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Sample records for acid signaling molecules

  1. Oxidized fatty acids as inter-kingdom signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Carolina H; Kock, Johan L F

    2014-01-20

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to "listen" and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  2. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  3. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia N. H.; Davies, David G.; Sauer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA) that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation. PMID:26610524

  4. Quantitative structure-property relationship studies on amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid as defense signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Zu-Guang; Chen, Ke-Xian; Xie, Hai-Ying; Gao, Jian-Rong

    2009-06-01

    Jasmonates and related compounds, including amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid, have regulatory functions in the signaling pathway for plant developmental processes and responses to the complex equilibrium of biotic and abiotic stress. But the molecular details of the signaling mechanism are still poorly understood. Statistically significant quantitative structure-property relationship models (r(2) > 0.990) constructed by genetic function approximation and molecular field analysis were generated for the purpose of deriving structural requirements for lipophilicity of amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid. The best models derived in the present study provide some valuable academic information in terms of the 2/3D-descriptors influencing the lipophilicity, which may contribute to further understanding the mechanism of exogenous application of jasmonates in their signaling pathway and designing novel analogs of jasmonic acid as ecological pesticides.

  5. Extracellular movement of signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Patrick; Schier, Alexander F.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular signaling molecules have crucial roles in development and homeostasis, and their incorrect deployment can lead to developmental defects and disease states. Signaling molecules are released from sending cells, travel to target cells and act over length scales of several orders of magnitude, from morphogen-mediated patterning of small developmental fields to hormonal signaling throughout the organism. We discuss how signals are modified and assembled for transport, which routes they take to reach their targets and how their range is affected by mobility and stability. PMID:21763615

  6. Extracellular movement of signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Schier, Alexander F

    2011-07-19

    Extracellular signaling molecules have crucial roles in development and homeostasis, and their incorrect deployment can lead to developmental defects and disease states. Signaling molecules are released from sending cells, travel to target cells, and act over length scales of several orders of magnitude, from morphogen-mediated patterning of small developmental fields to hormonal signaling throughout the organism. We discuss how signals are modified and assembled for transport, which routes they take to reach their targets, and how their range is affected by mobility and stability.

  7. Microfluidic study of the chemotactic response of Escherichia coli to amino acids, signaling molecules and secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Krisztina; Sipos, Orsolya; Valkai, Sándor; Gombai, Éva; Hodula, Orsolya; Kerényi, Ádám; Ormos, Pál; Galajda, Péter

    2015-07-01

    Quorum sensing and chemotaxis both affect bacterial behavior on the population level. Chemotaxis shapes the spatial distribution of cells, while quorum sensing realizes a cell-density dependent gene regulation. An interesting question is if these mechanisms interact on some level: Does quorum sensing, a density dependent process, affect cell density itself via chemotaxis? Since quorum sensing often spans across species, such a feedback mechanism may also exist between multiple species. We constructed a microfluidic platform to study these questions. A flow-free, stable linear chemical gradient is formed in our device within a few minutes that makes it suitable for sensitive testing of chemoeffectors: we showed that the amino acid lysine is a weak chemoattractant for Escherichia coli, while arginine is neutral. We studied the effect of quorum sensing signal molecules of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on E. coli chemotaxis. Our results show that N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (oxo-C12-HSL) and N-(butryl)-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) are attractants. Furthermore, we tested the chemoeffector potential of pyocyanin and pyoverdine, secondary metabolites under a quorum sensing control. Pyocyanin is proved to be a weak attractant while pyoverdine are repellent. We demonstrated the usability of the device in co-culturing experiments, where we showed that various factors released by P. aeruginosa affect the dynamic spatial rearrangement of a neighboring E. coli population, while surface adhesion of the cells is also modulated. PMID:26339306

  8. The Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid Increases Metabolic Activity and Reverts Persister Cells to an Antimicrobial-Susceptible State

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Aleksey; Planzos, Penny; Zelaya, Hector M.

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells, which are tolerant to antimicrobials, contribute to biofilm recalcitrance to therapeutic agents. In turn, the ability to kill persister cells is believed to significantly improve efforts in eradicating biofilm-related, chronic infections. While much research has focused on elucidating the mechanism(s) by which persister cells form, little is known about the mechanism or factors that enable persister cells to revert to an active and susceptible state. Here, we demonstrate that cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA), a fatty acid signaling molecule, is able to change the status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli persister cells from a dormant to a metabolically active state without an increase in cell number. This cell awakening is supported by an increase of the persister cells' respiratory activity together with changes in protein abundance and increases of the transcript expression levels of several metabolic markers, including acpP, 16S rRNA, atpH, and ppx. Given that most antimicrobials target actively growing cells, we also explored the effect of cis-DA on enhancing antibiotic efficacy in killing persister cells due to their inability to keep a persister cell state. Compared to antimicrobial treatment alone, combinational treatments of persister cell subpopulations with antimicrobials and cis-DA resulted in a significantly greater decrease in cell viability. In addition, the presence of cis-DA led to a decrease in the number of persister cells isolated. We thus demonstrate the ability of a fatty acid signaling molecule to revert bacterial cells from a tolerant phenotype to a metabolically active, antimicrobial-sensitive state. PMID:25192989

  9. A split G-quadruplex-based DNA nano-tweezers structure as a signal-transducing molecule for the homogeneous detection of specific nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Shigeto, Hajime; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2015-12-15

    A portable method of specific nucleic acid detection would be very useful for monitoring public health in a variety of settings for point-of-care and point-of-need testing. However, conventional methods for the detection of nucleic acids are not ideal for use in the field, as they require skilled operators and complex equipment. Here, we constructed a method for specific nucleic acid detection using a split G-quadruplex (Gq) structure that can recognize target nucleic acids without competitive reactions in a bimolecular reaction and directly produce a detectable signal based on peroxidase activity. We developed a single signal-transducing molecule with a split Gq-based DNA-nano tweezers (NT) structure that self-assembles from three single-stranded DNAs through simple mixing, and detects its target without requiring any washing steps. A model target, a partial norovirus mRNA (NV-RNA), was specifically recognized by the split Gq-based DNA-NT, causing it to undergo a structural change that restored its peroxidase activity. The peroxidase activity was measured by following the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), which gave a greenish colorimetric response, and was proportional to the NV-RNA concentration. The lower detection limit was 4 nM. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting specific nucleic acids with a split Gq-based DNA-NT structure as a nucleic acid signal-transducing molecule in a homogenous assay format. Also the target recognition sites of split Gq-based DNA-NT can easily be designed without delicate optimization of tweezers structure. Thus a split Gq-based DNA-NT technique is readily applicable to a basic platform for the development of a portable device.

  10. Signaling Molecules: Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a signaling molecule as well as a cytoprotectant. It modulates neurotransmission, regulates vascular tone, and protects various tissues and organs, including neurons, the heart, and kidneys, from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury. H2S is produced from l-cysteine by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) along with cysteine aminotransferase. Recent Advances: In addition to these enzymes, we recently identified a novel pathway to produce H2S from d-cysteine, which involves d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) along with 3MST. These enzymes are localized in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. However, some enzymes translocate to organelles under specific conditions. Moreover, H2S-derived potential signaling molecules such as polysulfides and HSNO have been identified. Critical Issues: The physiological stimulations, which trigger the production of H2S and its derivatives and maintain their local levels, remain unclear. Future Directions: Understanding the regulation of the H2S production and H2S-derived signaling molecules and the specific stimuli that induce their release will provide new insights into the biology of H2S and therapeutic development in diseases involving these substances. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 362–376. PMID:24800864

  11. Bile acid signaling through FXR induces intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in mouse liver and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pu; Borges-Marcucci, Lisa A; Evans, Mark J; Harnish, Douglas C

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a dramatic induction of inflammatory gene expression in livers from mice fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet containing cholate after 3-5 wk. To determine the contribution of cholate in mediating these inductions, C57BL/6 mice were fed a chow diet supplemented with increasing concentrations of cholic acid (CA) for 5 days. A dose-dependent induction in the hepatic levels of TNF-alpha, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and SAA-2 mRNA were observed. As positive controls, a dose-dependent repression of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and a dose-dependent induction of small heterodimer partner (SHP) expression were also observed, suggesting that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was activated. In addition, ICAM-1 and SHP mRNA levels were also induced in primary human hepatocytes when treated with chenodeoxycholic acid or GW4064, a FXR-selective agonist. The involvement of FXR in CA-induced inflammatory gene expression was further investigated in the human hepatic cell line HepG2. Both ICAM-1 and SHP expression were induced in a dose- and time-dependent manner by treatment with the FXR-selective agonist GW4064. Moreover, the induction of ICAM-1 by GW4064 was inhibited by the FXR antagonist guggulsterone or with transfection of FXR siRNA. Finally, the activity of FXR was mapped to a retinoic acid response element (RARE) site containing an imbedded farnesoid X response element (FXRE) on the human ICAM-1 promoter and FXR and retinoid X receptor were demonstrated to bind to this site. Finally, FXR-mediated activation of ICAM-1 could be further enhanced by TNF-alpha cotreatment in hepatocytes, suggesting a potential cooperation between cytokine and bile acid-signaling pathways during hepatic inflammatory events.

  12. Exogenous adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate behaves as a signal molecule in plants; it augments metabolism of phenylpropanoids and salicylic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Nuc, Katarzyna; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Cells contain various congeners of the canonical nucleotides. Some of these accumulate in cells under stress and may function as signal molecules. Their cellular levels are enzymatically controlled. Previously, we demonstrated a signaling function for diadenosine polyphosphates and cyclic nucleotides in Arabidopsis thaliana and grape, Vitis vinifera. These compounds increased the expression of genes for and the specific activity of enzymes of phenylpropanoid pathways resulting in the accumulation of certain products of these pathways. Here, we show that adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate, whose level can be controlled by HIT-family proteins, induced similar effects. This natural nucleotide, when added to A. thaliana seedlings, activated the genes for phenylalanine:ammonia lyase, 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, chalcone synthase, cinnamoyl-coenzyme A:NADP oxidoreductase and isochorismate synthase, which encode proteins catalyzing key reactions of phenylpropanoid pathways, and caused accumulation of lignins, anthocyanins and salicylic acid. Adenosine 5'-phosphofluoridate, a synthetic congener of adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate, behaved similarly. The results allow us to postulate that adenosine 5'-phosphoramidate should be considered as a novel signaling molecule.

  13. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  14. Hydrogen sulfide acts as a downstream signal molecule in salicylic acid-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Xie, Lin-Run; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2015-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, is a small phenolic compound with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development, and the acquisition of stress tolerance. In recent years, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been found to have similar functions, but cross talk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. In this study, pretreatment of maize seedlings with SA improved the survival percentage of seedlings under heat stress, indicating that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings. In addition, treatment with SA enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, which in turn induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. Interestingly, SA-induced heat tolerance was enhanced by addition of NaHS, a H2S donor, but weakened by specific inhibitors of H2S biosynthesis DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and its scavenger hydroxylamine (HT). Furthermore, pretreatment with paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), inhibitors of SA biosynthesis, had no significant effect on NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings. Similarly, significant change in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H), the key enzymes in SA biosynthesis, and the content of endogenous SA, was not observed in maize seedlings by NaHS treatment. All of the above-mentioned results suggest that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings, and H2S might be a novel downstream signal molecule in SA-induced heat tolerance.

  15. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  16. Polypetide signaling molecules in plant development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intercellular communication mediated by small signaling molecules is a key mechanism for coordinating plant growth and development. In the past few years, polypeptide signals have been shown to play prominent roles in processes as diverse as shoot and root meristem maintenance, vascular differentiat...

  17. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  18. Effects of terbium (III) on signaling molecules in horseradish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Zhang, Xuanbo; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth elements, especially terbium (Tb), are high-valence heavy metal elements that accumulate in the environment, and they show toxic effects on plants. Signaling molecules regulate many physiological and biochemical processes in plants. How rare earth elements affect signaling molecules remains largely unknown. In the present study, the effects of Tb(3+) on some extracellular and intracellular signaling molecules (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, auxin, H2O2, and Ca(2+)) in horseradish leaves were investigated by using high-performance liquid chromatography, X-ray energy spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy, and Tb(3+) was sprayed on the surface of leaves. Tb(3+) treatment decreased the auxin and gibberellic acid contents and increased the abscisic acid content. These changes in the contents of phytohormones (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, and auxin) triggered excessive production of intracellular H2O2. Consequently, the increase in H2O2 content stimulated the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and the release of Ca(2+) from Ca(2+) stores, leading to Ca(2+) overload and the resulting inhibition of physiological and biochemical processes. The effects outlined above were more evident with increasing the concentration of Tb(3+) sprayed on horseradish leaves. Our data provide a possible underlying mechanism of Tb(3+) action on plants.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  20. Modulation of Pb-induced stress in Prosopis shoots through an interconnected network of signaling molecules, phenolic compounds and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zafari, Somaieh; Sharifi, Mohsen; Ahmadian Chashmi, Najmeh; Mur, Luis A J

    2016-02-01

    Lead (Pb) is a hazardous heavy metal present in the environment which elicits oxidative stress in plants. To characterize the physiological and biochemical basis of Pb tolerance, Prosopis farcta seedlings were exposed to Hoagland's solutions at six different Pb concentrations (0, 80, 160, 320, 400 and 480 μM) for different periods of time. As expected, application of Pb significantly increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content. In response, P. farcta deployed the antioxidative defence mechanisms with significantly higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), enzymes related to H2O2 removal, and also the increases in proline as a solute marker of stress. Increases were observed in nitric oxide (NO) production which could also act in triggering defense functions to detoxify Pb. Enhanced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity at early days of exposure to Pb was correlated with increases in phenolic compounds. Significant increases in phenolic acids and flavonoids; daidzein, vitexin, ferulic acid and salicylic acid were observed with Pb treatment. Furthermore, the stress effects were followed by changes in free amino acid content and composition. Aspartic acid and glycine content was increased but glutamic acid significantly decreased. It is likely that stress signal transduction by NO and H2O2 mediated defence responses to Pb by coordination of antioxidative system and metabolic pathways of phenylpropanoid and amino acids.

  1. Sulfide as a signaling molecule in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene; Crespo, José L.; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is already recognized as an important signaling molecule in mammalian systems, and emerging data suggest that H2S is a signaling molecule just as important as nitric oxide (NO) and H2O2 in plants. Although sulfide is generated in chloroplasts and mitochondria, it is present predominantly in the charged HS- form due to the basic pH inside both organelles, thus requiring an active transporter, which is yet to be identified, to be released. In Arabidopsis, we found that the cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase DES1 is involved in the degradation of cysteine, and therefore responsible for the generation of H2S in this cellular compartment. DES1 deficiency leads to the induction of autophagy. Moreover, we have demonstrated that sulfide in particular exerts a general effect on autophagy through negative regulation, in a way unrelated to nutrient deficiency. The mechanisms of H2S action and its molecular targets are largely unknown, although in animal systems, protein S-sulfhydration has been proposed as a mechanism for sulfide-mediated signaling. PMID:23328265

  2. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  3. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  5. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  6. Identification of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, R.I.

    1998-04-21

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS) between 25 and 35 kD, which is secreted by fibroblastic primary avian tendon cells in culture, and causes the cells to self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. It effects an increase of procollagen production in avian tendon cell cultures of ten fold while proliferation rates are decreased. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use. 2 figs.

  7. [Action of antibiotics as signalling molecules].

    PubMed

    Bulgakova, V G; Vinogradova, K A; Orlova, T I; Kozhevin, P A; Polin, A N

    2014-01-01

    It was thought that antibiotics should be produced by soil microorganisms to inhibit the growth of competitors in natural habitats. Yet it has been shown that antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations may have a role as signalling molecules providing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria in the environment. Antibiotics modulate gene transcription and regulate gene expression in microbial populations. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics may cause a number of phenotypic and genotypic changes in microorganisms. These transcription changes are dependent on the interaction of antibiotics with macromolecular receptors such as ribosome or RNA-polymerase. Antibiotic signalling and quorum-sensing system are important regulatory mechanisms in bacteria. It was demonstrated that antibiotics interfered with quorum-sensing system.

  8. Alpha2,6-sialic acid on platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) regulates its homophilic interactions and downstream antiapoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Kitazume, Shinobu; Imamaki, Rie; Ogawa, Kazuko; Komi, Yusuke; Futakawa, Satoshi; Kojima, Soichi; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Marth, Jamey D; Paulson, James C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2010-02-26

    Antiangiogenesis therapies are now part of the standard repertoire of cancer therapies, but the mechanisms for the proliferation and survival of endothelial cells are not fully understood. Although endothelial cells are covered with a glycocalyx, little is known about how endothelial glycosylation regulates endothelial functions. Here, we show that alpha2,6-sialic acid is necessary for the cell-surface residency of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that plays multiple roles in cell adhesion, mechanical stress sensing, antiapoptosis, and angiogenesis. As a possible underlying mechanism, we found that the homophilic interactions of PECAM in endothelial cells were dependent on alpha2,6-sialic acid. We also found that the absence of alpha2,6-sialic acid down-regulated the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM and recruitment of Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 2 and rendered the cells more prone to mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis, as evaluated using PECAM- deficient endothelial cells. The present findings open up a new possibility that modulation of glycosylation could be one of the promising strategies for regulating angiogenesis. PMID:20048157

  9. Plant peroxisomes as a source of signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Nyathi, Yvonne; Baker, Alison

    2006-12-01

    Peroxisomes are pleiomorphic, metabolically plastic organelles. Their essentially oxidative function led to the adoption of the name 'peroxisome'. The dynamic and diverse nature of peroxisome metabolism has led to the realisation that peroxisomes are an important source of signalling molecules that can function to integrate cellular activity and multicellular development. In plants defence against predators and a hostile environment is of necessity a metabolic and developmental response--a plant has no place to hide. Mutant screens are implicating peroxisomes in disease resistance and signalling in response to light. Characterisation of mutants disrupted in peroxisomal beta-oxidation has led to a growing appreciation of the importance of this pathway in the production of jasmonic acid, conversion of indole butyric acid to indole acetic acid and possibly in the production of other signalling molecules. Likewise the role of peroxisomes in the production and detoxification of reactive oxygen, and possibly reactive nitrogen species and changes in redox status, suggests considerable scope for peroxisomes to contribute to perception and response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. Whereas the peroxisome is the sole site of beta-oxidation in plants, the production and detoxification of ROS in many cell compartments makes the specific contribution of the peroxisome much more difficult to establish. However progress in identifying peroxisome specific isoforms of enzymes associated with ROS metabolism should allow a more definitive assessment of these contributions in the future. PMID:17030442

  10. Plant peroxisomes as a source of signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Nyathi, Yvonne; Baker, Alison

    2006-12-01

    Peroxisomes are pleiomorphic, metabolically plastic organelles. Their essentially oxidative function led to the adoption of the name 'peroxisome'. The dynamic and diverse nature of peroxisome metabolism has led to the realisation that peroxisomes are an important source of signalling molecules that can function to integrate cellular activity and multicellular development. In plants defence against predators and a hostile environment is of necessity a metabolic and developmental response--a plant has no place to hide. Mutant screens are implicating peroxisomes in disease resistance and signalling in response to light. Characterisation of mutants disrupted in peroxisomal beta-oxidation has led to a growing appreciation of the importance of this pathway in the production of jasmonic acid, conversion of indole butyric acid to indole acetic acid and possibly in the production of other signalling molecules. Likewise the role of peroxisomes in the production and detoxification of reactive oxygen, and possibly reactive nitrogen species and changes in redox status, suggests considerable scope for peroxisomes to contribute to perception and response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. Whereas the peroxisome is the sole site of beta-oxidation in plants, the production and detoxification of ROS in many cell compartments makes the specific contribution of the peroxisome much more difficult to establish. However progress in identifying peroxisome specific isoforms of enzymes associated with ROS metabolism should allow a more definitive assessment of these contributions in the future.

  11. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  12. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Stoddart, David; Japrung, Deanpen; Bayley, Hagan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the methods used in our laboratory for the analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores. The technical section is preceded by a review of the variety of experiments that can be done with protein nanopores. The end goal of much of this work is single-molecule DNA sequencing, although sequencing is not discussed explicitly here. The technical section covers the equipment required for nucleic acid analysis, the preparation and storage of the necessary materials, and aspects of signal processing and data analysis. PMID:20627172

  13. Sugar amino acids in designing new molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti; Srinivasu, Pothukanuri; Tapadar, Subhasish; Mohan, Bajjuri Krishna

    2005-03-01

    Emulating the basic principles followed by nature to build its vast repertoire of biomolecules, organic chemists are developing many novel multifunctional building blocks and using them to create 'nature-like' and yet unnatural organic molecules. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to Nature's molecular arsenal. This article describes some of our works on various sugar amino acids and many other related building blocks, like furan amino acids, pyrrole amino acids etc. used in wide-ranging peptidomimetic studies. PMID:16133829

  14. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  15. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J.; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W.; Williamson, Valerie M.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture. PMID:26203561

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid signalling in development.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiaoyan; Yung, Yun C; Chen, Allison; Chun, Jerold

    2015-04-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that is present in all tissues examined to date. LPA signals extracellularly via cognate G protein-coupled receptors to mediate cellular processes such as survival, proliferation, differentiation, migration, adhesion and morphology. These LPA-influenced processes impact many aspects of organismal development. In particular, LPA signalling has been shown to affect fertility and reproduction, formation of the nervous system, and development of the vasculature. Here and in the accompanying poster, we review the developmentally related features of LPA signalling. PMID:25852197

  17. Nanoconstructions Based on Spatially Ordered Nucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    Different strategies for the design of nanoconstructions whose building blocks are both linear molecules of double-stranded nucleic acids and nucleic acid molecules fixed in the spatial structure of particles of liquid-crystalline dispersions are described.

  18. Lysophosphatidic Acid signaling in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yung, Yun C; Stoddard, Nicole C; Mirendil, Hope; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-18

    The brain is composed of many lipids with varied forms that serve not only as structural components but also as essential signaling molecules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive lipid species that is part of the lysophospholipid (LP) family. LPA is primarily derived from membrane phospholipids and signals through six cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-6. These receptors are expressed on most cell types within central and peripheral nervous tissues and have been functionally linked to many neural processes and pathways. This Review covers a current understanding of LPA signaling in the nervous system, with particular focus on the relevance of LPA to both physiological and diseased states. PMID:25695267

  19. Piperazic acid derivatives inhibit Gli1 in Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Khatra, Harleen; Kundu, Jayanta; Khan, Pragya Paramita; Duttagupta, Indranil; Pattanayak, Sankha; Sinha, Surajit

    2016-09-15

    Piperazic acid, a non-proteinogenic amino acid, found in complex secondary metabolites and peptide natural substances, has shown down regulation of Gli1 expression in Hedgehog signaling pathway in cell based assays. Further structure activity relationship study indicated that amide derivatives of piperazic acid are more potent than piperazic acid itself, with little to no toxicity. However, other cellular components involved in the pathway were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the inhibitory property of piperazic acid in this pathway. Hence, this molecule could serve as a useful tool for studying Hedgehog signaling. PMID:27528433

  20. Carbon Monoxide as a Signaling Molecule in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Liao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous molecule, has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants, due to its ability to trigger a series of physiological reactions. This article provides a brief update on the synthesis of CO, its physiological functions in plant growth and development, as well as its roles in abiotic stress tolerance such as drought, salt, ultraviolet radiation, and heavy metal stress. CO has positive effects on seed germination, root development, and stomatal closure. Also, CO can enhance plant abiotic stress resistance commonly through the enhancement of antioxidant defense system. Moreover, CO shows cross talk with other signaling molecules including NO, phytohormones (IAA, ABA, and GA) and other gas signaling molecules (H2S, H2, CH4). PMID:27200045

  1. Carbon Monoxide as a Signaling Molecule in Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Liao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous molecule, has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants, due to its ability to trigger a series of physiological reactions. This article provides a brief update on the synthesis of CO, its physiological functions in plant growth and development, as well as its roles in abiotic stress tolerance such as drought, salt, ultraviolet radiation, and heavy metal stress. CO has positive effects on seed germination, root development, and stomatal closure. Also, CO can enhance plant abiotic stress resistance commonly through the enhancement of antioxidant defense system. Moreover, CO shows cross talk with other signaling molecules including NO, phytohormones (IAA, ABA, and GA) and other gas signaling molecules (H2S, H2, CH4). PMID:27200045

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid and signaling in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Bolier, Ruth; Beuers, Ulrich H

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid is a potent signaling lipid molecule that has initially been characterized as a growth factor. However, later studies have revealed many more functions such as modulation of cell shape, cell migration, prevention of apoptosis, platelet aggregation, wound healing, osteoclast differentiation, vasopressor activity, embryo implantation, angiogenesis, lung fibrosis, hair growth and more. The molecule mainly acts through the activation of a set of at least 6 G-protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6), but intracellular LPA was also shown to signal through the activation of the nuclear receptor PPARγ. In this short review we discuss the recent observations which suggest that in pathological conditions LPA also modulates signaling in sensory neurons. Thus, LPA has been shown to play a role in the initiation of neuropathic pain and, more recently, a relation was observed between increased LPA levels in the circulation and cholestatic itch. The mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. PMID:25218302

  3. Simple Signaling Molecules for Inductive Bone Regenerative Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Stephen J.; Deng, Meng; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Doty, Stephen B.; Lo, Kevin W. H.; Khan, Yusuf M.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2014-01-01

    With greater than 500,000 orthopaedic procedures performed in the United States each year requiring a bone graft, the development of novel graft materials is necessary. We report that some porous polymer/ceramic composite scaffolds possess intrinsic osteoinductivity as shown through their capacity to induce in vivo host osteoid mineralization and in vitro stem cell osteogenesis making them attractive synthetic bone graft substitutes. It was discovered that certain low crystallinity ceramics partially dissociate into simple signaling molecules (i.e., calcium and phosphate ions) that induce stem cells to endogenously produce their own osteoinductive proteins. Review of the literature has uncovered a variety of simple signaling molecules (i.e., gases, ions, and redox reagents) capable of inducing other desirable stem cell differentiation through endogenous growth factor production. Inductive simple signaling molecules, which we have termed inducerons, represent a paradigm shift in the field of regenerative engineering where they can be utilized in place of recombinant protein growth factors. PMID:25019622

  4. Recent advances in understanding carotenoid-derived signaling molecules in regulating plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids (C40) are synthesized in plastids and perform numerous important functions in these organelles. In addition, carotenoids can be processed into smaller signaling molecules that regulate various phases of the plant’s life cycle. Besides the relatively well-studied phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA) and strigolactones (SLs), additional carotenoid-derived signaling molecules have been discovered and shown to regulate plant growth and development. As a few excellent reviews summarized recent research on ABA and SLs, this mini review will focus on progress made on identification and characterization of the emerging carotenoid-derived signals. Overall, a better understanding of carotenoid-derived signaling molecules has immediate applications in improving plant biomass production which in turn will have far reaching impacts on providing food, feed, and fuel for the growing world population. PMID:26442092

  5. Unraveling plant hormone signaling through the use of small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rigal, Adeline; Ma, Qian; Robert, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Plants have acquired the capacity to grow continuously and adjust their morphology in response to endogenous and external signals, leading to a high architectural plasticity. The dynamic and differential distribution of phytohormones is an essential factor in these developmental changes. Phytohormone perception is a fast but complex process modulating specific developmental reprogramming. In recent years, chemical genomics or the use of small molecules to modulate target protein function has emerged as a powerful strategy to study complex biological processes in plants such as hormone signaling. Small molecules can be applied in a conditional, dose-dependent and reversible manner, with the advantage of circumventing the limitations of lethality and functional redundancy inherent to traditional mutant screens. High-throughput screening of diverse chemical libraries has led to the identification of bioactive molecules able to induce plant hormone-related phenotypes. Characterization of the cognate targets and pathways of those molecules has allowed the identification of novel regulatory components, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant hormone signaling. An extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of the natural phytohormones, their designed synthetic analogs and newly identified bioactive molecules has led to the determination of the structural requirements essential for their bioactivity. In this review, we will summarize the so far identified small molecules and their structural variants targeting specific phytohormone signaling pathways. We will highlight how the SAR analyses have enabled better interrogation of the molecular mechanisms of phytohormone responses. Finally, we will discuss how labeled/tagged hormone analogs can be exploited, as compelling tools to better understand hormone signaling and transport mechanisms. PMID:25126092

  6. Recent Advances in Developing Small Molecules Targeting Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maolin; Yu, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chao; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids participate in a large number of biological processes. However, current approaches for small molecules targeting protein are incompatible with nucleic acids. On the other hand, the lack of crystallization of nucleic acid is the limiting factor for nucleic acid drug design. Because of the improvements in crystallization in recent years, a great many structures of nucleic acids have been reported, providing basic information for nucleic acid drug discovery. This review focuses on the discovery and development of small molecules targeting nucleic acids. PMID:27248995

  7. Involvement of secondary messengers and small organic molecules in auxin perception and signaling.

    PubMed

    Di, Dong-Wei; Zhang, Caiguo; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-06-01

    Auxin is a major phytohormone involved in most aspects of plant growth and development. Generally, auxin is perceived by three distinct receptors: TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESISTANT1-Auxin/INDOLE ACETIC ACID, S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2A and AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN1. The auxin perception is regulated by a variety of secondary messenger molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, calcium, cyclic GMP, cyclic AMP, inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol and by physiological pH. In addition, some small organic molecules, including inositol hexakisphosphate, yokonolide B, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, toyocamycin and terfestatin A, are involved in auxin signaling. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress in understanding the functions of these secondary messengers and small organic molecules, which are now thoroughly demonstrated to be pervasive and important in auxin perception and signal transduction. PMID:25693494

  8. Involvement of secondary messengers and small organic molecules in auxin perception and signaling.

    PubMed

    Di, Dong-Wei; Zhang, Caiguo; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-06-01

    Auxin is a major phytohormone involved in most aspects of plant growth and development. Generally, auxin is perceived by three distinct receptors: TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESISTANT1-Auxin/INDOLE ACETIC ACID, S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2A and AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN1. The auxin perception is regulated by a variety of secondary messenger molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, calcium, cyclic GMP, cyclic AMP, inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol and by physiological pH. In addition, some small organic molecules, including inositol hexakisphosphate, yokonolide B, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, toyocamycin and terfestatin A, are involved in auxin signaling. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress in understanding the functions of these secondary messengers and small organic molecules, which are now thoroughly demonstrated to be pervasive and important in auxin perception and signal transduction.

  9. Chasing the structures of small molecules in arbuscular mycorrhizal signaling.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Marcel; Wegmüller, Sarah; Drissner, David

    2009-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is a symbiosis between most terrestrial plants and fungi of the ancient phylum Glomeromycota. AM improves the uptake of water and mineral nutrients, such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), of the host plant in exchange for photosynthetically fixed carbon. Successful colonization and a functional interaction between host plant and mycobiont are based upon exchange of signaling molecules at different stages of symbiosis development. Strigolactones, a novel class of plant hormones, are secreted by plant roots stimulating presymbiotic growth of AM fungi. Fungi release soluble signaling molecules, the enigmatic 'Myc factors', that activate early symbiotic root responses. Lysophosphatidylcholine is a lipophilic intraradical mycorrhizal signal triggering plant phosphate transporter gene expression late in AM development through a P-controlled transcriptional mechanism. This enables uptake of orthophosphate released from the AM fungus.

  10. More than a signal: non-signaling properties of quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Boulette, Megan L; Whiteley, Marvin

    2009-05-01

    Quorum sensing in bacteria serves as an example of the adaptation of single-celled organisms to engage in cooperative group behaviors. This phenomenon is much more widespread than originally thought, with many different species 'speaking' through various secreted small molecules. Despite some variation in signaling molecules, the principles of quorum sensing are conserved across a wide range of organisms. Small molecules, secreted into the environment, are detected by neighbors who respond by altering gene expression and, as a consequence, behavior. However, it is not known whether these systems evolved specifically for this purpose, or even if their role is exclusive to information trafficking. Rather, clues exist that many quorum sensing molecules function as more than just signals. Here, we discuss non-signaling roles for quorum sensing molecules in such important processes as nutrient scavenging, ultrastructure modification and competition.

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid in neural signaling systems.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid has been conserved in neural signalling systems in the cephalopods, fish, amphibian, reptiles, birds, mammals, primates and humans. This extreme conservation, despite wide genomic changes over 500 million years, testifies to a uniqueness of this molecule in the brain. The brain selectively incorporates docosahexaenoic acid and its rate of incorporation into the developing brain has been shown to be greater than ten times more efficient than its synthesis from the omega 3 fatty acids of land plant origin. Data has now been published demonstrating a significant influence of dietary omega 3 fatty acids on neural gene expression. As docosahexaenoic acid is the only omega 3 fatty acid in the brain, it is likely that it is the ligand involved. The selective uptake, requirement for function and stimulation of gene expression would have conferred an advantage to a primate which separated from the chimpanzees in the forests and woodlands and sought a different ecological niche. In view of the paucity of docosahexaenoic acid in the land food chain it is likely that the advantage would have been gained from a lacustrine or marine coastal habitat with access to food rich in docosahexaenoic acid and the accessory micronutrients, such as iodine, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium, of importance in brain development and protection against peroxidation. Land agricultural development has, in recent time, come to dominate the human food chain. The decline in use and availability of aquatic resources is not considered important by Langdon (2006) as he considers the resource was not needed for human evolution and can be replaced from the terrestrial food chain. This notion is not supported by the biochemistry nor the molecular biology. He misses the point that the shoreline hypothesis is not just dependent on docosahexaenoic acid but also on the other accessory nutrients specifically required by the brain. Moreover he neglects the basic principle of Darwinian

  12. Quorum signal molecules as biosurfactants affecting swarming in Rhizobium etli

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Ruth; Reynaert, Sven; Hoekstra, Hans; Verreth, Christel; Janssens, Joost; Braeken, Kristien; Fauvart, Maarten; Beullens, Serge; Heusdens, Christophe; Lambrichts, Ivo; De Vos, Dirk E.; Vanderleyden, Jos; Vermant, Jan; Michiels, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Swarming motility is suggested to be a social phenomenon that enables groups of bacteria to coordinately and rapidly move atop solid surfaces. This multicellular behavior, during which the apparently organized bacterial populations are embedded in an extracellular slime layer, has previously been linked with biofilm formation and virulence. Many population density-controlled activities involve the activation of complex signaling pathways using small diffusible molecules, also known as autoinducers. In Gram-negative bacteria, quorum sensing (QS) is achieved primarily by means of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). Here, we report on a dual function of AHL molecules in controlling swarming behavior of Rhizobium etli, the bacterial symbiotic partner of the common bean plant. The major swarming regulator of R. etli is the cinIR QS system, which is specifically activated in swarming cells by its cognate AHL and other long-chain AHLs. This signaling role of long-chain AHLs is required for high-level expression of the cin and rai QS systems. Besides this signaling function, the long-chain AHLs also have a direct role in surface movement of swarmer cells as these molecules possess significant surface activity and induce liquid flows, known as Marangoni flows, as a result of gradients in surface tension at biologically relevant concentrations. These results point to an as-yet-undisclosed direct role of long-chain AHL molecules as biosurfactants. PMID:16990436

  13. Agrobacterium tumefaciens responses to plant-derived signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nathoo, Naeem; Klimov, Eugene; Yuan, Ze-Chun

    2014-01-01

    As a special phytopathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens infects a wide range of plant hosts and causes plant tumors also known as crown galls. The complexity of Agrobacterium–plant interaction has been studied for several decades. Agrobacterium pathogenicity is largely attributed to its evolved capabilities of precise recognition and response to plant-derived chemical signals. Agrobacterium perceives plant-derived signals to activate its virulence genes, which are responsible for transferring and integrating its Transferred DNA (T-DNA) from its Tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid into the plant nucleus. The expression of T-DNA in plant hosts leads to the production of a large amount of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), cytokinin (CK), and opines. IAA and CK stimulate plant growth, resulting in tumor formation. Agrobacterium utilizes opines as nutrient sources as well as signals in order to activate its quorum sensing (QS) to further promote virulence and opine metabolism. Intriguingly, Agrobacterium also recognizes plant-derived signals including γ-amino butyric acid and salicylic acid (SA) to activate quorum quenching that reduces the level of QS signals, thereby avoiding the elicitation of plant defense and preserving energy. In addition, Agrobacterium hijacks plant-derived signals including SA, IAA, and ethylene to down-regulate its virulence genes located on the Ti plasmid. Moreover, certain metabolites from corn (Zea mays) also inhibit the expression of Agrobacterium virulence genes. Here we outline the responses of Agrobacterium to major plant-derived signals that impact Agrobacterium–plant interactions. PMID:25071805

  14. Role of chrysin on expression of insulin signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, Kottireddy; Sravanthi, Koora; Shaker, Ivvala Anand; Ponnulakshmi, Rajagopal; Selvaraj, Jayaraman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently available drugs are unsuccessful for the treatment of tye-2 diabetes due to their adverseside-effects. Hence, a search for novel drugs, especially ofplant origin, continues. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid, natural component of traditional medicinal herbs, present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts that hasbeen used in traditional medicine around the world to treat numerous ailments. Objective: The present study was aimed to identify the protective role of chrysin on the expression of insulin-signaling molecules in the skeletal muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rats. Materials and Methods: The oral effective dose of chrysin (100 mg/kg body weight) was given once a day until the end of the study (30 days post-induction of diabetes) to high fat diet-induced diabetic rats. At the end of the experimental period, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, serum lipid profile, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and free radical generation, as well as the levels of insulin signaling molecules and tissue glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle were assessed. Results: Diabetic rats showed impaired glucose tolerance and impairment in insulin signaling molecules (IR, IRS-1, p-IRS-1Tyr632, p- AktThr308), glucose transporter subtype 4 [GLUT4] proteins and glycogen concentration. Serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and free radical generation were found to be increased in diabetic control rats. The treatment with chrysin normalized the altered levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, lipid profile, LPO and insulin signaling molecules as well as GLUT4 proteins. Conclusion: Our present findings indicate that chrysin improves glycemic control through activation of insulin signal transduction in the gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic male rats. PMID:26834424

  15. Silicon technology compatible photonic molecules for compact optical signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Barea, Luis A. M. Vallini, Felipe; Jarschel, Paulo F.; Frateschi, Newton C.

    2013-11-11

    Photonic molecules (PMs) based on multiple inner coupled microring resonators allow to surpass the fundamental constraint between the total quality factor (Q{sub T}), free spectral range (FSR), and resonator size. In this work, we use a PM that presents doublets and triplets resonance splitting, all with high Q{sub T}. We demonstrate the use of the doublet splitting for 34.2 GHz signal extraction by filtering the sidebands of a modulated optical signal. We also demonstrate that very compact optical modulators operating 2.75 times beyond its resonator linewidth limit may be obtained using the PM triplet splitting, with separation of ∼55 GHz.

  16. TSH Receptor Signaling Abrogation by a Novel Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Rauf; Realubit, Ronald B.; Karan, Charles; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2016-01-01

    Pathological activation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is caused by thyroid-stimulating antibodies in patients with Graves’ disease (GD) or by somatic and rare genomic mutations that enhance constitutive activation of the receptor influencing both G protein and non-G protein signaling. Potential selective small molecule antagonists represent novel therapeutic compounds for abrogation of such abnormal TSHR signaling. In this study, we describe the identification and in vitro characterization of a novel small molecule antagonist by high-throughput screening (HTS). The identification of the TSHR antagonist was performed using a transcription-based TSH-inhibition bioassay. TSHR-expressing CHO cells, which also expressed a luciferase-tagged CRE response element, were optimized using bovine TSH as the activator, in a 384 well plate format, which had a Z score of 0.3–0.6. Using this HTS assay, we screened a diverse library of ~80,000 compounds at a final concentration of 16.7 μM. The selection criteria for a positive hit were based on a mean signal threshold of ≥50% inhibition of control TSH stimulation. The screening resulted in 450 positive hits giving a hit ratio of 0.56%. A secondary confirmation screen against TSH and forskolin – a post receptor activator of adenylyl cyclase – confirmed one TSHR-specific candidate antagonist molecule (named VA-K-14). This lead molecule had an IC50 of 12.3 μM and a unique chemical structure. A parallel analysis for cell viability indicated that the lead inhibitor was non-cytotoxic at its effective concentrations. In silico docking studies performed using a TSHR transmembrane model showed the hydrophobic contact locations and the possible mode of inhibition of TSHR signaling. Furthermore, this molecule was capable of inhibiting TSHR stimulation by GD patient sera and monoclonal-stimulating TSHR antibodies. In conclusion, we report the identification of a novel small molecule TSHR inhibitor, which has

  17. Composition for detection of cell density signal molecule

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a novel proteinaceous cell density signal molecule (CDS), which is secreted by fibroblastic cells in culture, preferably tendon cells, and which provides a means by which the cells self-regulate their proliferation and the expression of differentiated function. CDS, and the antibodies which recognize them, are important for the development of diagnostics and treatments for injuries and diseases involving connective tissues, particularly tendon. Also disclosed are methods of production and use.

  18. Observation of an electrical signal from a single molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Arooj; Shaheen, Noor; Dobiszewski, Kyle; Kanwal, Alokik; Farrow, Reginald; Thomas, Gordon

    We have attached a folded protein molecule to the tip of a carbon nanotube using electrophoresis. We have then measured the electrons produced when the protein catalyzes a series of reactions. As an initial example of the reactions, we have used the catalysis by glucose-oxidase of glucose. We can show that the characteristic dynamic signals from the molecule scale with the glucose concentration. The molecule on the carbon nanotube tip is stable with respect to time under controlled conditions. The signals also indicate the glucose diffusion as its concentration is locally depleted at the nanotube by the catalysis. We use a second carbon nanotube with a laccase molecule on its tip to complete the circuit with an oxygen reaction. In a previous stage of this process, the other end of the nanotube is attached with a low-impedance electrical connection to a Ti thin film and the measuring circuitry. This work is an early step toward investigating the feasibility of an implantable glucose monitor to help treat diabetes.

  19. Decreased Gene Expressions of Insulin Signal Molecules in Canine Hyperadrenocorticism

    PubMed Central

    NOZAWA, Satoshi; ODA, Hitomi; AKIYAMA, Ran; UEDA, Kaori; SAEKI, Kaori; SHONO, Saori; MARUYAMA, Natsuki; MURATA, Atsuki; TAZAKI, Hiroyuki; MORI, Akihiro; MOMOTA, Yutaka; AZAKAMI, Daigo; SAKO, Toshinori; ISHIOKA, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) is a common endocrine disorder in dogs, in which excess glucocorticoid causes insulin resistance. Disturbance of insulin action may be caused by multiple factors, including transcriptional modulation of insulin signal molecules which lie downstream of insulin binding to insulin receptors. In this study, gene expressions of insulin signal molecules were examined using neutrophils of the HAC dogs (the untreated dogs and the dogs which had been treated with trilostane). Insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, IRS-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), protein kinase B/Akt kinase (Akt)-2 and protein kinase C (PKC)-lambda were analyzed in the HAC dogs and compared with those from normal dogs. The IRS-1 gene expressions decreased by 37% and 35% of the control dogs in the untreated and treated groups, respectively. The IRS-2 gene expressions decreased by 61% and 72%, the PI3-K gene expressions decreased by 47% and 55%, and the Akt-2 gene expressions decreased by 45% and 56% of the control dogs, similarly. Collectively, gene expressions of insulin signal molecules are suppressed in the HAC dogs, which may partially contribute to the induction of insulin resistance. PMID:24829079

  20. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  1. Signalling to the nucleus under the control of light and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Juillot, Samuel; Beyer, Hannes M; Madl, Josef; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D; Römer, Winfried

    2016-02-01

    One major regulatory mechanism in cell signalling is the spatio-temporal control of the localization of signalling molecules. We synthetically designed an entire cell signalling pathway, which allows controlling the transport of signalling molecules from the plasma membrane to the nucleus, by using light and small molecules.

  2. Diamidinium and iminium aromatics as new aggregators of the bacterial signaling molecule, c-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Ilana; Nakayama, Shizuka; Sintim, Herman O

    2012-01-15

    C-di-GMP has emerged as an important bacterial signaling molecule that is involved in biofilm formation. Small molecules that can form biologically inactive complexes with c-di-GMP have the potential to be used as anti-biofilm agents. Herein, we report that water-soluble diamidinium/iminium aromatics (such as berenil), which are traditionally considered as minor groove binders of nucleic acids, are capable of aggregating c-di-GMP into G-quadruplexes via π-stacking interactions. PMID:22217869

  3. Small molecules intercept Notch signaling and the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Andreas; Mentrup, Torben; Kleizen, Bertrand; Rivera-Milla, Eric; Reichenbach, Daniela; Enzensperger, Christoph; Nohl, Richard; Täuscher, Eric; Görls, Helmar; Ploubidou, Aspasia; Englert, Christoph; Werz, Oliver; Arndt, Hans-Dieter; Kaether, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Notch signaling has a pivotal role in numerous cell-fate decisions, and its aberrant activity leads to developmental disorders and cancer. To identify molecules that influence Notch signaling, we screened nearly 17,000 compounds using automated microscopy to monitor the trafficking and processing of a ligand-independent Notch-enhanced GFP (eGFP) reporter. Characterization of hits in vitro by biochemical and cellular assays and in vivo using zebrafish led to five validated compounds, four of which induced accumulation of the reporter at the plasma membrane by inhibiting γ-secretase. One compound, the dihydropyridine FLI-06, disrupted the Golgi apparatus in a manner distinct from that of brefeldin A and golgicide A. FLI-06 inhibited general secretion at a step before exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which was accompanied by a tubule-to-sheet morphological transition of the ER, rendering FLI-06 the first small molecule acting at such an early stage in secretory traffic. These data highlight the power of phenotypic screening to enable investigations of central cellular signaling pathways. PMID:24077179

  4. Signal transduction molecule patterns indicating potential glioblastoma therapy approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cruceru, Maria Linda; Enciu, Ana-Maria; Popa, Adrian Claudiu; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica; Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Constantinescu, Stefan N

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The expression of an array of signaling molecules, along with the assessment of real-time cell proliferation, has been performed in U87 glioma cell line and in patients’ glioblastoma established cell cultures in order to provide a better understanding of cellular and molecular events involved in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Experimental therapy was performed using a phosphatidylinositol-3′-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Patients and methods xMAP technology was employed to assess expression levels of several signal transduction molecules and real-time xCELLigence platform for cell behavior. Results PI3K inhibition induced the most significant effects on global signaling pathways in patient-derived cell cultures, especially on members of the mitogen-activated protein-kinase family, P70S6 serine-threonine kinase, and cAMP response element-binding protein expression and further prevented tumor cell proliferation. Conclusion The PI3K pathway might be a prime target for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:24348050

  5. Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling and Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Voronkov, Andrey; Krauss, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a branch of a functional network that dates back to the first metazoans and it is involved in a broad range of biological systems including stem cells, embryonic development and adult organs. Deregulation of components involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in a wide spectrum of diseases including a number of cancers and degenerative diseases. The key mediator of Wnt signaling, β-catenin, serves several cellular functions. It functions in a dynamic mode at multiple cellular locations, including the plasma membrane, where β-catenin contributes to the stabilization of intercellular adhesive complexes, the cytoplasm where β-catenin levels are regulated and the nucleus where β-catenin is involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin interactions. Central effectors of β-catenin levels are a family of cysteine-rich secreted glycoproteins, known as Wnt morphogens. Through the LRP5/6-Frizzled receptor complex, Wnts regulate the location and activity of the destruction complex and consequently intracellular β- catenin levels. However, β-catenin levels and their effects on transcriptional programs are also influenced by multiple other factors including hypoxia, inflammation, hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling, and the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The broad implications of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in development, in the adult body and in disease render the pathway a prime target for pharmacological research and development. The intricate regulation of β-catenin at its various locations provides alternative points for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23016862

  6. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases. PMID:26202202

  7. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  8. 2-hydroxyoleic acid: a new hypotensive molecule.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Regina; Terés, Silvia; Baamonde, Carmela; Benet, Mikhail; Vögler, Oliver; Escribá, Pablo V

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that diets rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) from olive oil, a natural source of oleic acid, have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients. With this in mind, we investigated whether a synthetic derivative of the MUFA oleic acid, 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2-OHOA), was capable of regulating the BP of Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal and oral administration of 2-OHOA to rats induced significant and sustained decreases in BP in a time-dependent manner. Without affecting heart rate, treatments for 7 days provoked reductions in systolic BP of 20 to 26 mm Hg. At the molecular level, the density of Galpha(s), but not Galpha(i2) or Galpha(o), increased in membranes from the hearts and aortas of 2-OHOA-treated rats, whereas in heart membranes, the density of Galpha(q)/11 and protein kinase Calpha proteins was also augmented. These molecular alterations were reflected in the increase in cAMP levels after Galpha(s) protein and beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation. On the contrary, inhibitory hormones reduced adenylyl cyclase activity to the same extent in 2-OHOA-treated rats as in vehicle-treated ones. Our results indicate that cardiovascular tissues from 2-OHOA-treated rats exhibited increased cAMP production in response to Galpha(s) activation, which might be attributed to enhanced expression of Galpha(s) proteins. As a result of this change, a significant reduction in systolic BP was observed. Therefore, BP can be lowered by administration of 2-OHOA, which might represent the first member of a new family of antihypertensive drugs.

  9. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs' carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  10. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  11. Electrical Transport Properties of Au-Doped Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jong Seung; Hong, Su Heon; Kim, Hyung Kwon; Kwon, Young Whan; Jin, Jung Il; Hwang, Sung Woo; Ahn, Doyeol

    2005-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules were doped with Au atoms and their electrical transport properties were measured. The Au doping was carried out by incubating a mixture of HAuCl4\\cdot3H2O and DNA solutions. The binding of Au atoms to DNA bases was identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The Au-doped DNA molecules were deposited on nanoelectrodes and the presence of the molecules between the electrodes was determined by both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Measurement of the current-voltage characteristics showed that the Au-doped DNA molecules exhibited a higher conductivity than undoped DNA molecules. Detailed analysis of the chemical composition shows that there is a strong possibility of reliably controlling the conductivity of DNA molecules using this method.

  12. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  13. Abscisic acid signaling through cyclic ADP-ribose in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yan; Kuzma, J.; Marechal, E.

    1997-12-19

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the primary hormone that mediates plant responses to stresses such as cold, drought, and salinity. Single-cell microinjection experiments in tomato were used to identify possible intermediates involved in ABA signal transduction. Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) was identified as a signaling molecule in the ABA response and was shown to exert its effects by way of calcium. Bioassay experiments showed that the amounts of cADPR in Arabidopsis thaliana plants increased in response to ABA treatment and before ABA-induced gene expression.

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of notch signaling molecules in ameloblastomas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We examined Notch signaling molecules, Notch1 and Jagged1, in serial large cases of typical solid/multicystic ameloblastoma. In general, Notch positive staining products were frequently detected in the cytoplasms of the cells. In the same cells, Jagged positive staining were also frequently observed, while only occasionally positive in peripheral cells, especially in cuboidal cells. The results showed that these morphogenesis regulation factors are closely related to cytological differentiation in neoplastic cells of ameloblastoma. The Notch and Jagged positive-cell ratios were frequently positive, and the ratios were nearly the same between the varied histopathological, cytological patterns. However, the less-differentiated cells were fewer in number than that of well-differentiated cells. PMID:21810559

  15. Advances in targeting cell surface signalling molecules for immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheng; Zhu, Yuwen; Chen, Lieping

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the development of immunomodulatory approaches to combat a broad range of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, autoimmunity and inflammation as well as in the prevention of transplant rejection. Immunomodulatory approaches mostly involve the use of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant fusion proteins that target cell surface signalling molecules on immune cells to drive immune responses towards the desired direction. Advances in our understanding of the human immune system, along with valuable lessons learned from the first generation of therapeutic biologics, are aiding the design of the next generation of immunomodulatory biologics with better therapeutic efficacy, minimized adverse effects and long-lasting clinical benefit. The recent encouraging results from antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) and B7 homolog 1 (B7H1; also known as PDL1) for the treatment of various advanced human cancers show that immunomodulatory therapy has come of age. PMID:23370250

  16. Cross-talk in abscisic acid signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2002-01-01

    "Cross-talk" in hormone signaling reflects an organism's ability to integrate different inputs and respond appropriately, a crucial function at the heart of signaling network operation. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in bud and seed dormancy, growth regulation, leaf senescence and abscission, stomatal opening, and a variety of plant stress responses. This review summarizes what is known about ABA signaling in the control of stomatal opening and seed dormancy and provides an overview of emerging knowledge about connections between ABA, ethylene, sugar, and auxin synthesis and signaling.

  17. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  18. DETECTION OF A NEW INTERSTELLAR MOLECULE: THIOCYANIC ACID HSCN

    SciTech Connect

    Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.; Bruenken, S.; Gottlieb, C. A.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P. E-mail: lziurys@as.arizona.edu E-mail: cgottlieb@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: pthaddeus@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-09-10

    A new interstellar molecule, HSCN (thiocyanic acid), an energetic isomer of the well-known species HNCS, has been detected toward Sgr B2(N) with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope. Eight rotational transitions in the K{sub a} = 0 ladder were observed in the 2 mm and 3 mm bands. Five consecutive transitions in the 3 mm band are unblended, but three in the 2 mm band are partially masked by lines of other molecules. The peak intensity of all eight transitions are well described by a rotational temperature that is in very good agreement with that of many other molecules in this source. The line width and radial velocity of HSCN match closely with those of the ground state isomer HNCS (isothiocyanic acid), HNCO (isocyanic acid), and HOCN (cyanic acid); preliminary maps indicate that all four molecules are similarly distributed in Sgr B2. Although HSCN is calculated to lie over 3000 K higher in energy than HNCS, its column density of 1.3 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} in Sgr B2(N) is only three times lower than that of HNCS. The fractional abundances of HSCN and HNCS relative to H{sub 2} are 4.5 x 10{sup -12} and 1.1 x 10{sup -11}. By analogy with the isomeric pair HCN and HNC, these two sulfur-bearing isomers are plausibly formed from a common cation precursor.

  19. Reaction of Acylated Homoserine Lactone Bacterial Signaling Molecules with Oxidized Halogen Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Borchardt, S. A.; Allain, E. J.; Michels, J. J.; Stearns, G. W.; Kelly, R. F.; McCoy, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized halogen antimicrobials, such as hypochlorous and hypobromous acids, have been used extensively for microbial control in industrial systems. Recent discoveries have shown that acylated homoserine lactone cell-to-cell signaling molecules are important for biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that biofouling can be controlled by interfering with bacterial cell-to-cell communication. This study was conducted to investigate the potential for oxidized halogens to react with acylated homoserine lactone-based signaling molecules. Acylated homoserine lactones containing a 3-oxo group were found to rapidly react with oxidized halogens, while acylated homoserine lactones lacking the 3-oxo functionality did not react. The Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 bioassay was used to determine the effects of such reactions on acylated homoserine lactone activity. The results demonstrated that 3-oxo acyl homoserine lactone activity was rapidly lost upon exposure to oxidized halogens; however, acylated homoserine lactones lacking the 3-oxo group retained activity. Experiments with the marine alga Laminaria digitata demonstrated that natural haloperoxidase systems are capable of mediating the deactivation of acylated homoserine lactones. This may illustrate a natural defense mechanism to prevent biofouling on the surface of this marine alga. The Chromobacterium violaceum activity assay illustrates that reactions between 3-oxo acylated homoserine lactone molecules and oxidized halogens do occur despite the presence of biofilm components at much greater concentrations. This work suggests that oxidized halogens may control biofilm not only via a cidal mechanism, but also by possibly interfering with 3-oxo acylated homoserine lactone-based cell signaling. PMID:11425738

  20. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  1. Integrating Retinoic Acid Signaling with Brain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tuanlian; Wagner, Elisabeth; Drager, Ursula C.

    2009-01-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) regulates the transcription of about a 6th of the human genome. Compelling evidence indicates a role of RA in cognitive activities, but its integration with the molecular mechanisms of higher brain functions is not known. Here we describe the properties of RA signaling in the mouse, which point to…

  2. Regulation of mesangial cell function by vasodilatory signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Buschhausen, L; Seibold, S; Gross, O; Matthaeus, T; Weber, M; Schulze-Lohoff, E

    2001-08-15

    Proliferation of mesangial cells and expansion of mesangial matrix is a hallmark of glomerular disease leading to end-stage renal failure and requiring renal replacement therapy. Independently from the type of injury, e.g. in glomerulonephritis or diabetic nephropathy, the response to injury is remarkably uniform. Chronic glomerular disease is frequently associated with increases in systemic blood pressure and altered intraglomerular hemodynamics. Furthermore, reduction of systemic blood pressure and inhibition of the vasoconstrictor peptide angiotensin II have been shown to delay end-stage renal failure in various types of human kidney disease. Since vasoconstrictors of mesangial cells and efferent glomerular arterioli, such as angiotensin II, are thought to be detrimental for the progression of chronic glomerular disease, we propose that vasodilatory factors which antagonize the effects of angiotensin II, might have beneficial effects during the course of progressive kidney disease. To support this concept we will summarize currently available data on the role of vasodilatory signaling molecules such as natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), nitric oxide (NO), the prostaglandines PGE2 and prostacycline, and the purine mediator adenosine in the regulation of mesangial function.

  3. Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus) Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (CD150) Is an Entry Receptor for Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Carsillo, Thomas; Huey, Devra; Levinsky, Amy; Obojes, Karola; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) replicate measles virus (MV) after intranasal infection in the respiratory tract and lymphoid tissue. We have cloned the cotton rat signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (CD150, SLAM) in order to investigate its role as a potential receptor for MV. Cotton rat CD150 displays 58% and 78% amino acid homology with human and mouse CD150, respectively. By staining with a newly generated cotton rat CD150 specific monoclonal antibody expression of CD150 was confirmed in cotton rat lymphoid cells and in tissues with a pattern of expression similar to mouse and humans. Previously, binding of MV hemagglutinin has been shown to be dependent on amino acids 60, 61 and 63 in the V region of CD150. The human molecule contains isoleucine, histidine and valine at these positions and binds to MV-H whereas the mouse molecule contains valine, arginine and leucine and does not function as a receptor for MV. In the cotton rat molecule, amino acids 61 and 63 are identical with the mouse molecule and amino acid 60 with the human molecule. After transfection with cotton rat CD150 HEK 293 T cells became susceptible to infection with single cycle VSV pseudotype virus expressing wild type MV glycoproteins and with a MV wildtype virus. After infection, cells expressing cotton rat CD150 replicated virus to lower levels than cells expressing the human molecule and formed smaller plaques. These data might explain why the cotton rat is a semipermissive model for measles virus infection. PMID:25295727

  4. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Signaling in Vertebrate Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoqin; Chun, Jerold

    2009-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a cell membrane phospholipid metabolite that can act as an extracellular signal. Its effects are mediated through at least five G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-5, and likely others as well. Studies in multiple species including LPA receptor-deficient mice and humans have identified or implicated important roles for receptor-mediated LPA signaling in multiple aspects of vertebrate reproduction. These include ovarian function, spermatogenesis, fertilization, early embryo development, embryo implantation, embryo spacing, decidualization, pregnancy maintenance, and parturition. LPA signaling may also have pathological consequences, influencing aspects of endometriosis and ovarian cancer. Here we review recent progress in LPA signaling research relevant to female and male reproduction. PMID:19836970

  5. Visual Map Development: Bidirectional Signaling, Bifunctional Guidance Molecules, and Competition

    PubMed Central

    Feldheim, David A.; O’Leary, Dennis D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Topographic maps are a two-dimensional representation of one neural structure within another and serve as the main strategy to organize sensory information. The retina’s projection via axons of retinal ganglion cells to midbrain visual centers, the optic tectum/superior colliculus, is the leading model to elucidate mechanisms of topographic map formation. Each axis of the retina is mapped independently using different mechanisms and sets of axon guidance molecules expressed in gradients to achieve the goal of representing a point in the retina onto a point within the target. An axon’s termination along the temporal-nasal mapping axis is determined by opposing gradients of EphAs and ephrin-As that act through their forward and reverse signaling, respectively, within the projecting axons, each of which inhibits interstitial branching, cooperating with a branch-promoting activity, to generate topographic specific branching along the shaft of the parent axons that overshoot their correct termination zone along the anterior-posterior axis of the target. The dorsal-ventral termination position is then determined using a gradient of ephrin-B that can act as a repellent or attractant depending on the ephrin-B concentration relative to EphB levels on the interstitial branches to guide them along the medial-lateral axis of the target to their correct termination zone, where they arborize. In both cases, axon-axon competition results in axon mapping based on relative rather than absolute levels of repellent or attractant activity. The map is subsequently refined through large-scale pruning driven in large part by patterned retinal activity. PMID:20880989

  6. Xyloglucan Octasaccharide XXLGol Derived from the Seeds of Hymenaea courbaril Acts as a Signaling Molecule1

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Rechia, Carem; Reicher, Fany; Rita Sierakowski, Maria; Heyraud, Alain; Driguez, Hugues; Liénart, Yvette

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of the xyloglucan isolated from the seeds of Hymenaea courbaril with Humicola insolens endo-1,4-β-d-glucanase I produced xyloglucan oligosaccharides, which were then isolated and characterized. The two most abundant compounds were the heptasaccharide (XXXG) and the octasaccharide (XXLG), which were examined by reference to the biological activity of other structurally related xyloglucan compounds. The reduced oligomer (XXLGol) was shown to promote growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum) coleoptiles independently of the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). In the presence of 2,4-D, XXLGol at nanomolar concentrations increased the auxin-induced response. It was found that XXLGol is a signaling molecule, since it has the ability to induce, at nanomolar concentrations, a rapid increase in an α-l-fucosidase response in suspended cells or protoplasts of Rubus fruticosus L. and to modulate 2,4-D or gibberellic acid-induced α-l-fucosidase. PMID:9501133

  7. Signaling molecules of the CNS as targets of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and receptors are the fundamental basis for neuronal communication in the nervous system and are important targets of autoimmunity. The different neuronal domains contain a unique repertoire of voltage-gated Na(+) (Nav), Ca(2+) (Cav), and K(+) (Kv), as well as other K(+) channels and hyperpolarization-gated cyclic nucleotide-regulated channels. The distinct ion channel distribution defines the electrophysiologic properties of different subtypes of neurons. The different neuronal compartments also express neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, or ionotropic receptors, as well as G protein-coupled receptors. Of particular relevance in the central nervous system are excitatory glutamate receptors and inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine receptors. The interactions among different ion channels and receptors regulate neuronal excitability; frequency and pattern of firing of action potentials (AP); propagation of the AP along the axon; neurotransmitter release at synaptic terminals; AP backpropagation from the axon initial segment to the somatodendritic domain; dendritic integration of synaptic signals; and use-dependent plasticity. PMID:27112669

  8. Sugar amino acids and their uses in designing bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tushar K; Ghosh, Subhash; Jayaprakash, Sarva

    2002-02-01

    In search of new molecular entities for discovering new drugs and materials, organic chemists are looking for innovative approaches that try to imitate nature in assembling quickly large number of distinct and diverse molecular structures from 'nature-like' and yet unnatural designer building blocks using combinatorial approach. The main objective in developing such libraries is to mimic the diversities displayed in structures and properties of natural products. The unnatural building blocks used in these assemblies are carefully designed to manifest the structural diversities of the monomeric units used by nature like amino acids, carbohydrates and nucleosides to build its arsenal. Compounds made of such unnatural building blocks are also expected to be more stable toward proteolytic cleavage in physiological systems than their natural counterparts. Sugar amino acids constitute an important class of such polyfunctional scaffolds where the carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl termini provide an excellent opportunity to organic chemists to create structural diversities akin to nature's molecular arsenal. Recent advances in the area of combinatorial chemistry give an unprecedented technological support for rapid compilations of sugar amino acid-based libraries exploiting the diversities of carbohydrate molecules and well-developed solid-phase peptide synthesis methods. This review describes the development of sugar amino acids as a novel class of peptidomimetic building blocks and their applications in creating large number of structurally diverse peptide-based molecules many of which display interesting three-dimensional structures as well as useful biological properties. PMID:11945118

  9. Abscisic acid: biosynthesis, inactivation, homoeostasis and signalling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Park, Youngmin; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes during plant growth and abiotic stress responses. The endogenous ABA level is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms involving biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and signal transduction pathways. This complex regulatory network may target multiple levels, including transcription, translation and post-translational regulation of genes involved in ABA responses. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, catabolism and transport have been characterized. The local ABA concentration is critical for initiating ABA-mediated signalling during plant development and in response to environmental changes. In this chapter we discuss the mechanisms that regulate ABA biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and homoeostasis. We also present the findings of recent research on ABA perception by cellular receptors, and ABA signalling in response to cellular and environmental conditions.

  10. Development of Inhibitors of Salicylic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Kurimoto, Tetsuya; Seo, Eun-kyung; Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Asami, Tadao

    2015-08-19

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays important roles in the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. Determining the mechanism of SAR will extend our understanding of plant defenses against pathogens. We recently reported that PAMD is an inhibitor of SA signaling, which suppresses the expression of the pathogenesis-related PR genes and is expected to facilitate the understanding of SA signaling. However, PAMD strongly inhibits plant growth. To minimize the side effects of PAMD, we synthesized a number of PAMD derivatives, and identified compound 4 that strongly suppresses the expression of the PR genes with fewer adverse effects on plant growth than PAMD. We further showed that the adverse effects on plant growth were partially caused the stabilization of DELLA, which is also related to the pathogen responses. These results indicate that compound 4 would facilitate our understanding of SA signaling and its cross talk with other plant hormones.

  11. Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family Receptor Homologs in New World Monkey Cytomegaloviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Farré, Domènec; Martínez-Vicente, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox; Engel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Throughout evolution, large DNA viruses have been usurping genes from their hosts to equip themselves with proteins that restrain host immune defenses. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family (SLAMF) receptors are involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, which occurs upon engagement with their ligands via homotypic or heterotypic interactions. Here we report a total of seven SLAMF genes encoded by the genomes of two cytomegalovirus (CMV) species, squirrel monkey CMV (SMCMV) and owl monkey CMV (OMCMV), that infect New World monkeys. Our results indicate that host genes were captured by retrotranscription at different stages of the CMV-host coevolution. The most recent acquisition led to S1 in SMCMV. S1 is a SLAMF6 homolog with an amino acid sequence identity of 97% to SLAMF6 in its ligand-binding N-terminal Ig domain. We demonstrate that S1 is a cell surface glycoprotein capable of binding to host SLAMF6. Furthermore, the OMCMV genome encodes A33, an LY9 (SLAMF3) homolog, and A43, a CD48 (SLAMF2) homolog, two soluble glycoproteins which recognize their respective cellular counterreceptors and thus are likely to be viral SLAMF decoy receptors. In addition, distinct copies of further divergent CD48 homologs were found to be encoded by both CMV genomes. Remarkably, all these molecules display a number of unique features, including cytoplasmic tails lacking characteristic SLAMF signaling motifs. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel immune evasion mechanism in which incorporation of host SLAMF receptors that retain their ligand-binding properties enables viruses to interfere with SLAMF functions and to supply themselves with convenient structural molds for expanding their immunomodulatory repertoires. IMPORTANCE The way in which viruses shape their genomes under the continual selective pressure exerted by the host immune system is central for their survival. Here, we report that New World monkey cytomegaloviruses

  12. Fatty Acid Signaling: The New Function of Intracellular Lipases

    PubMed Central

    Papackova, Zuzana; Cahova, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, intracellular triacylglycerols (TAG) stored in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets have been considered to be only passive “energy conserves”. Nevertheless, degradation of TAG gives rise to a pleiotropic spectrum of bioactive intermediates, which may function as potent co-factors of transcription factors or enzymes and contribute to the regulation of numerous cellular processes. From this point of view, the process of lipolysis not only provides energy-rich equivalents but also acquires a new regulatory function. In this review, we will concentrate on the role that fatty acids liberated from intracellular TAG stores play as signaling molecules. The first part provides an overview of the transcription factors, which are regulated by fatty acids derived from intracellular stores. The second part is devoted to the role of fatty acid signaling in different organs/tissues. The specific contribution of free fatty acids released by particular lipases, hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose triacylglycerol lipase and lysosomal lipase will also be discussed. PMID:25674855

  13. L-Ascorbic Acid: A Multifunctional Molecule Supporting Plant Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is as essential to plants as it is to animals. Ascorbic acid functions as a major redox buffer and as a cofactor for enzymes involved in regulating photosynthesis, hormone biosynthesis, and regenerating other antioxidants. Ascorbic acid regulates cell division and growth and is involved in signal transduction. In contrast to the single pathway responsible for ascorbic acid biosynthesis in animals, plants use multiple pathways to synthesize ascorbic acid, perhaps reflecting the importance of this molecule to plant health. Given the importance of ascorbic acid to human nutrition, several technologies have been developed to increase the ascorbic acid content of plants through the manipulation of biosynthetic or recycling pathways. This paper provides an overview of these approaches as well as the consequences that changes in ascorbic acid content have on plant growth and function. Discussed is the capacity of plants to tolerate changes in ascorbic acid content. The many functions that ascorbic acid serves in plants, however, will require highly targeted approaches to improve their nutritional quality without compromising their health. PMID:24278786

  14. [Signaling molecules in the brain and epigenetic factors in neurodegenerative and mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomazkov, O A

    2015-01-01

    The literature on a role of signaling molecules in the organization of memory and cognitive functions is analyzed basing on mechanisms of memory physiology determined by a complex of biochemical processes initiated by the transmission of the signal to the synapse and completed by the synthesis of functionally significant molecules in the neuronal genetic apparatus. The center of these processes is a coordinated system of signal transduction, transcription, epigenetic and neurotrophic molecules. The dissonance of signal mechanisms is a prime cause of memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction as social maladaptation factors. The results of experimental and clinical studies of a role of the multilevel signaling system in age-related, neurodegenerative (Alzheimer’s disease) and mental (depression) disorders are discussed. At the same time, signaling molecules may be considered as particular targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26649375

  15. Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of acid-base systems, solvated molecules and MALDI matrix molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustis, Soren Newman

    Gas phase, mass-selected, anion photoelectron spectroscopic studies were performed on a variety of molecular systems. These studies can be grouped into three main themes: acid-base interactions, solvation, and ions of analytical interest. Acid-base interactions represent some of the most fundamental processes in chemistry. The study of these processes elucidates elementary principles such as inner and outer sphere complexes, hard and soft ions, and salt formation---to name a few. Apart from their appeal from a pedagogical standpoint, the ubiquity of chemical reactions which involve acids, bases or the resulting salts makes the study of their fundamental interactions both necessary and fruitful. With this in mind, the neutral and anionic series (NH3···HX) (X= F, Cl, Br, I) were examined experimentally and theoretically. The relatively small size of these systems, combined with the advances in computational methods, allowed our experimental results to be compared with very high level ab initio theoretical results. The synergy between theory and experiment yielded an understanding of the nature of the complexes that could not be achieved with either method in isolation. The second theme present in this body or work is molecular solvation. Solvation is a phenomenon which is present in biology, chemistry and physics. Many biological molecules do not become 'active' until they are solvated by water. Thus, the study of biologically relevant species solvated by water is one step in a bottom up approach to studying the biochemical interactions in living organisms. Furthermore, the hydration of acidic molecules in the atmosphere is what drives the formation of 'free' protons or hydronium ions which are the key players in acid driven chemistry. Here are presented two unique solvation studies, Adenine(H2O)-n and C6F6(H2O)-n, these systems are very distinct, but show somewhat similar responses to hydration. The last theme presented in this work is the electronic properties

  16. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling May Initiate Fetal Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Yun C.; Mutoh, Tetsuji; Lin, Mu-en; Noguchi, Kyoko; Rivera, Richard R.; Choi, Ji Woong; Kingsbury, Marcy A.; Chun, Jerold

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydrocephalus (FH), characterized by the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), enlarged heads, histological defects, and neurological dysfunction, is the most common neurological disorder of newborns. Although the etiology of FH remains unclear, it is known to be associated with intracranial hemorrhage. Here, we report that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a blood-borne lipid that activates signaling through G protein-coupled receptors, provides a molecular explanation for FH associated with hemorrhage and other conditions that increase LPA levels. A mouse model of intracranial hemorrhage in which the brains of mouse embryos were exposed to blood or LPA resulted in characteristics of FH that were dependent on the presence of the LPA1 receptor expressed by neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Administration of an LPA1 receptor antagonist blocked development of FH. These findings identify the LPA signaling pathway in the etiology of FH and suggest potential targets toward developing new therapeutics to treat FH. PMID:21900594

  17. Bile acid signaling and liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingjie; Wang, Xichun; Xu, Ganyu; Yan, Qingfeng; Huang, Wendong

    2015-02-01

    The liver is able to regenerate itself in response to partial hepatectomy or liver injury. This is accomplished by a complex network of different cell types and signals both inside and outside the liver. Bile acids (BAs) are recently identified as liver-specific metabolic signals and promote liver regeneration by activating their receptors: Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) and G-protein-coupled BA receptor 1 (GPBAR1, or TGR5). FXR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. FXR promotes liver regeneration after 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx) or liver injury. Moreover, activation of FXR is able to alleviate age-related liver regeneration defects. Both liver- and intestine-FXR are activated by BAs after liver resection or injury and promote liver regeneration through distinct mechanism. TGR5 is a membrane-bound BA receptor and it is also activated during liver regeneration. TGR5 regulates BA hydrophobicity and stimulates BA excretion in urine during liver regeneration. BA signaling thus represents a novel metabolic pathway during liver regeneration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  18. Altered retinoic acid signalling underpins dentition evolution.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Yann; Samarut, Eric; Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Bernard, Laure; Borday-Birraux, Véronique; Sadier, Alexa; Labbé, Catherine; Viriot, Laurent; Laudet, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Small variations in signalling pathways have been linked to phenotypic diversity and speciation. In vertebrates, teeth represent a reservoir of adaptive morphological structures that are prone to evolutionary change. Cyprinid fish display an impressive diversity in tooth number, but the signals that generate such diversity are unknown. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA) availability influences tooth number size in Cyprinids. Heterozygous adult zebrafish heterozygous for the cyp26b1 mutant that encodes an enzyme able to degrade RA possess an extra tooth in the ventral row. Expression analysis of pharyngeal mesenchyme markers such as dlx2a and lhx6 shows lateral, anterior and dorsal expansion of these markers in RA-treated embryos, whereas the expression of the dental epithelium markers dlx2b and dlx3b is unchanged. Our analysis suggests that changes in RA signalling play an important role in the diversification of teeth in Cyprinids. Our work illustrates that through subtle changes in the expression of rate-limiting enzymes, the RA pathway is an active player of tooth evolution in fish.

  19. Difficulties in Laboratory Studies and Astronomical Observations of Organic Molecules: Hydroxyacetone and Lactic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apponi, A. J.; Brewster, M. A.; Hoy, J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2006-01-01

    For the past 35 years, radio astronomy has revealed a rich organic chemistry in the interstellar gas, which is exceptionally complex towards active star-forming regions. New solar systems condense out of this gas and may influence the evolution of life on newly formed planets. Much of the biologically important functionality is present among the some 130 gas-phase molecules found to date, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, amines, amides and even the simplest sugar - glycolaldehyde. Still, many unidentified interstellar radio signals remain, and their identification relies on further laboratory study. The molecules hydroxyacetone and lactic acid are relatively small organic molecules, but possess rather complex rotational spectra owing to their high asymmetry. Hydroxyacetone is particularly problematic because it possess a very low barrier to internal rotation, and exhibits strong coupling of the free-rotor states with the overall rotation of the molecule. As in the case of acetamide, a full decomposition method was employed to order the resultant eigenstates onto normal asymmetric top eigenvectors.

  20. Structure of Replicating Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules 1

    PubMed Central

    Sebring, E. D.; Kelly, T. J.; Thoren, M. M.; Salzman, N. P.

    1971-01-01

    Properties of replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been examined by sedimentation analysis and by direct observation during a lytic cycle of infection of African green monkey kidney cells. Two types of replicating DNA molecules were observed in the electron microscope. One was an open structure containing two branch points, three branches, and no free ends whose length measurements were consistent with those expected for replicating SV40 DNA molecules. A second species had the same features as the open structure, but in addition it contained a superhelix in the unreplicated portion of the molecule. Eighty to ninety per cent of the replicative intermediates (RI) were in this latter configuration, and length measurements of these molecules also were consistent with replicating SV40 DNA. Replicating DNA molecules with this configuration have not been described previously. RI, when examined in ethidium bromide-cesium chloride (EB-CsCl) isopycnic gradients, banded in a heterogeneous manner. A fraction of the RI banded at the same density as circular SV40 DNA containing one or more single-strand nicks (component II). The remaining radioactive RI banded at densities higher than that of component II, and material was present at all densities between that of supercoiled double-stranded DNA (component I) and component II. When RI that banded at different densities in EB-CsCl were examined in alkaline gradients, cosedimentation of parental DNA and newly replicated DNA did not occur. All newly replicated DNA sedimented more slowly than did intact single-stranded SV40 DNA, a finding that is inconsistent with the rolling circle model of DNA replication. An inverse correlation exists between the extent of replication of the SV40 DNA and the banding density in EB-CsCl. Under alkaline conditions, the parental DNA strands that were contained in the RI sedimented as covalently closed structures. The sedimentation rates in alkali of the covalently closed

  1. Modulation of Host Biology by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules: Messengers or Traitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Chia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells sense their population density and respond accordingly by producing various signal molecules to the surrounding environments thereby trigger a plethora of gene expression. This regulatory pathway is termed quorum sensing (QS). Plenty of bacterial virulence factors are controlled by QS or QS-mediated regulatory systems and QS signal molecules (QSSMs) play crucial roles in bacterial signaling transduction. Moreover, bacterial QSSMs were shown to interfere with host cell signaling and modulate host immune responses. QSSMs not only regulate the expression of bacterial virulence factors but themselves act in the modulation of host biology that can be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26617576

  2. Xanthomonas campestris cell–cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell–cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell–cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  3. Xanthomonas campestris cell-cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-11-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell-cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell-cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery.

  4. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  5. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  6. Next Generation of Targeted Molecules for Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Intracellular Targets and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hannah; Ruan, Jia

    2016-09-15

    Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma have guided the development of targeted therapies that disrupt aberrant signaling pathways important for communication within lymphoma cells and for their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. This has led to unprecedented therapeutic progress, with biologic agents that have begun to transform the care of patients with lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This review discusses the mechanisms of action, clinical development, and emerging applications of small-molecule inhibitors that target B-cell receptor signaling pathways, B-cell lymphoma-2 inhibitors, selective inhibitors of nuclear export, and epigenetic modifiers. PMID:27633417

  7. Where are signal molecules likely to be located in anaerobic granular sludge?

    PubMed

    Feng, Huajun; Ding, Yangcheng; Wang, Meizhen; Zhou, Guanglan; Zheng, Xin; He, Hongzhen; Zhang, Xueqin; Shen, Dongsheng; Shentu, Jiali

    2014-03-01

    Quorum sensing is a concentration-sensing mechanism that plays a vital role in sludge granulation. In this study, the regularities of distribution of different signal molecules, including intra- and interspecific signal molecules (diffusible signal factor, DSF), interspecific signal molecules (autoinducter-2, AI-2) and intraspecific signal molecules (acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs), from three types of anaerobic granular sludge were investigated. The results showed that 70-90% of DSF was distributed in sludge, while AI-2 in the Water phase accounted for over 80% of the total content. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between DSF and AI-2, which played opposite roles in granulation. Moreover, more than 55% of short and medium acyl chain AHLs tended to spread in aqueous water, while the long acyl chain AHLs were closer to granular sludge than the short and medium acyl chain AHLs. With the exception of one type of sludge, the percentage of long acyl chain AHLs in the sludge phase was greater than 70%. The different distributions of signal molecules were primarily determined based on their physicochemical properties, including molecular weight and solubility in water or organic solutions. In addition, the basic properties of sludge, such as the granular level or the production of EPS, were closely related to the diversity, distribution and concentration of signal molecules. As a medium in granulation, extracellular polymeric substances production was regulated by different signal molecules from different parts of anaerobic granular sludge. This study provides a foundation for investigation of quorum sensing in the system of anaerobic granular sludge.

  8. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    PubMed Central

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickaël; Sauer, Jørgen; Sullivan, John T.; Maolanon, Nicolai; Vinther, Maria; Lorentzen, Andrea; Madsen, Esben B.; Jensen, Knud J.; Roepstorff, Peter; Thirup, Søren; Ronson, Clive W.; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides called Nod factors function as primary rhizobial signal molecules triggering legumes to develop new plant organs: root nodules that host the bacteria as nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 5 (NFR5) and Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1) bind Nod factor directly at high-affinity binding sites. Both receptor proteins were posttranslationally processed when expressed as fusion proteins and extracted from purified membrane fractions of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis thaliana. The N-terminal signal peptides were cleaved, and NFR1 protein retained its in vitro kinase activity. Processing of NFR5 protein was characterized by determining the N-glycosylation patterns of the ectodomain. Two different glycan structures with identical composition, Man3XylFucGlcNAc4, were identified by mass spectrometry and located at amino acid positions N68 and N198. Receptor–ligand interaction was measured by using ligands that were labeled or immobilized by application of chemoselective chemistry at the anomeric center. High-affinity ligand binding was demonstrated with both solid-phase and free solution techniques. The Kd values obtained for Nod factor binding were in the nanomolar range and comparable to the concentration range sufficient for biological activity. Structure-dependent ligand specificity was shown by using chitin oligosaccharides. Taken together, our results suggest that ligand recognition through direct ligand binding is a key step in the receptor-mediated activation mechanism leading to root nodule development in legumes. PMID:22859506

  9. Small molecule aptamer assays based on fluorescence anisotropy signal-enhancer oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Sandrine; Bouilloud, Prisca; De Oliveira Coelho, Gisella; Henry, Mickael; Peyrin, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Herein, we design novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) aptamer sensing platforms dedicated to small molecule detection. The assay strategy relied on enhanced fluctuations of segmental motion dynamics of the aptamer tracer mediated by an unlabelled, partially complementary oligonucleotide. The signal-enhancer oligonucleotide (SEO) essentially served as a free probe fraction revealer. By targeting specific regions of the signalling functional nucleic acid, the SEO binding to the unbound aptamer triggered perturbations of both the internal DNA flexibility and the localized dye environment upon the free probe to duplex structure transition. This potentiating effect determined increased FA variations between the duplex and target bound states of the aptameric probe. FA assay responses were obtained with both pre-structured (adenosine) and unstructured (tyrosinamide) aptamers and with dyes of different photochemical properties (fluorescein and texas red). The multiplexed analysis ability was further demonstrated through the simultaneous multicolour detection of the two small targets. The FA method appears to be especially simple, sensitive and widely applicable. PMID:27085946

  10. All-optical signal processing at 10 GHz using a photonic crystal molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Junay, Alexandra; De Rossi, Alfredo; Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano; Ménager, Loic; Peter Reithmaier, Johann

    2013-11-04

    We report on 10 GHz operation of an all-optical gate based on an Indium Phosphide Photonic Crystal Molecule. Wavelength conversion and all-optical mixing of microwave signals are demonstrated using the 2 mW output of a mode locked diode laser. The spectral separation of the optical pump and signal is crucial in suppressing optical cross-talk.

  11. Signaling Active CD95 Receptor Molecules Trigger Co-translocation of Inactive CD95 Molecules into Lipid Rafts*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Isabell; Fick, Andrea; Schäfer, Viktoria; Giner, Tina; Siegmund, Daniela; Wajant, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The capability of soluble CD95L trimers to trigger CD95-associated signaling pathways is drastically increased by oligomerization. The latter can be achieved, for example, by antibodies recognizing a N-terminal epitope tag in recombinant CD95L variants or by genetic engineering-enforced formation of hexamers. Using highly sensitive and accurate binding studies with recombinant CD95L variants equipped with a Gaussia princeps luciferase reporter domain, we found that oligomerization of CD95L has no major effect on CD95 occupancy. This indicates that the higher activity of oligomerized CD95L trimers is not related to an avidity-related increase in apparent affinity and points instead to a crucial role of aggregation of initially formed trimeric CD95L-CD95 complexes in CD95 activation. Furthermore, binding of soluble CD95L trimers was found to be insufficient to increase the association of CD95 with the lipid raft-containing membrane fraction. However, when Gaussia princeps luciferase-CD95L trimers were used as tracers to “mark” inactive CD95 molecules, increased association of these inactive receptors was observed upon activation of the remaining CD95 molecules by help of highly active hexameric Fc-CD95L or membrane CD95L. Moreover, in cells expressing endogenous CD95 and chimeric CD40-CD95 receptors, triggering of CD95 signaling via endogenous CD95 resulted in co-translocation of CD40-CD95 to the lipid raft fraction, whereas vice versa activation of CD95-associated pathways with Fc-CD40L via CD40-CD95 resulted in co-translocation of endogenous CD95. In sum, this shows that signaling-active CD95 molecules not only enhance their own association with the lipid raft-containing membrane fraction but also those of inactive CD95 molecules. PMID:22645131

  12. Coherent (photon) vs incoherent (current) detection of multidimensional optical signals from single molecules in open junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Hua, Weijie; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-06-07

    The nonlinear optical response of a current-carrying single molecule coupled to two metal leads and driven by a sequence of impulsive optical pulses with controllable phases and time delays is calculated. Coherent (stimulated, heterodyne) detection of photons and incoherent detection of the optically induced current are compared. Using a diagrammatic Liouville space superoperator formalism, the signals are recast in terms of molecular correlation functions which are then expanded in the many-body molecular states. Two dimensional signals in benzene-1,4-dithiol molecule show cross peaks involving charged states. The correlation between optical and charge current signal is also observed.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide in plants: from dissipation of excess sulfur to signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Alexander; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-09-15

    Sulfur is essential in all organisms for the synthesis of amino acids cysteine and methionine and as an active component of numerous co-factors and prosthetic groups. However, only plants, algae, fungi, and some prokaryotes are capable of using the abundant inorganic source of sulfur, sulfate. Plants take sulfate up, reduce it, and assimilate into organic compounds with cysteine being the first product of the pathway and a donor of reduced sulfur for synthesis of other S-containing compounds. Cysteine is formed in a reaction between sulfide, derived from reduction of sulfite and an activated amino acid acceptor, O-acetylserine. Sulfide is thus an important intermediate in sulfur metabolism, but numerous other functions in plants has been revealed. Hydrogen sulfide can serve as an alternative source of sulfur for plants, which may be significant in anaerobic conditions of waterlogged soils. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen sulfide have been detected from many plant species. Since the amount of H2S discharged correlated with sulfate supply to the plants, the emissions were considered a mechanism for dissipation of excess sulfur. Significant hydrogen sulfide emissions were also observed in plants infected with pathogens, particularly with fungi. H2S thus seems to be part of the widely discussed sulfur-induced-resistance/sulfur-enhanced-defense. Recently, however, more evidence has emerged for a role for H2S in regulation and signaling. Sulfide stabilizes the cysteine synthase complex, increasing so the synthesis of its acceptor O-acetylserine. H2S has been implicating in regulation of plant stress response, particularly draught stress. There are more and more examples of processes regulated by H2S in plants being discovered, and hydrogen sulfide is emerging as an important signaling molecule, similar to its role in the animal and human world. How similar the functions, and homeostasis of H2S are in these diverse organisms, however, remains to be elucidated.

  14. Expression and localization of the diacylglycerol kinase family and of phosphoinositide signaling molecules in adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Yasukazu; Akimoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Akihito; Otani, Koichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Goto, Kaoru

    2015-11-01

    Adrenal glands play a central role in the secretion of steroid hormones and catecholamines. Previous studies have revealed that molecules engaged in phosphoinositide (PI) turnover are expressed in the adrenal gland, suggesting the importance of PI signaling in adrenal signal transduction. Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG), a major second messenger in the PI signaling cascade. The DGK family is expressed in distinct patterns in endocrine organs at the mRNA and protein levels. Nevertheless, little is known about the characteristics and morphological aspects of DGKs in the adrenal gland. We have performed immunohistochemical analyses to investigate the expression and localization of DGK isozymes, together with PI signaling molecules, in the adrenal gland at the protein level. Our results show that the DGK family and a set of PI signaling molecules are expressed intensely in zona glomerulosa cells and medullary chromaffin cells in the adrenal gland. In adrenal cells, DGKγ localizes to the Golgi complex, DGKε to the plasma membrane, and DGKζ to the nucleus. These findings show the distinct expression and subcellular localization of DGK isozymes and PI signaling molecules in the adrenal gland, suggesting that each DGK isozyme has a role in signal transduction in adrenal cells, especially in the zona glomerulosa and medulla.

  15. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php.

  16. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  17. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Chang; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Roh, Tae-Young; Park, Jihwan; Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  18. Pyrene excimer signaling molecular beacons for probing nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Patrick; Yang, Chaoyong James; Wu, Yanrong; Chen, Yan; Martinez, Karen; Kim, Youngmi; Stevens, Nathan; Marti, Angel A; Jockusch, Steffen; Turro, Nicholas J; Tan, Weihong

    2008-01-01

    Molecular beacon DNA probes, containing 1-4 pyrene monomers on the 5' end and the quencher DABCYL on the 3' end, were engineered and employed for real-time probing of DNA sequences. In the absence of a target sequence, the multiple-pyrene labeled molecular beacons (MBs) assumed a stem-closed conformation resulting in quenching of the pyrene excimer fluorescence. In the presence of target, the beacons switched to a stem-open conformation, which separated the pyrene label from the quencher molecule and generated an excimer emission signal proportional to the target concentration. Steady-state fluorescence assays resulted in a subnanomolar limit of detection in buffer, whereas time-resolved signaling enabled low-nanomolar target detection in cell-growth media. It was found that the excimer emission intensity could be scaled by increasing the number of pyrene monomers conjugated to the 5' terminal. Each additional pyrene monomer resulted in substantial increases in the excimer emission intensities, quantum yields, and excited-state lifetimes of the hybridized MBs. The long fluorescence lifetime ( approximately 40 ns), large Stokes shift (130 nm), and tunable intensity of the excimer make this multiple-pyrene moiety a useful alternative to traditional fluorophore labeling in nucleic acid probes.

  19. Pyrene Excimer Signaling Molecular Beacons for Probing Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Patrick; Yang, Chaoyong James; Wu, Yanrong; Chen, Yan; Martinez, Karen; Kim, Youngmi; Stevens, Nathan; Marti, Angel A.; Jockusch, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Molecular beacon DNA probes, containing one to four pyrene monomers on the 5′ end and the quencher DABCYL on the 3′ end, were engineered and employed for real-time probing of DNA sequences. In the absence of a target sequence, the multiple-pyrene labeled molecular beacons (MBs) assumed a stem-closed conformation resulting in quenching of the pyrene excimer fluorescence. In the presence of target, the beacons switched to a stem-open conformation which separated the pyrene label from the quencher molecule and generated an excimer emission signal proportional to the target concentration. Steady-state fluorescence assays resulted in a sub-nanomolar limit of detection in buffer, while time-resolved signaling enabled low-nanomolar target detection in cell growth media. It was found that the excimer emission intensity could be scaled by increasing the number of pyrene monomers conjugated to the 5′ terminal. Each additional pyrene monomer resulted in substantial increases in the excimer emission intensities, quantum yields, and excited-state lifetimes of the hybridized MBs. The long fluorescence lifetime (~40 ns), large Stokes shift (130 nm), and tunable intensity of the excimer make this multiple-pyrene moiety a useful alternative to traditional fluorophore labeling in nucleic acid probes. In addition, this excimer complex serves as an efficient FRET donor for red-emitting fluorophores, such as TMR, for further extending the Stokes shift of the fluorescent complex. PMID:18078339

  20. Switching Off Key Signaling Survival Molecules to Switch On the Resolution of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Denise Alves; Athayde, Rayssa Maciel; Reis, Alesandra Corte; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological response of the immune system to injury or infection but may become chronic. In general, inflammation is self-limiting and resolves by activating a termination program named resolution of inflammation. It has been argued that unresolved inflammation may be the basis of a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases. Resolution of inflammation is an active process that is fine-tuned by the production of proresolving mediators and the shutdown of intracellular signaling molecules associated with cytokine production and leukocyte survival. Apoptosis of leukocytes (especially granulocytes) is a key element in the resolution of inflammation and several signaling molecules are thought to be involved in this process. Here, we explore key signaling molecules and some mediators that are crucial regulators of leukocyte survival in vivo and that may be targeted for therapeutic purposes in the context of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25136148

  1. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  2. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids.

    PubMed

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  3. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  4. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  5. Immunopathological roles of cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shui-Lian; Kuan, Woon-Pang; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with unknown etiology affecting more than one million individuals each year. It is characterized by B- and T-cell hyperactivity and by defects in the clearance of apoptotic cells and immune complexes. Understanding the complex process involved and the interaction between various cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, and pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in the immune pathways will provide valuable information on the development of novel therapeutic targets for treating SLE. In this paper, we review the immunopathological roles of novel cytokines, chemokines, signaling molecules, PRRs, and their interactions in immunoregulatory networks and suggest how their disturbances may implicate pathological conditions in SLE.

  6. Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules Produced by Reference and Emerging Soft-Rot Bacteria (Dickeya and Pectobacterium spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Hélias, Valérie; Taupin, Laure; Reverchon, Sylvie; Nasser, William; Faure, Denis; Dufour, Alain; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Heurlier, Karin; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Several small diffusible molecules are involved in bacterial quorum sensing and virulence. The production of autoinducers-1 and -2, quinolone, indole and γ-amino butyrate signaling molecules was investigated in a set of soft-rot bacteria belonging to six Dickeya or Pectobacterium species including recent or emerging potato isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Using bacterial biosensors, immunoassay, and chromatographic analysis, we showed that soft-rot bacteria have the common ability to produce transiently during their exponential phase of growth the N-3-oxo-hexanoyl- or the N-3-oxo-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactones and a molecule of the autoinducer-2 family. Dickeya spp. produced in addition the indole-3-acetic acid in tryptophan-rich conditions. All these signaling molecules have been identified for the first time in the novel Dickeya solani species. In contrast, quinolone and γ-amino butyrate signals were not identified and the corresponding synthases are not present in the available genomes of soft-rot bacteria. To determine if the variations of signal production according to growth phase could result from expression modifications of the corresponding synthase gene, the respective mRNA levels were estimated by reverse transcriptase-PCR. While the N-acyl-homoserine lactone production is systematically correlated to the synthase expression, that of the autoinducer-2 follows the expression of an enzyme upstream in the activated methyl cycle and providing its precursor, rather than the expression of its own synthase. Conclusions/Significance Despite sharing the S-adenosylmethionine precursor, no strong link was detected between the production kinetics or metabolic pathways of autoinducers-1 and -2. In contrast, the signaling pathway of autoinducer-2 seems to be switched off by the indole-3-acetic acid pathway under tryptophan control. It therefore appears that the two genera of soft-rot bacteria have similarities but also differences in the

  7. Signal molecules mediate the impact of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa on growth, development and defence of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Puga-Freitas, Ruben; Barot, Sébastien; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Blouin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Earthworms have generally a positive impact on plant growth, which is often attributed to a trophic mechanism: namely, earthworms increase the release of mineral nutrients from soil litter and organic matter. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed since the discovery of a signal molecule (Indole Acetic Acid) in earthworm faeces. In this study, we used methodologies developed in plant science to gain information on ecological mechanisms involved in plant-earthworm interaction, by looking at plant response to earthworm presence at a molecular level. First, we looked at plant overall response to earthworm faeces in an in vitro device where only signal molecules could have an effect on plant growth; we observed that earthworms were inducing positive or negative effects on different plant species. Then, using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with an impaired auxin transport, we demonstrated the potential of earthworms to stimulate root growth and to revert the dwarf mutant phenotype. Finally, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence and absence of earthworms; we found that genes modulated in the presence of earthworms are known to respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, or to the application of exogenous hormones. A comparison of our results with other studies found in databases revealed strong analogies with systemic resistance, induced by signal molecules emitted by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and/or elicitors emitted by non-virulent pathogens. Signal molecules such as auxin and ethylene, which are considered as major in plant-microorganisms interactions, can also be of prior importance to explain plant-macroinvertebrates interactions. This could imply revisiting ecological theories which generally stress on the role of trophic relationships.

  8. Signal molecules mediate the impact of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa on growth, development and defence of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Puga-Freitas, Ruben; Barot, Sébastien; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Blouin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Earthworms have generally a positive impact on plant growth, which is often attributed to a trophic mechanism: namely, earthworms increase the release of mineral nutrients from soil litter and organic matter. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed since the discovery of a signal molecule (Indole Acetic Acid) in earthworm faeces. In this study, we used methodologies developed in plant science to gain information on ecological mechanisms involved in plant-earthworm interaction, by looking at plant response to earthworm presence at a molecular level. First, we looked at plant overall response to earthworm faeces in an in vitro device where only signal molecules could have an effect on plant growth; we observed that earthworms were inducing positive or negative effects on different plant species. Then, using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with an impaired auxin transport, we demonstrated the potential of earthworms to stimulate root growth and to revert the dwarf mutant phenotype. Finally, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence and absence of earthworms; we found that genes modulated in the presence of earthworms are known to respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, or to the application of exogenous hormones. A comparison of our results with other studies found in databases revealed strong analogies with systemic resistance, induced by signal molecules emitted by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and/or elicitors emitted by non-virulent pathogens. Signal molecules such as auxin and ethylene, which are considered as major in plant-microorganisms interactions, can also be of prior importance to explain plant-macroinvertebrates interactions. This could imply revisiting ecological theories which generally stress on the role of trophic relationships. PMID:23226498

  9. Signal Molecules Mediate the Impact of the Earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa on Growth, Development and Defence of the Plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Puga-Freitas, Ruben; Barot, Sébastien; Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Blouin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Earthworms have generally a positive impact on plant growth, which is often attributed to a trophic mechanism: namely, earthworms increase the release of mineral nutrients from soil litter and organic matter. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed since the discovery of a signal molecule (Indole Acetic Acid) in earthworm faeces. In this study, we used methodologies developed in plant science to gain information on ecological mechanisms involved in plant-earthworm interaction, by looking at plant response to earthworm presence at a molecular level. First, we looked at plant overall response to earthworm faeces in an in vitro device where only signal molecules could have an effect on plant growth; we observed that earthworms were inducing positive or negative effects on different plant species. Then, using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with an impaired auxin transport, we demonstrated the potential of earthworms to stimulate root growth and to revert the dwarf mutant phenotype. Finally, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence and absence of earthworms; we found that genes modulated in the presence of earthworms are known to respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, or to the application of exogenous hormones. A comparison of our results with other studies found in databases revealed strong analogies with systemic resistance, induced by signal molecules emitted by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria and/or elicitors emitted by non-virulent pathogens. Signal molecules such as auxin and ethylene, which are considered as major in plant-microorganisms interactions, can also be of prior importance to explain plant-macroinvertebrates interactions. This could imply revisiting ecological theories which generally stress on the role of trophic relationships. PMID:23226498

  10. The Adapter Molecule Sin Regulates T-Cell-Receptor-Mediated Signal Transduction by Modulating Signaling Substrate Availability

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Luzhou; Donlin, Laura T.; Miller, Rebecca H.; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina

    2004-01-01

    Engagement of the T-cell receptor (TCR) results in the activation of a multitude of signaling events that regulate the function of T lymphocytes. These signaling events are in turn modulated by adapter molecules, which control the final functional output through the formation of multiprotein complexes. In this report, we identified the adapter molecule Sin as a new regulator of T-cell activation. We found that the expression of Sin in transgenic T lymphocytes and Jurkat T cells inhibited interleukin-2 expression and T-cell proliferation. This inhibitory effect was specific and was due to defective phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) phosphorylation and activation. In contrast to other adapters that become phosphorylated upon TCR stimulation, Sin was constitutively phosphorylated in resting cells by the Src kinase Fyn and bound to signaling intermediates, including PLC-γ. In stimulated cells, Sin was transiently dephosphorylated, which coincided with transient dissociation of Fyn and PLC-γ. Downregulation of Sin expression using Sin-specific short interfering RNA oligonucleotides inhibited transcriptional activation in response to TCR stimulation. Our results suggest that endogenous Sin influences T-lymphocyte signaling by sequestering signaling substrates and regulating their availability and/or activity in resting cells, while Sin is required for targeting these intermediates to the TCR for fast signal transmission during stimulation. PMID:15121874

  11. Effects of an EGFR-binding affibody molecule on intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Ekerljung, L; Sahlberg, S H; Carlsson, J; Lennartsson, J; Glimelius, B

    2010-04-01

    Effects on intracellular signaling were studied in cells treated with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2 that targets the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is overexpressed in many types of cancers and plays a fundamental role in cell signaling and it is of interest to find targeting agents capable of blocking the receptor. The clinically approved antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) and the natural ligand EGF were included as reference molecules. Two EGFR-rich cell lines, A-431 and U-343, were exposed to the three targeting agents and lysed. The cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with the receptors, or directly separated by SDS-Page. Autophosphorylation of the receptors and phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins Erk and Akt, were evaluated by Western blotting. Although the three different agents compete for the same binding site on EGFR, they influenced the signaling differently. The affibody molecule did not induce autophosphorylation of EGFR or any other receptor in the EGFR-family but, in spite of this, induced phosphorylation of Erk in both cell lines and Akt in the A-431 cells. Thus, the results suggest that the signaling pattern induced by (ZEGFR:955)2 is only partly similar to that induced by cetuximab. This makes the affibody molecule a potentially interesting alternative to cetuximab for EGFR-targeted therapy since it might give different therapy-related effects on tumor cells and different side effects on normal tissues. PMID:20198342

  12. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics. PMID:26490957

  13. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics.

  14. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382 entries of 182 unique signaling molecules from 215 organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform ‘SigMol’. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics. PMID:26490957

  15. Feeding by whiteflies suppresses downstream jasmonic acid signaling by eliciting salicylic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng-Jun; Li, Wei-Di; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Jin-Ming; Xu, Fang-Cheng; Lu, Yao-Bin

    2013-05-01

    Phloem-feeding whiteflies in the species complex Bemisia tabaci cause extensive crop damage worldwide. One of the reasons for their "success" is their ability to suppress the effectual jasmonic acid (JA) defenses of the host plant. However, little is understood about the mechanisms underlying whitefly suppression of JA-regulated defenses. Here, we showed that the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes (EDS1 and PR1) in Arabidopsis thaliana was significantly enhanced during feeding by whitefly nymphs. Whereas upstream JA-responsive genes (LOX2 and OPR3) also were induced, the downstream JA-responsive gene (VSP1) was repressed, i.e., whiteflies only suppressed downstream JA signaling. Gene-expression analyses with various Arabidopsis mutants, including NahG, npr-1, ein2-1, and dde2-2, revealed that SA signaling plays a key role in the suppression of downstream JA defenses by whitefly feeding. Assays confirmed that SA activation enhanced whitefly performance by suppressing downstream JA defenses.

  16. Signaling molecules and pathways regulating the fate of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Kokkinaki, Maria; Dym, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process that involves the division and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are a subpopulation of type A spermatogonia resting on the basement membrane in the mammalian testis. Self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are the foundation of normal spermatogenesis, and thus a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in the SSCs is of paramount importance for the regulation of spermatogenesis and may eventually lead to novel targets for male contraception as well as for gene therapy of male infertility and testicular cancer. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms is also of great interest to a better understanding of SSC aging and for developing novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases in view of the recent work demonstrating the pluripotent potential of the SSC. Progress has recently been made in elucidating the signaling molecules and pathways that determine cell fate decisions of SSCs. In this review, we first address the morphological features, phenotypic characteristics, and the potential of SSCs. And then we focus on the recent advances in defining the key signaling molecules and crucial signaling pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. The association of aberrant expression of signaling molecules and cascades with abnormal spermatogenesis and testicular cancer are also discussed. Finally we point out potential future directions to pursue in research on signaling pathways of SSCs. PMID:19263492

  17. Basic roles of key molecules connected with NMDAR signaling pathway on regulating learning and memory and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    With key roles in essential brain functions ranging from the long-term potentiation (LTP) to synaptic plasticity, the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) can be considered as one of the fundamental glutamate receptors in the central nervous system. The role of NMDA R was first identified in synaptic plasticity and has been extensively studied. Some molecules, such as Ca(2+), postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II), protein kinase A (PKA), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive element binding protein (CREB), are of special importance in learning and memory. This review mainly focused on the new research of key molecules connected with learning and memory, which played important roles in the NMDAR signaling pathway. PMID:27583167

  18. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  19. Acupuncture Alters Expression of Insulin Signaling Related Molecules and Improves Insulin Resistance in OLETF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To determine effect of acupuncture on insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats and to evaluate expression of insulin signaling components. Rats were divided into three groups: Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, OLETF rats, and acupuncture+OLETF rats. Acupuncture was subcutaneously applied to Neiguan (PC6), Zusanli (ST36), and Sanyinjiao (SP6); in contrast, acupuncture to Shenshu (BL23) was administered perpendicularly. For Neiguan (PC6) and Zusanli (ST36), needles were connected to an electroacupuncture (EA) apparatus. Fasting blood glucose (FPG) was measured by glucose oxidase method. Plasma fasting insulin (FINS) and serum C peptide (C-P) were determined by ELISA. Protein and mRNA expressions of insulin signaling molecules were determined by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. OLETF rats exhibit increased levels of FPG, FINS, C-P, and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which were effectively decreased by acupuncture treatment. mRNA expressions of several insulin signaling related molecules IRS1, IRS2, Akt2, aPKCζ, and GLUT4 were decreased in OLETF rats compared to SD controls. Expression of these molecules was restored back to normal levels upon acupuncture administration. PI3K-p85α was increased in OLETF rats; this increase was also reversed by acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture improves insulin resistance in OLETF rats, possibly via regulating expression of key insulin signaling related molecules. PMID:27738449

  20. Recent developments in the localization of oil body-associated signaling molecules during lipolysis in oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Bhatla, Satish C; Vandana, Shweta; Kaushik, Vibha

    2009-03-01

    Prior to and/or accompanying lipolytic degradation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) during seed germination in oilseeds, certain enzymatic and non-enzymatic signaling molecules are expressed on the oil body membranes. These include certain proteases, lipoxygenase, phospholipase A(2) and lipase. Although enough biochemical investigations have demonstrated their activities, recent developments in the in situ localization of these signaling molecules in germinating oilseeds, have enhanced our understanding in this field. This is evident from the temporal and spatial changes observed in the expression pattern of some of these molecules. Present review aims at providing an up-to-date account of these recent developments in the author's and other laboratories, which are largely based on fluorescence microscopic and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging of the molecular changes using specific fluorescent probes. A model for the molecular events associated with oil body mobilization is also being presented.

  1. Recent developments in the localization of oil body-associated signaling molecules during lipolysis in oilseeds

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, Shweta; Kaushik, Vibha

    2009-01-01

    Prior to and/or accompanying lipolytic degradation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) during seed germination in oilseeds, certain enzymatic and non-enzymatic signaling molecules are expressed on the oil body membranes. These include certain proteases, lipoxygenase, phospholipase A2 and lipase. Although enough biochemical investigations have demonstrated their activities, recent developments in the in situ localization of these signaling molecules in germinating oilseeds, have enhanced our understanding in this field. This is evident from the temporal and spatial changes observed in the expression pattern of some of these molecules. Present review aims at providing an up-to-date account of these recent developments in the author's and other laboratories, which are largely based on fluorescence microscopic and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging of the molecular changes using specific fluorescent probes. A model for the molecular events associated with oil body mobilization is also being presented. PMID:19721744

  2. Single-molecule characterization and engineering of the surfaces of nucleic acid sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephs, Eric Alan

    The advent of personalized medicine will require biosensors capable of reliably detecting small levels of disease biomarkers. In microarrays and sensors for nucleic acids, hybridization events between surface-tethered DNA probes and the nucleic acids of interest (targets) are transduced into a detectable signal. However, target-binding ultimately occurs as a result of molecular motions and interactions between the probe and target at the nanometer scale, and common characterization methods either lack the resolution to characterize the sensors at this scale or provide only limited information about their interactions with their nanoscale chemical environment. In this dissertation I argue that an impediment to the development of more reliable and practical biosensors is the lack of knowledge and control of the nanometer length-scale structure of biosensor surfaces, which has a profound impact on molecular recognition and reactions for detection. After reviewing the fundamental surface chemistry and structural motifs of biosensors in Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 I use electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) to characterize in situ a common class of model nucleic acid sensors---thiolated DNA attached to a gold electrode which has been passivated by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer---with single-molecule resolution. This level of detail allows me to observe both the conformations of individual probes and their spatial distribution at the nanoscale, then determine how these are affected by assembly conditions, probe structure, and interactions with co-adsorbates. I also determine how these nanoscale details affect the dynamic response of probes to electric fields, which have been commonly used in sensing schemes, and ultimately the ability of the surface-tethered probes to bind with target nucleic acids. In Chapter 3, I demonstrate and optimize the nanoscale patterning of individual DNA molecules into isolated, chemically well-defined niches on the surface

  3. Polysialic Acid Directs Tumor Cell Growth by Controlling Heterophilic Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seidenfaden, Ralph; Krauter, Andrea; Schertzinger, Frank; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2003-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA), a carbohydrate polymer attached to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promotes neural plasticity and tumor malignancy, but its mode of action is controversial. Here we establish that PSA controls tumor cell growth and differentiation by interfering with NCAM signaling at cell-cell contacts. Interactions between cells with different PSA and NCAM expression profiles were initiated by enzymatic removal of PSA and by ectopic expression of NCAM or PSA-NCAM. Removal of PSA from the cell surface led to reduced proliferation and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), inducing enhanced survival and neuronal differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. Blocking with an NCAM-specific peptide prevented these effects. Combinatorial transinteraction studies with cells and membranes with different PSA and NCAM phenotypes revealed that heterophilic NCAM binding mimics the cellular responses to PSA removal. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that PSA masks heterophilic NCAM signals, having a direct impact on tumor cell growth. This provides a mechanism for how PSA may promote the genesis and progression of highly aggressive PSA-NCAM-positive tumors. PMID:12897159

  4. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  5. Olive oils modulate fatty acid content and signaling protein expression in apolipoprotein E knockout mice brain.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Regina; Navarro, María A; Vögler, Oliver; Perona, Javier S; Osada, Jesús; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis contributes to disruption of neuronal signaling pathways by producing lipid-dependent modifications of brain plasma membranes, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether long-term (11 weeks) consumption of refined- (ROO) and pomace- (POO) olive oil modulated the fatty acid composition and the levels of membrane signaling proteins in the brain of apolipoprotein E (apoE) knockout (KO) mice, an animal model of atherosclerosis. Both of these oils are rich in bioactive molecules with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. ROO and POO long-term consumption increased the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), particularly of oleic acid, while reducing the level of the saturated fatty acids (SFAs) palmitic and stearic acid. As a result, the MUFA:SFA ratio was higher in apoE KO mice brain fed with ROO and POO. Furthermore, both oils reduced the level of arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid, suggesting a decrease in the generation of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. Finally, ROO and POO induced an increase in the density of membrane proteins implicated in both the Galphas/PKA and Galphaq/PLCbeta1/PKCalpha signaling pathways. The combined effects of long-term ROO and POO consumption on fatty acid composition and the level of signaling proteins involved in PKA and PKC activation, suggest positive effects on neuroinflammation and brain function in apoE KO mice brain, and convert these oils into promising functional foods in diseases involving apoE deficiency.

  6. Old concepts, new molecules and current approaches applied to the bacterial nucleotide signalling field.

    PubMed

    Gründling, Angelika; Lee, Vincent T

    2016-11-01

    Signalling nucleotides are key molecules that help bacteria to rapidly coordinate cellular pathways and adapt to changes in their environment. During the past 10 years, the nucleotide signalling field has seen much excitement, as several new signalling nucleotides have been discovered in both eukaryotic and bacterial cells. The fields have since advanced quickly, aided by the development of important tools such as the synthesis of modified nucleotides, which, combined with sensitive mass spectrometry methods, allowed for the rapid identification of specific receptor proteins along with other novel genome-wide screening methods. In this review, we describe the principle concepts of nucleotide signalling networks and summarize the recent work that led to the discovery of the novel signalling nucleotides. We also highlight current approaches applied to the research in the field as well as resources and methodological advances aiding in a rapid identification of nucleotide-specific receptor proteins.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'. PMID:27672152

  7. Hormones, neurosecretions, and growth factors as signal molecules for intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Sicard, R E

    1986-01-01

    Chemical signals, whether in the form of hormones, neurosecretions (neurotransmitters and neuropeptides), or growth factors and chalones are used to communicate information to cells at all stages of their life cycle. These signals inform the cells when it is time to progress through developmental change, when to change the rates of various activities (e.g. metabolism or contraction), and, in some cases, even when it is time to die. Throughout all of these interactive exchanges, the signal molecule itself carries no intrinsic message of a universal nature. The chemical identity of the signal molecule has meaning only for those cells competent to receive the signal (i.e. does it possess an appropriate receptor?). Moreover, it is the nature of the cell receiving the signal (itself the product of innumerable previous encounters with signals from other cells) that dictates the specific response that a particular signal will evoke. The signal emitted by the communicating cell only informs the target cell that it is time to act in a manner consistent with that signal. The majority of the discussion has been from the perspective of vertebrate organisms. Moreover, of necessity, the discussion has been general and superficial. The primary objective of the preceding discussion has been to underscore major similarities and differences existing among hormones, neurosecretions (neurotransmitters and neuropeptides), and growth factors as information-bearing substances used in communication among vertebrate cells. It should be realized that similar means of communication are employed by multicellular invertebrates, by plants, and even by single-celled organisms such as the protists and bacteria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  9. Soluble co-signaling molecules predict long-term graft outcome in kidney-transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Melendreras, Susana G; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Menéndez, Aurora; Bravo-Mendoza, Cristina; González-Vidal, Ana; Coto, Eliecer; Díaz-Corte, Carmen; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; López-Larrea, Carlos; Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Co-signaling molecules are responsible for full T-cell activation after solid organ transplantation. Their increased expression can lead to the release of a soluble form that can modulate the immune response post-transplantation. We analyzed the presence of co-signaling molecules (sCD30, sCD40, sCD137, sCTLA-4, sCD80, sCD28, sCD40L, sPD-1, and sPD-L1) in serum from kidney-transplanted patients (n = 59) obtained at different times (before transplantation, and 15 days, 3 months and 1 year post-transplantation) and their contribution to graft outcome was evaluated using principal component analysis. Before transplantation, high levels of soluble co-signaling molecules (mainly sCD30, sCD137 and sCD40) were detected in all patients. These molecules were modulated soon after receiving an allograft but never attained similar levels to those of healthy controls. A signature based on the determination of six soluble co-stimulatory (sCD30, sCD40, sCD137 and sCD40L) and co-inhibitory (sPD-1 and sPD-L1) molecules at 3 months post-transplantation allowed a group of patients to be identified (27.12%) with a worse long-term graft outcome. Patients with high levels of soluble molecules showed a progressive and gradual deterioration of kidney function (increased creatinine and proteinuria levels and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate) over time and a higher risk of graft loss at 6 years post-transplantation than patients with low levels of these molecules (62.55% versus 5.14%, p<0.001). Thus, our data show an aberrant expression of soluble co-signaling molecules in kidney-transplanted patients whose quantification at 3 months post-transplantation might be a useful biomarker of immune status and help to predict long-term graft evolution.

  10. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) mediates renal epithelial cell repair via ERK MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Cai, Cindy X

    2016-01-01

    The expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), a very promising sensitive and specific urinary biomarker for acute renal injury, is markedly upregulated in injured and regenerating renal proximal tubular epithelial cells following ischemic or toxic insults, suggesting a possible role for this molecule in renal repair process. In the present study we report that expression of KIM-1 facilitates renal tubular epithelial cell repair by promoting cell migration and proliferation. KIM-1 expression also enhances ERK MAPK activation, and the modulatory effect of KIM-1 on cellular repair process is likely mediated via ERK MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27084535

  11. Two 2[5H]-Furanones as Possible Signaling Molecules in Lactobacillus helveticus

    PubMed Central

    Ndagijimana, Maurice; Vallicelli, Melania; Cocconcelli, P. Sandro; Cappa, Fabrizio; Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Guerzoni, M. Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    Two 2[5H]-furanones, in association with medium-chain fatty acids, were released in whey by Lactobacillus helveticus exposed to oxidative and heat stresses. This species plays an important role in cheese technology, particularly for Swiss-type cheeses and Grana cheese. Moreover, it significantly contributes to cheese ripening by means of an early autolysis and the release of enzymes during processing. Experimental evidence of the involvement of the two 2[5H]-furanones, detected by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/solid-phase microextraction technique, in the autolysis phenomenon has been obtained. Zymograms performed by using renaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were used to detect the bioactivity of the supernatants containing the two furanones on fresh cells of the same strain. In addition to bands corresponding to known autolysins, new autolysins were detected concomitant with the exposure of Lactobacillus helveticus to the supernatants, which can be regarded as conditioned media (CM), and to a commercial furanone, 5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methyl-2[5H]-furanone (HEMFi), having spectral data similar to those of the newly described 2[5H]-furanones. Morphological changes were observed when fresh cells were exposed to CM containing the two 2[5H]-furanones and HEMFi. The two furanones produced by Lactobacillus helveticus, which met a number of criteria to be included in cell-cell signaling molecules, have a presumptive molecular mass lower than those of already known 3[2H]-furanones having an autolytic activity and being produced by gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, they present a different chemical structure with respect to the furanones already identified as products of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris or to those identified in some cheeses with Lactobacillus helveticus as a starter culture. PMID:16957229

  12. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-01

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  13. Development of A Cell-Based Assay to Identify Small Molecule Inhibitors of FGF23 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Diener, Susanne; Schorpp, Kenji; Strom, Tim-Matthias; Hadian, Kamyar; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a bone-derived endocrine key regulator of phosphate homeostasis. It inhibits renal tubular phosphate reabsorption by activating receptor complexes composed of FGF receptor 1c (FGFR1c) and the co-receptor Klotho. As a major signaling pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is employed. In this study, we established an FGF23-inducible cell model by stably expressing human Klotho in HEK293 cells (HEK293-KL cells) containing endogenous FGF receptors. To identify novel small molecule compounds that modulate FGF23/FGFR1c/Klotho signaling, we developed and optimized a cell-based assay that is suited for high-throughput screening. The assay monitors the phosphorylation of endogenous extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 in cellular lysates of HEK293-KL cells after induction with FGF23. This cell-based assay was highly robust (Z' factor >0.5) and the induction of the system is strictly dependent on the presence of FGF23. The inhibitor response curves generated using two known MAPK pathway inhibitors correlate well with data obtained by another assay format. This assay was further used to identify small molecule modulators of the FGF23 signaling cascade by screening the 1,280 food and drug administration-approved small molecule library of Prestwick Chemical. The primary hit rate was 2% and false positives were efficiently identified by retesting the hits in primary and secondary validation screening assays and in western blot analysis. Intriguingly, by using a basic FGF (bFGF)/FGFR counterscreening approach, one validated hit compound retained specificity toward FGF23 signaling, while bFGF signaling was not affected. Since increased plasma concentrations of FGF23 are the main cause of many hypophosphatemic disorders, a modulation of its effect could be a potential novel strategy for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, this strategy may be valuable for other disorders affecting phosphate homeostasis. PMID:26461432

  14. Rhizosphere ecology of lumichrome and riboflavin, two bacterial signal molecules eliciting developmental changes in plants.

    PubMed

    Dakora, Felix D; Matiru, Viviene N; Kanu, Alfred S

    2015-01-01

    Lumichrome and riboflavin are novel molecules from rhizobial exudates that stimulate plant growth. Reported studies have revealed major developmental changes elicited by lumichrome at very low nanomolar concentrations (5 nM) in plants, which include early initiation of trifoliate leaves, expansion of unifoliate and trifoliate leaves, increased stem elongation and leaf area, and consequently greater biomass accumulation in monocots and dicots. But higher lumichrome concentration (50 nM) depressed root development and reduced growth of unifoliate and second trifoliate leaves. While the mechanisms remain unknown, it is possible that lumichrome released by rhizobia induced the biosynthesis of classical phytohormones that caused the observed developmental changes in plants. We also showed in earlier studies that applying either 10 nM lumichrome, 10 nM ABA, or 10 ml of infective rhizobial cells (0.2 OD600) to roots of monocots and dicots for 44 h produced identical effects, which included decreased stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration in Bambara groundnut, soybean, and maize, increased stomatal conductance and transpiration in cowpea and lupin, and elevated root respiration in maize (19% by rhizobia and 20% by lumichrome). Greater extracellular exudation of lumichrome, riboflavin and indole acetic acid by N2-fixing rhizobia over non-fixing bacteria is perceived to be an indication of their role as symbiotic signals. This is evidenced by the increased concentration of lumichrome and riboflavin in the xylem sap of cowpea and soybean plants inoculated with infective rhizobia. In fact, greater xylem concentration of lumichrome in soybean and its correspondingly increased accumulation in leaves was found to result in dramatic developmental changes than in cowpea. Furthermore, lumichrome and riboflavin secreted by soil rhizobia are also known to function as (i) ecological cues for sensing environmental stress, (ii) growth factors for microbes, plants, and humans, (iii

  15. Rhizosphere ecology of lumichrome and riboflavin, two bacterial signal molecules eliciting developmental changes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Dakora, Felix D.; Matiru, Viviene N.; Kanu, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Lumichrome and riboflavin are novel molecules from rhizobial exudates that stimulate plant growth. Reported studies have revealed major developmental changes elicited by lumichrome at very low nanomolar concentrations (5 nM) in plants, which include early initiation of trifoliate leaves, expansion of unifoliate and trifoliate leaves, increased stem elongation and leaf area, and consequently greater biomass accumulation in monocots and dicots. But higher lumichrome concentration (50 nM) depressed root development and reduced growth of unifoliate and second trifoliate leaves. While the mechanisms remain unknown, it is possible that lumichrome released by rhizobia induced the biosynthesis of classical phytohormones that caused the observed developmental changes in plants. We also showed in earlier studies that applying either 10 nM lumichrome, 10 nM ABA, or 10 ml of infective rhizobial cells (0.2 OD600) to roots of monocots and dicots for 44 h produced identical effects, which included decreased stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration in Bambara groundnut, soybean, and maize, increased stomatal conductance and transpiration in cowpea and lupin, and elevated root respiration in maize (19% by rhizobia and 20% by lumichrome). Greater extracellular exudation of lumichrome, riboflavin and indole acetic acid by N2-fixing rhizobia over non-fixing bacteria is perceived to be an indication of their role as symbiotic signals. This is evidenced by the increased concentration of lumichrome and riboflavin in the xylem sap of cowpea and soybean plants inoculated with infective rhizobia. In fact, greater xylem concentration of lumichrome in soybean and its correspondingly increased accumulation in leaves was found to result in dramatic developmental changes than in cowpea. Furthermore, lumichrome and riboflavin secreted by soil rhizobia are also known to function as (i) ecological cues for sensing environmental stress, (ii) growth factors for microbes, plants, and humans, (iii

  16. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation.

  17. Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling by Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of cell signaling pathways as well as many bacterial and viral infection processes. As such, they define critical targets for drug development against diseases such as cancer, arthritis, obesity, AIDS and many others. Until now, the clinical inhibition of protein-protein interactions and signaling has been accomplished with the use of antibodies or soluble versions of receptor molecules. Small molecule replacements of these therapeutic agents have been extremely difficult to develop; either the necessary potency has been hard to achieve or the expected biological effect has not been obtained. In this presentation, we show that a rigorous thermodynamic approach that combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a unique platform for the identification and optimization of small molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in the development of cell entry inhibitors of HIV-1 using this approach will be discussed.

  18. Caffeine and REM sleep deprivation: Effect on basal levels of signaling molecules in area CA1.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Alhaider, Ibrahim A

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effect of chronic caffeine treatment on basal levels of memory-related signaling molecules in area CA1 of sleep-deprived rats. Animals in the caffeine groups were treated with caffeine in drinking water (0.3g/l) for four weeks before they were REM sleep-deprived for 24h in the Modified Multiple Platforms paradigm. Western blot analysis of basal protein levels of plasticity- and memory-related signaling molecules in hippocampal area CA1 showed significant down regulation of the basal levels of phosphorylated- and total-CaMKII, phosphorylated- and total-CREB as well as those of BDNF and CaMKIV in sleep deprived rats. All these changes were completely prevented in rats that chronically consumed caffeine. The present findings suggest an important neuroprotective property of caffeine in sleep deprivation. PMID:26767416

  19. The roles of bile acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in the hepatobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Yuza, Kizuki; Hirose, Yuki; Nakajima, Masato; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Hait, Nitai C; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Based on research carried out over the last decade, it has become increasingly evident that bile acids act not only as detergents, but also as important signaling molecules that exert various biological effects via activation of specific nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways. Bile acids also regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in the synthesis and metabolism of bile acids, glucose, fatty acids, and lipoproteins, as well as energy metabolism. Receptors activated by bile acids include, farnesoid X receptor α, pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled receptors, TGR5, muscarinic receptor 2, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)2. The ligand of S1PR2, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates various physiological and pathophysiological cellular processes. We have recently reported that conjugated bile acids, via S1PR2, activate and upregulate nuclear sphingosine kinase 2, increase nuclear S1P, and induce genes encoding enzymes and transporters involved in lipid and sterol metabolism in the liver. Here, we discuss the role of bile acids and S1P signaling in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:27459945

  20. Gasotransmitters are emerging as new guard cell signaling molecules and regulators of leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2013-03-01

    Specialized guard cells modulate plant gas exchange through the regulation of stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is a direct function of the volume of the guard cells. The transport of solutes across channels in plasma membrane is a crucial process in the maintenance of guard cell water status. The fine tuned regulation of that transport requires an integrated convergence of multiple endogenous and exogenous signals perceived at both the cellular and the whole plant level. Gasotransmitters are novel signaling molecules with key functions in guard cell physiology. Three gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) are involved in guard cell regulatory processes. These molecules are endogenously produced by plant cells and are part of the guard cells responses to drought stress conditions through ABA-dependent pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of gasotransmitters as versatile molecules interacting with different components of guard cell signaling network and propose them as players in new paradigms to study ABA-independent guard cell responses to water deficit.

  1. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  2. Nucleic acid detection technologies and marker molecules in bacterial diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Kurg, Ants

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing need for quick and reliable methods for microorganism detection and identification worldwide. Although traditional culture-based technologies are trustworthy and accurate at a relatively low cost, they are also time- and labor-consuming and are limited to culturable bacteria. Those weaknesses have created a necessity for alternative technologies that are capable for faster and more precise bacterial identification from medical, food or environmental samples. The most common current approach is to analyze the nucleic acid component of analyte solution and determine the bacterial composition according to the specific nucleic acid profiles that are present. This review aims to give an up-to-date overview of different nucleic acid target sequences and respective analytical technologies.

  3. 2-Fatty acrylic acids: new highly derivatizable lipophilic platform molecules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the incorporation of an alpha-methylene unit into fatty acid skeletons. Since the new olefin is conjugated with the carboxylate, it is susceptible to 1,4- (Michael) additions. We have used multifunctional thiols and amines for additions at the methylene. The resulting products ...

  4. Electric Dipole Moments of Nanosolvated Acid Molecules in Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggemos, Nicholas; Slavíček, Petr; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    The electric dipole moments of (H2O)nDCl (n =3 - 9 ) clusters have been measured by the beam-deflection method. Reflecting the (dynamical) charge distribution within the system, the dipole moment contributes information about the microscopic structure of nanoscale solvation. The addition of a DCl molecule to a water cluster results in a strongly enhanced susceptibility. There is evidence for a noticeable rise in the dipole moment occurring at n ≈5 - 6 . This size is consistent with predictions for the onset of ionic dissociation. Additionally, a molecular-dynamics model suggests that even with a nominally bound impurity an enhanced dipole moment can arise due to the thermal and zero-point motion of the proton and the water molecules. The experimental measurements and the calculations draw attention to the importance of fluctuations in defining the polarity of water-based nanoclusters and generally to the essential role played by motional effects in determining the response of fluxional nanoscale systems under realistic conditions.

  5. Surface functionalization of bioactive glasses with natural molecules of biological significance, Part I: Gallic acid as model molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Ferraris, Sara; Prenesti, Enrico; Verné, Enrica

    2013-12-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) and its derivatives are a group of biomolecules (polyphenols) obtained from plants. They have effects which are potentially beneficial to heath, for example they are antioxidant, anticarcinogenic and antibacterial, as recently investigated in many fields such as medicine, food and plant sciences. The main drawbacks of these molecules are both low stability and bioavailability. In this research work the opportunity to graft GA to bioactive glasses is investigated, in order to deliver the undamaged biological molecule into the body, using the biomaterial surfaces as a localized carrier. GA was considered for functionalization since it is a good model molecule for polyphenols and presents several interesting biological activities, like antibacterial, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. Two different silica based bioactive glasses (SCNA and CEL2), with different reactivity, were employed as substrates. UV photometry combined with the Folin&Ciocalteu reagent was adopted to test the concentration of GA in uptake solution after functionalization. This test verified how much GA consumption occurred with surface modification and it was also used on solid samples to test the presence of GA on functionalized glasses. XPS and SEM-EDS techniques were employed to characterize the modification of material surface properties and functional group composition before and after functionalization.

  6. Identification of quorum sensing signal molecules and oligolignols associated with watermark disease in willow (Salix sp.).

    PubMed

    Huvenne, Hanneke; Goeminne, Geert; Maes, Martine; Messens, Eric

    2008-09-01

    The bacterium Brenneria salicis is the causal agent of watermark disease in willow. This work shows the importance of in situ studies and high-resolution separation of biological samples with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry to unambiguously identify molecular compounds associated with this disease. Approximately 40 oligolignols accumulated in wood sap of watermark diseased willow, and are indicative for degradation of the xylem cell wall, of which 15 were structurally assigned based on an earlier study. Many bacteria are known to produce and release quorum sensing signal molecules that switch on the expression of specific, sometimes pathogenic functions. Two quorum sensing signal molecules, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(hexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, were present in 4/1 ratios in diseased wood and in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis at 0.13-1.2 microM concentrations, and absent in healthy wood and in low-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis. Although it is not a proof, it can be an indication for involvement of quorum sensing in B. salicis pathogenesis. Cyclic dipeptides were present at high concentrations in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis, but not in situ, and were found not to be involved in quorum sensing signaling, therefore, the attribution of quorum signal properties to cyclic dipeptides isolated from in vitro cultures of pathogenic bacteria should be reconsidered.

  7. Identification of Small Molecules That Suppress Ricin-Induced Stress-Activated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wahome, Paul G.; Ahlawat, Sarita; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Ricin is a member of the ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) family of plant and bacterial toxins. In this study we used a high-throughput, cell-based assay to screen more than 118,000 compounds from diverse chemical libraries for molecules that reduced ricin-induced cell death. We describe three compounds, PW66, PW69, and PW72 that at micromolar concentrations significantly delayed ricin-induced cell death. None of the compounds had any demonstrable effect on ricin's ability to arrest protein synthesis in cells or on ricin's enzymatic activity as assessed in vitro. Instead, all three compounds appear to function by blocking downstream stress-induced signaling pathways associated with the toxin-mediated apoptosis. PW66 virtually eliminated ricin-induced TNF-α secretion by J774A.1 macrophages and concomitantly blocked activation of the p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways. PW72 suppressed ricin-induced TNF-α secretion, but not p38 MAPK and JNK signaling. PW69 suppressed activity of the executioner caspases 3/7 in ricin toxin- and Shiga toxin 2-treated cells. While the actual molecular targets of the three compounds have yet to be identified, these data nevertheless underscore the potential of small molecules to down-regulate inflammatory signaling pathways associated with exposure to the RIP family of toxins. PMID:23133670

  8. Nitro-Fatty Acids in Plant Signaling: Nitro-Linolenic Acid Induces the Molecular Chaperone Network in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, María N.; Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Luque, Francisco; Melguizo, Manuel; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Peñas-Sanjuán, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species derived of nitric oxide (NO) and unsaturated fatty acids. In animal systems, NO2-FAs are considered novel signaling mediators of cell function based on a proven antiinflammatory response. Nevertheless, the interaction of NO with fatty acids in plant systems has scarcely been studied. Here, we examine the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in Arabidopsis and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant’s development by mass spectrometry. The observed levels of this NO2-FA at picomolar concentrations suggested its role as a signaling effector of cell function. In fact, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing heat shock proteins and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that NO2-Ln was also involved in the response to oxidative stress conditions, mainly depicted by H2O2, reactive oxygen species, and oxygen-containing compound responses, with a high induction of ascorbate peroxidase expression. Closely related to these results, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions such as wounding or exposure to salinity, cadmium, and low temperature, thus validating the outcomes found by RNA-seq technology. Jointly, to our knowledge, these are the first results showing the endogenous presence of NO2-Ln in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and supporting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the defense mechanism against different abiotic-stress situations. PMID:26628746

  9. Nitro-Fatty Acids in Plant Signaling: Nitro-Linolenic Acid Induces the Molecular Chaperone Network in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Padilla, María N; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Luque, Francisco; Melguizo, Manuel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Peñas-Sanjuán, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-02-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species derived of nitric oxide (NO) and unsaturated fatty acids. In animal systems, NO2-FAs are considered novel signaling mediators of cell function based on a proven antiinflammatory response. Nevertheless, the interaction of NO with fatty acids in plant systems has scarcely been studied. Here, we examine the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in Arabidopsis and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development by mass spectrometry. The observed levels of this NO2-FA at picomolar concentrations suggested its role as a signaling effector of cell function. In fact, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing heat shock proteins and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that NO2-Ln was also involved in the response to oxidative stress conditions, mainly depicted by H2O2, reactive oxygen species, and oxygen-containing compound responses, with a high induction of ascorbate peroxidase expression. Closely related to these results, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions such as wounding or exposure to salinity, cadmium, and low temperature, thus validating the outcomes found by RNA-seq technology. Jointly, to our knowledge, these are the first results showing the endogenous presence of NO2-Ln in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and supporting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the defense mechanism against different abiotic-stress situations. PMID:26628746

  10. Acid properties of solid acid catalysts characterized by solid-state 31P NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Huang, Shing-Jong; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2011-09-01

    A brief review is presented on acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts by means of solid-state phosphor-31 magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P MAS NMR) spectroscopy using phosphor-containing molecules as probes. It is emphasized that such a simple approach using (31)P MAS NMR of adsorbed phosphorous probe molecules, namely trimethylphosphine (TMP) and trialkylphosphine oxides (R(3)PO), represents a unique technique in providing detailed qualitative and quantitative features, viz. type, strength, distribution, and concentration of acid sites in solid acid catalysts. In particular, it will be shown that when applied with a proper choice of probe molecules with varied sizes and results obtained from elemental analysis, the amounts and locations (intracrystalline vs. extracrystalline) of different types (Brønsted vs. Lewis) of acid sites may be determined. In addition, by incorporating the NMR results with that obtained from theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, correlations between the (31)P chemical shifts (δ(31)P) and acidic strengths of Brønsted and Lewis acid sites may also be derived, facilitating a suitable acidity scale for solid acid catalysts.

  11. Stardust and the Molecules of Life (Why are the Amino Acids Left-Handed?)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2010-04-02

    A mechanism for creating and selecting amino acid chirality is identified, and subsequent chemical replication and galactic mixing that would populate the galaxy with the predominant species will be described. This involves: (1) the spin of the {sup 14}N in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules from which amino acids might be formed, coupling to the chirality of the molecules; (2) the neutrinos emitted from the supernova, together with magnetic field from the nascent neutron star or black hole from the supernova selectively destroying one orientation of the {sup 14}N, thereby selecting the chirality associated with the other {sup 14}N orientation; (3) amplification by chemical evolution, by which the molecules replicate on a relatively short timescale; and (4) galactic mixing on a longer timescale mixing the selected molecules throughout the galaxy.

  12. The function of hydrogen sulphide in iron availability: Sulfur nutrient or signaling molecule?

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) has traditionally been considered as a phytotoxin, having deleterious effects on the plant growth and survival. Recently, it was recongnized as a potential signaling molecule involving in physiological regulation similar to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) in plants. In a recent study, we mainly focused on the signaling function of H2S in improving adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency. We reported that H2S was closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increased chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in Z. mays seedlings. Here, we provide more commentary on the signaling roles of H2S in coping with Fe deficiency in plants through increasing sulfur containing metabolites and regulating the expression level of iron homeostasis and sulfur metabolism-related genes in maize seedlings. PMID:26906467

  13. Adsorption of monomers on microspherical structures of thermal heterocomplex molecules from amino ACIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Hajime; Sakurazawa, Shigeru; Dekikimura, H.; Imai, Eiichi; Matsuno, Koichiro

    1995-10-01

    The surface of a microspherical structure formed in the aqueous suspension of thermal heterocomplex molecules made by heating aspartic acid and proline can adsorb basic amino acids such as histidine, lysine and arginine. It can also adsorb adenine, cytosine, adenosine and cytidine. Electrostatic interactions acting between those monomers to be adsorbed and the adsorbing surface are responsible for the adsorption.

  14. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with strong acid molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Viggiano, A.A.; Paulson, J.F.; Henchman, M.J.

    1986-06-15

    Using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, we have determined (at variously 300 and 570 K) the dissociative attachment coefficients ..beta.. for the reactions of electrons with the common acids HNO/sub 3/ (producing NO/sup -//sub 2/) and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (HSO/sup -//sub 4/), the superacids FSO/sub 3/H (FSO/sup -//sub 3/), CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/H (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), ClSO/sub 3/H (ClSO/sup -//sub 3/,Cl/sup -/), the acid anhydride (CF/sub 3/SO/sub 2/)/sub 2/O (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), and the halogen halides HBr (Br/sup -/) and HI (I/sup -/). The anions formed in the reactions are those given in the parentheses. The reactions with HF and HCl were investigated, but did not occur at a measurable rate since they are very endothermic. Dissociative attachment is rapid for the common acids, the superacids, and the anhydride, the measured ..beta.. being appreciable fractions of the theoretical maximum ..beta.. for such reactions, ..beta../sub max/. The HI reaction is very fast ( ..beta..approx...beta../sub max/) but the HBr reaction occurs much more slowly because it is significantly endothermic. The data indicate that the extreme acidity of the (Bronsted-type) superacids has its equivalence in the very efficient gas-phase dissociative attachment which these species undergo when reacting with free electrons. The anions of the superacids generated in these reactions, notably FSO/sup -//sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/, are very stable (unreactive) implying exceptionally large electron affinities for the FSO/sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/ radicals.

  15. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules in micro- and nano-fluidics.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Sarah M; Zec, Helena C; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2016-03-01

    Nucleic acid analysis has enhanced our understanding of biological processes and disease progression, elucidated the association of genetic variants and disease, and led to the design and implementation of new treatment strategies. These diverse applications require analysis of a variety of characteristics of nucleic acid molecules: size or length, detection or quantification of specific sequences, mapping of the general sequence structure, full sequence identification, analysis of epigenetic modifications, and observation of interactions between nucleic acids and other biomolecules. Strategies that can detect rare or transient species, characterize population distributions, and analyze small sample volumes enable the collection of richer data from biosamples. Platforms that integrate micro- and nano-fluidic operations with high sensitivity single molecule detection facilitate manipulation and detection of individual nucleic acid molecules. In this review, we will highlight important milestones and recent advances in single molecule nucleic acid analysis in micro- and nano-fluidic platforms. We focus on assessment modalities for single nucleic acid molecules and highlight the role of micro- and nano-structures and fluidic manipulation. We will also briefly discuss future directions and the current limitations and obstacles impeding even faster progress toward these goals.

  16. Activation of Carbonyl-Containing Molecules with Solid Lewis Acids in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

    2011-09-28

    Current interest in reacting carbonyl-containing molecules in aqueous media is primarily due to the growing emphasis on conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Recently, solid Lewis acids have been shown to perform catalytic reactions with carbonyl-containing molecules such as sugars in aqueous media. Here, catalysis mediated by Lewis acids is briefly discussed, Lewis acid solids that perform catalysis in aqueous media are then described, and the review is concluded with a few comments on the outlook for the future.

  17. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    PubMed

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer. PMID:26592976

  18. Dissection of the cis-2-decenoic acid signaling network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using microarray technique

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani-Badi, Azadeh; Sepehr, Shayesteh; Fallahi, Hossein; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use quorum-sensing (QS) signaling to regulate the expression of factors contributing to virulence and persistence. Bacteria produce signals of different chemical classes. The signal molecule, known as diffusible signal factor (DSF), is a cis-unsaturated fatty acid that was first described in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris. Previous works have shown that human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also synthesizes a structurally related molecule, characterized as cis-2-decenoic acid (C10: Δ2, CDA) that induces biofilm dispersal by multiple types of bacteria. Furthermore, CDA has been shown to be involved in inter-kingdom signaling that modulates fungal behavior. Therefore, an understanding of its signaling mechanism could suggest strategies for interference, with consequences for disease control. To identify the components of CDA signaling pathway in this pathogen, a comparative transcritpome analysis was conducted, in the presence and absence of CDA. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for differentially expressed (DE) genes with known function was then constructed by STRING and Cytoscape. In addition, the effects of CDA in combination with antimicrobial agents on the biofilm surface area and bacteria viability were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and digital image analysis. Microarray analysis identified 666 differentially expressed genes in the presence of CDA and gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that in P. aeruginosa, CDA mediates dispersion of biofilms through signaling pathways, including enhanced motility, metabolic activity, virulence as well as persistence at different temperatures. PPI data suggested that a cluster of five genes (PA4978, PA4979, PA4980, PA4982, PA4983) is involved in the CDA synthesis and perception. Combined treatments using both CDA and antimicrobial agents showed that following exposure of the biofilms to CDA, remaining cells on the surface were easily removed and killed by

  19. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  20. Hydration of biological molecules: lipids versus nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Pohle, W; Gauger, D R; Dornberger, U; Birch-Hirschfeld, E; Selle, C; Rupprecht, A; Bohl, M

    2002-01-01

    We used FTIR spectroscopy to comparatively study the hydration of films prepared from nucleic acids (DNA and double-stranded RNA) and lipids (phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines chosen as the most abundant ones) at room temperature by varying the ambient relative humidity in terms of solvent-induced structural changes. The nucleic acids and phospholipids both display examples of polymorphism on the one hand and structural conservatism on the other; even closely related representatives behave differently in this respect. DNA undergoes a hydration-driven A-B conformational transition, but RNA maintains an A-like structure independently of the water activity. Similarly, a main transition between the solid and liquid-crystalline phases can be induced lyotropically in certain phosphatidylcholines, while their phosphatidylethanolamine counterparts do not exhibit chain melting under the same conditions. A principal difference concerning the structural changes that occur in the studied biomolecules is given by the relevant water-substrate stoichiometries. These are rather high in DNA and often low in phospholipids, suggesting different mechanisms of action of the hydration water that appears to induce structural changes on global- and local-mode levels, respectively.

  1. Carbon Monoxide, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Nitric Oxide as Signaling Molecules in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianrico; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) used to be thought of simply as lethal and (for H2S) smelly gaseous molecules; now they are known to have important signaling functions in the gastrointestinal tract. CO and H2S, which are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by different enzymes, regulate smooth muscle membrane potential and tone, transmit signals from enteric nerves and can regulate the immune system. The pathways that produce nitric oxide (NO) H2S and CO interact—each can inhibit and potentiate the level and activity of the other. However, there are significant differences between these molecules, such as in half-lives; CO is more stable and therefore able to have effects distal to the site of production, whereas NO and H2S are short lived and act only close to sites of production. We review their signaling functions in the luminal gastrointestinal tract and discuss how their pathways interact. We also describe other physiologic functions of CO and H2S and how they might be used as therapeutic agents. PMID:24798417

  2. Relevance of signaling molecules for apoptosis induction on influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Atsushi; Shiozaki, Takuya; Miyazaki, Tadaaki

    2013-11-22

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism to maintain homeostasis in mammals, and disruption of the apoptosis regulation mechanism triggers a range of diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and developmental disorders. The severity of influenza A virus (IAV) infection is also closely related to dysfunction of apoptosis regulation. In the virus infected cells, the functions of various host cellular molecules involved in regulation of induction of apoptosis are modulated by IAV proteins to enable effective virus replication. The modulation of the intracellular signaling pathway inducing apoptosis by the IAV infection also affects extracellular mechanisms controlling apoptosis, and triggers abnormal host responses related to the disease severity of IAV infections. This review focuses on apoptosis related molecules involved in IAV replication and pathogenicity, the strategy of the virus propagation through the regulation of apoptosis is also discussed.

  3. Noise and critical phenomena in biochemical signaling cycles at small molecule numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzner, C.; Sajitz-Hermstein, M.; Schmidberger, M.; Fabry, B.

    2009-08-01

    Biochemical reaction networks in living cells usually involve reversible covalent modification of signaling molecules, such as protein phosphorylation. Under conditions of small molecule numbers, as is frequently the case in living cells, mass-action theory fails to describe the dynamics of such systems. Instead, the biochemical reactions must be treated as stochastic processes that intrinsically generate concentration fluctuations of the chemicals. We investigate the stochastic reaction kinetics of covalent modification cycles (CMCs) by analytical modeling and numerically exact Monte Carlo simulation of the temporally fluctuating concentration. Depending on the parameter regime, we find for the probability density of the concentration qualitatively distinct classes of distribution functions including power-law distributions with a fractional and tunable exponent. These findings challenge the traditional view of biochemical control networks as deterministic computational systems and suggest that CMCs in cells can function as versatile and tunable noise generators.

  4. Experimental study of the internal signal of alliesthesia induced by sweet molecules in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Cabanac, M

    1994-01-01

    To identify the preabsorptive signal that arouses alliesthesia, we compared the effects of five sweet molecules: glucose (3 g.5 ml-1), cyclamate (0.280 g.5 ml-1), saccharin (0.016 g.5 ml-1), aspartame (0.020 g.5 ml-1), and mannitol (3 g.5 ml-1) on the intestive aversive responses of rats. In Experiment 1, the sweet stimuli were adjusted to taste similarly sweet, and they were administered orally; they aroused similar ingestive responses. In Experiment 2, an isovolumetric load of each of the five molecules was administered in the stomach and its influence on ingestive/aversive response aroused by oral sucrose was recorded. Negative alliesthesia was obtained after gastric loads of glucose and mannitol, but not after gastric loads of cyclamate, saccharin, and aspartame.

  5. Old concepts, new molecules and current approaches applied to the bacterial nucleotide signalling field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Signalling nucleotides are key molecules that help bacteria to rapidly coordinate cellular pathways and adapt to changes in their environment. During the past 10 years, the nucleotide signalling field has seen much excitement, as several new signalling nucleotides have been discovered in both eukaryotic and bacterial cells. The fields have since advanced quickly, aided by the development of important tools such as the synthesis of modified nucleotides, which, combined with sensitive mass spectrometry methods, allowed for the rapid identification of specific receptor proteins along with other novel genome-wide screening methods. In this review, we describe the principle concepts of nucleotide signalling networks and summarize the recent work that led to the discovery of the novel signalling nucleotides. We also highlight current approaches applied to the research in the field as well as resources and methodological advances aiding in a rapid identification of nucleotide-specific receptor proteins. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672152

  6. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  7. Single-molecule pull-down for investigating protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Fareh, Mohamed; Loeff, Luuk; Szczepaniak, Malwina; Haagsma, Anna C; Yeom, Kyu-Hyeon; Joo, Chirlmin

    2016-08-01

    The genome and transcriptome are constantly modified by proteins in the cell. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques allow for high spatial and temporal observations of these interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. However, due to the difficulty of obtaining functional protein complexes, it remains challenging to study the interactions between macromolecular protein complexes and nucleic acids. Here, we combined single-molecule fluorescence with various protein complex pull-down techniques to determine the function and stoichiometry of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Through the use of three examples of protein complexes from eukaryotic cells (Drosha, Dicer, and TUT4 protein complexes), we provide step-by-step guidance for using novel single-molecule techniques. Our single-molecule methods provide sub-second and nanometer resolution and can be applied to other nucleoprotein complexes that are essential for cellular processes. PMID:27017911

  8. L-Cysteine Desulfhydrase 1 modulates the generation of the signaling molecule sulfide in plant cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis C.; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with data in animal systems, experimental evidence highlights sulfide as a signaling molecule of equal importance to NO and H2O2 in plant systems. In mammals, two cytosolic enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), have been shown to be responsible for the endogenous production of sulfide. L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 (DES1) has been recently established as the only enzyme that is involved in the generation of hydrogen sulfide in plant cytosol. Although plants have an available source of sulfide within chloroplasts, the basic stromal pH prevents sulfide release into the cytosol. Therefore, DES1 is essential for the production of sulfide for signaling purposes. PMID:23428891

  9. Differential Targeting of Gβγ-Subunit Signaling with Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Tabetha M.; Mathews, Jennifer L.; Yuan, Chujun; Lehmann, David M.; Malik, Sundeep; Wu, Dianqing; Font, Jose L.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Smrcka, Alan V.

    2006-04-01

    G protein βγ subunits have potential as a target for therapeutic treatment of a number of diseases. We performed virtual docking of a small-molecule library to a site on Gβγ subunits that mediates protein interactions. We hypothesized that differential targeting of this surface could allow for selective modulation of Gβγ subunit functions. Several compounds bound to Gβγ subunits with affinities from 0.1 to 60 μM and selectively modulated functional Gβγ-protein-protein interactions in vitro, chemotactic peptide signaling pathways in HL-60 leukocytes, and opioid receptor-dependent analgesia in vivo. These data demonstrate an approach for modulation of G protein-coupled receptor signaling that may represent an important therapeutic strategy.

  10. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics. PMID:27566686

  11. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics.

  12. Methylglyoxal: An Emerging Signaling Molecule in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Tahsina S.; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Mostofa, Mohammad G.; Burritt, David J.; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenated short aldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) is produced in plants as a by-product of a number of metabolic reactions, including elimination of phosphate groups from glycolysis intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. MG is mostly detoxified by the combined actions of the enzymes glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II that together with glutathione make up the glyoxalase system. Under normal growth conditions, basal levels of MG remain low in plants; however, when plants are exposed to abiotic stress, MG can accumulate to much higher levels. Stress-induced MG functions as a toxic molecule, inhibiting different developmental processes, including seed germination, photosynthesis and root growth, whereas MG, at low levels, acts as an important signaling molecule, involved in regulating diverse events, such as cell proliferation and survival, control of the redox status of cells, and many other aspects of general metabolism and cellular homeostases. MG can modulate plant stress responses by regulating stomatal opening and closure, the production of reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium ion concentrations, the activation of inward rectifying potassium channels and the expression of many stress-responsive genes. MG appears to play important roles in signal transduction by transmitting and amplifying cellular signals and functions that promote adaptation of plants growing under adverse environmental conditions. Thus, MG is now considered as a potential biochemical marker for plant abiotic stress tolerance, and is receiving considerable attention by the scientific community. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding MG metabolism in plants under abiotic stress, and evaluate the concept of MG signaling. In addition, we will demonstrate the importance of giving consideration to MG metabolism and the glyoxalase system, when investigating plant adaptation and responses to various environmental stresses. PMID:27679640

  13. Methylglyoxal: An Emerging Signaling Molecule in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Tahsina S.; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Mostofa, Mohammad G.; Burritt, David J.; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenated short aldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) is produced in plants as a by-product of a number of metabolic reactions, including elimination of phosphate groups from glycolysis intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. MG is mostly detoxified by the combined actions of the enzymes glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II that together with glutathione make up the glyoxalase system. Under normal growth conditions, basal levels of MG remain low in plants; however, when plants are exposed to abiotic stress, MG can accumulate to much higher levels. Stress-induced MG functions as a toxic molecule, inhibiting different developmental processes, including seed germination, photosynthesis and root growth, whereas MG, at low levels, acts as an important signaling molecule, involved in regulating diverse events, such as cell proliferation and survival, control of the redox status of cells, and many other aspects of general metabolism and cellular homeostases. MG can modulate plant stress responses by regulating stomatal opening and closure, the production of reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium ion concentrations, the activation of inward rectifying potassium channels and the expression of many stress-responsive genes. MG appears to play important roles in signal transduction by transmitting and amplifying cellular signals and functions that promote adaptation of plants growing under adverse environmental conditions. Thus, MG is now considered as a potential biochemical marker for plant abiotic stress tolerance, and is receiving considerable attention by the scientific community. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding MG metabolism in plants under abiotic stress, and evaluate the concept of MG signaling. In addition, we will demonstrate the importance of giving consideration to MG metabolism and the glyoxalase system, when investigating plant adaptation and responses to various environmental stresses.

  14. Methylglyoxal: An Emerging Signaling Molecule in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses and Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Tahsina S; Hossain, Mohammad A; Mostofa, Mohammad G; Burritt, David J; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenated short aldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) is produced in plants as a by-product of a number of metabolic reactions, including elimination of phosphate groups from glycolysis intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. MG is mostly detoxified by the combined actions of the enzymes glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II that together with glutathione make up the glyoxalase system. Under normal growth conditions, basal levels of MG remain low in plants; however, when plants are exposed to abiotic stress, MG can accumulate to much higher levels. Stress-induced MG functions as a toxic molecule, inhibiting different developmental processes, including seed germination, photosynthesis and root growth, whereas MG, at low levels, acts as an important signaling molecule, involved in regulating diverse events, such as cell proliferation and survival, control of the redox status of cells, and many other aspects of general metabolism and cellular homeostases. MG can modulate plant stress responses by regulating stomatal opening and closure, the production of reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium ion concentrations, the activation of inward rectifying potassium channels and the expression of many stress-responsive genes. MG appears to play important roles in signal transduction by transmitting and amplifying cellular signals and functions that promote adaptation of plants growing under adverse environmental conditions. Thus, MG is now considered as a potential biochemical marker for plant abiotic stress tolerance, and is receiving considerable attention by the scientific community. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding MG metabolism in plants under abiotic stress, and evaluate the concept of MG signaling. In addition, we will demonstrate the importance of giving consideration to MG metabolism and the glyoxalase system, when investigating plant adaptation and responses to various environmental stresses. PMID:27679640

  15. Methylglyoxal: An Emerging Signaling Molecule in Plant Abiotic Stress Responses and Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Tahsina S; Hossain, Mohammad A; Mostofa, Mohammad G; Burritt, David J; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son P

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenated short aldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) is produced in plants as a by-product of a number of metabolic reactions, including elimination of phosphate groups from glycolysis intermediates dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. MG is mostly detoxified by the combined actions of the enzymes glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II that together with glutathione make up the glyoxalase system. Under normal growth conditions, basal levels of MG remain low in plants; however, when plants are exposed to abiotic stress, MG can accumulate to much higher levels. Stress-induced MG functions as a toxic molecule, inhibiting different developmental processes, including seed germination, photosynthesis and root growth, whereas MG, at low levels, acts as an important signaling molecule, involved in regulating diverse events, such as cell proliferation and survival, control of the redox status of cells, and many other aspects of general metabolism and cellular homeostases. MG can modulate plant stress responses by regulating stomatal opening and closure, the production of reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium ion concentrations, the activation of inward rectifying potassium channels and the expression of many stress-responsive genes. MG appears to play important roles in signal transduction by transmitting and amplifying cellular signals and functions that promote adaptation of plants growing under adverse environmental conditions. Thus, MG is now considered as a potential biochemical marker for plant abiotic stress tolerance, and is receiving considerable attention by the scientific community. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding MG metabolism in plants under abiotic stress, and evaluate the concept of MG signaling. In addition, we will demonstrate the importance of giving consideration to MG metabolism and the glyoxalase system, when investigating plant adaptation and responses to various environmental stresses.

  16. Electrochemiluminescence detection of near single DNA molecules by using quantum dots-dendrimer nanocomposites for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Divsar, Faten; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-09-21

    An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescent biosensor was developed for detection of near single DNA molecules with a linear range of 7 orders of magnitude by combining the specific recognition of a molecular beacon with signal amplification of quantum dots-dendrimer nanocomposites.

  17. Jasmonic acid is involved in the signaling pathway for fungal endophyte-induced volatile oil accumulation of Atractylodes lancea plantlets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized signaling molecule in plant defense responses. However, its relationships with other signal molecules in secondary metabolite production induced by endophytic fungus are largely unknown. Atractylodes lancea (Asteraceae) is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant that produces antimicrobial volatiles oils. We incubated plantlets of A. lancea with the fungus Gilmaniella sp. AL12. to research how JA interacted with other signal molecules in volatile oil production. Results Fungal inoculation increased JA generation and volatile oil accumulation. To investigate whether JA is required for volatile oil production, plantlets were treated with JA inhibitors ibuprofen (IBU) and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The inhibitors suppressed both JA and volatile oil production, but fungal inoculation could still induce volatile oils. Plantlets were further treated with the nitric oxide (NO)-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO), the H2O2 inhibitors diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and catalase (CAT), and the salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis inhibitors paclobutrazol and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid. With fungal inoculation, IBU did not inhibit NO production, and JA generation was significantly suppressed by cPTIO, showing that JA may act as a downstream signal of the NO pathway. Exogenous H2O2 could reverse the inhibitory effects of cPTIO on JA generation, indicating that NO mediates JA induction by the fungus through H2O2-dependent pathways. With fungal inoculation, the H2O2 scavenger DPI/CAT could inhibit JA generation, but IBU could not inhibit H2O2 production, implying that H2O2 directly mediated JA generation. Finally, JA generation was enhanced when SA production was suppressed, and vice versa. Conclusions Jasmonic acid acts as a downstream signaling molecule in NO- and H2O2-mediated volatile oil accumulation induced by endophytic fungus and has a complementary

  18. Design and experimental approach to the construction of a human signal-molecule-profiling database.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-12-01

    The human signal-molecule-profiling database (HSMPD) is designed as a prospective medical database for translational bioinformatics (TBI). To explore the feasibility of low-cost database construction, we studied the roadmap of HSMPD. A HSMPD-oriented tool, called "signal-molecule-profiling (SMP) chip" was developed for data acquisition, which can be employed in the routine blood tests in hospitals; the results will be stored in the HSMPD system automatically. HSMPD system can provide data services for the TBI community, which generates a stable income to support the data acquisition. The small-scale experimental test was performed in the hospital to verify SMP chips and the demo HSMPD software. One hundred and eighty nine complete SMP records were collected, and the demo HSMPD system was also evaluated in the survey study on patients and doctors. The function of SMP chip was verified, whereas the demo HSMPD software needed to be improved. The survey study showed that patients would only accept free tests of SMP chips when they originally needed blood examinations. The study indicated that the construction of HSMPD relies on the self-motivated cooperation of the TBI community and the traditional healthcare system. The proposed roadmap potentially provides an executable solution to build the HSMPD without high costs. PMID:24351788

  19. Cross Talk between H2O2 and Interacting Signal Molecules under Plant Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ina; Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is an important cause of cellular damage. During stress conditions, plants have evolved regulatory mechanisms to adapt to various environmental stresses. One of the consequences of stress is an increase in the cellular concentration of reactive oxygen species, which is subsequently converted to H2O2. H2O2 is continuously produced as the byproduct of oxidative plant aerobic metabolism. Organelles with a high oxidizing metabolic activity or with an intense rate of electron flow, such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, or peroxisomes are major sources of H2O2 production. H2O2 acts as a versatile molecule because of its dual role in cells. Under normal conditions, H2O2 immerges as an important factor during many biological processes. It has been established that it acts as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks. In this review, we discuss potential roles of H2O2 and other signaling molecules during various stress responses.

  20. Design and Experimental Approach to the Construction of a Human Signal-Molecule-Profiling Database

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The human signal-molecule-profiling database (HSMPD) is designed as a prospective medical database for translational bioinformatics (TBI). To explore the feasibility of low-cost database construction, we studied the roadmap of HSMPD. A HSMPD-oriented tool, called “signal-molecule-profiling (SMP) chip” was developed for data acquisition, which can be employed in the routine blood tests in hospitals; the results will be stored in the HSMPD system automatically. HSMPD system can provide data services for the TBI community, which generates a stable income to support the data acquisition. The small-scale experimental test was performed in the hospital to verify SMP chips and the demo HSMPD software. One hundred and eighty nine complete SMP records were collected, and the demo HSMPD system was also evaluated in the survey study on patients and doctors. The function of SMP chip was verified, whereas the demo HSMPD software needed to be improved. The survey study showed that patients would only accept free tests of SMP chips when they originally needed blood examinations. The study indicated that the construction of HSMPD relies on the self-motivated cooperation of the TBI community and the traditional healthcare system. The proposed roadmap potentially provides an executable solution to build the HSMPD without high costs. PMID:24351788

  1. Inhibition of Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling by a Small Molecule Acting on Gα Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Damian, Marjorie; Gespach, Christian; Ferrandis, Eric; Lavergne, Olivier; De Wever, Olivier; Banères, Jean-Louis; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prévost, Grégoire Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneous activation of many distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and heterotrimeric G proteins play a major role in various pathological conditions. Pan-inhibition of GPCR signaling by small molecules thus represents a novel strategy to treat various diseases. To better understand such therapeutic approach, we have characterized the biomolecular target of BIM-46187, a small molecule pan-inhibitor of GPCR signaling. Combining bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques in living cells as well as in reconstituted receptor-G protein complexes, we observed that, by direct binding to the Gα subunit, BIM-46187 prevents the conformational changes of the receptor-G protein complex associated with GPCR activation. Such a binding prevents the proper interaction of receptors with the G protein heterotrimer and inhibits the agonist-promoted GDP/GTP exchange. These observations bring further evidence that inhibiting G protein activation through direct binding to the Gα subunit is feasible and should constitute a new strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19648112

  2. Small Molecule Inhibition of Ligand-Stimulated RAGE-DIAPH1 Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Manigrasso, Michaele B.; Pan, Jinhong; Rai, Vivek; Zhang, Jinghua; Reverdatto, Sergey; Quadri, Nosirudeen; DeVita, Robert J.; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Shekhtman, Alexander; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) binds diverse ligands linked to chronic inflammation and disease. NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallization studies of the extracellular domains of RAGE indicate that RAGE ligands bind by distinct charge- and hydrophobicity-dependent mechanisms. The cytoplasmic tail (ct) of RAGE is essential for RAGE ligand-mediated signal transduction and consequent modulation of gene expression and cellular properties. RAGE signaling requires interaction of ctRAGE with the intracellular effector, mammalian diaphanous 1 or DIAPH1. We screened a library of 58,000 small molecules and identified 13 small molecule competitive inhibitors of ctRAGE interaction with DIAPH1. These compounds, which exhibit in vitro and in vivo inhibition of RAGE-dependent molecular processes, present attractive molecular scaffolds for the development of therapeutics against RAGE-mediated diseases, such as those linked to diabetic complications, Alzheimer’s disease, and chronic inflammation, and provide support for the feasibility of inhibition of protein-protein interaction (PPI). PMID:26936329

  3. Cross Talk between H2O2 and Interacting Signal Molecules under Plant Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ina; Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is an important cause of cellular damage. During stress conditions, plants have evolved regulatory mechanisms to adapt to various environmental stresses. One of the consequences of stress is an increase in the cellular concentration of reactive oxygen species, which is subsequently converted to H2O2. H2O2 is continuously produced as the byproduct of oxidative plant aerobic metabolism. Organelles with a high oxidizing metabolic activity or with an intense rate of electron flow, such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, or peroxisomes are major sources of H2O2 production. H2O2 acts as a versatile molecule because of its dual role in cells. Under normal conditions, H2O2 immerges as an important factor during many biological processes. It has been established that it acts as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks. In this review, we discuss potential roles of H2O2 and other signaling molecules during various stress responses. PMID:27200043

  4. Cross Talk between H2O2 and Interacting Signal Molecules under Plant Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ina; Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is an important cause of cellular damage. During stress conditions, plants have evolved regulatory mechanisms to adapt to various environmental stresses. One of the consequences of stress is an increase in the cellular concentration of reactive oxygen species, which is subsequently converted to H2O2. H2O2 is continuously produced as the byproduct of oxidative plant aerobic metabolism. Organelles with a high oxidizing metabolic activity or with an intense rate of electron flow, such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, or peroxisomes are major sources of H2O2 production. H2O2 acts as a versatile molecule because of its dual role in cells. Under normal conditions, H2O2 immerges as an important factor during many biological processes. It has been established that it acts as a secondary messenger in signal transduction networks. In this review, we discuss potential roles of H2O2 and other signaling molecules during various stress responses. PMID:27200043

  5. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nievas, Fiorela L; Bogino, Pablo C; Giordano, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences of lab experiments allow these students to investigate biochemical problems whose solution is feasible within the context of their knowledge and experience. We previously designed and reported a programmed lab experiment that familiarizes microbiology students with techniques for detection and characterization of quorum-sensing (QS) and quorum-quenching (QQ) signal molecules. Here, we describe a sequence of experiments designed to expand the understanding and capabilities of biochemistry students using techniques for extraction and identification of QS and QQ signal molecules from peanut rhizospheric soil bacteria, including culturing and manipulation of bacteria under sterile conditions. The program provides students with an opportunity to perform useful assays, draw conclusions from their results, and discuss possible extensions of the study. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:256-262, 2016.

  6. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  7. Electrochemical detection of nucleic acids, proteins, small molecules and cells using a DNA-nanostructure-based universal biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meihua; Song, Ping; Zhou, Guobao; Zuo, Xiaolei; Aldalbahi, Ali; Lou, Xiaoding; Shi, Jiye; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and prognosis of many complex diseases, such as cancers, is associated with the variation of various molecules, including DNA at the genetic level, RNA at the regulatory level, proteins at the functional level and small molecules at the metabolic level (defined collectively as multilevel molecules). Thus it is highly desirable to develop a single platform for detecting multilevel biomarkers for early-stage diagnosis. Here we report a protocol on DNA-nanostructure-based programmable engineering of the biomolecular recognition interface, which provides a universal electrochemical biosensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids (DNA/RNA), proteins, small molecules and whole cells. The protocol starts with the synthesis of a series of differentially sized, self-assembled tetrahedral DNA nanostructures (TDNs) with site-specifically modified thiol groups that can be readily anchored on the surface of a gold electrode with high reproducibility. By exploiting the rigid structure, nanoscale addressability and versatile functionality of TDNs, one can tailor the type of biomolecular probes appended on individual TDNs for the detection of specific molecules of interest. Target binding occurring on the gold surface patterned with TDNs is quantitatively translated into electrochemical signals via a coupled enzyme-based catalytic process. This uses a sandwich assay strategy in which biotinylated reporter probes recognize TDN-bound target biomolecules, which then allow binding of horseradish-peroxidase-conjugated avidin (avidin-HRP). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is then reduced by avidin-HRP in the presence of TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine) to generate a quantitative electrochemical signal. The time range for the entire protocol is ∼1 d, whereas the detection process takes ∼30 min to 3 h. PMID:27310264

  8. Polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule in brain plasticity: from synapses to integration of new neurons.

    PubMed

    Gascon, Eduardo; Vutskits, Laszlo; Kiss, Jozsef Zoltan

    2007-11-01

    Isoforms of the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) carrying the linear homopolymer of alpha 2,8-linked sialic acid (polysialic acid, PSA) have emerged as particularly attractive candidates for promoting plasticity in the nervous system. The large negatively charged PSA chain of NCAM is postulated to be a spacer that reduces adhesion forces between cells allowing dynamic changes in membrane contacts. Accumulating evidence also suggests that PSA-NCAM-mediated interactions lead to activation of intracellular signaling cascades that are fundamental to the biological functions of the molecule. An important role of PSA-NCAM appears to be during development, when its expression level is high and where it contributes to the regulation of cell shape, growth or migration. However, PSA-NCAM does persist in adult brain structures such as the hippocampus that display a high degree of plasticity where it is involved in activity-induced synaptic plasticity. Recent advances in the field of PSA-NCAM research have not only consolidated the importance of this molecule in plasticity processes but also suggest a role for PSA-NCAM in the regulation of higher cognitive functions and psychiatric disorders. In this review, we discuss the role and mode of actions of PSA-NCAM in structural plasticity as well as its potential link to cognitive processes.

  9. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Evan R.; Yang, Jing; So, Juhoon; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Kahn, Michael; Ishitani, Tohru; Shin, Donghun; Mustata Wilson, Gabriela; Monga, Satdarshan P.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, lacks effective medical therapy. Large subsets of HCC demonstrate Wnt/β-catenin activation, making this an attractive therapeutic target. We report strategy and characterization of a novel small-molecule inhibitor, ICG-001, known to affect Wnt signaling by disrupting β-catenin–CREB binding protein interactions. We queried the ZINC online database for structural similarity to ICG-001 and identified PMED-1 as the lead compound, with ≥70% similarity to ICG-001. PMED-1 significantly reduced β-catenin activity in hepatoblastoma and several HCC cells, as determined by TOPflash reporter assay, with an IC50 ranging from 4.87 to 32 μmol/L. Although no toxicity was observed in primary human hepatocytes, PMED-1 inhibited Wnt target expression in HCC cells, including those with CTNNB1 mutations, and impaired cell proliferation and viability. PMED-1 treatment decreased β-catenin–CREB binding protein interactions without affecting total β-catenin levels or activity of other common kinases. PMED-1 treatment of Tg(OTM:d2EGFP) zebrafish expressing GFP under the β-catenin/Tcf reporter led to a notable decrease in β-catenin activity. The PMED effect on β-catenin signaling lasted from 12 to 24 hours in vitro and 6 to 15 hours in vivo. Thus, using a rapid and cost-effective computational methodology, we have identified a novel and specific small-molecule inhibitor of Wnt signaling that may have implications for HCC treatment. PMID:24819961

  10. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics. PMID:26068799

  11. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling.

  12. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling. PMID:22291200

  13. Bardoxolone methyl prevents high-fat diet-induced alterations in prefrontal cortex signalling molecules involved in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Fernandez, Francesca; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-06-01

    High fat (HF) diets are known to induce changes in synaptic plasticity in the forebrain leading to learning and memory impairments. Previous studies of oleanolic acid derivatives have found that these compounds can cross the blood-brain barrier to prevent neuronal cell death. We examined the hypothesis that the oleanolic acid derivative, bardoxolone methyl (BM) would prevent diet-induced cognitive deficits in mice fed a HF diet. C57BL/6J male mice were fed a lab chow (LC) (5% of energy as fat), a HF (40% of energy as fat), or a HF diet supplemented with 10mg/kg/day BM orally for 21weeks. Recognition memory was assessed by performing a novel object recognition test on the treated mice. Downstream brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling molecules were examined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of mice via Western blotting and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor binding. BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced impairment in recognition memory (p<0.001). In HF diet fed mice, BM administration attenuated alterations in the NMDA receptor binding density in the PFC (p<0.05), however, no changes were seen in the hippocampus (p>0.05). In the PFC and hippocampus of the HF diet fed mice, BM administration improved downstream BDNF signalling as indicated by increased protein levels of BDNF, phosphorylated tropomyosin related kinase B (pTrkB) and phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAkt), and increased phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) (p<0.05). BM administration also prevented the HF diet-induced increase in the protein levels of inflammatory molecules, phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK) in the PFC, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in both the PFC and hippocampus. In summary, these findings suggest that BM prevents HF diet-induced impairments in recognition memory by improving downstream BDNF signal transduction, increasing pAMPK, and reducing inflammation in the PFC and hippocampus.

  14. A stromal interaction molecule 1 variant up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression by strengthening nucleoplasmic Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengrong; Zhu, Liping; Cai, Lei; Zhang, Jiwei; Zeng, Xianqin; Li, Jiansha; Su, Yuan; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Very recent studies hold promise to reveal the role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in non-store-operated Ca2+ entry. Here we showed that in contrast to cytoplasmic membrane redistribution as previously noted, human umbilical vein endothelial STIM1 with a T-to-C nucleotide transition resulting in an amino acid substitution of leucine by proline in the signal peptide sequence translocated to perinuclear membrane upon intracellular Ca2+ depletion, amplified nucleoplasmic Ca2+ signaling through ryanodine receptor-dependent pathway, and enhanced the subsequent cAMP responsive element binding protein activity, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) gene expression, and endothelial tube forming. The abundance of mutated STIM1 and the MMP-2 expression were higher in native human umbilical vein endothelial cells of patients with gestational hypertension than controls and were significantly correlated with blood pressure. These findings broaden our understanding about structure-function bias of STIM1 and offer unique insights into its application in nucleoplasmic Ca2+, MMP-2 expression, endothelial dysfunction, and pathophysiological mechanism(s) of gestational hypertension. PMID:26775216

  15. Syntheses of biodiesel precursors: sulfonic acid catalysts for condensation of biomass-derived platform molecules.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Madhesan; Sacia, Eric R; Bell, Alexis T

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis of transportation fuel from lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive solution to the green alternative-energy problem. The production of biodiesel, in particular, involves the process of upgrading biomass-derived small molecules to diesel precursors containing a specific carbon range (C11 -C23). Herein, a carbon-upgrading process utilizing an acid-catalyzed condensation of furanic platform molecules from biomass is described. Various types of sulfonic acid catalysts have been evaluated for this process, including biphasic and solid supported catalysts. A silica-bound alkyl sulfonic acid catalyst has been developed for promoting carbon-carbon bond formation of biomass-derived carbonyl compounds with 2-methylfuran. This hydrophobic solid acid catalyst exhibits activity and selectivity that are comparable to those of a soluble acid catalyst. The catalyst can be readily recovered and recycled, possesses appreciable hydrolytic stability in the presence of water, and retains its acidity over multiple reaction cycles. Application of this catalyst to biomass-derived platform molecules led to the synthesis of a variety of furanic compounds, which are potential biodiesel precursors.

  16. A Small Molecule RAS-Mimetic Disrupts RAS Association with Effector Proteins to Block Signaling.

    PubMed

    Athuluri-Divakar, Sai Krishna; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Dutta, Kaushik; Baker, Stacey J; Cosenza, Stephen C; Basu, Indranil; Gupta, Yogesh K; Reddy, M V Ramana; Ueno, Lynn; Hart, Jonathan R; Vogt, Peter K; Mulholland, David; Guha, Chandan; Aggarwal, Aneel K; Reddy, E Premkumar

    2016-04-21

    Oncogenic activation of RAS genes via point mutations occurs in 20%-30% of human cancers. The development of effective RAS inhibitors has been challenging, necessitating new approaches to inhibit this oncogenic protein. Functional studies have shown that the switch region of RAS interacts with a large number of effector proteins containing a common RAS-binding domain (RBD). Because RBD-mediated interactions are essential for RAS signaling, blocking RBD association with small molecules constitutes an attractive therapeutic approach. Here, we present evidence that rigosertib, a styryl-benzyl sulfone, acts as a RAS-mimetic and interacts with the RBDs of RAF kinases, resulting in their inability to bind to RAS, disruption of RAF activation, and inhibition of the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway. We also find that ribosertib binds to the RBDs of Ral-GDS and PI3Ks. These results suggest that targeting of RBDs across multiple signaling pathways by rigosertib may represent an effective strategy for inactivation of RAS signaling. PMID:27104980

  17. Is L-lactate a novel signaling molecule in the brain?

    PubMed

    Mosienko, Valentina; Teschemacher, Anja G; Kasparov, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    In the brain, L-lactate is produced by both neurons and astrocytes. There is no doubt that neurons use L-lactate as a supplementary fuel although the importance of this energy source is disputed. Irrespective of its caloric value, L-lactate might also have a signaling role in the brain. Here, we review several current hypotheses of L-lactate mediated signaling. Some proposed mechanisms require L-lactate entry into the neurons leading to a shift in ATP/ADP ratio or redox state. Others postulate interaction with either known receptor HCA1 (GPR81) or a novel, yet unidentified receptor. We argue that the sensitivity of any such mechanism has to match the concentration range of extracellular L-lactate, which is less than ~1.5 mmol/L under physiologic conditions. From that point of view, some of the proposed mechanisms require supraphysiologic levels of L-lactate and could be engaged during ischemia or seizures when L-lactate concentration rises dramatically. Currently, we do not know whether L-lactate production in the brain occurs in microdomains, which might create higher than average local concentrations. Nevertheless, it is clear that in the brain, as in the peripheral tissues, L-lactate is not only used as a source of energy but also acts as a signaling molecule.

  18. Is L-lactate a novel signaling molecule in the brain?

    PubMed Central

    Mosienko, Valentina; Teschemacher, Anja G; Kasparov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    In the brain, L-lactate is produced by both neurons and astrocytes. There is no doubt that neurons use L-lactate as a supplementary fuel although the importance of this energy source is disputed. Irrespective of its caloric value, L-lactate might also have a signaling role in the brain. Here, we review several current hypotheses of L-lactate mediated signaling. Some proposed mechanisms require L-lactate entry into the neurons leading to a shift in ATP/ADP ratio or redox state. Others postulate interaction with either known receptor HCA1 (GPR81) or a novel, yet unidentified receptor. We argue that the sensitivity of any such mechanism has to match the concentration range of extracellular L-lactate, which is less than ~1.5 mmol/L under physiologic conditions. From that point of view, some of the proposed mechanisms require supraphysiologic levels of L-lactate and could be engaged during ischemia or seizures when L-lactate concentration rises dramatically. Currently, we do not know whether L-lactate production in the brain occurs in microdomains, which might create higher than average local concentrations. Nevertheless, it is clear that in the brain, as in the peripheral tissues, L-lactate is not only used as a source of energy but also acts as a signaling molecule. PMID:25920953

  19. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  20. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  1. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish. PMID:25732591

  2. Sustained Small Molecule Delivery from Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels through Host-Guest Mediated Retention

    PubMed Central

    Mealy, Joshua E.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled and injectable hydrogels have many beneficial properties for the local delivery of therapeutics; however, challenges still exist in the sustained release of small molecules from these highly hydrated networks. Host-guest chemistry between cyclodextrin and adamantane has been used to create supramolecular hydrogels from modified polymers. Beyond assembly, this chemistry may also provide increased drug retention and sustained release through the formation of inclusion complexes between drugs and cyclodextrin. Here, we engineered a two-component system from adamantane-modified and β-cyclodextrin (CD)-modified hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural component of the extracellular matrix, to produce hydrogels that are both injectable and able to sustain the release of small molecules. The conjugation of cyclodextrin to HA dramatically altered its affinity for hydrophobic small molecules, such as tryptophan. This interaction led to lower molecule diffusivity and the release of small molecules for up to 21 days with release profiles dependent on CD concentration and drug-CD affinity. There was significant attenuation of release from the supramolecular hydrogels (~20% release in 24h) when compared to hydrogels without CD (~90% release in 24h). The loading of small molecules also had no effect on hydrogel mechanics or self-assembly properties. Finally, to illustrate this controlled delivery approach with clinically used small molecule pharmaceuticals, we sustained the release of two widely used drugs (i.e., doxycycline and doxorubicin) from these hydrogels. PMID:26693019

  3. Small-Volume Analysis of Cell–Cell Signaling Molecules in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Romanova, Elena V; Aerts, Jordan T; Croushore, Callie A; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2014-01-01

    Modern science is characterized by integration and synergy between research fields. Accordingly, as technological advances allow new and more ambitious quests in scientific inquiry, numerous analytical and engineering techniques have become useful tools in biological research. The focus of this review is on cutting edge technologies that aid direct measurement of bioactive compounds in the nervous system to facilitate fundamental research, diagnostics, and drug discovery. We discuss challenges associated with measurement of cell-to-cell signaling molecules in the nervous system, and advocate for a decrease of sample volumes to the nanoliter volume regimen for improved analysis outcomes. We highlight effective approaches for the collection, separation, and detection of such small-volume samples, present strategies for targeted and discovery-oriented research, and describe the required technology advances that will empower future translational science. PMID:23748227

  4. Is SS-A/Ro52 a hydrogen peroxide-sensitive signaling molecule?

    PubMed

    Nobuhara, Yumiko; Kawano, Seiji; Kageyama, Goichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Saegusa, Jun; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2007-03-01

    SS-A/Ro52 (Ro52) protein is one of the targets of autoantibodies in Sjogren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus. Ro52 structurally belongs to the RING-B-box/coiled-coil family, which appears to carry out diverse functions, but the physiological function of Ro52 remains largely unknown. Here, the authors demonstrate that hydrogen peroxide but not other oxidative stressors induced translocation of Ro52 protein from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and this phenomenon was attenuated by inhibition of MAP kinases, ERK in particular. These findings raise the possibility that SS-A/Ro52 may function as a hydrogen peroxide-selective, oxidative stress-sensitive signaling molecule that is activated via the MAP kinase pathway.

  5. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase and its signalling molecules as novel targets in lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, A M L; Gunby, R H; Tartari, C J; Scapozza, L; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Passoni, Lorena

    2005-06-01

    A crucial issue in the development of molecularly-targeted anticancer therapies is the identification of appropriate molecules whose targeting would result in tumour regression with a minimal level of systemic toxicity. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, normally expressed at low levels in the nervous system. As a consequence of chromosomal translocations involving the alk gene (2p23), ALK is also aberrantly expressed and constitutively activated in approximately 60% of CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs). Due to the selective overexpression of ALK in tumour cells, its direct involvement in the process of malignant transformation and its frequent expression in ALCL patients, the authors recognise ALK as a suitable candidate for the development of molecularly targeted strategies for the therapeutic treatment of ALK-positive lymphomas. Strategies targeting ALK directly or indirectly via the inhibition of the protein networks responsible for ALK oncogenic signalling are discussed. PMID:15948671

  6. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signaling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Djordjevic, Michael A; Imin, Nijat

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  7. Small-volume analysis of cell-cell signaling molecules in the brain.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Elena V; Aerts, Jordan T; Croushore, Callie A; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2014-01-01

    Modern science is characterized by integration and synergy between research fields. Accordingly, as technological advances allow new and more ambitious quests in scientific inquiry, numerous analytical and engineering techniques have become useful tools in biological research. The focus of this review is on cutting edge technologies that aid direct measurement of bioactive compounds in the nervous system to facilitate fundamental research, diagnostics, and drug discovery. We discuss challenges associated with measurement of cell-to-cell signaling molecules in the nervous system, and advocate for a decrease of sample volumes to the nanoliter volume regimen for improved analysis outcomes. We highlight effective approaches for the collection, separation, and detection of such small-volume samples, present strategies for targeted and discovery-oriented research, and describe the required technology advances that will empower future translational science.

  8. Lipo-chitin oligosaccharides, plant symbiosis signalling molecules that modulate mammalian angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Michael A; Bezos, Anna; Susanti; Marmuse, Laurence; Driguez, Hugues; Samain, Eric; Vauzeilles, Boris; Beau, Jean-Marie; Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; Rolfe, Barry G; Schwörer, Ralf; Daines, Alison M; Gresshoff, Peter M; Parish, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides (LCOs) are signaling molecules required by ecologically and agronomically important bacteria and fungi to establish symbioses with diverse land plants. In plants, oligo-chitins and LCOs can differentially interact with different lysin motif (LysM) receptors and affect innate immunity responses or symbiosis-related pathways. In animals, oligo-chitins also induce innate immunity and other physiological responses but LCO recognition has not been demonstrated. Here LCO and LCO-like compounds are shown to be biologically active in mammals in a structure dependent way through the modulation of angiogenesis, a tightly-regulated process involving the induction and growth of new blood vessels from existing vessels. The testing of 24 LCO, LCO-like or oligo-chitin compounds resulted in structure-dependent effects on angiogenesis in vitro leading to promotion, or inhibition or nil effects. Like plants, the mammalian LCO biological activity depended upon the presence and type of terminal substitutions. Un-substituted oligo-chitins of similar chain lengths were unable to modulate angiogenesis indicating that mammalian cells, like plant cells, can distinguish between LCOs and un-substituted oligo-chitins. The cellular mode-of-action of the biologically active LCOs in mammals was determined. The stimulation or inhibition of endothelial cell adhesion to vitronectin or fibronectin correlated with their pro- or anti-angiogenic activity. Importantly, novel and more easily synthesised LCO-like disaccharide molecules were also biologically active and de-acetylated chitobiose was shown to be the primary structural basis of recognition. Given this, simpler chitin disaccharides derivatives based on the structure of biologically active LCOs were synthesised and purified and these showed biological activity in mammalian cells. Since important chronic disease states are linked to either insufficient or excessive angiogenesis, LCO and LCO-like molecules may have the

  9. Emergence of hydrogen sulfide as an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Polhemus, David J; Lefer, David J

    2014-02-14

    Long recognized as a malodorous and highly toxic gas, recent experimental studies have revealed that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced enzymatically in all mammalian species including man and exerts several critical actions to promote cardiovascular homeostasis and health. During the past 15 years, scientists have determined that H2S is produced by 3 endogenous enzymes and exerts powerful effects on endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nuclear transcription factors. These effects have been reported in multiple organ systems, and the majority of data clearly indicate that H2S produced by the endogenous enzymes exerts cytoprotective actions. Recent preclinical studies investigating cardiovascular diseases have demonstrated that the administration of physiological or pharmacological levels of H2S attenuates myocardial injury, protects blood vessels, limits inflammation, and regulates blood pressure. H2S has emerged as a critical cardiovascular signaling molecule similar to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide with a profound effect on the heart and circulation. Our improved understanding of how H2S elicits protective actions, coupled with the rapid development of novel H2S-releasing agents, has resulted in heightened enthusiasm for the clinical translation of this ephemeral gaseous molecule. This review will examine our current state of knowledge about the actions of H2S within the cardiovascular system with an emphasis on the therapeutic potential and molecular cross talk between H2S, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide.

  10. Emergence of Hydrogen Sulfide as an Endogenous Gaseous Signaling Molecule in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Lefer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Long recognized as a malodorous and highly toxic gas, recent experimental studies have revealed that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced enzymatically in all mammalian species including man and exerts a number of critical actions to promote cardiovascular homeostasis and health. During the past 15 years, scientists have determined that H2S is produced by three endogenous enzymes and exerts powerful effects on endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nuclear transcription factors. These effects have been reported in multiple organ systems and the vast majority of data clearly indicate that H2S produced by the endogenous enzymes exerts cytoprotective actions. Recent preclinical studies investigating cardiovascular diseases have demonstrated that the administration of physiological or pharmacological levels of H2S attenuates myocardial injury, protects blood vessels, limits inflammation, and regulates blood pressure. H2S has emerged as a critical cardiovascular signaling molecule similar to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) with a profound impact on the heart and circulation (Figure 1). Our improved understanding of how H2S elicits protective actions, coupled with the very rapid development of novel H2S releasing agents, has resulted in heightened enthusiasm for the clinical translation of this ephemeral gaseous molecule. This review will examine our current state of knowledge regarding the actions of H2S within the cardiovascular system with an emphasis on the therapeutic potential and molecular crosstalk between H2S, NO, and CO. PMID:24526678

  11. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  12. Investigation of pyridine carboxylic acids in CM2 carbonaceous chondrites: Potential precursor molecules for ancient coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-07-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  13. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We lso report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  14. Investigation of Pyridine Carboxylic Acids in CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Potential Precursor Molecules for Ancient Coenzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Karen E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and abundances of pyridine carboxylic acids (including nicotinic acid) in eight CM2 carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 85013, DOM 03183, DOM 08003, EET 96016, LAP 02333, LAP 02336, LEW 85311, and WIS 91600) were investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection and high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry. We find that pyridine monocarboxylic acids are prevalent in CM2-type chondrites and their abundance negatively correlates with the degree of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration that the meteorite parent body experienced. We also report the first detection of pyridine dicarboxylic acids in carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we carried out laboratory studies of proton-irradiated pyridine in carbon dioxide-rich ices (a 1:1 mixture) to serve as a model of the interstellar ice chemistry that may have led to the synthesis of pyridine carboxylic acids. Analysis of the irradiated ice residue shows that a comparable suite of pyridine mono- and dicarboxylic acids was produced, although aqueous alteration may still play a role in the synthesis (and ultimate yield) of these compounds in carbonaceous meteorites. Nicotinic acid is a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a likely ancient molecule used in cellular metabolism in all of life, and its common occurrence in CM2 chondrites may indicate that meteorites may have been a source of molecules for the emergence of more complex coenzymes on the early Earth.

  15. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  16. Signalling by the global regulatory molecule ppGpp in bacteria and chloroplasts of land plants.

    PubMed

    Tozawa, Y; Nomura, Y

    2011-09-01

    The hyperphosphorylated guanine ribonucleotide ppGpp mediates the stringent response in bacteria. Biochemical and genetic studies of this response in Escherichia coli have shown that the biosynthesis of ppGpp is catalysed by two homologous enzymes, RelA and SpoT. RelA is activated in response to amino acid starvation, and SpoT responds to abiotic physical stress beside nutritional stress. All free-living bacteria, including Gram-positive firmicutes, contain RelA-SpoT homologues (RSH). Further, novel ppGpp biosynthetic enzymes, designated small alarmone synthetases (SASs), were recently identified in a subset of bacteria, including the Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis, and were shown to consist only of a ppGpp synthetase domain. Studies suggest that these SAS proteins contribute to ppGpp signalling in response to stressful conditions in a manner distinct from that of RelA-SpoT enzymes. SAS proteins currently appear to always occur in addition to RSH enzymes in various combinations but never alone. RSHs have also been identified in chloroplasts, organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that originated from endosymbiotic photosynthetic bacteria. These chloroplast RSHs are exclusively encoded in nuclear DNA and targeted into chloroplasts. The findings suggest that ppGpp may regulate chloroplast functions similar to those regulated in bacteria, including transcription and translation. In addition, a novel ppGpp synthetase that is regulated by Ca²⁺ as a result of the presence of two EF-hand motifs at its COOH terminus was recently identified in chloroplasts of land plants. This finding indicates the existence of a direct connection between eukaryotic Ca²⁺ signalling and prokaryotic ppGpp signalling in chloroplasts. The new observations with regard to ppGpp signalling in land plants suggest that such signalling contributes to the regulation of a wider range of cellular functions than previously anticipated.

  17. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  18. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-07-20

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca(2+) is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca(2+)-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca(2+)-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca(2+)-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca(2+)-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca(2+)-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level.

  19. Conformational dynamics of nucleic acid molecules studied by PELDOR spectroscopy with rigid spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisner, T. F.; Marko, A.; Sigurdsson, S. Th.

    2015-03-01

    Nucleic acid molecules can adopt a variety of structures and exhibit a large degree of conformational flexibility to fulfill their various functions in cells. Here we describe the use of Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance (PELDOR or DEER) to investigate nucleic acid molecules where two cytosine analogs have been incorporated as spin probes. Because these new types of spin labels are rigid and incorporated into double stranded DNA and RNA molecules, there is no additional flexibility of the spin label itself present. Therefore the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between both spin labels encodes for the distance as well as for the mutual orientation between the spin labels. All of this information can be extracted by multi-frequency/multi-field PELDOR experiments, which gives very precise and valuable information about the structure and conformational flexibility of the nucleic acid molecules. We describe in detail our procedure to obtain the conformational ensembles and show the accuracy and limitations with test examples and application to double-stranded DNA.

  20. Small molecule- and amino acid-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Hesham M; Shah, Akash; Konieczny, Michael; Hoffmann, Joan A; Nijdam, A Jasper; Reeves, M E

    2013-06-25

    To understand which organic molecules are capable of binding to gold nanoparticles and/or inducing nanoparticle aggregation, we investigate the interaction of gold nanoparticles with small molecules and amino acids at variable pH. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra were measured on mixtures of colloidal gold with small molecules to track the progression of the aggregation of gold nanoparticles. We introduce the 522 to 435 nm UV-vis absorbance ratio as a sensitive method for the detection of colloidal gold aggregation, whereby we delineate the ability of thiol, amine, and carboxylic acid functional groups to bind to the surfaces of gold nanoparticles and investigate how combinations of these functional groups affect colloidal stability. We present models for mechanisms of aggregation of colloidal gold, including surface charge reduction and bridging linkers. For all molecules whose addition leads to the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, the aggregation kinetics were accelerated at acidic pH values. Colloidal gold is maintained only in the presence of anionic carboxyl groups, which are neutralized by protonation at lower pH. The overall reduced charge on the stabilizing carboxyl groups accounts for the accelerated aggregation at lower pH values. PMID:23718319

  1. Extracellular signalling molecules in the ischaemic/reperfused heart – druggable and translatable for cardioprotection?

    PubMed Central

    Kleinbongard, P; Heusch, G

    2015-01-01

    In patients with acute myocardial infarction, timely reperfusion is essential to limit infarct size. However, reperfusion also adds to myocardial injury. Brief episodes of ischaemia/reperfusion in the myocardium or on organ remote from the heart, before or shortly after sustained myocardial ischaemia effectively reduce infarct size, provided there is eventual reperfusion. Such conditioning phenomena have been established in many experimental studies and also translated to humans. The underlying signal transduction, that is the molecular identity of triggers, mediators and effectors, is not clear yet in detail, but several extracellular signalling molecules, such as adenosine, bradykinin and opioids, have been identified to contribute to cardioprotection by conditioning manoeuvres. Several trials have attempted the translation of cardioprotection by such autacoids into a clinical scenario of myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion. Adenosine and its selective agonists reduced infarct size in a few studies, but this benefit was not translated into improved clinical outcome. All studies with bradykinin or drugs which increase bradykinin's bioavailability reported reduced infarct size and some of them also improved clinical outcome. Synthetic opioid agonists did not result in a robust infarct size reduction, but this failure of translation may relate to the cardioprotective properties of the underlying anaesthesia per se or of the comparator drugs. The translation of findings in healthy, young animals with acute coronary occlusion/reperfusion to patients of older age, with a variety of co-morbidities and co-medications, suffering from different scenarios of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion remains a challenge. PMID:25204973

  2. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (CDw150) is homophilic but self-associates with very low affinity.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, N; Mason, D W; Atkinson, P D; Evans, E J; Gilbert, R J; Stuart, D I; Fennelly, J A; Barclay, A N; Davis, S J; Brown, M H

    2000-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activating molecule ((SLAM) CDw150) is a glycoprotein that belongs to the CD2 subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily and is expressed on the surface of activated T- and B-cells. It has been proposed that SLAM is homophilic and required for bidirectional signaling during T- and B-cell activation. Previous work has suggested that the affinity of SLAM self-association might be unusually high, undermining the concept that protein interactions mediating transient cell-cell contacts, such as those involving leukocytes, have to be weak in order that such contacts are readily reversible. Using surface plasmon resonance-based methods and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), we confirm that SLAM is homophilic. However, we also establish a new theoretical treatment of surface plasmon resonance-derived homophilic binding data, which indicates that SLAM-SLAM interactions (solution K(d) approximately 200 micrometer) are in fact considerably weaker than most other well characterized protein-protein interactions at the cell surface (solution K(d) approximately 0.4-20 micrometer), a conclusion that is supported by the AUC analysis. Whereas further analysis of the AUC data imply that SLAM could form "head to head" dimers spanning adjacent cells, the very low affinity raises important questions regarding the physiological role and/or properties of such interactions. PMID:10831600

  3. Is insulin signaling molecules misguided in diabetes for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation?

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Sampathkumar, Rangasamy; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2005-07-01

    Recent mining of the human and mouse genomes, use of yeast genetics, and detailed analyses of several biochemical pathways, have resulted in the identification of many new roles for ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation of proteins. In the context of last year's award of Noble Prize (Chemistry) work, the ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications are increasingly recognized as key regulatory events in health and disease. Although the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome system has evolved as premier cellular proteolytic machinery, dysregulation of this system by several different mechanisms leads to inappropriate degradation of specific proteins and pathological consequences. While aberrations in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been implicated in certain malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, recent studies indicate a role for this system in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Inappropriate degradation of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2) has been demonstrated in experimental diabetes, mediated in part through the up-regulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS). It appears that altered ubiquitin-proteasome system might be one of the molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in many pathological situations. Drugs that modulate the SOCS action and/or proteasomal degradation of proteins could become novel agents for the treatment of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

  4. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (CDw150) is homophilic but self-associates with very low affinity.

    PubMed

    Mavaddat, N; Mason, D W; Atkinson, P D; Evans, E J; Gilbert, R J; Stuart, D I; Fennelly, J A; Barclay, A N; Davis, S J; Brown, M H

    2000-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activating molecule ((SLAM) CDw150) is a glycoprotein that belongs to the CD2 subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily and is expressed on the surface of activated T- and B-cells. It has been proposed that SLAM is homophilic and required for bidirectional signaling during T- and B-cell activation. Previous work has suggested that the affinity of SLAM self-association might be unusually high, undermining the concept that protein interactions mediating transient cell-cell contacts, such as those involving leukocytes, have to be weak in order that such contacts are readily reversible. Using surface plasmon resonance-based methods and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), we confirm that SLAM is homophilic. However, we also establish a new theoretical treatment of surface plasmon resonance-derived homophilic binding data, which indicates that SLAM-SLAM interactions (solution K(d) approximately 200 micrometer) are in fact considerably weaker than most other well characterized protein-protein interactions at the cell surface (solution K(d) approximately 0.4-20 micrometer), a conclusion that is supported by the AUC analysis. Whereas further analysis of the AUC data imply that SLAM could form "head to head" dimers spanning adjacent cells, the very low affinity raises important questions regarding the physiological role and/or properties of such interactions.

  5. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D.; McHugh, K.P.; Haynes, D.R.; Crotti, T.N.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  6. Quorum sensing signal molecules (acylated homoserine lactones) in gram-negative fish pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jesper B; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nielsen, Kristian F; Buchholtz, Christiane; Larsen, Jens L; Gram, Lone

    2005-06-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the production of quorum sensing signals (specifically acylated homoserine lactones, AHLs) among a selection of strains of Gram-negative fish bacterial pathogens. These signals are involved in the regulation of virulence factors in some human and plant-pathogenic bacteria. A total of 59 strains, representing 9 different fish pathogenic species, were tested against 2 AHL monitor bacteria (Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 [pZLR4] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026) in a well diffusion assay and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Representative samples were further characterized by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HR-MS). AHLs were produced by all strains of Aeromonas salmonicida, Aeromonas hydrophila, Yersinia ruckeri, Vibrio salmonicida, and Vibrio vulnificus. Some strains of atypical Aeromonas salmonicida and Vibrio splendidus were also positive. Aeromonas species produced N-butanoyl homoserine lactone (BHL) and N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (HHL) and 1 additional product, whereas N-3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone (OHHL) and HHL were detected in Vibrio salmonicida. N-3-oxo-octanoyl homoserine lactone (OOHL) and N-3-octanoyl homoserine lactone (OHL) were detected in Y. ruckeri. AHLs were not detected from strains of Photobacterium damselae, Flavobacterium psychrophilum or Moritella viscosa. AHLs were extracted from fish infected with Y. ruckeri but not from fish infected with A. salmonicida. In conclusion, the production of quorum sensing signals, AHLs, is common among the strains that we examined. If the AHL molecules regulate the expression of the virulence phenotype in these bacteria, as shown to occur in some bacterial pathogens, novel disease control measures may be developed by blocking AHL-mediated communication and suppressing virulence.

  7. Phosphatidic acid, a versatile water-stress signal in roots

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Fionn; Testerink, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Adequate water supply is of utmost importance for growth and reproduction of plants. In order to cope with water deprivation, plants have to adapt their development and metabolism to ensure survival. To maximize water use efficiency, plants use a large array of signaling mediators such as hormones, protein kinases, and phosphatases, Ca2+, reactive oxygen species, and low abundant phospholipids that together form complex signaling cascades. Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a signaling lipid that rapidly accumulates in response to a wide array of abiotic stress stimuli. PA formation provides the cell with spatial and transient information about the external environment by acting as a protein-docking site in cellular membranes. PA reportedly binds to a number of proteins that play a role during water limiting conditions, such as drought and salinity and has been shown to play an important role in maintaining root system architecture. Members of two osmotic stress-activated protein kinase families, sucrose non-fermenting 1-related protein kinase 2 and mitogen activated protein kinases were recently shown bind PA and are also involved in the maintenance of root system architecture and salinity stress tolerance. In addition, PA regulates several proteins involved in abscisic acid-signaling. PA-dependent recruitment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase under water limiting conditions indicates a role in regulating metabolic processes. Finally, a recent study also shows the PA recruits the clathrin heavy chain and a potassium channel subunit, hinting toward additional roles in cellular trafficking and potassium homeostasis. Taken together, the rapidly increasing number of proteins reported to interact with PA implies a broad role for this versatile signaling phospholipid in mediating salt and water stress responses. PMID:24391659

  8. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  9. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits an Activated FGFR3 Mutant, and Blocks Downstream Signaling in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, April N.; McAndrew, Christopher W.; Donoghue, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations within Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase, are responsible for human skeletal dysplasias including achondroplasia and the neonatal lethal syndromes, Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) type I and II. Several of these same FGFR3 mutations have also been identified somatically in human cancers, including multiple myeloma, bladder carcinoma and cervical cancer. Based on reports that strongly activated mutants of FGFR3 such as the TDII (K650E) mutant signal preferentially from within the secretory pathway, the inhibitory properties of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which blocks protein transport through the Golgi, were investigated. NDGA was able to inhibit FGFR3 autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, signaling molecules downstream of FGFR3 activation such as STAT1, STAT3 and MAPK were inhibited by NDGA treatment. Using HEK293 cells expressing activated FGFR3-TDII, together with several multiple myeloma cell lines expressing activated forms of FGFR3, NDGA generally resulted in a decrease in MAPK activation by 1 hour, and resulted in increased apoptosis over 24 hours. The effects of NDGA on activated FGFR3 derivatives targeted either to the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm were also examined. These results suggest that inhibitory small molecules such as NDGA that target a specific subcellular compartment may be beneficial in the inhibition of activated receptors such as FGFR3 that signal from the same compartment. PMID:18794123

  10. On the influence of low-energy ionizing radiation on the amino acid molecule: proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila; Vukstich, Vasyl; Papp, Alexander; Shkurin, Serhiy; Baliulyte, Laura; Snegursky, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    New data on the electron-impact fragmentation of the amino acid proline molecule are presented as being related to the formation of the ionized products due to the influence of low-energy ionizing radiation on the above molecule. An extensive DFT-theory based on the theoretical approach enabled the main pathways of the proline molecules fragmentation to be elucidated. A series of the produced fragments have been identified. The absolute appearance energies for some of them have been both measured experimentally and calculated theoretically. The data of the experimental studies and theoretical calculations are compared and analyzed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  11. Nonenzymatic turnover of an Erwinia carotovora quorum-sensing signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Byers, Joseph T; Lucas, Claire; Salmond, George P C; Welch, Martin

    2002-02-01

    The production of virulence factors and carbapenem antibiotic in the phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora is under the control of quorum sensing. The quorum-sensing signaling molecule, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL), accumulates in log-phase culture supernatants of E. carotovora but diminishes in concentration during the stationary phase. In this study, we show that the diminution in OHHL was not due to sequestration of the ligand by the cells, although some partitioning did occur. Rather, it was caused by degradation of the molecule. The rate of stationary-phase degradation of OHHL was as rapid as the rate of log-phase accumulation of the ligand, but it was nonenzymatic and led to a decrease in the expression of selected genes known to be under the control of quorum sensing. The degradation of OHHL was dependent on the pH of the supernatant, which increased as the growth curve progressed in cultures grown in Luria-Bertani medium from pH 7 to approximately 8.5. OHHL became unstable over a narrow pH range (pH 7 to 8). Instability was increased at high temperatures even at neutral pH but could be prevented at the growth temperature (30 degrees C) by buffering the samples at pH 6.8. These results may provide a rationale for the observation that an early response of plants which are under attack by Erwinia is to activate a proton pump which alkalizes the site of infection to a pH of >8.2.

  12. Impact of a Cross-Kingdom Signaling Molecule of Candida albicans on Acinetobacter baumannii Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Kostoulias, Xenia; Murray, Gerald L.; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Kong, Jason B.; Bantun, Farkad; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Khoo, Chen Ai

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic human pathogen that has become highly problematic in the clinical environment. Novel therapies are desperately required. To assist in identifying new therapeutic targets, the antagonistic interactions between A. baumannii and the most common human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, were studied. We have observed that the C. albicans quorum-sensing molecule, farnesol, has cross-kingdom interactions, affecting the viability of A. baumannii. To gain an understanding of its mechanism, the transcriptional profile of A. baumannii exposed to farnesol was examined. Farnesol caused dysregulation of a large number of genes involved in cell membrane biogenesis, multidrug efflux pumps (AcrAB-like and AdeIJK-like), and A. baumannii virulence traits such as biofilm formation (csuA, csuB, and ompA) and motility (pilZ and pilH). We also observed a strong induction in genes involved in cell division (minD, minE, ftsK, ftsB, and ftsL). These transcriptional data were supported by functional assays showing that farnesol disrupts A. baumannii cell membrane integrity, alters cell morphology, and impairs virulence characteristics such as biofilm formation and twitching motility. Moreover, we showed that A. baumannii uses efflux pumps as a defense mechanism against this eukaryotic signaling molecule. Owing to its effects on membrane integrity, farnesol was tested to see if it potentiated the activity of the membrane-acting polymyxin antibiotic colistin. When coadministered, farnesol increased sensitivity to colistin for otherwise resistant strains. These data provide mechanistic understanding of the antagonistic interactions between diverse pathogens and may provide important insights into novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26482299

  13. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

  14. Utilization of Microwave Spectroscopy to Identify and Probe Reaction Dynamics of Hsno, a Crucial Biological Signaling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Matthew; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Stanton, John F.; Cummins, Christopher; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2016-06-01

    Thionitrous acid (HSNO), a potential key intermediate in biological signaling pathways, has been proposed to link NO and H2S biochemistries. Its existence and stability in vivo, however, remain controversial. By means of Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, we establish that HSNO is spontaneously formed in high concentration when NO and H2S gases are simply mixed at room temperature in the presence of metallic surfaces. Our measurements reveal that HSNO is formed with high efficiency by the reaction H2S and N2O3 to produce HSNO and HNO2, where N2O3 is a product of NO disproportionation. These studies also suggest that further reaction of HSNO with H2S may form HNO and HSSH. The length of the S--N bond has been derived to high precision from isotopic studies, and is found to be unusually long, 1.84 Å -- the longest S--N bond reported to date for an SNO compound. The present structural and reactivity investigations of this elusive molecule provide a firm fundation to better understand its physiological chemistry and propensity to undergo S--N bond homolysis in vivo.

  15. Arabidopsis leaf necrosis caused by simulated acid rain is related to the salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngmi; Park, Jongbum; Im, Kyunghoan; Kim, Kiyoon; Lee, Jungwoo; Lee, Kyungyeoll; Park, Jung-An; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Park, Dae-Sup; Yang, Joo-Sung; Kim, Donggiun; Lee, Sukchan

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis leaves treated with simulated acid rain (SiAR) showed phenotypes similar to necrotic lesions caused by biotic stresses like Pseudomonad infiltration. Exposure of Arabidopsis to SiAR resulted in the up-regulation of genes known to be induced by the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated pathogen resistance response. The expression of enhanced disease susceptibility (EDS), nonexpressor of PR (NPR) and pathogen-related 1 (PR1), all of which are involved in the salicylic acid signaling pathway, were increased after SiAR exposure. However, vegetative storage protein (VSP), a member of the jasmonic acid pathway did not show a significant change in transcript level. SiAR treatment of transgenic plants expressing salicylate hydroxylase (Nah-G), which prevents the accumulation of salicylic acid, underwent more extensive necrosis than wild-type plants, indicating that the signaling pathway activated by SiAR may overlap with the SA-dependent, systemic acquired resistance pathway. Both Col-0 and Nah-G plants showed sensitivity to SiAR and sulfuric SiAR (S-SiAR) by developing necrotic lesions. Neither Col-0 plants nor Nah-G plants showed sensitivity to nitric SiAR (N-SiAR). These results suggest that SiAR activates at least the salicylic acid pathway and activation of this pathway is sensitive to sulfuric acid.

  16. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, J.A.; Zika, R.G. ); Alexander, M. )

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of (2-{sup 14}C)glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of {sup 14}C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A{sub 330}. Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  17. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic Acid.

    PubMed

    Amador, J A; Alexander, M; Zika, R G

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of [2-C]glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A(330). Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  18. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  19. Evolution of Abscisic Acid Synthesis and Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Felix; Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) mediates seed dormancy, controls seedling development and triggers tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought. Core ABA signaling components consist of a recently identified group of ABA receptor proteins of the PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/REGULATORY COMPONENT OF ABA RECEPTOR (RCAR) family that act as negative regulators of members of the PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C (PP2C) family. Inhibition of PP2C activity enables activation of SNF1-RELATED KINASE 2 (SnRK2) protein kinases, which target downstream components, including transcription factors, ion channels and NADPH oxidases. These and other components form a complex ABA signaling network. Here, an in depth analysis of the evolution of components in this ABA signaling network shows that (i) PYR/RCAR ABA receptor and ABF-type transcription factor families arose during land colonization of plants and are not found in algae and other species, (ii) ABA biosynthesis enzymes have evolved to plant- and fungal-specific forms, leading to different ABA synthesis pathways, (iii) existing stress signaling components, including PP2C phosphatases and SnRK kinases, were adapted for novel roles in this plant-specific network to respond to water limitation. In addition, evolutionarily conserved secondary structures in the PYR/RCAR ABA receptor family are visualized. PMID:21549957

  20. Abscisic acid perception and signaling transduction in strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunli; Jia, Haifeng; Chai, Yemao; Shen, Yuanyue

    2011-01-01

    On basis of fruit differential respiration and ethylene effects, climacteric and non-climacteric fruits have been classically defined. Over the past decades, the molecular mechanisms of climacteric fruit ripening were abundantly described and found to focus on ethylene perception and signaling transduction. In contrast, until our most recent breakthroughs, much progress has been made toward understanding the signaling perception and transduction mechanisms for abscisic acid (ABA) in strawberry, a model for non-climacteric fruit ripening. Our reports not only have provided several lines of strong evidences for ABA-regulated ripening of strawberry fruit, but also have demonstrated that homology proteins of Arabidopsis ABA receptors, including PYR/PYL/RCAR and ABAR/CHLH, act as positive regulators of ripening in response to ABA. These receptors also trigger a set of ABA downstream signaling components, and determine significant changes in the expression levels of both sugar and pigment metabolism-related genes that are closely associated with ripening. Soluble sugars, especially sucrose, may act as a signal molecular to trigger ABA accumulation through an enzymatic action of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (FaNCED1). This mini-review offers an overview of these processes and also outlines the possible, molecular mechanisms for ABA in the regulation of strawberry fruit ripening through the ABA receptors. PMID:22095148

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Testerink, C; Wang, M

    2000-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), calcium, potassium, pH and a transient activation of MAP kinase. The ABA signal transduction cascades have been shown to be tissue-specific, the transient activation of MAP kinase has until now only been found in barley aleurone cells. However, type 2C phosphatases are involved in the induction of most ABA responses, as shown by the PP2C-deficient abi-mutants. These phosphatases show high homology with phosphatases that regulate MAP kinase activity in yeast. In addition, the role of farnesyl transferase as a negative regulator of ABA responses also indicates towards involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction. Farnesyl transferase is known to regulate Ras proteins, Ras proteins in turn are known to regulate MAP kinase activation. Interestingly, Ras-like proteins were detected in barley aleurone cells. Further establishment of the involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction and its role therein, still awaits more study.

  2. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  3. Enhanced Neurite Outgrowth of Human Model (NT2) Neurons by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Rho/ROCK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roloff, Frank; Scheiblich, Hannah; Dewitz, Carola; Dempewolf, Silke; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Axonal injury in the adult human central nervous system often results in loss of sensation and motor functions. Promoting regeneration of severed axons requires the inactivation of growth inhibitory influences from the tissue environment and stimulation of the neuron intrinsic growth potential. Especially glial cell derived factors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, Nogo-A, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin in general, prevent axon regeneration. Most of the glial growth inhibiting factors converge onto the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in neurons. Although conditions in the injured nervous system are clearly different from those during neurite outgrowth in vitro, here we use a chemical approach to manipulate Rho/ROCK signalling with small-molecule agents to encourage neurite outgrowth in cell culture. The development of therapeutic treatments requires drug testing not only on neurons of experimental animals, but also on human neurons. Using human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A GTPase) activation and promotes neurite growth. Inhibition of the downstream effector Rho kinase by the drug Y-27632 results in a strong increase in neurite outgrowth. Conversely, activation of the Rho pathway by lysophosphatidic acid results in growth cone collapse and eventually to neurite retraction. Finally, we show that blocking of Rho kinase, but not RhoA results in an increase in neurons bearing neurites. Due to its anti-inflammatory and neurite growth promoting action, the use of a pharmacological treatment of damaged neural tissue with Ibuprofen should be explored. PMID:25714396

  4. Adding explicit solvent molecules to continuum solvent calculations for the calculation of aqueous acid dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Casey P; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2006-02-23

    Aqueous acid dissociation free energies for a diverse set of 57 monoprotic acids have been calculated using a combination of experimental and calculated gas and liquid-phase free energies. For ionic species, aqueous solvation free energies were calculated using the recently developed SM6 continuum solvation model. This model combines a dielectric continuum with atomic surface tensions to account for bulk solvent effects. For some of the acids studied, a combined approach that involves attaching a single explicit water molecule to the conjugate base (anion), and then surrounding the resulting anion-water cluster by a dielectric continuum, significantly improves the agreement between the calculated pK(a) value and experiment. This suggests that for some anions, particularly those concentrating charge on a single exposed heteroatom, augmenting implicit solvent calculations with a single explicit water molecule is required, and adequate, to account for strong short-range hydrogen bonding interactions between the anion and the solvent. We also demonstrate the effect of adding several explicit waters by calculating the pK(a) of bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) using as the conjugate base carbonate (CO(3)(2-)) bound by up to three explicit water molecules.

  5. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6). PMID:27100009

  6. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6).

  7. Integrins as a primary signal transduction molecule regulating monocyte immediate-early gene induction.

    PubMed Central

    Yurochko, A D; Liu, D Y; Eierman, D; Haskill, S

    1992-01-01

    Integrins are cell surface receptors found on monocytes that facilitate adhesion to both cellular and extracellular substrates. These integrins are thought to be involved in the selective gene induction observed after monocyte adhesion to various extracellular matrices. To investigate this hypothesis, we stimulated monocytes with monoclonal antibodies to different integrin receptors to specifically mimic the integrin receptor-ligand interactions. Engagement of the common beta chain of the beta 1 subfamily of integrins resulted in expression of the inflammatory mediator genes, interleukin 1 beta, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist, and monocyte adherence-derived inflammatory gene 6 (MAD-6), whereas engagement of the common beta chain of the beta 2 family did not. Furthermore, to characterize integrin-mediated gene induction, we examined the ability of antibodies to the alpha chain of integrin receptors to regulate gene expression. Engagement of the very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) receptor resulted in induction of all the mediator genes. Receptor crosslinking was required because individual Fab fragments were unable to stimulate gene induction whereas the divalent F(ab')2 fragment and the whole IgG molecule could. Interleukin 1 beta secretion was dependent on the anti-integrin antibody used. Some antibodies required a second signal and, for others, direct engagement was sufficient for protein production. In conclusion, engagement of integrin receptors regulated the production of both inflammatory mediator mRNA and protein. These results suggest that integrin-dependent recognition and adherence may provide the key signals for initiation of the inflammatory response during monocyte diapedesis. Images PMID:1384041

  8. Identification of small molecule compounds that inhibit the HIF-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the major hypoxia-regulated transcription factor that regulates cellular responses to low oxygen environments. HIF-1 is composed of two subunits: hypoxia-inducible HIF-1α and constitutively-expressed HIF-1β. During hypoxic conditions, HIF-1α heterodimerizes with HIF-1β and translocates to the nucleus where the HIF-1 complex binds to the hypoxia-response element (HRE) and activates expression of target genes implicated in cell growth and survival. HIF-1α protein expression is elevated in many solid tumors, including those of the cervix and brain, where cells that are the greatest distance from blood vessels, and therefore the most hypoxic, express the highest levels of HIF-1α. Therapeutic blockade of the HIF-1 signaling pathway in cancer cells therefore provides an attractive strategy for development of anticancer drugs. To identify small molecule inhibitors of the HIF-1 pathway, we have developed a cell-based reporter gene assay and screened a large compound library by using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. Results The assay is based upon a β-lactamase reporter under the control of a HRE. We have screened approximate 73,000 compounds by qHTS, with each compound tested over a range of seven to fifteen concentrations. After qHTS we have rapidly identified three novel structural series of HIF-1 pathway Inhibitors. Selected compounds in these series were also confirmed as inhibitors in a HRE β-lactamase reporter gene assay induced by low oxygen and in a VEGF secretion assay. Three of the four selected compounds tested showed significant inhibition of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation by western blot analysis. Conclusion The use of β-lactamase reporter gene assays, in combination with qHTS, enabled the rapid identification and prioritization of inhibitors specific to the hypoxia induced signaling pathway. PMID:20003191

  9. Mycosporine-like amino acids are multifunctional molecules in sea hares and their marine community.

    PubMed

    Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Kamio, Michiya; Nguyen, Linh; Germann, Markus W; Derby, Charles D

    2011-07-12

    Molecules of keystone significance are relatively rare, yet mediate a variety of interactions between organisms. They influence the distribution and abundance of species, the transfer of energy across multiple trophic levels, and thus they play significant roles in structuring ecosystems. Despite their potential importance in facilitating our understanding of ecological systems, only three molecules thus far have been proposed as molecules of keystone significance: saxitoxin and dimethyl sulfide in marine communities and tetrodotoxin in riparian communities. In the course of studying the neuroecology of chemical defenses, we identified three mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs)--N-ethanol palythine (= asterina-330), N-isopropanol palythine (= aplysiapalythine A), and N-ethyl palythine (= aplysiapalythine B)--as intraspecific alarm cues for sea hares (Aplysia californica). These alarm cues are released in the ink secretion of sea hares and cause avoidance behaviors in neighboring conspecifics. Further, we show that these three bioactive MAAs, two [aplysiapalythine A (APA) and -B (APB)] being previously unknown molecules, are present in the algal diet of sea hares and are concentrated in their defensive secretion as well as in their skin. MAAs are known to be produced by algae, fungi, and cyanobacteria and are acquired by many aquatic animals through trophic interactions. MAAs are widely used as sunscreens, among other uses, but sea hares modify their function to serve a previously undocumented role, as intraspecific chemical cues. Our findings highlight the multifunctionality of MAAs and their role in ecological connectivity, suggesting that they may function as molecules of keystone significance in marine ecosystems.

  10. Acid contact in the rodent pulmonary alveolus causes proinflammatory signaling by membrane pore formation.

    PubMed

    Westphalen, Kristin; Monma, Eiji; Islam, Mohammad N; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2012-07-01

    Although gastric acid aspiration causes rapid lung inflammation and acute lung injury, the initiating mechanisms are not known. To determine alveolar epithelial responses to acid, we viewed live alveoli of the isolated lung by fluorescence microscopy, then we microinjected the alveoli with HCl at pH of 1.5. The microinjection caused an immediate but transient formation of molecule-scale pores in the apical alveolar membrane, resulting in loss of cytosolic dye. However, the membrane rapidly resealed. There was no cell damage and no further dye loss despite continuous HCl injection. Concomitantly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in the adjacent perialveolar microvascular endothelium in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. By contrast, ROS did not increase in wild-type mice in which we gave intra-alveolar injections of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-catalase, in mice overexpressing alveolar catalase, or in mice lacking functional NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Together, our findings indicate the presence of an unusual proinflammatory mechanism in which alveolar contact with acid caused membrane pore formation. The effect, although transient, was nevertheless sufficient to induce Ca(2+) entry and Nox2-dependent H(2)O(2) release from the alveolar epithelium. These responses identify alveolar H(2)O(2) release as the signaling mechanism responsible for lung inflammation induced by acid and suggest that intra-alveolar PEG-catalase might be therapeutic in acid-induced lung injury.

  11. Convergence of Nitric Oxide and Lipid Signaling: Anti-Inflammatory Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul R.S.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; O’Donnell, Valerie B.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The signaling mediators nitric oxide (·NO) and oxidized lipids, once viewed to transduce metabolic and inflammatory information via discrete and independent pathways, are now appreciated as interdependent regulators of immune response and metabolic homeostasis. The interactions between these two classes of mediators result in reciprocal control of mediator sythesis that is strongly influenced by the local chemical environment. The relationship between the two pathways extends beyond co-regulation of ·NO and eicosanoid formation to converge via the nitration of unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitro derivatives (NO2-FA). These pluripotent signaling molecules are generated in vivo as an adaptive response to oxidative inflammatory conditions and manifest predominantly anti-inflammatory signaling reactions. These actions of NO2-FA are diverse, with these species serving as a potential chemical reserve of ·NO, reacting with cellular nucleophiles to post-translationally modify protein structure, function and localization. In this regard these species act as potent endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ. Functional consequences of these signaling mechanisms have been shown in multiple model systems, including the inhibition of platelet and neutrophil functions, induction of heme oxygenase-1, inhibition of LPS-induced cytokine release in monocytes, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in adipocytes and relaxation of pre-constricted rat aortic segments. These observations have propelled further in vitro and in vivo studies of mechanisms of NO2-FA signaling and metabolism, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this class of molecules as anti-inflammatory drug candidates. PMID:19200454

  12. Enhancement of Antiviral Immunity by Small Molecule Antagonist of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Chulbul M. I.; Dabelic, Rea; Martin, James P.; Jager, Lindsey D.; Haider, S. Mohammad; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCSs) are negative regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity via inhibition of signaling by cytokines such as type I and type II IFNs. We have developed a small peptide antagonist of SOCS-1 that corresponds to the activation loop of JAK2. SOCS-1 inhibits both type I and type II IFN activities by binding to the kinase activation loop via the kinase inhibitory region of the SOCS. The antagonist, pJAK2(1001–1013), inhibited the replication of vaccinia virus and encephalomyocarditis virus in cell culture, suggesting that it possesses broad antiviral activity. In addition, pJAK2(1001–1013) protected mice against lethal vaccinia and encephalomyocarditis virus infection. pJAK2(1001–1013) increased the intracellular level of the constitutive IFN-β, which may play a role in the antagonist antiviral effect at the cellular level. Ab neutralization suggests that constitutive IFN-β may act intracellularly, consistent with recent findings on IFN-γ intracellular signaling. pJAK2(1001–1013) also synergizes with IFNs as per IFN-γ mimetic to exert a multiplicative antiviral effect at the level of transcription, the cell, and protection of mice against lethal viral infection. pJAK2(1001–1013) binds to the kinase inhibitory region of both SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 and blocks their inhibitory effects on the IFN-γ activation site promoter. In addition to a direct antiviral effect and synergism with IFN, the SOCS antagonist also exhibits adjuvant effects on humoral and cellular immunity as well as an enhancement of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid activation of TLR3. The SOCS antagonist thus presents a novel and effective approach to enhancement of host defense against viruses. PMID:20543109

  13. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant's defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis.

  14. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant's defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  15. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant’s defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  16. Morphofunctional and signaling molecules overlap of the pineal gland and thymus: role and significance in aging.

    PubMed

    Paltsev, Michael A; Polyakova, Victoria O; Kvetnoy, Igor M; Anderson, George; Kvetnaia, Tatiana V; Linkova, Natalia S; Paltseva, Ekaterina M; Rubino, Rosa; De Cosmo, Salvatore; De Cata, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-03-15

    Deficits in neuroendocrine-immune system functioning, including alterations in pineal and thymic glands, contribute to aging-associated diseases. This study looks at ageing-associated alterations in pineal and thymic gland functioning evaluating common signaling molecules present in both human and animal pinealocytes and thymocytes: endocrine cell markers (melatonin, serotonin, pCREB, AANAT, CGRP, VIP, chromogranin А); cell renovation markers (p53, AIF, Ki67), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9) and lymphocytes markers (CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20). Pineal melatonin is decreased, as is one of the melatonin pathway synthesis enzymes in the thymic gland. A further similarity is the increased MMPs levels evident over age in both glands. Significant differences are evident in cell renovation processes, which deteriorate more quickly in the aged thymus versus the pineal gland. Decreases in the number of pineal B-cells and thymic T-cells were also observed over aging. Collected data indicate that cellular involution of the pineal gland and thymus show many commonalities, but also significant changes in aging-associated proteins. It is proposed that such ageing-associated alterations in these two glands provide novel pharmaceutical targets for the wide array of medical conditions that are more likely to emerge over the course of ageing.

  17. Morbilliviruses Use Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecules (CD150) as Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuo, Hironobu; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    Morbilliviruses comprise measles virus, canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, and several other viruses that cause devastating human and animal diseases accompanied by severe immunosuppression and lymphopenia. Recently, we have shown that human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a cellular receptor for measles virus. In this study, we examined whether canine distemper and rinderpest viruses also use canine and bovine SLAMs, respectively, as cellular receptors. The Onderstepoort vaccine strain and two B95a (marmoset B cell line)-isolated strains of canine distemper virus caused extensive cytopathic effects in normally resistant CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells after expression of canine SLAM. The Ako vaccine strain of rinderpest virus produced strong cytopathic effects in bovine SLAM-expressing CHO cells. The data on entry with vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes bearing measles, canine distemper, or rinderpest virus envelope proteins were consistent with development of cytopathic effects in SLAM-expressing CHO cell clones after infection with the respective viruses, confirming that SLAM acts at the virus entry step (as a cellular receptor). Furthermore, most measles, canine distemper, and rinderpest virus strains examined could any use of the human, canine, and bovine SLAMs to infect cells. Our findings suggest that the use of SLAM as a cellular receptor may be a property common to most, if not all, morbilliviruses and explain the lymphotropism and immunosuppressive nature of morbilliviruses. PMID:11390585

  18. L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE SIGNALING IS INHIBITED BY ETHANOL IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Littner, Yoav; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is an immense public health problem. In vitro studies support the hypothesis that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity. L1 is critical for the development of the central nervous system. It functions through signal transduction leading to phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of tyrosines on its cytoplasmic domain. The function of L1 is also dependent on trafficking through lipid rafts. Our hypothesis is that L1 is a target for ethanol neurotoxicity in vivo. Our objective is to demonstrate changes in L1 phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and lipid raft association in vivo. Methods Rat pups on postnatal day 6 are administered 4.5, 5.25 and 6 g/kg of ethanol divided into 2 doses 2 hours apart, then sacrificed. Cerebella are rapidly frozen for assay. Blood is analyzed for blood ethanol concentration. L1 tyrosine phosphorylation is determined by immunoprecipitation and dephosphorylation of tyrosine 1176 determined by immunoblot. Lipid rafts are isolated by sucrose density gradient and the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts is determined. Results Ethanol at all doses reduced the relative amount of Y1176 dephosphorylation as well as the relative amount of L1 phosphorylated on other tyrosines. The proportion of L1 present in lipid rafts is significantly increased in pups who received 6 g/kg ethanol compared to intubated controls. Conclusions L1 is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity in vivo. PMID:23050935

  19. Pharmacology of novel small-molecule tubulin inhibitors in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling.

    PubMed

    Phoa, Athena F; Browne, Stephen; Gurgis, Fadi M S; Åkerfeldt, Mia C; Döbber, Alexander; Renn, Christian; Peifer, Christian; Stringer, Brett W; Day, Bryan W; Wong, Chin; Chircop, Megan; Johns, Terrance G; Kassiou, Michael; Munoz, Lenka

    2015-12-15

    We recently reported that CMPD1, originally developed as an inhibitor of MK2 activation, primarily inhibits tubulin polymerisation and induces apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. In the present study we provide detailed pharmacological investigation of CMPD1 analogues with improved molecular properties. We determined their anti-cancer efficacy in glioblastoma cells with enhanced EGFR signalling, as deregulated EGFR often leads to chemoresistance. Eight analogues of CMPD1 with varying lipophilicity and basicity were synthesised and tested for efficacy in the cell viability assay using established glioblastoma cell lines and patient-derived primary glioblastoma cells. The mechanism of action for the most potent analogue 15 was determined using MK2 activation and tubulin polymerisation assays, together with the immunofluorescence analysis of the mitotic spindle formation. Apoptosis was analysed by Annexin V staining, immunoblotting analysis of bcl-2 proteins and PARP cleavage. The apoptotic activity of CMPD1 and analogue 15 was comparable across glioblastoma cell lines regardless of the EGFR status. Primary glioblastoma cells of the classical subtype that are characterized by enhanced EGFR activity were most sensitive to the treatment with CMPD1 and 15. In summary, we present mechanism of action for a novel small molecule tubulin inhibitor, compound 15 that inhibits tubulin polymerisation and mitotic spindle formation, induces degradation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 proteins and leads to apoptosis of glioblastoma cells. We also demonstrate that the enhanced EGFR activity does not decrease the efficacy of tubulin inhibitors developed in this study.

  20. Morphofunctional and signaling molecules overlap of the pineal gland and thymus: role and significance in aging.

    PubMed

    Paltsev, Michael A; Polyakova, Victoria O; Kvetnoy, Igor M; Anderson, George; Kvetnaia, Tatiana V; Linkova, Natalia S; Paltseva, Ekaterina M; Rubino, Rosa; De Cosmo, Salvatore; De Cata, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-03-15

    Deficits in neuroendocrine-immune system functioning, including alterations in pineal and thymic glands, contribute to aging-associated diseases. This study looks at ageing-associated alterations in pineal and thymic gland functioning evaluating common signaling molecules present in both human and animal pinealocytes and thymocytes: endocrine cell markers (melatonin, serotonin, pCREB, AANAT, CGRP, VIP, chromogranin А); cell renovation markers (p53, AIF, Ki67), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9) and lymphocytes markers (CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20). Pineal melatonin is decreased, as is one of the melatonin pathway synthesis enzymes in the thymic gland. A further similarity is the increased MMPs levels evident over age in both glands. Significant differences are evident in cell renovation processes, which deteriorate more quickly in the aged thymus versus the pineal gland. Decreases in the number of pineal B-cells and thymic T-cells were also observed over aging. Collected data indicate that cellular involution of the pineal gland and thymus show many commonalities, but also significant changes in aging-associated proteins. It is proposed that such ageing-associated alterations in these two glands provide novel pharmaceutical targets for the wide array of medical conditions that are more likely to emerge over the course of ageing. PMID:26943046

  1. Measles Virus Entry Through the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Governs Efficacy of Mantle Cell Lymphoma Radiovirotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miest, Tanner S; Frenzke, Marie; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We developed here a vaccine-identical measles virus (MV) as an oncolytic agent against mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is difficult to cure but radiosensitive. We armed the virus with the sodium-iodide symporter, which concentrates iodide within infected cells enabling noninvasive imaging and combination radiovirotherapy. Through high-resolution in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we visualized the spread of infections in primary and metastatic tumors for over 2 weeks after therapy, documenting homogeneous virus seeding and spread restricted to perfused tissue. Infection of metastases was more rapid and intense than primary tumors, achieving isotope uptake within about threefold the efficiency of the thyroid. Virotherapy combined with systemic 131I resulted in more rapid disease regression than either therapy alone. In addition to ubiquitous CD46, vaccine MV retains cell entry through its immune cell-specific receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM). We asked whether both receptors could sustain effective oncolysis of MCL. Strikingly, only SLAM-dependent entry sustained efficient viral spread, tumor regression, and prolonged survival. These observations shift the focus of future clinical trials to SLAM-expressing hematologic malignancies and suggest that oncolytic vectors may depend on tissue-specific receptors for both cell entry and activation of responses assisting their replication. PMID:23913184

  2. Morphofunctional and signaling molecules overlap of the pineal gland and thymus: role and significance in aging

    PubMed Central

    Paltsev, Michael A.; Polyakova, Victoria O.; Kvetnoy, Igor M.; Anderson, George; Kvetnaia, Tatiana V.; Linkova, Natalia S.; Paltseva, Ekaterina M.; Rubino, Rosa; De Cosmo, Salvatore; De Cata, Angelo; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in neuroendocrine-immune system functioning, including alterations in pineal and thymic glands, contribute to aging-associated diseases. This study looks at ageing-associated alterations in pineal and thymic gland functioning evaluating common signaling molecules present in both human and animal pinealocytes and thymocytes: endocrine cell markers (melatonin, serotonin, pCREB, AANAT, CGRP, VIP, chromogranin A); cell renovation markers (p53, AIF, Ki67), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9) and lymphocytes markers (CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20). Pineal melatonin is decreased, as is one of the melatonin pathway synthesis enzymes in the thymic gland. A further similarity is the increased MMPs levels evident over age in both glands. Significant differences are evident in cell renovation processes, which deteriorate more quickly in the aged thymus versus the pineal gland. Decreases in the number of pineal B-cells and thymic T-cells were also observed over aging. Collected data indicate that cellular involution of the pineal gland and thymus show many commonalities, but also significant changes in aging-associated proteins. It is proposed that such ageing-associated alterations in these two glands provide novel pharmaceutical targets for the wide array of medical conditions that are more likely to emerge over the course of ageing. PMID:26943046

  3. Lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylinosiol--novel promissing signaling molecules and their possible therapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    Drzazga, Anna; Sowińska, Agata; Koziołkiewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    For many years the role of lysophospholipids (LPLs) was associated only with structural and storage components of the cell without any informational function. Today, based on many research projects performed during the last decades, it is clear that some of the LPLs act as hormone-like signaling molecules and thus are very important inter- and intracellular lipid mediators. They can activate specific membrane receptors and/or nuclear receptors regulating many crucial physiological and pathophysiological processes. The LPLs were iden- tified as involved in a majority of cellular processes, including modulation of disease-related mechanisms observed, for instance, in case of diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis and cancer. Among LPLs, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) are becoming attractive research topics. Their recently revealed activities as novel ligands of orphan G protein-coupled receptors (i.e., GPR55 and GPR119) involved in modulation of tumor physiology and insulin secretion seem to be one of the most interesting aspects of these compounds. Moreover, the most recent scientific reports emphasize the significance of the acyl chain structure bound to the glycerol basis of LPL, as it entails different biological properties and activities of the compounds. PMID:25745761

  4. Measles virus entry through the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule governs efficacy of mantle cell lymphoma radiovirotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miest, Tanner S; Frenzke, Marie; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2013-11-01

    We developed here a vaccine-identical measles virus (MV) as an oncolytic agent against mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is difficult to cure but radiosensitive. We armed the virus with the sodium-iodide symporter, which concentrates iodide within infected cells enabling noninvasive imaging and combination radiovirotherapy. Through high-resolution in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we visualized the spread of infections in primary and metastatic tumors for over 2 weeks after therapy, documenting homogeneous virus seeding and spread restricted to perfused tissue. Infection of metastases was more rapid and intense than primary tumors, achieving isotope uptake within about threefold the efficiency of the thyroid. Virotherapy combined with systemic (131)I resulted in more rapid disease regression than either therapy alone. In addition to ubiquitous CD46, vaccine MV retains cell entry through its immune cell-specific receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM). We asked whether both receptors could sustain effective oncolysis of MCL. Strikingly, only SLAM-dependent entry sustained efficient viral spread, tumor regression, and prolonged survival. These observations shift the focus of future clinical trials to SLAM-expressing hematologic malignancies and suggest that oncolytic vectors may depend on tissue-specific receptors for both cell entry and activation of responses assisting their replication.

  5. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest.

  6. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest. PMID:23275581

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  8. Early abscisic acid signal transduction mechanisms: newly discovered components and newly emerging questions

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Katharine E.; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants, including seed germination and development and abiotic stress tolerance, particularly drought resistance. Understanding early events in ABA signal transduction has been a major goal of plant research. The recent identification of the PYRABACTIN (4-bromo-N-[pyridin-2-yl methyl]naphthalene-1-sulfonamide) RESISTANCE (PYR)/REGULATORY COMPONENT OF ABA RECEPTOR (RCAR) family of ABA receptors and their biochemical mode of action represents a major breakthrough in the field. The solving of PYR/RCAR structures provides a context for resolving mechanisms mediating ABA control of protein–protein interactions for downstream signaling. Recent studies show that a pathway based on PYR/RCAR ABA receptors, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2Cs (PP2Cs), and SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 2s (SnRK2s) forms the primary basis of an early ABA signaling module. This pathway interfaces with ion channels, transcription factors, and other targets, thus providing a mechanistic connection between the phytohormone and ABA-induced responses. This emerging PYR/RCAR–PP2C–SnRK2 model of ABA signal transduction is reviewed here, and provides an opportunity for testing novel hypotheses concerning ABA signaling. We address newly emerging questions, including the potential roles of different PYR/RCAR isoforms, and the significance of ABA-induced versus constitutive PYR/RCAR–PP2C interactions. We also consider how the PYR/RCAR–PP2C–SnRK2 pathway interfaces with ABA-dependent gene expression, ion channel regulation, and control of small molecule signaling. These exciting developments provide researchers with a framework through which early ABA signaling can be understood, and allow novel questions about the hormone response pathway and possible applications in stress resistance engineering of plants to be addressed. PMID:20713515

  9. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observations of Benzoic Acid Molecules Coadsorbed with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Au(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabot, Caroline; Clair, Sylvain; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with benzoic acid molecules coadsorbed on a Au(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We studied the self-assembly of the benzoic acid overlayer on Au(111) terraces and along Au(111) step edges and compared the structure of this layer with the benzoic acid molecular structure along SWCNTs.

  10. Pharmacologic retinoid signaling and physiologic retinoic acid receptor signaling inhibit basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    So, Po-Lin; Fujimoto, Michele A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2008-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) are highly susceptible to developing many BCCs as a result of a constitutive inactivating mutation in one allele of PATCHED 1, which encodes a tumor suppressor that is a major inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling. Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is a common feature of both hereditary and sporadic BCCs. Recently, we showed remarkable anti-BCC chemopreventive efficacy of tazarotene, a retinoid with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta/gamma specificity, in Ptch1+/- mice when treatment was commenced before carcinogenic insults. In this study, we assessed whether the effect of tazarotene against BCC carcinogenesis is sustained after its withdrawal and whether tazarotene is effective against preexisting microscopic BCC lesions. We found that BCCs did not reappear for at least 5 months after topical drug treatment was stopped and that already developed, microscopic BCCs were susceptible to tazarotene inhibition. In vitro, tazarotene inhibited a murine BCC keratinocyte cell line, ASZ001, suggesting that its effect in vivo is by direct action on the actual tumor cells. Down-regulation of Gli1, a target gene of Hedgehog signaling and up-regulation of CRABPII, a target gene of retinoid signaling, were observed with tazarotene treatment. Finally, we investigated the effects of topical applications of other retinoid-related compounds on BCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Tazarotene was the most effective of the preparations studied, and its effect most likely was mediated by RARgamma activation. Furthermore, inhibition of basal RAR signaling in the skin promoted BCC carcinogenesis, suggesting that endogenous RAR signaling restrains BCC growth.

  11. A Small Molecule Inhibits Virion Attachment to Heparan Sulfate- or Sialic Acid-Containing Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Colpitts, Che C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary attachment to cellular glycans is a critical entry step for most human viruses. Some viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), bind to heparan sulfate, whereas others, such as influenza A virus (IAV), bind to sialic acid. Receptor mimetics that interfere with these interactions are active against viruses that bind to either heparan sulfate or to sialic acid. However, no molecule that inhibits the attachment of viruses in both groups has yet been identified. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea catechin, is active against many unrelated viruses, including several that bind to heparan sulfate or to sialic acid. We sought to identify the basis for the broad-spectrum activity of EGCG. Here, we show that EGCG inhibits the infectivity of a diverse group of enveloped and nonenveloped human viruses. EGCG acts directly on the virions, without affecting the fluidity or integrity of the virion envelopes. Instead, EGCG interacts with virion surface proteins to inhibit the attachment of HSV-1, HCV, IAV, vaccinia virus, adenovirus, reovirus, and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) virions. We further show that EGCG competes with heparan sulfate for binding of HSV-1 and HCV virions and with sialic acid for binding of IAV virions. Therefore, EGCG inhibits unrelated viruses by a common mechanism. Most importantly, we have identified EGCG as the first broad-spectrum attachment inhibitor. Our results open the possibility for the development of small molecule broad-spectrum antivirals targeting virion attachment. IMPORTANCE This study shows that it is possible to develop a small molecule antiviral or microbicide active against the two largest groups of human viruses: those that bind to glycosaminoglycans and those that bind to sialoglycans. This group includes the vast majority of human viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, cytomegalovirus, influenza virus, poxvirus, hepatitis C virus, HIV, and many others. PMID

  12. DNAzyme molecular beacon probes for target-induced signal-amplifying colorimetric detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rongzhan; Li, Taihua; Lee, Soo Suk; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2011-01-15

    A novel DNAzyme molecular beacon (DNAzymeMB) strategy was developed for target-induced signal-amplifying colorimetric detection of target nucleic acids. The DNAzymeMB, which exhibits peroxidase activity in its free hairpin structure, was engineered to form a catalytically inactive hybrid through hybridization with a blocker DNA. The presence of target DNA leads to dissociation of the DNAzymeMB from the inactive hybrid through hybridization with the blocker DNA. This process results in recovery of the catalytically active DNAzymeMB, which can catalyze a colorimetric reaction that signals the presence of the target DNA. In addition, a primer was rationally designed to anneal to the blocker DNA of the blocker/target DNA duplex and displace the bound target DNA during the extension reaction. The released target DNA triggers the next cycle involving hybridization with blocker DNA, DNAzymeMB dissociation, primer extension, and target displacement. This unique amplifying strategy leads to the generation of multiple numbers of active DNAzymeMB molecules from a single target molecule and gives a detection limit down to 1 pM, a value that is nearly 3 or 5 orders of magnitude lower than those of previously reported DNAzyme molecular beacon-based DNA detection methods.

  13. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications. PMID:24789252

  14. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications.

  15. Cytokinins and auxin communicate nitrogen availability as long-distance signal molecules in pineapple (Ananas comosus).

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Vívian; Mercier, Helenice

    2007-11-01

    This work aimed at identifying a possible role of phytohormones in long-distance (root-shoot) signaling under nitrogen deficiency. Three-months old pineapple plants were transferred from Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium to nitrogen-free MS (-N). During the first 24h on -N, 20 plants were harvested every 4h. After 30 days in -N, the remaining plants were transferred back to regular MS (+N) and 20 plants harvested every 4h for the first 24h. Following the harvests, endogenous levels of nitrate (NO(3)(-)), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), isopentenyladenine (iP), isopentenyladenine riboside (iPR), zeatin (Z) and zeatin riboside (ZR) were analyzed in roots and leaves. In N-starved plants, the NO(3)(-) level dropped by 20% in roots between the first (4h) and the second harvest (8h). In leaves a reduction of 20% was found 4h later. Accumulation of IAA peaked in leaves at 16h. In roots, the accumulation of IAA only started at 16h while the leaf content was already in decline, which suggests that the hormone might have traveled from the leaves to the roots, communicating N-shortage. The contents of the four cytokinins were generally low in both, shoot and roots, and remained almost unchanged during the 24h of analysis. After N re-supply, roots showed a NO(3)(-) peak at 8h whereas the foliar concentration increased 4h later. Hormone levels in roots climaxed at 8h, this coinciding with the highest NO(3)(-) concentration. In leaf tissue, a dramatic accumulation was only observed for Z and ZR, and the peak was seen 4h later than in roots, suggesting that Z-type cytokinins might have traveled from the roots to the leaves. These findings provide evidence that there is a signaling pathway for N availability in pineapple plants, communicated upwards through cytokinins (N-supplemented plants) and downwards through auxin (N-starved plants).

  16. Acceleration of suspending single-walled carbon nanotubes in BSA aqueous solution induced by amino acid molecules.

    PubMed

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Horie, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) suspensions in aqueous media were prepared using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amino acid molecules. It was found that the amino acid molecules clearly decreased the time required for suspending the SWCNTs in BSA aqueous solutions. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed that the particle sizes of the SWCNTs suspended in aqueous media with and without amino acid molecules were approximately the same and stable for more than one week. The zeta potential values of the BSA molecules in pure water and amino acid aqueous solutions were different, and these values were also reflected in the surface potential of colloidal SWCNT particles in the corresponding aqueous media, thus inducing different dispersibility of SWCNTs in aqueous media. Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements showed that the interactions between the SWCNTs and the amino acid molecules are weak and comprise chemical exchange interactions and not bonding interactions. Amino acid molecules play a fascinating role in the preparation of SWCNT suspensions in BSA aqueous media by increasing electrostatic repulsive interactions between SWCNT colloidal particles and consequently enhancing the dispersion ability of the BSA molecules.

  17. Basic Aspects of Tumor Cell Fatty Acid-Regulated Signaling and Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Lin, Yi-Hui; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Valentich, Mirta Ana; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin Ernesto; Pasqualini, Marìa Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and experimental research about the mechanisms by which fatty acids and their derivatives control specific gene expression involved during carcinogenesis. Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases (LOXs), cyclooxygenases (COXs), and cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450), seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. Their regulation may be carried out either through direct binding to DNA as peroxisome proliferator–activated receptors (PPARs) or via modulation in an indirect manner of signaling pathway molecules (e.g., protein kinase C [PKC]) and other transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B [NFκB] and sterol regulatory element binding protein [SREBP]). Knowledge of the mechanisms by which fatty acids control specific gene expression may identify important risk factors for cancer, and provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies for a better management of whole-body lipid metabolism. PMID:22048864

  18. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  19. A Small Molecule Screen Exposes mTOR Signaling Pathway Involvement in Radiation-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Lira, Ana; McConnell, Michael J; Norambuena, Andrés; Bloom, George S; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S; Lazo, John S

    2016-05-20

    Individuals are at risk of exposure to acute ionizing radiation (IR) from a nuclear accident or terrorism, but we lack effective therapies to mitigate the lethal IR effects. In the current study, we exploited an optimized, cell-based, high throughput screening assay to interrogate a small molecule library comprising 3437 known pharmacologically active compounds for mitigation against IR-induced apoptosis. Thirty-three library compounds significantly reduced apoptosis when administered 1 h after 4 Gy IR. Two- or three-dimensional computational structural analyses of the compounds indicated only one or two chemical clusters with most of the compounds being unique structures. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, rapamycin, was the most potent compound, and it mitigated apoptosis by 50% at 200 ± 50 pM. Other mTOR inhibitors, namely everolimus, AZD8055, and torin 1, also suppressed apoptosis, providing additional pharmacological evidence for mTOR pathway involvement in regulating cell death after IR. Everolimus and torin 1 treatment after IR decreased the S phase population and enforced both G1 and G2 phase arrest. This prorogation of cell cycle progression was accompanied by decreased IR-induced DNA damage measured by γH2AX phosphorylation at Ser139. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the respective mTORC1 and mTORC2 subunits, Raptor or Rictor, also mitigated IR-induced apoptosis. Collectively, this study suggests a central role for the mTOR signaling in the cytotoxic response to IR and offers a useful platform to probe for additional agents. PMID:26938669

  20. 'Chromosomal Rainbows' Detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M; Weier, Jingly F; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G

    2010-01-01

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'- end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners.We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabasepair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  1. Controlled synthesis and inclusion ability of a hyaluronic acid derivative bearing beta-cyclodextrin molecules.

    PubMed

    Charlot, Aurélia; Heyraud, Alain; Guenot, Pierre; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2006-03-01

    A new synthetic route to beta-cyclodextrin-linked hyaluronic acid (HA-CD) was developed. This was based on the preparation of a HA derivative selectively modified with adipic dihydrazide (HA-ADH) and a beta-cyclodextrin derivative possessing an aldehyde function on the primary face, followed by their coupling by a reductive amination-type reaction. The CD-polysaccharide was fully characterized in terms of chemical integrity and purity by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The complexation ability of the grafted CD was further demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry using sodium adamantane acetate (ADAc) and Ibuprofen as model guest molecules. The thermodynamic parameters for the complexation of these negatively charged guest molecules by the beta-CD grafted on negatively charged HA were shown to be largely influenced by the ionic strength of the aqueous medium. PMID:16529430

  2. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode.

    PubMed

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Norata, Giuseppe D; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  3. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode

    PubMed Central

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S.; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L.; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PMID:25964372

  4. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions.

  5. Retinoic acid signalling centres in the avian embryo identified by sites of expression of synthesising and catabolising enzymes.

    PubMed

    Blentic, Aida; Gale, Emily; Maden, Malcolm

    2003-05-01

    Retinoic acid is an important signalling molecule in the developing embryo, but its precise distribution throughout development is very difficult to determine by available techniques. Examining the distribution of the enzymes by which it is synthesised by using in situ hybridisation is an alternative strategy. Here, we describe the distribution of three retinoic acid synthesising enzymes and one retinoic acid catabolic enzyme during the early stages of chick embryogenesis with the intention of identifying localized retinoic acid signalling regions. The enzymes involved are Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3, and Cyp26A1. Although some of these distributions have been described before, here we assemble them all in one species and several novel sites of enzyme expression are identified, including Hensen's node, the cardiac endoderm, the presumptive pancreatic endoderm, and the dorsal lens. This study emphasizes the dynamic pattern of expression of the enzymes that control the availability of retinoic acid as well as the role that retinoic acid plays in the development of many regions of the embryo throughout embryogenesis. This strategy provides a basis for understanding the phenotypes of retinoic acid teratology and retinoic acid-deficiency syndromes.

  6. Defective phosphatidic acid-phospholipase C signaling in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Dibrov, Elena; Austria, J Alejandro; Sahi, Nidhi; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2004-03-26

    The effects of exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) on Ca2+ transients and contractile activity were studied in cardiomyocytes isolated from chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In control cells, 25 microM PA induced a significant increase in active cell shortening and Ca2+ transients. PA increased IP3 generation in the control cardiomyocytes and its inotropic effects were blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In cardiomyocytes from diabetic rats, PA induced a 25% decrease in active cell shortening and no significant effect on Ca2+ transients. Basal and PA-induced IP3 generation in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes was 3-fold lower as compared to control cells. Sarcolemmal membrane PLC activity was impaired. Insulin treatment of the diabetic animals resulted in a partial recovery of PA responses. Our results, therefore, identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for heart dysfunction during diabetes. PMID:15003542

  7. Defective phosphatidic acid-phospholipase C signaling in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Dibrov, Elena; Austria, J Alejandro; Sahi, Nidhi; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2004-03-26

    The effects of exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) on Ca2+ transients and contractile activity were studied in cardiomyocytes isolated from chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In control cells, 25 microM PA induced a significant increase in active cell shortening and Ca2+ transients. PA increased IP3 generation in the control cardiomyocytes and its inotropic effects were blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In cardiomyocytes from diabetic rats, PA induced a 25% decrease in active cell shortening and no significant effect on Ca2+ transients. Basal and PA-induced IP3 generation in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes was 3-fold lower as compared to control cells. Sarcolemmal membrane PLC activity was impaired. Insulin treatment of the diabetic animals resulted in a partial recovery of PA responses. Our results, therefore, identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for heart dysfunction during diabetes.

  8. Amino acid-bile acid based molecules: extremely narrow surfactant nanotubes formed by a phenylalanine-substituted cholic acid.

    PubMed

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2012-12-21

    An amino acid-substituted bile acid forms tubular aggregates with inner and outer diameters of about 3 and 6 nm. The diameters are unusually small for surfactant self-assembled tubes. The results enhance the spectrum of applications of supramolecular tubules and open up possibilities for investigating a novel class of biological amphiphiles.

  9. EMBO Retinoids 2011: mechanisms, biology and pathology of signaling by retinoic acid and retinoic acid receptors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is one of the principal active metabolites of vitamin A (retinol) which mediates a spectrum of critical physiological and developmental processes. Transcriptional regulation by RA is mediated primarily by members of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) subfamily of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. NRs bind specific genomic DNA sequence motifs and engage coregulators and components of the basal transcription machinery to effect transcriptional regulation at target gene promoters. Disruption of signaling by retinoic acid is thought to underlie the etiology of a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases including breast cancer and haematological malignancies. A meeting of international researchers in retinoid signaling was convened in Strasbourg in September 2011 under the auspices of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). Retinoids 2011 encompassed myriad mechanistic, biological and pathological aspects of these hormones and their cognate receptors, as well as setting these advances in the context of wider current questions on signaling by members of the NR superfamily. PMID:22438793

  10. Nucleation of Mixed Nitric Acid-Water Ice Nanoparticles in Molecular Beams that Starts with a HNO3 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Jozef; Pysanenko, Andriy; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Poterya, Viktoriya; Pradzynski, Christoph C; Zeuch, Thomas; Slavíček, Petr; Fárník, Michal

    2012-11-01

    Mixed (HNO3)m(H2O)n clusters generated in supersonic expansion of nitric acid vapor are investigated in two different experiments, (1) time-of-flight mass spectrometry after electron ionization and (2) Na doping and photoionization. This combination of complementary methods reveals that only clusters containing at least one acid molecule are generated, that is, the acid molecule serves as the nucleation center in the expansion. The experiments also suggest that at least four water molecules are needed for HNO3 acidic dissociation. The clusters are undoubtedly generated, as proved by electron ionization; however, they are not detected by the Na doping due to a fast charge-transfer reaction between the Na atom and HNO3. This points to limitations of the Na doping recently advocated as a general method for atmospheric aerosol detection. On the other hand, the combination of the two methods introduces a tool for detecting molecules with sizable electron affinity in clusters.

  11. Temporal and Spatial Properties of a Yeast Multi-Cellular Amplification System Based on Signal Molecule Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Michael; Mölle, Annett; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

    2013-01-01

    We report on the spatial and temporal signaling properties of a yeast pheromone-based cell communication and amplifier system. It utilizes the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating response pathway and relies on diffusion of the pheromone α–factor as key signaling molecule between two cell types. One cell type represents the α–factor secreting sensor part and the other the reporter part emitting fluorescence upon activation. Although multi-cellular signaling systems promise higher specificity and modularity, the complex interaction of the cells makes prediction of sensor performance difficult. To test the maximum distance and response time between sensor and reporter cells, the two cell types were spatially separated in defined compartments of agarose hydrogel (5 × 5 mm) and reconnected by diffusion of the yeast pheromone. Different ratios of sensor to reporter cells were tested to evaluate the minimum amount of sensor cells required for signal transduction. Even the smallest ratio, one α–factor-secreting cell to twenty reporter cells, generated a distinct fluorescence signal. When using a 1:1 ratio, the secreted pheromone induced fluorescence in a distance of up to four millimeters after six hours. We conclude from both our experimental results and a mathematical diffusion model that in our approach: (1) the maximum dimension of separated compartments should not exceed five millimeters in gradient direction; and (2) the time-limiting step is not diffusion of the signaling molecule but production of the reporter protein. PMID:24233076

  12. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence. PMID:27145878

  13. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence.

  14. Abscisic acid perception and signaling: structural mechanisms and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ley Moy; Melcher, Karsten; Teh, Bin Tean; Xu, H Eric

    2014-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions are a threat to agricultural yield and therefore exert a global effect on livelihood, health and the economy. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a vital plant hormone that regulates abiotic stress tolerance, thereby allowing plants to cope with environmental stresses. Previously, attempts to develop a complete understanding of the mechanisms underlying ABA signaling have been hindered by difficulties in the identification of bona fide ABA receptors. The discovery of the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of ABA receptors therefore represented a major milestone in the effort to overcome these roadblocks; since then, many structural and functional studies have provided detailed insights into processes ranging from ABA perception to the activation of ABA-responsive gene transcription. This understanding of the mechanisms of ABA perception and signaling has served as the basis for recent, preliminary developments in the genetic engineering of stress-resistant crops as well as in the design of new synthetic ABA agonists, which hold great promise for the agricultural enhancement of stress tolerance. PMID:24786231

  15. Basic amino-acid side chains regulate transmembrane integrin signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chungho; Schmidt, Thomas; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Ye, Feng; Ulmer, Tobias S; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2011-12-18

    Side chains of Lys/Arg near transmembrane domain (TMD) membrane-water interfaces can 'snorkel', placing their positive charge near negatively charged phospholipid head groups; however, snorkelling's functional effects are obscure. Integrin β TMDs have such conserved basic amino acids. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to show that integrin β(3)(Lys 716) helps determine β(3) TMD topography. The α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD structure indicates that precise β(3) TMD crossing angles enable the assembly of outer and inner membrane 'clasps' that hold the αβ TMD together to limit transmembrane signalling. Mutation of β(3)(Lys 716) caused dissociation of α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMDs and integrin activation. To confirm that altered topography of β(3)(Lys 716) mutants activated α(ΙΙb)β(3), we used directed evolution of β(3)(K716A) to identify substitutions restoring default state. Introduction of Pro(711) at the midpoint of β(3) TMD (A711P) increased α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD association and inactivated integrin α(ΙΙb)β(3)(A711P,K716A). β(3)(Pro 711) introduced a TMD kink of 30 ± 1° precisely at the border of the outer and inner membrane clasps, thereby decoupling the tilt between these segments. Thus, widely occurring snorkelling residues in TMDs can help maintain TMD topography and membrane-embedding, thereby regulating transmembrane signalling.

  16. Conductometric simultaneous determination of acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid using orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, R; Ghasemi, J; Abdollahi, B

    2006-04-17

    A simultaneous conductometric titration method for determination of mixtures of acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid based on the multivariate calibration partial least squares is proposed. It is possible to obtain an adjustable model to relate squared concentration values of the mixtures used in the calibration range by conductance. The effect of orthogonal signal correction (OSC) as a preprocessing technique used to remove the information unrelated to the target variables is studied. The calibration model was build using conductometric titrations data of 16 mixtures of three acids. The concentration matrix was designed by a orthogonal design. The root mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP) for acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid with and without OSC were 0.08, 0.30 and 0.08, and 0.15, 0.40 and 0.18, respectively. The results obtained by OSC-PLS are better than the PLS and this indicate the successful application of the OSC filter as a good preprocessing method in multivariate calibration methods. The proposed procedure allows the simultaneous determination of these acids, in the synthetic mixtures.

  17. Recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus and variation in its receptor, the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule, in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kazue; Suzuki, Rintaro; Maeda, Taro; Tsuda, Miwako; Abe, Erika; Yoshida, Takao; Endo, Yasuyuki; Okamura, Maki; Nagamine, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hanae; Ueda, Miya; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a receptor for morbilliviruses. To understand the recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus (CDV) in carnivores, we determined the nucleotide sequences of SLAMs of various carnivores and generated three-dimensional homology SLAM models. Thirty-four amino acid residues were found for the candidates binding to CDV on the interface of the carnivore SLAMs. SLAM of the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) were similar to those of other members of the suborder Caniformia, indicating that the animals in this group have similar sensitivity to dog CDV. However, they were different at nine positions from those of felids. Among the nine residues, four of domestic cat (Felis catus) SLAM (72, 76, 82, and 129) and three of lion (Panthera leo persica) SLAM (72, 82, and 129) were associated with charge alterations, suggesting that the felid interfaces have lower affinities to dog CDV. Only the residue at 76 was different between domestic cat and lion SLAM interfaces. The domestic cat SLAM had threonine at 76, whereas the lion SLAM had arginine, a positively charged residue like that of the dog SLAM. The cat SLAM with threonine is likely to have lower affinity to CDV-H and to confer higher resistance against dog CDV. Thus, the four residues (72, 76, 82, and 129) on carnivore SLAMs are important for the determination of affinity and sensitivity with CDV. Additionally, the CDV-H protein of felid strains had a substitution of histidine for tyrosine at 549 of dog CDV-H and may have higher affinity to lion SLAM. Three-dimensional model construction is a new risk assessment method of morbillivirus infectivity. Because the method is applicable to animals that have no information about virus infection, it is especially useful for morbillivirus risk assessment and wildlife conservation.

  18. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and "receptor for advanced glycation endproduct" (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26807573

  19. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting RAGE Signaling in Diabetic Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; An, Shung Hyun; Kang, Sang Won; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, the detailed action mechanisms of UDCA in atherosclerosis are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated whether UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting ER stress and “receptor for advanced glycation endproduct” (RAGE) signaling. UDCA markedly reduced ER stress, RAGE expression, and pro-inflammatory responses [including NF-κB activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production] induced in endothelial cells (ECs) by high glucose (HG). In particular, UDCA inhibited HG-induced ROS production by increasing the Nrf2 level. In macrophages, UDCA also blocked HG-induced RAGE and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and inhibited foam cell formation via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In the diabetic mouse model, UDCA inhibited atheromatous plaque formation by decreasing ER stress, and the levels of RAGE and adhesion molecules. In conclusion, UDCA exerts an anti-atherogenic activity in diabetic atherosclerosis by targeting both ER stress and RAGE signaling. Our work implicates UDCA as a potential therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26807573

  20. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  1. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C–H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C–H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C–H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C–H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  2. Impact of exogenous lipase supplementation on growth, intestinal function, mucosal immune and physical barrier, and related signaling molecules mRNA expression of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zeng, Yun-Yun; Xu, Shu-De; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of exogenous lipase supplementation on the growth performance, intestinal growth and function, immune response and physical barrier function, and related signaling molecules mRNA expression of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 450 grass carp (255.02 ± 0.34 g) were fed five diets for 60 days. There were 5 dietary treatments that included a normal protein and lipid diet containing 30% crude protein (CP) with 5% ether extract (EE), and the low-protein and high-lipid diets (28% CP, 6% EE) supplemented with graded levels of exogenous lipase supplementation activity at 0, 1193, 2560 and 3730 U/kg diet. The results indicated that compared with a normal protein and lipid diet (30% CP, 5% EE), a low-protein and high-lipid diet (28% CP, 6% EE) (un-supplemented lipase) improved lysozyme activities and complement component 3 contents in the distal intestine (DI), interleukin 10 mRNA expression in the proximal intestine (PI), and glutathione S-transferases activity and glutathione content in the intestine of young grass carp. In addition, in low-protein and high-lipid diets, optimal exogenous lipase supplementation significantly increased acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and complement component 3 (C3) contents (P < 0.05), up-regulated the relative mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides (liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2 and hepcidin) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor β1) and signaling molecules inhibitor protein-κBα (IκBα) and target of rapamycin (TOR) (P < 0.05), down-regulated the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, interferon γ2, and interleukin 1β), and signaling molecules (nuclear factor kappa B p65, IκB kinase β, IκB kinase γ) (P < 0.05) in the intestine of young grass carp. Moreover, optimal exogenous lipase supplementation significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde

  3. Alterations in T-cell signal transduction molecules associated with recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas D; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2004-10-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that cell-mediated immunity is altered during pregnancy and that failure to suppress the maternal immune response can lead to placentation failure, resulting in partial or total rejection of the fetus. In contrast to women experiencing recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSA), normal uncomplicated pregnancies are associated decreased T-cell proliferation and production of Th1 cytokines and increased T-cell apoptosis. This study addresses a circulating factor in normal pregnancy that may mediate these events. Sera were obtained from three groups: pregnant women who have uncomplicated term deliveries (Group 1, n = 8), pregnant women with a history of RSA, who subsequently abort (Group 2, n = 10), and age-matched non-pregnant female controls (Group 3, n = 8). Pregnancy sera were obtained between 10 and 12 weeks of gestation. Using chromatography, a CD3-zeta inhibitory factor (or analogous fraction) was isolated from each patient within each group and incubated with cultured T-cells, Jurkat and HUT-78 cells. Apoptosis was assayed by a cell-death ELISA and IL-2 production by cytokine-specific ELISA. Apoptosis regulatory proteins and signaling molecules were analyzed by western immunoblotting. Group 1 material induced a significant increase in apoptosis versus Groups 2 and 3. No significant apoptosis was observed between Groups 2 and 3. Material from Group 1 resulted in an increase in the bax expression compared to Groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001), while no significant differences were observed in the expression of bcl-2. IL-2 secretion was inhibited 2.8-fold by material from Group 1 compared to Groups 2 and 3. Group 1 material decreased the expression of CD3-zeta, JAK3 and STAT5 compared to Groups 2 and 3 (as defined by densitometric units). Circulating materials from normal pregnancies are associated with increased lymphoid apoptosis, possibly through increased bax, and diminished production of the Th1 cytokine, IL-2. Our findings indicate that women

  4. Nitric oxide in denitrification - an elusive signal molecule emitted from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. R.; Frostegard, A.

    2010-12-01

    Soils emit variable amounts of NO and N2O, with environmental consequences (atmosphere chemistry and global warming). Nitrification was for some time considered the main source of NO emission, but several investigations have indicated that denitrification may be a potent source as well. However, strong emission of NO from denitrifying organisms is in some conflict with common understanding of the role of NO in the regulation of denitrification, as based on paradigm model strains. NO appears to be an important signal molecule for denitrifying organisms by exerting a positive feedback on the expression of the genes coding for denitrification. On the other hand, a careful control of the NO concentrations at nanomolar concentrations has long been considered an essential fitness character for denitrifying organisms, since micromolar concentrations of NO is toxic to many organisms. For the same reason, organisms lacking genes encoding NO reductase (NOR) have been considered unfit for denitrification. This view is challenged by isolation of organisms whose primary product of denitrification is NO, either because they lack the genes for NO reductase, or because their synthesis of the denitrification proteome is extremely unbalanced, resulting in transient NO accumulation to micromolar concentrations when grown in pure culture. Such paralyzing NO concentrations are probably never reached in natural environments, however, due to diffusion and NO-absorption by adjacent organisms, be it by NOR or other NO scavenging enzymes. Hypothetically, the production of NO by denitrifying organisms may be an advantage by fending off nearby competitors. We have embarked on a comparative study of denitrification phenotypes regarding their denitrification gene expression and control of NO and N2O concentrations in response to anoxic spells. This includes model strains (Paracoccus denitrificans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and recently isolated strains within several genera. Some are found

  5. Mouse nasal epithelial innate immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules require taste signaling components

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Chen, Bei; Redding, Kevin M.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously observed that the human bitter taste receptor T2R38 is an important component of upper respiratory innate defense because it detects acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing molecules secreted by gram-negative bacteria. T2R38 activation in human sinonasal epithelial cells stimulates calcium and nitric oxide signals that increase mucociliary clearance, the major physical respiratory defense against inhaled pathogens. While mice do not have a clear T2R38 orthologue, they do have bitter taste receptors capable of responding to T2R38 agonists, suggesting that T2R-mediated innate immune mechanisms may be conserved in mice. We examined whether AHLs activate calcium and nitric oxide signaling in mouse nasal epithelial cells and utilized pharmacology as well as cells from knockout mice lacking important components of canonical taste signal transduction pathways to determine if AHL-stimulated responses require taste signaling molecules. We found that AHLs stimulate calcium-dependent NO production that increases mucociliary clearance and thus likely serves an innate immune role against gram-negative bacteria. These responses require PLCβ2 and TRPM5 taste signaling components, but not α-gustducin. These data suggest the mouse may be a useful model for further studies of T2R-mediated innate immunity. PMID:24045336

  6. UV photolysis, organic molecules in young disks, and the origin of meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throop, Henry B.

    2011-04-01

    The origin of complex organic molecules such as amino acids and their precursors found in meteorites and comets is unknown. Previous studies have accounted for the complex organic inventory of the Solar System by aqueous chemistry on warm meteoritic parent bodies, or by accretion of organics formed in the interstellar medium. This paper proposes a third possibility: that complex organics were created in situ by ultraviolet light from nearby O/B stars irradiating ices already in the Sun's protoplanetary disk. If the Sun was born in a dense cluster near UV-bright stars, the flux hitting the disk from external stars could be many orders of magnitude higher than that from the Sun alone. Such photolysis of ices in the laboratory can rapidly produce amino acid precursors and other complex organic molecules. I present a simple model coupling grain growth and UV exposure in a young circumstellar disk. It is shown that the production may be sufficient to create the Solar System's entire complex organic inventory within 10 6 yr. Subsequent aqueous alteration on meteoritic parent bodies is not ruled out.

  7. Signal transduction pathways mediated by PECAM-1: new roles for an old molecule in platelet and vascular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 [CD31])-deficient mice have revealed that this molecule plays an important role in controlling the activation and survival of cells on which it is expressed. In this review, we focus on the complex cytoplasmic domain of PECAM-1 and describe what is presently known about its structure, posttranslational modifications, and binding partners. In addition, we summarize findings that implicate PECAM-1 as an inhibitor of cellular activation via protein tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling pathways, an activator of integrins, and a suppressor of cell death via pathways that depend on damage to the mitochondria. The challenge of future research will be to bridge our understanding of the functional and biochemical properties of PECAM-1 by establishing mechanistic links between signals transduced by the PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain and discrete cellular responses. PMID:12689916

  8. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  9. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines

    PubMed Central

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  10. Bioactive Molecules Released in Food by Lactic Acid Bacteria: Encrypted Peptides and Biogenic Amines.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Cirrincione, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can produce a huge amount of bioactive compounds. Since their elective habitat is food, especially dairy but also vegetal food, it is frequent to find bioactive molecules in fermented products. Sometimes these compounds can have adverse effects on human health such as biogenic amines (tyramine and histamine), causing allergies, hypertensive crises, and headache. However, some LAB products also display benefits for the consumers. In the present review article, the main nitrogen compounds produced by LAB are considered. Besides biogenic amines derived from the amino acids tyrosine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine, ornithine, and glutamate by decarboxylation, interesting peptides can be decrypted by the proteolytic activity of LAB. LAB proteolytic system is very efficient in releasing encrypted molecules from several proteins present in different food matrices. Alpha and beta-caseins, albumin and globulin from milk and dairy products, rubisco from spinach, beta-conglycinin from soy and gluten from cereals constitute a good source of important bioactive compounds. These encrypted peptides are able to control nutrition (mineral absorption and oxidative stress protection), metabolism (blood glucose and cholesterol lowering) cardiovascular function (antithrombotic and hypotensive action), infection (microbial inhibition and immunomodulation) and gut-brain axis (opioids and anti-opioids controlling mood and food intake). Very recent results underline the role of food-encrypted peptides in protein folding (chaperone-like molecules) as well as in cell cycle and apoptosis control, suggesting new and positive aspects of fermented food, still unexplored. In this context, the detailed (transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic) characterization of LAB of food interest (as starters, biocontrol agents, nutraceuticals, and probiotics) can supply a solid evidence-based science to support beneficial effects and it is a promising approach as well to obtain

  11. UDP-Sugars as Extracellular Signaling Molecules: Cellular and Physiologic Consequences of P2Y14 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lazarowski, Eduardo R.

    2015-01-01

    UDP-sugars, which are indispensable for protein glycosylation reactions in cellular secretory pathways, also act as important extracellular signaling molecules. We discuss here the broadly expressed P2Y14 receptor, a G-protein–coupled receptor targeted by UDP sugars, and the increasingly diverse set of physiologic responses discovered recently functioning downstream of this receptor in many epithelia as well as in immune, inflammatory, and other cells. PMID:25829059

  12. Degradation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules by the Microscopic Yeast Trichosporon loubieri Isolated from Tropical Wetland Waters

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast. PMID:24072030

  13. AtWRKY22 promotes susceptibility to aphids and modulates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Karen J.; Wiegers, Gerrie L.; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; van Haarst, Jan C.; Kruijer, Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2016-01-01

    Aphids induce many transcriptional perturbations in their host plants, but the signalling cascades responsible and the effects on plant resistance are largely unknown. Through a genome-wide association (GWA) mapping study in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified WRKY22 as a candidate gene associated with feeding behaviour of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. The transcription factor WRKY22 is known to be involved in pathogen-triggered immunity, and WRKY22 gene expression has been shown to be induced by aphids. Assessment of aphid population development and feeding behaviour on knockout mutants and overexpression lines showed that WRKY22 increases susceptibility to M. persicae via a mesophyll-located mechanism. mRNA sequencing analysis of aphid-infested wrky22 knockout plants revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signalling and down-regulation of genes involved in plant growth and cell-wall loosening. In addition, mechanostimulation of knockout plants by clip cages up-regulated jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, resulting in substantial negative JA–SA crosstalk. Based on this and previous studies, WRKY22 is considered to modulate the interplay between the SA and JA pathways in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Its induction by aphids and its role in suppressing SA and JA signalling make WRKY22 a potential target for aphids to manipulate host plant defences. PMID:27107291

  14. AtWRKY22 promotes susceptibility to aphids and modulates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Karen J; Wiegers, Gerrie L; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; van Haarst, Jan C; Kruijer, Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2016-05-01

    Aphids induce many transcriptional perturbations in their host plants, but the signalling cascades responsible and the effects on plant resistance are largely unknown. Through a genome-wide association (GWA) mapping study in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified WRKY22 as a candidate gene associated with feeding behaviour of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae The transcription factor WRKY22 is known to be involved in pathogen-triggered immunity, and WRKY22 gene expression has been shown to be induced by aphids. Assessment of aphid population development and feeding behaviour on knockout mutants and overexpression lines showed that WRKY22 increases susceptibility to M. persicae via a mesophyll-located mechanism. mRNA sequencing analysis of aphid-infested wrky22 knockout plants revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signalling and down-regulation of genes involved in plant growth and cell-wall loosening. In addition, mechanostimulation of knockout plants by clip cages up-regulated jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, resulting in substantial negative JA-SA crosstalk. Based on this and previous studies, WRKY22 is considered to modulate the interplay between the SA and JA pathways in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Its induction by aphids and its role in suppressing SA and JA signalling make WRKY22 a potential target for aphids to manipulate host plant defences. PMID:27107291

  15. AtWRKY22 promotes susceptibility to aphids and modulates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Karen J; Wiegers, Gerrie L; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; van Haarst, Jan C; Kruijer, Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2016-05-01

    Aphids induce many transcriptional perturbations in their host plants, but the signalling cascades responsible and the effects on plant resistance are largely unknown. Through a genome-wide association (GWA) mapping study in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified WRKY22 as a candidate gene associated with feeding behaviour of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae The transcription factor WRKY22 is known to be involved in pathogen-triggered immunity, and WRKY22 gene expression has been shown to be induced by aphids. Assessment of aphid population development and feeding behaviour on knockout mutants and overexpression lines showed that WRKY22 increases susceptibility to M. persicae via a mesophyll-located mechanism. mRNA sequencing analysis of aphid-infested wrky22 knockout plants revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signalling and down-regulation of genes involved in plant growth and cell-wall loosening. In addition, mechanostimulation of knockout plants by clip cages up-regulated jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, resulting in substantial negative JA-SA crosstalk. Based on this and previous studies, WRKY22 is considered to modulate the interplay between the SA and JA pathways in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Its induction by aphids and its role in suppressing SA and JA signalling make WRKY22 a potential target for aphids to manipulate host plant defences.

  16. Docosahexaenoic acid and signaling pathways in rabbit colon.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, V; Parrillo, C; Balestrieri, M L; Giovane, A; Filippelli, A; Rossi, F

    1994-04-01

    The effects of one of the main components of fish oil, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), on prostaglandin (PG) and Ca2+ signaling pathways were examined in intact mucosa and freshly isolated crypt cells of rabbit descending colon. Preincubation of serosal mucosa for 20 min with 1 microM DHA fully suppressed the short-circuit and transepithelial conductance increase induced by serosal addition of 10 microM arachidonic acid (AA). DHA at 1 microM also prevented the Cl- secretion promoted by 10 microM AA, as estimated by unidirectional 36Cl flux measurements (net flux = 0.68 +/- 0.30 versus -1.91 +/- 0.20 microEq/hr/cm2, four experiments, p < 0.001), whereas it did not affect the electrophysiological and ion flux responses to PGE2. Addition of 1 microM DHA to the serosal side of the mucosa also inhibited the PG cascade activation elicited by AA (PG synthesis and second messenger cAMP increase). In vitro assays of colonic cyclooxygenase activity showed that 1 microM DHA inhibited (with a 20-min lag) cyclooxygenase activity to the same extent as 5 microM indomethacin (approximately 82% and 80%, respectively). DHA also affected the Ca2+ signaling pathway; in isolated crypt cells, the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) dropped by 49 +/- 7.6% (mean +/- standard error, six experiments) after incubation with 1 microM DHA. The sustained phase of the [Ca2+]i response to 500 nM concentrations of the intracellular Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin was also inhibited within 150 sec upon 1 microM DHA addition (141 +/- 5.8 versus 243 +/- 8.2 nM [Ca2+]i mean +/- standard error, eight experiments, p < 0.01). The [Ca2+]i-lowering effect of DHA, which was not achieved by incubation with other free fatty acids, was not prevented by removal of Na+ from the incubation medium (-46 +/- 4.3% versus -47 +/- 3.8%, mean +/- standard error, four experiments), nor it was mediated by cAMP-, protein kinase C-, or calmodulin-dependent mechanisms. The incubation of highly purified basolateral

  17. Electroporation loading of membrane-impermeable molecules to investigate intra- and intercellular Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Decrock, Elke; De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Bol, Mélissa; Gadicherla, Ashish K; Leybaert, Luc

    2015-03-02

    Electroporation is a technique that temporarily induces pores in the plasma membranes of cells, thereby allowing plasma membrane-impermeable substances to enter the cells. This loading method requires an electrical drive circuit providing an electroporation signal, an electrode to apply the signal to a localized zone in a cell monolayer, and a special solution that has a low electrical conductivity. To avoid impairment of cell function and cell death from the electroporation procedure itself, the applied electrical signal should ideally be a high-frequency oscillating signal (50 kHz) without any direct current (DC) component. Here, we describe the detailed procedure of electroporation loading.

  18. Insulin Signaling in Liver and Adipose Tissues in Periparturient Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Asako; Kenéz, Ákos; Locher, Lena; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The glucose homeostasis in dairy cattle is very well controlled, in line with the metabolic adaptation during the periparturient period. Former studies showed that nicotinic acid (NA) lowered plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the expression of proteins involved in hepatic and adipose insulin signaling and protein expression of hepatic glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) were affected by dietary NA and dietary concentrate intake in periparturient dairy cows. Twenty pluriparous German Holstein cows were fed with the same diet from about 21 days before the expected calving date (d-21) to calving. After calving, cows were randomly assigned in 4 groups and fed with diets different in concentrate proportion (“HC” with 60:40% or “LC” with 30:70% concentrate-to-roughage ratio) and supplemented with NA (24 g/day) (NA) or without (CON) until d21. Biopsy samples were taken from the liver, subcutaneous (SCAT) and retroperitoneal (RPAT) adipose tissues at d-21 and d21. Protein expression of insulin signaling molecules (insulin receptor (INSR), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ)) and hepatic GLUT2 was measured by Western Blotting. The ratio of protein expression at d21/at d-21 was calculated and statistically evaluated for the effects of time and diet. Cows in HC had significantly higher dietary energy intake than cows in LC. In RPAT a decrease in PI3K and PKCζ expression was found in all groups, irrespectively of diet. In the liver, the GLUT2 expression was significantly lower in cows in NA compared with cows in CON. In conclusion, insulin signaling might be decreased in RPAT over time without any effect of diet. NA was able to modulate hepatic GLUT2 expression, but its physiological role is unclear. PMID:26766039

  19. Insulin Signaling in Liver and Adipose Tissues in Periparturient Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Asako; Kenéz, Ákos; Locher, Lena; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The glucose homeostasis in dairy cattle is very well controlled, in line with the metabolic adaptation during the periparturient period. Former studies showed that nicotinic acid (NA) lowered plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the expression of proteins involved in hepatic and adipose insulin signaling and protein expression of hepatic glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) were affected by dietary NA and dietary concentrate intake in periparturient dairy cows. Twenty pluriparous German Holstein cows were fed with the same diet from about 21 days before the expected calving date (d-21) to calving. After calving, cows were randomly assigned in 4 groups and fed with diets different in concentrate proportion ("HC" with 60:40% or "LC" with 30:70% concentrate-to-roughage ratio) and supplemented with NA (24 g/day) (NA) or without (CON) until d21. Biopsy samples were taken from the liver, subcutaneous (SCAT) and retroperitoneal (RPAT) adipose tissues at d-21 and d21. Protein expression of insulin signaling molecules (insulin receptor (INSR), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ)) and hepatic GLUT2 was measured by Western Blotting. The ratio of protein expression at d21/at d-21 was calculated and statistically evaluated for the effects of time and diet. Cows in HC had significantly higher dietary energy intake than cows in LC. In RPAT a decrease in PI3K and PKCζ expression was found in all groups, irrespectively of diet. In the liver, the GLUT2 expression was significantly lower in cows in NA compared with cows in CON. In conclusion, insulin signaling might be decreased in RPAT over time without any effect of diet. NA was able to modulate hepatic GLUT2 expression, but its physiological role is unclear. PMID:26766039

  20. Insulin Signaling in Liver and Adipose Tissues in Periparturient Dairy Cows Supplemented with Dietary Nicotinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Asako; Kenéz, Ákos; Locher, Lena; Meyer, Ulrich; Dänicke, Sven; Rehage, Jürgen; Huber, Korinna

    2016-01-01

    The glucose homeostasis in dairy cattle is very well controlled, in line with the metabolic adaptation during the periparturient period. Former studies showed that nicotinic acid (NA) lowered plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the expression of proteins involved in hepatic and adipose insulin signaling and protein expression of hepatic glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) were affected by dietary NA and dietary concentrate intake in periparturient dairy cows. Twenty pluriparous German Holstein cows were fed with the same diet from about 21 days before the expected calving date (d-21) to calving. After calving, cows were randomly assigned in 4 groups and fed with diets different in concentrate proportion ("HC" with 60:40% or "LC" with 30:70% concentrate-to-roughage ratio) and supplemented with NA (24 g/day) (NA) or without (CON) until d21. Biopsy samples were taken from the liver, subcutaneous (SCAT) and retroperitoneal (RPAT) adipose tissues at d-21 and d21. Protein expression of insulin signaling molecules (insulin receptor (INSR), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ)) and hepatic GLUT2 was measured by Western Blotting. The ratio of protein expression at d21/at d-21 was calculated and statistically evaluated for the effects of time and diet. Cows in HC had significantly higher dietary energy intake than cows in LC. In RPAT a decrease in PI3K and PKCζ expression was found in all groups, irrespectively of diet. In the liver, the GLUT2 expression was significantly lower in cows in NA compared with cows in CON. In conclusion, insulin signaling might be decreased in RPAT over time without any effect of diet. NA was able to modulate hepatic GLUT2 expression, but its physiological role is unclear.

  1. Gold Nanoparticles Surface Plasmon Resonance Enhanced Signal for the Detection of Small Molecules on Split-Aptamer Microarrays (Small Molecules Detection from Split-Aptamers)

    PubMed Central

    Melaine, Feriel; Roupioz, Yoann; Buhot, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The detection of small molecules by biosensors remains a challenge for diagnostics in many areas like pharmacology, environment or homeland security. The main difficulty comes from both the low molecular weight and low concentrations of most targets, which generally requires an indirect detection with an amplification or a sandwich procedure. In this study, we combine both strategies as the amplification of Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) signal is obtained by the use of gold nanoparticles and the sequence engineering of split-aptamers, short oligonucleotides strands with strong affinity towards small targets, allows for a sandwich structure. Combining those two strategies, we obtained state-of-the-art results in the limit of detection (LOD = 50 nM) with the model target adenosine. Furthermore, the SPRi detection led on aptamer microarrays paves the way for potential multi-target detections thanks to the multi-probe imaging approach.

  2. 'Smelling' the cerebrospinal fluid: olfactory signaling molecules are expressed in and mediate chemosensory signaling from the choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Isabel; Hubbard, Peter C; Tomás, Joana; Quintela, Telma; Tavares, Gabriela; Caria, Sandra; Barreiros, Daniela; Santos, Cecília R A

    2016-05-01

    The olfactory-type signaling machinery has been known to be involved not only in odorant detection but also in other tissues with unsuspected sensory roles. As a barrier, the choroid plexus (CP) is an active participant in the monitoring of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), promptly responding to alterations in its composition. We hypothesized that olfactory signaling could be active in CP, contributing to the surveillance of the CSF composition. We determined the mRNA and protein expression of the major components of the olfactory transduction pathway in the rat CP, including odorant receptors, the olfactory G-protein (Gαolf), adenylate cyclase 3 and cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2. The functionality of the transduction pathway and the intracellular mechanisms involved were analyzed by DC field potential recording electrophysiological analysis, in an ex vivo CP-brain setup, using polyamines as stimuli and blockers of the downstream signaling pathways. Concentration-dependent responses were obtained for the polyamines studied (cadaverine, putrescine, spermine and spermidine), all known to be present in the CSF. Transfection of a CP epithelial cell line with siRNA against Gαolf effectively knocked down protein expression and reduced the CP cells' response to spermine. Thus, the key components of the olfactory chemosensory apparatus are present and are functional in murine CP, and polyamines seem to trigger both the cAMP and the phospholipase C-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathways. Olfactory-like chemosensory signaling may be an essential component of the CP chemical surveillance apparatus to detect alterations in the CSF composition, and to elicit responses to modulate and maintain brain homeostasis. PMID:26934374

  3. Regulatory signals for intestinal amino acid transporters and peptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, R.P.; Kwan, W.W.; Diamond, J. )

    1988-08-01

    Dietary protein ultimately regulates many processes involved in protein digestion, but it is often unclear whether proteins themselves, peptides, or amino acids (AAs) are the proximate regulatory signal. Hence the authors compared several processes involved in protein digestion in mice adapted to one of three rations, identical except for containing 54% of either casein, a partial hydrolysate of casein, or a free AA mixture simulating a complete hydrolysate of casein. The authors measured brush-border uptakes of seven AAs that variously serve as substrates for four AA transporters, and brush-border and cytosolic activities of four peptidases. The three rations yielded essentially the same AA uptake rates. Peptidase activities tended to be lower on the AA ration than on the protein ration. In other studies, all three rations yielded the same rates of brush-border peptide uptake; protein is only modestly more effective than AAs at inducing synthesis of pancreatic proteases; and, depending on the animal species, protein is either much less or much more effective than AAs at stimulating release of cholecystokinin and hence of pancreatic enzymes. Thus the regulators of each process involved in protein digestion are not necessarily that process's substrate.

  4. SALDI-TOF-MS analyses of small molecules (citric acid, dexasone, vitamins E and A) using TiO2 nanocrystals as substrates.

    PubMed

    Popović, Iva A; Nešić, Maja; Vranješ, Mila; Šaponjić, Zoran; Petković, Marijana

    2016-10-01

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SALDI-TOF-MS) might be the method of choice for the analysis of low mass molecules (less than m/z 500). Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystals as a substrate for SALDI-TOF-MS improve the reproducibility of the signal intensities and prevent the fragmentation of some molecules upon laser irradiation, as we have previously shown. In addition, variously shaped and sized TiO2 nanocrystals/substrates for SALDI-MS could be used for quantification of small molecules, which are otherwise difficult to detect with the assistance of organic matrices. TiO2-assisted LDI-MS spectra could be acquired with excellent reproducibility and repeatability and with low detection limit. In the current study, we analysed the spectra of dexasone, citric acid, vitamin E and vitamin A acquired with TiO2 nanocrystals of various shapes and dimensions, i.e. the colloidal TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), TiO2 prolate nanospheroids (TiO2 PNSs) and TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). Various shapes and dimensions of substrates were used since these factors determine desorption and ionisation processes. The homogeneity on the target plate was compared based on signal-to-noise values of peaks of interest of analysed molecules as well as the within-day and day-to-day repeatability. In summary, the obtained results show that the applicability of individual TiO2 nanocrystals depends on the analyte. Signals which are acquired with the assistance of TiO2 PNSs have the highest sensitivity and reproducibility (the smallest standard deviation), even compared with those in the LDI mode. This implies that TiO2 PNSs could also be suitable for quantitative analyses of small molecules. PMID:27510281

  5. Role of Ethylene and Its Cross Talk with Other Signaling Molecules in Plant Responses to Heavy Metal Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Thu, Nguyen Binh Anh; Hoang, Xuan Lan Thi; Asgher, Mohd; Khan, Nafees A.; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Excessive heavy metals (HMs) in agricultural lands cause toxicities to plants, resulting in declines in crop productivity. Recent advances in ethylene biology research have established that ethylene is not only responsible for many important physiological activities in plants but also plays a pivotal role in HM stress tolerance. The manipulation of ethylene in plants to cope with HM stress through various approaches targeting either ethylene biosynthesis or the ethylene signaling pathway has brought promising outcomes. This review covers ethylene production and signal transduction in plant responses to HM stress, cross talk between ethylene and other signaling molecules under adverse HM stress conditions, and approaches to modify ethylene action to improve HM tolerance. From our current understanding about ethylene and its regulatory activities, it is believed that the optimization of endogenous ethylene levels in plants under HM stress would pave the way for developing transgenic crops with improved HM tolerance. PMID:26246451

  6. Role of Ethylene and Its Cross Talk with Other Signaling Molecules in Plant Responses to Heavy Metal Stress.

    PubMed

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Khan, M Iqbal R; Thu, Nguyen Binh Anh; Hoang, Xuan Lan Thi; Asgher, Mohd; Khan, Nafees A; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-09-01

    Excessive heavy metals (HMs) in agricultural lands cause toxicities to plants, resulting in declines in crop productivity. Recent advances in ethylene biology research have established that ethylene is not only responsible for many important physiological activities in plants but also plays a pivotal role in HM stress tolerance. The manipulation of ethylene in plants to cope with HM stress through various approaches targeting either ethylene biosynthesis or the ethylene signaling pathway has brought promising outcomes. This review covers ethylene production and signal transduction in plant responses to HM stress, cross talk between ethylene and other signaling molecules under adverse HM stress conditions, and approaches to modify ethylene action to improve HM tolerance. From our current understanding about ethylene and its regulatory activities, it is believed that the optimization of endogenous ethylene levels in plants under HM stress would pave the way for developing transgenic crops with improved HM tolerance.

  7. Constitutive and hyperresponsive signaling by mutant forms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid sensor Ssy1.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Richard F; Ottow, Kim; Andersen, Helge A; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C

    2003-10-01

    Sensing of extracellular amino acids results in transcriptional induction of amino acid permease genes in yeast. Ssy1, a membrane protein resembling amino acid permeases, is required for signaling but is apparently unable to transport amino acids and is thus believed to be a sensor. By using a novel genetic screen in which potassium uptake was made dependent on amino acid signaling, we obtained gain-of-function mutations in SSY1. Some alleles confer inducer-independent signaling; others increase the apparent affinity for inducers. The results reveal that amino acid transport is not required for signaling and support the notion that sensing by Ssy1 occurs via its direct interaction with extracellular amino acids. PMID:14555474

  8. Regulation of PI-3-Kinase and Akt Signaling in T Lymphocytes and Other Cells by TNFR Family Molecules

    PubMed Central

    So, Takanori; Croft, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt (protein kinase B) is a common response triggered by a range of membrane-bound receptors on many cell types. In T lymphocytes, the PI3K-Akt pathway promotes clonal expansion, differentiation, and survival of effector cells and suppresses the generation of regulatory T cells. PI3K activation is tightly controlled by signals through the T cell receptor (TCR) and the co-stimulatory receptor CD28, however sustained and periodic signals from additional co-receptors are now being recognized as critical contributors to the activation of this pathway. Accumulating evidence suggests that many members of the Tumor Necrosis Factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, TNFR2 (TNFRSF1B), OX40 (TNFRSF4), 4-1BB (TNFRSF9), HVEM (TNFRSF14), and DR3 (TNFRSF25), that are constitutive or inducible on T cells, can directly or indirectly promote activity in the PI3K-Akt pathway. We discuss recent data which suggests that ligation of one TNFR family molecule organizes a signalosome, via TNFR-associated factor (TRAF) adapter proteins in T cell membrane lipid microdomains, that results in the subsequent accumulation of highly concentrated depots of PI3K and Akt in close proximity to TCR signaling units. We propose this may be a generalizable mechanism applicable to other TNFR family molecules that will result in a quantitative contribution of these signalosomes to enhancing and sustaining PI3K and Akt activation triggered by the TCR. We also review data that other TNFR molecules, such as CD40 (TNFRSF5), RANK (TNFRSF11A), FN14 (TNFRSF12A), TACI (TNFRSF13B), BAFFR (TNFRSF13C), and NGFR (TNFRSF16), contribute to the activation of this pathway in diverse cell types through a similar ability to recruit PI3K or Akt into their signaling complexes. PMID:23760533

  9. Identification of small molecule sulfonic acids as ecto-5'-Nucleotidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Raza, Rabia; Saeed, Aamer; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2012-11-01

    Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase inhibitors have great potential as anti-tumor agents. We have investigated biochemical properties of human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidases and characterized 19 small molecule sulfonic acid derivatives as potential inhibitors of ecto-5'-Nucleotidases. We identified 11 potent inhibitors of human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidases and checked their selectivity. Compound 10 (Sodium 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonate) with K(i) value of 0.66 μM and 19 (N-(4-sulfamoylphenylcarbamothioyl) pivalamide) with K(i) value of 0.78 μM were identified as the most potent inhibitors for human and rat ecto-5'-Nucleotidase, respectively. The present compounds have low molecular weights, water solubility and equal potency as compared to the reported inhibitors.

  10. Ionization-site effects on the photofragmentation of chloro- and bromoacetic acid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levola, Helena; Itälä, Eero; Schlesier, Kim; Kooser, Kuno; Laine, Sanna; Laksman, Joakim; Ha, Dang Trinh; Rachlew, Elisabeth; Tarkanovskaja, Marta; Tanzer, Katrin; Kukk, Edwin

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation of gas-phase chloro- and bromoacetic acid samples, particularly its dependency on the atomic site of the initial core ionization, was studied in photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence (PEPIPICO) measurements. The fragmentation was investigated after ionizing carbon 1 s and bromine 3 d or chlorine 2 p core orbitals. It was observed that the samples had many similar fragmentation pathways and that their relative weights depended strongly on the initial ionization site. Additional Auger PEPIPICO measurements revealed a clear dependence of fragment pair intensities on the kinetic energy of the emitted Auger electrons. The modeled and measured Auger electron spectra indicated that the average internal energy of the molecule was larger following the carbon 1 s core-hole decay than after the decay of the halogen core hole. This difference in the internal energies was found to be the source of the site-dependent photofragmentation behavior.

  11. Single-molecule FRET and crosslinking studies in structural biology enabled by noncanonical amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Swati; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary structural biology research promises more than just static snap-shots of molecular machineries. This goal is not just facilitated by combining different structural biology techniques, but also by new tools from the field of protein and genetic engineering, as well as from chemistry. Genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) through codon-suppression technology provides an excellent opportunity to probe biomolecules using different structural biology methods. In this article, we review the applications of ncAA incorporation into proteins for determining structural information through various techniques with the main focus on crosslinking mass spectrometry and single-molecule FRET-based techniques. Furthermore, advances and limitations of the incorporation of multiple ncAAs are discussed, with respect to design of an ideal host organism for modern and integrative structural biology research.

  12. Cross-Linking Poly(lactic acid) Film Surface by Neutral Hyperthermal Hydrogen Molecule Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Du, Wangli; Shao, Hong; He, Zhoukun; Tang, Changyu; Liu, Yu; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Yan; Lau, Woon-ming; Hui, David

    2015-12-16

    Constructing a dense cross-linking layer on a polymer film surface is a good way to improve the water resistance of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). However, conventional plasma treatments have failed to achieve the aim as a result of the unavoidable surface damage arising from the charged species caused by the uncontrolled high energy coming from colliding ions and electrons. In this work, we report a modified plasma method called hyperthermal hydrogen-induced cross-linking (HHIC) technology to construct a dense cross-linking layer on PLA film surfaces. This method produces energy-controlled neutral hyperthermal hydrogen, which selectively cleaves C-H bonds by molecule collision from the PLA film without breaking other bonds (e.g., C-C bonds in the polymer backbone), and results in subsequent cross-linking of the carbon radicals generated from the organic molecules. The formation of a dense cross-linking layer can serve as a barrier layer to significantly improve both the hydrophobicity and water vapor barrier property of the PLA film. Because of the advantage of selective cleavage of C-H bonds by HHIC treatment, the original physical properties (e.g., mechanical strength and light transmittance) of the PLA films are well-preserved. PMID:26594874

  13. Cross-Linking Poly(lactic acid) Film Surface by Neutral Hyperthermal Hydrogen Molecule Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Du, Wangli; Shao, Hong; He, Zhoukun; Tang, Changyu; Liu, Yu; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Yan; Lau, Woon-ming; Hui, David

    2015-12-16

    Constructing a dense cross-linking layer on a polymer film surface is a good way to improve the water resistance of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). However, conventional plasma treatments have failed to achieve the aim as a result of the unavoidable surface damage arising from the charged species caused by the uncontrolled high energy coming from colliding ions and electrons. In this work, we report a modified plasma method called hyperthermal hydrogen-induced cross-linking (HHIC) technology to construct a dense cross-linking layer on PLA film surfaces. This method produces energy-controlled neutral hyperthermal hydrogen, which selectively cleaves C-H bonds by molecule collision from the PLA film without breaking other bonds (e.g., C-C bonds in the polymer backbone), and results in subsequent cross-linking of the carbon radicals generated from the organic molecules. The formation of a dense cross-linking layer can serve as a barrier layer to significantly improve both the hydrophobicity and water vapor barrier property of the PLA film. Because of the advantage of selective cleavage of C-H bonds by HHIC treatment, the original physical properties (e.g., mechanical strength and light transmittance) of the PLA films are well-preserved.

  14. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  15. Anti-biofilm activity of pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis tac125 against staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm: Evidence of a signal molecule involvement?

    PubMed

    Parrilli, E; Papa, R; Carillo, S; Tilotta, M; Casillo, A; Sannino, F; Cellini, A; Artini, M; Selan, L; Corsaro, M M; Tutino, M L

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is recognized as cause of biofilm-associated infections and interest in the development of new approaches for S. epidermidis biofilm treatment has increased. In a previous paper we reported that the supernatant of Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 presents an anti-biofilm activity against S. epidermidis and preliminary physico-chemical characterization of the supernatant suggested that this activity is due to a polysaccharide. In this work we further investigated the chemical nature of the anti-biofilm P. haloplanktis TAC125 molecule. The production of the molecule was evaluated in different conditions, and reported data demonstrated that it is produced in all P. haloplanktis TAC125 biofilm growth stages, also in minimal medium and at different temperatures. By using a surface coating assay, the surfactant nature of the anti-biofilm compound was excluded. Moreover, a purification procedure was set up and the analysis of an enriched fraction demonstrated that the anti-biofilm activity is not due to a polysaccharide molecule but that it is due to small hydrophobic molecules that likely work as signal. The enriched fraction was also used to evaluate the effect on S. epidermidis biofilm formation in dynamic condition by BioFlux system.

  16. Anti-biofilm activity of pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis tac125 against staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm: Evidence of a signal molecule involvement?

    PubMed

    Parrilli, E; Papa, R; Carillo, S; Tilotta, M; Casillo, A; Sannino, F; Cellini, A; Artini, M; Selan, L; Corsaro, M M; Tutino, M L

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is recognized as cause of biofilm-associated infections and interest in the development of new approaches for S. epidermidis biofilm treatment has increased. In a previous paper we reported that the supernatant of Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 presents an anti-biofilm activity against S. epidermidis and preliminary physico-chemical characterization of the supernatant suggested that this activity is due to a polysaccharide. In this work we further investigated the chemical nature of the anti-biofilm P. haloplanktis TAC125 molecule. The production of the molecule was evaluated in different conditions, and reported data demonstrated that it is produced in all P. haloplanktis TAC125 biofilm growth stages, also in minimal medium and at different temperatures. By using a surface coating assay, the surfactant nature of the anti-biofilm compound was excluded. Moreover, a purification procedure was set up and the analysis of an enriched fraction demonstrated that the anti-biofilm activity is not due to a polysaccharide molecule but that it is due to small hydrophobic molecules that likely work as signal. The enriched fraction was also used to evaluate the effect on S. epidermidis biofilm formation in dynamic condition by BioFlux system. PMID:25816412

  17. Acetyl salicylic acid attenuates cardiac hypertrophy through Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Gitau, Samuel Chege; Li, Xuelian; Zhao, Dandan; Guo, Zhenfeng; Liang, Haihai; Qian, Ming; Lv, Lifang; Li, Tianshi; Xu, Bozhi; Wang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Chaoqian; Lu, Yanjie; Du, Zhiming; Shan, Hongli; Yang, Baofeng

    2015-12-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular morbid events. The vascular properties of low-dose acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) provide cardiovascular benefits through the irreversible inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase 1; however, the possible anti-hypertrophic properties and potential mechanism of aspirin have not been investigated in detail. In this study, healthy wild-type male mice were randomly divided into three groups and subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham operation. The TAC-operated mice were treated with the human equivalent of low-dose aspirin (10 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)); the remaining mice received an equal amount of phosphate buffered saline with 0.65% ethanol, which was used as a vehicle. A cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model induced by angiotensin II (10 nmol·L(-1)) was treated with the human equivalent of low (10 or 100 μmol·L(-1)) and high (1000 μmol·L(-1)) aspirin concentrations in plasma. Changes in the cardiac structure and function were assessed through echocardiography and transmission electron microscopy. Gene expression was determined through RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Results indicated that aspirin treatment abrogated the increased thickness of the left ventricular anterior and posterior walls, the swelling of mitochondria, and the increased surface area in in vivo and in vitro hypertrophy models. Aspirin also normalized the upregulated hypertrophic biomarkers, β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and b-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Aspirin efficiently reversed the upregulation of β-catenin and P-Akt expression and the TAC- or ANG II-induced downregulation of GSK-3β. Therefore, low-dose aspirin possesses significant anti-hypertrophic properties at clinically relevant concentrations for anti-thrombotic therapy. The downregulation of β-catenin and Akt may be the underlying signaling mechanism of the effects of aspirin. PMID:26626190

  18. Acetyl salicylic acid attenuates cardiac hypertrophy through Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Gitau, Samuel Chege; Li, Xuelian; Zhao, Dandan; Guo, Zhenfeng; Liang, Haihai; Qian, Ming; Lv, Lifang; Li, Tianshi; Xu, Bozhi; Wang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Chaoqian; Lu, Yanjie; Du, Zhiming; Shan, Hongli; Yang, Baofeng

    2015-12-01

    Ventricular hypertrophy is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular morbid events. The vascular properties of low-dose acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) provide cardiovascular benefits through the irreversible inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase 1; however, the possible anti-hypertrophic properties and potential mechanism of aspirin have not been investigated in detail. In this study, healthy wild-type male mice were randomly divided into three groups and subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham operation. The TAC-operated mice were treated with the human equivalent of low-dose aspirin (10 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)); the remaining mice received an equal amount of phosphate buffered saline with 0.65% ethanol, which was used as a vehicle. A cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model induced by angiotensin II (10 nmol·L(-1)) was treated with the human equivalent of low (10 or 100 μmol·L(-1)) and high (1000 μmol·L(-1)) aspirin concentrations in plasma. Changes in the cardiac structure and function were assessed through echocardiography and transmission electron microscopy. Gene expression was determined through RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Results indicated that aspirin treatment abrogated the increased thickness of the left ventricular anterior and posterior walls, the swelling of mitochondria, and the increased surface area in in vivo and in vitro hypertrophy models. Aspirin also normalized the upregulated hypertrophic biomarkers, β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and b-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Aspirin efficiently reversed the upregulation of β-catenin and P-Akt expression and the TAC- or ANG II-induced downregulation of GSK-3β. Therefore, low-dose aspirin possesses significant anti-hypertrophic properties at clinically relevant concentrations for anti-thrombotic therapy. The downregulation of β-catenin and Akt may be the underlying signaling mechanism of the effects of aspirin.

  19. A bead-based activity screen for small-molecule inhibitors of signal transduction in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Juliesta E.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia is characterized by the presence of the chimeric BCR-ABL gene, which is expressed as the constitutively active Bcr-Abl kinase. Although kinase activity is directly responsible for the clinical phenotype, current diagnostic and prognostic methods focus on a genetic classification system where molecularly distinct subcategories are used to predict patient responses to small-molecule inhibitors of the Bcr-Abl kinase. Point mutations in the kinase domain are a central factor regulating inhibitor resistance; however, compensatory signaling caused by the activation of unrelated kinases can influence inhibitor efficacy. Kinase activity profiling can be used as a complementary approach to genetic screening and allows direct screening of small-molecule inhibitors. We developed a quantitative assay to monitor tyrosine kinase activities and inhibitor sensitivities in a model of chronic myelogenous leukemia using peptide reporters covalently immobilized on Luminex beads. Kinase activity is quantified by non-linear regression from well-specific internal standard curves. Using optimized synthetic substrates and peptides derived from native substrates as probes, we measured kinase inhibition in cell lysates by the signal transduction inhibitors imatinib and dasatinib. Taking advantage of a convenient 96-well plate format, this assay also allows a straightforward and quantitative analysis of the differential effects of ATP and inhibitors on kinase activity. This method for analyzing a focused signaling network benefits from rigorous statistical analysis and short processing times, thereby offering a powerful tool for drug discovery and clinical testing. PMID:20423990

  20. The inflammasome and danger molecule signaling: at the crossroads of inflammation and pathogen persistence in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Özlem; Lee, Kyu Lim

    2015-10-01

    Inflammasomes are an oligomeric assembly of multiprotein complexes that activate the caspase-1-dependent maturation and the subsequent secretion of inflammatory interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18 cytokines in response to a 'danger signal' in vertebrates. The assessment of their significance continues to grow rapidly as the complex biology of various chronic inflammatory conditions is better dissected. Increasing evidence strongly links inflammasomes and host-derived small 'danger molecule ATP' signaling with the modulation of the host immune response by microbial colonizers as well as with potential altering of the microbiome structure and intermicrobial interactions in the host. All of these factors eventually lead to the destructive chronic inflammatory disease state. In the oral cavity, a highly dynamic and multifaceted interplay takes place between the signaling of endogenous danger molecules and colonizing microbes on the mucosal surfaces. This interaction may redirect the local microenvironment to favor the conversion of the resident microbiome toward pathogenicity. This review outlines the major components of the known inflammasome complexes/mechanisms and highlights their regulation, in particular, by oral microorganisms, in relation to periodontal disease pathology. Better characterization of the cellular and molecular biology of the inflammasome will probably identify important potential therapeutic targets for the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease, as well as for other debilitating chronic diseases.

  1. Micelle-assisted signaling of peracetic acid by the oxidation of pyreneboronic acid via monomer-excimer switching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Cho, Min Jeoung; Chang, Suk-Kyu

    2015-08-15

    A simple fluorescent probe for the industrial oxidant peracetic acid (PAA) was investigated. PAA-assisted oxidative conversion of pyrene-1-boronic acid into 1-hydroxypyrene was used as the signaling tool. Pyreneboronic acid was found to display selective signaling behavior, being more responsive to PAA than to other commonly used practical oxidants such as H2O2 and HOCl. The changes in pyrene monomer fluorescence to excimer were used in the quantitative analysis of PAA. When using the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as a micellar additive, the signaling of PAA was markedly enhanced. Selective fluorescence signaling of PAA by pyrene-1-boronic acid with a detection limit of 1.5×10(-6)M in aqueous environment was successfully achieved. PMID:25966389

  2. Cardiac-Specific SOCS3 Deletion Prevents In Vivo Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury through Sustained Activation of Cardioprotective Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Takanobu; Yasukawa, Hideo; Kyogoku, Sachiko; Oba, Toyoharu; Takahashi, Jinya; Nohara, Shoichiro; Minami, Tomoko; Mawatari, Kazutoshi; Sugi, Yusuke; Shimozono, Koutatsu; Pradervand, Sylvain; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Aoki, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) adversely affects cardiac performance and the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Although myocardial signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is potently cardioprotective during IRI, the inhibitory mechanism responsible for its activation is largely unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the myocardial suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3, an intrinsic negative feedback regulator of the Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT signaling pathway, in the development of myocardial IRI. Myocardial IRI was induced in mice by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 1 h, followed by different reperfusion times. One hour after reperfusion, the rapid expression of JAK-STAT–activating cytokines was observed. We precisely evaluated the phosphorylation of cardioprotective signaling molecules and the expression of SOCS3 during IRI and then induced myocardial IRI in wild-type and cardiac-specific SOCS3 knockout mice (SOCS3-CKO). The activation of STAT3, AKT, and ERK1/2 rapidly peaked and promptly decreased during IRI. This decrease correlated with the induction of SOCS3 expression up to 24 h after IRI in wild-type mice. The infarct size 24 h after reperfusion was significantly reduced in SOCS3-CKO compared with wild-type mice. In SOCS3-CKO mice, STAT3, AKT, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was sustained, myocardial apoptosis was prevented, and the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was augmented. Cardiac-specific SOCS3 deletion led to the sustained activation of cardioprotective signaling molecules including and prevented myocardial apoptosis and injury during IRI. Our findings suggest that SOCS3 may represent a key factor that exacerbates the development of myocardial IRI. PMID:26010537

  3. Identification of a Small Molecule Signaling Factor That Regulates the Biosynthesis of the Antifungal Polycyclic Tetramate Macrolactam HSAF in Lysobacter enzymogenes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yong; Wang, Yan; Tombosa, Simon; Wright, Stephen; Huffman, Justin; Yuen, Gary; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng

    2014-01-01

    Lysobacter species are emerging as new sources of antibiotics. The regulation of these antibiotics is not well understood. Here, we identified a small molecule metabolite (LeDSF3) that regulates the biosynthesis of the antifungal antibiotic HSAF (heat-stable antifungal factor), a polycyclic tetramate macrolactam with a structure and mode of action distinct from the existing antifungal drugs. LeDSF3 was isolated from the culture broth of L. enzymogenes, and its chemical structure was established by NMR and MS. The purified compound induced green fluorescence in a reporter strain of Xanthomonas campestris, which contained gfp gene under the control of a DSF (diffusible signaling factor)-inducible promoter. Exogenous addition of LeDSF3 in L. enzymogenes cultures significantly increased the HSAF yield, the transcription of HSAF biosynthetic genes, and the antifungal activity of the organism. The LeDSF3-regulated HSAF production is dependent on the two-component regulatory system RpfC/RpfG. Moreover, LeDSF3 up-regulated the expression of the global regulator Clp (cAMP receptor-like protein). The disruption of clp led to no HSAF production. Together, the results show that LeDSF3 is a fatty acid-derived, diffusible signaling factor positively regulating HSAF biosynthesis and that the signaling is mediated by the RfpC/RpfG-Clp pathway. These findings may facilitate the antibiotic production through applied genetics and molecular biotechnology in Lysobacter, a group of ubiquitous yet underexplored microorganisms. PMID:25301587

  4. Amino acid conjugated self assembling molecules for enhancing surface wettability of fiber laser treated titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkan, Cagri K.; Hür, Deniz; Uzun, Lokman; Garipcan, Bora

    2016-03-01

    Surface wetting properties of implants are one of the most critical parameter, which determine the interaction of proteins and cells with the implant surface. In this regards, acid etching and sand blasting are the mostly used methods at surface modification of Titanium (Ti) for enhanced surface wettability. Besides, these kinds of modifications may cause a conflict whether the surface wettability is influenced by the process related surface contaminations or by the surface roughness. In contrast, lasers might be an option for the alteration of surface wetting properties via supporting micro and/or nano surface topographies while preventing surface chemical contaminations. In this work, we focused on two steps of surface processing approaches of Ti surface: physical and chemical modifications. Herein, we hierarchically structured Ti surfaces by using microsecond modulated pulsed fiber laser. Subsequently, laser structured and non-structured Ti surfaces were further modified with novel histidine and leucine Amino Acid conjugated Self-Assembled Molecules (His1-SAMs2 and Leu3-SAMs) to alter the surface wettability by introducing biologically hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. Modification of Ti surfaces with His-SAMs and Leu-SAMs ended up with stable wetting properties when compared to non-modified surfaces after 7 days which may enhances the cell-surface interaction.

  5. Formation and Fragmentation of Protonated Molecules after Ionization of Amino Acid and Lactic Acid Clusters by Collision with Ions in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Poully, Jean-Christophe; Vizcaino, Violaine; Schwob, Lucas; Delaunay, Rudy; Kocisek, Jaroslav; Eden, Samuel; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Méry, Alain; Rangama, Jimmy; Adoui, Lamri; Huber, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Collisions between O(3+) ions and neutral clusters of amino acids (alanine, valine and glycine) as well as lactic acid are performed in the gas phase, in order to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on these biologically relevant molecular systems. All monomers and dimers are found to be predominantly protonated, and ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on model systems indicate that for amino acids, this is due to proton transfer within the clusters after ionization. For lactic acid, which has a lower proton affinity than amino acids, a significant non-negligible amount of the radical cation monomer is observed. New fragment-ion channels observed from clusters, as opposed to isolated molecules, are assigned to the statistical dissociation of protonated molecules formed upon ionization of the clusters. These new dissociation channels exhibit strong delayed fragmentation on the microsecond time scale, especially after multiple ionization.

  6. Selective imaging of quorum sensing receptors in bacteria using fluorescent Au nanocluster probes surface functionalized with signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Samanta, Anupam; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Chowdhury, Somak; Prabhune, Asmita; Devi, R Nandini

    2013-12-26

    Fluorescent ultrasmall gold clusters decorated with bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactone, are synthesized. These fluorescent probes are found to have emission in the near-infrared spectral region advantageous for bioimaging. Imaging studies using different strains of bacteria with and without acyl homoserine lactone receptors with the aid of confocal microscopy have shown that the probe interacts preferentially with cells possessing these receptors. This indicates that, with appropriate surface functionalization, the Au clusters can be used for receptor specific detection with enhanced selectivity.

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Cytokine-Mediated STAT1 Signal Transduction In β-Cells With Improved Aqueous Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Stephen S.; Tang, Alicia J.; Lundh, Morten; Mosher, Carrie M.; Perkins, Kedar M.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of BRD0476 (1), a small molecule generated by diversity-oriented synthesis that suppresses cytokine-induced β-cell apoptosis. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 1 and analogs with improved aqueous solubility. By replacing naphthyl with quinoline moieties, we prepared active analogs with up to a 1400-fold increase in solubility from 1. In addition, we demonstrated that compound 1 and analogs inhibit STAT1 signal transduction induced by IFN-γ. PMID:23617753

  8. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. L-lysine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike L-histidine, L-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and D-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, L-Asp-γ-L-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of L-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1(Y395C) by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1(K9R,K16R). Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes.

  9. Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule enhances CD40 signaling in B cells and augments the plasma cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Hiroaki; Rothstein, Thomas L

    2009-08-01

    Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) was cloned as a mediator of Fas resistance that is highly evolutionarily conserved but contains no known effector motifs. In this study, we report entirely new functions of FAIM that regulate B cell signaling and differentiation. FAIM acts to specifically enhance CD40 signaling for NF-kappaB activation, IRF-4 expression, and BCL-6 down-regulation in vitro, but has no effect on its own or in conjunction with LPS or anti-Ig stimulation. In keeping with its effects on IRF-4 and BCL-6, FAIM overexpression augments the plasma cell compartment in vivo. These results indicate that FAIM is a new player on the field of B cell differentiation and acts as a force multiplier for a series of events that begins with CD40 engagement and ends with plasma cell differentiation.

  10. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Hideyasu; Furuichi, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Keiji Shimbara, Naoki

    2008-04-18

    The inducible transcription factor NF-{kappa}B regulates divergent signaling pathways including inflammatory response and cancer development. Selective inhibitors for NF-{kappa}B signaling are potentially useful for treatment of inflammation and cancer. NF-{kappa}B is canonically activated by preferential disposal of its inhibitory protein; I{kappa}B, which suppresses the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. I{kappa}B{alpha} (a major member of I{kappa}B family proteins) is phosphorylated with an I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and subsequently polyubiquitylated by SCF{sup {beta}}{sup TrCP1} ubiquitin-ligase in the presence of E1 and E2 prior to proteasomal degradation. Here, we describe a novel inhibitor termed GS143, which suppressed I{kappa}B{alpha} ubiquitylation, but not I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, MDM2-directed p53 ubiquitylation, and proteasome activity in vitro. GS143 markedly suppressed the destruction of I{kappa}B{alpha} stimulated by TNF{alpha} and a set of downstream responses coupled to NF-{kappa}B signaling but not those of p53 and {beta}-catenin in vivo. Our results indicate that GS143 serves as an effective inhibitor of multiple pathways served by NF-{kappa}B signaling.

  11. Gambogic acid causes fin developmental defect in zebrafish embryo partially via retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling-Ling; Li, Kang; Lin, Qing-Hua; Ren, Jian; He, Zhi-Heng; Li, Huan; Shen, Ning; Wei, Ping; Feng, Feng; He, Ming-Fang

    2016-08-01

    Gambogic acid (GA), the major active ingredient of gamboge, has been approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for clinical trials in cancer patients due to its strong anticancer activity. However, our previous research showed that GA was teratogenic against zebrafish fin development. To explore the teratogenicity and the underlying mechanisms, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were used. The morphological observations revealed that GA caused fin defects in zebrafish embryos in a concentration-dependent manner. The critical exposure time of GA to reveal teratogenicity was before 8 hpf (hours post fertilization). LC/MS/MS analysis revealed that a maximum bioconcentration of GA was occurred at 4 hpf. Q-PCR data showed that GA treatment resulted in significant inactivation of RA signaling which could be partially rescued by the exogenous supply of RA. These results indicate the potential teratogenicity of GA and provide evidence for a caution in its future clinic use.

  12. A ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade for amplified fluorescence detection of biological small molecules with zero-background signal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Kong, Rong-Mei; Yang, Bin; Tan, Weihong

    2011-08-01

    Many types of fluorescent sensing systems have been reported for biological small molecules. Particularly, several methods have been developed for the recognition of ATP or NAD(+), but they only show moderate sensitivity, and they cannot discriminate either ATP or NAD(+) from their respective analogues. We have addressed these limitations and report here a dual strategy which combines split DNAzyme-based background reduction with catalytic and molecular beacon (CAMB)-based amplified detection to develop a ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade, resulting in ultrahigh sensitivity. First, the 8-17 DNAzyme is split into two separate oligonucleotide fragments as the building blocks for the DNA ligation reaction, thereby providing a zero-background signal to improve overall sensitivity. Next, a CAMB strategy is further employed for amplified signal detection achieved through cycling and regenerating the DNAzyme to realize the true enzymatic multiple turnover (one enzyme catalyzes the cleavage of several substrates) of catalytic beacons. This combination of zero-background signal and signal amplification significantly improves the sensitivity of the sensing systems, resulting in detection limits of 100 and 50 pM for ATP and NAD(+), respectively, much lower than those of previously reported biosensors. Moreover, by taking advantage of the highly specific biomolecule-dependence of the DNA ligation reaction, the developed DNAzyme cascades show significantly high selectivity toward the target cofactor (ATP or NAD(+)), and the target biological small molecule can be distinguished from its analogues. Therefore, as a new and universal platform for the design of DNA ligation reaction-based sensing systems, this novel ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade method may find a broad spectrum of applications in both environmental and biomedical fields.

  13. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  14. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  15. Small-Molecule Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitor of Oncogenic Rho Signaling.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Vescovo, Cosmo D; Dreyer, Elisa; Reggi, Erica; Osman, Halima; Ruggieri, Lucia; Gonano, Cynthia; Cavin, Sabrina; Box, Clare L; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Bellucci, Luca; Seeber, Michele; Fanelli, Francesca

    2016-09-22

    Uncontrolled activation of Rho signaling by RhoGEFs, in particular AKAP13 (Lbc) and its close homologs, is implicated in a number of human tumors with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. Structure predictions and alanine scanning mutagenesis of Lbc identified a circumscribed hot region for RhoA recognition and activation. Virtual screening targeting that region led to the discovery of an inhibitor of Lbc-RhoA interaction inside cells. By interacting with the DH domain, the compound inhibits the catalytic activity of Lbc, halts cellular responses to activation of oncogenic Lbc pathways, and reverses a number of prostate cancer cell phenotypes such as proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. This study provides insights into the structural determinants of Lbc-RhoA recognition. This is a successful example of structure-based discovery of a small protein-protein interaction inhibitor able to halt oncogenic Rho signaling in cancer cells with therapeutic implications.

  16. Improving Signal/Noise Resolution in Single-Molecule Experiments Using Molecular Constructs with Short Handles

    PubMed Central

    Forns, N.; de Lorenzo, S.; Manosas, M.; Hayashi, K.; Huguet, J.M.; Ritort, F.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate unfolding/folding force kinetics in DNA hairpins exhibiting two and three states with newly designed short dsDNA handles (29 bp) using optical tweezers. We show how the higher stiffness of the molecular setup moderately enhances the signal/noise ratio (SNR) in hopping experiments as compared to conventional long-handled constructs (≅700 bp). The shorter construct results in a signal of higher SNR and slower folding/unfolding kinetics, thereby facilitating the detection of otherwise fast structural transitions. A novel analysis, as far as we are aware, of the elastic properties of the molecular setup, based on high-bandwidth measurements of force fluctuations along the folded branch, reveals that the highest SNR that can be achieved with short handles is potentially limited by the marked reduction of the effective persistence length and stretch modulus of the short linker complex. PMID:21463590

  17. NFAT targets signaling molecules to gene promoters in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael C; Borenstein-Auerbach, Nofit; McGlynn, Kathleen; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Shahbazov, Rauf; Syed, Ilham; Kanak, Mazhar; Takita, Morihito; Levy, Marlon F; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is activated by calcineurin in response to calcium signals derived by metabolic and inflammatory stress to regulate genes in pancreatic islets. Here, we show that NFAT targets MAPKs, histone acetyltransferase p300, and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to gene promoters to differentially regulate insulin and TNF-α genes. NFAT and ERK associated with the insulin gene promoter in response to glucagon-like peptide 1, whereas NFAT formed complexes with p38 MAPK (p38) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) upon promoters of the TNF-α gene in response to IL-1β. Translocation of NFAT and MAPKs to gene promoters was calcineurin/NFAT dependent, and complex stability required MAPK activity. Knocking down NFATc2 expression, eliminating NFAT DNA binding sites, or interfering with NFAT nuclear import prevented association of MAPKs with gene promoters. Inhibiting p38 and JNK activity increased NFAT-ERK association with promoters, which repressed TNF-α and enhanced insulin gene expression. Moreover, inhibiting p38 and JNK induced a switch from NFAT-p38/JNK-histone acetyltransferase p300 to NFAT-ERK-HDAC3 complex formation upon the TNF-α promoter, which resulted in gene repression. Histone acetyltransferase/HDAC exchange was reversed on the insulin gene by p38/JNK inhibition in the presence of glucagon-like peptide 1, which enhanced gene expression. Overall, these data indicate that NFAT directs signaling enzymes to gene promoters in islets, which contribute to protein-DNA complex stability and promoter regulation. Furthermore, the data suggest that TNF-α can be repressed and insulin production can be enhanced by selectively targeting signaling components of NFAT-MAPK transcriptional/signaling complex formation in pancreatic β-cells. These findings have therapeutic potential for suppressing islet inflammation while preserving islet function in diabetes and islet transplantation.

  18. A structure activity-relationship study of the bacterial signal molecule HHQ reveals swarming motility inhibition in Bacillus atrophaeus.

    PubMed

    Reen, F Jerry; Shanahan, Rachel; Cano, Rafael; O'Gara, Fergal; McGlacken, Gerard P

    2015-05-21

    The sharp rise in antimicrobial resistance has been matched by a decline in the identification and clinical introduction of new classes of drugs to target microbial infections. Thus new approaches are being sought to counter the pending threat of a post-antibiotic era. In that context, the use of non-growth limiting small molecules, that target virulence behaviour in pathogens, has emerged as a solution with real clinical potential. We have previously shown that two signal molecules (HHQ and PQS) from the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa have modulatory activity towards other microorganisms. This current study involves the synthesis and evaluation of analogues of HHQ towards swarming and biofilm virulence behaviour in Bacillus atrophaeus, a soil bacterium and co-inhibitor with P. aeruginosa. Compounds with altered C6-C8 positions on the anthranilate-derived ring of HHQ, display a surprising degree of biological specificity, with certain candidates displaying complete motility inhibition. In contrast, anti-biofilm activity of the parent molecule was completely lost upon alteration at any position indicating a remarkable degree of specificity and delineation of phenotype. PMID:25880413

  19. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor: A Key Bridging Molecule of External and Internal Chemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jijing; Feng, Yu; Fu, Hualing; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Jiang, Joy Xiaosong; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a highly evolutionary conserved, ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known to mediate the toxicities of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Phenotype of AhR-null mice, together with the recent discovery of a variety of endogenous and plant-derived ligands, point to the integral roles of AhR in normal cell physiology, in addition to its roles in sensing the environmental chemicals. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about AhR signaling pathways, its ligands and AhR-mediated effects on cell specialization, host defense and detoxification. AhR-mediated health effects particularly in liver, immune, and nervous systems, as well as in tumorgenesis are discussed. Dioxin-initiated embryotoxicity and immunosuppressive effects in fish and birds are reviewed. Recent data demonstrate that AhR is a convergence point of multiple signaling pathways that inform the cell of its external and internal environments. As such, AhR pathway is a promising potential target for therapeutics targeting nervous, liver, and autoimmune diseases through AhR ligand-mediated interventions and other perturbations of AhR signaling. Additionally, using available laboratory data obtained on animal models, AhR-centered adverse outcome pathway analysis is useful in reexamining known and potential adverse outcomes of specific or mixed compounds on wildlife. PMID:26079192

  20. Blank peak current-suppressed electrochemical aptameric sensing platform for highly sensitive signal-on detection of small molecule

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songbai; Hu, Rong; Hu, Peng; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, an electrochemical aptameric sensing scheme for the sensitive detection of small molecules is proposed using adenosine as a target model. A ferrocene (Fc)-functionalized thiolated aptamer probe is adapted and immobilized onto an electrode surface. Introducing a recognition site for EcoRI into the aptamer sequence not only suppresses the peak current corresponding to blank sample but also provides a signal-on response mechanism. In the absence of adenosine, the aptamer can fold into a hairpin structure and form a cleavable double-stranded region. Fc is capable of being removed from electrode surface by treatment with endonuclease, and almost no peak current is observed. The adenosine/aptamer binding induces the conformational transition of designed aptamer, dissociating the cleavable double-stranded segment. Therefore, the integrated aptamer sequence is maintained when exposing to endonuclease, generating a peak current of Fc. Utilizing the present sensing scheme, adenosine even at a low concentration can give a detectable current signal. Thus, a detection limit of 10−10 M and a linear response range from 3.74 × 10−9 to 3.74 × 10−5 M are achieved. The proposed proof-of-principle of a novel electrochemical sensing is expected to extend to establish various aptameric platforms for the analysis of a broad range of target molecules of interest. PMID:20724441

  1. NTB-A Receptor Crystal Structure: Insights into Homophilic Interactions in the Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Receptor Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Ramagopal, U.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Yan, Q.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that regulate both innate and adaptive immunity. The ectodomains of most SLAM family members are composed of an N-terminal IgV domain and a C-terminal IgC2 domain. NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A) is a homophilic receptor that stimulates cytotoxicity in natural killer (NK) cells, regulates bactericidal activities in neutrophils, and potentiates T helper 2 (Th2) responses. The 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete NTB-A ectodomain revealed a rod-like monomer that self-associates to form a highly kinked dimer spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}100 {angstrom}. The NTB-A homophilic and CD2-CD58 heterophilic dimers show overall structural similarities but differ in detailed organization and physicochemical properties of their respective interfaces. The NTB-A structure suggests a mechanism responsible for binding specificity within the SLAM family and imposes physical constraints relevant to the colocalization of SLAM-family proteins with other signaling molecules in the immunological synapse.

  2. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling. PMID:24499972

  3. Zearalenone Mycotoxin Affects Immune Mediators, MAPK Signalling Molecules, Nuclear Receptors and Genome-Wide Gene Expression in Pig Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Pistol, Gina Cecilia; Braicu, Cornelia; Motiu, Monica; Gras, Mihail Alexandru; Marin, Daniela Eliza; Stancu, Mariana; Calin, Loredana; Israel-Roming, Florentina; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA) was evaluated in swine spleen, a key organ for the innate and adaptative immune response. Weaned pigs were fed for 18 days with a control or a ZEA contaminated diet. The effect of ZEA was assessed on wide genome expression, pro- (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, IL-4) cytokines, other molecules involved in inflammatory processes (MMPs/TIMPs), as well as signaling molecules, (p38/JNK1/JNK2-MAPKs) and nuclear receptors (PPARγ/NFkB/AP-1/STAT3/c-JUN). Microarray analysis showed that 46% of total number of differentially expressed genes was involved in cellular signaling pathway, 13% in cytokine network and 10% in the inflammatory response. ZEA increased expression and synthesis of pro- inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β) and had no effect on IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines in spleen. The inflammatory stimulation might be a consequence of JNK pathway activation rather than of p-38MAPK and NF-kB involvement whose gene and protein expression were suppressed by ZEA action. In summary, our findings indicated the role of ZEA as an immune disruptor at spleen level. PMID:26011631

  4. Clinical development of galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate), a small molecule inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Herbertz, Stephan; Sawyer, J Scott; Stauber, Anja J; Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Driscoll, Kyla E; Estrem, Shawn T; Cleverly, Ann L; Desaiah, Durisala; Guba, Susan C; Benhadji, Karim A; Slapak, Christopher A; Lahn, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling regulates a wide range of biological processes. TGF-β plays an important role in tumorigenesis and contributes to the hallmarks of cancer, including tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inflammation, angiogenesis, and escape of immune surveillance. There are several pharmacological approaches to block TGF-β signaling, such as monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, antisense oligonucleotides, and small molecule inhibitors. Galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate) is an oral small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor I kinase that specifically downregulates the phosphorylation of SMAD2, abrogating activation of the canonical pathway. Furthermore, galunisertib has antitumor activity in tumor-bearing animal models such as breast, colon, lung cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Continuous long-term exposure to galunisertib caused cardiac toxicities in animals requiring adoption of a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based dosing strategy to allow further development. The use of such a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model defined a therapeutic window with an appropriate safety profile that enabled the clinical investigation of galunisertib. These efforts resulted in an intermittent dosing regimen (14 days on/14 days off, on a 28-day cycle) of galunisertib for all ongoing trials. Galunisertib is being investigated either as monotherapy or in combination with standard antitumor regimens (including nivolumab) in patients with cancer with high unmet medical needs such as glioblastoma, pancreatic cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present review summarizes the past and current experiences with different pharmacological treatments that enabled galunisertib to be investigated in patients. PMID:26309397

  5. Isolation and molecular characterization of biofouling bacteria and profiling of quorum sensing signal molecules from membrane bioreactor activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-02-04

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  6. Chlorogenic Acid Improves Late Diabetes through Adiponectin Receptor Signaling Pathways in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shasha; Chang, Cuiqing; Zhang, Lantao; Liu, Yang; Huang, Xianren; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on glucose and lipid metabolism in late diabetic db/db mice, as well as on adiponectin receptors and their signaling molecules, to provide evidence for CGA in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We randomly divided 16 female db/db mice into db/db-CGA and db/db-control (CON) groups equally; db/m mice were used as control mice. The mice in both the db/db-CGA and db/m-CGA groups were administered 80 mg/kg/d CGA by lavage for 12 weeks, whereas the mice in both CON groups were given equal volumes of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) by lavage. At the end of the intervention, we assessed body fat and the parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism in the plasma, liver and skeletal muscle tissues as well as the levels of aldose reductase (AR) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the kidneys and measured adiponectin receptors and the protein expression of their signaling molecules in liver and muscle tissues. After 12 weeks of intervention, compared with the db/db-CON group, the percentage of body fat, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the db/db-CGA group were all significantly decreased; TGF-β1 protein expression and AR activity in the kidney were both decreased; and the adiponectin level in visceral adipose was increased. The protein expression of adiponectin receptors (ADPNRs), the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the liver and muscle, and the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) in the liver were all significantly greater. CGA could lower the levels of fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c during late diabetes and improve kidney fibrosis to some extent through the modulation of adiponectin receptor signaling pathways in db/db mice. PMID:25849026

  7. Plant signal molecules activate the syrB gene, which is required for syringomycin production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Y Y; Gross, D C

    1991-01-01

    The syrB gene is required for syringomycin production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and full virulence during plant pathogenesis. Strain B3AR132 containing a syrB::lacZ fusion was used to detect transcriptional activation of the syrB gene in syringomycin minimal medium by plant metabolites with signal activity. Among 34 plant phenolic compounds tested, arbutin, phenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and salicin were shown to be strong inducers of syrB, giving rise to approximately 1,200 U of beta-galactosidase activity at 100 microM; esculin and helicin were moderate inducers, with about 250 to 400 U of beta-galactosidase activity at 100 microM. Acetosyringone and flavonoids that serve as signal molecules in Agrobacterium and Rhizobium species, respectively, did not induce the syrB::lacZ fusion. All syrB inducers were phenolic glucosides and none of the aglucone derivatives were active, suggesting that the beta-glycosidic linkage was necessary for signal activity. Phenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside containing galactose substituted for glucose in the beta-glycosidic linkage also lacked inducer activity. Phenolic signal activity was enhanced two- to fivefold by specific sugars common to plant tissues, including D-fructose, D-mannose, and sucrose. The effect of sugars on syrB induction was most noticeable at low concentrations of phenolic glucoside (i.e., 1 to 10 microM), indicating that sugars such as D-fructose increase the sensitivity of P. syringae pv. syringae to the phenolic plant signal. Besides induction of syrB, syringomycin biosynthesis by parental strain B3A-R was induced to yield over 250 U of toxin by the additions of arbutin and D-fructose to syringomycin minimal medium. These data indicate that syringomycin production by most strains of P. syringae pv. syringae is modulated by the perception of two classes of plant signal molecules and transduced to the transcriptional apparatus of syringomycin (syr) genes such as syrB. PMID:1885550

  8. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of MyD88-dependent signaling pathways using a computational screen

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Mark A.; Lee, Michael S.; Kissner, Teri L.; Alam, Shahabuddin; Waugh, David S.; Saikh, Kamal U.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used high-throughput computational screening to discover drug-like inhibitors of the host MyD88 protein-protein signaling interaction implicated in the potentially lethal immune response associated with Staphylococcal enterotoxins. We built a protein-protein dimeric docking model of the Toll-interleukin receptor (TIR)-domain of MyD88 and identified a binding site for docking small molecules. Computational screening of 5 million drug-like compounds led to testing of 30 small molecules; one of these molecules inhibits the TIR-TIR domain interaction and attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human primary cell cultures. Compounds chemically similar to this hit from the PubChem database were observed to be more potent with improved drug-like properties. Most of these 2nd generation compounds inhibit Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-1β production at 2–10 μM in human primary cells. Biochemical analysis and a cell-based reporter assay revealed that the most promising compound, T6167923, disrupts MyD88 homodimeric formation, which is critical for its signaling function. Furthermore, we observed that administration of a single dose of T6167923 completely protects mice from lethal SEB-induced toxic shock. In summary, our in silico approach has identified anti-inflammatory inhibitors against in vitro and in vivo toxin exposure with promise to treat other MyD88-related pro-inflammatory diseases. PMID:26381092

  9. Nucleation of Mixed Nitric Acid-Water Ice Nanoparticles in Molecular Beams that Starts with a HNO3 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Jozef; Pysanenko, Andriy; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Poterya, Viktoriya; Pradzynski, Christoph C; Zeuch, Thomas; Slavíček, Petr; Fárník, Michal

    2012-11-01

    Mixed (HNO3)m(H2O)n clusters generated in supersonic expansion of nitric acid vapor are investigated in two different experiments, (1) time-of-flight mass spectrometry after electron ionization and (2) Na doping and photoionization. This combination of complementary methods reveals that only clusters containing at least one acid molecule are generated, that is, the acid molecule serves as the nucleation center in the expansion. The experiments also suggest that at least four water molecules are needed for HNO3 acidic dissociation. The clusters are undoubtedly generated, as proved by electron ionization; however, they are not detected by the Na doping due to a fast charge-transfer reaction between the Na atom and HNO3. This points to limitations of the Na doping recently advocated as a general method for atmospheric aerosol detection. On the other hand, the combination of the two methods introduces a tool for detecting molecules with sizable electron affinity in clusters. PMID:26296012

  10. Fabrication of nickel and gold nanowires by controlled electrodeposition on deoxyribonucleic acid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun; Jin, Helena; Dai, Kun

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic and electrical nanowires are two important materials in the development of futuristic nanoelectronics, data storage media and nanosensors. Ni and Au nanowires with a diameter of a few tens of nanometres have been fabricated using deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules as a template through nanoparticle-controlled electroless deposition (ELD). Nanowire precursors, 1-3 nm Pt(0)-DNA and 1.4 nm Au(0)-DNA, were assembled using two different methods. Chemical reduction was used to deposit Pt(0) particles on DNA which catalyzed Ni nanowire growth. Positively charged Au nanoparticles were directly assembled on phosphate groups of DNA which were stretched and anchored between micrometre-spaced electrodes. Electrical measurement has shown that Au nanowires, catalyzed by Au(0)-DNA in a subsequent ELD, are highly conductive and show linear I-V characteristics. The major factors for the resistivity of nanowires were discussed in detail. This work involves important aspects in the field of DNA-based self-assembly, such as DNA and surface interaction, DNA nanoparticle assembly and electrical property of fabricated nanowires.

  11. Relationship between ST8SIA2, polysialic acid and its binding molecules, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chihiro; Hane, Masaya; Kitajima, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia, PSA) is a unique and functionally important glycan, particularly in vertebrate brains. It is involved in higher brain functions such as learning, memory, and social behaviors. Recently, an association between several genetic variations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ST8SIA2/STX, one of two polysialyltransferase genes in vertebrates, and psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), was reported based on candidate gene approaches and genome-wide studies among normal and mental disorder patients. It is of critical importance to determine if the reported mutations and SNPs in ST8SIA2 lead to impairments of the structure and function of polySia, which is the final product of ST8SIA2. To date, however, only a few such forward-directed studies have been conducted. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying polySia-involved brain functions remain unknown, although polySia was shown to have an anti-adhesive effect. In this report, we review the relationships between psychiatric disorders and polySia and/or ST8SIA2, and describe a new function of polySia as a regulator of neurologically active molecules, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dopamine, which are deeply involved in psychiatric disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc.

  12. Relationship between ST8SIA2, polysialic acid and its binding molecules, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chihiro; Hane, Masaya; Kitajima, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia, PSA) is a unique and functionally important glycan, particularly in vertebrate brains. It is involved in higher brain functions such as learning, memory, and social behaviors. Recently, an association between several genetic variations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ST8SIA2/STX, one of two polysialyltransferase genes in vertebrates, and psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), was reported based on candidate gene approaches and genome-wide studies among normal and mental disorder patients. It is of critical importance to determine if the reported mutations and SNPs in ST8SIA2 lead to impairments of the structure and function of polySia, which is the final product of ST8SIA2. To date, however, only a few such forward-directed studies have been conducted. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying polySia-involved brain functions remain unknown, although polySia was shown to have an anti-adhesive effect. In this report, we review the relationships between psychiatric disorders and polySia and/or ST8SIA2, and describe a new function of polySia as a regulator of neurologically active molecules, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dopamine, which are deeply involved in psychiatric disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc. PMID:27105834

  13. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  14. Regulation of Arabidopsis embryo and endosperm development by the polypeptide signaling molecule CLE8.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Elisa; Fletcher, Jennifer C

    2012-03-01

    The plant seed is a major nutritional source for humans as well as an essential embryo development and dispersal unit. To ensure proper seed formation, fine spatial and temporal coordination between the embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed components must be achieved. However, the intercellular signaling pathways that direct the synchronous development of these tissues are poorly understood. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana peptide ligand CLAVATA3/embryo surrounding region-related8 (CLE8) is exclusively expressed in young embryos and endosperm, and that it acts cell and noncell autonomously to regulate basal embryo cell division patterns, endosperm proliferation, and the timing of endosperm differentiation. CLE8 positively regulates expression of the transcription factor gene Wuschel-like homeobox8 (WOX8), and together CLE8 and WOX8 form a signaling module that promotes seed growth and overall seed size. These results demonstrate that seed development is coordinated by a secreted peptide ligand that plays a key early role in orchestrating cell patterning and proliferation in the embryo and endosperm.

  15. Antioxidant role of glutathione S-transferases: 4-Hydroxynonenal, a key molecule in stress-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singh, Sharda P; Singhal, Preeti; Horne, David; Singhal, Jyotsana; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2015-12-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (4HNE), one of the major end products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), has been shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of cell lines. It appears to modulate signaling processes in more than one way because it has been suggested to have a role in signaling for differentiation and proliferation. It has been known that glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) can reduce lipid hydroperoxides through their Se-independent glutathione-peroxidase activity and that these enzymes can also detoxify LPO end-products such as 4HNE. Available evidence from earlier studies together with results of recent studies in our laboratories strongly suggests that LPO products, particularly hydroperoxides and 4HNE, are involved in the mechanisms of stress-mediated signaling and that it can be modulated by the alpha-class GSTs through the regulation of the intracellular concentrations of 4HNE. We demonstrate that 4HNE induced apoptosis in various cell lines is accompanied with c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-3 activation. Cells exposed to mild, transient heat or oxidative stress acquire the capacity to exclude intracellular 4HNE at a faster rate by inducing GSTA4-4 which conjugates 4HNE to glutathione (GSH), and RLIP76 which mediates the ATP-dependent transport of the GSH-conjugate of 4HNE (GS-HNE). The balance between formation and exclusion promotes different cellular processes - higher concentrations of 4HNE promote apoptosis; whereas, lower concentrations promote proliferation. In this article, we provide a brief summary of the cellular effects of 4HNE, followed by a review of its GST-catalyzed detoxification, with an emphasis on the structural attributes that play an important role in the interactions with alpha-class GSTA4-4. Taken together, 4HNE is a key signaling molecule and that GSTs being determinants of its intracellular concentrations, can regulate stress-mediated signaling, are reviewed in this article.

  16. Urocanate as a potential signaling molecule for bacterial recognition of eukaryotic hosts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Xian; Ritchie, Stephen R; Rainey, Paul B

    2014-02-01

    Host recognition is the crucial first step in infectious disease pathogenesis. Recognition allows pathogenic bacteria to identify suitable niches and deploy appropriate phenotypes for successful colonization and immune evasion. However, the mechanisms underlying host recognition remain largely unknown. Mounting evidence suggests that urocanate-an intermediate of the histidine degradation pathway-accumulates in tissues, such as skin, and acts as a molecule that promotes bacterial infection via molecular interaction with the bacterial regulatory protein HutC. In Gram-negative bacteria, HutC has long been known as a transcriptional repressor of hut genes for the utilization of histidine (and urocanate) as sources of carbon and nitrogen. Recent work on the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and zoonotic pathogen Brucella abortus shows that urocanate, in conjunction with HutC, plays a significant role in the global control of cellular metabolism, cell motility, and expression of virulence factors. We suggest that in addition to being a valuable source of carbon and nitrogen, urocanate may be central to the elicitation of bacterial pathogenesis.

  17. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  18. Small molecules dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 inhibit myostatin/GDF8 signaling and promote functional myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horbelt, Daniel; Boergermann, Jan H; Chaikuad, Apirat; Alfano, Ivan; Williams, Eleanor; Lukonin, Ilya; Timmel, Tobias; Bullock, Alex N; Knaus, Petra

    2015-02-01

    GDF8, or myostatin, is a member of the TGF-β superfamily of secreted polypeptide growth factors. GDF8 is a potent negative regulator of myogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. We found that GDF8 signaling was inhibited by the small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189. These compounds were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of BMP signaling by binding to the BMP type I receptors ALK1/2/3/6. We present the crystal structure of the type II receptor ActRIIA with dorsomorphin and demonstrate that dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 target GDF8 induced Smad2/3 signaling and repression of myogenic transcription factors. As a result, both inhibitors rescued myogenesis in myoblasts treated with GDF8. As revealed by quantitative live cell microscopy, treatment with dorsomorphin or LDN-193189 promoted the contractile activity of myotubular networks in vitro. We therefore suggest these inhibitors as suitable tools to promote functional myogenesis. PMID:25368322

  19. Single-molecule tracking of small GTPase Rac1 uncovers spatial regulation of membrane translocation and mechanism for polarized signaling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sulagna; Yin, Taofei; Yang, Qingfen; Zhang, Jingqiao; Wu, Yi I.; Yu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Polarized Rac1 signaling is a hallmark of many cellular functions, including cell adhesion, motility, and cell division. The two steps of Rac1 activation are its translocation to the plasma membrane and the exchange of nucleotide from GDP to GTP. It is, however, unclear whether these two processes are regulated independent of each other and what their respective roles are in polarization of Rac1 signaling. We designed a single-particle tracking (SPT) method to quantitatively analyze the kinetics of Rac1 membrane translocation in living cells. We found that the rate of Rac1 translocation was significantly elevated in protrusions during cell spreading on collagen. Furthermore, combining FRET sensor imaging with SPT measurements in the same cell, the recruitment of Rac1 was found to be polarized to an extent similar to that of the nucleotide exchange process. Statistical analysis of single-molecule trajectories and optogenetic manipulation of membrane lipids revealed that Rac1 membrane translocation precedes nucleotide exchange, and is governed primarily by interactions with phospholipids, particularly PI(3,4,5)P3, instead of protein factors. Overall, the study highlights the significance of membrane translocation in spatial Rac1 signaling, which is in addition to the traditional view focusing primarily on GEF distribution and exchange reaction. PMID:25561548

  20. DNA curtains: novel tools for imaging protein-nucleic acid interactions at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Collins, Bridget E; Ye, Ling F; Duzdevich, Daniel; Greene, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are at the molecular foundations of most key biological processes, including DNA replication, genome maintenance, the regulation of gene expression, and chromosome segregation. A complete understanding of these types of biological processes requires tackling questions with a range of different techniques, such as genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, and structural biology. Here, we describe a novel experimental approach called "DNA curtains" that can be used to complement and extend these more traditional techniques by providing real-time information about protein-nucleic acid interactions at the level of single molecules. We describe general features of the DNA curtain technology and its application to the study of protein-nucleic acid interactions in vitro. We also discuss some future developments that will help address crucial challenges to the field of single-molecule biology.

  1. Dual action antifungal small molecule modulates multidrug efflux and TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Shekhar-Guturja, Tanvi; Gunaherath, G M Kamal B; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Averette, Anna F; Lee, Soo Chan; Kim, Taeyup; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Tripodi, Farida; Ammar, Ron; Döhl, Katja; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Schmitt, Lutz; Loewith, Robbie J; Roth, Frederick P; Sanglard, Dominique; Andes, David; Nislow, Corey; Coccetti, Paola; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Heitman, Joseph; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-10-01

    There is an urgent need for new strategies to treat invasive fungal infections, which are a leading cause of human mortality. Here, we establish two activities of the natural product beauvericin, which potentiates the activity of the most widely deployed class of antifungal against the leading human fungal pathogens, blocks the emergence of drug resistance, and renders antifungal-resistant pathogens responsive to treatment in mammalian infection models. Harnessing genome sequencing of beauvericin-resistant mutants, affinity purification of a biotinylated beauvericin analog, and biochemical and genetic assays reveals that beauvericin blocks multidrug efflux and inhibits the global regulator TORC1 kinase, thereby activating the protein kinase CK2 and inhibiting the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Substitutions in the multidrug transporter Pdr5 that enable beauvericin efflux impair antifungal efflux, thereby impeding resistance to the drug combination. Thus, dual targeting of multidrug efflux and TOR signaling provides a powerful, broadly effective therapeutic strategy for treating fungal infectious disease that evades resistance.

  2. Dual action antifungal small molecule modulates multidrug efflux and TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Shekhar-Guturja, Tanvi; Gunaherath, G M Kamal B; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Averette, Anna F; Lee, Soo Chan; Kim, Taeyup; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Tripodi, Farida; Ammar, Ron; Döhl, Katja; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Schmitt, Lutz; Loewith, Robbie J; Roth, Frederick P; Sanglard, Dominique; Andes, David; Nislow, Corey; Coccetti, Paola; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Heitman, Joseph; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-10-01

    There is an urgent need for new strategies to treat invasive fungal infections, which are a leading cause of human mortality. Here, we establish two activities of the natural product beauvericin, which potentiates the activity of the most widely deployed class of antifungal against the leading human fungal pathogens, blocks the emergence of drug resistance, and renders antifungal-resistant pathogens responsive to treatment in mammalian infection models. Harnessing genome sequencing of beauvericin-resistant mutants, affinity purification of a biotinylated beauvericin analog, and biochemical and genetic assays reveals that beauvericin blocks multidrug efflux and inhibits the global regulator TORC1 kinase, thereby activating the protein kinase CK2 and inhibiting the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Substitutions in the multidrug transporter Pdr5 that enable beauvericin efflux impair antifungal efflux, thereby impeding resistance to the drug combination. Thus, dual targeting of multidrug efflux and TOR signaling provides a powerful, broadly effective therapeutic strategy for treating fungal infectious disease that evades resistance. PMID:27571477

  3. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors. PMID:27246030

  4. Visualization of Signaling Molecules During Neutrophil Recruitment in Transgenic Mice Expressing FRET Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A number of chemical mediators regulate neutrophil recruitment to inflammatory sites either positively or negatively. Although the actions of each chemical mediator on the intracellular signaling networks controlling cell migration have been studied with neutrophils cultured in vitro, how such chemical mediators act cooperatively or counteractively in vivo remains largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms regulating neutrophil recruitment to the inflamed intestine in vivo, we recently generated transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) and set up two-photon excitation microscopy to observe the gastrointestinal tract in living mice. By measuring FRET in neutrophils, we showed activity changes of protein kinases in the neutrophils recruited to inflamed intestines. In this chapter, we describe the protocol used to visualize the protein kinase activities in neutrophils of the inflamed intestine of transgenic mice expressing the FRET biosensors.

  5. Rspo1-activated signalling molecules are sufficient to induce ovarian differentiation in XY medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linyan; Charkraborty, Tapas; Zhou, Qian; Mohapatra, Sipra; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Zhang, Yueguang

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to our understanding of testicular differentiation, ovarian differentiation is less well understood in vertebrates. In mammals, R-spondin1 (Rspo1), an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, is located upstream of the female sex determination pathway. However, the functions of Rspo1 in ovarian differentiation remain unclear in non-mammalian species. In order to elucidate the detailed functions of Rspo/Wnt signaling pathway in fish sex determination/differentiation, the ectopic expression of the Rspo1 gene was performed in XY medaka (Oryzias latipes). The results obtained demonstrated that the gain of Rspo1 function induced femininity in XY fish. The overexpression of Rspo1 enhanced Wnt4b and β-catenin transcription, and completely suppressed the expression of male-biased genes (Dmy, Gsdf, Sox9a2 and Dmrt1) as well as testicular differentiation. Gonadal reprograming of Rspo1-over-expressed-XY (Rspo1-OV-XY) fish, induced the production of female-biased genes (Cyp19a1a and Foxl2), estradiol-17β production and further female type secondary sexuality. Moreover, Rspo1-OV-XY females were fertile and produced successive generations. Promoter analyses showed that Rspo1 transcription was directly regulated by DM domain genes (Dmy, the sex-determining gene, and Dmrt1) and remained unresponsive to Foxl2. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that Rspo1 is sufficient to activate ovarian development and plays a decisive role in the ovarian differentiation in medaka. PMID:26782368

  6. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 Regulates Salicylic Acid and Abscisic Acid Signaling, and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Micol-Ponce, Rosa; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Xu, Qian; Barrero, José María; Micol, José Luis; Ponce, María Rosa

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic regulatory states can persist through mitosis and meiosis, but the connection between chromatin structure and DNA replication remains unclear. Arabidopsis INCURVATA2 (ICU2) encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α, and null alleles of ICU2 have an embryo-lethal phenotype. Analysis of icu2-1, a hypomorphic allele of ICU2, demonstrated that ICU2 functions in chromatin-mediated cellular memory; icu2-1 strongly impairs ICU2 function in the maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks but does not seem to affect ICU2 polymerase activity. To better understand the global function of ICU2 in epigenetic regulation, here we performed a microarray analysis of icu2-1 mutant plants. We found that the genes up-regulated in the icu2-1 mutant included genes encoding transcription factors and targets of the Polycomb Repressive Complexes. The down-regulated genes included many known players in salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and accumulation, ABA signaling and ABA-mediated responses. In addition, we found that icu2-1 plants had reduced SA levels in normal conditions; infection by Fusarium oxysporum induced SA accumulation in the En-2 wild type but not in the icu2-1 mutant. The icu2-1 plants were also hypersensitive to salt stress and exogenous ABA in seedling establishment, post-germination growth and stomatal closure, and accumulated more ABA than the wild type in response to salt stress. The icu2-1 mutant also showed high tolerance to the oxidative stress produced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT). Our results uncover a role for ICU2 in the regulation of genes involved in ABA signaling as well as in SA biosynthesis and accumulation.

  7. Involvement of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kalachova, Tetiana; Iakovenko, Oksana; Kretinin, Sergii; Kravets, Volodymyr

    2013-05-01

    Salicylic acid is associated with the primary defense responses to biotic stress and formation of systemic acquired resistance. However, molecular mechanisms of early cell reactions to phytohormone application are currently undisclosed. The present study investigates the participation of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signal transduction cascade. The activation of lipid signaling enzymes within 15 min of salicylic acid application was shown in Arabidopsis thaliana plants by measuring the phosphatidic acid accumulation. Adding of primary alcohol (1-butanol) to the incubation medium led to phosphatidylbutanol accumulation as a result of phospholipase D (PLD) action in wild-type and NADPH-oxidase RbohD deficient plants. Salicylic acid induced rapid increase in NADPH-oxidase activity in histochemical assay with nitroblue tetrazolium but the reaction was not observed in presence of 1-butanol and NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodide (DPI). The further physiological effect of salicylic acid and inhibitory analysis of the signaling cascade were made in the guard cell model. Stomatal closure induced by salicylic acid was inhibited by 1-butanol and DPI treatment. rbohD transgenic plants showed impaired stomatal reaction upon phytohormone effect, while the reaction to H2O2 did not differ from that of wild-type plants. Thus a key role of NADPH-oxidase D-isoform in the process of stomatal closure in response to salicylic acid has been postulated. It has enabled to predict a cascade implication of PLD and NADPH oxidase to salicylic acid signaling pathway.

  8. Searching for amino-acid homochirality on Mars with the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard ExoMars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Brault, A.; Szopa, C.; Claude-Geffroy, C.; Coll, P. J.; Grand, N.; Raulin, F.; Pinick, V.; Goesmann, F.

    2012-12-01

    The joint ESA-Roscosmos Exo-Mars-2018 rover mission plans to seek the signs of a past or a present life on Mars. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment onboard theExoMars rover will be a key analytical tool in providing molecular information from Mars solid samples, with a specific focus on the characterization of their organic content. In this purpose, one of MOMA's main instruments is a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), which provides a unique ability to characterize a broad range of compounds and allow chemical analyses on volatile and refractory species. The challenge with the analysis of this refractory matter embedded in soil is their primary extraction before their analysis by GC-MS. Since the extraction of organic matter is not possible by liquid solvent extraction, we have developed a method based on the thermodesorption and subsequent derivatization of the organic molecules. The goal of the thermodesorption is to extract the organic matter by heating the sample quickly enough not to degrade its organic content. One of the main focuses is to determine the chirality of this organic matter, notably amino acids. Indeed, on Earth, homochirality of molecules is an indicator for the presence of life. Amino acids appear to bear only the left-handed form (L) in living system. However, other refractory compounds can raise interest: nucleobases, carboxylic acids and PAHs are among molecules supported by life as we know it, and all of them can display chirality. The intrinsic chirality of molecules being thermosensitive, the thermodesorption parameters have been adjusted to occur within a range of temperatures from 150 °C to 300 °C over a period of 30 s to 10 min, depending on the chemical compound. Under these conditions, we have shown that amino acids are not degraded and that their chirality is preserved. Once extracted, refractory molecules with labile hydrogens (e.g. amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, etc.) are derivatized

  9. FIA functions as an early signal component of abscisic acid signal cascade in Vicia faba guard cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yusuke; Uraji, Misugi; Watanabe-Sugimoto, Megumi; Okuma, Eiji; Munemasa, Shintaro; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Iwai, Sumio; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    An abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive Vicia faba mutant, fia (fava bean impaired in ABA-induced stomatal closure) had previously been isolated. In this study, it was investigated how FIA functions in ABA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. Unlike ABA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), H(2)O(2), and nitric oxide (NO) induced stomatal closure in the fia mutant. ABA did not induce production of either reactive oxygen species or NO in the mutant. Moreover, ABA did not suppress inward-rectifying K(+) (K(in)) currents or activate ABA-activated protein kinase (AAPK) in mutant guard cells. These results suggest that FIA functions as an early signal component upstream of AAPK activation in ABA signalling but does not function in MeJA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba.

  10. FIA functions as an early signal component of abscisic acid signal cascade in Vicia faba guard cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yusuke; Uraji, Misugi; Watanabe-Sugimoto, Megumi; Okuma, Eiji; Munemasa, Shintaro; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Iwai, Sumio; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    An abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive Vicia faba mutant, fia (fava bean impaired in ABA-induced stomatal closure) had previously been isolated. In this study, it was investigated how FIA functions in ABA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. Unlike ABA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), H(2)O(2), and nitric oxide (NO) induced stomatal closure in the fia mutant. ABA did not induce production of either reactive oxygen species or NO in the mutant. Moreover, ABA did not suppress inward-rectifying K(+) (K(in)) currents or activate ABA-activated protein kinase (AAPK) in mutant guard cells. These results suggest that FIA functions as an early signal component upstream of AAPK activation in ABA signalling but does not function in MeJA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. PMID:22131163

  11. Retinoic Acid Signaling Regulates Differential Expression of the Tandemly-Duplicated Long Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Opsin Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Ruth A.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) regulates rod and cone photoreceptor fate, differentiation, and survival. Here we elucidate the role of RA in differential regulation of the tandemly-duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes. Zebrafish embryos were treated with RA from 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to 75 hpf, and RNA was isolated from eyes for microarray analysis. ~170 genes showed significantly altered expression, including several transcription factors and components of cellular signaling pathways. Of interest, the LWS1 opsin gene was strongly upregulated by RA. LWS1 is the upstream member of the tandemly duplicated LWS opsin array and is normally not expressed embryonically. Embryos treated with RA 48 hpf to 100 hpf or beyond showed significant reductions in LWS2-expressing cones in favor of LWS1-expressing cones. The LWS reporter line, LWS-PAC(H) provided evidence that individual LWS cones switched from LWS2 to LWS1 expression in response to RA. The RA signaling reporter line, RARE:YFP indicated that increased RA signaling in cones was associated with this opsin switch, and experimental reduction of RA signaling in larvae at the normal time of onset of LWS1 expression significantly inhibited LWS1 expression. A role for endogenous RA signaling in regulating differential expression of the LWS genes in postmitotic cones was further supported by the presence of an RA signaling domain in ventral retina of juvenile zebrafish that coincided with a ventral zone of LWS1 expression. This is the first evidence that an extracellular signal may regulate differential expression of opsin genes in a tandemly duplicated array. PMID:26296154

  12. Retinoic Acid Signaling Regulates Differential Expression of the Tandemly-Duplicated Long Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Opsin Genes in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Diana M; Stevens, Craig B; Frey, Ruth A; Hunter, Samuel S; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji; Stenkamp, Deborah L

    2015-08-01

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) regulates rod and cone photoreceptor fate, differentiation, and survival. Here we elucidate the role of RA in differential regulation of the tandemly-duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes. Zebrafish embryos were treated with RA from 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to 75 hpf, and RNA was isolated from eyes for microarray analysis. ~170 genes showed significantly altered expression, including several transcription factors and components of cellular signaling pathways. Of interest, the LWS1 opsin gene was strongly upregulated by RA. LWS1 is the upstream member of the tandemly duplicated LWS opsin array and is normally not expressed embryonically. Embryos treated with RA 48 hpf to 100 hpf or beyond showed significant reductions in LWS2-expressing cones in favor of LWS1-expressing cones. The LWS reporter line, LWS-PAC(H) provided evidence that individual LWS cones switched from LWS2 to LWS1 expression in response to RA. The RA signaling reporter line, RARE:YFP indicated that increased RA signaling in cones was associated with this opsin switch, and experimental reduction of RA signaling in larvae at the normal time of onset of LWS1 expression significantly inhibited LWS1 expression. A role for endogenous RA signaling in regulating differential expression of the LWS genes in postmitotic cones was further supported by the presence of an RA signaling domain in ventral retina of juvenile zebrafish that coincided with a ventral zone of LWS1 expression. This is the first evidence that an extracellular signal may regulate differential expression of opsin genes in a tandemly duplicated array.

  13. Anion Effects on Sodium Ion and Acid Molecule Adduction to Protein Ions in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Williams, Evan R.

    2012-01-01

    Gaseous protein–metal ion and protein–molecule complexes can be readily formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions containing proteins and millimolar concentrations of sodium salts of various anions. The extent of sodium and acid molecule adduction to multiply charged protein ions is inversely related and depends strongly on the proton affinity (PA) of the anion, with extensive sodium adduction occurring for anions with PA values greater than ~300 kcal·mol−1 and extensive acid molecule adduction occurring for anions with PA values less than 315 kcal·mol−1. The role of the anion on the extent of sodium and acid molecule adduction does not directly follow the Hofmeister series, suggesting that direct protein–ion interactions may not play a significant role in the observed effect of anions on protein structure in solution. These results indicate that salts with anions that have low PA values may be useful solution-phase additives to minimize nonspecific metal ion adduction in ESI experiments designed to identify specific protein-metal ion interactions. PMID:21952761

  14. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Böhmer, Maik; Hu, Honghong; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms. PMID:20192751

  15. Tumor suppressor microRNAs: Targeted molecules and signaling pathways in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Asghari, F; Haghnavaz, N; Baradaran, B; Hemmatzadeh, M; Kazemi, T

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women whose prevalence is increasing every year. Common strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and specific treatment of breast cancer need improvements to increase patients' survival. For this reason, there is growing number of efforts world-wide with molecular approaches. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), they have been interested for almost all aspects of tumorgenesis and correlation of breast cancer and microRNAs was discovered for the first time in 2005. MiRNAs form a group of small noncoding RNAs which participate in regulation of gene expression and subsequently several biological processes and pathogenesis of various diseases. As other cancers, miRNAs involved in breast cancer are classified in two groups: the first group is tumor inducing miRNAs (also called oncomirs) that can induce tumor initiation and progression, and their expression is increased in cancerous cells. The second group is tumor suppressor miRNAs. In normal situation, tumor suppressor miRNAs prevent beginning and progression of breast cancer through suppressing the expression of various oncogenes. In this review we will give a general overview about miRNAs and breast cancer, and in the following, more discussion about tumor suppressor miRNAs, with focus on the best known of them and their targeted oncogenes and signaling pathways. Finally, we will point to application of this group of miRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients.

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans recognizes a bacterial quorum-sensing signal molecule through the AWCON neuron.

    PubMed

    Werner, Kristen M; Perez, Lark J; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Semmelhack, Martin F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-09-19

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria use chemicals called autoinducers for cell-cell communication. Population-wide detection of autoinducers enables bacteria to orchestrate collective behaviors. In the animal kingdom detection of chemicals is vital for success in locating food, finding hosts, and avoiding predators. This behavior, termed chemotaxis, is especially well studied in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we demonstrate that the Vibrio cholerae autoinducer (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one, termed CAI-1, influences chemotaxis in C. elegans. C. elegans prefers V. cholerae that produces CAI-1 over a V. cholerae mutant defective for CAI-1 production. The position of the CAI-1 ketone moiety is the key feature driving CAI-1-directed nematode behavior. CAI-1 is detected by the C. elegans amphid sensory neuron AWC(ON). Laser ablation of the AWC(ON) cell, but not other amphid sensory neurons, abolished chemoattraction to CAI-1. These analyses define the structural features of a bacterial-produced signal and the nematode chemosensory neuron that permit cross-kingdom interaction.

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans Recognizes a Bacterial Quorum-sensing Signal Molecule through the AWCON Neuron*

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Kristen M.; Perez, Lark J.; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria use chemicals called autoinducers for cell-cell communication. Population-wide detection of autoinducers enables bacteria to orchestrate collective behaviors. In the animal kingdom detection of chemicals is vital for success in locating food, finding hosts, and avoiding predators. This behavior, termed chemotaxis, is especially well studied in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we demonstrate that the Vibrio cholerae autoinducer (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one, termed CAI-1, influences chemotaxis in C. elegans. C. elegans prefers V. cholerae that produces CAI-1 over a V. cholerae mutant defective for CAI-1 production. The position of the CAI-1 ketone moiety is the key feature driving CAI-1-directed nematode behavior. CAI-1 is detected by the C. elegans amphid sensory neuron AWCON. Laser ablation of the AWCON cell, but not other amphid sensory neurons, abolished chemoattraction to CAI-1. These analyses define the structural features of a bacterial-produced signal and the nematode chemosensory neuron that permit cross-kingdom interaction. PMID:25092291

  18. Tumor suppressor microRNAs: Targeted molecules and signaling pathways in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Asghari, F; Haghnavaz, N; Baradaran, B; Hemmatzadeh, M; Kazemi, T

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women whose prevalence is increasing every year. Common strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and specific treatment of breast cancer need improvements to increase patients' survival. For this reason, there is growing number of efforts world-wide with molecular approaches. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), they have been interested for almost all aspects of tumorgenesis and correlation of breast cancer and microRNAs was discovered for the first time in 2005. MiRNAs form a group of small noncoding RNAs which participate in regulation of gene expression and subsequently several biological processes and pathogenesis of various diseases. As other cancers, miRNAs involved in breast cancer are classified in two groups: the first group is tumor inducing miRNAs (also called oncomirs) that can induce tumor initiation and progression, and their expression is increased in cancerous cells. The second group is tumor suppressor miRNAs. In normal situation, tumor suppressor miRNAs prevent beginning and progression of breast cancer through suppressing the expression of various oncogenes. In this review we will give a general overview about miRNAs and breast cancer, and in the following, more discussion about tumor suppressor miRNAs, with focus on the best known of them and their targeted oncogenes and signaling pathways. Finally, we will point to application of this group of miRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27261608

  19. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure alters expression of central and peripheral insulin signaling molecules in adult guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Christine C; Thevasundaram, Kersh; Mongillo, Daniel L; Winterborn, Andrew; Holloway, Alison C; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2014-11-01

    Maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy can produce a range of teratogenic outcomes in offspring. The mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is multi-faceted, but may involve alterations in insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways. These pathways are not only important for metabolism, but are also critically involved in neuronal survival and plasticity, and they can be altered by chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE). The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CPEE alters expression of insulin and IGF signaling molecules in the prefrontal cortex and liver of adult guinea pig offspring. Pregnant Dunkin-Hartley-strain guinea pigs received ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding (nutritional control) throughout gestation. Fasting blood glucose concentration was measured in male and female offspring at postnatal day 150-200, followed by euthanasia, collection of prefrontal cortex and liver, and RNA extraction. IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), IGF-2, IGF-2 receptor (IGF-2R), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, IRS-2, and insulin receptor (INSR) mRNA expression levels were measured in tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. The mean maternal blood ethanol concentration was 281 ± 15 mg/dL at 1 h after the second divided dose of ethanol on GD 57. CPEE resulted in increased liver weight in adult offspring, but produced no difference in fasting blood glucose concentration compared with nutritional control. In the liver, CPEE decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-1R, and IGF-2, and increased IRS-2 mRNA expression in male offspring only compared with nutritional control. Female CPEE offspring had decreased INSR hepatic mRNA expression compared with male CPEE offspring. In the prefrontal cortex, IRS-2 mRNA expression was increased in CPEE offspring compared with nutritional control. The data demonstrate that CPEE alters both central and peripheral expression of insulin and IGF signaling

  20. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure alters expression of central and peripheral insulin signaling molecules in adult guinea pig offspring.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Christine C; Thevasundaram, Kersh; Mongillo, Daniel L; Winterborn, Andrew; Holloway, Alison C; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2014-11-01

    Maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy can produce a range of teratogenic outcomes in offspring. The mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is multi-faceted, but may involve alterations in insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways. These pathways are not only important for metabolism, but are also critically involved in neuronal survival and plasticity, and they can be altered by chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE). The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that CPEE alters expression of insulin and IGF signaling molecules in the prefrontal cortex and liver of adult guinea pig offspring. Pregnant Dunkin-Hartley-strain guinea pigs received ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding (nutritional control) throughout gestation. Fasting blood glucose concentration was measured in male and female offspring at postnatal day 150-200, followed by euthanasia, collection of prefrontal cortex and liver, and RNA extraction. IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), IGF-2, IGF-2 receptor (IGF-2R), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, IRS-2, and insulin receptor (INSR) mRNA expression levels were measured in tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. The mean maternal blood ethanol concentration was 281 ± 15 mg/dL at 1 h after the second divided dose of ethanol on GD 57. CPEE resulted in increased liver weight in adult offspring, but produced no difference in fasting blood glucose concentration compared with nutritional control. In the liver, CPEE decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-1R, and IGF-2, and increased IRS-2 mRNA expression in male offspring only compared with nutritional control. Female CPEE offspring had decreased INSR hepatic mRNA expression compared with male CPEE offspring. In the prefrontal cortex, IRS-2 mRNA expression was increased in CPEE offspring compared with nutritional control. The data demonstrate that CPEE alters both central and peripheral expression of insulin and IGF signaling

  1. Growth profiles of recent canine distemper isolates on Vero cells expressing canine signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM).

    PubMed

    Lan, N T; Yamaguchi, R; Uchida, K; Sugano, S; Tateyama, S

    2005-07-01

    Fresh samples of lymph node, lung and cerebrum taken post mortem from dogs no. 1, 2 and 3 yielded canine distemper virus (CDV) strains 007 Lm, 009 L and 011 C, respectively. These were titrated on Vero cells stably expressing canine signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM; Vero-DST cells). Growth curves of the three strains were produced by titration of the released virus and cell-associated virus at various timepoints. All three isolates, especially 007 Lm, grew well on Vero-DST cells. The titres of cell-associated virus of two strains (009 L and 011 C) were clearly lower than those of virus released into the culture supernate. The results indicate that Vero-DST cells are not only useful for primary isolation but also efficient for titrating virus from fresh tissues and for the study of growth profiles of recent CDV isolates.

  2. Expression and Localization of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule and Polysialic Acid during Chick Corneal Development

    PubMed Central

    Schwend, Tyler; Conrad, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assay for expression and localization of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and polysialic acid (polySia) in the chick cornea during embryonic and postnatal development. Methods. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine NCAM expression and polysiaylation in embryonic, hatchling, and adult chick corneas. Immunofluorescence staining for NCAM and polySia was conducted on cryosections of embryonic and adult corneas, whole embryonic corneas, and trigeminal neurons. Results. NCAM and ST8SiaII mRNA transcripts peaked by embryonic day (E)9, remained steady between E10 and E14 and slowly decreased thereafter during embryonic development. Both gene transcripts showed > 190-fold decline in the adult chick cornea compared with E9. In contrast, ST8SiaIV expression gradually decreased 26.5-fold from E6 to E19, increased thereafter, and rose to the early embryonic level in the adult cornea. Western blot analysis revealed NCAM was polysialylated and its expression developmentally changed. Other polysiaylated proteins aside from NCAM were also detected by Western blot analysis. Five NCAM isoforms including NCAM-120, NCAM-180 and three soluble NCAM isoforms with low molecular weights (87–96 kDa) were present in chick corneas, with NCAM-120 being the predominate isoform. NCAM was localized to the epithelium, stroma, and stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) of the embryonic cornea. In stroma, NCAM expression shifted from anterior to posterior stroma during embryonic development and eventually became undetectable in 20-week-old adult cornea. Additionally, both NCAM and polySia were detected on embryonic corneal and pericorneal nerves. Conclusions. NCAM and polySia are expressed and developmentally regulated in chick corneas. Both membrane-associated and soluble NCAM isoforms are expressed in chick corneas. The distributions of NCAM and polySia in cornea and on corneal nerves suggest their potential functions in corneal innervation. PMID

  3. Divergent signalling via APO-1/Fas and the TNF receptor, two homologous molecules involved in physiological cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Osthoff, K; Krammer, P H; Dröge, W

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R) and APO-1/Fas (CD95) are members of the tumor necrosis factor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily involved in various forms of physiological cell death. Due to the structural homology between these receptors and their ligands, it has been suggested that APO-1/Fas and TNF-R kill cells by similar mechanisms. Here, we compared the killing pathways mediated by each receptor molecule in TNF-sensitive L929 cells stably transfected with APO-1/Fas cDNA. Morphological analysis revealed that TNF-induced cell death resembles necrosis, while APO-1/Fas-mediated cell killing shows an apoptotic pattern, evident by the appearance of membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and non-random DNA degradation. Studies with inhibitors of several intracellular pathways further demonstrate that the mechanisms of TNF- and APO-1/Fas-mediated cell killing are substantially different. TNF cytotoxicity is mediated by reactive oxygen intermediates generated during mitochondrial respiration. However, these mediators are not involved in APO-1/Fas-mediated cell death as neither mitochondrial inhibitors nor antioxidants exert a protecting effect. Moreover, several inhibitors of calcium metabolism, ADP ribosylation and phospholipase action suppress TNF cytotoxicity, but not APO-1/Fas-mediated apoptosis. Additional differences between the two molecules were observed at the transcriptional level. Whereas transcription factor NF-kappa B was readily activated by TNF, activation was not induced by triggering APO-1/Fas. These data suggest that the two molecules, though structurally related, utilize distinct signal transduction pathways, even in a single cell type. Hence, cells may undergo different programs of cell death depending on the activating stimulus. Images PMID:7523113

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone has immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Telford, G; Wheeler, D; Williams, P; Tomkins, P T; Appleby, P; Sewell, H; Stewart, G S; Bycroft, B W; Pritchard, D I

    1998-01-01

    Diverse gram-negative bacterial cells communicate with each other by using diffusible N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules to coordinate gene expression with cell population density. Accumulation of AHLs above a threshold concentration renders the population "quorate," and the appropriate target gene is activated. In pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, AHL-mediated quorum sensing is involved in the regulation of multiple virulence determinants. We therefore sought to determine whether the immune system is capable of responding to these bacterial signal molecules. Consequently the immunomodulatory properties of the AHLs N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL) were evaluated in murine and human leukocyte immunoassays in vitro. OdDHL, but not OHHL, inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and tumor necrosis factor alpha production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Furthermore, OdDHL simultaneously and potently down-regulated the production of IL-12, a Th-1-supportive cytokine. At high concentrations (>7 x 10(-5) M) OdDHL inhibited antibody production by keyhole limpet hemocyanin-stimulated spleen cells, but at lower concentrations (<7 x 10(-5) M), antibody production was stimulated, apparently by increasing the proportion of the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) isotype. OdDHL also promoted IgE production by interleukin-4-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that OdDHL may influence the Th-1-Th-2 balance in the infected host and suggest that, in addition to regulating the expression of virulence determinants, OdDHL may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections by functioning as a virulence determinant per se.

  5. NBBA, a synthetic small molecule, inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced angiogenesis by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Hee; Jung, Hye Jin; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-01-15

    Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a crucial transcription factor that contributes to cancer development by regulating a number of genes involved in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Here, we describe (Z)-N-(3-(7-nitro-3-oxobenzo[d][1,2]selenazol-2(3H)-yl)benzylidene) propan-2-amine oxide (NBBA) as a new anti-angiogenic small molecule that targets NF-{kappa}B activity. NBBA showed stronger growth inhibition on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) than on the cancer cell lines we tested. Moreover, NBBA inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha})-induced tube formation and invasion of HUVECs. In addition, NBBA suppressed the neovascularization of chorioallantonic membrane from growing chick embryos in vivo. To address the mode of action of the compound, the effect of NBBA on TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B transcription activity was investigated. NBBA suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, which resulted in suppression of transcription of NF-{kappa}B and its target genes, including interleukin-8, interleukin-1{alpha}, and epidermal growth factor. Collectively, these results demonstrated that NBBA is a new anti-angiogenic small molecule that targets the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway.

  6. Surface active molecules: preparation and properties of long chain n-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Infante, R; Dominguez, J G; Erra, P; Julia, R; Prats, M

    1984-12-01

    Synopsis A new route for the synthesis of long chain N(alpha)-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guamdine alkyl acid derivatives, with cationic or amphoteric character has been established. The general formula of these compounds is shown below. A physico-chemical and antimicrobial study of these products as a function of the alkyl ester or sodium salt (R), the straight chain length of the fatty acid residue (x) and the number of carbons between the omega-guanidine and omega-carboxyl group (n) has been investigated. The water solubility, surface tension, critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas) has been determined. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has been used to condense fatty acids and alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acids. In these conditions protection of the omega-guanidine group is not necessary. The main characteristic of this synthetic procedure is the use of very mild experimental conditions (temperature, pH) to form the amide linkage which leads to pure optical compounds in high yield in the absence of electrolytes. The results show that some structural modifications, particularly the protection of the carboxyl group, promote variations of the surfactant and antimicrobial properties. Only those molecules with the blocked carboxyl group (cationic molecules, where R = Me, Et or Pr) showed a good surfactant and antimicrobial activity. When the carboxyl group was unprotected (amphoteric molecules, where R = Na(+)) the resulting compounds were inactive.

  7. [Role of NO signal in ABA-induced phenolic acids accumulation in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lihong; Ren, Jiahui; Jin, Wenfang; Wang, Ruijie; Ni, Chunhong; Tong, Mengjiao; Liang, Zongsuo; Yang, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    To investigate roles of nitric oxide (NO) signal in accumulations of phenolic acids in abscisic.acid (ABA)-induced Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots, S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots were treated with different concentrations of sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-an exogenous NO donor, for 6 days, and contents of phenolic acids in the hairy roots are determined. Then with treatment of ABA and NO scavenger (2-(4-carboxy-2-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1- oxyl-3-oxide, c-PTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME), contents of phenolic acids and expression levels of three key genes involved in phenolic acids biosynthesis were detected. Phenolic acids production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots was most significantly improved by 100 µmoL/L SNP. Contents of RA and salvianolic acid B increased by 3 and 4 folds. ABA significantly improved transcript levels of PAL (phenylalanine ammonia lyase), TAT (tyrosine aminotransferase) and RAS (rosmarinic acid synthase), and increased phenolic acids accumulations. However, with treatments of ABA+c-PTIO or ABA+L-NAME, accumulations of phenolic acids and expression levels of the three key genes were significantly inhibited. Both NO and ABA can increase accumulations of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. NO signal probably mediates the ABA-induced phenolic acids production. PMID:27382772

  8. Effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 on rotavirus replication and gene expressions of RIG-I signalling molecule in porcine rotavirus-infected IPEC-J2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ye; Yu, Bing; Mao, Xiangbing; He, Jun; Huang, Zhiqing; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jie; Han, Guoquan; Liang, Xiaofang; Chen, Daiwen

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated whether a 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3) supplementation decreases the replication of rotavirus by the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signalling pathway in a porcine small intestinal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2). The results show that IPEC-J2 cells express high baseline levels of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), which converts inactive 25D3 to the active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Porcine rotavirus (PRV) infection alone resulted in a significant increase in CYP27B1 mRNA, which augmented the production of active vitamin D. Physiological concentrations of 25D3 were found to decrease PRV replication in IPEC-J2 cells. RIG-I plays an important role in the recognition of double-stranded RNA virus by host cells. Upon recognition, RIG-I triggers a series of signalling molecules such as interferon-β (IFN-β) promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1) leading to the expression of type I interferons (IFN-β). Active 25D3 that was generated by PRV-infected IPEC-J2 cells led to an increased expression of toll-like receptors 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes 15 (ISG15) with important innate immune functions. Inhibiting CYP27B1 also failed to increase RIG-I, IPS-1, IFN-β and ISG15 mRNA expression. These observations suggest that 25D3 can directly inhibit PRV in IPEC-J2 cells, which requires this active form of vitamin D. The anti-rotavirus effect of 25D3 is mediated at least in part by RIG-I signalling pathways in IPEC-J2 cells.

  9. Identification of the nuclear export signals that regulate the intracellular localization of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Akiko; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken. E-mail: kitajima@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    The CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSS) catalyzes the activation of sialic acid (Sia) to CMP-Sia which is a donor substrate of sialyltransferases. The vertebrate CSSs are usually localized in nucleus due to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the molecule. In this study, we first point out that a small, but significant population of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase (mCSS) is also present in cytoplasm, though mostly in nucleus. As a mechanism for the localization in cytoplasm, we first identified two nuclear export signals (NESs) in mCSS, based on the localization studies of the potential NES-deleted mCSS mutants as well as the potential NES-tagged eGFP proteins. These two NESs are conserved among mammalian and fish CSSs, but not present in the bacterial or insect CSS. These results suggest that the intracellular localization of vertebrate CSSs is regulated by not only the NLS, but also the NES sequences.

  10. Detection of Intracellular Selenol-Containing Molecules Using a Fluorescent Probe with Near-Zero Background Signal.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Yang, Shu-Hou; Wu, Lei; Dong, Qing-Jian; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-06-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec), encoded as the 21st amino acid, is the predominant chemical form of selenium that is closely related to various human diseases. Thus, it is of high importance to identify novel probes for sensitive and selective recognition of Sec and Sec-containing proteins. Although a few probes have been reported to detect artificially introduced selenols in cells or tissues, none of them has been shown to be sensitive enough to detect endogenous selenols. We report the characterization and application of a new fluorogenic molecular probe for the detection of intracellular selenols. This probe exhibits near-zero background fluorescence but produces remarkable fluorescence enhancement upon reacting with selenols in a fast chemical reaction. It is highly specific and sensitive for intracellular selenium-containing molecules such as Sec and selenoproteins. When combined with flow cytometry, this probe is able to detect endogenous selenols in various human cancer cells. It is also able to image endogenous selenol-containing molecules in zebrafish under a fluorescence microscope. These results demonstrate that this molecular probe can function as a useful molecular tool for intracellular selenol sensing, which is valuable in the clinical diagnosis for human diseases associated with Sec-deficiency or overdose. PMID:27161304

  11. Retinoic acid suppresses the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in embryonic stem cells and activates the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have both the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into various cell lineages. Retinoic acid (RA), a metabolite of Vitamin A, has a critical function in initiating lineage differentiation of ESCs through binding to the retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Additionally, the Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in pluripotency and differentiation, depending on the activation status of the canonical and noncanonical pathways. The activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which requires the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and its interaction with Tcf1/Lef at Wnt response elements, is involved in ESC stemness maintenance. The noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway, through actions of Tcf3, can antagonize the canonical pathway. We show that RA activates the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway, while concomitantly inhibiting the canonical pathway. RA increases the expression of ligands and receptors of the noncanonical Wnt pathway (Wnt 5a, 7a, Fzd2 and Fzd6), downstream signaling, and Tcf3 expression. RA reduces the phosphorylated β-catenin level by 4-fold, though total β-catenin levels don't change. We show that RA signaling increases the dissociation of Tcf1 and the association of Tcf3 at promoters of genes that regulate stemness (e.g. NR5A2,Lrh-1) or differentiation (eg. Cyr61, Zic5). Knockdown of Tcf3 increases Lrh-1 transcript levels in mESCs and prevents the RA-associated, ∼4-fold increase in Zic5, indicating that RA requires Tcf3 to effect changes in Zic5 levels. We demonstrate a novel role for RA in altering the activation of these two Wnt signaling pathways and show that Tcf3 mediates some actions of RA during differentiation. PMID:24648413

  12. Stable isotope labelling reveals that NaCl stress decreases the production of Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Petri; Räsänen, Leena A; Lortet, Gilles; Lindström, Kristina

    2013-12-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris is a symbiont of salt-tolerant leguminous trees in the genera Acacia and Prosopis that are utilized in the prevention of soil erosion and desertification and in phytoremediation of salinized soil. Signalling between the plant and the rhizobia is essential for the formation of effective symbiosis that increases the success of reclaiming saline sites. We assessed the effect of salt stress on the growth and the production of lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules (LCOs) of S. arboris HAMBI 2361, an LCO-overproducing derivative of the S. arboris type strain HAMBI 1552. The strain tolerated NaCl up to 750 mM. To obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the LCO production under salt stress, we devised a method where LCOs were differentially labelled by stable isotopes of nitrogen, (14)N and (15)N, and analysed by mass spectrometry. Under control conditions, the strain produced altogether 27 structural LCO variants. In 380 mM NaCl, 13 LCO variants were produced in detectable amounts, and six of these were reliably quantified, ranging from one-tenth to one-third of the non-stressed one.

  13. Neurotrophic signaling molecules associated with cholinergic damage in young and aged rats: environmental enrichment as potential therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Paban, Véronique; Chambon, Caroline; Manrique, Christine; Touzet, Claude; Alescio-Lautier, Béatrice

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the neurobiological bases of behavioral deficits associated with cholinergic damage and the potential of long-term environmental enrichment as a therapeutic agent. Rats were submitted to intra-structures injection of 192 IgG-saporin and then behaviorally tested 1 month and 1 year post-lesion in a nonmatching-to-position task. The gene expression changes were assessed by cDNA macroarray technology using the GE array Q series designed to profile the expression of neurotrophic signaling molecules. Results showed that (1) cholinergic injury modulated the expression of genes such as brain-derived neurotrophin factor but also genes associated with inflammatory response, neuron apoptosis, regulation of angiogenesis, and synaptic plasticity, (2) aging is associated with regulation of glial proliferation and apoptosis, and (3) long-term enriched environment housing enhanced behavioral performance in lesioned and non-lesioned rats and upregulated gene expression. This therapeutic role of the enriched environment seemed to be associated with a suppression of expression of genes involved in apoptosis, glial cell differentiation, and cell cycle, but also with an enhanced expression of a subset of genes involved in signal transduction. PMID:19398249

  14. Folic Acid Supplementation Stimulates Notch Signaling and Cell Proliferation in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Huang, Guo-wei; Zhang, Xu-mei; Ren, Da-lin; X. Wilson, John

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of folic acid supplementation on the Notch signaling pathway and cell proliferation in rat embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs). The NSCs were isolated from E14–16 rat brain and grown as neurospheres in serum-free suspension culture. Individual cultures were assigned to one of 3 treatment groups that differed according to the concentration of folic acid in the medium: Control (baseline folic acid concentration of 4 mg/l), low folic acid supplementation (4 mg/l above baseline, Folate-L) and high folic acid supplementation (40 mg/l above baseline, Folate-H). NSCs were identified by their expression of immunoreactive nestin and proliferating cells by incorporation of 5'bromo-2'deoxyuridine. Cell proliferation was also assessed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Notch signaling was analyzed by real-time PCR and western blot analyses of the expression of Notch1 and hairy and enhancer of split 5 (Hes5). Supplementation of NSCs with folic acid increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of Notch1 and Hes5. Folic acid supplementation also stimulated NSC proliferation dose-dependently. Embryonic NSCs respond to folic acid supplementation with increased Notch signaling and cell proliferation. This mechanism may mediate the effects of folic acid supplementation on neurogenesis in the embryonic nervous system. PMID:20838574

  15. Quantitative Structure of an Acetate Dye Molecule Analogue at the TiO2–Acetic Acid Interface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The positions of atoms in and around acetate molecules at the rutile TiO2(110) interface with 0.1 M acetic acid have been determined with a precision of ±0.05 Å. Acetate is used as a surrogate for the carboxylate groups typically employed to anchor monocarboxylate dye molecules to TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Structural analysis reveals small domains of ordered (2 × 1) acetate molecules, with substrate atoms closer to their bulk terminated positions compared to the clean UHV surface. Acetate is found in a bidentate bridge position, binding through both oxygen atoms to two 5-fold titanium atoms such that the molecular plane is along the [001] azimuth. Density functional theory calculations provide adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiment. The availability of these structural data will improve the accuracy of charge transport models for DSSC. PMID:27110318

  16. The cell-adhesion and signaling molecule PECAM-1 is a molecular mediator of resistance to genotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergom, Carmen; Goel, Reema; Paddock, Cathy; Gao, Cunji; Newman, Debra K; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Newman, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptotic pathways have been implicated in the emergence of cancers resistant to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Identification of novel signaling molecules that influence cell survival has the potential to facilitate the development of new cancer therapies. The cell adhesion and signaling molecule, PECAM-1, is expressed in many hematopoietic and endothelial cell malignancies, and has previously been shown to suppress mitochondrial-dependent, Bax-mediated apoptosis. The ability of PECAM-1 to influence tumor cell survival following exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, however, is not known. Here we show that, when overexpressed in HEK293 and REN mesothelioma cells, PECAM-1 confers resistance to apoptosis induced by the DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agent, etoposide. Surprisingly, PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection was found to be largely independent of its ability to form a signaling complex with the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, as virtually no tyrosine phosphorylation of, or SHP-2 association with, PECAM-1 could be detected after etoposide treatment. Furthermore, PECAM-1 retained its ability to protect against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cells with SHP-2 levels significantly reduced using SHP-2-specific siRNA, and in cells in which Erk1/2--a downstream effector of SHP-2--had been inhibited. Finally, to determine whether endogenous PECAM-1 confers resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lymphoid malignancies and endothelial cells, we used a lentiviral vector to stably express PECAM-1-specific siRNA in the Jurkat leukemia cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). siRNA-expressing Jurkat cells with a 70% reduction of PECAM-1 expression were significantly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. HUVECs with PECAM-1 expression reduced 75% were also markedly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Taken together, these data demonstrate that endogenous PECAM-1 expression on lymphoid

  17. Kinase Signaling in Apoptosis Induced by Saturated Fatty Acids in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Šrámek, Jan; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kovář, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cell failure and death is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for type 2 diabetes. It is caused by, in addition to hyperglycemia, chronic exposure to increased concentrations of fatty acids, mainly saturated fatty acids. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in β-cells are not completely clear. It has been proposed that kinase signaling could be involved, particularly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C (PKC), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and Akt kinases and their pathways. In this review, we discuss these kinases and their signaling pathways with respect to their possible role in apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:27626409

  18. Kinase Signaling in Apoptosis Induced by Saturated Fatty Acids in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Šrámek, Jan; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kovář, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cell failure and death is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for type 2 diabetes. It is caused by, in addition to hyperglycemia, chronic exposure to increased concentrations of fatty acids, mainly saturated fatty acids. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in β-cells are not completely clear. It has been proposed that kinase signaling could be involved, particularly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C (PKC), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and Akt kinases and their pathways. In this review, we discuss these kinases and their signaling pathways with respect to their possible role in apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:27626409

  19. Progesterone regulates chicken embryonic germ cell meiotic initiation independent of retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yuling; He, Bin; Li, Jian; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2014-07-15

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) is known to trigger germ cells to enter meiosis. However, RA may not be the only secreted inducer of meiosis. Our previous data indicate that luteinizing hormone also promotes germ cell meiotic initiation by upregulating 3βHSDII transcription. Here, using chicken embryos, we investigate the role of progesterone (P4) in regulating germ cell meiotic initiation. Progesterone treatment at embryonic Day 9.5 accelerated germ cell meiosis entry in the female chicken embryos. However, P4 treatment in vivo did no influence on testicular germ cells but triggered their meiotic initiation in the cultured testes. As treatment with an RA receptor (RAR) inhibitor did not block the stimulatory effect of P4 on germ cell meiotic initiation, this P4 stimulatory effect seems to be independent of RAR-mediated signaling. The abundance of RA metabolism-related enzymes and RAR (RARβ) mRNAs did not differ significantly between P4-treated and control individuals. The RA concentration in the ovaries remained unchanged by P4 treatment in vivo. Because no inhibition by the P4 receptor (PR) nuclear receptor antagonist mifepristone on P4 effect was observed in either in vitro or in vivo experiments, the effect of P4 on germ cell meiotic initiation is probably mediated by membrane PRs (mPR). The mPRα, mPRβ, and mPRγ mRNAs were all expressed in the embryonic ovaries. The expression of mPRα and mPRβ was higher than that of mPRγ. Immunohistochemical results showed that mPRα-positive cells were mainly scattered in the ovarian cortex area where most germ cells were distributed. The mPRβ-positive cells were widely distributed in the ovaries, and positive cells were clustered with a similar morphology to that of germ cell clusters. In conclusion, P4 may regulate embryonic germ cell meiotic initiation independent of RA signaling through the membrane PRs. This study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of germ cell meiotic initiation in the chicken

  20. 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic “inactivation” of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators. PMID:25450232

  1. Low Band Gap Coplanar Conjugated Molecules Featuring Dynamic Intramolecular Lewis Acid-Base Coordination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Congzhi; Guo, Zi-Hao; Mu, Anthony U; Liu, Yi; Wheeler, Steven E; Fang, Lei

    2016-05-20

    Ladder-type conjugated molecules with a low band gap and low LUMO level were synthesized through an N-directed borylation reaction of pyrazine-derived donor-acceptor-donor precursors. The intramolecular boron-nitrogen coordination bonds played a key role in rendering the rigid and coplanar conformation of these molecules and their corresponding electronic structures. Experimental investigation and theoretical simulation revealed the dynamic nature of such coordination, which allowed for active manipulation of the optical properties of these molecules by using competing Lewis basic solvents. PMID:27096728

  2. Long-chain bases, phosphatidic acid, MAPKs, and reactive oxygen species as nodal signal transducers in stress responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo-García, Mariana; Gavilanes-Ruíz, Marina; Arce-Cervantes, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Due to their sessile condition, plants have developed sensitive, fast, and effective ways to contend with environmental changes. These mechanisms operate as informational wires conforming extensive and intricate networks that are connected in several points. The responses are designed as pathways orchestrated by molecules that are transducers of protein and non-protein nature. Their chemical nature imposes selective features such as specificity, formation rate, and generation site to the informational routes. Enzymes such as mitogen-activated protein kinases and non-protein, smaller molecules, such as long-chain bases, phosphatidic acid, and reactive oxygen species are recurrent transducers in the pleiotropic responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. In this review, we considered these four components as nodal points of converging signaling pathways that start from very diverse stimuli and evoke very different responses. These pleiotropic effects may be explained by the potentiality that every one of these four mediators can be expressed from different sources, cellular location, temporality, or magnitude. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the interplay of these four specific signaling components in Arabidopsis cells, with an emphasis on drought, cold and pathogen stresses. PMID:25763001

  3. Redox-Dependent Anti-Inflammatory Signaling Actions of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Delmastro-Greenwood, Meghan; Freeman, Bruce A.; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are metabolized to reactive products that can act as pro- or anti-inflammatory signaling mediators. Electrophilic fatty acid species, including nitro- and oxo-containing fatty acids, display salutary anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions. Electrophilicity can be conferred by both enzymatic and oxidative reactions, via the homolytic addition of nitrogen dioxide to a double bond or via the formation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and epoxide substituents. The endogenous formation of electrophilic fatty acids is significant and influenced by diet, metabolic, and inflammatory reactions. Transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes can sense the redox status of the surrounding environment upon electrophilic fatty acid adduction of functionally significant, nucleophilic cysteines. Through this covalent and often reversible posttranslational modification, gene expression and metabolic responses are induced. At low concentrations, the pleiotropic signaling actions that are regulated by these protein targets suggest that some classes of electrophilic lipids may be useful for treating metabolic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24161076

  4. Ligation of MHC class I and class II molecules can lead to heterologous desensitization of signal transduction pathways that regulate homotypic adhesion in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, N; Engel, P; Vega, M; Tedder, T F

    1994-06-01

    Engagement of lymphocyte MHC class I and class II Ags activates an array of intracellular signal transduction pathways that up-regulates the activity of cell-surface adhesion receptors, resulting in homotypic cell-cell aggregation. In this study, engagement of MHC class I and class II molecules with specific mAbs was shown to also inhibit lymphocyte homotypic adhesion. Two mAbs reactive with class II Ag, homotypic adhesion blocking mAb (HAB)-2, and HAB-3, and one mAb reactive with class I Ag, HAB-4, were generated that inhibited homotypic adhesion of activated lymphocytes and B and T cell lines at concentrations as low as 0.1 microgram/ml. Binding of these mAbs resulted in heterologous desensitization of other surface signal transduction molecules as homotypic adhesion induced through class I, class II, CD19, CD20, CD39, CD40, Leu-13, and PMA was also inhibited. The spontaneous adhesion exhibited by some cell lines was also abrogated by binding of these mAbs. Abs that either induced, blocked, or had no effect on adhesion bound to distinct epitopes on class I, whereas the anti-class II mAbs recognized either distinct or overlapping epitopes. Thus, engagement of distinct epitopes on MHC molecules can result in homologous or heterologous desensitization of cell-surface signaling molecules. The induction or inhibition of homotypic adhesion through class I molecules did not require the presence of the cytoplasmic domain, as deletion of this portion of the class I molecule had no effect. In contrast, the transmembrane region was essential for signal transduction as the mAbs binding to a chimeric molecule in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of class I were exchanged with those of the HB15 molecule did not induce or inhibit homotypic adhesion. Although this report is the first demonstration that homotypic adhesion can be influenced in a negative manner through MHC molecules, these findings demonstrate a considerable level of cross-talk between MHC molecules

  5. Phytanic acid and pristanic acid, branched-chain fatty acids associated with Refsum disease and other inherited peroxisomal disorders, mediate intracellular Ca2+ signaling through activation of free fatty acid receptor GPR40.

    PubMed

    Kruska, Nicol; Reiser, Georg

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of the two branched-chain fatty acids phytanic acid and pristanic acid is known to play an important role in several diseases with peroxisomal impairment, like Refsum disease, Zellweger syndrome and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency. Recent studies elucidated that the toxic activity of phytanic acid and pristanic acid is mediated by multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions, generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca2+ deregulation via the InsP3-Ca2+ signaling pathway in glial cells. However, the exact signaling mechanism through which both fatty acids mediate toxicity is still under debate. Here, we studied the ability of phytanic acid and pristanic acid to activate the free fatty acid receptor GPR40, a G-protein-coupled receptor, which was described to be involved in the Ca2+ signaling of fatty acids. We treated HEK 293 cells expressing the GPR40 receptor with phytanic acid or pristanic acid. This resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular Ca2+ level, similar to the effect seen after treatment with the synthetic GPR40 agonist GW9508. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the GPR40 activation might be due to an interaction of the carboxylate moiety of fatty acids with the receptor. Our findings indicate that the phytanic acid- and pristanic acid-mediated Ca2+ deregulation can involve the activation of GPR40. Therefore, we suppose that activation of GPR40 might be part of the signaling cascade of the toxicity of phytanic and pristanic acids.

  6. The small molecule indirubin-3′-oxime activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and inhibits adipocyte differentiation and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, O M; Cho, Y-H; Choi, S; Lee, S-H; Seo, S H; Kim, H-Y; Han, G; Min, D S; Park, T; Choi, K Y

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway inhibits adipogenesis by maintaining preadipocytes in an undifferentiated state. We investigated the effect of indirubin-3′-oxime (I3O), which was screened as an activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling, on inhibiting the preadipocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Methods: 3T3L1 preadipocytes were differentiated with 0, 4 or 20 μM of I3O. The I3O effect on adipocyte differentiation was observed by Oil-red-O staining. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in I3O-treated 3T3L1 cells was shown using immunocytochemical and immunoblotting analyses for β-catenin. The regulation of adipogenic markers was analyzed via real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting analyses. For the in vivo study, mice were divided into five different dietary groups: chow diet, high-fat diet (HFD), HFD supplemented with I3O at 5, 25 and 100 mg kg−1. After 8 weeks, adipose and liver tissues were excised from the mice and subject to morphometry, real-time RT-PCR, immunoblotting and histological or immunohistochemical analyses. In addition, adipokine and insulin concentrations in serum of the mice were accessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Using a cell-based approach to screen a library of pharmacologically active small molecules, we identified I3O as a Wnt/β-catenin pathway activator. I3O inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into mature adipocytes and decreased the expression of adipocyte markers, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, at both mRNA and protein levels. In vivo, I3O inhibited the development of obesity in HFD-fed mice by attenuating HFD-induced body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation without showing any significant toxicity. Factors associated with metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia were also improved by treatment of I3O. Conclusion: Activation of the Wnt

  7. Sex specific retinoic acid signaling is required for the initiation of urogenital sinus bud development.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Sarah L; Francis, Jeffrey C; Lokody, Isabel B; Wang, Hong; Risbridger, Gail P; Loveland, Kate L; Swain, Amanda

    2014-11-15

    The mammalian urogenital sinus (UGS) develops in a sex specific manner, giving rise to the prostate in the male and the sinus vagina in the embryonic female. Androgens, produced by the embryonic testis, have been shown to be crucial to this process. In this study we show that retinoic acid signaling is required for the initial stages of bud development from the male UGS. Enzymes involved in retinoic acid synthesis are expressed in the UGS mesenchyme in a sex specific manner and addition of ligand to female tissue is able to induce prostate-like bud formation in the absence of androgens, albeit at reduced potency. Functional studies in mouse organ cultures that faithfully reproduce the initiation of prostate development indicate that one of the roles of retinoic acid signaling in the male is to inhibit the expression of Inhba, which encodes the βA subunit of Activin, in the UGS mesenchyme. Through in vivo genetic analysis and culture studies we show that inhibition of Activin signaling in the female UGS leads to a similar phenotype to that of retinoic acid treatment, namely bud formation in the absence of androgens. Our data also reveals that both androgens and retinoic acid have extra independent roles to that of repressing Activin signaling in the development of the prostate during fetal stages. This study identifies a novel role for retinoic acid as a mesenchymal factor that acts together with androgens to determine the position and initiation of bud development in the male UGS epithelia. PMID:25261715

  8. Meat and Livestock Association Plenary Lecture 2005. Oocyte signalling molecules and their effects on reproduction in ruminants.

    PubMed

    McNatty, Kenneth P; Lawrence, Stephen; Groome, Nigel P; Meerasahib, Mohammed F; Hudson, Norma L; Whiting, Lynda; Heath, Derek A; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    signalling molecules have profound effects on reproduction in mammals, including rodents, humans and ruminants. Moreover, in vivo manipulation of these oocyte signalling molecules provides new opportunities for the management of the fertility of ruminants.

  9. NMDA receptor subunits and associated signaling molecules mediating antidepressant-related effects of NMDA-GluN2B antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Kiselycznyk, Carly; Jury, Nicholas; Halladay, Lindsay; Nakazawa, Kazu; Mishina, Masayoshi; Sprengel, Rolf; Grant, Seth G.N.; Svenningsson, Per; Holmes, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Drugs targeting the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) may be efficacious for treating mood disorders, as exemplified by the rapid antidepressant effects produced by single administration of the NMDAR antagonist ketamine. Though the precise mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-related effects of NMDAR antagonism remain unclear, recent studies implicate specific NMDAR subunits, including GluN2A and GluN2B, as well as the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit glutamate receptor interacting molecule, PSD-95. Here, integrating mutant and pharmacological in mice, we investigated the contribution of these subunits and molecules to antidepressant-related behaviors and the antidepressant-related effects of the GluN2B blocker, Ro 25-6981. We found that global deletion of GluA1 or PSD-95 reduced forced swim test (FST) immobility, mimicking the antidepressant-related effect produced by systemically administered Ro 25-6981 in C57BL/6J mice. Moreover, the FST antidepressant-like effects of systemic Ro 25-6981 were intact in mutants with global GluA1 deletion or GluN1 deletion in forebrain interneurons, but were absent in mutants constitutively lacking GluN2A or PSD-95. Next, we found that microinfusing Ro 25-6981 into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but not basolateral amygdala, of C57BL/6J mice was sufficient to produce an antidepressant-like effect. Together, these findings extend and refine current understanding of the mechanisms mediating antidepressant-like effects produced by NMDAR-GluN2B antagonists, and may inform the development of a novel class of medications for treating depression that target the GluN2B subtype of NMDAR. PMID:25800971

  10. A novel role for neural cell adhesion molecule in modulating insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai Jie; Xia, Yin Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Goh, Kim Jee; Ju, Pei Jun; Feng, Zhi Wei

    2011-08-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has recently been found on adult stem cells, but its biological significance remains largely unknown. In this study, we used bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from wild-type and NCAM knockout mice to investigate the role of NCAM in adipocyte differentiation. It was demonstrated that NCAM isoforms 180 and 140 but not NCAM-120 are expressed on almost all wild-type MSCs. Upon adipogenic induction, Ncam(-/-) MSCs exhibited a marked decrease in adipocyte differentiation compared with wild-type cells. The role of NCAM in adipocyte differentiation was also confirmed in NCAM-silenced preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells, which also had a phenotype with reduced adipogenic potential. In addition, we found that Ncam(-/-) MSCs appeared to be insulin resistant, as shown by their impaired insulin signaling cascade, such as the activation of the insulin-IGF-1 receptor, PI3K-Akt and CREB pathways. The PI3K-Akt inhibitor, LY294002, completely blocked adipocyte differentiation of MSCs, unveiling that the reduced adipogenic potential of Ncam(-/-) MSCs is due to insulin resistance as a result of loss of NCAM function. Furthermore, insulin resistance of Ncam(-/-) MSCs was shown to be associated with induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), a key mediator of insulin resistance. Finally, we demonstrated that re-expression of NCAM-180, but not NCAM-140, inhibits induction of TNF-α and thereby improves insulin resistance and adipogenic potential of Ncam(-/-) MSCs. Our results suggest a novel role of NCAM in promoting insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation of adult stem cells. These findings raise the possibility of using NCAM intervention to improve insulin resistance.

  11. Investigating a possible role for the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones in Balanus improvisus cyprid settlement.

    PubMed

    Tait, Karen; Havenhand, Jon

    2013-05-01

    Increased settlement on bacterial biofilms has been demonstrated for a number of marine invertebrate larvae, but the nature of the cue(s) responsible is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that the bay barnacle Balanus improvisus utilizes the bacterial signal molecules N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as a cue for the selection of sites for permanent attachment. Single species biofilms of the AHL-producing bacteria Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas hydrophila and Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 were attractive to settling cypris larvae of B. improvisus. However, when AHL production was inactivated, either by mutation of the AHL synthetic genes or by expression of an AHL-degrading gene (aiiA), the ability of the bacteria to attract cyprids was abolished. In addition, cyprids actively explored biofilms of E. coli expressing the recombinant AHL synthase genes luxI from Vibrio fischeri (3-oxo-C6-HSL), rhlI from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (C4-HSL/C6-HSL), vanI from V. anguillarum (3-oxo-C10-HSL) and sulI from Sulfitobacter sp. BR1 (C4-HSL, 3-hydroxy-C6-HSL, C8-HSL and 3-hydroxy-C10-HSL), but not E. coli that did not produce AHLs. Finally, synthetic AHLs (C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C10-HSL and C12-HSL) at concentrations similar to those found within natural biofilms (5 μm) resulted in increased cyprid settlement. Thus, B. improvisus cypris exploration of and settlement on biofilms appears to be mediated by AHL-signalling bacteria in the laboratory. This adds to our understanding of how quorum sensing inhibition may be used as for biofouling control. Nonetheless, the significance of our results for larvae settling naturally in the field, and the mechanisms that underlay the observed responses to AHLs, is as yet unknown.

  12. The plastidial retrograde signal methyl erythritol cyclopyrophosphate is a regulator of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Mark; Xiao, Yanmei; Bjornson, Marta; Wang, Jin-zheng; Hicks, Derrick; de Souza, Amancio; Wang, Chang-Quan; Yang, Panyu; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    The exquisite harmony between hormones and their corresponding signaling pathways is central to prioritizing plant responses to simultaneous and/or successive environmental trepidations. The crosstalk between jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) is an established effective mechanism that optimizes and tailors plant adaptive responses. However, the underlying regulatory modules of this crosstalk are largely unknown. Global transcriptomic analyses of mutant plants (ceh1) with elevated levels of the stress-induced plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol cyclopyrophosphate (MEcPP) revealed robustly induced JA marker genes, expected to be suppressed by the presence of constitutively high SA levels in the mutant background. Analyses of a range of genotypes with varying SA and MEcPP levels established the selective role of MEcPP-mediated signal(s) in induction of JA-responsive genes in the presence of elevated SA. Metabolic profiling revealed the presence of high levels of the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), but near wild type levels of JA in the ceh1 mutant plants. Analyses of coronatine-insensitive 1 (coi1)/ceh1 double mutant plants confirmed that the MEcPP-mediated induction is JA receptor COI1 dependent, potentially through elevated OPDA. These findings identify MEcPP as a previously unrecognized central regulatory module that induces JA-responsive genes in the presence of high SA, thereby staging a multifaceted plant response within the environmental context. PMID:26733689

  13. [Significance of electron interactions of fatty acids of phospholipid molecules in the organism adaptation to habitation temperature].

    PubMed

    Zabelinskiĭ, S A; Chebotareva, M A; Arakelova, E S; Shukoliukova, E P; Furaev, V V; Kalandarov, A M; Feĭzulaev, B A; Krivchenko, A I

    2009-01-01

    Data in the fatty acid composition of muscle tissue phospholipids of some representatives of gastropod molluscs (Gastropoda) have been presented for the first time. In the lake phytophagues Lymnaea stagnalis and Lymnaea ovata the long-chained C22-acid was not detected, whereas in the predator common whelk Buccinum undatum, C22:6omega3 was present. Comparison of absorption spectra (240-720 nm) of lipid extracts of the studied invertebrates and of rat has been performed. The obtained data are discussed from the point of view of participation of pi-electrons of phospholipid fatty acid molecules in adaptation of membranes to the habitation temperature, which arises owing to interelectron attraction and to the process of formation of Cooper's pairs.

  14. Drosophila fatty acid taste signals through the PLC pathway in sugar-sensing neurons.

    PubMed

    Masek, Pavel; Keene, Alex C

    2013-01-01

    Taste is the primary sensory system for detecting food quality and palatability. Drosophila detects five distinct taste modalities that include sweet, bitter, salt, water, and the taste of carbonation. Of these, sweet-sensing neurons appear to have utility for the detection of nutritionally rich food while bitter-sensing neurons signal toxicity and confer repulsion. Growing evidence in mammals suggests that taste for fatty acids (FAs) signals the presence of dietary lipids and promotes feeding. While flies appear to be attracted to fatty acids, the neural basis for fatty acid detection and attraction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a range of FAs are detected by the fly gustatory system and elicit a robust feeding response. Flies lacking olfactory organs respond robustly to FAs, confirming that FA attraction is mediated through the gustatory system. Furthermore, flies detect FAs independent of pH, suggesting the molecular basis for FA taste is not due to acidity. We show that low and medium concentrations of FAs serve as an appetitive signal and they are detected exclusively through the same subset of neurons that sense appetitive sweet substances, including most sugars. In mammals, taste perception of sweet and bitter substances is dependent on phospholipase C (PLC) signaling in specialized taste buds. We find that flies mutant for norpA, a Drosophila ortholog of PLC, fail to respond to FAs. Intriguingly, norpA mutants respond normally to other tastants, including sucrose and yeast. The defect of norpA mutants can be rescued by selectively restoring norpA expression in sweet-sensing neurons, corroborating that FAs signal through sweet-sensing neurons, and suggesting PLC signaling in the gustatory system is specifically involved in FA taste. Taken together, these findings reveal that PLC function in Drosophila sweet-sensing neurons is a conserved molecular signaling pathway that confers attraction to fatty acids.

  15. Structure and thermodynamics of effector molecule binding to the nitrogen signal transduction PII protein GlnZ from Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Truan, Daphné; Bjelić, Saša; Li, Xiao-Dan; Winkler, Fritz K

    2014-07-29

    The trimeric PII signal transduction proteins regulate the function of a variety of target proteins predominantly involved in nitrogen metabolism. ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) are key effector molecules influencing PII binding to targets. Studies of PII proteins have established that the 20-residue T-loop plays a central role in effector sensing and target binding. However, the specific effects of effector binding on T-loop conformation have remained poorly documented. We present eight crystal structures of the Azospirillum brasilense PII protein GlnZ, six of which are cocrystallized and liganded with ADP or ATP. We find that interaction with the diphosphate moiety of bound ADP constrains the N-terminal part of the T-loop in a characteristic way that is maintained in ADP-promoted complexes with target proteins. In contrast, the interactions with the triphosphate moiety in ATP complexes are much more variable and no single predominant interaction mode is apparent except for the ternary MgATP/2-OG complex. These conclusions can be extended to most investigated PII proteins of the GlnB/GlnK subfamily. Unlike reported for other PII proteins, microcalorimetry reveals no cooperativity between the three binding sites of GlnZ trimers for any of the three effectors under carefully controlled experimental conditions.

  16. Identification of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules and a Biosynthetic Gene in Alicycliphilus sp. Isolated from Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Okutsu, Noriya; Xie, Xiaonan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge is a complicated mixture of various microorganisms that is used to treat sewage and industrial wastewater. Many bacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as a quorum-sensing signal molecule to regulate the expression of the exoenzymes used for wastewater treatment. Here, we isolated an AHL-producing bacteria from an activated sludge sample collected from an electronic component factory, which we named Alicycliphilus sp. B1. Clone library analysis revealed that Alicycliphilus was a subdominant genus in this sample. When we screened the activated sludge sample for AHL-producing strains, 12 of 14 the AHL-producing isolates were assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. A putative AHL-synthase gene, ALISP_0667, was cloned from the genome of B1 and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α. The AHLs were extracted from the culture supernatants of the B1 strain and E. coli DH5α cells harboring the ALISP_0667 gene and were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as N-(3-hydroxydecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. The results of comparative genomic analysis suggested that the quorum-sensing genes in the B1 strain might have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer within activated sludge. PMID:27490553

  17. Identification of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules and a Biosynthetic Gene in Alicycliphilus sp. Isolated from Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Okutsu, Noriya; Xie, Xiaonan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge is a complicated mixture of various microorganisms that is used to treat sewage and industrial wastewater. Many bacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as a quorum-sensing signal molecule to regulate the expression of the exoenzymes used for wastewater treatment. Here, we isolated an AHL-producing bacteria from an activated sludge sample collected from an electronic component factory, which we named Alicycliphilus sp. B1. Clone library analysis revealed that Alicycliphilus was a subdominant genus in this sample. When we screened the activated sludge sample for AHL-producing strains, 12 of 14 the AHL-producing isolates were assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. A putative AHL-synthase gene, ALISP_0667, was cloned from the genome of B1 and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α. The AHLs were extracted from the culture supernatants of the B1 strain and E. coli DH5α cells harboring the ALISP_0667 gene and were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as N-(3-hydroxydecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. The results of comparative genomic analysis suggested that the quorum-sensing genes in the B1 strain might have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer within activated sludge. PMID:27490553

  18. Identification of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules and a Biosynthetic Gene in Alicycliphilus sp. Isolated from Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Okutsu, Noriya; Xie, Xiaonan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-08-02

    Activated sludge is a complicated mixture of various microorganisms that is used to treat sewage and industrial wastewater. Many bacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as a quorum-sensing signal molecule to regulate the expression of the exoenzymes used for wastewater treatment. Here, we isolated an AHL-producing bacteria from an activated sludge sample collected from an electronic component factory, which we named Alicycliphilus sp. B1. Clone library analysis revealed that Alicycliphilus was a subdominant genus in this sample. When we screened the activated sludge sample for AHL-producing strains, 12 of 14 the AHL-producing isolates were assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. A putative AHL-synthase gene, ALISP_0667, was cloned from the genome of B1 and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α. The AHLs were extracted from the culture supernatants of the B1 strain and E. coli DH5α cells harboring the ALISP_0667 gene and were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as N-(3-hydroxydecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. The results of comparative genomic analysis suggested that the quorum-sensing genes in the B1 strain might have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer within activated sludge.

  19. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) inhibits low density lipoprotein-induced signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Relou, Ingrid A M; Gorter, Gertie; Ferreira, Irlando Andrade; van Rijn, Herman J M; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N

    2003-08-29

    At physiological concentrations, low density lipoprotein (LDL) increases the sensitivity of platelets to aggregation- and secretion-inducing agents without acting as an independent activator of platelet functions. LDL sensitizes platelets by inducing a transient activation of p38MAPK, a Ser/Thr kinase that is activated by the simultaneous phosphorylation of Thr180 and Tyr182 and is an upstream regulator of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). A similar transient phosphorylation of p38MAPK is induced by a peptide mimicking amino acids 3359-3369 in apoB100 called the B-site. Here we report that the transient nature of p38MAPK activation is caused by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), a receptor with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. PECAM-1 activation by cross-linking induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and a fall in phosphorylated p38MAPK and cPLA2. Interestingly, LDL and the B-site peptide also induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1, and studies with immunoprecipitates indicate the involvement of c-Src. Inhibition of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A (okadaic acid) makes the transient p38MAPK activation by LDL and the B-site peptide persistent. Inhibition of Tyr-phosphatases (vanadate) increases Tyr-phosphorylated PECAM-1 and blocks the activation of p38MAPK. Together, these findings suggest that, following a first phase in which LDL, through its B-site, phosphorylates and thereby activates p38MAPK, a second phase is initiated in which LDL activates PECAM-1 and induces dephosphorylation of p38MAPK via activation of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A. PMID:12775720

  20. The botanical molecule p-hydroxycinnamic acid as a new osteogenic agent: insight into the treatment of cancer bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2016-10-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained through a balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Bone loss with aging is induced by decreasing in osteoblastic bone formation and increasing in osteoclastic bone resorption, thereby leading to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis with its accompanying decrease in bone mass is widely recognized as a major public heath problem. Pharmacologic and nutritional factors may play a role in the prevention and treatment of bone loss with aging. p-Hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA), which stimulates bone mineralization in mouse bone tissues in vitro, has been found to be present in the leafstalk of wasabi (Wasabi japonica MATSUM) among various food and plants. Other phenolic acids including cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid and 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid did not have osteogenic effects. HCA was demonstrated to stimulate osteoblastic bone formation and suppresses osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro by antagonizing activation of the nuclear factor kappa B. Oral administration of HCA was found to exhibit restorative effects on bone loss induced by ovariectomy and diabetic states, supporting a role in the treatment of osteoporosis. Moreover, HCA was demonstrated to prevent the suppressed osteoblastic mineralization and the enhanced osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow cells cocultured with bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in vitro. The botanical molecule HCA, as a new osteogenic agent, is suggested to play a role in the treatment of cancer bone metastases. This review will discuss an advanced recent finding that HCA may be a useful agent to treat bone metabolic disorder. PMID:27573001

  1. Observation of new particle formation and measurement of sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines and highly oxidized organic molecules at a rural site in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bergen, Anton; Heinritzi, Martin; Leiminger, Markus; Lorenz, Verena; Piel, Felix; Simon, Mario; Sitals, Robert; Wagner, Andrea C.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The exact mechanisms for new particle formation (NPF) under different boundary layer conditions are not known yet. One important question is whether amines and sulfuric acid lead to efficient NPF in the atmosphere. Furthermore, it is not clear to what extent highly oxidized organic molecules (HOMs) are involved in NPF. We conducted field measurements at a rural site in central Germany in the proximity of three larger dairy farms to investigate whether there is a connection between NPF and the presence of amines and/or ammonia due to the local emissions from the farms. Comprehensive measurements using a nitrate chemical ionization-atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), particle counters and differential mobility analyzers (DMAs), as well as measurements of trace gases and meteorological parameters, were performed. We demonstrate here that the nitrate CI-APi-TOF is suitable for sensitive measurements of sulfuric acid, amines, a nitrosamine, ammonia, iodic acid and HOMs. NPF was found to correlate with sulfuric acid, while an anti-correlation with RH, amines and ammonia is observed. The anti-correlation between NPF and amines could be due to the efficient uptake of these compounds by nucleating clusters and small particles. Much higher HOM dimer (C19/C20 compounds) concentrations during the night than during the day indicate that these HOMs do not efficiently self-nucleate as no nighttime NPF is observed. Observed iodic acid probably originates from an iodine-containing reservoir substance, but the iodine signals are very likely too low to have a significant effect on NPF.

  2. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peizhen Rockwell, Cheryl E. Cui, Julia Yue Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  3. Discrimination of organic acids using a three molecule array based upon cruciform fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Davey, Evan A; Zucchero, Anthony J; Trapp, Oliver; Bunz, Uwe H F

    2011-05-25

    A small array was obtained from three reactive cruciform fluorophores in six different solvents. The array discerned 10 different aromatic carboxylic acids by protonation-induced fluorescence shifts, which were recorded by digital photography. This simple array can discern acids that have closely spaced pK(a) values.

  4. Enantioselective silyl protection of alcohols catalysed by an amino-acid-based small molecule.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Rodrigo, Jason; Hoveyda, Amir H; Snapper, Marc L

    2006-09-01

    Reliable, selective and environmentally friendly chemical transformations are crucial to the development of new therapeutics and the design of novel materials. Chiral catalysts that can be easily prepared and used to obtain organic molecules of high enantiomeric purity are critical to modern chemical synthesis. The development of protecting groups that shield reactive functionalities has also proved indispensable in the preparation of complex biologically active molecules. Here we present a chiral catalyst that promotes the enantioselective protection of a secondary alcohol as one of the most commonly used protected forms of an alcohol: a silyl ether. The catalyst is a small, simple molecule that can be prepared in three steps from commercial materials without the need for rigorously controlled conditions. Enantioselective silylations are performed with commercial silyl chlorides and produce yields of up to 96 per cent at an enantiomeric ratio of up to 98:2. Chiral catalysts for selective formation of commonly used protecting groups such as silyl ethers should significantly enhance the ability of chemical synthesis to deliver, in a more practical and efficient manner, important organic molecules.

  5. Lobaric Acid Inhibits VCAM-1 Expression in TNF-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Modulation of NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ii-Seul; Yim, Joung-Han; Lee, Hong-Kum; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2016-01-01

    Lichens have been known to possess multiple biological activities, including anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Hence, VCAM-1 is a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of the inflammatory disease. However, the effect of lobaric acid on VCAM-1 has not yet been investigated and characterized. For this study, we examined the effect of lobaric acid on the inhibition of VCAM-1 in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated mouse vascular smooth muscle cells. Western blot and ELISA showed that the increased expression of VCAM-1 by TNF-α was significantly suppressed by the pre-treatment of lobaric acid (0.1–10 μg/ml) for 2 h. Lobaric acid abrogated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity through preventing the degradation of IκB and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Lobaric acid also inhibited the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). Overall, our results suggest that lobaric acid inhibited VCAM-1 expression through the inhibition of p38, ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and downregulation of TNF-R1 expression. Therefore, it is implicated that lobaric acid may suppress inflammation by altering the physiology of the atherosclerotic lesion. PMID:26759698

  6. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  7. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  8. Acetic Acid Acts as a Volatile Signal To Stimulate Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Gozzi, Kevin; Yan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Volatiles are small air-transmittable chemicals with diverse biological activities. In this study, we showed that volatiles produced by the bacterium Bacillus subtilis had a profound effect on biofilm formation of neighboring B. subtilis cells that grew in proximity but were physically separated. We further demonstrated that one such volatile, acetic acid, is particularly potent in stimulating biofilm formation. Multiple lines of genetic evidence based on B. subtilis mutants that are defective in either acetic acid production or transportation suggest that B. subtilis uses acetic acid as a metabolic signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation. Lastly, we investigated how B. subtilis cells sense and respond to acetic acid in regulating biofilm formation. We showed the possible involvement of three sets of genes (ywbHG, ysbAB, and yxaKC), all encoding putative holin-antiholin-like proteins, in cells responding to acetic acid and stimulating biofilm formation. All three sets of genes were induced by acetate. A mutant with a triple mutation of those genes showed a severe delay in biofilm formation, whereas a strain overexpressing ywbHG showed early and robust biofilm formation. Results of our studies suggest that B. subtilis and possibly other bacteria use acetic acid as a metabolic signal to regulate biofilm formation as well as a quorum-sensing-like airborne signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation by physically separated cells in the community. PMID:26060272

  9. T Cell Receptor (TCR) Interacting Molecule (TRIM), A Novel Disulfide-linked Dimer Associated with the TCR–CD3–ζ Complex, Recruits Intracellular Signaling Proteins to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bruyns, Eddy; Marie-Cardine, Anne; Kirchgessner, Henning; Sagolla, Karin; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Autschbach, Frank; Bensussan, Armand; Meuer, Stefan; Schraven, Burkhart

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating recruitment of intracellular signaling proteins like growth factor receptor–bound protein 2 (Grb2), phospholipase Cγ1, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) to the plasma membrane after stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR)– CD3–ζ complex are not very well understood. We describe here purification, tandem mass spectrometry sequencing, molecular cloning, and biochemical characterization of a novel transmembrane adaptor protein which associates and comodulates with the TCR–CD3–ζ complex in human T lymphocytes and T cell lines. This protein was termed T cell receptor interacting molecule (TRIM). TRIM is a disulfide-linked homodimer which is comprised of a short extracellular domain of 8 amino acids, a 19–amino acid transmembrane region, and a 159–amino acid cytoplasmic tail. In its intracellular domain, TRIM contains several tyrosine-based signaling motifs that could be involved in SH2 domain–mediated protein–protein interactions. Indeed, after T cell activation, TRIM becomes rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues and then associates with the 85-kD regulatory subunit of PI3-kinase via an YxxM motif. Thus, TRIM represents a TCR-associated transmembrane adaptor protein which is likely involved in targeting of intracellular signaling proteins to the plasma membrane after triggering of the TCR. PMID:9687533

  10. Two Isomers of Protonated Isocyanic Acid: Evidence for an Ion-Molecule Pathway for HNCO ↔ HOCN Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Thorwirth, Sven; Gottlieb, Carl A; McCarthy, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    Ion-molecule reactions a