noriko; Iwashima, Makio; Kitamura, Toshio; Moriya, Hideshige; Saito, Takashi

    2004-05-25

    A functional cDNA cloning system was developed by using a retrovirus library encoding CD8-chimeric proteins and a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-GFP reporter cell line to identify molecules inducing NFAT activation. By using this strategy, NFAT activating molecule 1 (NFAM1) was cloned as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing cell surface molecule belonging to the Ig superfamily and is predominantly expressed in spleen B and T cells. NFAM1 crosslinking induced ITAM phosphorylation, ZAP-70/Syk recruitment, NFAT activation, and cytokine production. In vivo overexpression of NFAM1 in bone marrow chimeras and transgenic mice induced severe impairment of early B cell development in an ITAM-dependent manner. In NFAM1-expressing B cells, B cell antigen receptor stimulation induced NFAM1 translocation to lipid raft, and NFAM1 co-crosslinking augmented B cell antigen receptor signaling. The results suggest that NFAM1 modulates B cell signaling through its ITAM, which regulates B cell development.

  14. Anti-biofilm activity of pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis tac125 against staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm: Evidence of a signal molecule involvement?

    PubMed

    Parrilli, E; Papa, R; Carillo, S; Tilotta, M; Casillo, A; Sannino, F; Cellini, A; Artini, M; Selan, L; Corsaro, M M; Tutino, M L

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is recognized as cause of biofilm-associated infections and interest in the development of new approaches for S. epidermidis biofilm treatment has increased. In a previous paper we reported that the supernatant of Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 presents an anti-biofilm activity against S. epidermidis and preliminary physico-chemical characterization of the supernatant suggested that this activity is due to a polysaccharide. In this work we further investigated the chemical nature of the anti-biofilm P. haloplanktis TAC125 molecule. The production of the molecule was evaluated in different conditions, and reported data demonstrated that it is produced in all P. haloplanktis TAC125 biofilm growth stages, also in minimal medium and at different temperatures. By using a surface coating assay, the surfactant nature of the anti-biofilm compound was excluded. Moreover, a purification procedure was set up and the analysis of an enriched fraction demonstrated that the anti-biofilm activity is not due to a polysaccharide molecule but that it is due to small hydrophobic molecules that likely work as signal. The enriched fraction was also used to evaluate the effect on S. epidermidis biofilm formation in dynamic condition by BioFlux system.

  15. Amino acid conjugated self assembling molecules for enhancing surface wettability of fiber laser treated titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkan, Cagri K.; Hür, Deniz; Uzun, Lokman; Garipcan, Bora

    2016-03-01

    Surface wetting properties of implants are one of the most critical parameter, which determine the interaction of proteins and cells with the implant surface. In this regards, acid etching and sand blasting are the mostly used methods at surface modification of Titanium (Ti) for enhanced surface wettability. Besides, these kinds of modifications may cause a conflict whether the surface wettability is influenced by the process related surface contaminations or by the surface roughness. In contrast, lasers might be an option for the alteration of surface wetting properties via supporting micro and/or nano surface topographies while preventing surface chemical contaminations. In this work, we focused on two steps of surface processing approaches of Ti surface: physical and chemical modifications. Herein, we hierarchically structured Ti surfaces by using microsecond modulated pulsed fiber laser. Subsequently, laser structured and non-structured Ti surfaces were further modified with novel histidine and leucine Amino Acid conjugated Self-Assembled Molecules (His1-SAMs2 and Leu3-SAMs) to alter the surface wettability by introducing biologically hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. Modification of Ti surfaces with His-SAMs and Leu-SAMs ended up with stable wetting properties when compared to non-modified surfaces after 7 days which may enhances the cell-surface interaction.

  16. Development of Small Molecules Targeting the Wnt Signaling Pathway in Cancer Stem Cells for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Li, Yuemin; He, Baoming; Gong, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) was ranked third in morbidity and mortality in the United States in 2013. Although substantial progress has been made in surgical techniques and postoperative chemotherapy in recent years, the prognosis for colon cancer is still not satisfactory, mainly because of cancer recurrence and metastasis. The latest studies have shown that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play important roles in cancer recurrence and metastasis. Drugs that target CSCs might therefore have great therapeutic potential in prevention of cancer recurrence and metastasis. The wingless-int (Wnt) signaling pathway in CSCs has been suggested to play crucial roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, and has become a popular target for anti-CRC therapy. Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway, mostly by inactivating mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor or oncogenic mutations of β-catenin, has been implicated as a key factor in colorectal tumorigenesis. Abnormal increases of β-catenin levels represents a common pathway in Wnt signaling activation and is also observed in other human malignancies. These findings highlight the importance of developing small-molecule drugs that target the Wnt pathway. Herein we provide an overview on the current development of small molecules that target the Wnt pathway in colorectal CSCs and discuss future research directions.

  17. The inflammasome and danger molecule signaling: at the crossroads of inflammation and pathogen persistence in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Özlem; Lee, Kyu Lim

    2015-10-01

    Inflammasomes are an oligomeric assembly of multiprotein complexes that activate the caspase-1-dependent maturation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18 cytokines in response to a 'danger signal' in vertebrates. The assessment of their significance continues to grow rapidly as the complex biology of various chronic inflammatory conditions is better dissected. Increasing evidence strongly links inflammasomes and host-derived small 'danger molecule ATP' signaling with the modulation of the host immune response by microbial colonizers as well as with potential altering of the microbiome structure and intermicrobial interactions in the host. All of these factors eventually lead to the destructive chronic inflammatory disease state. In the oral cavity, a highly dynamic and multifaceted interplay takes place between the signaling of endogenous danger molecules and colonizing microbes on the mucosal surfaces. This interaction may redirect the local microenvironment to favor the conversion of the resident microbiome toward pathogenicity. This review outlines the major components of the known inflammasome complexes/mechanisms and highlights their regulation, in particular, by oral microorganisms, in relation to periodontal disease pathology. Better characterization of the cellular and molecular biology of the inflammasome will probably identify important potential therapeutic targets for the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease, as well as for other debilitating chronic diseases.

  18. Tissue- and fibre-specific modifications of insulin-signalling molecules in cardiac and skeletal muscle of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ekladous, Demiana; Mehdi, Mohamad Z; Costa, Myriam; Srivastava, Ashok K; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Coderre, Lise

    2008-08-01

    1. Levels of insulin-signalling molecules are altered in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, a model of Type 1 diabetes. However, the tissue-specific regulation of these changes and the effect of insulin supplementation on signalling molecule protein levels have not been well characterized. 2. In the present study, we evaluated the level of proximal insulin-signalling intermediates in the heart and in red and white gastrocnemius muscles of 2 week diabetic rats and diabetic rats supplemented with insulin. 3. Diabetes augmented levels of the insulin receptor and the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the red gastrocnemius, but not in the white gastrocnemius or the heart. Furthermore, diabetes reduced insulin receptor substrate-1 levels in both the red and white gastrocnemius, but not in the heart. Examination of the levels and basal activities of distal insulin-signalling intermediates (protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)) also failed to reveal a specific pattern in these changes. Thus, diabetes reduced basal ERK1/2 and PKB/Akt phosphorylation in the heart and white gastrocnemius, respectively, whereas it augmented basal p38 MAPK activity in the red gastrocnemius. Insulin supplementation normalized the levels and activities of some but not all proteins. 4. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrate that adaptation to STZ-induced diabetes varies among skeletal muscle fibre types and the heart, emphasizing the complex tissue-specific responses to diabetes.

  19. Identification of a Small Molecule Signaling Factor That Regulates the Biosynthesis of the Antifungal Polycyclic Tetramate Macrolactam HSAF in Lysobacter enzymogenes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yong; Wang, Yan; Tombosa, Simon; Wright, Stephen; Huffman, Justin; Yuen, Gary; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng

    2014-01-01

    Lysobacter species are emerging as new sources of antibiotics. The regulation of these antibiotics is not well understood. Here, we identified a small molecule metabolite (LeDSF3) that regulates the biosynthesis of the antifungal antibiotic HSAF (heat-stable antifungal factor), a polycyclic tetramate macrolactam with a structure and mode of action distinct from the existing antifungal drugs. LeDSF3 was isolated from the culture broth of L. enzymogenes, and its chemical structure was established by NMR and MS. The purified compound induced green fluorescence in a reporter strain of Xanthomonas campestris, which contained gfp gene under the control of a DSF (diffusible signaling factor)-inducible promoter. Exogenous addition of LeDSF3 in L. enzymogenes cultures significantly increased the HSAF yield, the transcription of HSAF biosynthetic genes, and the antifungal activity of the organism. The LeDSF3-regulated HSAF production is dependent on the two-component regulatory system RpfC/RpfG. Moreover, LeDSF3 up-regulated the expression of the global regulator Clp (cAMP receptor-like protein). The disruption of clp led to no HSAF production. Together, the results show that LeDSF3 is a fatty acid-derived, diffusible signaling factor positively regulating HSAF biosynthesis and that the signaling is mediated by the RfpC/RpfG-Clp pathway. These findings may facilitate the antibiotic production through applied genetics and molecular biotechnology in Lysobacter, a group of ubiquitous yet underexplored microorganisms. PMID:25301587

  20. Formation and Fragmentation of Protonated Molecules after Ionization of Amino Acid and Lactic Acid Clusters by Collision with Ions in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Poully, Jean-Christophe; Vizcaino, Violaine; Schwob, Lucas; Delaunay, Rudy; Kocisek, Jaroslav; Eden, Samuel; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Méry, Alain; Rangama, Jimmy; Adoui, Lamri; Huber, Bernd

    2015-08-03

    Collisions between O(3+) ions and neutral clusters of amino acids (alanine, valine and glycine) as well as lactic acid are performed in the gas phase, in order to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on these biologically relevant molecular systems. All monomers and dimers are found to be predominantly protonated, and ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on model systems indicate that for amino acids, this is due to proton transfer within the clusters after ionization. For lactic acid, which has a lower proton affinity than amino acids, a significant non-negligible amount of the radical cation monomer is observed. New fragment-ion channels observed from clusters, as opposed to isolated molecules, are assigned to the statistical dissociation of protonated molecules formed upon ionization of the clusters. These new dissociation channels exhibit strong delayed fragmentation on the microsecond time scale, especially after multiple ionization.

  1. Bile acid homeostasis controls CAR signaling pathways in mouse testis through FXRalpha.

    PubMed

    Martinot, Emmanuelle; Baptissart, Marine; Véga, Aurélie; Sèdes, Lauriane; Rouaisnel, Betty; Vaz, Fred; Saru, Jean-Paul; de Haze, Angélique; Baron, Silvère; Caira, Françoise; Beaudoin, Claude; Volle, David H

    2017-02-09

    Bile acids (BAs) are molecules with endocrine activities controlling several physiological functions such as immunity, glucose homeostasis, testicular physiology and male fertility. The role of the nuclear BA receptor FXRα in the control of BA homeostasis has been well characterized. The present study shows that testis synthetize BAs. We demonstrate that mice invalidated for the gene encoding FXRα have altered BA homeostasis in both liver and testis. In the absence of FXRα, BA exposure differently alters hepatic and testicular expression of genes involved in BA synthesis. Interestingly, Fxrα-/- males fed a diet supplemented with BAs show alterations of testicular physiology and sperm production. This phenotype was correlated with the altered testicular BA homeostasis and the production of intermediate metabolites of BAs which led to the modulation of CAR signaling pathways within the testis. The role of the CAR signaling pathways within testis was validated using specific CAR agonist (TCPOBOP) and inverse agonist (androstanol) that respectively inhibited or reproduced the phenotype observed in Fxrα-/- males fed BA-diet. These data open interesting perspectives to better define how BA homeostasis contributes to physiological or pathophysiological conditions via the modulation of CAR activity.

  2. Bile acid homeostasis controls CAR signaling pathways in mouse testis through FXRalpha

    PubMed Central

    Martinot, Emmanuelle; Baptissart, Marine; Véga, Aurélie; Sèdes, Lauriane; Rouaisnel, Betty; Vaz, Fred; Saru, Jean-Paul; de Haze, Angélique; Baron, Silvère; Caira, Françoise; Beaudoin, Claude; Volle, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are molecules with endocrine activities controlling several physiological functions such as immunity, glucose homeostasis, testicular physiology and male fertility. The role of the nuclear BA receptor FXRα in the control of BA homeostasis has been well characterized. The present study shows that testis synthetize BAs. We demonstrate that mice invalidated for the gene encoding FXRα have altered BA homeostasis in both liver and testis. In the absence of FXRα, BA exposure differently alters hepatic and testicular expression of genes involved in BA synthesis. Interestingly, Fxrα-/- males fed a diet supplemented with BAs show alterations of testicular physiology and sperm production. This phenotype was correlated with the altered testicular BA homeostasis and the production of intermediate metabolites of BAs which led to the modulation of CAR signaling pathways within the testis. The role of the CAR signaling pathways within testis was validated using specific CAR agonist (TCPOBOP) and inverse agonist (androstanol) that respectively inhibited or reproduced the phenotype observed in Fxrα-/- males fed BA-diet. These data open interesting perspectives to better define how BA homeostasis contributes to physiological or pathophysiological conditions via the modulation of CAR activity. PMID:28181583

  3. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  4. Differential regulation of EGFR-MAPK signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Martinez, Jesse D

    2014-10-01

    A high-fat diet coincides with increased levels of bile acids. This increase in bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), has been strongly associated with the development of colon cancer. Conversely, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have chemopreventive properties. Although structurally similar, DCA and UDCA present different biological and pathological effects in colon cancer progression. The differential regulation of cancer by these two bile acids is not yet fully understood. However, one possible explanation for their diverging effects is their ability to differentially regulate signaling pathways involved in the multistep progression of colon cancer, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This review will examine the biological effects of DCA and UDCA on colon cancer development, as well as the diverging effects of these bile acids on the oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in colon cancer development, with a particular emphasis on bile acid regulation of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

  5. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Cytokine-Mediated STAT1 Signal Transduction In β-Cells With Improved Aqueous Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Stephen S.; Tang, Alicia J.; Lundh, Morten; Mosher, Carrie M.; Perkins, Kedar M.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of BRD0476 (1), a small molecule generated by diversity-oriented synthesis that suppresses cytokine-induced β-cell apoptosis. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 1 and analogs with improved aqueous solubility. By replacing naphthyl with quinoline moieties, we prepared active analogs with up to a 1400-fold increase in solubility from 1. In addition, we demonstrated that compound 1 and analogs inhibit STAT1 signal transduction induced by IFN-γ. PMID:23617753

  6. Micelle-assisted signaling of peracetic acid by the oxidation of pyreneboronic acid via monomer-excimer switching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Cho, Min Jeoung; Chang, Suk-Kyu

    2015-08-15

    A simple fluorescent probe for the industrial oxidant peracetic acid (PAA) was investigated. PAA-assisted oxidative conversion of pyrene-1-boronic acid into 1-hydroxypyrene was used as the signaling tool. Pyreneboronic acid was found to display selective signaling behavior, being more responsive to PAA than to other commonly used practical oxidants such as H2O2 and HOCl. The changes in pyrene monomer fluorescence to excimer were used in the quantitative analysis of PAA. When using the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as a micellar additive, the signaling of PAA was markedly enhanced. Selective fluorescence signaling of PAA by pyrene-1-boronic acid with a detection limit of 1.5×10(-6)M in aqueous environment was successfully achieved.

  7. Characterization of Hedgehog Acyltransferase Inhibitors Identifies a Small Molecule Probe for Hedgehog Signaling by Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Ursula R; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Masumoto, Naoko; Ritzefeld, Markus; Burke, Rosemary; Blagg, Julian; Magee, Anthony I; Tate, Edward W

    2016-12-16

    The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays a critical role during embryonic development and cancer progression. N-terminal palmitoylation of Shh by Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) is essential for efficient signaling, raising interest in Hhat as a novel drug target. A recently identified series of dihydrothienopyridines has been proposed to function via this mode of action; however, the lead compound in this series (RUSKI-43) was subsequently shown to possess cytotoxic activity unrelated to canonical Shh signaling. To identify a selective chemical probe for cellular studies, we profiled three RUSKI compounds in orthogonal cell-based assays. We found that RUSKI-43 exhibits off-target cytotoxicity, masking its effect on Hhat-dependent signaling, hence results obtained with this compound in cells should be treated with caution. In contrast, RUSKI-201 showed no off-target cytotoxicity, and quantitative whole-proteome palmitoylation profiling with a bioorthogonal alkyne-palmitate reporter demonstrated specific inhibition of Hhat in cells. RUSKI-201 is the first selective Hhat chemical probe in cells and should be used in future studies of Hhat catalytic function.

  8. Hedgehog signaling pathway regulates ovarian cancer invasion and migration via adhesion molecule CD24

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chunyan; Chen, Tingtao; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays an important role in cancer; however, its mechanism in ovarian cancer migration and invasion remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the effect of the Hh signalling pathway on ovarian cancer migration and invasion through the regulation of CD24 expression, both in vitro and in vivo. Patients with ovarian cancer (n = 97) were recruited for this study. Evaluation of the explored the role parameters of patients indicated that CD24 expression was negatively associated with age, histological type and lymph node metastasis (p>0.05), but was positively associated with the clinical stage and pathological grading (p<0.05).The in vitro results indicated that the activator (sonic hedgehog, Shh) and inhibitor (GANT61) of Hh signalling significantly enhanced and reduced CD24 expression, respectively, at both the gene and protein levels (p<0.05).The addition of Shh significantly enhanced cellular migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells in vitro (p<0.05) Down regulation of CD24 using siRNA inhibited the tumour-promoting effects of Shh, and the in vivo results confirmed that GANT61 significantly inhibited CD24 expression and reduced tumour growth (p<0.01). In conclusion, the expression of CD24 can be regulated by Hh signalling, and downregulation of CD24 could play an important role in inhibiting ovarian cancer progression. PMID:28382140

  9. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Hideyasu; Furuichi, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Keiji Shimbara, Naoki

    2008-04-18

    The inducible transcription factor NF-{kappa}B regulates divergent signaling pathways including inflammatory response and cancer development. Selective inhibitors for NF-{kappa}B signaling are potentially useful for treatment of inflammation and cancer. NF-{kappa}B is canonically activated by preferential disposal of its inhibitory protein; I{kappa}B, which suppresses the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. I{kappa}B{alpha} (a major member of I{kappa}B family proteins) is phosphorylated with an I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and subsequently polyubiquitylated by SCF{sup {beta}}{sup TrCP1} ubiquitin-ligase in the presence of E1 and E2 prior to proteasomal degradation. Here, we describe a novel inhibitor termed GS143, which suppressed I{kappa}B{alpha} ubiquitylation, but not I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, MDM2-directed p53 ubiquitylation, and proteasome activity in vitro. GS143 markedly suppressed the destruction of I{kappa}B{alpha} stimulated by TNF{alpha} and a set of downstream responses coupled to NF-{kappa}B signaling but not those of p53 and {beta}-catenin in vivo. Our results indicate that GS143 serves as an effective inhibitor of multiple pathways served by NF-{kappa}B signaling.

  10. Characterization of Hedgehog Acyltransferase Inhibitors Identifies a Small Molecule Probe for Hedgehog Signaling by Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays a critical role during embryonic development and cancer progression. N-terminal palmitoylation of Shh by Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat) is essential for efficient signaling, raising interest in Hhat as a novel drug target. A recently identified series of dihydrothienopyridines has been proposed to function via this mode of action; however, the lead compound in this series (RUSKI-43) was subsequently shown to possess cytotoxic activity unrelated to canonical Shh signaling. To identify a selective chemical probe for cellular studies, we profiled three RUSKI compounds in orthogonal cell-based assays. We found that RUSKI-43 exhibits off-target cytotoxicity, masking its effect on Hhat-dependent signaling, hence results obtained with this compound in cells should be treated with caution. In contrast, RUSKI-201 showed no off-target cytotoxicity, and quantitative whole-proteome palmitoylation profiling with a bioorthogonal alkyne-palmitate reporter demonstrated specific inhibition of Hhat in cells. RUSKI-201 is the first selective Hhat chemical probe in cells and should be used in future studies of Hhat catalytic function. PMID:27779865

  11. The Role of DARPP-32, an Intracellular Signaling Molecule, in the Actions of the Nerve Agent Sarin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase signaling cascade, which dephosphorylates phospho-T34-DARPP-32 (Nishi et al., 1999). DARPP-32 is also...32 at Ser-102 (S102) and Ser-137 (S137). For example, S102 on DARPP-32 is phosphorylated by casein kinase II (CK2). In previously published...al., 1989). DARPP-32 is also phosphorylated on amino acid S137 by casein kinase I (CK1). Increases in phosphorylation at this site decrease the rate

  12. A ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade for amplified fluorescence detection of biological small molecules with zero-background signal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Kong, Rong-Mei; Yang, Bin; Tan, Weihong

    2011-08-03

    Many types of fluorescent sensing systems have been reported for biological small molecules. Particularly, several methods have been developed for the recognition of ATP or NAD(+), but they only show moderate sensitivity, and they cannot discriminate either ATP or NAD(+) from their respective analogues. We have addressed these limitations and report here a dual strategy which combines split DNAzyme-based background reduction with catalytic and molecular beacon (CAMB)-based amplified detection to develop a ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade, resulting in ultrahigh sensitivity. First, the 8-17 DNAzyme is split into two separate oligonucleotide fragments as the building blocks for the DNA ligation reaction, thereby providing a zero-background signal to improve overall sensitivity. Next, a CAMB strategy is further employed for amplified signal detection achieved through cycling and regenerating the DNAzyme to realize the true enzymatic multiple turnover (one enzyme catalyzes the cleavage of several substrates) of catalytic beacons. This combination of zero-background signal and signal amplification significantly improves the sensitivity of the sensing systems, resulting in detection limits of 100 and 50 pM for ATP and NAD(+), respectively, much lower than those of previously reported biosensors. Moreover, by taking advantage of the highly specific biomolecule-dependence of the DNA ligation reaction, the developed DNAzyme cascades show significantly high selectivity toward the target cofactor (ATP or NAD(+)), and the target biological small molecule can be distinguished from its analogues. Therefore, as a new and universal platform for the design of DNA ligation reaction-based sensing systems, this novel ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade method may find a broad spectrum of applications in both environmental and biomedical fields.

  13. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. L-lysine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike L-histidine, L-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and D-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, L-Asp-γ-L-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of L-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1(Y395C) by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1(K9R,K16R). Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes.

  14. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor

    PubMed Central

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. l-lysine, l-histidine and l-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike l-histidine, l-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and d-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, l-Asp-γ-l-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of l-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1Y395C by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1K9R,K16R. Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes. PMID:24852066

  15. Control of Adult Neurogenesis by Short-Range Morphogenic-Signaling Molecules.

    PubMed

    Choe, Youngshik; Pleasure, Samuel J; Mira, Helena

    2015-12-04

    Adult neurogenesis is dynamically regulated by a tangled web of local signals emanating from the neural stem cell (NSC) microenvironment. Both soluble and membrane-bound niche factors have been identified as determinants of adult neurogenesis, including morphogens. Here, we review our current understanding of the role and mechanisms of short-range morphogen ligands from the Wnt, Notch, Sonic hedgehog, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) families in the regulation of adult neurogenesis. These morphogens are ideally suited to fine-tune stem-cell behavior, progenitor expansion, and differentiation, thereby influencing all stages of the neurogenesis process. We discuss cross talk between their signaling pathways and highlight findings of embryonic development that provide a relevant context for understanding neurogenesis in the adult brain. We also review emerging examples showing that the web of morphogens is in fact tightly linked to the regulation of neurogenesis by diverse physiologic processes.

  16. Improving signal/noise resolution in single-molecule experiments using molecular constructs with short handles.

    PubMed

    Forns, N; de Lorenzo, S; Manosas, M; Hayashi, K; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F

    2011-04-06

    We investigate unfolding/folding force kinetics in DNA hairpins exhibiting two and three states with newly designed short dsDNA handles (29 bp) using optical tweezers. We show how the higher stiffness of the molecular setup moderately enhances the signal/noise ratio (SNR) in hopping experiments as compared to conventional long-handled constructs (≅700 bp). The shorter construct results in a signal of higher SNR and slower folding/unfolding kinetics, thereby facilitating the detection of otherwise fast structural transitions. A novel analysis, as far as we are aware, of the elastic properties of the molecular setup, based on high-bandwidth measurements of force fluctuations along the folded branch, reveals that the highest SNR that can be achieved with short handles is potentially limited by the marked reduction of the effective persistence length and stretch modulus of the short linker complex.

  17. Structure-Activity Analysis of the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, James; Bowden, Steven D.; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Spring, David R.; Welch, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We synthesized a range of PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone) analogues and tested them for their ability to stimulate MvfR-dependent pqsA transcription, MvfR-independent pyoverdine production, and membrane vesicle production. The structure-activity profile of the PQS analogues was different for each of these phenotypes. Certain inactive PQS analogues were also found to strongly synergize PQS-dependent pyoverdine production. PMID:20494992

  18. Purification of an Extracellular Signaling Molecule Involved in Production of Aerial Mycelium by Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Nodwell, Justin R.; Losick, Richard

    1998-01-01

    We have extensively purified a factor from conditioned medium that restores aerial mycelium formation to a mutant of Streptomyces coelicolor that is defective in morphological differentiation. Response to this factor is shown to depend on the presence of the BldK oligopeptide import system. We suggest that this substance acts at the first step in a putative cascade of developmental regulatory signals. PMID:9495776

  19. NFAT Targets Signaling Molecules to Gene Promoters in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein-Auerbach, Nofit; McGlynn, Kathleen; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Shahbazov, Rauf; Syed, Ilham; Kanak, Mazhar; Takita, Morihito; Levy, Marlon F.; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is activated by calcineurin in response to calcium signals derived by metabolic and inflammatory stress to regulate genes in pancreatic islets. Here, we show that NFAT targets MAPKs, histone acetyltransferase p300, and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to gene promoters to differentially regulate insulin and TNF-α genes. NFAT and ERK associated with the insulin gene promoter in response to glucagon-like peptide 1, whereas NFAT formed complexes with p38 MAPK (p38) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) upon promoters of the TNF-α gene in response to IL-1β. Translocation of NFAT and MAPKs to gene promoters was calcineurin/NFAT dependent, and complex stability required MAPK activity. Knocking down NFATc2 expression, eliminating NFAT DNA binding sites, or interfering with NFAT nuclear import prevented association of MAPKs with gene promoters. Inhibiting p38 and JNK activity increased NFAT-ERK association with promoters, which repressed TNF-α and enhanced insulin gene expression. Moreover, inhibiting p38 and JNK induced a switch from NFAT-p38/JNK-histone acetyltransferase p300 to NFAT-ERK-HDAC3 complex formation upon the TNF-α promoter, which resulted in gene repression. Histone acetyltransferase/HDAC exchange was reversed on the insulin gene by p38/JNK inhibition in the presence of glucagon-like peptide 1, which enhanced gene expression. Overall, these data indicate that NFAT directs signaling enzymes to gene promoters in islets, which contribute to protein-DNA complex stability and promoter regulation. Furthermore, the data suggest that TNF-α can be repressed and insulin production can be enhanced by selectively targeting signaling components of NFAT-MAPK transcriptional/signaling complex formation in pancreatic β-cells. These findings have therapeutic potential for suppressing islet inflammation while preserving islet function in diabetes and islet transplantation. PMID:25496032

  20. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: A Key Bridging Molecule of External and Internal Chemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jijing; Feng, Yu; Fu, Hualing; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Jiang, Joy Xiaosong; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly evolutionary conserved, ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known to mediate the toxicities of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Phenotype of AhR-null mice, together with the recent discovery of a variety of endogenous and plant-derived ligands, point to the integral roles of AhR in normal cell physiology, in addition to its roles in sensing the environmental chemicals. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about AhR signaling pathways, its ligands and AhR-mediated effects on cell specialization, host defense and detoxification. AhR-mediated health effects particularly in liver, immune, and nervous systems, as well as in tumorgenesis are discussed. Dioxin-initiated embryotoxicity and immunosuppressive effects in fish and birds are reviewed. Recent data demonstrate that AhR is a convergence point of multiple signaling pathways that inform the cell of its external and internal environments. As such, AhR pathway is a promising potential target for therapeutics targeting nervous, liver, and autoimmune diseases through AhR ligand-mediated interventions and other perturbations of AhR signaling. Additionally, using available laboratory data obtained on animal models, AhR-centered adverse outcome pathway analysis is useful in reexamining known and potential adverse outcomes of specific or mixed compounds on wildlife. PMID:26079192

  1. Sodium Methyldithiocarbamate Exerts Broad Inhibition of Cellular Signaling and Expression of Effector Molecules of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD) is one of the most abundantly used conventional pesticides in the United States. At dosages relevant to occupational exposure, it causes major effects on the immune system in mice, including a decreased resistance to sepsis. This lab has identified some of the mechanisms of action of this compound and some of the immunological parameters affected, but the global effects have not previously been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to conduct transcriptomic analysis of the effects of SMD on lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of mediators important in innate immunity and inflammation. The results revealed broad effects on expression of transcription factors in both branches of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling (MyD88 and TRIF). However, TLR3 and interferon signaling pathways were decreased to a greater extent, and assessment of the effects of SMD on polyinosinic polycytidylic acid–induced cytokine and chemokine production revealed that these responses mediated by TLR3 were indeed sensitive to the effects of SMD, with inhibition occurring at lower dosages than required to inhibit responses to other immunological stimuli tested in our previous studies. In the downstream signaling pathways of these TLRs, functional analysis also revealed that NF-κB activation was inhibited by SMD, as indicated by gene expression analysis and a reporter construct in mice. A previously unreported effect on luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone pathways was also observed. PMID:24056979

  2. A structure activity-relationship study of the bacterial signal molecule HHQ reveals swarming motility inhibition in Bacillus atrophaeus.

    PubMed

    Reen, F Jerry; Shanahan, Rachel; Cano, Rafael; O'Gara, Fergal; McGlacken, Gerard P

    2015-05-21

    The sharp rise in antimicrobial resistance has been matched by a decline in the identification and clinical introduction of new classes of drugs to target microbial infections. Thus new approaches are being sought to counter the pending threat of a post-antibiotic era. In that context, the use of non-growth limiting small molecules, that target virulence behaviour in pathogens, has emerged as a solution with real clinical potential. We have previously shown that two signal molecules (HHQ and PQS) from the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa have modulatory activity towards other microorganisms. This current study involves the synthesis and evaluation of analogues of HHQ towards swarming and biofilm virulence behaviour in Bacillus atrophaeus, a soil bacterium and co-inhibitor with P. aeruginosa. Compounds with altered C6-C8 positions on the anthranilate-derived ring of HHQ, display a surprising degree of biological specificity, with certain candidates displaying complete motility inhibition. In contrast, anti-biofilm activity of the parent molecule was completely lost upon alteration at any position indicating a remarkable degree of specificity and delineation of phenotype.

  3. AHL signaling molecules with a large acyl chain enhance biofilm formation on sulfur and metal sulfides by the bioleaching bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    González, Alex; Bellenberg, Sören; Mamani, Sigde; Ruiz, Lina; Echeverría, Alex; Soulère, Laurent; Doutheau, Alain; Demergasso, Cecilia; Sand, Wolfgang; Queneau, Yves; Vera, Mario; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Biofilm formation plays a pivotal role in bioleaching activities of bacteria in both industrial and natural environments. Here, by visualizing attached bacterial cells on energetic substrates with different microscopy techniques, we obtained the first direct evidence that it is possible to positively modulate biofilm formation of the extremophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans on sulfur and pyrite surfaces by using Quorum Sensing molecules of the N-acylhomoserine lactone type (AHLs). Our results revealed that AHL-signaling molecules with a long acyl chain (12 or 14 carbons) increased the adhesion of A. ferrooxidans cells to these substrates. In addition, Card-Fish experiments demonstrated that C14-AHL improved the adhesion of indigenous A. ferrooxidans cells from a mixed bioleaching community to pyrite. Finally, we demonstrated that this improvement of cell adhesion is correlated with an increased production of extracellular polymeric substances. Our results open up a promising means to develop new strategies for the improvement of bioleaching efficiency and metal recovery, which could also be used to control environmental damage caused by acid mine/rock drainage.

  4. The Inflammasome and Danger Molecule Signaling: At the Crossroads of Inflammation and Pathogen Persistence in the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Özlem; Lee, Kyu Lim

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes are an oligomeric assembly of multiprotein complexes that activate the caspase-1-dependent maturation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory interleukin-1β and interleukin-18 cytokines in response to a ‘danger signal’ in vertebrates. The assessment of their significance continues to grow rapidly as the complex biology of various chronic inflammatory conditions are better dissected. Increasing evidence links inflammasomes and host-derived small ‘danger molecule ATP’-signaling strongly with the modulation of the host immune response by microbial colonizers as well as potential altering of the microbiome structure and inter-microbial interactions in host. All of these factors eventually lead to the destructive chronic inflammatory disease state. In the oral cavity, a highly dynamic and multifaceted interplay takes place between the endogenous danger molecule signaling and colonizing microbes on the mucosal surfaces. This interaction may redirect the local microenvironment to favor the conversion of the resident microbiome towards pathogenicity. This review outlines the major components of the known inflammasome complexes/mechanisms and highlights their regulation, in particular, by oral microorganisms in relation to the periodontal disease pathology. Better characterizations of the cellular and molecular biology of the inflammasome will likely present important potential therapeutic targets in the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease as well as other debilitating chronic diseases. PMID:26252403

  5. Zearalenone Mycotoxin Affects Immune Mediators, MAPK Signalling Molecules, Nuclear Receptors and Genome-Wide Gene Expression in Pig Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Braicu, Cornelia; Motiu, Monica; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Stancu, Mariana; Calin, Loredana; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA) was evaluated in swine spleen, a key organ for the innate and adaptative immune response. Weaned pigs were fed for 18 days with a control or a ZEA contaminated diet. The effect of ZEA was assessed on wide genome expression, pro- (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-4) cytokines, other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (MMPs/TIMPs), as well as signaling molecules, (p38/JNK1/JNK2-MAPKs) and nuclear receptors (PPARγ/NFkB/AP-1/STAT3/c-JUN). Microarray analysis showed that 46% of total number of differentially expressed genes was involved in cellular signaling pathway, 13% in cytokine network and 10% in the inflammatory response. ZEA increased expression and synthesis of pro- inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β) and had no effect on IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in spleen. The inflammatory stimulation might be a consequence of JNK pathway activation rather than of p-38MAPK and NF-kB involvement whose gene and protein expression were suppressed by ZEA action. In summary, our findings indicated the role of ZEA as an immune disruptor at spleen level. PMID:26011631

  6. Isolation and characterization of quorum-sensing signalling molecules in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Lakshmana Gowda, Krishnappa; John, James; Marie, Mohammed A M; Sangeetha, Gopalkrishnan; Bindurani, Shanta Range

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common pathogens in nosocomial infections. Many studies have documented the role of quorum-sensing (QS) systems in antibiotic tolerance of P. aeruginosa. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) serve as QS signalling molecules and can be a target for modulating bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, nosocomial isolates of P. aeruginosa were characterized for the presence of different types of QS signalling molecules. AHLs were solvent extracted and quantified by determination of β-galactosidase activity using the Escherichia coli MG4 reporter strain. Further characterization was performed by analytical thin layer chromatography coupled with detection using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136 biosensor strain. All P. aeruginosa isolates produced AHLs, but there were differences in the quantity and nature of AHLs. We identified AHLs belonging to C4-homoserine lactone (HSL), C6-HSL, C8-HSL, C10-HSL and C12-HSL. AHL profiling of P. aeruginosa isolates showed differences in the amounts and types of AHLs, suggesting differences in the virulence factors and the potential for infection. Our results may be investigated further using animal model systems.

  7. PqsE of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acts as Pathway-Specific Thioesterase in the Biosynthesis of Alkylquinolone Signaling Molecules.

    PubMed

    Drees, Steffen Lorenz; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses the alkylquinolones PQS (2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone) and HHQ (2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone) as quorum-sensing signal molecules, controlling the expression of many virulence genes as a function of cell population density. The biosynthesis of HHQ is generally accepted to require the pqsABCD gene products. We now reconstitute the biosynthetic pathway in vitro, and demonstrate that in addition to PqsABCD, PqsE has a role in HHQ synthesis. PqsE acts as thioesterase, hydrolyzing the biosynthetic intermediate 2-aminobenzoylacetyl-coenzyme A to form 2-aminobenzoylacetate, the precursor of HHQ and 2-aminoacetophenone. The role of PqsE can be taken over to some extent by the broad-specificity thioesterase TesB, explaining why the pqsE deletion mutant of P. aeruginosa still synthesizes HHQ. Interestingly, the pqsE mutant produces increased levels of 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline, resulting from intramolecular cyclization of 2-aminobenzoylacetyl-coenzyme A. Overall, our data suggest that PqsE promotes the efficiency of alkylquinolone signal molecule biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa and balances the levels of secondary metabolites deriving from the alkylquinolone biosynthetic pathway.

  8. The translocation of signaling molecules in dark adapting mammalian rod photoreceptor cells is dependent on the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Reidel, Boris; Goldmann, Tobias; Giessl, Andreas; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    In vertebrate rod photoreceptor cells, arrestin and the visual G-protein transducin move between the inner segment and outer segment in response to changes in light. This stimulus dependent translocation of signalling molecules is assumed to participate in long term light adaptation of photoreceptors. So far the cellular basis for the transport mechanisms underlying these intracellular movements remains largely elusive. Here we investigated the dependency of these movements on actin filaments and the microtubule cytoskeleton of photoreceptor cells. Co-cultures of mouse retina and retinal pigment epithelium were incubated with drugs stabilizing and destabilizing the cytoskeleton. The actin and microtubule cytoskeleton and the light dependent distribution of signaling molecules were subsequently analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The application of cytoskeletal drugs differentially affected the cytoskeleton in photoreceptor compartments. During dark adaptation the depolymerization of microtubules as well as actin filaments disrupted the translocation of arrestin and transducin in rod photoreceptor cells. During light adaptation only the delivery of arrestin within the outer segment was impaired after destabilization of microtubules. Movements of transducin and arrestin required intact cytoskeletal elements in dark adapting cells. However, diffusion might be sufficient for the fast molecular movements observed as cells adapt to light. These findings indicate that different molecular translocation mechanisms are responsible for the dark and light associated translocations of arrestin and transducin in rod photoreceptor cells.

  9. Discovery of Potent, Orally Bioavailable, Small-Molecule Inhibitors of WNT Signaling from a Cell-Based Pathway Screen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    WNT signaling is frequently deregulated in malignancy, particularly in colon cancer, and plays a key role in the generation and maintenance of cancer stem cells. We report the discovery and optimization of a 3,4,5-trisubstituted pyridine 9 using a high-throughput cell-based reporter assay of WNT pathway activity. We demonstrate a twisted conformation about the pyridine–piperidine bond of 9 by small-molecule X-ray crystallography. Medicinal chemistry optimization to maintain this twisted conformation, cognisant of physicochemical properties likely to maintain good cell permeability, led to 74 (CCT251545), a potent small-molecule inhibitor of WNT signaling with good oral pharmacokinetics. We demonstrate inhibition of WNT pathway activity in a solid human tumor xenograft model with evidence for tumor growth inhibition following oral dosing. This work provides a successful example of hypothesis-driven medicinal chemistry optimization from a singleton hit against a cell-based pathway assay without knowledge of the biochemical target. PMID:25680029

  10. NTB-A Receptor Crystal Structure: Insights into Homophilic Interactions in the Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Receptor Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Ramagopal, U.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Yan, Q.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that regulate both innate and adaptive immunity. The ectodomains of most SLAM family members are composed of an N-terminal IgV domain and a C-terminal IgC2 domain. NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A) is a homophilic receptor that stimulates cytotoxicity in natural killer (NK) cells, regulates bactericidal activities in neutrophils, and potentiates T helper 2 (Th2) responses. The 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete NTB-A ectodomain revealed a rod-like monomer that self-associates to form a highly kinked dimer spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}100 {angstrom}. The NTB-A homophilic and CD2-CD58 heterophilic dimers show overall structural similarities but differ in detailed organization and physicochemical properties of their respective interfaces. The NTB-A structure suggests a mechanism responsible for binding specificity within the SLAM family and imposes physical constraints relevant to the colocalization of SLAM-family proteins with other signaling molecules in the immunological synapse.

  11. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuting; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W; Wines, Pamela G; Cryan, Ellen V; Demarest, Keith T

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2))/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca(2+)-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca(2+)-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  12. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  13. Acidity Constant (pKa ) Calculation of Large Solvated Dye Molecules: Evaluation of Two Advanced Molecular Dynamics Methods.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, Thierry; Ensing, Bernd; Rogge, Sven M J; De Clerck, Karen; Meijer, Evert Jan; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2016-11-04

    pH-Sensitive dyes are increasingly applied on polymer substrates for the creation of novel sensor materials. Recently, these dye molecules were modified to form a covalent bond with the polymer host. This had a large influence on the pH-sensitive properties, in particular on the acidity constant (pKa ). Obtaining molecular control over the factors that influence the pKa value is mandatory for the future intelligent design of sensor materials. Herein, we show that advanced molecular dynamics (MD) methods have reached the level at which the pKa values of large solvated dye molecules can be predicted with high accuracy. Two MD methods were used in this work: steered or restrained MD and the insertion/deletion scheme. Both were first calibrated on a set of phenol derivatives and afterwards applied to the dye molecule bromothymol blue. Excellent agreement with experimental values was obtained, which opens perspectives for using these methods for designing dye molecules.

  14. Small-molecule agonists and antagonists of F-box protein-substrate interactions in auxin perception and signaling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Tan, Xu; Zheng, Ning; Hatate, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yoshio; Kepinski, Stefan; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2008-04-08

    The regulation of gene expression by the hormone auxin is a crucial mechanism in plant development. We have shown that the Arabidopsis F-box protein TIR1 is a receptor for auxin, and our recent structural work has revealed the molecular mechanism of auxin perception. TIR1 is the substrate receptor of the ubiquitin-ligase complex SCF(TIR1). Auxin binding enhances the interaction between TIR1 and its substrates, the Aux/IAA repressors, thereby promoting the ubiquitination and degradation of Aux/IAAs, altering the expression of hundreds of genes. TIR1 is the prototype of a new class of hormone receptor and the first example of an SCF ubiquitin-ligase modulated by a small molecule. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of auxin agonists and antagonists. We show these molecules are specific to TIR1-mediated events in Arabidopsis, and their mode of action in binding to TIR1 is confirmed by x-ray crystallographic analysis. Further, we demonstrate the utility of these probes for the analysis of TIR1-mediated auxin signaling in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Our work not only provides a useful tool for plant chemical biology but also demonstrates an example of a specific small-molecule inhibitor of F-box protein-substrate recruitment. Substrate recognition and subsequent ubiquitination by SCF-type ubiquitin ligases are central to many cellular processes in eukaryotes, and ubiquitin-ligase function is affected in several human diseases. Our work supports the idea that it may be possible to design small-molecule agents to modulate ubiquitin-ligase function therapeutically.

  15. Characterization of Odin, a Novel Inhibitory Molecule, in EGF Receptor Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    2 isoform a 2.7 SLC25A6 solute carrier family 25, member A6 2.6 PRDX4 thioredoxin peroxidase (peroxiredoxin 4) 2.59 EEF2 eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 [ Homo sapiens ] 2.58 ...ABSTRACT: Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in the regulation of the function of the proteins and the control of wild range of cellular process...Introduction Tyrosine kinase mediated signaling events are important for controlling a diverse range of cellular processes ranging from proliferation and

  16. Enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence signals by colloidal silver nanoparticles in studies of protein translation.

    PubMed

    Bharill, Shashank; Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Mandecki, Wlodek; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2011-01-25

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) increased total photon emission of Cy3- and Cy5-labeled ribosomal initiation complexes near 50 nm silver particles 4- and 5.5-fold, respectively. Fluorescence intensity fluctuations above shot noise, at 0.1-5 Hz, were greater on silver particles. Overall signal-to-noise ratio was similar or slightly improved near the particles. Proximity to silver particles did not compromise ribosome function, as measured by codon-dependent binding of fluorescent tRNA, dynamics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between adjacent tRNAs in the ribosome, and tRNA translocation induced by elongation factor G.

  17. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling through the Lysophosphatidic Acid-1 Receptor Is Required for Alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Funke, Manuela; Knudsen, Lars; Lagares, David; Ebener, Simone; Probst, Clemens K; Fontaine, Benjamin A; Franklin, Alicia; Kellner, Manuela; Kühnel, Mark; Matthieu, Stephanie; Grothausmann, Roman; Chun, Jerold; Roberts, Jesse D; Ochs, Matthias; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, contributes to both the development and the pathological remodeling after injury of many organs. Because we found previously that LPA-LPA1 signaling contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, here we investigated whether this pathway is also involved in lung development. Quantitative assessment of lung architecture of LPA1-deficient knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of age using design-based stereology suggested the presence of an alveolarization defect in LPA1 KO mice at 3 weeks, which persisted as alveolar numbers increased in WT mice into adulthood. Across the ages examined, the lungs of LPA1 KO mice exhibited decreased alveolar numbers, septal tissue volumes, and surface areas, and increased volumes of the distal airspaces. Elastic fibers, critical to the development of alveolar septa, appeared less organized and condensed and more discontinuous in KO alveoli starting at P4. Tropoelastin messenger RNA expression was decreased in KO lungs, whereas expression of matrix metalloproteinases degrading elastic fibers was either decreased or unchanged. These results are consistent with the abnormal lung phenotype of LPA1 KO mice, being attributable to reduced alveolar septal formation during development, rather than to increased septal destruction as occurs in the emphysema of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Peripheral septal fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, which direct septation in late alveolarization, demonstrated reduced production of tropoelastin and matrix metalloproteinases, and diminished LPA-induced migration, when isolated from LPA1 KO mice. Taken together, our data suggest that LPA-LPA1 signaling is critically required for septation during alveolarization.

  18. Small Molecule Inhibitors of AI-2 Signaling in Bacteria: State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives for Anti-Quorum Sensing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Gamby, Sonja; Zheng, Yue; Sintim, Herman O.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria respond to different small molecules that are produced by other neighboring bacteria. These molecules, called autoinducers, are classified as intraspecies (i.e., molecules produced and perceived by the same bacterial species) or interspecies (molecules that are produced and sensed between different bacterial species). AI-2 has been proposed as an interspecies autoinducer and has been shown to regulate different bacterial physiology as well as affect virulence factor production and biofilm formation in some bacteria, including bacteria of clinical relevance. Several groups have embarked on the development of small molecules that could be used to perturb AI-2 signaling in bacteria, with the ultimate goal that these molecules could be used to inhibit bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. Additionally, these molecules have the potential to be used in synthetic biology applications whereby these small molecules are used as inputs to switch on and off AI-2 receptors. In this review, we highlight the state-of-the-art in the development of small molecules that perturb AI-2 signaling in bacteria and offer our perspective on the future development and applications of these classes of molecules. PMID:23994835

  19. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L

    2012-06-19

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein-coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptors such as DAF-38.

  20. Interaction of structure-specific and promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors mediates small-molecule signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donha; O'Doherty, Inish; Somvanshi, Rishi K.; Bethke, Axel; Schroeder, Frank C.; Kumar, Ujendra; Riddle, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    A chemically diverse family of small-molecule signals, the ascarosides, control developmental diapause (dauer), olfactory learning, and social behaviors of the nematode model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. The ascarosides act upstream of conserved signaling pathways, including the insulin, TGF-β, serotonin, and guanylyl cyclase pathways; however, the sensory processes underlying ascaroside function are poorly understood. Because ascarosides often are multifunctional and show strongly synergistic effects, characterization of their receptors will be essential for understanding ascaroside biology and may provide insight into molecular mechanisms that produce synergistic outcomes in small-molecule sensing. Based on DAF-8 immunoprecipitation, we here identify two G-protein–coupled receptors, DAF-37 and DAF-38, which cooperatively mediate ascaroside perception. daf-37 mutants are defective in all responses to ascr#2, one of the most potent dauer-inducing ascarosides, although this mutant responds normally to other ascarosides. In contrast, daf-38 mutants are partially defective in responses to several different ascarosides. Through cell-specific overexpression, we show that DAF-37 regulates dauer when expressed in ASI neurons and adult behavior when expressed in ASK neurons. Using a photoaffinity-labeled ascr#2 probe and amplified luminescence assays (AlphaScreen), we demonstrate that ascr#2 binds to DAF-37. Photobleaching fluorescent energy transfer assays revealed that DAF-37 and DAF-38 form heterodimers, and we show that heterodimerization strongly increases cAMP inhibition in response to ascr#2. These results suggest that that the ascarosides' intricate signaling properties result in part from the interaction of highly structure-specific G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-37 with more promiscuous G-protein–coupled receptors such as DAF-38. PMID:22665789

  1. Chlorogenic Acid Improves Late Diabetes through Adiponectin Receptor Signaling Pathways in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shasha; Chang, Cuiqing; Zhang, Lantao; Liu, Yang; Huang, Xianren; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on glucose and lipid metabolism in late diabetic db/db mice, as well as on adiponectin receptors and their signaling molecules, to provide evidence for CGA in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We randomly divided 16 female db/db mice into db/db-CGA and db/db-control (CON) groups equally; db/m mice were used as control mice. The mice in both the db/db-CGA and db/m-CGA groups were administered 80 mg/kg/d CGA by lavage for 12 weeks, whereas the mice in both CON groups were given equal volumes of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) by lavage. At the end of the intervention, we assessed body fat and the parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism in the plasma, liver and skeletal muscle tissues as well as the levels of aldose reductase (AR) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the kidneys and measured adiponectin receptors and the protein expression of their signaling molecules in liver and muscle tissues. After 12 weeks of intervention, compared with the db/db-CON group, the percentage of body fat, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the db/db-CGA group were all significantly decreased; TGF-β1 protein expression and AR activity in the kidney were both decreased; and the adiponectin level in visceral adipose was increased. The protein expression of adiponectin receptors (ADPNRs), the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the liver and muscle, and the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) in the liver were all significantly greater. CGA could lower the levels of fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c during late diabetes and improve kidney fibrosis to some extent through the modulation of adiponectin receptor signaling pathways in db/db mice. PMID:25849026

  2. A novel small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor blocks Jak2 signaling through Jak2 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Kapuria, Vaibhav; Levitzki, Alexander; Bornmann, William G; Maxwell, David; Priebe, Waldemar; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Talpaz, Moshe; Donato, Nicholas J

    2011-12-01

    AG490 is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against Jak2 and apoptotic activity in specific leukemias. Due to its weak kinase inhibitory activity and poor pharmacology, we conducted a cell-based screen for derivatives with improved Jak2 inhibition and activity in animals. Two hits emerged from an initial small chemical library screen, and more detailed structure-activity relationship studies led to the development of WP1130 with 50-fold greater activity in suppressing Jak2-dependent cytokine signaling than AG490. However, WP1130 did not directly suppress Jak2 kinase activity, but mediated Jak2 ubiquitination resulting in its trafficking through HDAC6 to perinuclear aggresomes without cytokine stimulation or SOCS-1 induction. Jak2 primarily contained K63-linked ubiquitin polymers, and mutation of this lysine blocked Jak2 ubiquitination and mobilization in WP1130-treated cells. Further analysis demonstrated that WP1130, but not AG490, acts as a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) inhibitor, possibly through a Michael addition reaction. We conclude that chemical modification of AG490 resulted in development of a DUB inhibitor with activity against a DUB capable of modulating Jak2 ubiquitination, trafficking and signal transduction.

  3. Inhibition of GSK3 by lithium, from single molecules to signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Freland, Laure; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2012-01-01

    For more than 60 years, the mood stabilizer lithium has been used alone or in combination for the treatment of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, and other mental illnesses. Despite this long history, the molecular mechanisms trough which lithium regulates behavior are still poorly understood. Among several targets, lithium has been shown to directly inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha and beta (GSK3α and GSK3β). However in vivo, lithium also inhibits GSK3 by regulating other mechanisms like the formation of a signaling complex comprised of beta-arrestin 2 (βArr2) and Akt. Here, we provide an overview of in vivo evidence supporting a role for inhibition of GSK3 in some behavioral effects of lithium. We also explore how regulation of GSK3 by lithium within a signaling network involving several molecular targets and cell surface receptors [e.g., G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs)] may provide cues to its relative pharmacological selectivity and its effects on disease mechanisms. A better understanding of these intricate actions of lithium at a systems level may allow the rational development of better mood stabilizer drugs with enhanced selectivity, efficacy, and lesser side effects. PMID:22363263

  4. Is oxytocin a maternal-foetal signalling molecule at birth? Implications for development.

    PubMed

    Kenkel, W M; Yee, J R; Carter, C S

    2014-10-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin was first noted for its capacity to promote uterine contractions and facilitate delivery in mammals. The study of oxytocin has grown to include awareness that this peptide is a neuromodulator with broad effects throughout the body. Accumulating evidence suggests that oxytocin is a powerful signal to the foetus, helping to prepare the offspring for the extrauterine environment. Concurrently, the use of exogenous oxytocin or other drugs to manipulate labour has become common practice. The use of oxytocin to expedite labour and minimise blood loss improves both infant and maternal survival under some conditions. However, further investigations are needed to assess the developmental consequences of changes in oxytocin, such as those associated with pre-eclampsia or obstetric manipulations associated with birth. This review focuses on the role of endogenous and exogenous oxytocin as a neurochemical signal to the foetal nervous system. We also examine the possible developmental consequences, including those associated with autism spectrum disorder, that arise from exogenous oxytocin supplementation during labour.

  5. [Involvement of ATP in radiation-induced bystander effect as a signaling molecule].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that low doses (0.25-0.5 Gy) of γ-rays induce intracellular antioxidant, radioresistant, DNA damage repair, and so on. Meanwhile, we have recently reported that ATP is released from the cells exposed to low-dose γ-rays. Here, it was investigated whether or not γ-radiation-induced release of extracellular ATP contributes to various radiation effects, in paricular, focusing on the inductions of intracellular antioxidant and DNA damage repair. Irradiation with γ-rays or exogenously added ATP increased expression of intracellular antioxidants such as thioredoxin and the increases were blocked by pretreatment with an ecto-nucleotidase in both cases. Moreover, release of ATP and autocrine/paracrine positive feedback through P2Y receptors serve to amplify the cellular repair response to radiation-induced DNA damage. To sum up, it would be suggested that ATP signaling is important for the effective induction of radiation stress response, such as protection of the body from the radiation and DNA damage repair. In addition, the possibility that this signaling is involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells and beneficial effect on the organism of low-dose radiation and radiation adaptive response, would be further suggested.

  6. Cyclic ADP-ribose as a universal calcium signal molecule in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Salmina, Alla B; Olovyannikova, Raissa Ya; Hashii, Minako; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Koizumi, Keita; Jin, Duo; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lopatina, Olga; Amina, Sarwat; Islam, Mohammad Saharul; Huang, Jian-Jun; Noda, Mami

    2007-01-01

    beta-NAD(+) is as abundant as ATP in neuronal cells. beta-NAD(+) functions not only as a coenzyme but also as a substrate. beta-NAD(+)-utilizing enzymes are involved in signal transduction. We focus on ADP-ribosyl cyclase/CD38 which synthesizes cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), a universal Ca(2+) mobilizer from intracellular stores, from beta-NAD(+). cADPR acts through activation/modulation of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) releasing Ca(2+) channels. cADPR synthesis in neuronal cells is stimulated or modulated via different pathways and various factors. Subtype-specific coupling of various neurotransmitter receptors with ADP-ribosyl cyclase confirms the involvement of the enzyme in signal transduction in neurons and glial cells. Moreover, cADPR/CD38 is critical in oxytocin release from the hypothalamic cell dendrites and nerve terminals in the posterior pituitary. Therefore, it is possible that pharmacological manipulation of intracellular cADPR levels through ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity or synthetic cADPR analogues may provide new therapeutic opportunities for treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  7. Novel regulator of enterohepatic bile acid signaling protects against hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2013-06-04

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major cause of cardiovascular disease and can be treated by targeting bile acid and cholesterol metabolism. Vergnes et al. (2013) now identify Diet1 as a novel regulator of fibroblast growth factor 15/19 production and bile acid biosynthesis.

  8. Superoxide generation in extracts from isolated plant cell walls is regulated by fungal signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Kiba, A; Miyake, C; Toyoda, K; Ichinose, Y; Yamada, T; Shiraishi, T

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT Fractions solubilized with NaCl from cell walls of pea and cowpea plants catalyzed the formation of blue formazan from nitroblue tetrazolium. Because superoxide dismutase decreased formazan production by over 90%, superoxide anion (O(2) ) may participate in the formation of formazan in the solubilized cell wall fractions. The formazan formation in the fractions solubilized from pea and cowpea cell walls was markedly reduced by exclusion of NAD(P)H, manganese ion, or p-coumaric acid from the reaction mixture. The formazan formation was severely inhibited by salicylhydroxamic acid and catalase, but not by imidazole, pyridine, quinacrine, and diphenyleneiodonium. An elicitor preparation from the pea pathogen Mycosphaerella pinodes enhanced the activities of formazan formation nonspecifically in both pea and cowpea fractions. The suppressor preparation from M. pinodes inhibited the activity in the pea fraction in the presence or absence of the elicitor. In the cowpea fraction, however, the suppressor did not inhibit the elicitor-enhanced activity, and the suppressor alone stimulated formazan formation. These results indicated that O(2) generation in the fractions solubilized from pea and cowpea cell walls seems to be catalyzed by cell wall-bound peroxidase(s) and that the plant cell walls alone are able to respond to the elicitor non-specifically and to the suppressor in a species-specific manner, suggesting the plant cell walls may play an important role in determination of plant-fungal pathogen specificity.

  9. Signaling molecules regulating phenotypic conversions of astrocytes and glial scar formation in damaged nerve tissues.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Phenotypic conversion of astrocytes from resting to reactive (i.e., astrocytic activation) occurs in numerous brain disorders. Astrocytic activation in severely damaged brain regions often leads to glial scar formation. Because astrocytic activation and glial scar largely affect the vulnerability and tissue repair of damaged brain, numerous studies have been made to clarify mechanisms regulating the astrocytic phenotype. The phenotypic conversion is accompanied by the increased expression of intermediate filament proteins and the induction of hypertrophy in reactive astrocytes. Severe brain damage results in proliferation and migration of reactive astrocytes, which lead to glial scar formations at the injured areas. Gliogenesis from neural progenitors in the adult brain is also involved in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. Recent studies have shown that increased expression of connexin 43, aquaporin 4, matrix metalloproteinase 9, and integrins alter the function of astrocytes. The transcription factors: STAT3, OLIG2, SMAD, NF-κB, and Sp1 have been suggested to play regulatory roles in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. In this review, I discuss the roles of these key molecules regulating the pathophysiological functions of reactive astrocytes.

  10. Signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule SLAMF1 augments mycobacteria BCG-induced inflammatory response and facilitates bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Song, Tengfei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis, which is caused by intracellular mycobacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the most serious global public health concerns. The mechanisms by which innate immunity regulates the inflammatory responses and affects mycobacterial infection remain unclear. In this study, signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule family 1 (SLAMF1) was significantly upregulated in Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected RAW264.7 cells. Overexpression of SLAMF1 significantly increased the production of inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as chemokine MCP-1, both in vitro and in vivo upon mycobacteria BCG infection. By contrast, knockdown of SLAMF1 significantly decreased the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MCP-1. Western blot analysis indicated that the NF-κB signaling pathway may contribute to the elevated inflammatory response promoted by SLAMF1, as evidenced by higher levels of phosphorylated p65 and IκBα detected with SLAMF1 overexpression. Furthermore, SLAMF1 upregulation facilitated bacterial clearance in infected RAW264.7 cells and in the lungs of infected mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BCG infection significantly upregulated SLAMF1, which enhanced inflammatory response by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway and facilitated bacterial clearance in BCG-infected RAW264.7 cells and mice.

  11. Single molecule imaging reveals a major role for diffusion in the exploration of ciliary space by signaling receptors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fan; Breslow, David K; Koslover, Elena F; Spakowitz, Andrew J; Nelson, W James; Nachury, Maxence V

    2013-08-06

    The dynamic organization of signaling cascades inside primary cilia is key to signal propagation. Yet little is known about the dynamics of ciliary membrane proteins besides a possible role for motor-driven Intraflagellar Transport (IFT). To characterize these dynamics, we imaged single molecules of Somatostatin Receptor 3 (SSTR3, a GPCR) and Smoothened (Smo, a Hedgehog signal transducer) in the ciliary membrane. While IFT trains moved processively from one end of the cilium to the other, single SSTR3 and Smo underwent mostly diffusive behavior interspersed with short periods of directional movements. Statistical subtraction of instant velocities revealed that SSTR3 and Smo spent less than a third of their time undergoing active transport. Finally, SSTR3 and IFT movements could be uncoupled by perturbing either membrane protein diffusion or active transport. Thus ciliary membrane proteins move predominantly by diffusion, and attachment to IFT trains is transient and stochastic rather than processive or spatially determined. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00654.001.

  12. Ubiquilin-mediated Small Molecule Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Rory T.; Shi, Yuntao; Long, Marcus J. C.; Marr, Michael T.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. mTORC1 has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration, and is a target to prolong lifespan. Here we report a small molecule inhibitor (Cbz-B3A) of mTORC1 signaling. Cbz-B3A inhibits the phosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) and blocks 68% of translation. In contrast, rapamycin preferentially inhibits the phosphorylation of p70S6k and blocks 35% of translation. Cbz-B3A does not appear to bind directly to mTORC1, but instead binds to ubiquilins 1, 2, and 4. Knockdown of ubiquilin 2, but not ubiquilins 1 and 4, decreases the phosphorylation of 4EBP1, suggesting that ubiquilin 2 activates mTORC1. The knockdown of ubiquilins 2 and 4 decreases the effect of Cbz-B3A on 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Cbz-B3A slows cellular growth of some human leukemia cell lines, but is not cytotoxic. Thus Cbz-B3A exemplifies a novel strategy to inhibit mTORC1 signaling that might be exploited for treating many human diseases. We propose that Cbz-B3A reveals a previously unappreciated regulatory pathway coordinating cytosolic protein quality control and mTORC1 signaling. PMID:26740621

  13. Small Molecules Dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 Inhibit Myostatin/GDF8 Signaling and Promote Functional Myoblast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Horbelt, Daniel; Boergermann, Jan H.; Chaikuad, Apirat; Alfano, Ivan; Williams, Eleanor; Lukonin, Ilya; Timmel, Tobias; Bullock, Alex N.; Knaus, Petra

    2015-01-01

    GDF8, or myostatin, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted polypeptide growth factors. GDF8 is a potent negative regulator of myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. We found that GDF8 signaling was inhibited by the small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189. These compounds were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of BMP signaling by binding to the BMP type I receptors ALK1/2/3/6. We present the crystal structure of the type II receptor ActRIIA with dorsomorphin and demonstrate that dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 target GDF8 induced Smad2/3 signaling and repression of myogenic transcription factors. As a result, both inhibitors rescued myogenesis in myoblasts treated with GDF8. As revealed by quantitative live cell microscopy, treatment with dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 promoted the contractile activity of myotubular networks in vitro. We therefore suggest these inhibitors as suitable tools to promote functional myogenesis. PMID:25368322

  14. Dual Action Antifungal Small Molecule Modulates Multidrug Efflux and TOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar-Guturja, Tanvi; Gunaherath, G. M. Kamal B.; Kithsiri Wijeratne, E. M.; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Averette, Anna F.; Lee, Soo Chan; Kim, Taeyup; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Tripodi, Farida; Ammar, Ron; Döhl, Katja; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Schmitt, Lutz; Loewith, Robbie J.; Roth, Frederick P.; Sanglard, Dominique; Andes, David; Nislow, Corey; Coccetti, Paola; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Heitman, Joseph; Leslie Gunatilaka, A. A.; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new strategies to treat invasive fungal infections, which are a leading cause of human mortality. We establish two activities of the natural product beauvericin, which potentiates the activity of the most widely deployed class of antifungal against the leading human fungal pathogens, blocks the emergence of drug resistance, and renders resistant pathogens responsive to treatment in mammalian infection models. Harnessing genome sequencing of beauvericin-resistant mutants, affinity purification of a biotinylated beauvericin analog, and biochemical and genetic assays reveals that beauvericin blocks multidrug efflux and inhibits the global regulator TORC1 kinase, thereby activating protein kinase CK2 and inhibiting the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Substitutions in the multidrug transporter Pdr5 that enable beauvericin efflux impair antifungal efflux, thereby impeding resistance to the drug combination. Thus, dual targeting of multidrug efflux and TOR signaling provides a powerful, broadly effective therapeutic strategy for fungal infectious disease that evades resistance. PMID:27571477

  15. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in tumor cells by small molecule Src family kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bartscht, Tobias; Rosien, Benjamin; Rades, Dirk; Kaufmann, Roland; Biersack, Harald; Lehnerta, Hendrik; Ungefroren, Hendrik

    2017-01-02

    In a series of studies carried out over the last couple of years in various cell types, it was observed that the experimentally used Src family kinase inhibitors PP1 and PP2 and the clinically used Src/Abl inhibitors AZM475271 and dasatinib are potent inhibitors of TGF-β mediated cellular responses such as Smad and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, Smad-dependent transcriptional activation, growth inhibition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and cell motility. While for PP1/PP2 it was demonstrated shown that these agents directly inhibit the kinase activity of the TGF-β type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 5, the mechanism of the anti-TGF-β effect of AZM475271 and dasatinib is less clear. In contrast, the anti-TGF-β effect of yet another Src/Abl inhibitor, bosutinib, is more variable with respect to the type of the TGF-β response and the cell type affected, and lacks a clear dose-dependency. In the light of their strong anti-activin receptor-like kinase 5 kinase effect, PP1 and PP2 should not be used when studying the role of c-Src as downstream mediators in TGF-β/activin receptor-like kinase 5 signaling. On the other hand, based upon in vitro findings, it is conceivable that part of the therapeutic effects of AZM475271 and dasatinib seen in preclinical and clinical studies with solid tumors was caused by inhibition of prometastatic TGF-β rather than Src signaling. If AZM475271 and dasatinib can indeed act as dual Src / TGF-β inhibitors in vivo, this may be beneficial for prevention of metastatic disease in more advanced tumor stages.

  16. A chemical genetic screen uncovers a small molecule enhancer of the N-acylethanolamine degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Faure, Lionel; Chapman, Kent D.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2017-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a group of fatty acid amides that play signaling roles in diverse physiological processes in eukaryotes. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades NAE into ethanolamine and free fatty acid to terminate its signaling function. In animals, chemical inhibitors of FAAH have been used for therapeutic treatment of pain and as tools to probe deeper into biochemical properties of FAAH. In a chemical genetic screen for small molecules that dampened the inhibitory effect of N-lauroylethanolamine (NAE 12:0) on Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth, we identified 6-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-2,4(3 H,6 H)-dione (or MDPD). MDPD alleviated the growth inhibitory effects of NAE 12:0, in part by enhancing the enzymatic activity of Arabidopsis FAAH (AtFAAH). In vitro, biochemical assays showed that MDPD enhanced the apparent Vmax of AtFAAH but did not alter the affinity of AtFAAH for its NAE substrates. Structural analogs of MDPD did not affect AtFAAH activity or dampen the inhibitory effect of NAE 12:0 on seedling growth indicating that MDPD is a specific synthetic chemical activator of AtFAAH. Collectively, our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an unbiased chemical genetic approach to identify new pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH- and NAE-mediated physiological processes in plants. PMID:28112243

  17. A chemical genetic screen uncovers a small molecule enhancer of the N-acylethanolamine degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Faure, Lionel; Chapman, Kent D.; ...

    2017-01-23

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a group of fatty acid amides that play signaling roles in diverse physiological processes in eukaryotes. We used fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades NAE into ethanolamine and free fatty acid to terminate its signaling function. In animals, chemical inhibitors of FAAH for therapeutic treatment of pain and as tools to probe deeper into biochemical properties of FAAH. In a chemical genetic screen for small molecules that dampened the inhibitory effect of N-lauroylethanolamine (NAE 12:0) on Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth, we identified 6-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-2,4(3 H,6 H)-dione (or MDPD). MDPD alleviated the growth inhibitory effects of NAE 12:0, inmore » part by enhancing the enzymatic activity of Arabidopsis FAAH (AtFAAH). In vitro, biochemical assays showed that MDPD enhanced the apparent Vmax of AtFAAH but did not alter the affinity of AtFAAH for its NAE substrates. Furthermore, structural analogs of MDPD did not affect AtFAAH activity or dampen the inhibitory effect of NAE 12:0 on seedling growth indicating that MDPD is a specific synthetic chemical activator of AtFAAH. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an unbiased chemical genetic approach to identify new pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH- and NAE-mediated physiological processes in plants.« less

  18. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  19. Searching for amino-acid homochirality on Mars with the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard ExoMars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Brault, A.; Szopa, C.; Claude-Geffroy, C.; Coll, P. J.; Grand, N.; Raulin, F.; Pinick, V.; Goesmann, F.

    2012-12-01

    The joint ESA-Roscosmos Exo-Mars-2018 rover mission plans to seek the signs of a past or a present life on Mars. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment onboard theExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing molecular information from Mars solid samples, with a specific focus on the characterization of their organic content. In this purpose, one of MOMA's main instruments is a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), which provides a unique ability to characterize a broad range of compounds and allow chemical analyses on volatile and refractory species. The challenge with the analysis of this refractory matter embedded in soil is their primary extraction before their analysis by GC-MS. Since the extraction of organic matter is not possible by liquid solvent extraction, we have developed a method based on the thermodesorption and subsequent derivatization of the organic molecules. The goal of the thermodesorption is to extract the organic matter by heating the sample quickly enough not to degrade its organic content. One of the main focuses is to determine the chirality of this organic matter, notably amino acids. Indeed, on Earth, homochirality of molecules is an indicator for the presence of life. Amino acids appear to bear only the left-handed form (L) in living system. However, other refractory compounds can raise interest: nucleobases, carboxylic acids and PAHs are among molecules supported by life as we know it, and all of them can display chirality. The intrinsic chirality of molecules being thermosensitive, the thermodesorption parameters have been adjusted to occur within a range of temperatures from 150 °C to 300 °C over a period of 30 s to 10 min, depending on the chemical compound. Under these conditions, we have shown that amino acids are not degraded and that their chirality is preserved. Once extracted, refractory molecules with labile hydrogens (e.g. amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, etc.) are derivatized

  20. Isomerization of HNO to HON in the singlet state assisted by amino acid residues and/or water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junyou; Li, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang; Wang, Weihua; Mou, Zhaoxia; Song, Rui

    The effects of amino acid residues in the presence or absence of water molecules on the isomerization of the singlet state of HNO/HON have been systematically investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. The structural characteristics, proton transfer (PT) mechanisms, and the corresponding thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, have been discussed, respectively. All the optimized complexes have been characterized by the ring structures through the intermolecular H-bonds. The origin of the increase in N bond H stretching frequency (blue shifts) occurring in the reactants has also been investigated using the natural bonding orbital (NBO) analyses, which is mainly attributed to the decrease of the electron densities in the antibonding orbital of the N bond H bonds as well as the increase of the polarization of the N bond H bond. All the PTs proceed with the concerted mechanisms since no ionic intermediates have been located during PT processes. At the same time, the cooperative effects of amino acid residues and water molecules on the selected PT processes have been observed, where the PTs assisted solely by the selected residues cannot occur without the participation of the water molecule. Overall, the introductions of one or two water molecules are more favorable for the isomerization of HNO assisted by the amino acid residues.

  1. Nanostructured lipid carrier-loaded hyaluronic acid microneedles for controlled dermal delivery of a lipophilic molecule.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Gon; Jeong, Jae Han; Lee, Kyung Min; Jeong, Kyu Ho; Yang, Huisuk; Kim, Miroo; Jung, Hyungil; Lee, Sangkil; Choi, Young Wook

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were employed to formulate a lipophilic drug into hydrophilic polymeric microneedles (MNs). Hyaluronic acid (HA) was selected as a hydrophilic and bioerodible polymer to fabricate MNs, and nile red (NR) was used as a model lipophilic molecule. NR-loaded NLCs were consolidated into the HA-based MNs to prepare NLC-loaded MNs (NLC-MNs). A dispersion of NLCs was prepared by high-pressure homogenization after dissolving NR in Labrafil and mixing with melted Compritol, resulting in 268 nm NLCs with a polydispersity index of 0.273. The NLC dispersion showed a controlled release of NR over 24 hours, following Hixson-Crowell's cube root law. After mixing the NLC dispersion with the HA solution, the drawing lithography method was used to fabricate NLC-MNs. The length, base diameter, and tip diameter of the NLC-MNs were approximately 350, 380, and 30 μm, respectively. Fluorescence microscopic imaging of the NLC-MNs helped confirm that the NR-loaded NLCs were distributed evenly throughout the MNs. In a skin permeation study performed using a Franz diffusion cell with minipig dorsal skin, approximately 70% of NR was localized in the skin after 24-hour application of NLC-MNs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (z-series) of the skin at different depths showed strong fluorescence intensity in the epidermal layer, which appeared to spread out radially with the passage of time. This study indicated that incorporation of drug-loaded NLCs into MNs could represent a promising strategy for controlled dermal delivery of lipophilic drugs.

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans Recognizes a Bacterial Quorum-sensing Signal Molecule through the AWCON Neuron*

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Kristen M.; Perez, Lark J.; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria use chemicals called autoinducers for cell-cell communication. Population-wide detection of autoinducers enables bacteria to orchestrate collective behaviors. In the animal kingdom detection of chemicals is vital for success in locating food, finding hosts, and avoiding predators. This behavior, termed chemotaxis, is especially well studied in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we demonstrate that the Vibrio cholerae autoinducer (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one, termed CAI-1, influences chemotaxis in C. elegans. C. elegans prefers V. cholerae that produces CAI-1 over a V. cholerae mutant defective for CAI-1 production. The position of the CAI-1 ketone moiety is the key feature driving CAI-1-directed nematode behavior. CAI-1 is detected by the C. elegans amphid sensory neuron AWCON. Laser ablation of the AWCON cell, but not other amphid sensory neurons, abolished chemoattraction to CAI-1. These analyses define the structural features of a bacterial-produced signal and the nematode chemosensory neuron that permit cross-kingdom interaction. PMID:25092291

  3. Increased signals from short-wavelength-excited fluorescent molecules using sub-Ti:Sapphire wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Norris, G; Amor, R; Dempster, J; Amos, W B; McConnell, G

    2012-11-01

    We report the use of an all-solid-state ultrashort pulsed source specifically for two-photon microscopy at wavelengths shorter than those of the conventional Ti:Sapphire laser. Our approach involves sum-frequency mixing of the output from an optical parametric oscillator (λ= 1400-1640 nm) synchronously pumped by a Yb-doped fibre laser (λ= 1064 nm), with the residual pump radiation. This generated an fs-pulsed output tunable in the red spectral region (λ= 620-636 nm, ~150 mW, 405 fs, 80 MHz, M(2) ~ 1.3). We demonstrate the performance of our ultrashort pulsed system using fluorescently labelled and autofluorescent tissue, and compare with conventional Ti:Sapphire excitation. We observe a more than 3-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity using our visible laser source in comparison with the Ti:Sapphire laser for two-photon excitation at equal illumination peak powers of 1.16 kW or less.

  4. Uric Acid Induces Endothelial Dysfunction by Activating the HMGB1/RAGE Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Duan, Xi-Mei; Liu, Ying; Yu, Jiao; Tang, Yun-Liang; Liu, Ze-Lin; Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liu, Jian-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction, a process in which inflammation may play an important role. UA increases high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) expression and extracellular release in endothelial cells. HMGB1 is an inflammatory cytokine that interacts with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inducing an oxidative stress and inflammatory response, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with a high concentration of UA (20 mg/dL) after which endothelial function and the expression of HMGB1, RAGE, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules were evaluated. UA inhibited endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production in HUVECs, increased intracellular HMGB1 expression and extracellular HMGB1 secretion, and upregulated RAGE expression. UA also activated NF-κB and increased the level of inflammatory cytokines. Blocking RAGE significantly suppressed the upregulation of RAGE and HMGB1 and prevented the increase in DNA binding activity of NF-κB and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. It also blocked the decrease in eNOS expression and NO production induced by UA. Our results suggest that high concentrations of UA cause endothelial dysfunction via the HMGB1/RAGE signaling pathway. PMID:28116308

  5. miR-181 interacts with signaling adaptor molecule DENN/MADD and enhances TNF-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Samira; Talebi, Farideh; Ghasemi, Sedigheh; Jahanbazi Jahan Abad, Ali; Vojgani, Mohammed; Noorbakhsh, Farshid

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs, which regulate the expression of protein coding transcripts through mRNA degradation or translational inhibition. Numerous reports have highlighted the role of miRNAs in regulating cell death pathways including the expression of genes involved in the induction of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine which can send pro-death signals through its receptor TNFR1. Diverse adaptor molecules including DENN/MADD adaptor protein have been shown to modulate TNF-α pro-death signaling via recruitment of MAP kinases to TNFR1 and activation of pro-survival NFκB signaling. Herein, we investigated the role of microRNA-181 (miR-181) in regulating DENN/MADD expression levels and its subsequent effects on TNF-α-induced cell death. Using bioinformatics analyses followed by luciferase reporter assays we showed that miR-181 interacts with the 3’ UTR of DENN/MADD transcripts. miR-181 overexpression also led to decreased endogenous DENN/MADD mRNA levels in L929 murine fibroblasts. Flow cytometric analysis of miR-181 transfected cells showed this miRNA accentuates mitochondrial membrane potential loss caused by TNF-α. These findings were associated with enhanced apoptosis of L929 cells following TNF-α treatment. Overall, these data point to the potential role of miR-181 in regulating TNF-α pro-death signaling, which could be of importance from pathogenesis and therapeutic perspectives in inflammatory disorders associated with tissue degeneration and cell death. PMID:28323882

  6. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure alters expression of central and peripheral insulin signaling molecules in adult guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Christine C; Thevasundaram, Kersh; Mongillo, Daniel L; Winterborn, Andrew; Holloway, Alison C; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2014-11-01

    Maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy can produce a range of teratogenic outcomes in offspring. The mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is multi-faceted, but may involve alterations in insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways. These pathways are not only important for metabolism, but are also critically involved in neuronal survival and plasticity, and they can be altered by chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE). The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CPEE alters expression of insulin and IGF signaling molecules in the prefrontal cortex and liver of adult guinea pig offspring. Pregnant Dunkin-Hartley-strain guinea pigs received ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding (nutritional control) throughout gestation. Fasting blood glucose concentration was measured in male and female offspring at postnatal day 150-200, followed by euthanasia, collection of prefrontal cortex and liver, and RNA extraction. IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), IGF-2, IGF-2 receptor (IGF-2R), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, IRS-2, and insulin receptor (INSR) mRNA expression levels were measured in tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. The mean maternal blood ethanol concentration was 281 ± 15 mg/dL at 1 h after the second divided dose of ethanol on GD 57. CPEE resulted in increased liver weight in adult offspring, but produced no difference in fasting blood glucose concentration compared with nutritional control. In the liver, CPEE decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-1R, and IGF-2, and increased IRS-2 mRNA expression in male offspring only compared with nutritional control. Female CPEE offspring had decreased INSR hepatic mRNA expression compared with male CPEE offspring. In the prefrontal cortex, IRS-2 mRNA expression was increased in CPEE offspring compared with nutritional control. The data demonstrate that CPEE alters both central and peripheral expression of insulin and IGF signaling

  7. Surface active molecules: preparation and properties of long chain n-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Infante, R; Dominguez, J G; Erra, P; Julia, R; Prats, M

    1984-12-01

    Synopsis A new route for the synthesis of long chain N(alpha)-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guamdine alkyl acid derivatives, with cationic or amphoteric character has been established. The general formula of these compounds is shown below. A physico-chemical and antimicrobial study of these products as a function of the alkyl ester or sodium salt (R), the straight chain length of the fatty acid residue (x) and the number of carbons between the omega-guanidine and omega-carboxyl group (n) has been investigated. The water solubility, surface tension, critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas) has been determined. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has been used to condense fatty acids and alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acids. In these conditions protection of the omega-guanidine group is not necessary. The main characteristic of this synthetic procedure is the use of very mild experimental conditions (temperature, pH) to form the amide linkage which leads to pure optical compounds in high yield in the absence of electrolytes. The results show that some structural modifications, particularly the protection of the carboxyl group, promote variations of the surfactant and antimicrobial properties. Only those molecules with the blocked carboxyl group (cationic molecules, where R = Me, Et or Pr) showed a good surfactant and antimicrobial activity. When the carboxyl group was unprotected (amphoteric molecules, where R = Na(+)) the resulting compounds were inactive.

  8. NBBA, a synthetic small molecule, inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced angiogenesis by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Hee; Jung, Hye Jin; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-01-15

    Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a crucial transcription factor that contributes to cancer development by regulating a number of genes involved in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here, we describe (Z)-N-(3-(7-nitro-3-oxobenzo[d][1,2]selenazol-2(3H)-yl)benzylidene) propan-2-amine oxide (NBBA) as a new anti-angiogenic small molecule that targets NF-{kappa}B activity. NBBA showed stronger growth inhibition on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) than on the cancer cell lines we tested. Moreover, NBBA inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha})-induced tube formation and invasion of HUVECs. In addition, NBBA suppressed the neovascularization of chorioallantonic membrane from growing chick embryos in vivo. To address the mode of action of the compound, the effect of NBBA on TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B transcription activity was investigated. NBBA suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, which resulted in suppression of transcription of NF-{kappa}B and its target genes, including interleukin-8, interleukin-1{alpha}, and epidermal growth factor. Collectively, these results demonstrated that NBBA is a new anti-angiogenic small molecule that targets the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway.

  9. Lamina-specific abnormalities of AMPA receptor trafficking and signaling molecule transcripts in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Beneyto, Monica; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2006-12-15

    Ampakines, positive AMPA receptor modulators, can improve cognitive function in schizophrenia, and enhancement of AMPA receptor-mediated currents by them potentiates the activity of antipsychotics. In vitro studies have revealed that trafficking of AMPA receptors is mediated by specific interactions of a complex network of proteins that also target and anchor them at the postsynaptic density (PSD). The aim of this study was to determine whether there are abnormalities of the molecules associated with trafficking and localization of AMPA receptors at the PSD in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia. We analyzed AMPA receptor expression in DLPFC in schizophrenia, major depression, bipolar disorder, and a control group, by examining transcript levels of all four AMPA receptor subunits by in situ hybridization. We found decreased GluR2 subunit expression in all three illnesses, decreased GluR3 in major depression, and decreased GluR4 in schizophrenia. However, autoradiography experiments showed no changes in AMPA receptor binding; thus, we hypothesized that these changes in receptor subunit stoichiometry do not alter binding to the assembled receptor, but rather intracellular processing. In situ hybridization for AMPA-trafficking molecules showed decreased expression of PICK1 and increased expression of stargazin in DLPFC in schizophrenia, both restricted to large cells of cortical layer III. These data suggest that AMPA-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission is compromised in schizophrenia, particularly at the level of AMPA-related PSD proteins that mediate AMPA receptor trafficking, synaptic surface expression, and intracellular signaling.

  10. Involvement of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kalachova, Tetiana; Iakovenko, Oksana; Kretinin, Sergii; Kravets, Volodymyr

    2013-05-01

    Salicylic acid is associated with the primary defense responses to biotic stress and formation of systemic acquired resistance. However, molecular mechanisms of early cell reactions to phytohormone application are currently undisclosed. The present study investigates the participation of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signal transduction cascade. The activation of lipid signaling enzymes within 15 min of salicylic acid application was shown in Arabidopsis thaliana plants by measuring the phosphatidic acid accumulation. Adding of primary alcohol (1-butanol) to the incubation medium led to phosphatidylbutanol accumulation as a result of phospholipase D (PLD) action in wild-type and NADPH-oxidase RbohD deficient plants. Salicylic acid induced rapid increase in NADPH-oxidase activity in histochemical assay with nitroblue tetrazolium but the reaction was not observed in presence of 1-butanol and NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodide (DPI). The further physiological effect of salicylic acid and inhibitory analysis of the signaling cascade were made in the guard cell model. Stomatal closure induced by salicylic acid was inhibited by 1-butanol and DPI treatment. rbohD transgenic plants showed impaired stomatal reaction upon phytohormone effect, while the reaction to H2O2 did not differ from that of wild-type plants. Thus a key role of NADPH-oxidase D-isoform in the process of stomatal closure in response to salicylic acid has been postulated. It has enabled to predict a cascade implication of PLD and NADPH oxidase to salicylic acid signaling pathway.

  11. Retinoic Acid Signaling Regulates Differential Expression of the Tandemly-Duplicated Long Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Opsin Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Ruth A.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) regulates rod and cone photoreceptor fate, differentiation, and survival. Here we elucidate the role of RA in differential regulation of the tandemly-duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes. Zebrafish embryos were treated with RA from 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to 75 hpf, and RNA was isolated from eyes for microarray analysis. ~170 genes showed significantly altered expression, including several transcription factors and components of cellular signaling pathways. Of interest, the LWS1 opsin gene was strongly upregulated by RA. LWS1 is the upstream member of the tandemly duplicated LWS opsin array and is normally not expressed embryonically. Embryos treated with RA 48 hpf to 100 hpf or beyond showed significant reductions in LWS2-expressing cones in favor of LWS1-expressing cones. The LWS reporter line, LWS-PAC(H) provided evidence that individual LWS cones switched from LWS2 to LWS1 expression in response to RA. The RA signaling reporter line, RARE:YFP indicated that increased RA signaling in cones was associated with this opsin switch, and experimental reduction of RA signaling in larvae at the normal time of onset of LWS1 expression significantly inhibited LWS1 expression. A role for endogenous RA signaling in regulating differential expression of the LWS genes in postmitotic cones was further supported by the presence of an RA signaling domain in ventral retina of juvenile zebrafish that coincided with a ventral zone of LWS1 expression. This is the first evidence that an extracellular signal may regulate differential expression of opsin genes in a tandemly duplicated array. PMID:26296154

  12. FIA functions as an early signal component of abscisic acid signal cascade in Vicia faba guard cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yusuke; Uraji, Misugi; Watanabe-Sugimoto, Megumi; Okuma, Eiji; Munemasa, Shintaro; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Iwai, Sumio; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    An abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive Vicia faba mutant, fia (fava bean impaired in ABA-induced stomatal closure) had previously been isolated. In this study, it was investigated how FIA functions in ABA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. Unlike ABA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), H(2)O(2), and nitric oxide (NO) induced stomatal closure in the fia mutant. ABA did not induce production of either reactive oxygen species or NO in the mutant. Moreover, ABA did not suppress inward-rectifying K(+) (K(in)) currents or activate ABA-activated protein kinase (AAPK) in mutant guard cells. These results suggest that FIA functions as an early signal component upstream of AAPK activation in ABA signalling but does not function in MeJA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba.

  13. A dual-signal strategy for the solid detection of both small molecules and proteins based on magnetic separation and highly fluorescent copper nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiepei; Wang, Wei; Bo, Bing; Mao, Xiaoxia; Wang, Keming; Zhu, Xiaoli

    2017-04-15

    Recently, a variety of analytical methods for the detection of small molecules or proteins based on small molecule-protein interaction have been developed. However, these methods often focus on either small molecules or proteins. Few efforts are made to detect both of them in the same system. In this work, a dual-signal strategy for the solid detection of both small molecules and proteins based on small molecule-protein interaction is proposed by using the streptavidin-biotin couple as a model. In our strategy, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are adopted for target separation, and highly fluorescent copper nanoclusters (CuNCs) are synthesized in situ to give signals. In the absence of the targets, CuNCs are associated with the MNPs and present in the precipitate under magnetic field; whereas in the presence of either streptavidin or biotin, the CuNCs will present in the supernate. By monitoring the fluorescent intensity of each, dual-signal can be obtained for the solid detection of either the protein or the small molecule. Results show that sensitive and specific detection of both streptavidin (detection limit: 0.47nM) and biotin (detection limit: 3.1nM) can be achieved. This method can be extended for the detection of other small molecule-protein couples, and thereby has the potential for biomedical and clinical applications.

  14. Input overload: Contributions of retinoic acid signaling feedback mechanisms to heart development and teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    D'Aniello, Enrico; Waxman, Joshua S

    2015-03-01

    Appropriate levels of retinoic acid (RA) signaling are critical for normal heart development in vertebrates. A fascinating property of RA signaling is the thoroughness by which positive and negative feedback are employed to promote proper embryonic RA levels. In the present short review, we first cover the advancement of hypotheses regarding the impact of RA signaling on cardiac specification. We then discuss our current understanding of RA signaling feedback mechanisms and the implications of recent studies, which have indicated improperly maintained RA signaling feedback can be a contributing factor to developmental malformations.

  15. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Böhmer, Maik; Hu, Honghong; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms. PMID:20192751

  16. Quantitative Structure of an Acetate Dye Molecule Analogue at the TiO2-Acetic Acid Interface.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hadeel; Torrelles, Xavier; Cabailh, Gregory; Rajput, Parasmani; Lindsay, Robert; Bikondoa, Oier; Tillotson, Marcus; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Thornton, Geoff

    2016-04-14

    The positions of atoms in and around acetate molecules at the rutile TiO2(110) interface with 0.1 M acetic acid have been determined with a precision of ±0.05 Å. Acetate is used as a surrogate for the carboxylate groups typically employed to anchor monocarboxylate dye molecules to TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Structural analysis reveals small domains of ordered (2 × 1) acetate molecules, with substrate atoms closer to their bulk terminated positions compared to the clean UHV surface. Acetate is found in a bidentate bridge position, binding through both oxygen atoms to two 5-fold titanium atoms such that the molecular plane is along the [001] azimuth. Density functional theory calculations provide adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiment. The availability of these structural data will improve the accuracy of charge transport models for DSSC.

  17. Quantitative Structure of an Acetate Dye Molecule Analogue at the TiO2–Acetic Acid Interface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The positions of atoms in and around acetate molecules at the rutile TiO2(110) interface with 0.1 M acetic acid have been determined with a precision of ±0.05 Å. Acetate is used as a surrogate for the carboxylate groups typically employed to anchor monocarboxylate dye molecules to TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Structural analysis reveals small domains of ordered (2 × 1) acetate molecules, with substrate atoms closer to their bulk terminated positions compared to the clean UHV surface. Acetate is found in a bidentate bridge position, binding through both oxygen atoms to two 5-fold titanium atoms such that the molecular plane is along the [001] azimuth. Density functional theory calculations provide adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiment. The availability of these structural data will improve the accuracy of charge transport models for DSSC. PMID:27110318

  18. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4-quinolone signal molecules HHQ and PQS play multifunctional roles in quorum sensing and iron entrapment.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Stephen P; Matthijs, Sandra; Wright, Victoria J; Fletcher, Matthew P; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Lamont, Iain L; Kong, Xiaole; Hider, Robert C; Cornelis, Pierre; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), a quorum-sensing (QS) signal that regulates numerous virulence genes including those involved in iron scavenging. Biophysical analysis revealed that 2-alkyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolones form complexes with iron(III) at physiological pH. The overall stability constant of 2-methyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone iron(III) complex was log beta(3) = 36.2 with a pFe(3+) value of 16.6 at pH 7.4. PQS was found to operate via at least three distinct signaling pathways, and its precursor, 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), which does not form an iron complex, was discovered to function as an autoinducer molecule per se. When PQS was supplied to a P. aeruginosa mutant unable to make pyoverdine or pyochelin, PQS associated with the cell envelope and inhibited bacterial growth, a finding that reveals a secondary function for PQS in iron entrapment to facilitate siderophore-mediated iron delivery.

  19. Expression Analysis of Taste Signal Transduction Molecules in the Fungiform and Circumvallate Papillae of the Rhesus Macaque, Macaca mulatta

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Abe, Miki; Asakura, Tomiko; Imai, Hiroo; Abe, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of the mammalian gustatory system have been examined in many studies using rodents as model organisms. In this study, we examined the mRNA expression of molecules involved in taste signal transduction in the fungiform papillae (FuP) and circumvallate papillae (CvP) of the rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta, using in situ hybridization. TAS1R1, TAS1R2, TAS2Rs, and PKD1L3 were exclusively expressed in different subsets of taste receptor cells (TRCs) in the FuP and CvP. This finding suggests that TRCs sensing different basic taste modalities are mutually segregated in macaque taste buds. Individual TAS2Rs exhibited a variety of expression patterns in terms of the apparent level of expression and the number of TRCs expressing these genes, as in the case of human TAS2Rs. GNAT3, but not GNA14, was expressed in TRCs of FuP, whereas GNA14 was expressed in a small population of TRCs of CvP, which were distinct from GNAT3- or TAS1R2-positive TRCs. These results demonstrate similarities and differences between primates and rodents in the expression profiles of genes involved in taste signal transduction. PMID:23029001

  20. Polyplexes assembled from self-peptides and regulatory nucleic acids blunt toll-like receptor signaling to combat autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hess, Krystina L; Andorko, James I; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Jewell, Christopher M

    2017-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system incorrectly recognizes self-molecules as foreign; in the case of multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin is attacked. Intriguingly, new studies reveal toll-like receptors (TLRs), pathways usually involved in generating immune responses against pathogens, play a significant role in driving autoimmune disease in both humans and animal models. We reasoned polyplexes formed from myelin self-antigen and regulatory TLR antagonists might limit TLR signaling during differentiation of myelin-specific T cells, inducing tolerance by biasing T cells away from inflammatory phenotypes. Complexes were formed by modifying myelin peptide with cationic amino acids to create peptides able to condense the anionic nucleic-acid based TLR antagonist. These immunological polyplexes eliminate synthetic polymers commonly used to condense polyplexes and do not rely on gene expression; however, the complexes mimic key features of traditional polyplexes such as tunable loading and co-delivery. Using these materials and classic polyplex analysis techniques, we demonstrate condensation of both immune signals, protection from enzymatic degradation, and tunable physicochemical properties. We show polyplexes reduce TLR signaling, and in primary dendritic cell and T cell co-culture, reduce myelin-driven inflammation. During mouse models of MS, these tolerogenic polyplexes improve the progression, severity, and incidence of disease.

  1. Theoretical study of the NLO responses of some natural and unnatural amino acids used as probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Derrar, S N; Sekkal-Rahal, M; Derreumaux, P; Springborg, M

    2014-08-01

    The first hyperpolarizabilities β of the natural aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine have been investigated using several methods and basis sets. Some of the theoretical results obtained were compared to the only experimental hyper-Rayleigh scattering data available. The sensitivity of tryptophan to its local environment was analyzed by constructing two-dimensional potential energy plots around the dipeptide tryptophan-lysine. Static hyperpolarizabilities β(0) of the found minima were calculated by a second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) method in combination with the 6-31+G(d) basis set. Moreover, the efficiency of tryptophan and those of a series of unnatural amino acids as endogenous probe molecules were tested by calculating the nonlinear responses of some peptides. Impressive results were obtained for the amino acid ALADAN, which shows significantly improved nonlinear performance compared to other amino acids with weak nonlinear responses.

  2. Cytosolic domain of the type I interleukin-1 receptor spontaneously recruits signaling molecules to activate a proinflammatory gene.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R; Huang, S; Guth, T; Konieczkowski, M; Sedor, J R

    1997-01-01

    Immediate postreceptor events activated by IL-1-IL-1R interaction remain undefined. We have initiated studies to identify candidate signal transducers that associate with the cytosolic domain (cd) of the IL-1R. Immunocomplex kinase assays demonstrated an IL-1-activated myelin basic protein kinase activity that coprecipitated with the IL-1R from rat mesangial, mouse EL-4, and HeLa cells. Using glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, HeLa cell lysates next were assayed for kinases that associated with IL-1R cytoplasmic sequences. A GST-IL-1R fusion protein containing the entire cd (amino acids 369-569; GST-IL-1Rcd) recruited a kinase activity in the absence and presence of IL-1 stimulation. In contrast, a GST-IL-1R membrane-proximal region mutant (amino acids 369-501; GST-IL-1RcdDelta), which lacks COOH-terminal amino acid residues required for nuclear factor-kappaB activation, poorly phosphorylated MBP. In gel, kinase assays demonstrated 63-, 83-, and 100-kD kinases that specifically coprecipitated with the HeLa IL-1R and the GST-IL-1Rcd, but not GST-IL-1RcdDelta. 35S-labeled proteins, with Mrs identical to the kinase activities, stably associated with GST-IL-1Rcd. Transient transfection assays of 293 cells were used to evaluate the functional significance of these findings. Simply increasing IL-1cd expression in 293 cells stimulated 5'-IL-6 flanking region-regulated CAT activity threefold above control, an effect blocked by the kinase inhibitors staurosporine and calphostin C. In summary, we have identified two previously unrecognized 63- and 83-kD kinases as well as a protein with an Mr similar to the recently cloned IL-1R-associated kinase, all of which associate spontaneously with the IL-1Rcd. Ectopic IL-1Rcd expression was sufficient to trigger cellular activation, suggesting that the extracellular domain of the intact receptor represses signal transduction until IL-1 is bound. Given that the IL-1Rcd signaling domain has been conserved in a

  3. Saturated fatty acids activate TLR-mediated proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shurong; Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Snodgrass, Ryan G; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D; Schneider, Dina A; Newman, John W; Adams, Sean H; Hwang, Daniel H

    2012-09-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 were shown to be activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) but inhibited by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, one report suggested that SFA-induced TLR activation in cell culture systems is due to contaminants in BSA used for solubilizing fatty acids. This report raised doubt about proinflammatory effects of SFAs. Our studies herein demonstrate that sodium palmitate (C16:0) or laurate (C12:0) without BSA solubilization induced phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB α, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p44/42 mitogen-activated-kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, and TLR target gene expression in THP1 monocytes or RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, when cultured in low FBS (0.25%) medium. C12:0 induced NFκB activation through TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6, and through TLR4. Because BSA was not used in these experiments, contaminants in BSA have no relevance. Unlike in suspension cells (THP-1), BSA-solubilized C16:0 instead of sodium C16:0 is required to induce TLR target gene expression in adherent cells (RAW264.7). C16:0-BSA transactivated TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6 and through TLR4 as seen with C12:0. These results and additional studies with the LPS sequester polymixin B and in MyD88(-/-) macrophages indicated that SFA-induced activation of TLR2 or TLR4 is a fatty acid-specific effect, but not due to contaminants in BSA or fatty acid preparations.

  4. Kojic acid--a new leading molecule for a preparation of compounds with an anti-neoplastic potential.

    PubMed

    Novotný, L; Rauko, P; Abdel-Hamid, M; Váchalková, A

    1999-01-01

    Kojic acid as a molecule of natural origin may serve as template for the synthesis of new biologically active compounds. The synthetic KA (pyranone) derivatives possess various kinds of biological activities which are related by their similarity to flavonoids. The most important property is the antifungal and antineoplastic activity and capability of chelating metals. It is shown that the antineoplastic activity of kojic acid derivatives is based on various mechanisms of action on different levels of cellular metabolism and functions what makes this compound interesting for future investigation as cytotoxic agent.

  5. Evolutionary Adaptation of the Essential tRNA Methyltransferase TrmD to the Signaling Molecule 3′,5′-cAMP in Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Agrebi, Rym; Bellows, Lauren E.; Collet, Jean-François; Kaever, Volkhard

    2017-01-01

    The nucleotide signaling molecule 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (3′,5′-cAMP) plays important physiological roles, ranging from carbon catabolite repression in bacteria to mediating the action of hormones in higher eukaryotes, including human. However, it remains unclear whether 3′,5′-cAMP is universally present in the Firmicutes group of bacteria. We hypothesized that searching for proteins that bind 3′,5′-cAMP might provide new insight into this question. Accordingly, we performed a genome-wide screen and identified the essential Staphylococcus aureus tRNA m1G37 methyltransferase enzyme TrmD, which is conserved in all three domains of life as a tight 3′,5′-cAMP-binding protein. TrmD enzymes are known to use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as substrate; we have shown that 3′,5′-cAMP binds competitively with AdoMet to the S. aureus TrmD protein, indicating an overlapping binding site. However, the physiological relevance of this discovery remained unclear, as we were unable to identify a functional adenylate cyclase in S. aureus and only detected 2′,3′-cAMP but not 3′,5′-cAMP in cellular extracts. Interestingly, TrmD proteins from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, organisms known to synthesize 3′,5′-cAMP, did not bind this signaling nucleotide. Comparative bioinformatics, mutagenesis, and biochemical analyses revealed that the highly conserved Tyr-86 residue in E. coli TrmD is essential to discriminate between 3′,5′-cAMP and the native substrate AdoMet. Combined with a phylogenetic analysis, these results suggest that amino acids in the substrate binding pocket of TrmD underwent an adaptive evolution to accommodate the emergence of adenylate cyclases and thus the signaling molecule 3′,5′-cAMP. Altogether this further indicates that S. aureus does not produce 3′,5′-cAMP, which would otherwise competitively inhibit an essential enzyme. PMID:27881678

  6. Effects of osmotic stress on rhamnolipid synthesis and time-course production of cell-to-cell signal molecules by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bazire, Alexis; Diab, Farès; Taupin, Laure; Rodrigues, Sophie; Jebbar, Mohamed; Dufour, Alain

    2009-08-13

    Biosynthesis of biosurfactant rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa depends on two hierarchical quorum sensing systems, LasRI and RhlRI, which synthesize and sense the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OC₁₂-HSL) and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C₄-HSL), respectively. The Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS) is a third cell-to-cell signal molecule connecting these two systems, and its precursor, 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), also constitutes a signal. The chronology of the production of signal molecules and rhamnolipids was determined during growth in PPGAS medium. Hyperosmotic condition (0.5 M NaCl) moderately affected growth, and led to intra-cellular accumulation of compatible solutes. Production of signal molecules was delayed and their highest concentrations were 2.5 to 5 fold lower than in NaCl-free PPGAS, except for HHQ, the highest concentration of which was increased. The presence of NaCl prevented rhamnolipid synthesis. When the osmoprotectant glycine betaine was added to PPGAS/NaCl medium, it was imported by the cells without being metabolized. This did not improve growth, but reestablished the time-courses of HSL and HHQ accumulation and fully or partially restored the HSL and PQS levels. It also partially restored rhamnolipid production. Quantification of mRNAs encoding enzymes involved in HSL, PQS, and rhamnolipid biosyntheses confirmed the effect of hyperosmotic stress and glycine betaine at the gene expression level.

  7. Detection of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules and Identification of an Autoinducer Synthase Gene among Biofilm Forming Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Anbazhagan, Deepa; Mansor, Marzida; Yan, Gracie Ong Siok; Md Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Hassan, Hamimah; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2012-01-01

    Background Quorum sensing is a term that describes an environmental sensing system that allows bacteria to monitor their own population density which contributes significantly to the size and development of the biofilm. Many gram negative bacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactones as quorum sensing signal molecules. In this study, we sought to find out if the biofilm formation among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. is under the control of autoinducing quorum sensing molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings Biofilm formation among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. was assessed and the production of signal molecules were detected with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 biosensor system. Characterisation of autoinducers was carried out by mass spectrometric analysis. We have also reported the identification of an autoinducer synthase gene, abaΙ among the isolates that produce quorum sensing signal molecules and have reported that the mutation in the abaI gene influences their biofilm forming capabilities. Using a microtitre-plate assay it was shown that 60% of the 50 Acinetobacter spp. isolates significantly formed biofilms. Further detection with the biosensor strain showed that some of these isolates produced long chain signal molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that five of these isolates produced N-decanoyl homoserine lactone and two isolates produced acyl-homoserine lactone with a chain length equal to C12. The abaΙ gene was identified and a tetracycline mutant of the abaΙ gene was created and the inhibition in biofilm formation in the mutant was shown. Conclusions/Significance These data are of great significance as the signal molecules aid in biofilm formation which in turn confer various properties of pathogenicity to the clinical isolates including drug resistance. The use of quorum sensing signal blockers to attenuate bacterial pathogenicity is therefore highly attractive, particularly with respect to the emergence of multi antibiotic

  8. Kinase Signaling in Apoptosis Induced by Saturated Fatty Acids in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Šrámek, Jan; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kovář, Jan

    2016-09-12

    Pancreatic β-cell failure and death is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for type 2 diabetes. It is caused by, in addition to hyperglycemia, chronic exposure to increased concentrations of fatty acids, mainly saturated fatty acids. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in β-cells are not completely clear. It has been proposed that kinase signaling could be involved, particularly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C (PKC), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and Akt kinases and their pathways. In this review, we discuss these kinases and their signaling pathways with respect to their possible role in apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in pancreatic β-cells.

  9. In silico Screening and Evaluation of the Anticonvulsant Activity of Docosahexaenoic Acid-Like Molecules in Experimental Models of Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Loron, Ali Gharibi; Sardari, Soroush; Narenjkar, Jamshid; Sayyah, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Resistance to antiepileptic drugs and the intolerability in 20-30% of the patients raises demand for developing new drugs with improved efficacy and safety. Acceptable anticonvulsant activity, good tolerability, and inexpensiveness of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) make it as a good candidate for designing and development of the new anticonvulsant medications. Methods: Ten DHA-based molecules were screened based on in silico screening of DHA-like molecules by root-mean-square deviation of atomic positions, the biological activity score of Professional Association for SQL Server, and structural requirements suggested by pharmacophore design. Anticonvulsant activity was tested against clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 60 mg/kg, i.p.) and tonic seizures induced by maximal electroshock (MES, 50 mA, 50 Hz, 1 ms duration) by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of the screened compounds to mice. Results: Among screened compounds, 4-Phenylbutyric acid, 4-Biphenylacetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and 2-Phenylbutyric acid showed significant protective activity in pentylenetetrazole test with ED50 values of 4, 5, 78, and 70 mM, respectively. In MES test, shikimic acid and 4-tert-Butylcyclo-hexanecarboxylic acid showed significant activity with ED50 values 29 and 637 mM, respectively. Effective compounds had no mortality in mice up to the maximum i.c.v. injectable dose of 1 mM. Conclusion: Common electrochemical features and three-dimensional spatial structures of the effective compounds suggest the involvement of the anticonvulsant mechanisms similar to the parent compound DHA. PMID:27592363

  10. 15-Oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2015-06-05

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic "inactivation" of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of the role of carboxylic acids in metabolite signaling in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Finkemeier, Iris; König, Ann-Christine; Heard, William; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Pham, Phuong Anh; Leister, Dario; Fernie, Alisdair R; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2013-05-01

    The transcriptional response to metabolites is an important mechanism by which plants integrate information about cellular energy and nutrient status. Although some carboxylic acids have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression for select transcripts, it is unclear whether all carboxylic acids have the same effect, how many transcripts are affected, and how carboxylic acid signaling is integrated with other metabolite signals. In this study, we demonstrate that perturbations in cellular concentrations of citrate, and to a lesser extent malate, have a major impact on nucleus-encoded transcript abundance. Functional categories of transcripts that were targeted by both organic acids included photosynthesis, cell wall, biotic stress, and protein synthesis. Specific functional categories that were only regulated by citrate included tricarboxylic acid cycle, nitrogen metabolism, sulfur metabolism, and DNA synthesis. Further quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of specific citrate-responsive transcripts demonstrated that the transcript response to citrate is time and concentration dependent and distinct from other organic acids and sugars. Feeding of isocitrate as well as the nonmetabolizable citrate analog tricarballylate revealed that the abundance of selected marker transcripts is responsive to citrate and not downstream metabolites. Interestingly, the transcriptome response to citrate feeding was most similar to those observed after biotic stress treatments and the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. Feeding of citrate to mutants with defects in plant hormone signaling pathways did not completely abolish the transcript response but hinted at a link with jasmonic acid and gibberellin signaling pathways. Our results suggest that changes in carboxylic acid abundances can be perceived and signaled in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by as yet unknown signaling pathways.

  12. Genetic evidence that oxidative derivatives of retinoic acid are not involved in retinoid signaling during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Niederreither, Karen; Abu-Abed, Suzan; Schuhbaur, Brigitte; Petkovich, Martin; Chambon, Pierre; Dollé, Pascal

    2002-05-01

    Retinoic acid, the active derivative of vitamin A (retinol), is a hormonal signaling molecule that acts in developing and adult tissues. The Cyp26a1 (cytochrome p450, 26) protein metabolizes retinoic acid into more polar hydroxylated and oxidized derivatives. Whether some of these derivatives are biologically active metabolites has been debated. Cyp26a1(-/-) mouse fetuses have lethal morphogenetic phenotypes mimicking those generated by excess retinoic acid administration, indicating that human CYP26A1 may be essential in controlling retinoic acid levels during development. This hypothesis suggests that the Cyp26a1(-/-) phenotype could be rescued under conditions in which embryonic retinoic acid levels are decreased. We show that Cyp26a1(-/-) mice are phenotypically rescued by heterozygous disruption of Aldh1a2 (also known as Raldh2), which encodes a retinaldehyde dehydrogenase responsible for the synthesis of retinoic acid during early embryonic development. Aldh1a2 haploinsufficiency prevents the appearance of spina bifida and rescues the development of posterior structures (sacral/caudal vertebrae, hindgut, urogenital tract), while partly preventing cervical vertebral transformations and hindbrain pattern alterations in Cyp26a1(-/-) mice. Thus, some of these double-mutant mice can reach adulthood. This study is the first report of a mutation acting as a dominant suppressor of a lethal morphogenetic mutation in mammals. We provide genetic evidence that ALDH1A2 and CYP26A1 activities concurrently establish local embryonic retinoic acid levels that must be finely tuned to allow posterior organ development and to prevent spina bifida.

  13. NMDA receptor subunits and associated signaling molecules mediating antidepressant-related effects of NMDA-GluN2B antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Kiselycznyk, Carly; Jury, Nicholas; Halladay, Lindsay; Nakazawa, Kazu; Mishina, Masayoshi; Sprengel, Rolf; Grant, Seth G.N.; Svenningsson, Per; Holmes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Drugs targeting the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) may be efficacious for treating mood disorders, as exemplified by the rapid antidepressant effects produced by single administration of the NMDAR antagonist ketamine. Though the precise mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-related effects of NMDAR antagonism remain unclear, recent studies implicate specific NMDAR subunits, including GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit glutamate receptor interacting molecule, PSD-95. Here, integrating mutant and pharmacological in mice, we investigated the contribution of these subunits and molecules to antidepressant-related behaviors and the antidepressant-related effects of the GluN2B blocker, Ro 25-6981. We found that global deletion of GluA1 or PSD-95 reduced forced swim test (FST) immobility, mimicking the antidepressant-related effect produced by systemically administered Ro 25-6981 in C57BL/6J mice. Moreover, the FST antidepressant-like effects of systemic Ro 25-6981 were intact in mutants with global GluA1 deletion or GluN1 deletion in forebrain interneurons, but were absent in mutants constitutively lacking GluN2A or PSD-95. Next, we found that microinfusing Ro 25-6981 into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not basolateral amygdala, of C57BL/6J mice was sufficient to produce an antidepressant-like effect. Together, these findings extend and refine current understanding of the mechanisms mediating antidepressant-like effects produced by NMDAR-GluN2B antagonists, and may inform the development of a novel class of medications for treating depression that target the GluN2B subtype of NMDAR. PMID:25800971

  14. Dose-dependent effect of Bisphenol-A on insulin signaling molecules in cardiac muscle of adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Sivashanmugam, Preethi; Mullainadhan, Vigneswari; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2017-03-25

    Environmental contaminant, Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a xenoestrogen, an essential component used for the production of two classes of polymers such as polycarbonate and epoxy resin which disrupts the normal endocrine function. BPA has intense effects on mice endocrine pancreas, an essential tissue involved in glucose metabolism. It disrupts pancreatic β-cell insulin content, induces hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in male rats. Cardiac muscle is an insulin responsive organ and insulin has direct effects on glucose transport. The present study was designed to assess the effect of BPA on insulin signaling molecules in the cardiac muscle of adult male Wistar rat. Adult male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were selected and divided into following groups: Group 1: Control (vehicle treated), Group 2: Rats treated with 10 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 3: Rats treated with 100 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally, Group 4: Rats treated with 400 mg BPA/kg b.wt./day for 30 days orally. IR (insulin receptor) and pIR(Tyr1162) proteins were significantly decreased in the high dose group (400 mg). There was no change in IRS1 (insulin receptor substrate-1) and Akt proteins. Whereas, a decrease in pIRS1(Tyr632) (100 mg and 400 mg), pAkt (Ser473) (400 mg) and GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) (cytosolic and plasma membrane) proteins was observed which may affect the cardiovascular function. It is concluded that BPA exposure has adverse effect on cardiac insulin signal transduction which may affect its function.

  15. Paper strip whole cell biosensors: a portable test for the semiquantitative detection of bacterial quorum signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Struss, Anjali; Pasini, Patrizia; Ensor, C Mark; Raut, Nilesh; Daunert, Sylvia

    2010-06-01

    Herein, we report the development of a novel, inexpensive, and portable filter-paper-based strip biosensor for the detection of bacterial quorum sensing signaling molecules, N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). AHLs are generally employed by Gram-negative bacteria for their cell-cell communication to control expression of specialized genes, such as those involved in biofilm formation and production of virulence factors, in a population-density-dependent manner. First, a bacterial cell-based sensing system employing components of AHL-mediated QS regulatory system as recognition elements and beta-galactosidase as the reporter protein was designed and developed. The bacterial-sensing cells were then liquid-dried on strips of filter paper. beta-Galactosidase as the reporter allows for the visual monitoring of the analyte-induced signal when a colorimetric method of detection is applied. The paper strip biosensor was able to detect low AHL concentrations down to 1 x 10(-8) M. Furthermore, it was successfully applied to the detection of AHLs in physiological samples, such as saliva. The filter-paper-based sensing strips could provide reproducible results upon storage at 4 degrees C for at least 3 months. In conclusion, a filter-paper-based strip biosensor was developed that allows for visual, fast, and convenient detection of AHLs in a dose-dependent manner in a test sample. In addition, it does not require expensive equipment or trained personnel and allows ease of transportation and storage. Therefore, we envision that this biosensor will serve as a simple and economical portable field kit for on-site monitoring of AHL in a variety of clinical and environmental samples.

  16. Small molecule-mediated duplex formation of nucleic acids with 'incompatible' backbones.

    PubMed

    Cafferty, Brian J; Musetti, Caterina; Kim, Keunsoo; Horowitz, Eric D; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V

    2016-04-07

    Proflavine, a known intercalator of DNA and RNA, promotes duplex formation by nucleic acids with natural and non-natural backbones that otherwise form duplexes with low thermal stability, and even some that show no sign of duplex formation in the absence of proflavine. These findings demonstrate the potential for intercalators to be used as cofactors for the assembly of rationally designed nucleic acid structures, and could provide fundamental insights regarding intercalation of natural nucleic acid duplexes.

  17. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Wang, Ying; Cen, Xiao-Min; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min; Xie, Qi-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy.

  18. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Cen, Xiao-min; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy. PMID:28194428

  19. Comparative proteome analyses reveal that nitric oxide is an important signal molecule in the response of rice to aluminum toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Tian, Dagang; Todd, Christopher D; Luo, Yuming; Hu, Xiangyang

    2013-03-01

    Acidic soils inhibit crop yield and reduce grain quality. One of the major contributing factors to acidic soil is the presence of soluble aluminum (Al(3+)) ions, but the mechanisms underlying plant responses to Al(3+) toxicity remain elusive. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important messenger and participates in various plant physiological responses. Here, we demonstrate that Al(3+) induced an increase of NO in rice seedlings; adding exogenous NO alleviated the Al(3+) toxicity related to rice growth and photosynthetic capacity, effects that could be reversed by suppressing NO metabolism. Comparative proteomic analyses successfully identified 92 proteins that showed differential expression after Al(3+) or NO treatment. In particular, some of the proteins are involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) metabolism. Further analyses confirmed that NO treatment reduced Al(3+)-induced ROS and RNS toxicities by increasing the activities and protein expression of antioxidant enzymes, as well as S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). Suppressing GSNOR enzymatic activity aggravated Al(3+) damage to rice and increased the accumulation of RNS. NO treatment altered the expression of proteins associated with cell wall synthesis, cell division and cell structure, calcium signaling and defense responses. On the basis of these results, we propose that NO activates multiple pathways that enhance rice adaptation to Al(3+) toxicity. Such findings may be applicable to crop engineering to enhance yield and improve stress tolerance.

  20. Sulforaphane inhibits TNF-α-induced adhesion molecule expression through the Rho A/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Nan; Huang, Hui-Pei; Wang, Chau-Jong; Liu, Kai-Li; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an early indicator of cardiovascular diseases. Increased stimulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) triggers the inflammatory mediator secretion of endothelial cells, leading to atherosclerotic risk. In this study, we investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN) affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in TNF-α-induced ECV 304 endothelial cells. Our data showed that SFN attenuated TNF-α-induced expression of ICAM-1 in ECV 304 cells. Pretreatment of ECV 304 cells with SFN inhibited dose-dependently the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. SFN inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SFN decreased TNF-α-mediated phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα, Rho A, ROCK, ERK1/2, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels. Collectively, SFN inhibited the NF-κB DNA binding activity and downregulated the TNF-α-mediated induction of ICAM-1 in endothelial cells by inhibiting the Rho A/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway, suggesting the beneficial effects of SFN on suppression of inflammation within the atherosclerotic lesion.

  1. Identification of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules and a Biosynthetic Gene in Alicycliphilus sp. Isolated from Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Okutsu, Noriya; Xie, Xiaonan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-08-02

    Activated sludge is a complicated mixture of various microorganisms that is used to treat sewage and industrial wastewater. Many bacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as a quorum-sensing signal molecule to regulate the expression of the exoenzymes used for wastewater treatment. Here, we isolated an AHL-producing bacteria from an activated sludge sample collected from an electronic component factory, which we named Alicycliphilus sp. B1. Clone library analysis revealed that Alicycliphilus was a subdominant genus in this sample. When we screened the activated sludge sample for AHL-producing strains, 12 of 14 the AHL-producing isolates were assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. A putative AHL-synthase gene, ALISP_0667, was cloned from the genome of B1 and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α. The AHLs were extracted from the culture supernatants of the B1 strain and E. coli DH5α cells harboring the ALISP_0667 gene and were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as N-(3-hydroxydecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. The results of comparative genomic analysis suggested that the quorum-sensing genes in the B1 strain might have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer within activated sludge.

  2. Signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein is a negative regulator of the CD8 T cell response in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Tai, Albert K; Lin, Miao; Chang, Francesca; Terhorst, Cox; Huber, Brigitte T

    2005-08-15

    The primary manifestation of X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome, caused by a dysfunctional adapter protein, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein (SAP), is an excessive T cell response upon EBV infection. Using the SAP-/- mouse as a model system for the human disease, we compared the response of CD8+ T cells from wild-type (wt) and mutant mice to various stimuli. First, we observed that CD8+ T cells from SAP-/- mice proliferate more vigorously than those from wt mice upon CD3/CD28 cross-linking in vitro. Second, we analyzed the consequence of SAP deficiency on CTL effector function and homeostasis. For this purpose, SAP-/- and wt mice were infected with the murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). At 2 wk postinfection, the level of viral-specific CTL was much higher in mutant than in wt mice, measured both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, we established that throughout 45 days of MHV-68 infection the frequency of virus-specific CD8+ T cells producing IFN-gamma was significantly higher in SAP-/- mice. Consequently, the level of latent infection by MHV-68 was considerably lower in SAP-/- mice, which indicates that SAP-/- CTL control this infection more efficiently than wt CTL. Finally, we found that the Vbeta4-specific CD8+ T cell expansion triggered by MHV-68 infection is also enhanced and prolonged in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, our data indicate that SAP functions as a negative regulator of CD8+ T cell activation.

  3. Identification of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules and a Biosynthetic Gene in Alicycliphilus sp. Isolated from Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Okutsu, Noriya; Xie, Xiaonan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge is a complicated mixture of various microorganisms that is used to treat sewage and industrial wastewater. Many bacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as a quorum-sensing signal molecule to regulate the expression of the exoenzymes used for wastewater treatment. Here, we isolated an AHL-producing bacteria from an activated sludge sample collected from an electronic component factory, which we named Alicycliphilus sp. B1. Clone library analysis revealed that Alicycliphilus was a subdominant genus in this sample. When we screened the activated sludge sample for AHL-producing strains, 12 of 14 the AHL-producing isolates were assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. A putative AHL-synthase gene, ALISP_0667, was cloned from the genome of B1 and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α. The AHLs were extracted from the culture supernatants of the B1 strain and E. coli DH5α cells harboring the ALISP_0667 gene and were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as N-(3-hydroxydecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. The results of comparative genomic analysis suggested that the quorum-sensing genes in the B1 strain might have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer within activated sludge. PMID:27490553

  4. Acidity Constant (pK a) Calculation of Large Solvated Dye Molecules: Evaluation of Two Advanced Molecular Dynamics Methods

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Thierry; Ensing, Bernd; Rogge, Sven M. J.; De Clerck, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract pH‐Sensitive dyes are increasingly applied on polymer substrates for the creation of novel sensor materials. Recently, these dye molecules were modified to form a covalent bond with the polymer host. This had a large influence on the pH‐sensitive properties, in particular on the acidity constant (pK a). Obtaining molecular control over the factors that influence the pK a value is mandatory for the future intelligent design of sensor materials. Herein, we show that advanced molecular dynamics (MD) methods have reached the level at which the pK a values of large solvated dye molecules can be predicted with high accuracy. Two MD methods were used in this work: steered or restrained MD and the insertion/deletion scheme. Both were first calibrated on a set of phenol derivatives and afterwards applied to the dye molecule bromothymol blue. Excellent agreement with experimental values was obtained, which opens perspectives for using these methods for designing dye molecules. PMID:27570194

  5. Statistical model for self-assembly of trimesic acid molecules into homologous series of flower phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibenskas, A.; Tornau, E. E.

    2012-11-01

    The statistical three-state model is proposed to describe the ordering of triangular TMA molecules into flower phases. The model is solved on a rescaled triangular lattice, assuming following intermolecular interactions: exclusion of any molecules on nearest neighbor sites, triangular trio H-bonding interactions for molecules of the same orientation on next-nearest neighbor sites, and dimeric H-bonding interactions for molecules of different (“tip-to-tip”) orientations on third-nearest neighbor sites. The model allows us to obtain the analytical solution for the ground state phase diagram with all homologous series of flower phases included, starting with the honeycomb phase (n=1) and ending with the superflower structure (n=∞). Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain the thermodynamical properties of this model. It is found that phase transitions from disordered to any of the flower phases (except n=1) undergo via intermediate correlated triangular domains structure. The transition from the disordered phase to the intermediate phase is, most likely, of the first order, while the transition from the intermediate to the flower phase is definitely first order phase transition. The phase diagrams including low-temperature flower phases are obtained. The origin of the intermediate phase, phase separation, and metastable structures are discussed.

  6. Observation of new particle formation and measurement of sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines and highly oxidized organic molecules at a rural site in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bergen, Anton; Heinritzi, Martin; Leiminger, Markus; Lorenz, Verena; Piel, Felix; Simon, Mario; Sitals, Robert; Wagner, Andrea C.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The exact mechanisms for new particle formation (NPF) under different boundary layer conditions are not known yet. One important question is whether amines and sulfuric acid lead to efficient NPF in the atmosphere. Furthermore, it is not clear to what extent highly oxidized organic molecules (HOMs) are involved in NPF. We conducted field measurements at a rural site in central Germany in the proximity of three larger dairy farms to investigate whether there is a connection between NPF and the presence of amines and/or ammonia due to the local emissions from the farms. Comprehensive measurements using a nitrate chemical ionization-atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), particle counters and differential mobility analyzers (DMAs), as well as measurements of trace gases and meteorological parameters, were performed. We demonstrate here that the nitrate CI-APi-TOF is suitable for sensitive measurements of sulfuric acid, amines, a nitrosamine, ammonia, iodic acid and HOMs. NPF was found to correlate with sulfuric acid, while an anti-correlation with RH, amines and ammonia is observed. The anti-correlation between NPF and amines could be due to the efficient uptake of these compounds by nucleating clusters and small particles. Much higher HOM dimer (C19/C20 compounds) concentrations during the night than during the day indicate that these HOMs do not efficiently self-nucleate as no nighttime NPF is observed. Observed iodic acid probably originates from an iodine-containing reservoir substance, but the iodine signals are very likely too low to have a significant effect on NPF.

  7. Effects of jasmonic acid signalling on the wheat microbiome differ between body sites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongwei; Carvalhais, Lilia C.; Schenk, Peer M.; Dennis, Paul G.

    2017-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signalling helps plants to defend themselves against necrotrophic pathogens and herbivorous insects and has been shown to influence the root microbiome of Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we determined whether JA signalling influences the diversity and functioning of the wheat (Triticum aestivum) microbiome and whether these effects are specific to particular parts of the plant. Activation of the JA pathway was achieved via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate and was confirmed by significant increases in the abundance of 10 JA-signalling-related gene transcripts. Phylogenetic marker gene sequencing revealed that JA signalling reduced the diversity and changed the composition of root endophytic but not shoot endophytic or rhizosphere bacterial communities. The total enzymatic activity and substrate utilisation profiles of rhizosphere bacterial communities were not affected by JA signalling. Our findings indicate that the effects of JA signalling on the wheat microbiome are specific to individual plant compartments. PMID:28134326

  8. Perception of the plant immune signal salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shunping; Dong, Xinnian

    2014-08-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in plant innate immunity. The diverse functions of this simple phenolic compound suggest that plants may have multiple SA receptors. Several SA-binding proteins have been identified using biochemical approaches. However, genetic evidence supporting that they are the bona fide SA receptors has not been forthcoming. Mutant screens revealed that NPR1 is a master regulator of SA-mediated responses. Although NPR1 cannot bind SA in a conventional ligand-binding assay, its homologs NPR3 and NPR4 bind SA and function as SA receptors. During pathogen challenge, the SA gradient generated at the infection site is sensed by NPR3 and NPR4, which serve as the adaptors for the Cullin 3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase to regulate NPR1 degradation. Consequently, NPR1 is degraded at the infection site to remove its inhibition on effector-triggered cell death and defense, whereas NPR1 accumulates in neighboring cells to promote cell survival and SA-mediated resistance.

  9. The plastidial retrograde signal methyl erythritol cyclopyrophosphate is a regulator of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Mark; Xiao, Yanmei; Bjornson, Marta; Wang, Jin-Zheng; Hicks, Derrick; Souza, Amancio de; Wang, Chang-Quan; Yang, Panyu; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-03-01

    The exquisite harmony between hormones and their corresponding signaling pathways is central to prioritizing plant responses to simultaneous and/or successive environmental trepidations. The crosstalk between jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) is an established effective mechanism that optimizes and tailors plant adaptive responses. However, the underlying regulatory modules of this crosstalk are largely unknown. Global transcriptomic analyses of mutant plants (ceh1) with elevated levels of the stress-induced plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol cyclopyrophosphate (MEcPP) revealed robustly induced JA marker genes, expected to be suppressed by the presence of constitutively high SA levels in the mutant background. Analyses of a range of genotypes with varying SA and MEcPP levels established the selective role of MEcPP-mediated signal(s) in induction of JA-responsive genes in the presence of elevated SA. Metabolic profiling revealed the presence of high levels of the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), but near wild type levels of JA in the ceh1 mutant plants. Analyses of coronatine-insensitive 1 (coi1)/ceh1 double mutant plants confirmed that the MEcPP-mediated induction is JA receptor COI1 dependent, potentially through elevated OPDA. These findings identify MEcPP as a previously unrecognized central regulatory module that induces JA-responsive genes in the presence of high SA, thereby staging a multifaceted plant response within the environmental context.

  10. Fatty acid bile acid conjugates (FABACs)—New molecules for the prevention of cholesterol crystallisation in bile

    PubMed Central

    Gilat, T; Somjen, G; Mazur, Y; Leikin-Frenkel, A; Rosenberg, R; Halpern, Z; Konikoff, F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cholesterol gall stones are a frequent disease for which at present surgery is the usual therapy. Despite the importance of bile acids it has become evident that phospholipids are the main cholesterol solubilisers in bile. Even phospholipid components, such as fatty acids, have anticrystallising activity.
AIM—To synthesise fatty acid bile acid conjugates (FABACs) and study their effects on cholesterol crystallisation in bile in vitro and in vivo.
METHODS—FABACs were prepared by conjugation of cholic acid at position 3 with saturated fatty acids of variable chain length using an amide bond. Cholesterol crystallisation and its kinetics (crystal observation time, crystal mass) were studied in model bile, pooled enriched human bile, and fresh human bile using FABACs with saturated fatty acids of varying chain length (C-6 to C-22). Absorption of FABACs into blood and bile was tested in hamsters. Prevention of biliary cholesterol crystallisation in vivo was tested in hamsters and inbred mice.
RESULTS—FABACs strongly inhibited cholesterol crystallisation in model as well as native bile. The FABACs with longer acyl chains (C-16 to C-22) were more effective. At a concentration of 5 mM, FABACs almost completely inhibited cholesterol crystallisation in fresh human bile for 21 days. FABACs were absorbed and found in both portal and heart blood of hamsters. Levels in bile were 2-3 times higher than in blood, indicating active secretion. Appreciable levels were found in the systemic circulation 24-48 hours after a single administration. Ingested FABACs completely prevented the formation of cholesterol crystals in the gall bladders of hamsters and mice fed a lithogenic diet.
CONCLUSIONS—FABACs are potent inhibitors of cholesterol crystallisation in bile. They are absorbed and secreted into bile and prevent the earliest step of cholesterol gall stone formation in animals. These compounds may be of potential use in cholesterol gall stone disease in

  11. The in silico identification of small molecules for protein-protein interaction inhibition in AKAP-Lbc-RhoA signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asifullah; Munir, Mehwish; Aiman, Sara; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Arif-Ullah

    2017-04-01

    The rational design of small molecules that mimic key residues at the interface of interacting proteins can be a successful approach to target certain biological signaling cascades causing pathophysiological outcome. The A-Kinase Anchoring Protein, i.e. AKAP-Lbc, catalyses nucleotide exchange on RhoA and is involved in cardiac repolarization. The oncogenic AKAP-Lbc induces the RhoA GTPase hyperactivity and aberrantly amplifies the signaling pathway leading to hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. We took advantage of the AKAP-Lbc-RhoA complex crystal structure to design in silico small molecules predicted to inhibit the associated pathological signaling cascade. We adopted the strategies of pharmacophore building, virtual screening and molecular docking to identify the small molecules capable to target AKAP-Lbc and RhoA interactions. The pharmacophore model based virtual screening unveils two lead compounds from the TIMBAL database of small molecules modulating the targeted protein-protein interactions. The molecular docking analysis revealed the lead compounds' potentialities to establish the essential chemical interactions with the key interactive residues of the complex. These features provided a road map for designing additional potent chemical derivatives and fragments of the original lead compounds to perturb the AKAP-Lbc and RhoA interactions. Experimental validations may elucidate the therapeutic potential of these lead chemical scaffolds to deal with aberrant AKAP-Lbc signaling based cardiac hypertrophy.

  12. Dihydrobenzoic acid modified nanoparticle as a MALDI-TOF MS matrix for soft ionization and structure determination of small molecules with diverse structures.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Mei-Chun; Obena, Rofeamor; Lu, Ying-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Lin, Ping-Yu; Yen, Yung-Sheng; Lin, Jiann-Tsuen; Huang, Li-De; Lu, Kuang-Lieh; Lai, Long-Li; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2010-11-01

    Efficient structural characterization is important for quality control when developing novel materials. In this study, we demonstrated the soft ionization capability of the hybrid of immobilized silica and 2,5-dihydrobenzoic acid (DHB) on iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in MALDI-TOF MS with a clean background. The ratio between SiO(2) and DHB was examined and was found to affect the surface immobilization of DHB on the nanoparticle, critically controlling the ionization efficiency and interference background. Compared with commercial DHB, the functionalized nanoparticle-assisted MALDI-TOF MS provided superior soft ionization with production of strong molecular ions within 5 ppm mass accuracy on a variety of new types of synthetic materials used for solar cells, light emitting devices, dendrimers, and glycolipids, including analytes with either thermally labile structures or poor protonation tendencies. In addition, the enhancements of the molecular ion signal also provided high-quality product-ion spectra allowing structural characterization and unambiguous small molecule identification. Using this technique, the structural differences among the isomers were distinguished through their characteristic fragment ions and comprehensive fragmentation patterns. With the advantages of long-term stability and simple sample preparation by deposition on a regular sample plate, the use of DHB-functionalized nanoparticles combined with high-resolution MALDI-TOF MS provides a generic platform for rapid and unambiguous structure determination of small molecules.

  13. Drosophila fatty acid taste signals through the PLC pathway in sugar-sensing neurons.

    PubMed

    Masek, Pavel; Keene, Alex C

    2013-01-01

    Taste is the primary sensory system for detecting food quality and palatability. Drosophila detects five distinct taste modalities that include sweet, bitter, salt, water, and the taste of carbonation. Of these, sweet-sensing neurons appear to have utility for the detection of nutritionally rich food while bitter-sensing neurons signal toxicity and confer repulsion. Growing evidence in mammals suggests that taste for fatty acids (FAs) signals the presence of dietary lipids and promotes feeding. While flies appear to be attracted to fatty acids, the neural basis for fatty acid detection and attraction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a range of FAs are detected by the fly gustatory system and elicit a robust feeding response. Flies lacking olfactory organs respond robustly to FAs, confirming that FA attraction is mediated through the gustatory system. Furthermore, flies detect FAs independent of pH, suggesting the molecular basis for FA taste is not due to acidity. We show that low and medium concentrations of FAs serve as an appetitive signal and they are detected exclusively through the same subset of neurons that sense appetitive sweet substances, including most sugars. In mammals, taste perception of sweet and bitter substances is dependent on phospholipase C (PLC) signaling in specialized taste buds. We find that flies mutant for norpA, a Drosophila ortholog of PLC, fail to respond to FAs. Intriguingly, norpA mutants respond normally to other tastants, including sucrose and yeast. The defect of norpA mutants can be rescued by selectively restoring norpA expression in sweet-sensing neurons, corroborating that FAs signal through sweet-sensing neurons, and suggesting PLC signaling in the gustatory system is specifically involved in FA taste. Taken together, these findings reveal that PLC function in Drosophila sweet-sensing neurons is a conserved molecular signaling pathway that confers attraction to fatty acids.

  14. Drosophila Fatty Acid Taste Signals through the PLC Pathway in Sugar-Sensing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Masek, Pavel; Keene, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    Taste is the primary sensory system for detecting food quality and palatability. Drosophila detects five distinct taste modalities that include sweet, bitter, salt, water, and the taste of carbonation. Of these, sweet-sensing neurons appear to have utility for the detection of nutritionally rich food while bitter-sensing neurons signal toxicity and confer repulsion. Growing evidence in mammals suggests that taste for fatty acids (FAs) signals the presence of dietary lipids and promotes feeding. While flies appear to be attracted to fatty acids, the neural basis for fatty acid detection and attraction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a range of FAs are detected by the fly gustatory system and elicit a robust feeding response. Flies lacking olfactory organs respond robustly to FAs, confirming that FA attraction is mediated through the gustatory system. Furthermore, flies detect FAs independent of pH, suggesting the molecular basis for FA taste is not due to acidity. We show that low and medium concentrations of FAs serve as an appetitive signal and they are detected exclusively through the same subset of neurons that sense appetitive sweet substances, including most sugars. In mammals, taste perception of sweet and bitter substances is dependent on phospholipase C (PLC) signaling in specialized taste buds. We find that flies mutant for norpA, a Drosophila ortholog of PLC, fail to respond to FAs. Intriguingly, norpA mutants respond normally to other tastants, including sucrose and yeast. The defect of norpA mutants can be rescued by selectively restoring norpA expression in sweet-sensing neurons, corroborating that FAs signal through sweet-sensing neurons, and suggesting PLC signaling in the gustatory system is specifically involved in FA taste. Taken together, these findings reveal that PLC function in Drosophila sweet-sensing neurons is a conserved molecular signaling pathway that confers attraction to fatty acids. PMID:24068941

  15. Single-chain structure of human ceruloplasmin: the complete amino acid sequence of the whole molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, N; Ortel, T L; Putnam, F W

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal 67,000-dalton (67-kDa) fragment of human ceruloplasmin and have established overlapping sequences between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments and between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. The 67-kDa fragment contains 480 amino acid residues and three glucosamine oligosaccharides. These results together with our previous sequence data for the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments complete the amino acid sequence of human ceruloplasmin. The polypeptide chain has a total of 1,046 amino acid residues (Mr 120,085) and has attachment sites for four glucosamine oligosaccharides; together these account for the total molecular mass of human ceruloplasmin (132 kDa). The sequence analysis of the peptides overlapping the fragments showed that one additional amino acid, arginine, is present between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments, and another, lysine, is between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. Only two apparent sites of amino acid interchange have been identified in the polypeptide chain. Both involve a single-point interchange of glycine and lysine that would result in a difference in charge. The results of the complete sequence analysis verified that human ceruloplasmin is composed of a single polypeptide chain and that the subunit-like fragments are produced by proteolytic cleavage during purification (and possibly also in vivo). PMID:6582496

  16. Enantioselective small molecule synthesis by carbon dioxide fixation using a dual Brønsted acid/base organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Vara, Brandon A; Struble, Thomas J; Wang, Weiwei; Dobish, Mark C; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2015-06-17

    Carbon dioxide exhibits many of the qualities of an ideal reagent: it is nontoxic, plentiful, and inexpensive. Unlike other gaseous reagents, however, it has found limited use in enantioselective synthesis. Moreover, unprecedented is a tool that merges one of the simplest biological approaches to catalysis-Brønsted acid/base activation-with this abundant reagent. We describe a metal-free small molecule catalyst that achieves the three component reaction between a homoallylic alcohol, carbon dioxide, and an electrophilic source of iodine. Cyclic carbonates are formed enantioselectively.

  17. Modeling and spectral simulation of matrix-isolated molecules by density functional calculations: A case study on formic acid dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2010-12-01

    The supermolecule approach has been used to model molecules embedded in solid argon matrix, wherein interaction between the guest and the host atoms in the first solvation shell is evaluated with the use of density functional calculations. Structural stability and simulated spectra have been obtained for formic acid dimer (FAD)-Arn (n = 21-26) clusters. The calculations at the B971/6-31++G(3df,3pd) level have shown that the tetrasubstitutional site on Ar(111) plane is likely to incorporate FAD most stably, in view of consistency with the matrix shifts available experimentally.

  18. Lobaric Acid Inhibits VCAM-1 Expression in TNF-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Modulation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ii-Seul; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-01-01

    Lichens have been known to possess multiple biological activities, including anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Hence, VCAM-1 is a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of the inflammatory disease. However, the effect of lobaric acid on VCAM-1 has not yet been investigated and characterized. For this study, we examined the effect of lobaric acid on the inhibition of VCAM-1 in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated mouse vascular smooth muscle cells. Western blot and ELISA showed that the increased expression of VCAM-1 by TNF-α was significantly suppressed by the pre-treatment of lobaric acid (0.1-10 μg/ml) for 2 h. Lobaric acid abrogated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity through preventing the degradation of IκB and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Lobaric acid also inhibited the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). Overall, our results suggest that lobaric acid inhibited VCAM-1 expression through the inhibition of p38, ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and downregulation of TNF-R1 expression. Therefore, it is implicated that lobaric acid may suppress inflammation by altering the physiology of the atherosclerotic lesion.

  19. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peizhen Rockwell, Cheryl E. Cui, Julia Yue Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  20. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  1. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  2. Chloroacetic acid triggers apoptosis in neuronal cells via a reactive oxygen species-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tien-Hui; Su, Chin-Chuan; Tang, Feng-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hung; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Kai-Min; Lee, kuan-I; Hung, Dong-Zong; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-05

    Chloroacetic acid (CA), a chlorinated analog of acetic acid and an environmental toxin that is more toxic than acetic, dichloroacetic, or trichloroacetic acids, is widely used in chemical industries. Furthermore, CA has been found to be the major disinfection by-products (DBPs) of drinking water. CA has been reported to be highly corrosive and to induce severe tissue injuries (including nervous system) that lead to death in mammals. However, the effects and underlying mechanisms of CA-induced neurotoxicity remain unknown. In the present study, we found that CA (0.5-2.0 mM) significantly increased LDH release, decreased the number of viable cells (cytotoxicity) and induced apoptotic events (including: increases in the numbers of apoptotic cells, the membrane externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), and caspase-3/-7 activity) in Neuro-2a cells. CA (1.5 mM; the approximate to LD50) also triggered ER stress, which was identified by monitoring several key molecules that are involved in the unfolded protein responses (including the increase in the expressions of p-PERK, p-IRE-1, p-eIF2α, ATF-4, ATF-6, CHOP, XBP-1, GRP 78, GRP 94, and caspase-12) and calpain activity. Transfection of GRP 78- and GRP 94-specific si-RNA effectively abrogated CA-induced cytotoxicity, caspase-3/-7 and caspase-12 activity, and GRP 78 and GRP 94 expression in Neuro-2a cells. Additionally, pretreatment with 2.5 mM N-acetylcysteine (NAC; a glutathione (GSH) precursor) dramatically suppressed the increase in lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity, apoptotic events, calpain and caspase-12 activity, and ER stress-related molecules in CA-exposed cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the higher concentration of CA exerts its cytotoxic effects in neuronal cells by triggering apoptosis via a ROS-induced ER stress signaling pathway.

  3. The Adaptor Protein Myd88 Is a Key Signaling Molecule in the Pathogenesis of Irinotecan-Induced Intestinal Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Deysi V T; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C P; Carvalho, Cibele B M; Borges, Vanessa F; Wanderley, Carlos W S; Bem, Amanda X C; Leite, Caio A V G; Teixeira, Maraiza A; Batista, Gabriela L P; Silva, Rangel L; Cunha, Thiago M; Brito, Gerly A C; Almeida, Paulo R C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common side effect of irinotecan-based anticancer regimens. Mucositis causes cell damage, bacterial/endotoxin translocation and production of cytokines including IL-1 and IL-18. These molecules and toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate a common signaling pathway that involves the Myeloid Differentiation adaptor protein, MyD88, whose role in intestinal mucositis is unknown. Then, we evaluated the involvement of TLRs and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. MyD88-, TLR2- or TLR9-knockout mice and C57BL/6 (WT) mice were given either saline or irinotecan (75 mg/kg, i.p. for 4 days). On day 7, animal survival, diarrhea and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the ileum were obtained for morphometric analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and measurement of pro-inflammatory markers. Irinotecan reduced the animal survival (50%) and induced a pronounced diarrhea, increased bacteremia, neutrophil accumulation in the intestinal tissue, intestinal damage and more than twofold increased expression of MyD88 (200%), TLR9 (400%), TRAF6 (236%), IL-1β (405%), IL-18 (365%), COX-2 (2,777%) and NF-κB (245%) in the WT animals when compared with saline-injected group (P<0.05). Genetic deletion of MyD88, TLR2 or TLR9 effectively controlled the signs of intestinal injury when compared with irinotecan-administered WT controls (P<0.05). In contrast to the MyD88-/- and TLR2-/- mice, the irinotecan-injected TLR9-/- mice showed a reduced survival, a marked diarrhea and an enhanced expression of IL-18 versus irinotecan-injected WT controls. Additionally, the expression of MyD88 was reduced in the TLR2-/- or TLR9-/- mice. This study shows a critical role of the MyD88-mediated TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis.

  4. The Adaptor Protein Myd88 Is a Key Signaling Molecule in the Pathogenesis of Irinotecan-Induced Intestinal Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Deysi V. T.; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C. P.; Carvalho, Cibele B. M.; Borges, Vanessa F.; Wanderley, Carlos W. S.; Bem, Amanda X. C.; Leite, Caio A. V. G.; Teixeira, Maraiza A.; Batista, Gabriela L. P.; Silva, Rangel L.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Brito, Gerly A. C.; Almeida, Paulo R. C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common side effect of irinotecan-based anticancer regimens. Mucositis causes cell damage, bacterial/endotoxin translocation and production of cytokines including IL–1 and IL–18. These molecules and toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate a common signaling pathway that involves the Myeloid Differentiation adaptor protein, MyD88, whose role in intestinal mucositis is unknown. Then, we evaluated the involvement of TLRs and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. MyD88-, TLR2- or TLR9-knockout mice and C57BL/6 (WT) mice were given either saline or irinotecan (75 mg/kg, i.p. for 4 days). On day 7, animal survival, diarrhea and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the ileum were obtained for morphometric analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and measurement of pro-inflammatory markers. Irinotecan reduced the animal survival (50%) and induced a pronounced diarrhea, increased bacteremia, neutrophil accumulation in the intestinal tissue, intestinal damage and more than twofold increased expression of MyD88 (200%), TLR9 (400%), TRAF6 (236%), IL–1β (405%), IL–18 (365%), COX–2 (2,777%) and NF-κB (245%) in the WT animals when compared with saline-injected group (P<0.05). Genetic deletion of MyD88, TLR2 or TLR9 effectively controlled the signs of intestinal injury when compared with irinotecan-administered WT controls (P<0.05). In contrast to the MyD88-/- and TLR2-/- mice, the irinotecan-injected TLR9-/- mice showed a reduced survival, a marked diarrhea and an enhanced expression of IL–18 versus irinotecan-injected WT controls. Additionally, the expression of MyD88 was reduced in the TLR2-/- or TLR9-/- mice. This study shows a critical role of the MyD88-mediated TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. PMID:26440613

  5. Peptide nucleic acids rather than RNA may have been the first genetic molecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, K. E.; Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous problems exist with the current thinking of RNA as the first genetic material. No plausible prebiotic processes have yet been demonstrated to produce the nucleosides or nucleotides or for efficient two-way nonenzymatic replication. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a promising precursor to RNA, consisting of N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and the adenine, uracil, guanine, and cytosine-N-acetic acids. However, PNA has not yet been demonstrated to be prebiotic. We show here that AEG is produced directly in electric discharge reactions from CH(4), N(2), NH(3), and H(2)O. Electric discharges also produce ethylenediamine, as do NH(4)CN polymerizations. AEG is produced from the robust Strecker synthesis with ethylenediamine. The NH(4)CN polymerization in the presence of glycine leads to the adenine and guanine-N(9)-acetic acids, and the cytosine and uracil-N(1)-acetic acids are produced in high yield from the reaction of cyanoacetaldehyde with hydantoic acid, rather than urea. Preliminary experiments suggest that AEG may polymerize rapidly at 100 degrees C to give the polypeptide backbone of PNA. The ease of synthesis of the components of PNA and possibility of polymerization of AEG reinforce the possibility that PNA may have been the first genetic material.

  6. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signalling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signalling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signalling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signalling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. PMID:25134739

  7. Signaling through retinoic acid receptors in cardiac development: Doing the right things at the right times.

    PubMed

    Xavier-Neto, José; Sousa Costa, Ângela M; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; Amaral, Fabio Neves do; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinical and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signaling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signaling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signaling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signaling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signaling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  8. Ethacrynic acid inhibits multiple steps in the NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Yusheng; Englert, Joshua A; Delude, Russell L; Fink, Mitchell P

    2005-01-01

    Ethacrynic acid has been used as a safe and effective diuretic for more than 30 years. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ethacrynic acid is also an anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits signaling by the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB. We showed that ethacrynic acid inhibited luciferase expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells transfected with an NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase reporter vector and also inhibited NF-kappaB DNA binding in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells (electrophoretic mobility shift assay). Ethacrynic acid inhibited degradation of IkappaBalpha and IkappaBbeta in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Ethacrynic acid impaired DNA binding of wild-type p65 subunits of NF-kappaB in cells. However, DNA binding of a Cys--> Ser p65 mutant was not inhibited by ethacrynic acid, suggesting that ethacrynic acid inhibits DNA binding by alkylating p65 at Cys. In a cell-free system, binding of p50 homodimers to an NF-kappaB consensus sequence was inhibited by ethacrynic acid at concentrations from 10 to 100 microM, indicating that ethacrynic acid probably also covalently modifies the p50 subunit. These data indicate that ethacrynic acid inhibits activation of the NF-kappaB pathway at multiple points and suggest that this well-studied drug warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic for various conditions that are associated with excessive inflammation.

  9. Identification and characterization of the motion of water molecules in normal and deuterated pyromellitic acid dihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schajor, W.; Haeberlen, U.; Tegenfeldt, T.

    Proton wide-line, multiple-pulse, T1 and T1 ϱ measurements on single crystals of PMADH, and deuteron EFG measurements and bandshape analyses of spectra recorded from deuterated crystals of PMADH are reported. The wide-line and multiple-pulse proton results indicate that the water molecules in PMADH are flipping about their twofold symmetry axes. Both T1 and T1 ϱ were measured as a function of crystal orientation and temperature. Comparison of the experimental data with model calculations for T1 ϱ based on the established flipping motions of the water molecules shows that {1}/{T 1ϱ} is dominated by this process whereas {1}/{T 1} is not. The T1 ϱ data thus enable determination of the rate of the H 2O flips as a function of temperature. EFGs of the water deuterons in deuterated PMADH, measured at low and high temperatures, confirm the occurrence of the flips for D 2O in PMADH. The flips constitute an exchange process for the water deuterons. Bandshape analyses of single-crystal deuteron spectra recorded at temperatures covering the full range of exchange rates allowed determination of the flip rates of the D 2O molecules. The activation energies for the H 2O and D 2O flips are the same, Ea = 10 kcal/mol, within the limits of accuracy of the experiments. The frequency factors in the Arrhenius relation are 8.3 X 10 13 sec -1 (H 2O) and 2.6 X 10 13 sec -1 (D 2O).

  10. The Arabidopsis MAP kinase kinase 7: A crosstalk point between Auxin signaling and defense responses?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-pathogen interaction induces a complex host response that coordinates various signaling pathways through multiple signal molecules. Besides the well-documented signal molecules salicylic acid (SA), ethylene and jasmonic acid, auxin is emerging as an important player in this response. We recent...

  11. Coupled Cluster Evaluation of the Stability of Atmospheric Acid-Base Clusters with up to 10 Molecules.

    PubMed

    Myllys, Nanna; Elm, Jonas; Halonen, Roope; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-04

    We investigate the utilization of the domain local pair natural orbital coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method for calculating binding energies of atmospherical molecular clusters. Applied to small complexes of atmospherical relevance we find that the DLPNO method significantly reduces the scatter in the binding energy, which is commonly present in DFT calculations. For medium sized clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and bases the DLPNO method yields a systematic underestimation of the binding energy compared to canonical coupled cluster results. The errors in the DFT binding energies appear to be more random, while the systematic nature of the DLPNO results allows the establishment of a scaling factor, to better mimic the canonical coupled cluster calculations. Based on the trends identified for the small and medium sized systems, we further extend the application of the DLPNO method to large acid - base clusters consisting of up to 10 molecules, which have previously been out of reach with accurate coupled cluster methods. Using the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code (ACDC) we compare the sulfuric acid dimer formation based on the new DLPNO binding energies with previously published RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z results. We also compare the simulated sulfuric acid dimer concentration as a function of the base concentration with measurement data from the CLOUD chamber and flow tube experiments. The DLPNO method, even after scaling, underpredicts the dimer concentration significantly. Reasons for this are discussed.

  12. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  13. Branched-chain amino acids in metabolic signaling and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are important directly- and indirectly-acting nutrient signals. Frequently, their actions have been reported to be anti-obesity in nature, especially in rodent models. Yet, circulating BCAAs tend to be elevated in obesity, and even associated with poorer metaboli...

  14. Serotonin modulates Arabidopsis root growth via changes in reactive oxygen species and jasmonic acid-ethylene signaling.

    PubMed

    Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; López-Bucio, José

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) is a bioactive indoleamine with neurotransmitter function in vertebrates, which represents an emerging signaling molecule in plants, playing key roles in the development and defense. In this study, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and jasmonic acid (JA)-ethylene (Et) signaling in root developmental alterations induced by serotonin was investigated. An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant defective at the RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) locus was resistant to paraquat-induced ROS accumulation in primary roots and showed decreased inhibition or root growth in response to serotonin. A suite of JA- and Et-related mutants including coronatine insensitive1, jasmonic acid resistant1 (jar1), etr1, ein2 and ein3 showed tolerance to serotonin in the inhibition of primary root growth and ROS redistribution within the root tip when compared with wild-type (WT) seedlings. Competence assays between serotonin and AgNO3 , a well-known blocker of Et action, showed that primary root growth in medium supplemented with serotonin was normalized by AgNO3 , whereas roots of eto3, an Et overproducer mutant, were oversensitive to serotonin. Comparison of ROS levels in WT, etr1, jar1 and rcd1 primary root tips using the ROS-specific probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate and confocal imaging showed that serotonin inhibition of primary root growth likely occurs independently of its conversion into melatonin. Our results provide compelling evidence that serotonin affects ROS distribution in roots, involving RCD1 and components of the JA-Et signaling pathways.

  15. Fluorescence study on the aggregation of collagen molecules in acid solution influenced by hydroxypropyl methylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cuicui; Zhang, Min; Li, Guoying

    2016-01-20

    The effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on the aggregation of collagen molecules with collagen concentrations of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0mg/mL was studied by fluorescence techniques. On one hand, both the synchronous fluorescence spectra and fluorescence emission spectra showed that there was no change in the fluorescence intensity of collagen intrinsic fluorescence when 30% HPMC was added, while it decreased obviously when HPMC content ≥ 50%. From the two-dimensional fluorescence correlation analysis, it was indicated that collagen molecules in 0.25 and 0.5mg/mL collagen solutions were more sensitive to HPMC than those in 1.0mg/mL collagen solution. On the other hand, the pyrene fluorescence and the fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicated that HPMC inhibited the collagen aggregation for 0.25 and 0.5mg/mL collagen, but promoted it for 1.0mg/mL collagen. The atomic force microscopy images further confirmed the effect of HPMC on collagen with different initial states.

  16. Exogenous Modulation of Retinoic Acid Signaling Affects Adult RGC Survival in the Frog Visual System after Optic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duprey-Díaz, Mildred V.; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Blanco, Rosa E.

    2016-01-01

    After lesions to the mammalian optic nerve, the great majority of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) die before their axons have even had a chance to regenerate. Frog RGCs, on the other hand, suffer only an approximately 50% cell loss, and we have previously investigated the mechanisms by which the application of growth factors can increase their survival rate. Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived lipophilic molecule that plays major roles during development of the nervous system. The RA signaling pathway is also present in parts of the adult nervous system, and components of it are upregulated after injury in peripheral nerves but not in the CNS. Here we investigate whether RA signaling affects long-term RGC survival at 6 weeks after axotomy. Intraocular injection of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) type-α agonist AM80, the RARβ agonist CD2314, or the RARγ agonist CD1530, returned axotomized RGC numbers to almost normal levels. On the other hand, inhibition of RA synthesis with disulfiram, or of RAR receptors with the pan-RAR antagonist Ro-41-5253, or the RARβ antagonist LE135E, greatly reduced the survival of the axotomized neurons. Axotomy elicited a strong activation of the MAPK, STAT3 and AKT pathways; this activation was prevented by disulfiram or by RAR antagonists. Finally, addition of exogenous ATRA stimulated the activation of the first two of these pathways. Future experiments will investigate whether these strong survival-promoting effects of RA are mediated via the upregulation of neurotrophins. PMID:27611191

  17. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  18. Exercise and amino acid anabolic cell signaling and the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2012-07-01

    A series of complex intracellular networks influence the regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover. In recent years, studies have examined how cellular regulators of muscle protein turnover modulate metabolic mechanisms contributing to the loss, gain, or conservation of skeletal muscle mass. Exercise and amino acids both stimulate anabolic signaling potentially through several intracellular pathways including the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the mitogen activated protein kinase cell signaling cascades. As novel molecular regulators of muscle integrity continue to be explored, a contemporary analysis of the literature is required to understand the metabolic mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids