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Sample records for acid signaling regulates

  1. Novel regulator of enterohepatic bile acid signaling protects against hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2013-06-04

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major cause of cardiovascular disease and can be treated by targeting bile acid and cholesterol metabolism. Vergnes et al. (2013) now identify Diet1 as a novel regulator of fibroblast growth factor 15/19 production and bile acid biosynthesis.

  2. Signalling of abscisic acid to regulate plant growth.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelbach, A; Iten, M; Grill, E

    1998-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth control is a fundamental response of plants to adverse environmental cues. The linkage between ABA perception and growth control is currently being unravelled by using different experimental approaches such as mutant analysis and microinjection experiments. So far, two protein phosphatases, ABI1 and ABI2, cADPR, pH, and Ca2+ have been identified as main components of the ABA signalling pathway. Here, the ABA signal transduction pathway is compared to signalling cascades from yeast and mammalian cells. A model for a bifurcated ABA signal transduction pathway exerting a positive and negative control mechanism is proposed. PMID:9800207

  3. Differential regulation of EGFR-MAPK signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Martinez, Jesse D

    2014-10-01

    A high-fat diet coincides with increased levels of bile acids. This increase in bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), has been strongly associated with the development of colon cancer. Conversely, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have chemopreventive properties. Although structurally similar, DCA and UDCA present different biological and pathological effects in colon cancer progression. The differential regulation of cancer by these two bile acids is not yet fully understood. However, one possible explanation for their diverging effects is their ability to differentially regulate signaling pathways involved in the multistep progression of colon cancer, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This review will examine the biological effects of DCA and UDCA on colon cancer development, as well as the diverging effects of these bile acids on the oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in colon cancer development, with a particular emphasis on bile acid regulation of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

  4. Insulin Signaling Regulates Fatty Acid Catabolism at the Level of CoA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Ruskeepää, Anna-Liisa; Aye, Cho Cho; Carson, Brian P.; Mora, Silvia; Orešič, Matej; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2012-01-01

    The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG) catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS). We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:22275878

  5. Exercise and amino acid anabolic cell signaling and the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2012-07-01

    A series of complex intracellular networks influence the regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover. In recent years, studies have examined how cellular regulators of muscle protein turnover modulate metabolic mechanisms contributing to the loss, gain, or conservation of skeletal muscle mass. Exercise and amino acids both stimulate anabolic signaling potentially through several intracellular pathways including the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and the mitogen activated protein kinase cell signaling cascades. As novel molecular regulators of muscle integrity continue to be explored, a contemporary analysis of the literature is required to understand the metabolic mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids affect cellular process that contribute to long-term adaptations and preservation of muscle mass. This article reviews the literature related to how exercise and amino acid availability affect cellular regulators of skeletal muscle mass, especially highlighting recent investigations that have identified mechanisms by which contractile forces and amino acids modulate muscle health. Furthermore, this review will explore integrated exercise and nutrition strategies that promote the maintenance of muscle health by optimizing exercise, and amino acid-induced cell signaling in aging adults susceptible to muscle loss.

  6. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-07

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  7. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  8. Ellagic acid checks lymphoma promotion via regulation of PKC signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sudha; Vinayak, Manjula

    2013-02-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) isozymes are key components involved in cell proliferation and their over activation leads to abnormal tumor growth. PKC follows signalling pathway by activation of downstream gene NF-kB and early transcription factor c-Myc. Over activation of NF-kB and c-Myc gene are also linked with unregulated proliferation of cancer cells. Therefore any agent which can inhibit the activation of Protein kinase C, NF-kB and c-Myc may be useful in reducing cancer progression. To investigate this hypothesis we have tested the effect of ellagic acid on these genes in Dalton's lymphoma bearing (DL). The role of ellagic acid was also tested in regulation of tumor suppressor gene Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). DL mice were treated with three different doses (40, 60 and 80 mg/kg body weight) of ellagic acid. Ascites cells of mice were used for the experiments. Ellagic acid administration to DL mice decreased oxidative stress by reducing lipid peroxidation. Ellagic acid also down regulates the expression of classical isozymes of PKC i.e. PKCα, PKCβ, and PKCγ as well as activity of total PKC and NF-kB, indicating its antitumor action. The anticarcinogenic action of ellagic acid was also confirmed by up regulation of TGF-β1 and down regulation of c-Myc. Lymphoma prevention by ellagic acid is further supported by decrease in cell proliferation, cell viability, ascites fluid accumulation and increase in life span of DL mice. All these findings suggest that ellagic acid prevents the cancer progression by down regulation of PKC signaling pathway leading to cell proliferation.

  9. The role of Zic transcription factors in regulating hindbrain retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The reiterated architecture of cranial motor neurons aligns with the segmented structure of the embryonic vertebrate hindbrain. Anterior-posterior identity of cranial motor neurons depends, in part, on retinoic acid signaling levels. The early vertebrate embryo maintains a balance between retinoic acid synthetic and degradative zones on the basis of reciprocal expression domains of the retinoic acid synthesis gene aldhehyde dehydrogenase 1a2 (aldh1a2) posteriorly and the oxidative gene cytochrome p450 type 26a1 (cyp26a1) in the forebrain, midbrain, and anterior hindbrain. Results This manuscript investigates the role of zinc finger of the cerebellum (zic) transcription factors in regulating levels of retinoic acid and differentiation of cranial motor neurons. Depletion of zebrafish Zic2a and Zic2b results in a strong downregulation of aldh1a2 expression and a concomitant reduction in activity of a retinoid-dependent transgene. The vagal motor neuron phenotype caused by loss of Zic2a/2b mimics a depletion of Aldh1a2 and is rescued by exogenously supplied retinoic acid. Conclusion Zic transcription factors function in patterning hindbrain motor neurons through their regulation of embryonic retinoic acid signaling. PMID:23937294

  10. Saturated fatty-acids regulate retinoic acid signaling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty-acid-binding protein 5

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L.; Noy, Noa

    2015-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes, and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5 which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer. PMID:26592976

  11. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    PubMed

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-11-23

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer.

  12. Conserved regulators of Rag GTPases orchestrate amino acid-dependent TORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Katie; De Virgilio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is the central component of a signaling network that couples a vast range of internal and external stimuli to cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. TORC1 deregulation is associated with a number of human pathologies, including many cancers and metabolic disorders, underscoring its importance in cellular and organismal growth control. The activity of TORC1 is modulated by multiple inputs; however, the presence of amino acids is a stimulus that is essential for its activation. Amino acid sufficiency is communicated to TORC1 via the highly conserved family of Rag GTPases, which assemble as heterodimeric complexes on lysosomal/vacuolar membranes and are regulated by their guanine nucleotide loading status. Studies in yeast, fly and mammalian model systems have revealed a multitude of conserved Rag GTPase modulators, which have greatly expanded our understanding of amino acid sensing by TORC1. Here we review the major known modulators of the Rag GTPases, focusing on recent mechanistic insights that highlight the evolutionary conservation and divergence of amino acid signaling to TORC1. PMID:27462445

  13. New roles for Smad signaling and phosphatidic acid in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is essential for normal bodily function and the loss of skeletal muscle (i.e. muscle atrophy/wasting) can have a major impact on mobility, whole-body metabolism, disease resistance, and quality of life. Thus, there is a clear need for the development of therapies that can prevent the loss, or increase, of skeletal muscle mass. However, in order to develop such therapies, we will first have to develop a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate muscle mass. Fortunately, our knowledge is rapidly advancing, and in this review, we will summarize recent studies that have expanded our understanding of the roles that Smad signaling and the synthesis of phosphatidic acid play in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

  14. Fatty acid synthase regulates estrogen receptor-α signaling in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, J A; Lupu, R

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for endogenous synthesis of fatty acids, is overexpressed and hyperactivated in a biologically aggressive subset of sex steroid-related tumors, including breast carcinomas. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we assessed the molecular relationship between FASN signaling and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in breast cancer. The small compound C75, a synthetic slow-binding inhibitor of FASN activity, induced a dramatic augmentation of estradiol (E2)-stimulated, ERα-driven transcription. FASN and ERα were both necessary for the synergistic activation of ERα transcriptional activity that occurred following co-exposure to C75 and E2: first, knockdown of FASN expression using RNAi (RNA interference) drastically lowered (>100 fold) the amount of E2 required for optimal activation of ERα-mediated transcriptional activity; second, FASN blockade synergistically increased E2-stimulated ERα-mediated transcriptional activity in ERα-negative breast cancer cells stably transfected with ERα, but not in ERα-negative parental cells. Non-genomic, E2-regulated cross-talk between the ERα and MAPK pathways participated in these phenomena. Thus, treatment with the pure antiestrogen ICI 182 780 or the potent and specific inhibitor of MEK/ERK, U0126, was sufficient to abolish the synergistic nature of the interaction between FASN blockade and E2-stimulated ERα transactivation. FASN inhibition suppressed E2-stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation while promoting the reduction of ERα protein. FASN blockade resulted in the increased expression and nuclear accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21WAF1/CIP1 and p27Kip1, two critical mediators of the therapeutic effects of antiestrogen in breast cancer, while inactivating AKT, a key mediator of E2-promoted anchorage-independent growth. The ability of FASN to regulate E2/ERα signaling may represent a

  15. Basic Aspects of Tumor Cell Fatty Acid-Regulated Signaling and Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Lin, Yi-Hui; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Valentich, Mirta Ana; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin Ernesto; Pasqualini, Marìa Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and experimental research about the mechanisms by which fatty acids and their derivatives control specific gene expression involved during carcinogenesis. Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases (LOXs), cyclooxygenases (COXs), and cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450), seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. Their regulation may be carried out either through direct binding to DNA as peroxisome proliferator–activated receptors (PPARs) or via modulation in an indirect manner of signaling pathway molecules (e.g., protein kinase C [PKC]) and other transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B [NFκB] and sterol regulatory element binding protein [SREBP]). Knowledge of the mechanisms by which fatty acids control specific gene expression may identify important risk factors for cancer, and provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies for a better management of whole-body lipid metabolism. PMID:22048864

  16. The Pepper CaOSR1 Protein Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response via Abscisic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms, and their growth and development is detrimentally affected by environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Defense mechanisms are tightly regulated and complex processes, which respond to changing environmental conditions; however, the precise mechanisms that function under adverse conditions remain unclear. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the CaOSR1 gene, which functions in the adaptive response to abiotic stress. We found that CaOSR1 gene expression in pepper leaves was up-regulated after exposure to abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and high salinity. In addition, we demonstrated that the fusion protein of CaOSR1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in the nucleus. We used CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants and CaOSR1-OX-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to show that the CaOSR1 protein regulates the osmotic stress response. CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants showed increased drought susceptibility, and this was accompanied by a high transpiration rate. CaOSR1-OX plants displayed phenotypes that were hypersensitive to ABA and hyposensitive to osmotic stress, during the seed germination and seedling growth stages; furthermore, these plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance at the adult stage, and this was characterized by higher leaf temperatures and smaller stomatal apertures because of ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, our data indicate that CaOSR1 positively regulates osmotic stress tolerance via ABA-mediated cell signaling. These findings suggest an involvement of a novel protein in ABA and osmotic stress signalings in plants. PMID:27446121

  17. The Pepper CaOSR1 Protein Regulates the Osmotic Stress Response via Abscisic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanmi; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms, and their growth and development is detrimentally affected by environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Defense mechanisms are tightly regulated and complex processes, which respond to changing environmental conditions; however, the precise mechanisms that function under adverse conditions remain unclear. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of the CaOSR1 gene, which functions in the adaptive response to abiotic stress. We found that CaOSR1 gene expression in pepper leaves was up-regulated after exposure to abscisic acid (ABA), drought, and high salinity. In addition, we demonstrated that the fusion protein of CaOSR1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in the nucleus. We used CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants and CaOSR1-OX-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to show that the CaOSR1 protein regulates the osmotic stress response. CaOSR1-silenced pepper plants showed increased drought susceptibility, and this was accompanied by a high transpiration rate. CaOSR1-OX plants displayed phenotypes that were hypersensitive to ABA and hyposensitive to osmotic stress, during the seed germination and seedling growth stages; furthermore, these plants exhibited enhanced drought tolerance at the adult stage, and this was characterized by higher leaf temperatures and smaller stomatal apertures because of ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, our data indicate that CaOSR1 positively regulates osmotic stress tolerance via ABA-mediated cell signaling. These findings suggest an involvement of a novel protein in ABA and osmotic stress signalings in plants.

  18. Retinoic Acid Regulates Calcium Signaling to Promote Mouse Ovarian Granulosa Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, Michael; Huang, Huiya; White, Carl; Kipp, Jingjing L

    2016-09-01

    Normal development of ovarian follicles is critical for female reproduction and endocrine function. We have identified retinoic acid (RA) and the RA-degrading enzyme CYP26B1 as regulators of ovarian follicle development and showed that RA and a CYP26 inhibitor stimulated ovarian granulosa cell proliferation. The mechanism underpinning RA-dependent proliferation, however, is not known. The current study was designed to examine the role of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling in mediating the effects of RA on primary mouse granulosa cell proliferation. In single-cell Ca(2+) imaging experiments, treatment of cultured granulosa cells with RA increased the steady-state Ca(2+) content of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores. This correlated with increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and enhanced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-dependent Ca(2+) release. In proliferation assays, RA treatment or Cyp26b1 knockdown stimulated proliferation, whereas Cyp26b1 overexpression inhibited proliferation. When RA was given together with 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2-APB), a blocker of IP3R-dependent ER Ca(2+) release and SOCE, with xestospongin C, a selective IP3R- receptor antagonist, or with 3,5-bis (trifluoromethyl)pyrazole (BTP-2), a specific SOCE blocker, the stimulatory effect of RA on cell proliferation was abolished. Further investigation showed that treatment with 2-APB or BTP-2 inhibited RA induction of RA response element (RARE) activation in granulosa cells, confirming an important role for Ca(2+) signaling in mediating RA actions. Overall, these data support a model in which RA regulates ovarian follicle development by stimulating granulosa cell proliferation and that this stimulatory effect is at least in part driven by the modulation of Ca(2+) signaling.

  19. Nolz1 promotes striatal neurogenesis through the regulation of retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nolz1 is a zinc finger transcription factor whose expression is enriched in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE), although its function is still unknown. Results Here we analyze the role of Nolz1 during LGE development. We show that Nolz1 expression is high in proliferating neural progenitor cells (NPCs) of the LGE subventricular zone. In addition, low levels of Nolz1 are detected in the mantle zone, as well as in the adult striatum. Similarly, Nolz1 is highly expressed in proliferating LGE-derived NPC cultures, but its levels rapidly decrease upon cell differentiation, pointing to a role of Nolz1 in the control of NPC proliferation and/or differentiation. In agreement with this hypothesis, we find that Nolz1 over-expression promotes cell cycle exit of NPCs in neurosphere cultures and negatively regulates proliferation in telencephalic organotypic cultures. Within LGE primary cultures, Nolz1 over-expression promotes the acquisition of a neuronal phenotype, since it increases the number of β-III tubulin (Tuj1)- and microtubule-associated protein (MAP)2-positive neurons, and inhibits astrocyte generation and/or differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA) is one of the most important morphogens involved in striatal neurogenesis, and regulates Nolz1 expression in different systems. Here we show that Nolz1 also responds to this morphogen in E12.5 LGE-derived cell cultures. However, Nolz1 expression is not regulated by RA in E14.5 LGE-derived cell cultures, nor is it affected during LGE development in mouse models that present decreased RA levels. Interestingly, we find that Gsx2, which is necessary for normal RA signaling during LGE development, is also required for Nolz1 expression, which is lost in Gsx2 knockout mice. These findings suggest that Nolz1 might act downstream of Gsx2 to regulate RA-induced neurogenesis. Keeping with this hypothesis, we show that Nolz1 induces the selective expression of the RA receptor (RAR)β without altering RARα or RARγ. In

  20. miR-33a/b contribute to the regulation of fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Smibert, Peter; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Warrier, Nikhil P.; Andreo, Ursula; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Rayner, Katey; Suresh, Uthra; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Esplugues, Enric; Fisher, Edward A.; Penalva, Luiz O. F.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Lai, Eric C.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Cellular imbalances of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism result in pathological processes, including atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Recent work from our group and others has shown that the intronic microRNAs hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b are located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 and -1 genes, respectively, and regulate cholesterol homeostasis in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33a and -b also regulate genes involved in fatty acid metabolism and insulin signaling. miR-33a and -b target key enzymes involved in the regulation of fatty acid oxidation, including carnitine O-octaniltransferase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A, hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), and AMP kinase subunit-α. Moreover, miR-33a and -b also target the insulin receptor substrate 2, an essential component of the insulin-signaling pathway in the liver. Overexpression of miR-33a and -b reduces both fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling in hepatic cell lines, whereas inhibition of endogenous miR-33a and -b increases these two metabolic pathways. Together, these data establish that miR-33a and -b regulate pathways controlling three of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, namely levels of HDL, triglycerides, and insulin signaling, and suggest that inhibitors of miR-33a and -b may be useful in the treatment of this growing health concern. PMID:21576456

  1. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  2. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  3. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  4. Strong regulation of slow anion channels and abscisic acid signaling in guard cells by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C; Schelle, I; Liao, Y J; Schroeder, J I

    1995-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that slow anion channels in guard cells need to be activated to trigger stomatal closing and efficiently inactivated during stomatal opening. The patch-clamp technique was employed here to determine mechanisms that produce strong regulation of slow anion channels in guard cells. MgATP in guard cells, serving as a donor for phosphorylation, leads to strong activation of slow anion channels. Slow anion-channel activity was almost completely abolished by removal of cytosolic ATP or by the kinase inhibitors K-252a and H7. Nonhydrolyzable ATP, GTP, and guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate did not replace the ATP requirement for anion-channel activation. In addition, down-regulation of slow anion channels by ATP removal was inhibited by the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. Stomatal closures in leaves induced by the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and malate were abolished by kinase inhibitors and/or enhanced by okadaic acid. These data suggest that ABA signal transduction may proceed by activation of protein kinases and inhibition of an okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase. This modulation of ABA-induced stomatal closing correlated to the large dynamic range for up- and down-regulation of slow anion channels by opposing phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events in guard cells. The presented opposing regulation by kinase and phosphatase modulators could provide important mechanisms for signal transduction by ABA and other stimuli during stomatal movements. PMID:11607582

  5. The plastidial retrograde signal methyl erythritol cyclopyrophosphate is a regulator of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Mark; Xiao, Yanmei; Bjornson, Marta; Wang, Jin-Zheng; Hicks, Derrick; Souza, Amancio de; Wang, Chang-Quan; Yang, Panyu; Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-03-01

    The exquisite harmony between hormones and their corresponding signaling pathways is central to prioritizing plant responses to simultaneous and/or successive environmental trepidations. The crosstalk between jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) is an established effective mechanism that optimizes and tailors plant adaptive responses. However, the underlying regulatory modules of this crosstalk are largely unknown. Global transcriptomic analyses of mutant plants (ceh1) with elevated levels of the stress-induced plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol cyclopyrophosphate (MEcPP) revealed robustly induced JA marker genes, expected to be suppressed by the presence of constitutively high SA levels in the mutant background. Analyses of a range of genotypes with varying SA and MEcPP levels established the selective role of MEcPP-mediated signal(s) in induction of JA-responsive genes in the presence of elevated SA. Metabolic profiling revealed the presence of high levels of the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), but near wild type levels of JA in the ceh1 mutant plants. Analyses of coronatine-insensitive 1 (coi1)/ceh1 double mutant plants confirmed that the MEcPP-mediated induction is JA receptor COI1 dependent, potentially through elevated OPDA. These findings identify MEcPP as a previously unrecognized central regulatory module that induces JA-responsive genes in the presence of high SA, thereby staging a multifaceted plant response within the environmental context.

  6. Retinoic Acid Signaling Regulates Differential Expression of the Tandemly-Duplicated Long Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Opsin Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Ruth A.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) regulates rod and cone photoreceptor fate, differentiation, and survival. Here we elucidate the role of RA in differential regulation of the tandemly-duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes. Zebrafish embryos were treated with RA from 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to 75 hpf, and RNA was isolated from eyes for microarray analysis. ~170 genes showed significantly altered expression, including several transcription factors and components of cellular signaling pathways. Of interest, the LWS1 opsin gene was strongly upregulated by RA. LWS1 is the upstream member of the tandemly duplicated LWS opsin array and is normally not expressed embryonically. Embryos treated with RA 48 hpf to 100 hpf or beyond showed significant reductions in LWS2-expressing cones in favor of LWS1-expressing cones. The LWS reporter line, LWS-PAC(H) provided evidence that individual LWS cones switched from LWS2 to LWS1 expression in response to RA. The RA signaling reporter line, RARE:YFP indicated that increased RA signaling in cones was associated with this opsin switch, and experimental reduction of RA signaling in larvae at the normal time of onset of LWS1 expression significantly inhibited LWS1 expression. A role for endogenous RA signaling in regulating differential expression of the LWS genes in postmitotic cones was further supported by the presence of an RA signaling domain in ventral retina of juvenile zebrafish that coincided with a ventral zone of LWS1 expression. This is the first evidence that an extracellular signal may regulate differential expression of opsin genes in a tandemly duplicated array. PMID:26296154

  7. Isp7 is a novel regulator of amino acid uptake in the TOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Laor, Dana; Cohen, Adiel; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Oron-Karni, Varda; Kupiec, Martin; Weisman, Ronit

    2014-03-01

    TOR proteins reside in two distinct complexes, TOR complexes 1 and 2 (TORC1 and TORC2), that are central for the regulation of cellular growth, proliferation, and survival. TOR is also the target for the immunosuppressive and anticancer drug rapamycin. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, disruption of the TSC complex, mutations in which can lead to the tuberous sclerosis syndrome in humans, results in a rapamycin-sensitive phenotype under poor nitrogen conditions. We show here that the sensitivity to rapamycin is mediated via inhibition of TORC1 and suppressed by overexpression of isp7(+), a member of the family of 2-oxoglutarate-Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase genes. The transcript level of isp7(+) is negatively regulated by TORC1 but positively regulated by TORC2. Yet we find extensive similarity between the transcriptome of cells disrupted for isp7(+) and cells mutated in the catalytic subunit of TORC1. Moreover, Isp7 regulates amino acid permease expression in a fashion similar to that of TORC1 and opposite that of TORC2. Overexpression of isp7(+) induces TORC1-dependent phosphorylation of ribosomal protein Rps6 while inhibiting TORC2-dependent phosphorylation and activation of the AGC-like kinase Gad8. Taken together, our findings suggest a central role for Isp7 in amino acid homeostasis and the presence of isp7(+)-dependent regulatory loops that affect both TORC1 and TORC2.

  8. Mesodermal retinoic acid signaling regulates endothelial cell coalescence in caudal pharyngeal arch artery vasculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Pashmforoush, Mohammad; Sucov, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of retinoic acid signaling causes a variety of pharyngeal arch artery and great vessel defects, as well as malformations in many other tissues, including those derived from the pharyngeal endoderm. Previous studies implied that arch artery defects in the context of defective RA signaling occur secondary to pharyngeal pouch segmentation defects, although this model has never been experimentally verified. In this study, we examined arch artery morphogenesis during mouse development, and the role of RA in this process. We show in normal embryos that the arch arteries form by vasculogenic differentiation of pharyngeal mesoderm. Using various genetic backgrounds and tissue-specific mutation approaches, we segregate pharyngeal arch artery and pharyngeal pouch defects in RA receptor mutants, and show that RA signal transduction only in pharyngeal mesoderm is required for arch artery formation. RA does not control pharyngeal mesodermal differentiation to endothelium, but instead promotes the aggregation of endothelial cells into nascent vessels. Expression of VE-cadherin was substantially reduced in RAR mutants, and this deficiency may underlie the arch artery defects. The consequences of disrupted mesodermal and endodermal RA signaling were restricted to the 4th and 6th arch arteries and to the 4th pharyngeal pouch, respectively, suggesting that different regulatory mechanisms control the formation of the more anterior arch arteries and pouches. PMID:22040871

  9. Crosstalk between cystine and glutathione is critical for the regulation of amino acid signaling pathways and ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau

    2016-07-18

    Although essential amino acids regulate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and the integrated stress response (ISR), the role of cysteine is unknown. We found that in hepatoma HepG2 cells, cystine (oxidized form of cysteine) activated mTORC1 and suppressed the ISR. Cystine deprivation induced GSH efflux and extracellular degradation, which aimed to restore cellular cysteine. Inhibition of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) impaired the ability of GSH or cell-permeable GSH to restore mTORC1 signaling and the ISR, suggesting that the capacity of GSH to release cysteine, but not GSH per se, regulated the signaling networks. Inhibition of protein translation restored both mTORC1 signaling and the ISR during cystine starvation, suggesting the bulk of cellular cysteine was committed to the biosynthetic process. Cellular cysteine and GSH displayed overlapping protective roles in the suppression of ferroptosis, further supporting their cooperation in the regulation of cell signaling. Thus, cellular cysteine and its derivative GSH cooperate to regulate mTORC1 pathway, the ISR and ferroptosis.

  10. Crosstalk between cystine and glutathione is critical for the regulation of amino acid signaling pathways and ferroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinlei; Long, Yun Chau

    2016-01-01

    Although essential amino acids regulate mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and the integrated stress response (ISR), the role of cysteine is unknown. We found that in hepatoma HepG2 cells, cystine (oxidized form of cysteine) activated mTORC1 and suppressed the ISR. Cystine deprivation induced GSH efflux and extracellular degradation, which aimed to restore cellular cysteine. Inhibition of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) impaired the ability of GSH or cell-permeable GSH to restore mTORC1 signaling and the ISR, suggesting that the capacity of GSH to release cysteine, but not GSH per se, regulated the signaling networks. Inhibition of protein translation restored both mTORC1 signaling and the ISR during cystine starvation, suggesting the bulk of cellular cysteine was committed to the biosynthetic process. Cellular cysteine and GSH displayed overlapping protective roles in the suppression of ferroptosis, further supporting their cooperation in the regulation of cell signaling. Thus, cellular cysteine and its derivative GSH cooperate to regulate mTORC1 pathway, the ISR and ferroptosis. PMID:27425006

  11. Zebrafish nephrogenesis is regulated by interactions between retinoic acid, mecom, and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Cheng, Christina N; Verdun, Valerie A; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2014-02-01

    The zebrafish pronephros provides a conserved model to study kidney development, in particular to delineate the poorly understood processes of how nephron segment pattern and cell type choice are established. Zebrafish nephrons are divided into distinct epithelial regions that include a series of proximal and distal tubule segments, which are comprised of intercalated transporting epithelial cells and multiciliated cells (MCC). Previous studies have shown that retinoic acid (RA) regionalizes the renal progenitor field into proximal and distal domains and that Notch signaling later represses MCC differentiation, but further understanding of these pathways has remained unknown. The transcription factor mecom (mds1/evi1 complex) is broadly expressed in renal progenitors, and then subsequently marks the distal tubule. Here, we show that mecom is necessary to form the distal tubule and to restrict both proximal tubule formation and MCC fate choice. We found that mecom and RA have opposing roles in patterning discrete proximal and distal segments. Further, we discovered that RA is required for MCC formation, and that one mechanism by which RA promotes MCC fate choice is to inhibit mecom. Next, we determined the epistatic relationship between mecom and Notch signaling, which limits MCC fate choice by lateral inhibition. Abrogation of Notch signaling with the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT revealed that Notch and mecom did not have additive effects in blocking MCC formation, suggesting that they function in the same pathway. Ectopic expression of the Notch signaling effector, Notch intracellular domain (NICD), rescued the expansion of MCCs in mecom morphants, indicating that mecom acts upstream to induce Notch signaling. These findings suggest a model in which mecom and RA arbitrate proximodistal segment domains, while MCC fate is modulated by a complex interplay in which RA inhibition of mecom, and mecom promotion of Notch, titrates MCC number. Taken together, our studies

  12. Zebrafish nephrogenesis is regulated by interactions between retinoic acid, mecom, and Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Cheng, Christina N.; Verdun, Valerie A.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish pronephros provides a conserved model to study kidney development, in particular to delineate the poorly understood processes of how nephron segment pattern and cell type choice are established. Zebrafish nephrons are divided into distinct epithelial regions that include a series of proximal and distal tubule segments, which are comprised of intercalated transporting epithelial cells and multiciliated cells (MCC). Previous studies have shown that retinoic acid (RA) regionalizes the renal progenitor field into proximal and distal domains and that Notch signaling later represses MCC differentiation, but further understanding of these pathways has remained unknown. The transcription factor mecom (mds1/evi1 complex) is broadly expressed in renal progenitors, and then subsequently marks the distal tubule. Here, we show that mecom is necessary to form the distal tubule and to restrict both proximal tubule formation and MCC fate choice. We found that mecom and RA have opposing roles in patterning discrete proximal and distal segments. Further, we discovered that RA is required for MCC formation, and that one mechanism by which RA promotes MCC fate choice is to inhibit mecom. Next, we determined the epistatic relationship between mecom and Notch signaling, which limits MCC fate choice by lateral inhibition. Abrogation of Notch signaling with the y-secretase inhibitor DAPT revealed that Notch and mecom did not have additive effects in blocking MCC formation, suggesting that they function in the same pathway. Ectopic expression of the Notch signaling effector, Notch intracellular domain (NICD), rescued the expansion of MCCs in mecom morphants, indicating that mecom acts upstream to induce Notch signaling. These findings suggest a model in which mecom and RA arbitrate proximodistal segment domains, while MCC fate is modulated by a complex interplay in which RA inhibition of mecom, and mecom promotion of Notch, titrates MCC number. Taken together, our studies

  13. Folic Acid Is Able to Polarize the Inflammatory Response in LPS Activated Microglia by Regulating Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Rosaria; Porro, Chiara; Trotta, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of folic acid to modulate the inflammatory responses of LPS activated BV-2 microglia cells and the signal transduction pathways involved. To this aim, the BV-2 cell line was exposed to LPS as a proinflammatory response inducer, in presence or absence of various concentrations of folic acid. The production of nitric oxide (NO) was determined by the Griess test. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and IL-10 were determined by ELISA. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS), nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, MAPKs protein, and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and SOCS3 were analyzed by western blotting. TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as iNOS dependent NO production, resulted significantly inhibited by folic acid pretreatment in LPS-activated BV-2 cells. We also observed that folic acid dose-dependently upregulated both SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression in BV-2 cells, leading to an increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Finally, p-IκBα, which indirectly reflects NF-κB complex activation, and JNK phosphorylation resulted dose-dependently downregulated by folic acid pretreatment of LPS-activated cells, whereas p38 MAPK phosphorylation resulted significantly upregulated by folic acid treatment. Overall, these results demonstrated that folic acid was able to modulate the inflammatory response in microglia cells, shifting proinflammatory versus anti-inflammatory responses through regulating multiple signaling pathways. PMID:27738387

  14. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-mediated calcium signalling in effector T cells regulates autoimmunity of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Kawakami, Naoto; Klinkert, Wolfgang E. F.; Lodygin, Dimtri; Lühder, Fred; Breunig, Esther; Schild, Detlev; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Dornmair, Klaus; Dammermann, Werner; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate represents a newly identified second messenger in T cells involved in antigen receptor-mediated calcium signalling. Its function in vivo is, however, unknown due to the lack of biocompatible inhibitors. Using a recently developed inhibitor, we explored the role of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate in autoreactive effector T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model for multiple sclerosis. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that calcium signalling controlled by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate is relevant for the pathogenic potential of autoimmune effector T cells. Live two photon imaging and molecular analyses revealed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate signalling regulates T cell motility and re-activation upon arrival in the nervous tissues. Treatment with the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor significantly reduced both the number of stable arrests of effector T cells and their invasive capacity. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17 were strongly diminished. Consecutively, the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis were ameliorated. In vitro, antigen-triggered T cell proliferation and cytokine production were evenly suppressed. These inhibitory effects were reversible: after wash-out of the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate antagonist, the effector T cells fully regained their functions. The nicotinic acid derivative BZ194 induced this transient state of non-responsiveness specifically in post-activated effector T cells. Naïve and long-lived memory T cells, which express lower levels of the putative nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptor, type 1 ryanodine receptor, were not targeted. T cell priming and recall responses in vivo were not reduced. These data indicate that the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate

  15. An Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized RRL protein mediates abscisic acid signal transduction through mitochondrial retrograde regulation involving ABI4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Li, Juanjuan; Liu, Jianping; Liu, Kede

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling have been studied for many years; however, how mitochondria-localized proteins play roles in ABA signalling remains unclear. Here an Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRL (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH-LIKE) was shown to function in ABA signalling. A previous study had revealed that the Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized protein RRG (RETARDED ROOT GROWTH) is required for cell division in the root meristem. RRL shares 54% and 57% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, with RRG; nevertheless, RRL shows a different function in Arabidopsis. In this study, disruption of RRL decreased ABA sensitivity whereas overexpression of RRL increased ABA sensitivity during seed germination and seedling growth. High expression levels of RRL were found in germinating seeds and developing seedlings, as revealed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining of ProRRL-GUS transgenic lines. The analyses of the structure and function of mitochondria in the knockout rrl mutant showed that the disruption of RRL causes extensively internally vacuolated mitochondria and reduced ABA-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) in the alternative respiratory pathway is increased by mitochondrial retrograde regulation to regain ROS levels when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is impaired. The APETALA2 (AP2)-type transcription factor ABI4 is a regulator of ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a (AOX1a) in mitochondrial retrograde signalling. This study showed that ABA-induced AOX1a and ABI4 expression was inhibited in the rrl mutant, suggesting that RRL is probably involved in ABI4-mediated mitochondrial retrograde signalling. Furthermore, the results revealed that ABI4 is a downstream regulatory factor in RRL-mediated ABA signalling in seed germination and seedling growth.

  16. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling is an essential positive regulator of the general amino acid control response and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Graef, Martin; Nunnari, Jodi; Powers, Ted

    2014-07-22

    The highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrient availability. TOR functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR Complex 2 (TORC2). Through TORC1, TOR negatively regulates autophagy, a conserved process that functions in quality control and cellular homeostasis and, in this capacity, is part of an adaptive nutrient deprivation response. Here we demonstrate that during amino acid starvation TOR also operates independently as a positive regulator of autophagy through the conserved TORC2 and its downstream target protein kinase, Ypk1. Under these conditions, TORC2-Ypk1 signaling negatively regulates the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and to promote autophagy. Our work reveals that the TORC2 pathway regulates autophagy in an opposing manner to TORC1 to provide a tunable response to cellular metabolic status.

  17. The inhibitory effects of carnosic acid on cervical cancer cells growth by promoting apoptosis via ROS-regulated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Ke; Wang, Chun-Fang; Zhang, Ying; Cai, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer has been the fourth most common cancer killing many women across the world. Carnosic acid (CA), as a phenolic diterpene, has been suggested to against cancer, exerting protective effects associated with inflammatory cytokines. It is aimed to demonstrate the therapeutic role of carnosic acid against cervical cancer and indicate its underlying molecular mechanisms. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was performed to assess the possible anti-proliferative effects of carnosic acid. And also, colony formation was used to further estimate carnosic acid's ability in suppressing cervical cancer cells proliferation. Flow cytometry assays were performed here to indicate the alterations of cervical cancer cells cycle and the development of apoptosis. Western blot assays and RT-PCR were also applied to clarify the apoptosis-associated signaling pathways affected by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. And immunofluorescence was used to detect ROS-positive cells. In vivo experiments, CaSki xenograft model samples of nude mice were involved to further elucidate the effects of carnosic acid. In our results, we found that carnosic acid exerted anti-tumor ability in vitro supported by up-regulation of apoptosis and ROS production in cervical cancer cells. Also, acceleration of ROS led to the phospharylation of (c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its-related signals, as well as activation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress, promoting the progression of apoptosis via stimulating Caspase3 expression. The development and growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice were found to be inhibited by the administration of carnosic acid for five weeks. And the suppressed role of carnosic acid in proliferation of cervical cancer cells and apoptosis of nude mice with tumor tissues were observed in our study. Taken together, our data indicated that carnosic acid resulted in apoptosis both in vitro and vivo experiments via promoting ROS and

  18. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into disease-related isoforms (PrPSc). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrPC in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrPSc formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrPC. In contrast, PrPC containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrPC) was not converted to PrPSc. Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrPC inhibited the production of PrPSc within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrPC contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrPC. Desialylated PrPC was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrPC and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrPC in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrPC modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrPSc formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. PMID:26553874

  19. Identification of TLR2/TLR6 signalling lactic acid bacteria for supporting immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chengcheng; Zhang, Qiuxiang; de Haan, Bart J.; Zhang, Hao; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) influence the consumer’s immune status it is not completely understood how this is established. Bacteria-host interactions between bacterial cell-wall components and toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been suggested to play an essential role. Here we investigated the interaction between LABs with reported health effects and TLRs. By using cell-lines expressing single or combination of TLRs, we show that LABs can signal via TLR-dependent and independent pathways. The strains only stimulated and did not inhibit TLRs. We found that several strains such as L. plantarum CCFM634, L. plantarum CCFM734, L. fermentum CCFM381, L. acidophilus CCFM137, and S. thermophilus CCFM218 stimulated TLR2/TLR6. TLR2/TLR6 is essential in immune regulatory processes and of interest for prevention of diseases. Specificity of the TLR2/TLR6 stimulation was confirmed with blocking antibodies. Immunomodulatory properties of LABs were also studied by assessing IL-10 and IL-6 secretion patterns in bacteria-stimulated THP1-derived macrophages, which confirmed species and strain specific effects of the LABs. With this study we provide novel insight in LAB specific host-microbe interactions. Our data demonstrates that interactions between pattern recognition receptors such as TLRs is species and strain specific and underpins the importance of selecting specific strains for promoting specific health effects. PMID:27708357

  20. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids regulation of PPARs, signaling: Relationship to tissue development and aging.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Francisca; Ortiz, Macarena; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Videla, Luis A

    2016-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that function as ligand-dependent transcription factors that can be activated by different types of fatty acids (FAs). Three isoforms of PPARs have been identify, namely, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, which are able to bind long-chain polyunsaturated FAs (LCPUFAs), n-3 LCPUFAs being bound with greater affinity to achieve activation. FA binding induces a conformational change of the nuclear receptors, triggering the transcription of specific genes including those encoding for various metabolic and cellular processes such as FA β-oxidation and adipogenesis, thus representing key mediators of lipid homeostasis. In addition, PPARs have important roles during placental, embryonal, and fetal development, and in the regulation of processes related to aging comprising oxidative stress, inflammation, and neuroprotection. The aim of this review was to assess the role of FAs as PPARs ligands, in terms of their main functions associated with FA metabolism and their relevance in the prevention and treatment of related pathologies during human life span.

  1. The Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Gene AOP2 Mediates Feed-back Regulation of Jasmonic Acid Signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Burow, Meike; Atwell, Susanna; Francisco, Marta; Kerwin, Rachel E; Halkier, Barbara A; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    Survival in changing and challenging environments requires an organism to efficiently obtain and use its resources. Due to their sessile nature, it is particularly critical for plants to dynamically optimize their metabolism. In plant primary metabolism, metabolic fine-tuning involves feed-back mechanisms whereby the output of a pathway controls its input to generate a precise and robust response to environmental changes. By contrast, few studies have addressed the potential for feed-back regulation of secondary metabolism. In Arabidopsis, accumulation of the defense compounds glucosinolates has previously been linked to genetic variation in the glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2. AOP2 expression can increase the transcript levels of two known regulators (MYB28 and MYB29) of the pathway, suggesting that AOP2 plays a role in positive feed-back regulation controlling glucosinolate biosynthesis. We generated mutants affecting AOP2, MYB28/29, or both. Transcriptome analysis of these mutants identified a so far unrecognized link between AOP2 and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling independent of MYB28 and MYB29. Thus, AOP2 is part of a regulatory feed-back loop linking glucosinolate biosynthesis and JA signaling and thereby allows the glucosinolate pathway to influence JA sensitivity. The discovery of this regulatory feed-back loop provides insight into how plants optimize the use of resources for defensive metabolites.

  2. Leucine aminopeptidase regulates defense and wound signaling in tomato downstream of jasmonic acid.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Jonathan H; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Aromdee, Dale N; Pautot, Véronique; Holzer, Frances M; Walling, Linda L

    2009-04-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase A (LapA) is a late wound-response gene of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). To elucidate the role of LapA, transgenic plants that overexpressed or abolished LapA gene expression were used. The early wound-response gene RNA levels were similar in wild-type and Lap-silenced (LapA-SI), -antisense (LapA-AS), and -overexpressing (LapA-OX) plants. By contrast, late wound-response gene RNA levels and protection against Manduca sexta damage were influenced by LapA RNA and protein levels. While LapA-OX plants had elevated levels of LapA RNAs and protein, ectopic expression of LapA was not sufficient to induce Pin (Ser proteinase inhibitor) or PPO (polyphenol oxidase) transcripts in nonwounded leaves. M. sexta larvae damaged less foliage and displayed delays in growth and development when feeding on LapA-OX plants. By contrast, LapA-SI and LapA-AS lines had lower levels of Pin and PPO RNAs than wild-type controls. Furthermore, larvae consumed more foliage and attained larger masses when feeding on LapA-SI plants. Jasmonic acid (JA) did not complement the wound-signaling phenotype of LapA-SI plants. Based on root elongation in the presence of JA, JA perception appeared to be intact in LapA-SI lines. Collectively, these data suggested that LAP-A has a role in modulating essential defenses against herbivores by promoting late wound responses and acting downstream of JA biosynthesis and perception.

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid signaling via LPA1 and LPA3 regulates cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kaori; Takahashi, Kaede; Yamasaki, Eri; Onishi, Yuka; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2017-03-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors exhibits a variety of biological effects, such as cell proliferation, motility and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of LPA1 and LPA3 in cellular functions during tumor progression in pancreatic cancer cells. LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown cells were generated from PANC-1 cells. The cell motile and invasive activities of PANC-1 cells were inhibited by LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown. In gelatin zymography, LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown cells indicated the low activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the presence of LPA. Next, to assess whether LPA1 and LPA3 regulate cellular functions induced by anticancer drug, PANC-1 cells were treated with cisplatin (CDDP) for approximately 6 months. The cell motile and invasive activities of long-term CDDP treated cells were markedly higher than those of PANC-1 cells, correlating with the expression levels of LPAR1 and LPAR3 genes. In soft agar assay, the long-term CDDP treated cells formed markedly large sized colonies. In addition, the cell motile and invasive activities enhanced by CDDP were significantly suppressed by LPA1 and LPA3 knockdown as well as colony formation. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA1 and LPA3 play an important role in the regulation of cellular functions during tumor progression in PANC-1 cells.

  4. Retinoic acid receptors inhibit AP1 activation by regulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and CBP recruitment to an AP1-responsive promoter.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, Madjid; Brand, Céline; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-07-01

    Retinoids exhibit antineoplastic activities that may be linked to retinoid receptor-mediated transrepression of activating protein 1 (AP1), a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of fos- and jun-related proteins. Here we show that transcriptional activation of an AP1-regulated gene through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (MAPK(ERK)) is characterized, in intact cells, by a switch from a fra2-junD dimer to a junD-fosB dimer loading on its promoter and by simultaneous recruitment of ERKs, CREB-binding protein (CBP), and RNA polymerase II. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) receptor (RAR) was tethered constitutively to the AP1 promoter. AP1 transrepression by retinoic acid was concomitant to glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation, negative regulation of junD hyperphosphorylation, and to decreased RNA polymerase II recruitment. Under these conditions, fra1 loading to the AP1 response element was strongly increased. Importantly, CBP and ERKs were excluded from the promoter in the presence of atRA. AP1 transrepression by retinoids was RAR and ligand dependent, but none of the functions required for RAR-mediated transactivation was necessary for AP1 transrepression. These results indicate that transrepressive effects of retinoids are mediated through a mechanism unrelated to transcriptional activation, involving the RAR-dependent control of transcription factors and cofactor assembly on AP1-regulated promoters.

  5. Retinoic Acid Receptors Inhibit AP1 Activation by Regulating Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase and CBP Recruitment to an AP1-Responsive Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Benkoussa, Madjid; Brand, Céline; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Retinoids exhibit antineoplastic activities that may be linked to retinoid receptor-mediated transrepression of activating protein 1 (AP1), a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of fos- and jun-related proteins. Here we show that transcriptional activation of an AP1-regulated gene through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (MAPKERK) is characterized, in intact cells, by a switch from a fra2-junD dimer to a junD-fosB dimer loading on its promoter and by simultaneous recruitment of ERKs, CREB-binding protein (CBP), and RNA polymerase II. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) receptor (RAR) was tethered constitutively to the AP1 promoter. AP1 transrepression by retinoic acid was concomitant to glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation, negative regulation of junD hyperphosphorylation, and to decreased RNA polymerase II recruitment. Under these conditions, fra1 loading to the AP1 response element was strongly increased. Importantly, CBP and ERKs were excluded from the promoter in the presence of atRA. AP1 transrepression by retinoids was RAR and ligand dependent, but none of the functions required for RAR-mediated transactivation was necessary for AP1 transrepression. These results indicate that transrepressive effects of retinoids are mediated through a mechanism unrelated to transcriptional activation, involving the RAR-dependent control of transcription factors and cofactor assembly on AP1-regulated promoters. PMID:12052862

  6. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Avafia Y.; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R.; Ford, Henri R.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26608185

  7. Periodic retinoic acid-STRA8 signaling intersects with periodic germ-cell competencies to regulate spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tsutomu; Romer, Katherine A; Anderson, Ericka L; Baltus, Andrew E; de Rooij, Dirk G; Page, David C

    2015-05-05

    Mammalian spermatogenesis--the transformation of stem cells into millions of haploid spermatozoa--is elaborately organized in time and space. We explored the underlying regulatory mechanisms by genetically and chemically perturbing spermatogenesis in vivo, focusing on spermatogonial differentiation, which begins a series of amplifying divisions, and meiotic initiation, which ends these divisions. We first found that, in mice lacking the retinoic acid (RA) target gene Stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8), undifferentiated spermatogonia accumulated in unusually high numbers as early as 10 d after birth, whereas differentiating spermatogonia were depleted. We thus conclude that Stra8, previously shown to be required for meiotic initiation, also promotes (but is not strictly required for) spermatogonial differentiation. Second, we found that injection of RA into wild-type adult males induced, independently, precocious spermatogonial differentiation and precocious meiotic initiation; thus, RA acts instructively on germ cells at both transitions. Third, the competencies of germ cells to undergo spermatogonial differentiation or meiotic initiation in response to RA were found to be distinct, periodic, and limited to particular seminiferous stages. Competencies for both transitions begin while RA levels are low, so that the germ cells respond as soon as RA levels rise. Together with other findings, our results demonstrate that periodic RA-STRA8 signaling intersects with periodic germ-cell competencies to regulate two distinct, cell-type-specific responses: spermatogonial differentiation and meiotic initiation. This simple mechanism, with one signal both starting and ending the amplifying divisions, contributes to the prodigious output of spermatozoa and to the elaborate organization of spermatogenesis.

  8. Bile acids: regulation of synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, John Y L

    2009-10-01

    Bile acids are physiological detergents that generate bile flow and facilitate intestinal absorption and transport of lipids, nutrients, and vitamins. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and inflammatory agents that rapidly activate nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways that regulate lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism. The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids exerts important physiological functions not only in feedback inhibition of bile acid synthesis but also in control of whole-body lipid homeostasis. In the liver, bile acids activate a nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), that induces an atypical nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner, which subsequently inhibits nuclear receptors, liver-related homolog-1, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha and results in inhibiting transcription of the critical regulatory gene in bile acid synthesis, cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). In the intestine, FXR induces an intestinal hormone, fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15; or FGF19 in human), which activates hepatic FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) signaling to inhibit bile acid synthesis. However, the mechanism by which FXR/FGF19/FGFR4 signaling inhibits CYP7A1 remains unknown. Bile acids are able to induce FGF19 in human hepatocytes, and the FGF19 autocrine pathway may exist in the human livers. Bile acids and bile acid receptors are therapeutic targets for development of drugs for treatment of cholestatic liver diseases, fatty liver diseases, diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome.

  9. Fenretinide mediated retinoic acid receptor signalling and inhibition of ceramide biosynthesis regulates adipogenesis, lipid accumulation, mitochondrial function and nutrient stress signalling in adipocytes and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mcilroy, George D.; Tammireddy, Seshu R.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Grant, Louise; Doherty, Mary K.; Watson, David G.; Delibegović, Mirela; Whitfield, Phillip D.; Mody, Nimesh

    2016-01-01

    Fenretinide (FEN) is a synthetic retinoid that inhibits obesity and insulin resistance in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice and completely prevents 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte differentiation. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) of FEN action in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in mice. We used the 3T3-L1 model of adipogenesis, fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and adipose tissue from HFD-induced obese mice to investigate the mechanisms of FEN action. We measured expression of adipogenic and retinoid genes by qPCR and activation of nutrient-signalling pathways by western blotting. Global lipid and metabolite analysis was performed and specific ceramide lipid species measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We provide direct evidence that FEN inhibits 3T3-L1 adipogenesis via RA-receptor (RAR)-dependent signaling. However, RARα antagonism did not prevent FEN-induced decreases in lipid levels in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting an RAR-independent mechanism. Lipidomics analysis revealed that FEN increased dihydroceramide lipid species 5- to 16-fold in adipocytes, indicating an inhibition of the final step of ceramide biosynthesis. A similar blockade in adipose tissue from FEN-treated obese mice was associated with a complete normalisation of impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation and tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The FEN catabolite, 4-oxo-N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-OXO), also decreased lipid accumulation without affecting adipogenesis. FEN and 4-OXO (but not RA) treatment additionally led to the activation of p38-MAPK, peIF2α and autophagy markers in adipocytes. Overall our data reveals FEN utilises both RAR-dependent and -independent pathways to regulate adipocyte biology, both of which may be required for FEN to prevent obesity and insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:26592777

  10. Gallic acid prevents isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis through regulation of JNK2 signaling and Smad3 binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yuhee; Jin, Li; Kee, Hae Jin; Piao, Zhe Hao; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Gwi Ran; Choi, Sin Young; Lin, Ming Quan; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gallic acid, a type of phenolic acid, has been shown to have beneficial effects in inflammation, vascular calcification, and metabolic diseases. The present study was aimed at determining the effect and regulatory mechanism of gallic acid in cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by isoproterenol (ISP) in mice and primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. Gallic acid pretreatment attenuated concentric cardiac hypertrophy. It downregulated the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide, and beta-myosin heavy chain in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, it prevented interstitial collagen deposition and expression of fibrosis-associated genes. Upregulation of collagen type I by Smad3 overexpression was observed in cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells but not in cardiac fibroblasts. Gallic acid reduced the DNA binding activity of phosphorylated Smad3 in Smad binding sites of collagen type I promoter in rat cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, it decreased the ISP-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) protein in mice. JNK2 overexpression reduced collagen type I and Smad3 expression as well as GATA4 expression in H9c2 cells and cardiac fibroblasts. Gallic acid might be a novel therapeutic agent for the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis by regulating the JNK2 and Smad3 signaling pathway. PMID:27703224

  11. A maize calcium-dependent protein kinase gene, ZmCPK4, positively regulated abscisic acid signaling and enhanced drought stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Li; Pan, Jiaowen; Liu, Yang; Kong, Xiangpei; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dequan

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play essential roles in calcium-mediated signal transductions in plant response to abiotic stress. Several members have been identified to be regulators for plants response to abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. Here, we isolated a subgroup I CDPK gene, ZmCPK4, from maize. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that the ZmCPK4 transcripts were induced by various stresses and signal molecules. Transient and stable expression of the ZmCPK4-GFP fusion proteins revealed ZmCPK4 localized to the membrane. Moreover, overexpression of ZmCPK4 in the transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced ABA sensitivity in seed germination, seedling growth and stomatal movement. The transgenic plants also enhanced drought stress tolerance. Taken together, the results suggest that ZmCPK4 might be involved in ABA-mediated regulation of stomatal closure in response to drought stress.

  12. ERK1/2 activation in human taste bud cells regulates fatty acid signaling and gustatory perception of fat in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Selvakumar; Ozdener, Mehmet Hakan; Abdoul-Azize, Souleymane; Saito, Katsuyoshi; Malik, Bilal; Maquart, Guillaume; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Marambaud, Philippe; Aribi, Mourad; Tordoff, Michael G; Besnard, Philippe; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem. An in-depth knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of oro-sensory detection of dietary lipids may help fight it. Humans and rodents can detect fatty acids via lipido-receptors, such as CD36 and GPR120. We studied the implication of the MAPK pathways, in particular, ERK1/2, in the gustatory detection of fatty acids. Linoleic acid, a dietary fatty acid, induced via CD36 the phosphorylation of MEK1/2-ERK1/2-ETS-like transcription factor-1 cascade, which requires Fyn-Src kinase and lipid rafts in human taste bud cells (TBCs). ERK1/2 cascade was activated by Ca(2+) signaling via opening of the calcium-homeostasis modulator-1 (CALHM1) channel. Furthermore, fatty acid-evoked Ca(2+) signaling and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were decreased in both human TBCs after small interfering RNA knockdown of CALHM1 channel and in TBCs from Calhm1(-/-) mice. Targeted knockdown of ERK1/2 by small interfering RNA or PD0325901 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) in the tongue and genetic ablation of Erk1 or Calhm1 genes impaired preference for dietary fat in mice. Lingual inhibition of ERK1/2 in healthy volunteers also decreased orogustatory sensitivity for linoleic acid. Our data demonstrate that ERK1/2-MAPK cascade is regulated by the opening of CALHM1 Ca(2+) channel in TBCs to modulate orogustatory detection of dietary lipids in mice and humans.-Subramaniam, S., Ozdener, M. H., Abdoul-Azize, S., Saito, K., Malik, B., Maquart, G., Hashimoto, T., Marambaud, P., Aribi, M., Tordoff, M. G., Besnard, P., Khan, N. A. ERK1/2 activation in human taste bud cells regulates fatty acid signaling and gustatory perception of fat in mice and humans.

  13. Chloroplast signaling: retrograde regulation revelations.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2011-05-24

    Developing chloroplasts are able to communicate their status to the nucleus and regulate expression of genes whose products are needed for photosynthesis. Heme is revealed to be a signaling molecule for this retrograde communication.

  14. Autophagy negatively regulates cell death by controlling NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling during senescence and the innate immune response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kohki; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Kusano, Miyako; Consonni, Chiara; Panstruga, Ralph; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Ken

    2009-09-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular process for vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components. In higher plants, autophagy defects result in early senescence and excessive immunity-related programmed cell death (PCD) irrespective of nutrient conditions; however, the mechanisms by which cells die in the absence of autophagy have been unclear. Here, we demonstrate a conserved requirement for salicylic acid (SA) signaling for these phenomena in autophagy-defective mutants (atg mutants). The atg mutant phenotypes of accelerated PCD in senescence and immunity are SA signaling dependent but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene signaling pathways. Application of an SA agonist induces the senescence/cell death phenotype in SA-deficient atg mutants but not in atg npr1 plants, suggesting that the cell death phenotypes in the atg mutants are dependent on the SA signal transducer NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. We also show that autophagy is induced by the SA agonist. These findings imply that plant autophagy operates a novel negative feedback loop modulating SA signaling to negatively regulate senescence and immunity-related PCD.

  15. Irx1 and Irx2 Are Coordinately Expressed and Regulated by Retinoic Acid, TGFβ and FGF Signaling during Chick Hindlimb Development

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Hernández, Martha Elena; Bustamante, Marcia; Galván-Hernández, Claudio Iván; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx) genes play a crucial role in the regionalization and patterning of tissues and organs during metazoan development. The Irx1 and Irx2 gene expression pattern during hindlimb development has been investigated in different species, but its regulation during hindlimb morphogenesis has not been explored yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene expression pattern of Irx1 and Irx2 as well as their regulation by important regulators of hindlimb development such as retinoic acid (RA), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling during chick hindlimb development. Irx1 and Irx2 were coordinately expressed in the interdigital tissue, digital primordia, joints and in the boundary between cartilage and non-cartilage tissue. Down-regulation of Irx1 and Irx2 expression at the interdigital tissue coincided with the onset of cell death. RA was found to down-regulate their expression by a bone morphogenetic protein-independent mechanism before any evidence of cell death. Furthermore, TGFβ protein regulated Irx1 and Irx2 in a stage-dependent manner at the interdigital tissue, it inhibited their expression when it was administered to the interdigital tissue at developing stages before their normal down-regulation. TGFβ administered to the interdigital tissue at developing stages after normal down-regulation of Irx1 and Irx2 evidenced that expression of these genes marked the boundary between cartilage tissue and non-cartilage tissue. It was also found that at early stages of hindlimb development FGF signaling inhibited the expression of Irx2. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Irx1 and Irx2 are coordinately expressed and regulated during chick embryo hindlimb development as occurs in other species of vertebrates supporting the notion that the genomic architecture of Irx clusters is conserved in vertebrates. PMID:23505533

  16. Irx1 and Irx2 are coordinately expressed and regulated by retinoic acid, TGFβ and FGF signaling during chick hindlimb development.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hernández, Martha Elena; Bustamante, Marcia; Galván-Hernández, Claudio Iván; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx) genes play a crucial role in the regionalization and patterning of tissues and organs during metazoan development. The Irx1 and Irx2 gene expression pattern during hindlimb development has been investigated in different species, but its regulation during hindlimb morphogenesis has not been explored yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene expression pattern of Irx1 and Irx2 as well as their regulation by important regulators of hindlimb development such as retinoic acid (RA), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling during chick hindlimb development. Irx1 and Irx2 were coordinately expressed in the interdigital tissue, digital primordia, joints and in the boundary between cartilage and non-cartilage tissue. Down-regulation of Irx1 and Irx2 expression at the interdigital tissue coincided with the onset of cell death. RA was found to down-regulate their expression by a bone morphogenetic protein-independent mechanism before any evidence of cell death. Furthermore, TGFβ protein regulated Irx1 and Irx2 in a stage-dependent manner at the interdigital tissue, it inhibited their expression when it was administered to the interdigital tissue at developing stages before their normal down-regulation. TGFβ administered to the interdigital tissue at developing stages after normal down-regulation of Irx1 and Irx2 evidenced that expression of these genes marked the boundary between cartilage tissue and non-cartilage tissue. It was also found that at early stages of hindlimb development FGF signaling inhibited the expression of Irx2. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Irx1 and Irx2 are coordinately expressed and regulated during chick embryo hindlimb development as occurs in other species of vertebrates supporting the notion that the genomic architecture of Irx clusters is conserved in vertebrates.

  17. Down-Regulation of AKT Signalling by Ursolic Acid Induces Intrinsic Apoptosis and Sensitization to Doxorubicin in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Victor Hugo; Vögler, Oliver; Barceló, Francisca; Martín-Broto, Javier; Martínez-Serra, Jordi; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Alemany, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Several important biological activities have been attributed to the pentacyclic triterpene ursolic acid (UA), being its antitumoral effect extensively studied in human adenocarcinomas. In this work, we focused on the efficacy and molecular mechanisms involved in the antitumoral effects of UA, as single agent or combined with doxorubicin (DXR), in human soft tissue sarcoma cells. UA (5–50 μM) strongly inhibited (up to 80%) the viability of STS cells at 24 h and its proliferation in soft agar, with higher concentrations increasing apoptotic death up to 30%. UA treatment (6–9 h) strongly blocked the survival AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signalling pathway, which led to a concomitant reduction of the anti-apoptotic proteins c-Myc and p21, altogether resulting in the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Interestingly, UA at low concentrations (10–15 μM) enhanced the antitumoral effects of DXR by up to 2-fold, while in parallel inhibiting DXR-induced AKT activation and p21 expression, two proteins implicated in antitumoral drug resistance and cell survival. In conclusion, UA is able to induce intrinsic apoptosis in human STS cells and also to sensitize these cells to DXR by blocking the AKT signalling pathway. Therefore, UA may have beneficial effects, if used as nutraceutical adjuvant during standard chemotherapy treatment of STS. PMID:27219337

  18. Saturated fatty acids up-regulate COX-2 expression in prostate epithelial cells via toll-like receptor 4/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Hu, Shuai; Cui, Yun; Sun, Meng-Kui; Xie, Feng; Zhang, Qian; Jin, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis, and recently it has been confirmed to be a molecular target of saturated fatty acids (SFAs). In the present study, we investigated the effect of stearic acid (SA) and palmitic acid (PA), two of the most abundant SFAs contained in dietary fat, on COX-2 expression in prostate epithelial cells and the signaling transduction pathway involved. First, we demonstrated that both SA and PA increased the mRNA and protein expression of COX-2, and consistently induced the activation of NF-κB in RWPE-1, BPH-1 and PC-3 prostate epithelial cell lines. The effect of SA and PA on COX-2 over-expression and NF-κB activation was in a dose-dependent manner, and PA was more potent than SA at the same concentration. Then, we demonstrated inhibition of NF-κB using its specific inhibitor strikingly attenuated PA-induced COX-2 expression. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was revealed to be expressed on RWPE-1, BPH-1 and PC-3 cell lines by PCR and immunofluorescence staining, and blocking its signaling significantly inhibited PA induced COX-2 over-expression and NF-κB activation. Taken together, we demonstrated that SFAs can up-regulate COX-2 expression in prostate epithelial cells, and this effect was mediated mainly through the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  19. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid increases neural stem cell pool and neuronal conversion by regulating mitochondria-cell cycle retrograde signaling.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Joana M; Morgado, Ana L; Rodrigues, Cecília Mp; Solá, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The low survival and differentiation rates of stem cells after either transplantation or neural injury have been a major concern of stem cell-based therapy. Thus, further understanding long-term survival and differentiation of stem cells may uncover new targets for discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. We have previously described the impact of mitochondrial apoptosis-related events in modulating neural stem cell (NSC) fate. In addition, the endogenous bile acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) was shown to be neuroprotective in several animal models of neurodegenerative disorders by acting as an anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant molecule at the mitochondrial level. Here, we hypothesize that TUDCA might also play a role on NSC fate decision. We found that TUDCA prevents mitochondrial apoptotic events typical of early-stage mouse NSC differentiation, preserves mitochondrial integrity and function, while enhancing self-renewal potential and accelerating cell cycle exit of NSCs. Interestingly, TUDCA prevention of mitochondrial alterations interfered with NSC differentiation potential by favoring neuronal rather than astroglial conversion. Finally, inhibition of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) scavenger and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase revealed that the effect of TUDCA is dependent on mtROS and ATP regulation levels. Collectively, these data underline the importance of mitochondrial stress control of NSC fate decision and support a new role for TUDCA in this process.

  20. Positive feedback regulation between gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor signaling and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release in developing neurons.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Christophe; Hatchett, Caroline; Longbottom, Rebecca E; McAinch, Kristina; Sihra, Talvinder S; Moss, Stephen J; Thomson, Alex M; Jovanovic, Jasmina N

    2011-06-17

    During the early development of the nervous system, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated signaling parallels the neurotrophin/tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk)-dependent signaling in controlling a number of processes from cell proliferation and migration, via dendritic and axonal outgrowth, to synapse formation and plasticity. Here we present the first evidence that these two signaling systems regulate each other through a complex positive feedback mechanism. We first demonstrate that GABA(A)R activation leads to an increase in the cell surface expression of these receptors in cultured embryonic cerebrocortical neurons, specifically at the stage when this activity causes depolarization of the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. We further demonstrate that GABA(A)R activity triggers release of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn by activating TrkB receptors, mediates the observed increase in cell surface expression of GABA(A)Rs. This BDNF/TrkB-dependent increase in surface levels of GABA(A)Rs requires the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) and does not involve the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activity. The increase in GABA(A)R surface levels occurs due to an inhibition of the receptor endocytosis by BDNF, whereas the receptor reinsertion into the plasma membrane remains unaltered. Thus, GABA(A)R activity is a potent regulator of the BDNF release during neuronal development, and at the same time, it is strongly enhanced by the activity of the BDNF/TrkB/PI3K/PKC signaling pathway.

  1. Cross-talk in abscisic acid signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2002-01-01

    "Cross-talk" in hormone signaling reflects an organism's ability to integrate different inputs and respond appropriately, a crucial function at the heart of signaling network operation. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone involved in bud and seed dormancy, growth regulation, leaf senescence and abscission, stomatal opening, and a variety of plant stress responses. This review summarizes what is known about ABA signaling in the control of stomatal opening and seed dormancy and provides an overview of emerging knowledge about connections between ABA, ethylene, sugar, and auxin synthesis and signaling.

  2. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  3. The Transcription Factor p8 Regulates Autophagy in Response to Palmitic Acid Stress via a Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-independent Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Cheng; Chen, Dian-Fu; Li, An-Qi; Dai, Li; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-02-26

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved degradative process that allows cells to maintain homoeostasis in numerous physiological situations. This process also functions as an essential protective response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes the removal and degradation of unfolded proteins. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which autophagy is initiated and regulated in response to ER stress. In this study, different types of autophagy were identified in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells in response to the stress induced by nutrient starvation or lipotoxicity in which the regulation of these pathways is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent or -independent, respectively. Interestingly, we found that p8, a stress-inducible transcription factor, was enhanced in MKN45 cells treated with palmitic acid to induce lipotoxicity. Furthermore, an increase in autophagy was observed in MKN45 cells stably overexpressing p8 using a lentivirus system, and autophagy induced by palmitic acid was blocked by p8 RNAi compared with the control. Western blotting analyses showed that autophagy was regulated by p8 or mTOR in response to the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/activating transcription factor 6-mediated ER stress of lipotoxicity or the parkin-mediated mitochondrial stress of nutrient starvation, respectively. Furthermore, our results indicated that autophagy induced by palmitic acid is mTOR-independent, but this autophagy pathway was regulated by p8 via p53- and PKCα-mediated signaling in MKN45 cells. Our findings provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy induced by the lipotoxic effects of excess fat accumulation in cells.

  4. Integrating Retinoic Acid Signaling with Brain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Tuanlian; Wagner, Elisabeth; Drager, Ursula C.

    2009-01-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) regulates the transcription of about a 6th of the human genome. Compelling evidence indicates a role of RA in cognitive activities, but its integration with the molecular mechanisms of higher brain functions is not known. Here we describe the properties of RA signaling in the mouse, which point to…

  5. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) associates with nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) to negatively regulate inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Morosky, Stefanie A; Zhu, Jianzhong; Mukherjee, Amitava; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2011-08-12

    Cytoplasmic caspase recruiting domain (CARD)-containing molecules often function in the induction of potent antimicrobial responses in order to protect mammalian cells from invading pathogens. Retinoic acid-induced gene-I (RIG-I) and nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) serve as key factors in the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens, and in the subsequent initiation of innate immune signals to combat infection. RIG-I and NOD2 share striking similarities in their cellular localization, both localize to membrane ruffles in non-polarized epithelial cells and both exhibit a close association with the junctional complex of polarized epithelia. Here we show that RIG-I and NOD2 not only colocalize to cellular ruffles and cell-cell junctions, but that they also form a direct interaction that is mediated by the CARDs of RIG-I and multiple regions of NOD2. Moreover, we show that RIG-I negatively regulates ligand-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling mediated by NOD2, and that NOD2 negatively regulates type I interferon induction by RIG-I. We also show that the three main Crohn disease-associated mutants of NOD2 (1007fs, R702W, G908R) form an interaction with RIG-I and negatively regulate its signaling to a greater extent than wild-type NOD2. Our results show that in addition to their role in innate immune recognition, RIG-I and NOD2 form a direct interaction at actin-enriched sites within cells and suggest that this interaction may impact RIG-I- and NOD2-dependent innate immune signaling.

  6. The Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Protease FtSH4 Is Involved in Leaf Senescence via Regulation of WRKY-Dependent Salicylic Acid Accumulation and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengchun; Li, Cui; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yaxue; Shu, Si; Huang, Ruihua; Zhang, Daowei; Li, Jian; Xiao, Shi; Yao, Nan; Yang, Chengwei

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondria and autophagy play important roles in the networks that regulate plant leaf senescence and cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between mitochondrial signaling and autophagy are currently not well understood. This study characterized the function of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mitochondrial AAA-protease gene FtSH4 in regulating autophagy and senescence, finding that FtSH4 mediates WRKY-dependent salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and signaling. Knockout of FtSH4 in the ftsh4-4 mutant resulted in severe leaf senescence, cell death, and high autophagy levels. The level of SA increased dramatically in the ftsh4-4 mutant. Expression of nahG in the ftsh4-4 mutant led to decreased SA levels and suppressed the leaf senescence and cell death phenotypes. The transcript levels of several SA synthesis and signaling genes, including SALICYLIC ACIDINDUCTION DEFICIENT2 (SID2), NON-RACE-SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (NDR1), and NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1), increased significantly in the ftsh4-4 mutants compared with the wild type. Loss of function of SID2, NDR1, or NPR1 in the ftsh4-4 mutant reversed the ftsh4-4 senescence and autophagy phenotypes. Furthermore, ftsh4-4 mutants had elevated levels of transcripts of several WRKY genes, including WRKY40, WRKY46, WRKY51, WRKY60, WRKY63, and WRKY75; all of these WRKY proteins can bind to the promoter of SID2 Loss of function of WRKY75 in the ftsh4-4 mutants decreased the levels of SA and reversed the senescence phenotype. Taken together, these results suggest that the mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease FtSH4 may regulate the expression of WRKY genes by modifying the level of reactive oxygen species and the WRKY transcription factors that control SA synthesis and signaling in autophagy and senescence.

  7. Down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene retinoic acid receptor beta2 through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Bruno; Brand, Céline; Flajollet, Sébastien; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-09-01

    The retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2) is a potent, retinoid-inducible tumor suppressor gene, which is a critical molecular relay for retinoid actions in cells. Its down-regulation, or loss of expression, leads to resistance of cancer cells to retinoid treatment. Up to now, no primary mechanism underlying the repression of the RARbeta2 gene expression, hence affecting cellular retinoid sensitivity, has been identified. Here, we demonstrate that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway affects cellular retinoid sensitivity, by regulating corepressor recruitment to the RARbeta2 promoter. Through direct phosphorylation of the corepressor silencing mediator for retinoic and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT), Akt stabilized RAR/SMRT interaction, leading to an increased tethering of SMRT to the RARbeta2 promoter, decreased histone acetylation, down-regulation of the RARbeta2 expression, and impaired cellular differentiation in response to retinoid. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, an important modulator of cellular survival, has thus a direct impact on cellular retinoid sensitivity, and its deregulation may be the triggering event in retinoid resistance of cancer cells.

  8. Salvianolic Acid B Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Endothelial Cell Apoptosis through Regulating PI3K/Akt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Li; Xie, Li-Xia; Li, Min; Durairajan, Siva Sundara Kumar; Goto, Shinya; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2007-01-01

    Background Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is one of the most bioactive components of Salvia miltiorrhiza, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been commonly used for prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disorders. However, the mechanism responsible for such protective effects remains largely unknown. It has been considered that cerebral endothelium apoptosis caused by reactive oxygen species including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is implicated in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular disorders. Methodology and Principal Findings By examining the effect of Sal B on H2O2-induced apoptosis in rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (rCMECs), we found that Sal B pretreatment significantly attenuated H2O2-induced apoptosis in rCMECs. We next examined the signaling cascade(s) involved in Sal B-mediated anti-apoptotic effects. We showed that H2O2 induces rCMECs apoptosis mainly through the PI3K/ERK pathway, since a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) blocked ERK activation caused by H2O2 and a specific inhibitor of MEK (U0126) protected cells from apoptosis. On the other hand, blockage of the PI3K/Akt pathway abrogated the protective effect conferred by Sal B and potentated H2O2-induced apoptosis, suggesting that Sal B prevents H2O2-induced apoptosis predominantly through the PI3K/Akt (upstream of ERK) pathway. Significance Our findings provide the first evidence that H2O2 induces rCMECs apoptosis via the PI3K/MEK/ERK pathway and that Sal B protects rCMECs against H2O2-induced apoptosis through the PI3K/Akt/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. PMID:18091994

  9. SlMAPK3 enhances tolerance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by regulating salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunzhou; Qin, Lei; Zhao, Jingjing; Muhammad, Tayeb; Cao, Hehe; Li, Hailiang; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported on the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK3) in plant immune responses. However, little is known about how MAPK3 functions in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) infected with tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). There is also uncertainty about the connection between plant MAPK3 and the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study indicated that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response against TYLCV. Tomato seedlings were inoculated with TYLCV to investigate the possible roles of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 against this virus. Inoculation with TYLCV strongly induced the expression and the activity of all three genes. Silencing of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 reduced tolerance to TYLCV, increased leaf H2O2 concentrations, and attenuated expression of defense-related genes after TYLCV infection, especially in SlMAPK3-silenced plants. Exogenous SA and methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) both significantly induced SlMAPK3 expression in tomato leaves. Over-expression of SlMAPK3 increased the transcript levels of SA/JA-mediated defense-related genes (PR1, PR1b/SlLapA, SlPI-I, and SlPI-II) and enhanced tolerance to TYLCV. After TYLCV inoculation, the leaves of SlMAPK3 over-expressed plants compared with wild type plants showed less H2O2 accumulation and greater superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Overall, the results suggested that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response of tomato to TYLCV, and that this process may be through either the SA or JA defense-signaling pathways. PMID:28222174

  10. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pava, Matthew J.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Lovinger, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506) produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability). Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis. PMID:27031992

  11. Release of GTP Exchange Factor Mediated Down-Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signal Transduction through ABA-Induced Rapid Degradation of RopGEFs.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixing; Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-05-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical to plant development and stress responses. Abiotic stress triggers an ABA signal transduction cascade, which is comprised of the core components PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, PP2C-type protein phosphatases, and protein kinases. Small GTPases of the ROP/RAC family act as negative regulators of ABA signal transduction. However, the mechanisms by which ABA controls the behavior of ROP/RACs have remained unclear. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis guanine nucleotide exchange factor protein RopGEF1 is rapidly sequestered to intracellular particles in response to ABA. GFP-RopGEF1 is sequestered via the endosome-prevacuolar compartment pathway and is degraded. RopGEF1 directly interacts with several clade A PP2C protein phosphatases, including ABI1. Interestingly, RopGEF1 undergoes constitutive degradation in pp2c quadruple abi1/abi2/hab1/pp2ca mutant plants, revealing that active PP2C protein phosphatases protect and stabilize RopGEF1 from ABA-mediated degradation. Interestingly, ABA-mediated degradation of RopGEF1 also plays an important role in ABA-mediated inhibition of lateral root growth. The presented findings point to a PP2C-RopGEF-ROP/RAC control loop model that is proposed to aid in shutting off ABA signal transduction, to counteract leaky ABA signal transduction caused by "monomeric" PYL/RCAR ABA receptors in the absence of stress, and facilitate signaling in response to ABA.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of abscisic acid signal core components during cucumber seed germination and under Cu²⁺, Zn²⁺, NaCl and simulated acid rain stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Wang, Ya; Kai, Wenbin; Zhao, Bo; Chen, Pei; Sun, Liang; Ji, Kai; Li, Qian; Dai, Shengjie; Sun, Yufei; Wang, Yidong; Pei, Yuelin; Leng, Ping

    2014-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that regulates lots of physiological and biochemical processes in plant life cycle, especially in seed germination and stress responses. For exploring the transcriptional regulation of ABA signal transduction during cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seed germination and under Cu(2+), Zn(2+), NaCl and simulated acid rain stresses, nine CsPYLs, three group A CsPP2Cs and two subclass III CsSnRK2s were identified from cucumber genome, which respectively showed high sequence similarities and highly conserved domains with homologous genes in Arabidopsis. Based on Real-time PCR analysis, most of the tested genes' expression decreased during cucumber seed germination, which was in accordance with the ABA level variation. In addition, according to the absolute expression, CsPYL1, CsPYL3, CsPP2C5, CsABI1, CsSnRK2.3 and CsSnRK2.4 were highly expressed, indicating that they may play more important roles in ABA signaling during cucumber seed germination. Moreover, most of these highly expressed genes, except CsPYL3, were up-regulated by ABA treatment. Meanwhile, most of the tested genes' expression dramatically changed at the initial water uptake phase, indicating that this period may be critical in the regulation of ABA on seed germination. Under Cu(2+), Zn(2+), NaCl and simulated acid rain stresses, cucumber seed germination percentage decreased and ABA content increased. Meanwhile, the expression of ABA signal transduction core components genes showed specific response to a particular stress and was not always consist with ABA variation. Generally, the expression of CsPYL1, CsPYL3, CsABI1, CsSnRK2.3 and CsSnRK2.4 was sensitive to 120 mM NaCl and 0.5 mM Cu(2+) treatments.

  13. Allantoin, a stress-related purine metabolite, can activate jasmonate signaling in a MYC2-regulated and abscisic acid-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Konishi, Tomokazu; Egusa, Mayumi; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Hirayama, Takashi; Kaminaka, Hironori; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Allantoin is a metabolic intermediate of purine catabolism that often accumulates in stressed plants. Recently, we used Arabidopsis knockout mutants (aln) of ALLANTOINASE to show that this purine metabolite activates abscisic acid (ABA) production, thereby stimulating stress-related gene expression and enhancing seedling tolerance to abiotic stress. A detailed re-examination of the microarray data of an aln mutant (aln-1) confirmed the increased expression of ABA-related genes and also revealed altered expression of genes involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, probably under the control of MYC2, a master switch in the JA signaling pathway. Consistent with the transcriptome profiles, the aln-1 mutant displayed increased JA levels and enhanced responses to mechanical wounding and exogenous JA. Moreover, aln mutants demonstrated modestly increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum, probably reflecting the antagonistic action of MYC2 on the defense against these bacterial phytopathogens. Exogenously administered allantoin elicited the expression of JA-responsive genes, including MYC2, in wild-type plants, supporting the idea that allantoin might be responsible for the observed JA-related phenotypes of aln mutants. However, mutants deficient in bioactive JA (jar1-1), insensitive to JA (myc2-3), or deficient in ABA (aba2-1 and bglu18) suppressed the effect of exogenous allantoin. The suppression was further confirmed in aln-1 jar1-1 and aln-1 bglu18 double mutants. These results indicate that allantoin can activate the MYC2-regulated JA signaling pathway through ABA production. Overall, this study suggests a possible connection of purine catabolism with stress hormone homeostasis and signaling, and highlights the potential importance of allantoin in these interactions. PMID:26931169

  14. The Arabidopsis Trehalose-6-P Synthase AtTPS1 Gene Is a Regulator of Glucose, Abscisic Acid, and Stress Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Avonce, Nelson; Leyman, Barbara; Mascorro-Gallardo, José O.; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M.; Iturriaga, Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), trehalose is present at almost undetectable levels, excluding its role as an osmoprotectant. Here, we report that overexpression of AtTPS1 in Arabidopsis using the 35S promoter led to a small increase in trehalose and trehalose-6-P levels. In spite of this, transgenic plants displayed a dehydration tolerance phenotype without any visible morphological alterations, except for delayed flowering. Moreover, seedlings overexpressing AtTPS1 exhibited glucose (Glc)- and abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive phenotypes. Transgenic seedlings germinated on Glc were visibly larger with green well-expanded cotyledonary leaves and fully developed roots, in contrast with wild-type seedlings showing growth retardation and absence of photosynthetic tissue. An ABA dose-response experiment revealed a higher germination rate for transgenic plants overexpressing AtTPS1 showing insensitive germination kinetics at 2.5 μm ABA. Interestingly, germination in the presence of Glc did not trigger an increase in ABA content in plants overexpressing AtTPS1. Expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in transgenic plants showed up-regulation of the ABI4 and CAB1 genes. In the presence of Glc, CAB1 expression remained high, whereas ABI4, HXK1, and ApL3 levels were down-regulated in the AtTPS1-overexpressing lines. Analysis of AtTPS1 expression in HXK1-antisense or HXK1-sense transgenic lines suggests the possible involvement of AtTPS1 in the hexokinase-dependent Glc-signaling pathway. These data strongly suggest that AtTPS1 has a pivotal role in the regulation of Glc and ABA signaling during vegetative development. PMID:15516499

  15. Seasonal abscisic acid signal and a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, DkbZIP5, regulate proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in persimmon fruit.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takashi; Katayama-Ikegami, Ayako; Kobayashi, Shozo; Sato, Akihiko; Kono, Atsushi; Yonemori, Keizo

    2012-02-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are secondary metabolites that contribute to plant protection and crop quality. Persimmon (Diospyros kaki) has a unique characteristic of accumulating large amounts of PAs, particularly in its fruit. Normal astringent-type and mutant nonastringent-type fruits show different PA accumulation patterns depending on the seasonal expression patterns of DkMyb4, which is a Myb transcription factor (TF) regulating many PA pathway genes in persimmon. In this study, attempts were made to identify the factors involved in DkMyb4 expression and the resultant PA accumulation in persimmon fruit. Treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) and an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor resulted in differential changes in the expression patterns of DkMyb4 and PA biosynthesis in astringent-type and nonastringent-type fruits depending on the development stage. To obtain an ABA-signaling TF, we isolated a full-length basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TF, DkbZIP5, which is highly expressed in persimmon fruit. We also showed that ectopic DkbZIP5 overexpression in persimmon calluses induced the up-regulation of DkMyb4 and the resultant PA biosynthesis. In addition, a detailed molecular characterization using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and transient reporter assay indicated that DkbZIP5 recognized ABA-responsive elements in the promoter region of DkMyb4 and acted as a direct regulator of DkMyb4 in an ABA-dependent manner. These results suggest that ABA signals may be involved in PA biosynthesis in persimmon fruit via DkMyb4 activation by DkbZIP5.

  16. Negative Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signaling by the Fagus sylvatica FsPP2C1 Plays A Role in Seed Dormancy Regulation and Promotion of Seed Germination1

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Mary Paz; Rodríguez, Dolores; Nicolás, Carlos; Rodríguez, Pedro Luis; Nicolás, Gregorio; Lorenzo, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    FsPP2C1 was previously isolated from beech (Fagus sylvatica) seeds as a functional protein phosphatase type-2C (PP2C) with all the conserved features of these enzymes and high homology to ABI1, ABI2, and PP2CA, PP2Cs identified as negative regulators of ABA signaling. The expression of FsPP2C1 was induced upon abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and was also up-regulated during early weeks of stratification. Furthermore, this gene was specifically expressed in ABA-treated seeds and was hardly detectable in vegetative tissues. In this report, to provide genetic evidence on FsPP2C1 function in seed dormancy and germination, we used an overexpression approach in Arabidopsis because transgenic work is not feasible in beech. Constitutive expression of FsPP2C1 under the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter confers ABA insensitivity in Arabidopsis seeds and, consequently, a reduced degree of seed dormancy. Additionally, transgenic 35S:FsPP2C1 plants are able to germinate under unfavorable conditions, as inhibitory concentrations of mannitol, NaCl, or paclobutrazol. In vegetative tissues, Arabidopsis FsPP2C1 transgenic plants show ABA-resistant early root growth and diminished induction of the ABA-response genes RAB18 and KIN2, but no effect on stomatal closure regulation. Seed and vegetative phenotypes of Arabidopsis 35S:FsPP2C1 plants suggest that FsPP2C1 negatively regulates ABA signaling. The ABA inducibility of FsPP2C1 expression, together with the transcript accumulation mainly in seeds, suggest that it could play an important role modulating ABA signaling in beechnuts through a negative feedback loop. Finally, we suggest that negative regulation of ABA signaling by FsPP2C1 is a factor contributing to promote the transition from seed dormancy to germination during early weeks of stratification. PMID:12970481

  17. Abscisic acid: biosynthesis, inactivation, homoeostasis and signalling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Park, Youngmin; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes during plant growth and abiotic stress responses. The endogenous ABA level is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms involving biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and signal transduction pathways. This complex regulatory network may target multiple levels, including transcription, translation and post-translational regulation of genes involved in ABA responses. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, catabolism and transport have been characterized. The local ABA concentration is critical for initiating ABA-mediated signalling during plant development and in response to environmental changes. In this chapter we discuss the mechanisms that regulate ABA biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and homoeostasis. We also present the findings of recent research on ABA perception by cellular receptors, and ABA signalling in response to cellular and environmental conditions.

  18. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L.; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species. PMID:26464512

  19. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture.

    PubMed

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-10-27

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species.

  20. Ferulic acid prevents LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4B and stimulates the cAMP/CREB signaling pathway in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Hong, Qian; Tan, Hong-ling; Xiao, Cheng-rong; Gao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) isozymes are involved in different functions, depending on their patterns of distribution in the brain. The PDE4 subtypes are distributed in different inflammatory cells, and appear to be important regulators of inflammatory processes. In this study we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a plant component with strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced up-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) in PC12 cells, which in turn regulated cellular cAMP levels and the cAMP/cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway in the cells. Methods: PC12 cells were treated with LPS (1 μg/mL) for 8 h, and the changes of F-actin were detected using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured suing ELISA kits, and PDE4B-specific enzymatic activity was assessed with a PDE4B assay kit. The mRNA levels of PDE4B were analyzed with Q-PCR, and the protein levels of CREB and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were determined using immunoblotting. Furthermore, molecular docking was used to identify the interaction between PDE4B2 and FA. Results: Treatment of PC12 cells with LPS induced thick bundles of actin filaments appearing in the F-actin cytoskeleton, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with FA (10–40 μmol/L) or with a PDE4B inhibitor rolipram (30 μmol/L). Pretreatment with FA dose-dependently inhibited the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β in PC12 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment with FA dose-dependently attenuated the LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4 activity in PC12 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with FA decreased LPS-induced up-regulation of the PDE4B mRNA, and reversed LPS-induced down-regulation of CREB and pCREB in PC12 cells. The molecular docking results revealed electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between FA and PDE4B2. Conclusion: The beneficial effects of FA in PC12 cells might be conferred through inhibition of LPS

  1. Regulation of CXCR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Busillo, John M.; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 belongs to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors, and is directly involved in a number of biological processes including organogenesis, hematopoeisis, and immune response. Recent evidence has highlighted the role of CXCR4 in a variety of diseases including HIV, cancer, and WHIM syndrome. Importantly, the involvement of CXCR4 in cancer metastasis and WHIM syndrome appears to be due to dysregulation of the receptor leading to enhanced signaling. Herein we review what is currently known regarding the regulation of CXCR4 and how dysregulation contributes to disease progression. PMID:17169327

  2. AtrbohD and AtrbohF positively regulate abscisic acid-inhibited primary root growth by affecting Ca2+ signalling and auxin response of roots in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yiheng; Sun, Lirong; Song, Yalin; Wang, Limin; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Liyue; Liu, Bo; Li, Ning; Miao, Chen; Hao, Fushun

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF play an important role in abscisic acid (ABA)-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. In this study, the double mutant atrbohD1/F1 and atrbohD2/F2, in which both AtrbohD and AtrbohF were disrupted, were less sensitive to ABA suppression of root cell elongation than wild-type (WT) plants. Furthermore, the double mutants showed impaired ABA responses in roots, including ROS generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) increases, and activation of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels compared with WT. Exogenous H2O2 can activate the Ca(2+) currents in roots of atrbohD1/F1. In addition, exogenous application of the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid effectively promoted ABA inhibition of root growth of the mutants relative to that of WT. The ABA-induced decreases in auxin sensitivity of the root tips were more pronounced in WT than in atrbohD1/F1. These findings suggest that both AtrbohD and AtrbohF are essential for ABA-promoted ROS production in roots. ROS activate Ca(2+) signalling and reduce auxin sensitivity of roots, thus positively regulating ABA-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

  3. Chloroacetic acid induced neuronal cells death through oxidative stress-mediated p38-MAPK activation pathway regulated mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hung; Chen, Sz-Jie; Su, Chin-Chuan; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Tseng, To-Jung; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Tang, Feng-Cheng; Chen, Kuo-Liang; Su, Yi-Chang; Lee, kuan-I; Hung, Dong-Zong; Huang, Chun-Fa

    2013-01-07

    Chloroacetic acid (CA), a toxic chlorinated analog of acetic acid, is widely used in chemical industries as an herbicide, detergent, and disinfectant, and chemical intermediates that are formed during the synthesis of various products. In addition, CA has been found as a by-product of chlorination disinfection of drinking water. However, there is little known about neurotoxic injuries of CA on the mammalian, the toxic effects and molecular mechanisms of CA-induced neuronal cell injury are mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity of CA on cultured Neuro-2a cells and investigated the possible mechanisms of CA-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment of Neuro-2a cells with CA significantly reduced the number of viable cells (in a dose-dependent manner with a range from 0.1 to 3mM), increased the generation of ROS, and reduced the intracellular levels of glutathione depletion. CA also increased the number of sub-G1 hypodiploid cells; increased mitochondrial dysfunction (loss of MMP, cytochrome c release, and accompanied by Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 down-regulation and Bax up-regulation), and activated the caspase cascades activations, which displayed features of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. These CA-induced apoptosis-related signals were markedly prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Moreover, CA activated the JNK and p38-MAPK pathways, but did not that ERK1/2 pathway, in treated Neuro-2a cells. Pretreatment with NAC and specific p38-MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), but not JNK inhibitor (SP600125) effectively abrogated the phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and attenuated the apoptotic signals (including: decrease in cytotoxicity, caspase-3/-7 activation, the cytosolic cytochrome c release, and the reversed alteration of Bcl-2 and Bax mRNA) in CA-treated Neuro-2a cells. Taken together, these data suggest that oxidative stress-induced p38-MAPK activated pathway-regulated mitochondria-dependent apoptosis plays an important role in CA-caused neuronal cell

  4. Expression of Stipa purpurea SpCIPK26 in Arabidopsis thaliana Enhances Salt and Drought Tolerance and Regulates Abscisic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanli; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yunqiang; Li, Xiong; Cheng, Ying; Yang, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Stipa purpurea (S. purpurea) is the dominant plant species in the alpine steppe of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China. It is highly resistant to cold and drought conditions. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating the stress tolerance are unknown. In this study, a CIPK gene from S. purpurea (SpCIPK26) was isolated. The SpCIPK26 coding region consisted of 1392 bp that encoded 464 amino acids. The protein has a highly conserved catalytic structure and regulatory domain. The expression of SpCIPK26 was induced by drought and salt stress. SpCIPK26 overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants provided increased tolerance to drought and salt stress in an abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent manner. Compared with wild-type A. thaliana plants, SpCIPK26-overexpressing plants had higher survival rates, water potentials, and photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm), as well as lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following exposure to drought and salt stress. Gene expression analyses indicated stress-inducible genes (RD29A, RD29B, and ABF2) and a ROS-scavenger gene (CAT1) were upregulated in SpCIPK26-overexpressing plants after stress treatments. All of these marker genes are associated with ABA-responsive cis-acting elements. Additionally, the similarities in the gene expression patterns following ABA, mannitol, and NaCl treatments suggest SpCIPK26 has an important role during plant responses to drought and salt stress and in regulating ABA signaling. PMID:27338368

  5. Signalling properties of lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Durieux, M E; Lynch, K R

    1993-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is the simplest natural phospholipid, primarily known as a membrane component and metabolic intermediate. However, a remarkable variety of biological effects of this compound have come to light, seemingly pointing to an additional role for LPA as a signalling molecule. In this review, Marcel Durieux and Kevin Lynch integrate the recent information that indicates that LPA could be an intercellular messenger, possibly acting through a G protein-coupled receptor, and with a role in cell growth and motility.

  6. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule-Associated Polysialic Acid Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning by Restraining the Signaling through GluN2B-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Senkov, Oleg; Grebenyuk, Sergei; Robinson, Catrina; Xiao, Mei-Fang; Stummeyer, Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Engel, Andreas K.; Feig, Larry; Semyanov, Alexey; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is the predominant carrier of α2,8 polysialic acid (PSA) in the mammalian brain. Abnormalities in PSA and NCAM expression are associated with schizophrenia in humans and cause deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning in mice. Here, we show that PSA inhibits opening of recombinant NMDA receptors composed of GluN1/2B (NR1/NR2B) or GluN1/2A/2B (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) but not of GluN1/2A (NR1/NR2A) subunits. Deficits in NCAM/PSA increase GluN2B-mediated transmission and Ca2+ transients in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. In line with elevation of GluN2B-mediated transmission, defects in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region and contextual fear memory in NCAM/PSA-deficient mice are abrogated by application of a GluN2B-selective antagonist. Furthermore, treatment with the glutamate scavenger glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, ablation of Ras-GRF1 (a mediator of GluN2B signaling to p38 MAPK), or direct inhibition of hyperactive p38 MAPK can restore impaired synaptic plasticity in brain slices lacking PSA/NCAM. Thus, PSA carried by NCAM regulates plasticity and learning by inhibition of the GluN2B-Ras-GRF1-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. These findings implicate carbohydrates carried by adhesion molecules in modulating NMDA receptor signaling in the brain and demonstrate reversibility of cognitive deficits associated with ablation of a schizophrenia-related adhesion molecule. PMID:20237287

  7. Curcumin protects ANIT-induced cholestasis through signaling pathway of FXR-regulated bile acid and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Tang, Xiaowen; Ding, Lili; zhou, Yue; Yang, Qiaoling; Gong, Junting; Wang, Guangyun; Wang, Zhengtao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a clinically significant symptom and widely associated with liver diseases, however, there are very few effective therapies for cholestasis. Danning tablet (DNT, a Chinese patent medicine preparation) has been clinically used to treat human liver and gallbladder diseases for more than 20 years in China. However, which ingredients of DNT contributed to this beneficial effect and their mechanistic underpinnings have been largely unknown. In the present study, we discovered that DNT not only demonstrated greater benefits for cholecystitis patients after cholecystectomy surgery in clinic but also showed protective effect against alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced cholestasis model in rodent. Curcumin, one major compound derived from DNT, exerted the protective effect against cholestasis through farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which has been focused as potential therapeutic targets for treating cholestasis. The underlying mechanism of curcumin against cholestasis was restoring bile acid homeostasis and antagonizing inflammatory responses in a FXR-dependent manner and in turn contributed to overall cholestasis attenuation. Collectively, curcumin can be served as a potential treatment option for liver injury with cholestasis. PMID:27624003

  8. Structural Basis for Ligand Regulation of the Fatty Acid-binding Protein 5, Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor β/δ (FABP5-PPARβ/δ) Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Eric H.; Goswami, Devrishi; Griffin, Patrick R.; Noy, Noa; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are a widely expressed group of calycins that play a well established role in solubilizing cellular fatty acids. Recent studies, however, have recast FABPs as active participants in vital lipid-signaling pathways. FABP5, like its family members, displays a promiscuous ligand binding profile, capable of interacting with numerous long chain fatty acids of varying degrees of saturation. Certain “activating” fatty acids induce the protein's cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation, stimulating PPARβ/δ transactivation; however, the rules that govern this process remain unknown. Using a range of structural and biochemical techniques, we show that both linoleic and arachidonic acid elicit FABP5's translocation by permitting allosteric communication between the ligand-sensing β2 loop and a tertiary nuclear localization signal within the α-helical cap of the protein. Furthermore, we show that more saturated, nonactivating fatty acids inhibit nuclear localization signal formation by destabilizing this activation loop, thus implicating FABP5 specifically in cis-bonded, polyunsaturated fatty acid signaling. PMID:24692551

  9. The retinoic acid signaling pathway regulates anterior/posterior patterning in the nerve cord and pharynx of amphioxus, a chordate lacking neural crest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escriva, Hector; Holland, Nicholas D.; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Laudet, Vincent; Holland, Linda Z.

    2002-01-01

    Amphioxus, the closest living invertebrate relative of the vertebrates, has a notochord, segmental axial musculature, pharyngeal gill slits and dorsal hollow nerve cord, but lacks neural crest. In amphioxus, as in vertebrates, exogenous retinoic acid (RA) posteriorizes the embryo. The mouth and gill slits never form, AmphiPax1, which is normally downregulated where gill slits form, remains upregulated and AmphiHox1 expression shifts anteriorly in the nerve cord. To dissect the role of RA signaling in patterning chordate embryos, we have cloned the single retinoic acid receptor (AmphiRAR), retinoid X receptor (AmphiRXR) and an orphan receptor (AmphiTR2/4) from amphioxus. AmphiTR2/4 inhibits AmphiRAR-AmphiRXR-mediated transactivation in the presence of RA by competing for DR5 or IR7 retinoic acid response elements (RAREs). The 5' untranslated region of AmphiTR2/4 contains an IR7 element, suggesting possible auto- and RA-regulation. The patterns of AmphiTR2/4 and AmphiRAR expression during embryogenesis are largely complementary: AmphiTR2/4 is strongly expressed in the cerebral vesicle (homologous to the diencephalon plus anterior midbrain), while AmphiRAR expression is high in the equivalent of the hindbrain and spinal cord. Similarly, while AmphiTR2/4 is expressed most strongly in the anterior and posterior thirds of the endoderm, the highest AmphiRAR expression is in the middle third. Expression of AmphiRAR is upregulated by exogenous RA and completely downregulated by the RA antagonist BMS009. Moreover, BMS009 expands the pharynx posteriorly; the first three gill slit primordia are elongated and shifted posteriorly, but do not penetrate, and additional, non-penetrating gill slit primordia are induced. Thus, in an organism without neural crest, initiation and penetration of gill slits appear to be separate events mediated by distinct levels of RA signaling in the pharyngeal endoderm. Although these compounds have little effect on levels of AmphiTR2/4 expression, RA

  10. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  11. Two pear glutathione S-transferases genes are regulated during fruit development and involved in response to salicylic acid, auxin, and glucose signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Xing; Chen, Liang; Xiang, Di-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Two genes encoding putative glutathione S-transferase proteins were isolated from pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) and designated PpGST1 and PpGST2. The deduced PpGST1 and PpGST2 proteins contain conserved Glutathione S-transferase N-terminal domain (GST_N) and Glutathione S-transferase, C-terminal domain (GST_C). Using PCR amplification technique, the genomic clones corresponding to PpGST1 and PpGST2 were isolated and shown to contain two introns and a singal intron respectively with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that PpGST1 belonged to Phi class of GST superfamilies and had high homology with apple MdGST, while PpGST2 was classified into the Tau class of GST superfamilies. The expression of PpGST1 and PpGST2 genes was developmentally regulated in fruit. Further study demonstrated that PpGST1 and PpGST2 expression was remarkably induced by glucose, salicylic acid (SA) and indole-3-aceticacid (IAA) treatments in pear fruit, and in diseased fruit. These data suggested that PpGST1 and PpGST2 might be involved in response to sugar, SA, and IAA signaling during fruit development of pear.

  12. Retinoic acid remodels extracellular matrix (ECM) of cultured human fetal palate mesenchymal cells (hFPMCs) through down-regulation of TGF-β/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Zhang, Lin; Yin, Xinjuan; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Huanhuan; Liu, Xiaozhuan; Pan, Xinjuan; Li, Ning; Yu, Zengli

    2014-03-03

    The regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) by retinoic acid (RA) is interesting in light of the fact that the ECM plays an essential role in morphogenesis and palatal shelf elevation. In the current study, we explored the effect of RA overexposure on ECM and the probable mechanisms in cultured human fetal palate mesenchymal cells (hFPMCs). RA dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation and mRNA and protein levels of ECM components fibronectin, tenascin C and fibrillin-2. Zymography revealed that MMP-2 activity was suppressed by RA. Further analysis revealed that mRNA levels of MMP2 and TIMP2 were decreased, while the MMP2/TIMP2 mRNA ratio was increased, which might facilitate the ECM degradation. Because of the pivotal role of TGF-β/Smad pathway in palatogenesis we therefore checked the effect of RA on TGF-β/Smad signaling. The results indicated RA treatment increased Smad7 expression and decreased the levels of TGF-β1, TGF-β3, TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3. Activation of the Smad pathways by either exogenous TGF-β3 or recombinant adenoviruses for Smad3 attenuated RA-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and ECM components and rescued the RA-altered MMP2/TIMP2 mRNA ratio. In conclusion, these findings suggested that RA overexposure inhibited cell proliferation and disrupted the ECM network through down-regulation of TGF-β/Smad pathway.

  13. Chrysophanic acid reduces testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats by suppressing 5α-reductase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Youn, Dong-Hyun; Park, Jinbong; Kim, Hye-Lin; Jung, Yunu; Kang, JongWook; Jeong, Mi-Young; Sethi, Gautam; Seok Ahn, Kwang; Um, Jae-Young

    2017-02-07

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common chronic diseases in male population, of which incidence increases gradually with age. In this study, we investigated the effect of chrysophanic acid (CA) on BPH. BPH was induced by a 4-week injection of testosterone propionate (TP). Four weeks of further injection with vehicle, TP, TP + CA, TP + finasteride was carried on. In the CA treatment group, the prostate weight was reduced and the TP-induced histological changes were restored as the normal control group. CA treatment suppressed the TP-elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) expression. In addition, 5α-reductase, a crucial factor in BPH development, was suppressed to the normal level close to the control group by CA treatment. The elevated expressions of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α and steroid receptor coactivator 1 by TP administration were also inhibited in the CA group when compared to the TP-induced BPH group. Then we evaluated the changes in three major factors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase chain during prostatic hyperplasia; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38). While ERK was elevated in the process of BPH, JNK and p38 was not changed. This up-regulated ERK was also reduced as normal by CA treatment. Further in vitro studies with RWPE-1 cells confirmed TP-induced proliferation and elevated AR, PSA and p-ERK were all reduced by CA treatment. Overall, these results suggest a potential pharmaceutical feature of CA in the treatment of BPH.

  14. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  15. Upregulation of Akt/NF-κB-regulated inflammation and Akt/Bad-related apoptosis signaling pathway involved in hepatic carcinoma process: suppression by carnosic acid nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo; Tang, Fang; Wang, Zhenran; Qi, Guangying; Liang, Xingsi; Li, Bo; Yuan, Shengguang; Liu, Jie; Yu, Shuiping; He, Songqing

    Primary liver cancer is globally the sixth most frequent cancer, and the second leading cause of cancer death and its incidence is increasing in many countries, becoming a serious threat to human health. Many researches focused on the treatment and prevention of liver cancer. However, due to the underlying molecular mechanism of liver cancer still not fully understood, the studies and development of treatments were forced to be delayed. Akt has been suggested to play an essential role in the progression of inflammation response and apoptosis. Hence, in this study, Akt-knockout mice and cells of liver cancer were used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism of Akt-associated inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathway linked with NF-κB and Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad) for the progression of liver cancer. Carnosic acid (CA), as a phenolic diterpene with anticancer, antibacterial, antidiabetic, as well as neuroprotective properties, is produced by many species from Lamiaceae family. Administration of CA nanoparticles was sufficient to lead to considerable inhibition of liver cancer progression. The results indicated that, compared to the normal liver cells, the expression of Akt was significantly higher in liver cancer cell lines. Also, we found that Akt-knockout cancer cell lines modulated inflammation response and apoptosis via inhibiting NF-κB activation and inducing apoptotic reaction. Our results indicated that the downstream signals, including cytokines regulated by NF-κB and caspase-3-activated apoptosis affected by Bad, were re-modulated for knockout of Akt. And CA nanoparticles, acting as Akt-knockout, could inhibit inflammation and accelerate apoptosis in liver cancer by altering NF-κB activation and activating caspase-3 through Bad pathway. These findings demonstrated that the nanoparticulate drug CA performed its effective role owing to its ability to reduce inflammatory action and enhance apoptosis for the overexpression of NF

  16. Upregulation of Akt/NF-κB-regulated inflammation and Akt/Bad-related apoptosis signaling pathway involved in hepatic carcinoma process: suppression by carnosic acid nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bo; Tang, Fang; Wang, Zhenran; Qi, Guangying; Liang, Xingsi; Li, Bo; Yuan, Shengguang; Liu, Jie; Yu, Shuiping; He, Songqing

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer is globally the sixth most frequent cancer, and the second leading cause of cancer death and its incidence is increasing in many countries, becoming a serious threat to human health. Many researches focused on the treatment and prevention of liver cancer. However, due to the underlying molecular mechanism of liver cancer still not fully understood, the studies and development of treatments were forced to be delayed. Akt has been suggested to play an essential role in the progression of inflammation response and apoptosis. Hence, in this study, Akt-knockout mice and cells of liver cancer were used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanism of Akt-associated inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathway linked with NF-κB and Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad) for the progression of liver cancer. Carnosic acid (CA), as a phenolic diterpene with anticancer, antibacterial, antidiabetic, as well as neuroprotective properties, is produced by many species from Lamiaceae family. Administration of CA nanoparticles was sufficient to lead to considerable inhibition of liver cancer progression. The results indicated that, compared to the normal liver cells, the expression of Akt was significantly higher in liver cancer cell lines. Also, we found that Akt-knockout cancer cell lines modulated inflammation response and apoptosis via inhibiting NF-κB activation and inducing apoptotic reaction. Our results indicated that the downstream signals, including cytokines regulated by NF-κB and caspase-3-activated apoptosis affected by Bad, were re-modulated for knockout of Akt. And CA nanoparticles, acting as Akt-knockout, could inhibit inflammation and accelerate apoptosis in liver cancer by altering NF-κB activation and activating caspase-3 through Bad pathway. These findings demonstrated that the nanoparticulate drug CA performed its effective role owing to its ability to reduce inflammatory action and enhance apoptosis for the overexpression of NF

  17. Pear 14-3-3a gene (Pp14-3-3a) is regulated during fruit ripening and senescense, and involved in response to salicylic acid and ethylene signalling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haiyan; Zhang, Yuxing

    2014-12-01

    14-3-3 proteins play important roles in regulating plant development and phytohormone (abscisic acid, gibberellin and brassinosteroids) signalling. However, their regulation in fruit ripening and senescense, and response to salicylic acid and ethylene signalling are yet to be illustrated. One cDNA encoding putative 14-3-3 protein was isolated from pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) and designated Pp14-3-3a. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that Pp14-3-3a belonged to ε-like group of 14-3-3 superfamilies. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the expression of Pp14-3-3a gene was developmentally regulated in the fruit. Further study demonstrated that Pp14-3-3a expression was inhibited by salicylic acid and induced by ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid in pear fruit. These data suggested that Pp14-3-3a might be involved in response to salicylic acid and ethylene signalling during fruit ripening and senescence of pear.

  18. Increased Expression of CYR61, an Extracellular Matrix Signaling Protein, in Human Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Its Regulation by Lysophosphatidic Acid

    PubMed Central

    SAKAMOTO, SHINJI; YOKOYAMA, MASAHIRO; ZHANG, XIANGHUA; PRAKASH, KULKARNI; NAGAO, KAORI; HATANAKA, TAKASHI; GETZENBERG, ROBERT H.; KAKEHI, YOSHIYUKI

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an endogenous lipid growth factor that is thought to play important roles in cell proliferation and antiapoptosis and therefore may have roles in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). CYR61 (CCN1), on the other hand, is a growth factor-inducible immediate early gene that functions in cell proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix synthesis. Here we show the close relationship between LPA-induced expression of CYR61 and prostate enlargement. CYR61 mRNA and protein were dramatically up-regulated by 18:1 LPA (oleoyl-LPA) within 1 and 2 h, respectively, in both stromal and epithelial prostatic cells. G protein-coupled receptors, i.e. Edg-2, Edg-4, and Edg-7, for LPA were also expressed in both stromal and epithelial prostatic cells. Furthermore, on DNA microarray analysis for normal and BPH patients, CYR61 was found to be related to the development and progression of BPH, regardless of symptoms. Although CYR61 mRNA was synthesized in hyperplastic epithelial cells, in many cases of BPH, CYR61 protein was detected in both the epithelial and stromal regions of BPH patient tissues. The functional contribution of CYR61 to prostatic cell growth was demonstrated by recombinant CYR61 protein and anti-CYR61 neutralizing antibodies, which inhibited CYR61-dependent cell spreading and significantly diminished cell proliferation, respectively. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that LPAs induce the expression of CYR61 by activating G protein-coupled receptors and that CYR61 acts as a secreted autocrine and/or paracrine mediator in stromal and epithelial hyperplasia, demonstrating the potential importance of this signaling mechanism in the disease. (Endocrinology 145: 2929–2940, 2004) PMID:14988385

  19. [27-O-(E)-p-coumaric acyl ursolic acid via JNK/SAPK signal pathway regulates apoptosis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-ting; Wang, Cun-qin

    2015-02-01

    27-O-(E)-p-coumaric acyl ursolic acid( DY-17) from Ilex latifolia is a compound of the monomer. To investigate the DY-17 inducing apoptosis in the human breast cancer cell line, the MDA-MB-231 cells were used as research object in this experiment. The proliferation activity of the MDA-MB-231 cells stimulated with the different concentrations of DY-17 (20, 40 µmol · L(-1)) was detected at different time( 12, 24, 36, 48, 60,72 h) . We surveyed the DY-17 inducing apoptosis of the MDA-MB-231 cells with the fluorescent staining technology. The rate of MDA-MB-231 cells apoptosis and necrosis was determined by flow cell cytometry (FCC). Moreover, expression of JNK, phosphorylated JNK, Bax, PARP shear and caspase-3 shear related to JNK/SAPK pathways were investigated in every group ( control group, EGF group, EGF + DY-17 40 µmol · L(1) group and EGF + SP600125 group) with Western blot. The MTT results showed that, in the presence of DY-17, the proliferation activity of MDA-MB-231 cells decreased in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The apoptosis and necrosis rates of MDA-MB-231 cells with DY-17(20, 40 µmol · L(-1)) groups was respectively 31.86%, 49.91% by flow cytometry and significantly increased compared with control group under Fluores- cence microscopy. Up-regulation of the JNK phosphorylation protein expression was observed in EGF group compared with control group. In addition, markedly decreased the expression of JNK phosphorylation protein were also surveyed in EGF + DY-17 40 µmol · L(-1) group compared with EGF group. The expression of Bax, shear PARP and shear caspase-3 protein in EGF + DY-17 40 µmol · L(-1) group were significantly increased in comparison with EGF group. The results showed DY-17 induced apoptosis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line related to down-regulating JNK/SAPK signal pathways.

  20. Amino acid-dependent signaling via S6K1 and MYC is essential for regulation of rDNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Kusnadi, Eric P.; Ogden, Allison J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Bammert, Lukas; Kutay, Ulrike; Hung, Sandy; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Ross D.; Hannan, Katherine M.; Pearson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is a consistent feature of malignant transformation that can be targeted to treat cancer. Understanding how rDNA transcription is coupled to the availability of growth factors and nutrients will provide insight into how ribosome biogenesis is maintained in a tumour environment characterised by limiting nutrients. We demonstrate that modulation of rDNA transcription initiation, elongation and rRNA processing is an immediate, co-regulated response to altered amino acid abundance, dependent on both mTORC1 activation of S6K1 and MYC activity. Growth factors regulate rDNA transcription initiation while amino acids modulate growth factor-dependent rDNA transcription by primarily regulating S6K1-dependent rDNA transcription elongation and processing. Thus, we show for the first time amino acids regulate rRNA synthesis by a distinct, post-initiation mechanism, providing a novel model for integrated control of ribosome biogenesis that has implications for understanding how this process is dysregulated in cancer. PMID:27385002

  1. Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene Signaling Pathways Regulate Glucosinolate Levels in Plants During Rhizobacteria-Induced Systemic Resistance Against a Leaf-Chewing Herbivore.

    PubMed

    Pangesti, Nurmi; Reichelt, Michael; van de Mortel, Judith E; Kapsomenou, Eleni; Gershenzon, Jonathan; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel; Pineda, Ana

    2016-12-01

    Beneficial soil microbes can promote plant growth and induce systemic resistance (ISR) in aboveground tissues against pathogens and herbivorous insects. Despite the increasing interest in microbial-ISR against herbivores, the underlying molecular and chemical mechanisms of this phenomenon remain elusive. Using Arabidopsis thaliana and the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r (formerly known as P. fluorescens WCS417r), we here evaluate the role of the JA-regulated MYC2-branch and the JA/ET-regulated ORA59-branch in modulating rhizobacteria-ISR to Mamestra brassicae by combining gene transcriptional, phytochemical, and herbivore performance assays. Our data show a consistent negative effect of rhizobacteria-mediated ISR on the performance of M. brassicae. Functional JA- and ET-signaling pathways are required for this effect, as shown by investigating the knock-out mutants dde2-2 and ein2-1. Additionally, whereas herbivory mainly induces the MYC2-branch, rhizobacterial colonization alone or in combination with herbivore infestation induces the ORA59-branch of the JA signaling pathway. Rhizobacterial colonization enhances the synthesis of camalexin and aliphatic glucosinolates (GLS) compared to the control, while it suppresses the herbivore-induced levels of indole GLS. These changes are associated with modulation of the JA-/ET-signaling pathways. Our data show that the colonization of plant roots by rhizobacteria modulates plant-insect interactions by prioritizing the JA/ET-regulated ORA59-branch over the JA-regulated MYC2-branch. This study elucidates how microbial plant symbionts can modulate the plant immune system to mount an effective defense response against herbivorous plant attackers.

  2. Regulation of Drosophila lifespan by JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Benoit; Karpac, Jason; Hwangbo, DaeSung; Jasper, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Cellular responses to extrinsic and intrinsic insults have to be carefully regulated to properly coordinate cytoprotection, repair processes, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Stress signaling pathways, most prominently the Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway, are critical regulators of such cellular responses and have accordingly been implicated in the regulation of lifespan in various organisms. JNK signaling promotes cytoprotective gene expression, but also interacts with the Insulin signaling pathway to influence growth, metabolism, stress tolerance and regeneration. Here, we review recent studies in Drosophila that elucidate the tissue-specific and systemic consequences of JNK activation that ultimately impact lifespan of the organism. PMID:21111799

  3. Regulation of Hedgehog signaling by ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Elaine Y. C.; Gui, Yirui; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles both in embryonic development and in adult stem cell function. The timing, duration and location of Hh signaling activity need to be tightly controlled. Abnormalities of Hh signal transduction lead to birth defects or malignant tumors. Recent data point to ubiquitination-related posttranslational modifications of several key Hh pathway components as an important mechanism of regulation of the Hh pathway. Here we review how ubiquitination regulates the localization, stability and activity of the key Hh signaling components. PMID:26366162

  4. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  5. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling in Cholestasis, Inflammation, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport, and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug, and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport, and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration, and carcinogenesis.

  6. Zoledronic acid impairs re-epithelialization through down-regulation of integrin αvβ6 and transforming growth factor beta signalling in a three-dimensional in vitro wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Izumi, K; Shiomi, A; Uenoyama, A; Ohnuki, H; Kato, H; Terada, M; Nozawa-Inoue, K; Kawano, Y; Takagi, R; Maeda, T

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the negative effects of zoledronic acid on the re-epithelialization of oral mucosa in a three-dimensional in vitro oral mucosa wound healing model. A living oral mucosa equivalent was constructed by seeding a mixture of primary human oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts, at a cell density of 1.5 × 10(5)cm(2) each, onto human cadaver dermis. This was cultured in a submerged condition in 1.2mM Ca(2+) EpiLife for 5 days, and then in an air-liquid interface for 14 days. The equivalent was wounded by excising a linear 2-mm-wide epithelial layer on day 8 and subsequently incubated with 10 μM zoledronic acid for an additional 11 days. Histological and immunohistochemical observations revealed zoledronic acid to significantly suppress the epithelial thickness and Ki-67-labelling index. Zoledronic acid also abolished integrin αvβ6 expression, implying impaired keratinocyte migration. Zoledronic acid did not attenuate the total transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) production into the supernatant, but down-regulated TGF-β receptor types I and II expression and Smad3 phosphorylation, as was also confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. This study therefore showed zoledronic acid to abrogate integrin αvβ6 expression, cause the down-regulation of TGF-β/Smad signalling in oral keratinocytes, and impair re-epithelialization, suggesting compromised oral mucosa homeostasis in patients receiving zoledronic acid.

  7. OsRACK1 Is Involved in Abscisic Acid- and H2O2-Mediated Signaling to Regulate Seed Germination in Rice (Oryza sativa, L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongping; Chen, Li; Li, Dahong; Lv, Bing; Chen, Yun; Chen, Jingui; XuejiaoYan; Liang, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) is one member of the most important WD repeat–containing family of proteins found in all eukaryotes and is involved in multiple signaling pathways. However, compared with the progress in the area of mammalian RACK1, our understanding of the functions and molecular mechanisms of RACK1 in the regulation of plant growth and development is still in its infancy. In the present study, we investigated the roles of rice RACK1A gene (OsRACK1A) in controlling seed germination and its molecular mechanisms by generating a series of transgenic rice lines, of which OsRACK1A was either over-expressed or under-expressed. Our results showed that OsRACK1A positively regulated seed germination and negatively regulated the responses of seed germination to both exogenous ABA and H2O2. Inhibition of ABA biosynthesis had no enhancing effect on germination, whereas inhibition of ABA catabolism significantly suppressed germination. ABA inhibition on seed germination was almost fully recovered by exogenous H2O2 treatment. Quantitative analyses showed that endogenous ABA levels were significantly higher and H2O2 levels significantly lower in OsRACK1A-down regulated transgenic lines as compared with those in wildtype or OsRACK1A-up regulated lines. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the transcript levels of OsRbohs and amylase genes, RAmy1A and RAmy3D, were significantly lower in OsRACK1A-down regulated transgenic lines. It is concluded that OsRACK1A positively regulates seed germination by controlling endogenous levels of ABA and H2O2 and their interaction. PMID:24865690

  8. Reduced adiponectin expression after high-fat diet is associated with selective up-regulation of ALDH1A1 and further retinoic acid receptor signaling in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Landrier, Jean-Francois; Kasiri, Elnaz; Karkeni, Esma; Mihály, Johanna; Béke, Gabriella; Weiss, Kathrin; Lucas, Renata; Aydemir, Gamze; Salles, Jérome; Walrand, Stéphane; de Lera, Angel R.; Rühl, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived adipokine with potent antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic activity. Long-term, high-fat diet results in gain of body weight, adiposity, further inflammatory-based cardiovascular diseases, and reduced adiponectin secretion. Vitamin A derivatives/retinoids are involved in several of these processes, which mainly take place in white adipose tissue (WAT). In this study, we examined adiponectin expression as a function of dietary high-fat and high–vitamin A conditions in mice. A decrease of adiponectin expression in addition to an up-regulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDH1A1), retinoid signaling, and retinoic acid response element signaling was selectively observed in WAT of mice fed a normal–vitamin A, high-fat diet. Reduced adiponectin expression in WAT was also observed in mice fed a high–vitamin A diet. Adipocyte cell culture revealed that endogenous and synthetic retinoic acid receptor (RAR)α- and RARγ-selective agonists, as well as a synthetic retinoid X receptor agonist, efficiently reduced adiponectin expression, whereas ALDH1A1 expression only increased with RAR agonists. We conclude that reduced adiponectin expression under high-fat dietary conditions is dependent on 1) increased ALDH1A1 expression in adipocytes, which does not increase all-trans-retinoic acid levels; 2) further RAR ligand–induced, WAT-selective, increased retinoic acid response element–mediated signaling; and 3) RAR ligand–dependent reduction of adiponectin expression.—Landrier, J.-F., Kasiri, E., Karkeni, E., Mihály, J., Béke, G., Weiss, K., Lucas, R., Aydemir, G., Salles, J., Walrand, S., de Lera, A. R., Rühl, R. Reduced adiponectin expression after high-fat diet is associated with selective up-regulation of ALDH1A1 and further retinoic acid receptor signaling in adipose tissue. PMID:27729412

  9. Regulation patterns in signaling networks of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Formation of cellular malignancy results from the disruption of fine tuned signaling homeostasis for proliferation, accompanied by mal-functional signals for differentiation, cell cycle and apoptosis. We wanted to observe central signaling characteristics on a global view of malignant cells which have evolved to selfishness and independence in comparison to their non-malignant counterparts that fulfill well defined tasks in their sample. Results We investigated the regulation of signaling networks with twenty microarray datasets from eleven different tumor types and their corresponding non-malignant tissue samples. Proteins were represented by their coding genes and regulatory distances were defined by correlating the gene-regulation between neighboring proteins in the network (high correlation = small distance). In cancer cells we observed shorter pathways, larger extension of the networks, a lower signaling frequency of central proteins and links and a higher information content of the network. Proteins of high signaling frequency were enriched with cancer mutations. These proteins showed motifs of regulatory integration in normal cells which was disrupted in tumor cells. Conclusion Our global analysis revealed a distinct formation of signaling-regulation in cancer cells when compared to cells of normal samples. From these cancer-specific regulation patterns novel signaling motifs are proposed. PMID:21110851

  10. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  11. Low-ω3 Fatty Acid and Soy Protein Attenuate Alcohol-Induced Fatty Liver and Injury by Regulating the Opposing Lipid Oxidation and Lipogenic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Varatharajalu, Ravi; Garige, Mamatha; Leckey, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic ethanol-induced downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) and upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-beta (PGC1β) affect hepatic lipid oxidation and lipogenesis, respectively, leading to fatty liver injury. Low-ω3 fatty acid (Low-ω3FA) that primarily regulates PGC1α and soy protein (SP) that seems to have its major regulatory effect on PGC1β were evaluated for their protective effects against ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis in rats fed with Lieber-deCarli control or ethanol liquid diets with high or low ω3FA fish oil and soy protein. Low-ω3FA and SP opposed the actions of chronic ethanol by reducing serum and liver lipids with concomitant decreased fatty liver. They also prevented the downregulation of hepatic Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and PGC1α and their target fatty acid oxidation pathway genes and attenuated the upregulation of hepatic PGC1β and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and their target lipogenic pathway genes via the phosphorylation of 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Thus, these two novel modulators attenuate ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis and consequent liver injury potentially by regulating the two opposing lipid oxidation and lipogenic pathways. PMID:28074114

  12. Low-ω3 Fatty Acid and Soy Protein Attenuate Alcohol-Induced Fatty Liver and Injury by Regulating the Opposing Lipid Oxidation and Lipogenic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Varatharajalu, Ravi; Garige, Mamatha; Leckey, Leslie C; Lakshman, M Raj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic ethanol-induced downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) and upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-beta (PGC1β) affect hepatic lipid oxidation and lipogenesis, respectively, leading to fatty liver injury. Low-ω3 fatty acid (Low-ω3FA) that primarily regulates PGC1α and soy protein (SP) that seems to have its major regulatory effect on PGC1β were evaluated for their protective effects against ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis in rats fed with Lieber-deCarli control or ethanol liquid diets with high or low ω3FA fish oil and soy protein. Low-ω3FA and SP opposed the actions of chronic ethanol by reducing serum and liver lipids with concomitant decreased fatty liver. They also prevented the downregulation of hepatic Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and PGC1α and their target fatty acid oxidation pathway genes and attenuated the upregulation of hepatic PGC1β and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and their target lipogenic pathway genes via the phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Thus, these two novel modulators attenuate ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis and consequent liver injury potentially by regulating the two opposing lipid oxidation and lipogenic pathways.

  13. [Signaling pathway of meiosis induced by retinoic acid during spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Wu, Ying-Ji

    2013-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an oxidative metabolite of vitamin A (retinol, ROH) and plays an important role in the spermatogenesis (as in meiosis) of mammals. In mammalian testes, RA, in combination with its retinoic acid receptor (RAR), regulates the expressions of related target genes in various types of cells at different times. It activates meiosis by up-regulating the expressions of the genes that promote meiosis and down-regulate those that inhibit it during spermatogenesis in a specific stage. The results of researches on mammalian spermatogenesis have a great application value in reproductive biology, developmental biology, and reproductive engineering. Therefore, it is of considerable significance to study the signaling pathway of RA-induced meiosis during mammalian spermatogenesis. This article presents an introduction of the RA signal transduction system and its action mechanisms, as well as an overview on the signaling pathway of RA-activated meiosis during spermatogenesis.

  14. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms. PMID:27054048

  15. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms.

  16. Powdery Mildew Resistance Conferred by Loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 Protein Kinase Is Suppressed by a Missense Mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M.; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L.; Innes, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling. PMID:18815384

  17. Powdery mildew resistance conferred by loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 protein kinase is suppressed by a missense mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a regulator of abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L; Innes, Roger W

    2008-11-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling.

  18. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival.

  19. A boswellic acid-containing extract ameliorates schistosomiasis liver granuloma and fibrosis through regulating NF-κB signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao; Wu, Qingsi; Chen, Peng; Büchele, Berthold; Bian, Maohong; Dong, Shengjian; Huang, Dake; Ren, Cuiping; Zhang, Yuxia; Hou, Xin; Simmet, Thomas; Shen, Jijia

    2014-01-01

    Boswellic acid (BA)-containing extracts such as BSE have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity. In chronic schistosomiasis, the hepatic granuloma and fibrosis induced by egg deposition in the liver is the most serious pathological manifestations. However, little is known regarding the role of BAs in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) egg-induced liver granuloma and fibrosis. In order to investigate the effect of a water-soluble complex preparation of BSE, BSE-CD, on S. japonicum egg-induced liver pathology, liver granuloma and fibrosis were induced by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 18-22 cercariae of S. japonicum. S. japonicum cercariae infected mice were injected with BSE-CD at the onset of egg granuloma formation (early phase BSE-CD treatment after 4 weeks infection) or after the formation of liver fibrosis (late phase BSE-CD treatment after 7 weeks infection). Our data show that treatment of infected mice with BSE-CD significantly reduced both the extent of hepatic granuloma and fibrosis. Consistent with an inhibition of NF-κB signaling as evidenced by reduced IκB kinase (IKK) activation, the mRNA expression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha TNF-α) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1, MCP-1) was decreased. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) revealed that the content of α-SMA in liver tissue of BSE-CD treated mice was dramatically decreased. Our findings suggest that BSE-CD treatment attenuates S. japonicum egg-induced hepatic granulomas and fibrosis, at least partly due to reduced NF-κB signaling and the subsequently decreased expression of VEGF, TNF-α, and MCP-1. Suppression of the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) may also be involved in the therapeutic efficacy of BSE-CD.

  20. A Boswellic Acid-Containing Extract Ameliorates Schistosomiasis Liver Granuloma and Fibrosis through Regulating NF-κB Signaling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Büchele, Berthold; Bian, Maohong; Dong, Shengjian; Huang, Dake; Ren, Cuiping; Zhang, Yuxia; Hou, Xin; Simmet, Thomas; Shen, Jijia

    2014-01-01

    Boswellic acid (BA)-containing extracts such as BSE have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity. In chronic schistosomiasis, the hepatic granuloma and fibrosis induced by egg deposition in the liver is the most serious pathological manifestations. However, little is known regarding the role of BAs in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) egg-induced liver granuloma and fibrosis. In order to investigate the effect of a water-soluble complex preparation of BSE, BSE-CD, on S. japonicum egg-induced liver pathology, liver granuloma and fibrosis were induced by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 18–22 cercariae of S. japonicum. S. japonicum cercariae infected mice were injected with BSE-CD at the onset of egg granuloma formation (early phase BSE-CD treatment after 4 weeks infection) or after the formation of liver fibrosis (late phase BSE-CD treatment after 7 weeks infection). Our data show that treatment of infected mice with BSE-CD significantly reduced both the extent of hepatic granuloma and fibrosis. Consistent with an inhibition of NF-κB signaling as evidenced by reduced IκB kinase (IKK) activation, the mRNA expression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha TNF-α) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1, MCP-1) was decreased. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) revealed that the content of α-SMA in liver tissue of BSE-CD treated mice was dramatically decreased. Our findings suggest that BSE-CD treatment attenuates S. japonicum egg-induced hepatic granulomas and fibrosis, at least partly due to reduced NF-κB signaling and the subsequently decreased expression of VEGF, TNF-α, and MCP-1. Suppression of the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) may also be involved in the therapeutic efficacy of BSE-CD. PMID:24941000

  1. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  2. E3 ubiquitin ligases and abscisic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongxia

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in the regulation of nearly every aspect of plant growth and development. Protein ubiquitination involves the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to target proteins through a cascade catalyzed by three enzymes known as E1, E2 and E3. E3s are of particular interest as they confer substrate specificity during ubiquitination through their diverse substrate recognition domains. Recently, a number of E3s have been identified that actively participate in abscisic acid hormone biology, including regulation of biosynthesis, de-repression or activation of abscisic acid response and degradation of signaling components. In this review, we summarize recent exciting studies of the different types of E3s that target specific mediators of abscisic acid signaling or affect the plants response to the hormone. PMID:21364320

  3. Dynamic Redox Regulation of IL-4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Gaurav; Gran, Margaret A.; Bagchi, Pritha; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and dynamics of protein oxidation during cell signaling is technically challenging. Computational modeling provides tractable, quantitative methods to test hypotheses of redox mechanisms that may be simultaneously operative during signal transduction. The interleukin-4 (IL-4) pathway, which has previously been reported to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidation of PTP1B, may be controlled by several other putative mechanisms of redox regulation; widespread proteomic thiol oxidation observed via 2D redox differential gel electrophoresis upon IL-4 treatment suggests more than one redox-sensitive protein implicated in this pathway. Through computational modeling and a model selection strategy that relied on characteristic STAT6 phosphorylation dynamics of IL-4 signaling, we identified reversible protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) oxidation as the primary redox regulatory mechanism in the pathway. A systems-level model of IL-4 signaling was developed that integrates synchronous pan-PTP oxidation with ROS-independent mechanisms. The model quantitatively predicts the dynamics of IL-4 signaling over a broad range of new redox conditions, offers novel hypotheses about regulation of JAK/STAT signaling, and provides a framework for interrogating putative mechanisms involving receptor-initiated oxidation. PMID:26562652

  4. Nutritional Signaling via Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Junki; Hasegawa, Sae; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Nakajima, Akira; Kimura, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Excess energy is stored primarily as triglycerides, which are mobilized when demand for energy arises. Dysfunction of energy balance by excess food intake leads to metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFAs) provided by dietary fat are not only important nutrients, but also contribute key physiological functions via FFA receptor (FFAR)-mediated signaling molecules, which depend on FFAs’ carbon chain length and the ligand specificity of the receptors. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs are critical for metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and contribute to energy homeostasis. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 and GPR120 improved glucose metabolism and systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the anti-inflammation and energy metabolism effects of short chain FAs have been linked to the activation of GPR41 and GPR43. In this review, we summarize recent progress in research on FFAs and their physiological roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. PMID:27023530

  5. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  6. Mitochondria: master regulators of danger signalling.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Throughout more than 1.5 billion years of obligate endosymbiotic co-evolution, mitochondria have developed not only the capacity to control distinct molecular cascades leading to cell death but also the ability to sense (and react to) multiple situations of cellular stress, including viral infection. In addition, mitochondria can emit danger signals that alert the cell or the whole organism of perturbations in homeostasis, hence promoting the induction of cell-intrinsic or systemic adaptive responses, respectively. As such, mitochondria can be considered as master regulators of danger signalling.

  7. Modulation of Nitro-fatty Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vitturi, Dario A.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Stewart, Nicolas A.; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Kensler, Thomas W.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation, characterized by the activation of both resident and infiltrated immune cells, is accompanied by increased production of oxidizing and nitrating species. Nitrogen dioxide, the proximal nitrating species formed under these conditions, reacts with unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitroalkene derivatives. These electrophilic products modulate protein function via post-translational modification of susceptible nucleophilic amino acids. Nitroalkenes react with Keap1 to instigate Nrf2 signaling, activate heat shock response gene expression, and inhibit NF-κB-mediated signaling, inducing net anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective metabolic responses. We report the purification and characterization of a NADPH-dependent liver enzyme that reduces the nitroalkene moiety of nitro-oleic acid, yielding the inactive product nitro-stearic acid. Prostaglandin reductase-1 (PtGR-1) was identified as a nitroalkene reductase by protein purification and proteomic studies. Kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, immunological and molecular biology approaches as well as clinical analyses confirmed this identification. Overexpression of PtGR-1 in HEK293T cells promoted nitroalkene metabolism to inactive nitroalkanes, an effect that abrogated the Nrf2-dependent induction of heme oxygenase-1 expression by nitro-oleic acid. These results situate PtGR-1 as a critical modulator of both the steady state levels and signaling activities of fatty acid nitroalkenes in vivo. PMID:23878198

  8. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-06

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment.

  9. Estrogen regulates excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) expression through sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) transacting FGFR-mediated ERK signaling in rat C6 astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Yuan, P; Wu, J; Huang, J

    2016-04-05

    Excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) is one important subtype of the excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), and its absence can increase the vulnerability to oxidative stress in neural tissue. Enhanced expression of EAAC1 can provide neuroprotection in multiple disorders, including ischemia and multiple sclerosis. However, the mechanism regulating EAAC1 expression is not fully understood. Using rat C6 astroglial cells, which specifically express EAAC1, we found that 17β-estradiol (E2) and (±)-1-[(3aR(∗),4S(∗),9bS(∗))-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone (G1), an agonist of the G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30), strongly increased EAAC1 protein levels and protected cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) toxicity. We further found that E2/G1 activated sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) via GPR30, resulting in the transcription of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), which stimulated its receptor (FGFR) and led to the phosphorylation of FGFR substrate 2α (FRS2α). This triggered downstream ERK1/2 signaling for the expression of EAAC1. Both the knockdown of FGF2 by siRNA and the pharmacological suppression of the FGFR-ERK cascade abolished the E2/G1 effect on EAAC1 expression. Overall, our work characterizes a signaling pathway by which E2 transactivates FGFR-ERK to induce EAAC1 expression in an FGF2-dependent manner. This occurs through SphK1 activation via GPR30 and leads to a resistance to H2O2 toxicity. This signal transduction pathway may provide novel insights into our understanding of the neuroprotective effects of E2 and may reveal new therapeutic targets or drugs for regulating the oxidative toxicity effects of various neurological diseases.

  10. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  11. Metabolic signals in sleep regulation: recent insights.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Charu; Basheer, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and energy balance are essential for health. The two processes act in concert to regulate central and peripheral homeostasis. During sleep, energy is conserved due to suspended activity, movement, and sensory responses, and is redirected to restore and replenish proteins and their assemblies into cellular structures. During wakefulness, various energy-demanding activities lead to hunger. Thus, hunger promotes arousal, and subsequent feeding, followed by satiety that promotes sleep via changes in neuroendocrine or neuropeptide signals. These signals overlap with circuits of sleep-wakefulness, feeding, and energy expenditure. Here, we will briefly review the literature that describes the interplay between the circadian system, sleep-wake, and feeding-fasting cycles that are needed to maintain energy balance and a healthy metabolic profile. In doing so, we describe the neuroendocrine, hormonal/peptide signals that integrate sleep and feeding behavior with energy metabolism.

  12. Metabolic signals in sleep regulation: recent insights

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Charu; Basheer, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and energy balance are essential for health. The two processes act in concert to regulate central and peripheral homeostasis. During sleep, energy is conserved due to suspended activity, movement, and sensory responses, and is redirected to restore and replenish proteins and their assemblies into cellular structures. During wakefulness, various energy-demanding activities lead to hunger. Thus, hunger promotes arousal, and subsequent feeding, followed by satiety that promotes sleep via changes in neuroendocrine or neuropeptide signals. These signals overlap with circuits of sleep-wakefulness, feeding, and energy expenditure. Here, we will briefly review the literature that describes the interplay between the circadian system, sleep-wake, and feeding-fasting cycles that are needed to maintain energy balance and a healthy metabolic profile. In doing so, we describe the neuroendocrine, hormonal/peptide signals that integrate sleep and feeding behavior with energy metabolism. PMID:26793010

  13. Localized signals that regulate transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Muller, William A

    2016-02-01

    Transendothelial migration (TEM) of leukocytes is the step in leukocyte emigration in which the leukocyte actually leaves the blood vessel to carry out its role in the inflammatory response. It is therefore, arguably the most critical step in emigration. This review focuses on two of the many aspects of this process that have seen important recent developments. The adhesion molecules, PECAM (CD31) and CD99 that regulate two major steps in TEM, do so by regulating specific signals. PECAM initiates the signaling pathway responsible for the calcium flux that is required for TEM. Calcium enters through the cation channel TRPC6 and recruits the first wave of trafficking of membrane from the lateral border recycling compartment (LBRC). CD99 signals through soluble adenylate cyclase to activate protein kinase A to recruit a second wave of LBRC trafficking. Another process that is critical for TEM is transient removal of VE-cadherin from the site of TEM. However, the local signaling pathways that are responsible for this appear to be different from those that open the junctions to increase vascular permeability.

  14. Kinetic and biochemical correlation between sustained p44ERK1 (44 kDa extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1) activation and lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated DNA synthesis in Rat-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, S J; McCormick, F

    1996-01-01

    Rat-1 fibroblasts were used to study the role of the sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-stimulated mitogenic signalling. Mitogenic doses of LPA, like serum, stimulated biphasic, sustained, ERK activation that persisted towards the G1/S boundary. The EC50 for LPA-stimulated ERK activation after 10 min, the time of peak response, was 2 orders of magnitude to the left of that for the sustained response after 3 h or that for DNA synthesis after 22 h, with the result that non-mitogenic doses stimulated a maximal peak response but no second phase. To complement these studies, we examined the role of different signal pathways in regulating the sustained and acute phases of ERK activation using defined biochemical inhibitors and mimetics. Activation of protein kinase C and Ca2+ fluxes played a minor and transient role in regulation of ERK1 activity by LPA in Rat-1 cells. Sustained ERK1 activation stimulated by LPA was completely inhibited by pertussis toxin, whereas the early peak response was only partly affected; this is correlated with the specific inhibition of LPA-stimulated DNA synthesis by pertussis toxin. The selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A completely inhibited sustained ERK1 activation by LPA but, again, the early phase of the response was only partially inhibited. In addition, low doses of staurosporine inhibited ERK1 activation by LPA. The effects of herbimycin A and staurosporine were selective for the response to LPA but did not affect that to epidermal growth factor. The results suggest a strong correlation between sustained ERK1 activation and DNA synthesis in LPA-stimulated Rat-1 cells. Furthermore, the two discrete phases of ERK activation by LPA are regulated by a combination of at least two different signalling pathways; the sustained activation of ERK1 in Rat-1 cells proceeds via a G1- or Gzero-mediated pathway which may also involve a tyrosine kinase. PMID:8947493

  15. The Kidney and Acid-Base Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeppen, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the topic of the role of the kidneys in the regulation of acid base balance was last reviewed from a teaching perspective (Koeppen BM. Renal regulation of acid-base balance. Adv Physiol Educ 20: 132-141, 1998), our understanding of the specific membrane transporters involved in H+, HCO , and NH transport, and especially how these…

  16. Evolution of retinoic acid receptors and retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A-derived morphogen controlling important developmental processes in vertebrates, and more generally in chordates, including axial patterning and tissue formation and differentiation. In the embryo, endogenous RA levels are controlled by RA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and the RA signal is transduced by two retinoid receptors: the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR). Both RAR and RXR are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors and mainly act as heterodimers to activate the transcription of target genes in the presence of their ligand, all-trans RA. This signaling pathway was long thought to be a chordate innovation, however, recent findings of gene homologs involved in RA signaling in the genomes of a wide variety of non-chordate animals, including ambulacrarians (sea urchins and acorn worms) and lophotrochozoans (annelids and mollusks), challenged this traditional view and suggested that the RA signaling pathway might have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously thought. In this chapter, we discuss the evolutionary history of the RA signaling pathway, and more particularly of the RARs, which might have experienced independent gene losses and duplications in different animal lineages. In sum, the available data reveal novel insights into the origin of the RA signaling pathway as well as into the evolutionary history of the RARs.

  17. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  18. Retinoic Acid Signaling Affects Cortical Synchrony During Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Stéphanie; Franken, Paul; Dauvilliers, Yves; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.; Chambon, Pierre; Tafti, Mehdi

    2005-10-01

    Delta oscillations, characteristic of the electroencephalogram (EEG) of slow wave sleep, estimate sleep depth and need and are thought to be closely linked to the recovery function of sleep. The cellular mechanisms underlying the generation of delta waves at the cortical and thalamic levels are well documented, but the molecular regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate in the mouse that the gene encoding the retinoic acid receptor beta determines the contribution of delta oscillations to the sleep EEG. Thus, retinoic acid signaling, which is involved in the patterning of the brain and dopaminergic pathways, regulates cortical synchrony in the adult.

  19. Signaling in Regulation of Podocyte Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The kidney podocyte is a terminally differentiated and highly specialized cell. The function of the glomerular filtration barrier depends on the integrity of the podocyte. Podocyte injury and loss have been observed in human and experimental models of glomerular diseases. Three major podocyte phenotypes have been described in glomerular diseases: effacement, apoptosis, and proliferation. Here, we highlight the signaling cascades that are responsible for the manifestation of these pathologic phenotypes. The integrity of the podocyte foot process is determined by the interaction of nephrin with proteins in the slit diaphragm complex, the regulation of actin dynamics by the Rho family of GTPases, and the transduction of extracellular signals through focal adhesion complexes. Activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and transforming growth factor-β 1 causes podocyte apoptosis. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase and its downstream target AKT protect podocytes from apoptosis. In human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy, Src-dependent activation of Stat3, mitogen- activated protein kinase 1,2, and hypoxia-inducible factor 2α is an important driver of podocyte proliferation. At the level of intracellular signaling, it appears that different extracellular signals can converge onto a few pathways to induce changes in the phenotype of podocytes. PMID:19142027

  20. Desmosome regulation and signaling in disease

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Joshua A.; Getsios, Spiro

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell adhesive organelles with a well-known role in forming strong intercellular adhesion during embryogenesis and in adult tissues subject to mechanical stress, such as the heart and skin. More recently, desmosome components have also emerged as cell signaling regulators. Loss of expression or interference with the function of desmosome molecules results in diseases of the heart and skin and contributes to cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that result in inherited and acquired disorders remain poorly understood. To address this question, researchers are directing their studies towards determining the functions that occur inside and outside of the junctions and the extent to which functions are adhesion-dependent or independent. This review focuses on recent discoveries that provide insights into the role of desmosomes and desmosome components in cell signaling and disease; wherever possible, we address molecular functions within and outside of the adhesive structure. PMID:25693896

  1. Desmosome regulation and signaling in disease.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Joshua A; Getsios, Spiro; Green, Kathleen J

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell adhesive organelles with a well-known role in forming strong intercellular adhesion during embryogenesis and in adult tissues subject to mechanical stress, such as the heart and skin. More recently, desmosome components have also emerged as cell signaling regulators. Loss of expression or interference with the function of desmosome molecules results in diseases of the heart and skin and contributes to cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that result in inherited and acquired disorders remain poorly understood. To address this question, researchers are directing their studies towards determining the functions that occur inside and outside of the junctions and the extent to which functions are adhesion-dependent or independent. This review focuses on recent discoveries that provide insights into the role of desmosomes and desmosome components in cell signaling and disease; wherever possible, we address molecular functions within and outside of the adhesive structure.

  2. Evolutionarily conserved regulation of TOR signalling.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Terunao; Maeda, Tatsuya

    2013-07-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase that regulates cell growth in response to various environmental as well as intracellular cues through the formation of 2 distinct TOR complexes (TORC), TORC1 and TORC2. Dysregulation of TORC1 and TORC2 activity is closely associated with various diseases, including diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Over the past few years, new regulatory mechanisms of TORC1 and TORC2 activity have been elucidated. Furthermore, recent advances in the study of TOR inhibitors have revealed previously unrecognized cellular functions of TORC1. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding of the evolutionarily conserved TOR signalling from upstream regulators to downstream events.

  3. Development of Inhibitors of Salicylic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Kurimoto, Tetsuya; Seo, Eun-kyung; Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Asami, Tadao

    2015-08-19

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays important roles in the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. Determining the mechanism of SAR will extend our understanding of plant defenses against pathogens. We recently reported that PAMD is an inhibitor of SA signaling, which suppresses the expression of the pathogenesis-related PR genes and is expected to facilitate the understanding of SA signaling. However, PAMD strongly inhibits plant growth. To minimize the side effects of PAMD, we synthesized a number of PAMD derivatives, and identified compound 4 that strongly suppresses the expression of the PR genes with fewer adverse effects on plant growth than PAMD. We further showed that the adverse effects on plant growth were partially caused the stabilization of DELLA, which is also related to the pathogen responses. These results indicate that compound 4 would facilitate our understanding of SA signaling and its cross talk with other plant hormones.

  4. Differential regulation of placental amino acid transport by saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-10-15

    Fatty acids are critical for normal fetal development but may also influence placental function. We have previously reported that oleic acid (OA) stimulates amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts (PHTs). In other tissues, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids have distinct effects on cellular signaling, for instance, palmitic acid (PA) but not OA reduces IκBα expression. We hypothesized that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids differentially affect trophoblast amino acid transport and cellular signaling. To test this hypothesis, PHTs were cultured in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 50 μM), OA (100 μM), or PA (100 μM). DHA and OA were also combined to test whether DHA could counteract the OA stimulatory effect on amino acid transport. The effects of fatty acids were compared against a vehicle control. Amino acid transport was measured by isotope-labeled tracers. Activation of inflammatory-related signaling pathways and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway were determined by Western blot analysis. Exposure of PHTs to DHA for 24 h reduced amino acid transport and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, STAT3, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, and ribosomal protein (rp)S6. In contrast, OA increased amino acid transport and phosphorylation of ERK, mTOR, S6 kinase 1, and rpS6. The combination of DHA with OA increased amino acid transport and rpS6 phosphorylation. PA did not affect amino acid transport but reduced IκBα expression. In conclusion, these fatty acids differentially regulated placental amino acid transport and cellular signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that dietary fatty acids could alter the intrauterine environment by modifying placental function, thereby having long-lasting effects on the developing fetus.

  5. WNK signalling pathways in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Meena; Kurz, Thimo; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension (high blood pressure) is a major public health problem affecting more than a billion people worldwide with complications, including stroke, heart failure and kidney failure. The regulation of blood pressure is multifactorial reflecting genetic susceptibility, in utero environment and external factors such as obesity and salt intake. In keeping with Arthur Guyton's hypothesis, the kidney plays a key role in blood pressure control and data from clinical studies; physiology and genetics have shown that hypertension is driven a failure of the kidney to excrete excess salt at normal levels of blood pressure. There is a number of rare Mendelian blood pressure syndromes, which have shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in dysregulated ion transport in the distal kidney. One in particular is Familial hyperkalemic hypertension (FHHt), an autosomal dominant monogenic form of hypertension characterised by high blood pressure, hyperkalemia, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, and hypercalciuria. The clinical signs of FHHt are treated by low doses of thiazide diuretic, and it mirrors Gitelman syndrome which features the inverse phenotype of hypotension, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypocalciuria. Gitelman syndrome is caused by loss of function mutations in the thiazide-sensitive Na/Cl cotransporter (NCC); however, FHHt patients do not have mutations in the SCL12A3 locus encoding NCC. Instead, mutations have been identified in genes that have revealed a key signalling pathway that regulates NCC and several other key transporters and ion channels in the kidney that are critical for BP regulation. This is the WNK kinase signalling pathway that is the subject of this review.

  6. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes.

  7. Over-expression of the bacterial phytase US417 in Arabidopsis reduces the concentration of phytic acid and reveals its involvement in the regulation of sulfate and phosphate homeostasis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Belgaroui, Nibras; Zaidi, Ikram; Farhat, Ameny; Chouayekh, Hichem; Bouain, Nadia; Chay, Sandrine; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane; Masmoudi, Khaled; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Berthomieu, Pierre; Rouached, Hatem; Hanin, Moez

    2014-11-01

    Phytic acid (PA) is the main phosphorus storage form in plant seeds. It is recognized as an anti-nutrient for humans and non-ruminant animals, as well as one of the major sources of phosphorus that contributes to eutrophication. Therefore, engineering plants with low PA content without affecting plant growth capacity has become a major focus in plant breeding. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge on the role of PA seed reserves in regulating plant growth and in maintaining ion homeostasis hinders such an agronomical application. In this context, we report here that the over-expression of the bacterial phytase PHY-US417 in Arabidopsis leads to a significant decrease in seed PA, without any effect on the seed germination potential. Interestingly, this over-expression also induced a higher remobilization of free iron during germination. Moreover, the PHY-over-expressor lines show an increase in inorganic phosphate and sulfate contents, and a higher biomass production after phosphate starvation. Finally, phosphate sensing was altered because of the changes in the expression of genes induced by phosphate starvation or involved in phosphate or sulfate transport. Together, these results show that the over-expression of PHY-US417 reduces PA concentration, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of PA in the regulation of sulfate and phosphate homeostasis and signaling.

  8. Regulation of FcεRI signaling by lipid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kuhny, Marcel; Zorn, Carolin N; Huber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue-resident sentinels of hematopoietic origin that play a prominent role in allergic diseases. They express the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI), which when cross-linked by multivalent antigens triggers the release of preformed mediators, generation of arachidonic acid metabolites, and the synthesis of cytokines and chemokines. Stimulation of the FcεRI with increasing antigen concentrations follows a characteristic bell-shaped dose-responses curve. At high antigen concentrations, the so-called supra-optimal conditions, repression of FcεRI-induced responses is facilitated by activation and incorporation of negative signaling regulators. In this context, the SH2-containing inositol-5'-phosphatase, SHIP1, has been demonstrated to be of particular importance. SHIP1 with its catalytic and multiple protein interaction sites provides several layers of control for FcεRI signaling. Regulation of SHIP1 function occurs on various levels, e.g., protein expression, receptor and membrane recruitment, competition for protein-protein interaction sites, and activating modifications enhancing the phosphatase function. Apart from FcεRI-mediated signaling, SHIP1 can be activated by diverse unrelated receptor systems indicating its involvement in the regulation of antigen-dependent cellular responses by autocrine feedback mechanisms or tissue-specific and/or (patho-) physiologically determined factors. Thus, pharmacologic engagement of SHIP1 may represent a beneficial strategy for patients suffering from acute or chronic inflammation or allergies.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide anion regulates redox signaling via electrophile sulfhydration

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Motohiro; Sawa, Tomohiro; Kitajima, Naoyuki; Ono, Katsuhiko; Inoue, Hirofumi; Ihara, Hideshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Suematsu, Makoto; Kurose, Hitoshi; van der Vliet, Albert; Freeman, Bruce A; Shibata, Takahiro; Uchida, Koji; Kumagai, Yoshito; Akaike, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    An emerging aspect of redox signaling is the pathway mediated by electrophilic byproducts, such as nitrated cyclic nucleotide (for example, 8-nitroguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP)) and nitro or keto derivatives of unsaturated fatty acids, generated via reactions of inflammation-related enzymes, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and secondary products. Here we report that enzymatically generated hydrogen sulfide anion (HS−) regulates the metabolism and signaling actions of various electrophiles. HS− reacts with electrophiles, best represented by 8-nitro-cGMP, via direct sulfhydration and modulates cellular redox signaling. The relevance of this reaction is reinforced by the significant 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mouse cardiac tissue after myocardial infarction that is modulated by alterations in HS− biosynthesis. Cardiac HS−, in turn, suppresses electrophile-mediated H-Ras activation and cardiac cell senescence, contributing to the beneficial effects of HS− on myocardial infarction–associated heart failure. Thus, this study reveals HS−-induced electrophile sulfhydration as a unique mechanism for regulating electrophile-mediated redox signaling. PMID:22772154

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinases regulate expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and neurite outgrowth via non-classical retinoic acid receptor signaling in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Tatsuya; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Shudo, Koichi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown that retinoic acid receptor (RAR) stimulation by an agonist Am80 recruits nitric oxide-dependent signaling via increased expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in rat midbrain slice cultures. Using neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, here we investigated the mechanisms of RAR-induced nNOS expression, together with relationship between nNOS expression and neurite outgrowth. Am80 promoted neurite outgrowth, which was attenuated by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK; SP600125) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK; SB203580). A selective nNOS inhibitor 3-bromo-nitroindazole also suppressed Am80-induced neurite outgrowth. Am80-induced increase in nNOS protein expression was attenuated by LY294002, SP600125 and SB203580, whereas increase in nNOS mRNA expression was attenuated only by LY294002. Am80-induced activation of JNK and p38 MAPK was blocked by LY294002, suggesting that these kinases acted downstream of PI3K. We also confirmed that DAX1, a nuclear receptor reported to regulate nNOS expression, was up-regulated in response to Am80. siRNA-mediated knockdown of DAX1 abrogated Am80-induced nNOS expression and neurite outgrowth. These results reveal for the first time that nNOS expression is crucial for RAR-mediated neurite outgrowth, and that non-genomic signaling such as JNK and p38 MAPK is involved in RAR-mediated nNOS expression.

  11. Aurintricarboxylic acid protects against cell death caused by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages by decreasing inducible nitric-oxide synthase induction via IkappaB kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tsi, Chin-Ju; Chao, Yee; Chen, Ching-Wen; Lin, Wan Wan

    2002-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms involved in cell protection by aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), an endonuclease inhibitor, high nitric oxide (NO)-induced macrophage apoptosis was studied. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, a high level of NO production accompanied by cell apoptosis was apparent with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Direct NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) also dramatically induced cell death, with an EC(50) of 1 mM. Coincubation of ATA (1-500 microM) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells resulted in a striking reduction of NO production and cell apoptosis, whereas only a partial cell protection was achieved in response to SNP. This suggests that abrogation of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent NO production might contribute to ATA protection of LPS-treated cells. Immunoblotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that ATA down-regulated iNOS protein through transcriptional inhibition of iNOS gene expression but was unrelated to iNOS protein stability. ATA not only inhibited nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation through impairment of the targeting and degradation of IkappaBs but also reduced LPS-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation. These actions of ATA were not caused by the influence on LPS binding to macrophage membrane. Kinase assays indicated that ATA inhibited IkappaB kinase (IKK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a direct interaction between ATA and these signaling molecules. Taken together, these results provide novel action targets of ATA and indicate that ATA protection of macrophages from LPS-mediated cell death is primarily the result of its inhibition of NO production, which closely relates to the inactivation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 and inhibition of IKK, ERK and p38 MAPK.

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  13. Scube regulates synovial angiogenesis-related signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Guo, Mingyang; Hu, Yonghe; Jiang, Yong

    2013-11-01

    Angiogenesis is particularly driven in the synovial microenvironment of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and considered as the fundamental cause for the persistent injury and chronic damage. Therefore, exploring the pathomechanism of synovial angiogenesis may provide promising prospects for vascular-targeting treatment of RA. The noval family of Scube proteins is confirmed to overlap significantly in structure characterized by epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains and CUB (complement subcomponents C1r/C1s, Uegf, bone morphogenetic protein-1) domain. As secreted glycoprotein and peripheral membrane protein, Scube increases its serum level in response to stimuli of inflammation and hypoxia. In rheumatoid angiogenesis-related signaling system defined by hedgehog (Hh), transforming growth factor (TGF)β and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), Scube1 and 2 antagonize BMP2 signaling, suppressing BMP2-induced phospho-Smad1/5/8 level in vivo. Scube3 functions as an endogenous TGFβ receptor ligand, increasing Smad2/3 phosphorylation, and thus upregulates target genes involved in angiogenesis. Via obligate assistance of Scube1 and 3, Scube2 plays a center role to recruit dually lipid-modified Hh transferred from Dispatched A (DispA), increasing Hh secretion by promoting its solubility. These findings support the hypothesis that Scube may regulate synovial angiogenesis may be the ideal vascular targets for anti-rheumatic treatment of RA.

  14. Cytokinin signaling regulates cambial development in poplar.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Immanen, Juha; Laxell, Marjukka; Kauppinen, Leila; Tarkowski, Petr; Dolezal, Karel; Tähtiharju, Sari; Elo, Annakaisa; Decourteix, Mélanie; Ljung, Karin; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Keinonen, Kaija; Albert, Victor A; Helariutta, Ykä

    2008-12-16

    Although a substantial proportion of plant biomass originates from the activity of vascular cambium, the molecular basis of radial plant growth is still largely unknown. To address whether cytokinins are required for cambial activity, we studied cytokinin signaling across the cambial zones of 2 tree species, poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and birch (Betula pendula). We observed an expression peak for genes encoding cytokinin receptors in the dividing cambial cells. We reduced cytokinin levels endogenously by engineering transgenic poplar trees (P. tremula x tremuloides) to express a cytokinin catabolic gene, Arabidopsis CYTOKININ OXIDASE 2, under the promoter of a birch CYTOKININ RECEPTOR 1 gene. Transgenic trees showed reduced concentration of a biologically active cytokinin, correlating with impaired cytokinin responsiveness. In these trees, both apical and radial growth was compromised. However, radial growth was more affected, as illustrated by a thinner stem diameter than in WT at same height. To dissect radial from apical growth inhibition, we performed a reciprocal grafting experiment. WT scion outgrew the diameter of transgenic stock, implicating cytokinin activity as a direct determinant of radial growth. The reduced radial growth correlated with a reduced number of cambial cell layers. Moreover, expression of a cytokinin primary response gene was dramatically reduced in the thin-stemmed transgenic trees. Thus, a reduced level of cytokinin signaling is the primary basis for the impaired cambial growth observed. Together, our results show that cytokinins are major hormonal regulators required for cambial development.

  15. Stabilized epoxygenated fatty acids regulate inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Kodani, Sean; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Epoxygenated fatty acids (EpFAs), which are lipid mediators produced by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases from polyunsaturated fatty acids, are important signaling molecules known to regulate various biological processes including inflammation, pain and angiogenesis. The EpFAs are further metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form fatty acid diols which are usually less-active. Pharmacological inhibitors of sEH that stabilize endogenous EpFAs are being considered for human clinical uses. Here we review the biology of ω-3 and ω-6 EpFAs on inflammation, pain, angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. PMID:24345640

  16. Altered retinoic acid signalling underpins dentition evolution.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Yann; Samarut, Eric; Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Bernard, Laure; Borday-Birraux, Véronique; Sadier, Alexa; Labbé, Catherine; Viriot, Laurent; Laudet, Vincent

    2015-03-07

    Small variations in signalling pathways have been linked to phenotypic diversity and speciation. In vertebrates, teeth represent a reservoir of adaptive morphological structures that are prone to evolutionary change. Cyprinid fish display an impressive diversity in tooth number, but the signals that generate such diversity are unknown. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA) availability influences tooth number size in Cyprinids. Heterozygous adult zebrafish heterozygous for the cyp26b1 mutant that encodes an enzyme able to degrade RA possess an extra tooth in the ventral row. Expression analysis of pharyngeal mesenchyme markers such as dlx2a and lhx6 shows lateral, anterior and dorsal expansion of these markers in RA-treated embryos, whereas the expression of the dental epithelium markers dlx2b and dlx3b is unchanged. Our analysis suggests that changes in RA signalling play an important role in the diversification of teeth in Cyprinids. Our work illustrates that through subtle changes in the expression of rate-limiting enzymes, the RA pathway is an active player of tooth evolution in fish.

  17. Jasmonic acid signaling modulates ozone-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Rao, M V; Lee, H; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Davis, K R

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and ethylene-dependent signaling pathways regulates plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress factors. Earlier studies demonstrated that ozone (O(3)) exposure activates a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death pathway in the Arabidopsis ecotype Cvi-0. We now have confirmed the role of SA and JA signaling in influencing O(3)-induced cell death. Expression of salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) in Cvi-0 reduced O(3)-induced cell death. Methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) pretreatment of Cvi-0 decreased O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) content and SA concentrations and completely abolished O(3)-induced cell death. Cvi-0 synthesized as much JA as did Col-0 in response to O(3) exposure but exhibited much less sensitivity to exogenous Me-JA. Analyses of the responses to O(3) of the JA-signaling mutants jar1 and fad3/7/8 also demonstrated an antagonistic relationship between JA- and SA-signaling pathways in controlling the magnitude of O(3)-induced HR-like cell death.

  18. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  19. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  20. Plasmodesmata localizing proteins regulate transport and signaling during systemic acquired immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants is mediated by the signaling molecules azelaic acid (AzA),glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), and salicylic acid (SA).Here, we show that AzA and G3P transport occurs via the symplastic route, which is regulated by channels known as plasmodesmata (PD). In contrast...

  1. Role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in synaptic transmission and plasticity of a nociceptive input on capsular central amygdaloid neurons in normal and acid-induced muscle pain mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sin-Jhong; Chen, Chien-Chang; Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Chang, Ya-Ting; Bai, Shin-Wen; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Yen, Chen-Tung; Min, Ming-Yuan

    2011-02-09

    Application of phorbol 12,13-diacetate (PDA) caused marked enhancement of synaptic transmission of nociceptive parabrachio-amygdaloid (PBA) input onto neurons of the capsular central amygdaloid (CeAC) nucleus. The potentiation of PBA-CeAC EPSCs by PDA involved a presynaptic protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent component and a postsynaptic PKC-extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent component. NMDA glutamatergic receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) of PBA-CeAC EPSCs, which was also dependent on the PKC-ERK signaling pathway, was induced by tetanus stimulation at 100 Hz. In slices from mice subjected to acid-induced muscle pain (AIMP), phosphorylated ERK levels in the CeAC increased, and PBA-CeAC synaptic transmission was postsynaptically enhanced. The enhanced PBA-CeAC synaptic transmission in AIMP mice shared common mechanisms with the postsynaptic potentiation effect of PDA and induction of NMDAR-dependent LTP by high-frequency stimulation in normal slices, both of which required ERK activation. Since the CeAC plays an important role in the emotionality of pain, enhanced synaptic function of nociceptive (PBA) inputs onto CeAC neurons might partially account for the supraspinal mechanisms underlying central sensitization.

  2. 5-Caffeoylquinic acid inhibits invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells through the inactivation of p70S6K and Akt activity: Involvement of p53 in differential regulation of signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    In, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Oh, Joa Sub; Seo, Dong-Wan

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanism of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Ligularia fischeri, on cell invasion, proliferation and adhesion in p53 wild-type A549 and p53-deficient H1299 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. 5-CQA abrogated mitogen-stimulated invasion, but not proliferation, in both A549 and H1299 cells. In addition, 5-CQA inhibited mitogen-stimulated adhesion in A549 cells only. Anti-invasive activity of 5-CQA in A549 cells was mediated by the inactivation of p70(S6K)-dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, in H1299 cells the inactivation of Akt was found to be involved in 5-CQA-mediated inhibition of cell invasion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the pharmacological roles and molecular targets of 5-CQA in regulating NSCLC cell fate, and suggest further evaluation and development of 5-CQA as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment and prevention of lung cancer.

  3. Fatty acid transduction of nitric oxide signaling. Nitrolinoleic acid is a hydrophobically stabilized nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, Francisco J; Baker, Paul R S; Giles, Gregory; Chumley, Phil; Batthyany, Carlos; Crawford, Jack; Patel, Rakesh P; Hogg, Neil; Branchaud, Bruce P; Lancaster, Jack R; Freeman, Bruce A

    2005-05-13

    The aqueous decay and concomitant release of nitric oxide (*NO) by nitrolinoleic acid (10-nitro-9,12-octadecadienoic acid and 12-nitro-9,12-octadecadienoic acid; LNO2) are reported. Mass spectrometric analysis of reaction products supports a modified Nef reaction as the mechanism accounting for the generation of *NO by the aqueous reactions of fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives. Nitrolinoleic acid is stabilized by an aprotic milieu, with LNO2 decay and *NO release strongly inhibited by phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol liposome membranes and detergents when present at levels above their critical micellar concentrations. The release of *NO from LNO2 was induced by UV photolysis and triiodide-based ozone chemiluminescence reactions currently used to quantify putative protein nitrosothiol and N-nitrosamine derivatives. This reactivity of LNO2 complicates the qualitative and quantitative analysis of biological oxides of nitrogen when applying UV photolysis and triiodide-based analytical systems to biological preparations typically abundant in nitrated fatty acids. The results reveal that nitroalkene derivatives of linoleic acid are pluripotent signaling mediators that act not only via receptor-dependent mechanisms, but also by transducing the signaling actions of *NO via pathways subject to regulation by the relative distribution of LNO2 to hydrophobic versus aqueous microenvironments.

  4. SIGNALS AND REGULATORS THAT GOVERN STREPTOMYCES DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Joseph R.; Flärdh, Klas

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is the genetically best characterized species of a populous genus belonging to the Gram-positive Actinobacteria. Streptomycetes are filamentous soil organisms, well known for the production of a plethora of biologically active secondary metabolic compounds. The Streptomyces developmental life cycle is uniquely complex, and involves coordinated multicellular development with both physiological and morphological differentiation of several cell types, culminating in production of secondary metabolites and dispersal of mature spores. This review presents a current appreciation of the signaling mechanisms used to orchestrate the decision to undergo morphological differentiation, and the regulators and regulatory networks that direct the intriguing development of multigenomic hyphae, first to form specialized aerial hyphae, and then to convert them into chains of dormant spores. This current view of S. coelicolor development is destined for rapid evolution as data from “-omics” studies shed light on gene regulatory networks, new genetic screens identify hitherto unknown players, and the resolution of our insights into the underlying cell biological processes steadily improve. PMID:22092088

  5. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  6. The Nuclear Interactor PYL8/RCAR3 of Fagus sylvatica FsPP2C1 Is a Positive Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling in Seeds and Stress1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Xandra; Modrego, Abelardo; Rodríguez, Dolores; González-García, Mary Paz; Sanz, Luis; Nicolás, Gregorio; Lorenzo, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    The functional protein phosphatase type 2C from beechnut (Fagus sylvatica; FsPP2C1) was a negative regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in seeds. In this report, to get deeper insight on FsPP2C1 function, we aim to identify PP2C-interacting partners. Two closely related members (PYL8/RCAR3 and PYL7/RCAR2) of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BetV I family were shown to bind FsPP2C1 in a yeast two-hybrid screening and in an ABA-independent manner. By transient expression of FsPP2C1 and PYL8/RCAR3 in epidermal onion (Allium cepa) cells and agroinfiltration in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) as green fluorescent protein fusion proteins, we obtained evidence supporting the subcellular localization of both proteins mainly in the nucleus and in both the cytosol and the nucleus, respectively. The in planta interaction of both proteins in tobacco cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays resulted in a specific nuclear colocalization of this interaction. Constitutive overexpression of PYL8/RCAR3 confers ABA hypersensitivity in Arabidopsis seeds and, consequently, an enhanced degree of seed dormancy. Additionally, transgenic 35S:PYL8/RCAR3 plants are unable to germinate under low concentrations of mannitol, NaCl, or paclobutrazol, which are not inhibiting conditions to the wild type. In vegetative tissues, Arabidopsis PYL8/RCAR3 transgenic plants show ABA-resistant drought response and a strong inhibition of early root growth. These phenotypes are strengthened at the molecular level with the enhanced induction of several ABA response genes. Both seed and vegetative phenotypes of Arabidopsis 35S:PYL8/RCAR3 plants are opposite those of 35S:FsPP2C1 plants. Finally, double transgenic plants confirm the role of PYL8/RCAR3 by antagonizing FsPP2C1 function and demonstrating that PYL8/RCAR3 positively regulates ABA signaling during germination and abiotic stress responses. PMID:19889877

  7. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyungjae; Kang, SeokBeom; Park, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism. PMID:26742061

  8. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyungjae; Kang, SeokBeom; Park, Woo Jung

    2016-01-04

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism.

  9. Algal swimming velocities signal fatty acid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Travis J; Hondzo, Miki; Mashek, Mara T; Mashek, Douglas G; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The use of microalgae for biofuel production will be beneficial to society if we can produce biofuels at large scales with minimal mechanical energy input in the production process. Understanding micro-algal physiological responses under variable environmental conditions in bioreactors is essential for the optimization of biofuel production. We demonstrate that measuring micro-algal swimming speed provides information on culture health and total fatty acid accumulation. Three strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were grown heterotrophically on acetate and subjected to various levels of nitrogen starvation. Other nutrient levels were explored to determine their effect on micro-algal kinetics. Swimming velocities were measured with two-dimensional micro-particle tracking velocimetry. The results show an inverse linear relationship between normalized total fatty acid mass versus swimming speed of micro-algal cells. Analysis of RNA sequencing data confirms these results by demonstrating that the biological processes of cell motion and the generation of energy precursors are significantly down-regulated. Experiments demonstrate that changes in nutrient concentration in the surrounding media also affect swimming speed. The findings have the potential for the in situ and indirect assessment of lipid content by measuring micro-algal swimming kinetics.

  10. AtWRKY22 promotes susceptibility to aphids and modulates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Karen J.; Wiegers, Gerrie L.; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; van Haarst, Jan C.; Kruijer, Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2016-01-01

    Aphids induce many transcriptional perturbations in their host plants, but the signalling cascades responsible and the effects on plant resistance are largely unknown. Through a genome-wide association (GWA) mapping study in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified WRKY22 as a candidate gene associated with feeding behaviour of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. The transcription factor WRKY22 is known to be involved in pathogen-triggered immunity, and WRKY22 gene expression has been shown to be induced by aphids. Assessment of aphid population development and feeding behaviour on knockout mutants and overexpression lines showed that WRKY22 increases susceptibility to M. persicae via a mesophyll-located mechanism. mRNA sequencing analysis of aphid-infested wrky22 knockout plants revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signalling and down-regulation of genes involved in plant growth and cell-wall loosening. In addition, mechanostimulation of knockout plants by clip cages up-regulated jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, resulting in substantial negative JA–SA crosstalk. Based on this and previous studies, WRKY22 is considered to modulate the interplay between the SA and JA pathways in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Its induction by aphids and its role in suppressing SA and JA signalling make WRKY22 a potential target for aphids to manipulate host plant defences. PMID:27107291

  11. Hypothalamic eIF2α Signaling Regulates Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Benani, Alexandre; Lorsignol, Anne; Brenachot, Xavier; Parry, Laurent; Carraro, Valérie; Guissard, Christophe; Averous, Julien; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Chaveroux, Cédric; B’chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Ron, David; Pénicaud, Luc; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Summary The reversible phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) is a highly conserved signal implicated in the cellular adaptation to numerous stresses such as the one caused by amino acid limitation. In response to dietary amino acid deficiency, the brain-specific activation of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 leads to food intake inhibition. We report here that GCN2 is rapidly activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) after consumption of a leucine-deficient diet. Furthermore, knockdown of GCN2 in this particular area shows that MBH GCN2 activity controls the onset of the aversive response. Importantly, pharmacological experiments demonstrate that the sole phosphorylation of eIF2α in the MBH is sufficient to regulate food intake. eIF2α signaling being at the crossroad of stress pathways activated in several pathological states, our study indicates that hypothalamic eIF2α phosphorylation could play a critical role in the onset of anorexia associated with certain diseases. PMID:24485657

  12. Amino acids regulate the intracellular trafficking of the general amino acid permease of Saccharomycescerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Esther J; Kaiser, Chris A

    2002-11-12

    The delivery to the plasma membrane of the general amino acid permease, Gap1p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the quality of the nitrogen source in the growth medium. In an effort to define how different nitrogen sources control Gap1p sorting, we find that mutations in GDH1 and GLN1 that decrease the flux through the glutamate and glutamine synthesis pathways result in increased Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Conversely, deletion of MKS1, which increases glutamate and glutamine synthesis, decreases Gap1p sorting to the plasma membrane. Glutamate and glutamine are not unusual in their ability to regulate Gap1p sorting, because the addition of all natural amino acids and many amino acid analogs to the growth medium results in increased Gap1p sorting to the vacuole. Importantly, amino acids have the capacity to signal Gap1p sorting to the vacuole regardless of whether they can be used as a source of nitrogen. Finally, we show that rapamycin does not affect Gap1p sorting, indicating that Gap1p sorting is not directly influenced by the TOR pathway. Together, these data show that amino acids are a signal for sorting Gap1p to the vacuole and imply that the nitrogen-regulated Gap1p sorting machinery responds to amino acid-like compounds rather than to the overall nutritional status associated with growth on a particular nitrogen source.

  13. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  14. Pharmacologic retinoid signaling and physiologic retinoic acid receptor signaling inhibit basal cell carcinoma tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Lin; Fujimoto, Michele A.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. Patients with basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome) are highly susceptible to developing many BCCs as a result of a constitutive inactivating mutation in one allele of PATCHED 1, which encodes a tumor suppressor that is a major inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling. Dysregulated Hedgehog signaling is a common feature of both hereditary and sporadic BCCs. Recently, we showed remarkable anti-BCC chemopreventive efficacy of tazarotene, a retinoid with retinoic acid receptor (RAR) β/γ specificity, in Ptch1 +/− mice when treatment was commenced before carcinogenic insults. In this study, we assessed whether the effect of tazarotene against BCC carcinogenesis is sustained after its withdrawal and whether tazarotene is effective against preexisting microscopic BCC lesions. We found that BCCs did not reappear for at least 5 months after topical drug treatment was stopped and that already developed, microscopic BCCs were susceptible to tazarotene inhibition. In vitro, tazarotene inhibited a murine BCC keratinocyte cell line, ASZ001, suggesting that its effect in vivo is by direct action on the actual tumor cells. Down-regulation of Gli1, a target gene of Hedgehog signaling and up-regulation of CRABPII, a target gene of retinoid signaling, were observed with tazarotene treatment. Finally, we investigated the effects of topical applications of other retinoid-related compounds on BCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Tazarotene was the most effective of the preparations studied, and its effect most likely was mediated by RARγ activation. Furthermore, inhibition of basal RAR signaling in the skin promoted BCC carcinogenesis, suggesting that endogenous RAR signaling restrains BCC growth. PMID:18483315

  15. Evolution of Abscisic Acid Synthesis and Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Felix; Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) mediates seed dormancy, controls seedling development and triggers tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought. Core ABA signaling components consist of a recently identified group of ABA receptor proteins of the PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/REGULATORY COMPONENT OF ABA RECEPTOR (RCAR) family that act as negative regulators of members of the PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C (PP2C) family. Inhibition of PP2C activity enables activation of SNF1-RELATED KINASE 2 (SnRK2) protein kinases, which target downstream components, including transcription factors, ion channels and NADPH oxidases. These and other components form a complex ABA signaling network. Here, an in depth analysis of the evolution of components in this ABA signaling network shows that (i) PYR/RCAR ABA receptor and ABF-type transcription factor families arose during land colonization of plants and are not found in algae and other species, (ii) ABA biosynthesis enzymes have evolved to plant- and fungal-specific forms, leading to different ABA synthesis pathways, (iii) existing stress signaling components, including PP2C phosphatases and SnRK kinases, were adapted for novel roles in this plant-specific network to respond to water limitation. In addition, evolutionarily conserved secondary structures in the PYR/RCAR ABA receptor family are visualized. PMID:21549957

  16. Evolution of abscisic acid synthesis and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Felix; Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-05-10

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) mediates seed dormancy, controls seedling development and triggers tolerance to abiotic stresses, including drought. Core ABA signaling components consist of a recently identified group of ABA receptor proteins of the PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE (PYR)/REGULATORY COMPONENT OF ABA RECEPTOR (RCAR) family that act as negative regulators of members of the PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2C (PP2C) family. Inhibition of PP2C activity enables activation of SNF1-RELATED KINASE 2 (SnRK2) protein kinases, which target downstream components, including transcription factors, ion channels and NADPH oxidases. These and other components form a complex ABA signaling network. Here, an in depth analysis of the evolution of components in this ABA signaling network shows that (i) PYR/RCAR ABA receptor and ABF-type transcription factor families arose during land colonization of plants and are not found in algae and other species, (ii) ABA biosynthesis enzymes have evolved to plant- and fungal-specific forms, leading to different ABA synthesis pathways, (iii) existing stress signaling components, including PP2C phosphatases and SnRK kinases, were adapted for novel roles in this plant-specific network to respond to water limitation. In addition, evolutionarily conserved secondary structures in the PYR/RCAR ABA receptor family are visualized.

  17. CONSTANS-Like 9 (OsCOL9) Interacts with Receptor for Activated C-Kinase 1(OsRACK1) to Regulate Blast Resistance through Salicylic Acid and Ethylene Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Dong, Shuangyu; Sun, Dayuan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Fengwei; Liu, Yongzhu; Guo, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jiafeng; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    In a previous transcriptome analysis of early response genes in rice during Magnaporthe oryzae infection, we identified a CONSTANS-like (COL) gene OsCOL9. In the present study, we investigated the functional roles of OsCOL9 in blast resistance. OsCOL9 belonged to group II of the COL protein family, and it contained a BB-box and a C-terminal CCT (CONSTANS, COL and TOC1) domain. OsCOL9 was found in the nucleus of rice cells, and it exerted transcriptional activation activities through its middle region (MR). Magnaporthe oryzae infection induced OsCOL9 expression, and transgenic OsCOL9 knock-out rice plants showed increased pathogen susceptibility. OsCOL9 was a critical regulator of pathogen-related genes, especially PR1b, which were also activated by exogenous salicylic acid (SA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylicacid (ACC), the precursor of ethylene (ET). Further analysis indicated that OsCOL9 over-expression increased the expressions of phytohormone biosynthetic genes, NPR1, WRKY45, OsACO1 and OsACS1, which were related to SA and ET biosynthesis. Interestingly, we found that OsCOL9 physically interacted with the scaffold protein OsRACK1 through its CCT domain, and the OsRACK1 expression was induced in response to exogenous SA and ACC as well as M. oryzae infection. Taken together, these results indicated that the COL protein OsCOL9 interacted with OsRACK1, and it enhanced the rice blast resistance through SA and ET signaling pathways.

  18. CONSTANS-Like 9 (OsCOL9) Interacts with Receptor for Activated C-Kinase 1(OsRACK1) to Regulate Blast Resistance through Salicylic Acid and Ethylene Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shuangyu; Sun, Dayuan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Fengwei; Liu, Yongzhu; Guo, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jiafeng; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    In a previous transcriptome analysis of early response genes in rice during Magnaporthe oryzae infection, we identified a CONSTANS-like (COL) gene OsCOL9. In the present study, we investigated the functional roles of OsCOL9 in blast resistance. OsCOL9 belonged to group II of the COL protein family, and it contained a BB-box and a C-terminal CCT (CONSTANS, COL and TOC1) domain. OsCOL9 was found in the nucleus of rice cells, and it exerted transcriptional activation activities through its middle region (MR). Magnaporthe oryzae infection induced OsCOL9 expression, and transgenic OsCOL9 knock-out rice plants showed increased pathogen susceptibility. OsCOL9 was a critical regulator of pathogen-related genes, especially PR1b, which were also activated by exogenous salicylic acid (SA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylicacid (ACC), the precursor of ethylene (ET). Further analysis indicated that OsCOL9 over-expression increased the expressions of phytohormone biosynthetic genes, NPR1, WRKY45, OsACO1 and OsACS1, which were related to SA and ET biosynthesis. Interestingly, we found that OsCOL9 physically interacted with the scaffold protein OsRACK1 through its CCT domain, and the OsRACK1 expression was induced in response to exogenous SA and ACC as well as M. oryzae infection. Taken together, these results indicated that the COL protein OsCOL9 interacted with OsRACK1, and it enhanced the rice blast resistance through SA and ET signaling pathways. PMID:27829023

  19. Brown adipocyte differentiation is regulated by hedgehog signaling during development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During development, brown fat tissue arises from mesenchymal precursor cells under the control of signaling networks that are not yet well understood. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is one of the major signaling pathways that regulate mesenchymal cell fate. However, whether the Hh pathway contr...

  20. Abscisic acid interacts antagonistically with salicylic acid signaling pathway in rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Kojima, Mikiko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Yoshida, Riichiro; Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Plant hormones play pivotal signaling roles in plant-pathogen interactions. Here, we report characterization of an antagonistic interaction of abscisic acid (ABA) with salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathways in the rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction. Exogenous application of ABA drastically compromised the rice resistance to both compatible and incompatible M. grisea strains, indicating that ABA negatively regulates both basal and resistance gene-mediated blast resistance. ABA markedly suppressed the transcriptional upregulation of WRKY45 and OsNPR1, the two key components of the SA signaling pathway in rice, induced by SA or benzothiadiazole or by blast infection. Overexpression of OsNPR1 or WRKY45 largely negated the enhancement of blast susceptibility by ABA, suggesting that ABA acts upstream of WRKY45 and OsNPR1 in the rice SA pathway. ABA-responsive genes were induced during blast infection in a pattern reciprocal to those of WRKY45 and OsPR1b in the compatible rice-blast interaction but only marginally in the incompatible one. These results suggest that the balance of SA and ABA signaling is an important determinant for the outcome of the rice-M. grisea interaction. ABA was detected in hyphae and conidia of M. grisea as well as in culture media, implying that blast-fungus-derived ABA could play a role in triggering ABA signaling at host infection sites.

  1. Scaffolds are 'active' regulators of signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Anita; Varga, János; Reményi, Attila

    2010-11-01

    Signaling cascades, in addition to proteins with obvious signaling-relevant activities (e.g. protein kinases or receptors), also employ dedicated 'inactive' proteins whose functions appear to be the organization of the former components into higher order complexes through protein-protein interactions. The core function of signaling adaptors, anchors and scaffolds is the recruitment of proteins into one macromolecular complex. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the recruiter and the recruited molecules mutually influence each other in a scaffolded complex. This yields fundamentally novel properties for the signaling complex as a whole. Because these are not merely additive to the properties of the individual components, scaffolded signaling complexes may behave as functionally distinct modules.

  2. 15-Oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2015-06-05

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic "inactivation" of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators.

  3. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  4. Regulation of neurogenesis by calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Shum, Andrew K.; Prakriya, Murali

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling has essential roles in the development of the nervous system from neural induction to the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural cells. Ca2+ signaling pathways are shaped by interactions among metabotropic signaling cascades, intracellular Ca2+ stores, ion channels, and a multitude of downstream effector proteins that activate specific genetic programs. The temporal and spatial dynamics of Ca2+ signals are widely presumed to control the highly diverse yet specific genetic programs that establish the complex structures of the adult nervous system. Progress in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the functional architecture of Ca2+ signaling networks involved in neurogenesis. In this review, we assess the literature on the molecular and functional organization of Ca2+ signaling networks in the developing nervous system and its impact on neural induction, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Particular emphasis is placed on the growing evidence for the involvement of store-operated Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in these processes. PMID:27020657

  5. The role of proteases in regulating Eph/ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Atapattu, Lakmali; Lackmann, Martin; Janes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Proteases regulate a myriad of cell functions, both in normal and disease states. In addition to protein turnover, they regulate a range of signaling processes, including those mediated by Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands. A variety of proteases is reported to directly cleave Ephs and/or ephrins under different conditions, to promote receptor and/or ligand shedding, and regulate receptor/ligand internalisation and signaling. They also cleave other adhesion proteins in response to Eph-ephrin interactions, to indirectly facilitate Eph-mediated functions. Proteases thus contribute to Eph/ephrin mediated changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in cell morphology and in cell migration and invasion, in a manner which appears to be tightly regulated by, and co-ordinated with, Eph signaling. This review summarizes the current literature describing the function and regulation of protease activities during Eph/ephrin-mediated cell signaling. PMID:25482632

  6. The dynamic mechanism of noisy signal decoding in gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijiang; Wang, Haohua; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2017-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports that signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation, but how an input signal is encoded by such a dynamic, noisy TF and further decoded by downstream genes remains largely unclear. Here, using a system of stochastic transcription with signal regulation, we show that (1) keeping the intensity of the signal noise invariant but prolonging the signal duration can both enhance the mutual information (MI) and reduce the energetic cost (EC); (2) if the signal duration is fixed, the larger MI needs the larger EC, but if the signal period is fixed, there is an optimal time that the signal spends at one lower branch, such that MI reaches the maximum; (3) if both the period and the duration are simultaneously fixed, increasing the input noise can always enhance MI in the case of transcription regulation rather than in the case of degradation regulation. In addition, we find that the input noise can induce stochastic focusing in a regulation-dependent manner. These results reveal not only the dynamic mechanism of noisy signal decoding in gene regulation but also the essential role of external noise in controlling gene expression levels. PMID:28176840

  7. A Pivotal Role of DELLAs in Regulating Multiple Hormone Signals.

    PubMed

    Davière, Jean-Michel; Achard, Patrick

    2016-01-04

    Plant phenotypic plasticity is controlled by diverse hormone pathways, which integrate and convey information from multiple developmental and environmental signals. Moreover, in plants many processes such as growth, development, and defense are regulated in similar ways by multiple hormones. Among them, gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones with pleiotropic actions, regulating various growth processes throughout the plant life cycle. Previous work has revealed extensive interplay between GAs and other hormones, but the molecular mechanism became apparent only recently. Molecular and physiological studies have demonstrated that DELLA proteins, considered as master negative regulators of GA signaling, integrate multiple hormone signaling pathways through physical interactions with transcription factors or regulatory proteins from different families. In this review, we summarize the latest progress in GA signaling and its direct crosstalk with the main phytohormone signaling, emphasizing the multifaceted role of DELLA proteins with key components of major hormone signaling pathways.

  8. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen.

  9. Erbin regulates NRG1 signaling and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yanmei; Dai, Penggao; Liu, Yu; Marchetto, Sylvie; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Borg, Jean-Paul; Mei, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) plays a critical role in myelination. However, little is known about regulatory mechanisms of NRG1 signaling. We show here that Erbin, a protein that contains leucine-rich repeats (LRR) and a PSD95-Dlg-Zol (PDZ) domain and that interacts specifically with ErbB2, is necessary for NRG1 signaling and myelination of peripheral nervous system (PNS). In Erbin null mice, myelinated axons were hypomyelinated with reduced expression of P0, a marker of mature myelinating Schwann cells (SCs), whereas unmyelinated axons were aberrantly ensheathed in Remak bundles, with increased numbers of axons in the bundles and in pockets. The morphological deficits were associated with decreased nerve conduction velocity and increased sensory threshold to mechanistic stimulation. These phenotypes were duplicated in erbinΔC/ΔC mice, in which Erbin lost the PDZ domain to interact with ErbB2. Moreover, ErbB2 was reduced at protein levels in both Erbin mutant sciatic nerves, and ErbB2 became unstable and NRG1 signaling compromised when Erbin expression was suppressed. These observations indicate a critical role of Erbin in myelination and identify a regulatory mechanism of NRG1 signaling. Our results suggest that Erbin, via the PDZ domain, binds to and stabilizes ErbB2, which is necessary for NRG1 signaling that has been implicated in tumorigenesis, heart development, and neural function. PMID:19458253

  10. p-Coumaric acid and ursolic acid from Corni fructus attenuated β-amyloid(25-35)-induced toxicity through regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Youn, Kumju; Ho, Chi-Tang; Karwe, Mukund V; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-05-28

    Neuroinflammatory responses induced by amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) are important causes in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Blockade of Aβ has emerged as a possible therapeutic approach to control the onset of AD. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects and molecular mechanisms of p-coumaric acid (p-CA) and ursolic acid (UA) from Corni fructus against Aβ(25-35)-induced toxicity in PC12 cells. p-CA and UA significantly inhibited the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in Aβ(25-35)-injured PC12 cells. Blockade of nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and phosphorylation of IκB-α was also observed after p-CA and UA treatment. For the upstream kinases, UA exclusively reduced ERK1/2, p-38, and JNK phosphorylation, but p-CA suppressed ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation. Both compounds comprehensively inhibited NF-κB activity, but possibly with different upstream pathways. The results provide new insight into the pharmacological modes of p-CA and UA and their potential therapeutic application to AD.

  11. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  12. Roles for Regulator of G Protein Signaling Proteins in Synaptic Signaling and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Kyle J.; Squires, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family of proteins serves critical roles in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and heterotrimeric G protein signal transduction. RGS proteins are best understood as negative regulators of GPCR/G protein signaling. They achieve this by acting as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Gα subunits and accelerating the turnoff of G protein signaling. Many RGS proteins also bind additional signaling partners that either regulate their functions or enable them to regulate other important signaling events. At neuronal synapses, GPCRs, G proteins, and RGS proteins work in coordination to regulate key aspects of neurotransmitter release, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity, which are necessary for central nervous system physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence has revealed key roles for specific RGS proteins in multiple signaling pathways at neuronal synapses, regulating both pre- and postsynaptic signaling events and synaptic plasticity. Here, we review and highlight the current knowledge of specific RGS proteins (RGS2, RGS4, RGS7, RGS9-2, and RGS14) that have been clearly demonstrated to serve critical roles in modulating synaptic signaling and plasticity throughout the brain, and we consider their potential as future therapeutic targets. PMID:26655302

  13. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  14. Ubiquitin-Dependent Regulation of TGFβ Signaling in Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Izzi, Luisa; Attisano, Liliana

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The transforming growth factorβ (TGFβ) superfamily regulates a broad spectrum of biological responses throughout embryonic development and adult life, including cell proliferation and differentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. TGFβ members initiate signaling by bringing together a complex of serine/threonine kinase receptors that transmit signals through intracellular Smad proteins. Genetic alterations in numerous components of the TGFβ signaling pathway have been associated with several human cancers. In addition, tight regulation of TGFβ signaling is pivotal to the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of carcinogenesis. The ubiquitin/proteosome system is one mechanism by which cells regulate the expression and activity of effectors of the TGFβ signaling cascade. Mounting evidence also suggests that disruption of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of components of the TGFβ pathway leads to the development and progression of cancer. Therefore, understanding how these two pathways intertwine will contribute to the advancement of our knowledge of cancer development. PMID:16925950

  15. Signaling pathways involved in MDSC regulation.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Prashant; Carson, William E

    2014-08-01

    The immune system has evolved mechanisms to protect the host from the deleterious effects of inflammation. The generation of immune suppressive cells like myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that can counteract T cell responses represents one such strategy. There is an accumulation of immature myeloid cells or MDSCs in bone marrow (BM) and lymphoid organs under pathological conditions such as cancer. MDSCs represent a population of heterogeneous myeloid cells comprising of macrophages, granulocytes and dendritic cells that are at early stages of development. Although, the precise signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms that lead to MDSC generation and expansion in cancer remains to be elucidated. It is widely believed that perturbation of signaling pathways involved during normal hematopoietic and myeloid development under pathological conditions such as tumorogenesis contributes to the development of suppressive myeloid cells. In this review we discuss the role played by key signaling pathways such as PI3K, Ras, Jak/Stat and TGFb during myeloid development and how their deregulation under pathological conditions can lead to the generation of suppressive myeloid cells or MDSCs. Targeting these pathways should help in elucidating mechanisms that lead to the expansion of MDSCs in cancer and point to methods for eliminating these cells from the tumor microenvironment.

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis of Murine Embryos Lacking Endogenous Retinoic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paschaki, Marie; Schneider, Carole; Rhinn, Muriel; Thibault-Carpentier, Christelle; Dembélé, Doulaye; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active derivative of the liposoluble vitamin A (retinol), acts as an important signaling molecule during embryonic development, regulating phenomenons as diverse as anterior-posterior axial patterning, forebrain and optic vesicle development, specification of hindbrain rhombomeres, pharyngeal arches and second heart field, somitogenesis, and differentiation of spinal cord neurons. This small molecule directly triggers gene activation by binding to nuclear receptors (RARs), switching them from potential repressors to transcriptional activators. The repertoire of RA-regulated genes in embryonic tissues is poorly characterized. We performed a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of murine wild-type and Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 null-mutant (Raldh2−/−) embryos — unable to synthesize RA from maternally-derived retinol — using Affymetrix DNA microarrays. Transcriptomic changes were analyzed in two embryonic regions: anterior tissues including forebrain and optic vesicle, and posterior (trunk) tissues, at early stages preceding the appearance of overt phenotypic abnormalities. Several genes expected to be downregulated under RA deficiency appeared in the transcriptome data (e.g. Emx2, Foxg1 anteriorly, Cdx1, Hoxa1, Rarb posteriorly), whereas reverse-transcriptase-PCR and in situ hybridization performed for additional selected genes validated the changes identified through microarray analysis. Altogether, the affected genes belonged to numerous molecular pathways and cellular/organismal functions, demonstrating the pleiotropic nature of RA-dependent events. In both tissue samples, genes upregulated were more numerous than those downregulated, probably due to feedback regulatory loops. Bioinformatic analyses highlighted groups (clusters) of genes displaying similar behaviors in mutant tissues, and biological functions most significantly affected (e.g. mTOR, VEGF, ILK signaling in forebrain tissues; pyrimidine and purine metabolism

  17. Climatic regulation of the neurotoxin domoic acid.

    PubMed

    McKibben, S Morgaine; Peterson, William; Wood, A Michelle; Trainer, Vera L; Hunter, Matthew; White, Angelicque E

    2017-01-10

    Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by certain marine microalgae that can accumulate in the foodweb, posing a health threat to human seafood consumers and wildlife in coastal regions worldwide. Evidence of climatic regulation of domoic acid in shellfish over the past 20 y in the Northern California Current regime is shown. The timing of elevated domoic acid is strongly related to warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Oceanic Niño Index, an indicator of El Niño events. Ocean conditions in the northeast Pacific that are associated with warm phases of these indices, including changes in prevailing currents and advection of anomalously warm water masses onto the continental shelf, are hypothesized to contribute to increases in this toxin. We present an applied domoic acid risk assessment model for the US West Coast based on combined climatic and local variables. Evidence of regional- to basin-scale controls on domoic acid has not previously been presented. Our findings have implications in coastal zones worldwide that are affected by this toxin and are particularly relevant given the increased frequency of anomalously warm ocean conditions.

  18. Climatic regulation of the neurotoxin domoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgaine McKibben, S.; Peterson, William; Wood, A. Michelle; Trainer, Vera L.; Hunter, Matthew; White, Angelicque E.

    2017-01-01

    Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by certain marine microalgae that can accumulate in the foodweb, posing a health threat to human seafood consumers and wildlife in coastal regions worldwide. Evidence of climatic regulation of domoic acid in shellfish over the past 20 y in the Northern California Current regime is shown. The timing of elevated domoic acid is strongly related to warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Oceanic Niño Index, an indicator of El Niño events. Ocean conditions in the northeast Pacific that are associated with warm phases of these indices, including changes in prevailing currents and advection of anomalously warm water masses onto the continental shelf, are hypothesized to contribute to increases in this toxin. We present an applied domoic acid risk assessment model for the US West Coast based on combined climatic and local variables. Evidence of regional- to basin-scale controls on domoic acid has not previously been presented. Our findings have implications in coastal zones worldwide that are affected by this toxin and are particularly relevant given the increased frequency of anomalously warm ocean conditions.

  19. Climatic regulation of the neurotoxin domoic acid

    PubMed Central

    McKibben, S. Morgaine; Peterson, William; Wood, A. Michelle; Trainer, Vera L.; Hunter, Matthew; White, Angelicque E.

    2017-01-01

    Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by certain marine microalgae that can accumulate in the foodweb, posing a health threat to human seafood consumers and wildlife in coastal regions worldwide. Evidence of climatic regulation of domoic acid in shellfish over the past 20 y in the Northern California Current regime is shown. The timing of elevated domoic acid is strongly related to warm phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Oceanic Niño Index, an indicator of El Niño events. Ocean conditions in the northeast Pacific that are associated with warm phases of these indices, including changes in prevailing currents and advection of anomalously warm water masses onto the continental shelf, are hypothesized to contribute to increases in this toxin. We present an applied domoic acid risk assessment model for the US West Coast based on combined climatic and local variables. Evidence of regional- to basin-scale controls on domoic acid has not previously been presented. Our findings have implications in coastal zones worldwide that are affected by this toxin and are particularly relevant given the increased frequency of anomalously warm ocean conditions. PMID:28069959

  20. Mitochondrial respiration links TOR Complex 2 signaling to calcium regulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2017-03-21

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved regulator of cell growth and functions within 2 different protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, where TORC2 positively controls macroautophagy/autophagy during amino acid starvation. Under these conditions, TORC2 signaling inhibits the activity of the calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin and promotes the general amino acid control (GAAC) response and autophagy. Here we demonstrate that TORC2 regulates calcineurin by controlling the respiratory activity of mitochondria. In particular, we find that mitochondrial oxidative stress affects the calcium channel regulatory protein Mid1, which we show is an essential upstream activator of calcineurin. Thus, these findings describe a novel regulation for autophagy that involves TORC2 signaling, mitochondrial respiration, and calcium homeostasis.

  1. Dynein-mediated trafficking negatively regulates LET-23 EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Skorobogata, Olga; Meng, Jassy; Gauthier, Kimberley; Rocheleau, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is essential for animal development, and increased signaling underlies many human cancers. Identifying the genes and cellular processes that regulate EGFR signaling in vivo will help to elucidate how this pathway can become inappropriately activated. Caenorhabditis elegans vulva development provides an in vivo model to genetically dissect EGFR signaling. Here we identified a mutation in dhc-1, the heavy chain of the cytoplasmic dynein minus end–directed microtubule motor, in a genetic screen for regulators of EGFR signaling. Despite the many cellular functions of dynein, DHC-1 is a strong negative regulator of EGFR signaling during vulva induction. DHC-1 is required in the signal-receiving cell and genetically functions upstream or in parallel to LET-23 EGFR. LET-23 EGFR accumulates in cytoplasmic foci in dhc-1 mutants, consistent with mammalian cell studies in which dynein is shown to regulate late endosome trafficking of EGFR with the Rab7 GTPase. However, we found different distributions of LET-23 EGFR foci in rab-7 versus dhc-1 mutants, suggesting that dynein functions at an earlier step of LET-23 EGFR trafficking to the lysosome than RAB-7. Our results demonstrate an in vivo role for dynein in limiting LET-23 EGFR signaling via endosomal trafficking. PMID:27654944

  2. Extracellular signal regulated kinase 5 mediates signals triggered by the novel tumor promoter palytoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Charlson, Aaron T.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2009-12-01

    Palytoxin is classified as a non-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type skin tumor because it does not bind to or activate protein kinase C. Palytoxin is thus a novel tool for investigating alternative signaling pathways that may affect carcinogenesis. We previously showed that palytoxin activates three major members of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Here we report that palytoxin also activates another MAPK family member, called ERK5, in HeLa cells and in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin (308 cells). By contrast, TPA does not activate ERK5 in these cell lines. The major cell surface receptor for palytoxin is the Na+,K+-ATPase. Accordingly, ouabain blocked the ability of palytoxin to activate ERK5. Ouabain alone did not activate ERK5. ERK5 thus represents a divergence in the signaling pathways activated by these two agents that bind to the Na+,K+-ATPase. Cycloheximide, okadaic acid, and sodium orthovanadate did not mimic the effect of palytoxin on ERK5. These results indicate that the stimulation of ERK5 by palytoxin is not simply due to inhibition of protein synthesis or inhibition of serine/threonine or tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, the mechanism by which palytoxin activates ERK5 differs from that by which it activates ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Finally, studies that used pharmacological inhibitors and shRNA to block ERK5 action indicate that ERK5 contributes to palytoxin-stimulated c-Fos gene expression. These results suggest that ERK5 can act as an alternative mediator for transmitting diverse tumor promoter-stimulated signals.

  3. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Wang, Ying; Cen, Xiao-Min; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min; Xie, Qi-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy.

  4. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Cen, Xiao-min; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy. PMID:28194428

  5. Interspecific Nematode Signals Regulate Dispersal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Fatma; Alborn, Hans T.; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Ali, Jared G.; Akyazi, Faruk; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Edison, Arthur S.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Teal, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective juveniles (IJ)s of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), e.g., Steinernema feltiae. Regulation of dispersal behavior has not been thoroughly investigated for C. elegans or any other nematode species. Based on the fact that ascarosides regulate entry in dauer stage as well as multiple behaviors in C. elegans adults including mating, avoidance and aggregation, we hypothesized that ascarosides might also be involved in regulation of dispersal behavior in C. elegans and for other nematodes such as IJ of phylogenetically related EPNs. Methodology/Principal Findings Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of C. elegans dauer conditioned media, which shows strong dispersing activity, revealed four known ascarosides (ascr#2, ascr#3, ascr#8, icas#9). A synthetic blend of these ascarosides at physiologically relevant concentrations dispersed C. elegans dauer in the presence of food and also caused dispersion of IJs of S. feltiae and J2s of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. Assay guided fractionation revealed structural analogs as major active components of the S. feltiae (ascr#9) and C. elegans (ascr#2) dispersal blends. Further analysis revealed ascr#9 in all Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp. infected insect host cadavers. Conclusions/Significance Ascaroside blends represent evolutionarily conserved, fundamentally important communication systems for nematodes from diverse habitats, and thus may provide sustainable means for control of parasitic nematodes. PMID:22701701

  6. Oxidized fatty acids as inter-kingdom signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Carolina H; Kock, Johan L F

    2014-01-20

    Oxylipins or oxidized fatty acids are a group of molecules found to play a role in signaling in many different cell types. These fatty acid derivatives have ancient evolutionary origins as signaling molecules and are ideal candidates for inter-kingdom communication. This review discusses examples of the ability of organisms from different kingdoms to "listen" and respond to oxylipin signals during interactions. The interactions that will be looked at are signaling between animals and plants; between animals and fungi; between animals and bacteria and between plants and fungi. This will aid in understanding these interactions, which often have implications in ecology, agriculture as well as human and animal health.

  7. Regulation of Notch signaling and endocytosis by the Lgl neoplastic tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Portela, Marta; Parsons, Linda M; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Richardson, Helena E

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved neoplastic tumor suppressor protein, Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl), plays roles in cell polarity and tissue growth via regulation of the Hippo pathway. In our recent study, we showed that in the developing Drosophila eye epithelium, depletion of Lgl leads to increased ligand-dependent Notch signaling. lgl mutant tissue also exhibits an accumulation of early endosomes, recycling endosomes, early-multivesicular body markers and acidic vesicles. We showed that elevated Notch signaling in lgl− tissue can be rescued by feeding larvae the vesicle de-acidifying drug chloroquine, revealing that Lgl attenuates Notch signaling by limiting vesicle acidification. Strikingly, chloroquine also rescued the lgl− overgrowth phenotype, suggesting that the Hippo pathway defects were also rescued. In this extraview, we provide additional data on the regulation of Notch signaling and endocytosis by Lgl, and discuss possible mechanisms by which Lgl depletion contributes to signaling pathway defects and tumorigenesis. PMID:25789785

  8. Regulation of Hedgehog Signalling Inside and Outside the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ramsbottom, Simon A.; Pownall, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway is conserved throughout metazoans and plays an important regulatory role in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Many levels of regulation exist that control the release, reception, and interpretation of the hedgehog signal. The fatty nature of the Shh ligand means that it tends to associate tightly with the cell membrane, and yet it is known to act as a morphogen that diffuses to elicit pattern formation. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a major role in the regulation of Hh distribution outside the cell. Inside the cell, the primary cilium provides an important hub for processing the Hh signal in vertebrates. This review will summarise the current understanding of how the Hh pathway is regulated from ligand production, release, and diffusion, through to signal reception and intracellular transduction. PMID:27547735

  9. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O.; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  10. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor: Its Intracellular Signaling and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), also known as the ghrelin receptor, is involved in mediating a wide variety of biological effects of ghrelin, including: stimulation of growth hormone release, increase of food intake and body weight, modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion, protection of neuronal and cardiovascular cells, and regulation of immune function. Dependent on the tissues and cells, activation of GHSR may trigger a diversity of signaling mechanisms and subsequent distinct physiological responses. Distinct regulation of GHSR occurs at levels of transcription, receptor interaction and internalization. Here we review the current understanding on the intracellular signaling pathways of GHSR and its modulation. An overview of the molecular structure of GHSR is presented first, followed by the discussion on its signaling mechanisms. Finally, potential mechanisms regulating GHSR are reviewed. PMID:24651458

  11. Drosophila Vps36 regulates Smo trafficking in Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Mao, Feifei; Lv, Xiangdong; Zhang, Zhao; Fu, Lin; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2013-09-15

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays a very important role in metazoan development by controlling pattern formation. Malfunction of the Hh signaling pathway leads to numerous serious human diseases, including congenital disorders and cancers. The seven-transmembrane domain protein Smoothened (Smo) is a key transducer of the Hh signaling pathway, and mediates the graded Hh signal across the cell plasma membrane, thereby inducing the proper expression of downstream genes. Smo accumulation on the cell plasma membrane is regulated by its C-tail phosphorylation and the graded Hh signal. The inhibitory mechanism for Smo membrane accumulation in the absence of Hh, however, is still largely unknown. Here, we report that Vps36 of the ESCRT-II complex regulates Smo trafficking between the cytosol and plasma membrane by specifically recognizing the ubiquitin signal on Smo in the absence of Hh. Furthermore, in the absence of Hh, Smo is ubiquitylated on its cytoplasmic part, including its internal loops and C-tail. Taken together, our data suggest that the ESCRT-II complex, especially Vps36, has a special role in controlling Hh signaling by targeting the membrane protein Smo for its trafficking in the absence of Hh, thereby regulating Hh signaling activity.

  12. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  13. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  14. Neu1 sialidase and matrix metalloproteinase-9 cross-talk regulates nucleic acid-induced endosomal TOLL-like receptor-7 and -9 activation, cellular signaling and pro-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Abdulkhalek, Samar; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2013-11-01

    The precise mechanism(s) by which intracellular TOLL-like receptors (TLRs) become activated by their ligands remains unclear. Here, we report a molecular organizational G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling platform to potentiate a novel mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with neuromedin B GPCR, all of which form a tripartite complex with TLR-7 and -9. siRNA silencing Neu1, MMP-9 and neuromedin-B GPCR in RAW-blue macrophage cells significantly reduced TLR7 imiquimod- and TLR9 ODN1826-induced NF-κB (NF-κB-pSer(536)) activity. Tamiflu, specific MMP-9 inhibitor, neuromedin B receptor specific antagonist BIM23127, and the selective inhibitor of whole heterotrimeric G-protein complex BIM-46174 significantly block nucleic acid-induced TLR-7 and -9 MyD88 recruitment, NF-κB activation and proinflammatory TNFα and MCP-1 cytokine responses. For the first time, Neu1 clearly plays a central role in mediating nucleic acid-induced intracellular TLR activation, and the interactions involving NMBR-MMP9-Neu1 cross-talk constitute a novel intracellular TLR signaling platform that is essential for NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses.

  15. Regulation of cardiomyocyte signaling by RGS proteins: differential selectivity towards G proteins and susceptibility to regulation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianming; Michalek, Christina; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Ming; Xu, Xiaomei; Mende, Ulrike

    2006-07-01

    Many signals that regulate cardiomyocyte growth, differentiation and function are mediated via heterotrimeric G proteins, which are under the control of RGS proteins (Regulators of G protein Signaling). Several RGS proteins are expressed in the heart, but so far little is known about their function and regulation. Using adenoviral gene transfer, we conducted the first comprehensive analysis of the capacity and selectivity of the major cardiac RGS proteins (RGS2-RGS5) to regulate central G protein-mediated signaling pathways in adult ventricular myocytes (AVM). All four RGS proteins potently inhibited Gq/11-mediated phospholipase C beta stimulation and cell growth (assessed in neonatal myocytes). Importantly, RGS2 selectively inhibited Gq/11 signaling, whereas RGS3, RGS4 and RGS5 had the capacity to regulate both Gq/11 and Gi/o signaling (carbachol-induced cAMP inhibition). Gs signaling was unaffected, and, contrary to reports in other cell lines, RGS2-RGS5 did not appear to regulate adenylate cyclase directly in AVM. Since RGS proteins can be highly regulated in their expression by many different stimuli, we also tested the hypothesis that RGS expression is subject to G protein-mediated regulation in AVM and determined the specificity with which enhanced G protein signaling alters endogenous RGS expression in AVM. RGS2 mRNA and protein were markedly but transiently up-regulated by enhanced Gq/11 signaling (alpha1-adrenergic stimulation or Galphaq* overexpression), possibly by a negative feedback mechanism. In contrast, the other negative regulators of Gq/11 signaling (RGS3-RGS5) were unchanged. Endogenous RGS2 (but not RGS3-RGS5) expression was also up-regulated in cells with enhanced AC signaling (beta-adrenergic or forskolin stimulation). Taken together, these findings suggest diverse roles of RGS proteins in regulating myocyte signaling. RGS2 emerged as the only selective and highly regulated inhibitor of Gq/11 signaling that could potentially become a promising

  16. EP2 Receptor Signaling Regulates Microglia Death

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Myung-Soon; Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Joe, Eunhye; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The timely resolution of inflammation prevents continued tissue damage after an initial insult. In the brain, the death of activated microglia by apoptosis has been proposed as one mechanism to resolve brain inflammation. How microglial death is regulated after activation is still unclear. We reported that exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interleukin (IL)-13 together initially activates and then kills rat microglia in culture by a mechanism dependent on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We show here that activation of the E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2, PTGER2) for prostaglandin E2 mediates microglial death induced by LPS/IL-13, and that EP2 activation by agonist alone kills microglia. Both EP2 antagonists and reactive oxygen scavengers block microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation. By contrast, the homeostatic induction of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) by LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation protects microglia. Both the Hmox1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin and a compound that releases the Hmox1 product carbon monoxide (CO) attenuated microglial death produced by LPS/IL-13. Whereas CO reduced COX-2 protein expression, EP2 activation increased Hmox1 and COX-2 expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, caspase-1 inhibition prevented microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or low (but not high) concentrations of butaprost, suggestive of a predominantly pyroptotic mode of death. Butaprost also caused the expression of activated caspase-3 in microglia, pointing to apoptosis. These results indicate that EP2 activation, which initially promotes microglial activation, later causes delayed death of activated microglia, potentially contributing to the resolution phase of neuroinflammation. PMID:25715797

  17. Kinase Signaling in Apoptosis Induced by Saturated Fatty Acids in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Šrámek, Jan; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kovář, Jan

    2016-09-12

    Pancreatic β-cell failure and death is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for type 2 diabetes. It is caused by, in addition to hyperglycemia, chronic exposure to increased concentrations of fatty acids, mainly saturated fatty acids. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in β-cells are not completely clear. It has been proposed that kinase signaling could be involved, particularly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C (PKC), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and Akt kinases and their pathways. In this review, we discuss these kinases and their signaling pathways with respect to their possible role in apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in pancreatic β-cells.

  18. Ethylene signaling and regulation in plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Cui, Xiankui; Sun, Yue; Dong, Chun-Hai

    2013-07-01

    Gaseous phytohormone ethylene affects many aspects of plant growth and development. The ethylene signaling pathway starts when ethylene binds to its receptors. Since the cloning of the first ethylene receptor ETR1 from Arabidopsis, a large number of studies have steadily improved our understanding of the receptors and downstream components in ethylene signal transduction pathway. This article reviews the regulation of ethylene receptors, signal transduction, and the posttranscriptional modulation of downstream components. Functional roles and importance of the ethylene signaling components in plant growth and stress responses are also discussed. Cross-reactions of ethylene with auxin and other phytohormones in plant organ growth will be analyzed. The studies of ethylene signaling in plant growth, development, and stress responses in the past decade greatly advanced our knowledge of how plants respond to endogenous signals and environmental factors.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of the role of carboxylic acids in metabolite signaling in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Finkemeier, Iris; König, Ann-Christine; Heard, William; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Pham, Phuong Anh; Leister, Dario; Fernie, Alisdair R; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2013-05-01

    The transcriptional response to metabolites is an important mechanism by which plants integrate information about cellular energy and nutrient status. Although some carboxylic acids have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression for select transcripts, it is unclear whether all carboxylic acids have the same effect, how many transcripts are affected, and how carboxylic acid signaling is integrated with other metabolite signals. In this study, we demonstrate that perturbations in cellular concentrations of citrate, and to a lesser extent malate, have a major impact on nucleus-encoded transcript abundance. Functional categories of transcripts that were targeted by both organic acids included photosynthesis, cell wall, biotic stress, and protein synthesis. Specific functional categories that were only regulated by citrate included tricarboxylic acid cycle, nitrogen metabolism, sulfur metabolism, and DNA synthesis. Further quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of specific citrate-responsive transcripts demonstrated that the transcript response to citrate is time and concentration dependent and distinct from other organic acids and sugars. Feeding of isocitrate as well as the nonmetabolizable citrate analog tricarballylate revealed that the abundance of selected marker transcripts is responsive to citrate and not downstream metabolites. Interestingly, the transcriptome response to citrate feeding was most similar to those observed after biotic stress treatments and the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. Feeding of citrate to mutants with defects in plant hormone signaling pathways did not completely abolish the transcript response but hinted at a link with jasmonic acid and gibberellin signaling pathways. Our results suggest that changes in carboxylic acid abundances can be perceived and signaled in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by as yet unknown signaling pathways.

  20. Elucidating the regulation of complex signalling systems in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith; Hussey, Patrick J

    2014-02-01

    The pollen tube represents a model system for the study of tip growth, and the root provides a valuable system to study gene and signalling networks in plants. In the present article, using the two systems as examples, we discuss how to elucidate the regulation of complex signalling systems in plant cells. First, we discuss how hormones and related genes in plant root development form a complex interacting network, and their activities are interdependent. Therefore their roles in root development must be analysed as an integrated system, and elucidation of the regulation of each component requires the adaptation of a novel modelling methodology: regulation analysis. Secondly, hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics are all important properties that regulate plant cell growth. We discuss how regulation analysis can be applied to study the regulation of hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics, using pollen tube growth as a model system. Finally, we discuss future prospects for elucidating the regulation of complex signalling systems in plant cells.

  1. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  2. New Insights into How Trafficking Regulates T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jieqiong; Rossy, Jérémie; Deng, Qiji; Pageon, Sophie V.; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that exocytosis plays an important role in regulating T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. The trafficking molecules involved in lytic granule (LG) secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been well-studied due to the immune disorder known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH). However, the knowledge of trafficking machineries regulating the exocytosis of receptors and signaling molecules remains quite limited. In this review, we summarize the reported trafficking molecules involved in the transport of the TCR and downstream signaling molecules to the cell surface. By combining this information with the known knowledge of LG exocytosis and general exocytic trafficking machinery, we attempt to draw a more complete picture of how the TCR signaling network and exocytic trafficking matrix are interconnected to facilitate T cell activation. This also highlights how membrane compartmentalization facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses that are essential for immune functions. PMID:27508206

  3. Metabolism strikes back: metabolic flux regulates cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on growth factor signaling to take up nutrients; however, coordination of glucose and glutamine uptake has been a mystery. In this issue of Genes & Development, Wellen and colleagues (pp. 2784–2799) show that glucose flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway regulates growth factor receptor glycosylation and enables glutamine consumption. This mechanism ensures that cells do not engage in anabolic metabolism when nutrients are limiting, and highlights how substrate availability for protein modifications can modulate cell signaling. PMID:21159812

  4. Recent advances in understanding carotenoid-derived signaling molecules in regulating plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids (C40) are synthesized in plastids and perform numerous important functions in these organelles. In addition, carotenoids can be processed into smaller signaling molecules that regulate various phases of the plant's life cycle. Besides the relatively well-studied phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA) and strigolactones (SLs), additional carotenoid-derived signaling molecules have been discovered and shown to regulate plant growth and development. As a few excellent reviews summarized recent research on ABA and SLs, this mini review will focus on progress made on identification and characterization of the emerging carotenoid-derived signals. Overall, a better understanding of carotenoid-derived signaling molecules has immediate applications in improving plant biomass production which in turn will have far reaching impacts on providing food, feed, and fuel for the growing world population.

  5. Karrikins: Regulators Involved in Phytohormone Signaling Networks during Seed Germination and Seedling Development

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yongjie; Shuai, Haiwei; Luo, Xiaofeng; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Wenguan; Yang, Wenyu; Shu, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Seed germination and early seedling establishment are critical stages during a plant’s life cycle. These stages are precisely regulated by multiple internal factors, including phytohormones and environmental cues such as light. As a family of small molecules discovered in wildfire smoke, karrikins (KARs) play a key role in various biological processes, including seed dormancy release, germination regulation, and seedling establishment. KARs show a high similarity with strigolactone (SL) in both chemical structure and signaling transduction pathways. Current evidence shows that KARs may regulate seed germination by mediating the biosynthesis and/or signaling transduction of abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA) and auxin [indoleacetic acid (IAA)]. Interestingly, KARs regulate seed germination differently in different species. Furthermore, the promotion effect on seedling establishment implies that KARs have a great potential application in alleviating shade avoidance response, which attracts more and more attention in plant molecular biology. In these processes, KARs may have complicated interactions with phytohormones, especially with IAA. In this updated review, we summarize the current understanding of the relationship between KARs and SL in the chemical structure, signaling pathway and the regulation of plant growth and development. Further, the crosstalk between KARs and phytohormones in regulating seed germination and seedling development and that between KARs and IAA during shade responses are discussed. Finally, future challenges and research directions for the KAR research field are suggested. PMID:28174573

  6. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  7. Signaling Mechanisms Regulating Myelination in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    AHRENDSEN, Jared T.; MACKLIN, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    The precise and coordinated production of myelin is essential for proper development and function of the nervous system. Diseases that disrupt myelin, including multiple sclerosis (MS), cause significant functional disability. Current treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory component of the disease, thereby preventing damage resulting from demyelination. However, therapies are not yet available to improve natural repair processes after damage has already occurred. A thorough understanding of the signaling mechanisms that regulate myelin generation will improve our ability to enhance repair. In this review, we summarize the positive and negative regulators of myelination, focusing primarily on central nervous system myelination. Axon-derived signals, extracellular signals from both diffusible factors and the extracellular matrix, and intracellular signaling pathways within myelinating oligodendrocytes are discussed. Much more is known about the positive regulators that drive myelination, while less is known about the negative regulators that shift active myelination to myelin maintenance at the appropriate time. Therefore, we also provide new data on potential negative regulators of CNS myelination. PMID:23558589

  8. Regulation, Signaling, and Physiological Functions of G-Proteins.

    PubMed

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Alegre, Kamela O; Dey, Raja; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2016-09-25

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) mainly relay the information from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the plasma membrane to the inside of cells to regulate various biochemical functions. Depending on the targeted cell types, tissues, and organs, these signals modulate diverse physiological functions. The basic schemes of heterotrimeric G-proteins have been outlined. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about the regulation, signaling, and physiological functions of G-proteins. We then focus on a few less explored areas such as the regulation of G-proteins by non-GPCRs and the physiological functions of G-proteins that cannot be easily explained by the known G-protein signaling pathways. There are new signaling pathways and physiological functions for G-proteins to be discovered and further interrogated. With the advancements in structural and computational biological techniques, we are closer to having a better understanding of how G-proteins are regulated and of the specificity of G-protein interactions with their regulators.

  9. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  10. Regulation of Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wade, Dana S; Calfee, M Worth; Rocha, Edson R; Ling, Elizabeth A; Engstrom, Elana; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2005-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients and is a major source of nosocomial infections. This bacterium controls many virulence factors by using two quorum-sensing systems, las and rhl. The las system is composed of the LasR regulator protein and its cell-to-cell signal, N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone, and the rhl system is composed of RhlR and the signal N-butyryl homoserine lactone. A third intercellular signal, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone), also regulates numerous virulence factors. PQS synthesis requires the expression of multiple operons, one of which is pqsABCDE. Previous experiments showed that the transcription of this operon, and therefore PQS production, is negatively regulated by the rhl quorum-sensing system and positively regulated by the las quorum-sensing system and PqsR (also known as MvfR), a LysR-type transcriptional regulator protein. With the use of DNA mobility shift assays and beta-galactosidase reporter fusions, we have studied the regulation of pqsR and its relationship to pqsA, lasR, and rhlR. We show that PqsR binds the promoter of pqsA and that this binding increases dramatically in the presence of PQS, implying that PQS acts as a coinducer for PqsR. We have also mapped the transcriptional start site for pqsR and found that the transcription of pqsR is positively regulated by lasR and negatively regulated by rhlR. These results suggest that a regulatory chain occurs where pqsR is under the control of LasR and RhlR and where PqsR in turn controls pqsABCDE, which is required for the production of PQS.

  11. FGF signaling specifies hematopoietic stem cells through its regulation of somitic Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonsung; Manegold, Jennifer E; Kim, Albert D; Pouget, Claire; Stachura, David L; Clements, Wilson K; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derive from hemogenic endothelial cells of the primitive dorsal aorta (DA) during vertebrate embryogenesis. The molecular mechanisms governing this unique endothelial to hematopoietic transition remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate a novel requirement for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in HSC emergence. This requirement is non-cell-autonomous, and acts within the somite to bridge the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that Wnt16 regulates the somitic expression of two Notch ligands, deltaC (dlc) and deltaD (dld), whose combined function is required for HSC fate. How Wnt16 connects to Notch function has remained an open question. Our current studies demonstrate that FGF signaling, via FGF receptor 4 (Fgfr4), mediates a signal transduction pathway between Wnt16 and Dlc, but not Dld, to regulate HSC specification. Our findings demonstrate that FGF signaling acts as a key molecular relay within the developmental HSC niche to instruct HSC fate. PMID:25428693

  12. Valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, D.

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries with gelled electrolyte appeared as a niche market during the 1950s. During the 1970s, when glass-fiber felts became available as a further method to immobilize the electrolyte, the market for VRLA batteries expanded rapidly. The immobilized electrolyte offers a number of obvious advantages including the internal oxygen cycle which accommodates the overcharging current without chemical change within the cell. It also suppresses acid stratification and thus opens new fields of application. VRLA batteries, however, cannot be made completely sealed, but require a valve for gas escape, since hydrogen evolution and grid corrosion are unavoidable secondary reactions. These reactions result in water loss, and also must be balanced in order to ensure proper charging of both electrodes. Both secondary reactions have significant activation energies, and can reduce the service life of VRLA batteries, operated at elevated temperature. This effect can be aggravated by the comparatively high heat generation caused by the internal oxygen cycle during overcharging. Temperature control of VRLA batteries, therefore, is important in many applications.

  13. Phospholipase D Signaling Pathways and Phosphatidic Acid as Therapeutic Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bruntz, Ronald C.; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase D is a ubiquitous class of enzymes that generates phosphatidic acid as an intracellular signaling species. The phospholipase D superfamily plays a central role in a variety of functions in prokaryotes, viruses, yeast, fungi, plants, and eukaryotic species. In mammalian cells, the pathways modulating catalytic activity involve a variety of cellular signaling components, including G protein–coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, polyphosphatidylinositol lipids, Ras/Rho/ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases, and conventional isoforms of protein kinase C, among others. Recent findings have shown that phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D plays roles in numerous essential cellular functions, such as vesicular trafficking, exocytosis, autophagy, regulation of cellular metabolism, and tumorigenesis. Many of these cellular events are modulated by the actions of phosphatidic acid, and identification of two targets (mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt kinase) has especially highlighted a role for phospholipase D in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Phospholipase D is a regulator of intercellular signaling and metabolic pathways, particularly in cells that are under stress conditions. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the regulation of phospholipase D activity and its modulation of cellular signaling pathways and functions. PMID:25244928

  14. Phospholipase D signaling pathways and phosphatidic acid as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Bruntz, Ronald C; Lindsley, Craig W; Brown, H Alex

    2014-10-01

    Phospholipase D is a ubiquitous class of enzymes that generates phosphatidic acid as an intracellular signaling species. The phospholipase D superfamily plays a central role in a variety of functions in prokaryotes, viruses, yeast, fungi, plants, and eukaryotic species. In mammalian cells, the pathways modulating catalytic activity involve a variety of cellular signaling components, including G protein-coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, polyphosphatidylinositol lipids, Ras/Rho/ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases, and conventional isoforms of protein kinase C, among others. Recent findings have shown that phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D plays roles in numerous essential cellular functions, such as vesicular trafficking, exocytosis, autophagy, regulation of cellular metabolism, and tumorigenesis. Many of these cellular events are modulated by the actions of phosphatidic acid, and identification of two targets (mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt kinase) has especially highlighted a role for phospholipase D in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Phospholipase D is a regulator of intercellular signaling and metabolic pathways, particularly in cells that are under stress conditions. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the regulation of phospholipase D activity and its modulation of cellular signaling pathways and functions.

  15. Regulation of spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis by Sertoli cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-04-01

    Spermatogenesis is a continuous and productive process supported by the self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which arise from undifferentiated precursors known as gonocytes and are strictly controlled in a special 'niche' microenvironment in the seminiferous tubules. Sertoli cells, the only somatic cell type in the tubules, directly interact with SSCs to control their proliferation and differentiation through the secretion of specific factors. Spermatocyte meiosis is another key step of spermatogenesis, which is regulated by Sertoli cells on the luminal side of the blood-testis barrier through paracrine signaling. In this review, we mainly focus on the role of Sertoli cells in the regulation of SSC self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis, with particular emphasis on paracrine and endocrine-mediated signaling pathways. Sertoli cell growth factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), as well as Sertoli cell transcription factors, such as ETS variant 5 (ERM; also known as ETV5), nociceptin, neuregulin 1 (NRG1), and androgen receptor (AR), have been identified as the most important upstream factors that regulate SSC self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis. Other transcription factors and signaling pathways (GDNF-RET-GFRA1 signaling, FGF2-MAP2K1 signaling, CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling, CCL9-CCR1 signaling, FSH-nociceptin/OPRL1, retinoic acid/FSH-NRG/ERBB4, and AR/RB-ARID4A/ARID4B) are also addressed.

  16. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  17. Insulin/IGF signaling and its regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nässel, Dick R; Liu, Yiting; Luo, Jiangnan

    2015-09-15

    Taking advantage of Drosophila as a genetically tractable experimental animal much progress has been made in our understanding of how the insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) pathway regulates development, growth, metabolism, stress responses and lifespan. The role of IIS in regulation of neuronal activity and behavior has also become apparent from experiments in Drosophila. This review briefly summarizes these functional roles of IIS, and also how the insulin producing cells (IPCs) are regulated in the fly. Furthermore, we discuss functional aspects of the spatio-temporal production of eight different insulin-like peptides (DILP1-8) that are thought to act on one known receptor (dInR) in Drosophila.

  18. Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 Is a Novel Modulator of HIV-1-associated Neuroinflammation via Regulation of Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling and Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter-2 Repression*

    PubMed Central

    Vartak-Sharma, Neha; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Joshi, Chaitanya; Borgamann, Kathleen; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), a novel human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-inducible oncogene, has generated significant interest in the field of cancer research as a therapeutic target for many metastatic aggressive tumors. However, little is known about its role in astrocyte responses during HIV-1 central nervous system (CNS) infection and whether it contributes toward the development of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Therefore, in this study, we investigated changes in AEG-1 CNS expression in HIV-1-infected brain tissues and elucidated a potential mechanism of AEG-1-mediated regulation of HAND. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analyses of HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 encephalitic human brain tissues revealed significantly elevated levels of AEG-1 protein. Immunohistochemical analyses of HIV-1 Tat transgenic mouse brain tissues also showed a marked increase in AEG-1 staining. Similar to in vivo observations, cultured astrocytes expressing HIV-1 Tat also revealed AEG-1 and cytokine up-regulation. Astrocytes treated with HAND-relevant stimuli, TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and HIV-1, also significantly induced AEG-1 expression and nuclear translocation via activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated IL-1β- or TNF-α-induced AEG-1 interaction with NF-κB p65 subunit. AEG-1 knockdown decreased NF-κB activation, nuclear translocation, and transcriptional output in TNF-α-treated astrocytes. Moreover, IL-1β treatment of AEG-1-overexpressing astrocytes significantly lowered expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 2, increased expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 2 repressor ying yang 1, and reduced glutamate clearance, a major transducer of excitotoxic neuronal damage. Findings from this study identify a novel transcriptional co-factor function of AEG-1 and further implicate AEG-1 in HAND-associated neuroinflammation. PMID:24855648

  19. Organelle size: a cilium length signal regulates IFT cargo loading.

    PubMed

    Pan, Junmin; Snell, William J

    2014-01-20

    Cilia grow by assembling structural precursors delivered to their tips by intraflagellar transport. New work on ciliary length control indicates that, during ciliary growth, cilia send a length signal to the cytoplasm that regulates cargo loading onto the constitutively trafficking intraflagellar transport machinery.

  20. Disruption of abscisic acid signaling constitutively activates Arabidopsis resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; López, Gemma; Ramos, Brisa; Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; Riviere, Marie-Pierre; Llorente, Francisco; Fernández, Paula Virginia; Miedes, Eva; Estevez, José Manuel; Grant, Murray; Molina, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Plant resistance to necrotrophic fungi is regulated by a complex set of signaling pathways that includes those mediated by the hormones salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ET), jasmonic acid (JA), and abscisic acid (ABA). The role of ABA in plant resistance remains controversial, as positive and negative regulatory functions have been described depending on the plant-pathogen interaction analyzed. Here, we show that ABA signaling negatively regulates Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. Arabidopsis plants impaired in ABA biosynthesis, such as the aba1-6 mutant, or in ABA signaling, like the quadruple pyr/pyl mutant (pyr1pyl1pyl2pyl4), were more resistant to P. cucumerina than wild-type plants. In contrast, the hab1-1abi1-2abi2-2 mutant impaired in three phosphatases that negatively regulate ABA signaling displayed an enhanced susceptibility phenotype to this fungus. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of aba1-6 and wild-type plants revealed that the ABA pathway negatively regulates defense genes, many of which are controlled by the SA, JA, or ET pathway. In line with these data, we found that aba1-6 resistance to P. cucumerina was partially compromised when the SA, JA, or ET pathway was disrupted in this mutant. Additionally, in the aba1-6 plants, some genes encoding cell wall-related proteins were misregulated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and biochemical analyses of cell walls from aba1-6 and wild-type plants revealed significant differences in their Fourier transform infrared spectratypes and uronic acid and cellulose contents. All these data suggest that ABA signaling has a complex function in Arabidopsis basal resistance, negatively regulating SA/JA/ET-mediated resistance to necrotrophic fungi.

  1. Interferon gamma Signaling Positively Regulates Hematopoietic Stem Cell Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Sawamiphak, Suphansa; Kontarakis, Zacharias; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vertebrate hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region from “hemogenic” endothelium. Here we show that the pro-inflammatory cytokine Ifn-γ and its receptor Crfb17 positively regulate HSC development in zebrafish. This regulation does not appear to modulate the proliferation or survival of HSCs or endothelial cells, but rather the endothelial to HSC transition. Notch signaling and blood flow positively regulate the expression of ifng and crfb17 in the AGM. Notably, Ifn-γ overexpression partially rescues the HSC loss observed in the absence of blood flow or Notch signaling. Importantly, Ifn-γ signaling acts cell-autonomously to control the endothelial to HSC transition. Ifn-γ activates Stat3, an atypical transducer of Ifn-γ signaling, in the AGM, and Stat3 inhibition decreases HSC formation. Together, our findings uncover a developmental role for an inflammatory cytokine and place its action downstream of Notch signaling and blood flow to control Stat3 activation and HSC emergence. PMID:25490269

  2. Regulation of Mitoflash Biogenesis and Signaling by Mitochondrial Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenwen; Sun, Tao; Liu, Beibei; Wu, Di; Qi, Wenfeng; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant network reorganization and exhibiting stochastic signaling events in the form of mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes). Here we investigate whether and how mitochondrial network dynamics regulate mitoflash biogenesis and signaling. We found that mitoflash frequency was largely invariant when network fragmentized or redistributed in the absence of mitofusin (Mfn) 1, Mfn2, or Kif5b. However, Opa1 deficiency decreased spontaneous mitoflash frequency due to superimposing changes in respiratory function, whereas mitoflash response to non-metabolic stimulation was unchanged despite network fragmentation. In Drp1- or Mff-deficient cells whose mitochondria hyperfused into a single whole-cell reticulum, the frequency of mitoflashes of regular amplitude and duration was again unaltered, although brief and low-amplitude “miniflashes” emerged because of improved detection ability. As the network reorganized, however, the signal mass of mitoflash signaling was dynamically regulated in accordance with the degree of network connectivity. These findings demonstrate a novel functional role of mitochondrial network dynamics and uncover a magnitude- rather than frequency-modulatory mechanism in the regulation of mitoflash signaling. In addition, our data support a stochastic trigger model for the ignition of mitoflashes. PMID:27623243

  3. Ferulic acid attenuated acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity though down-regulating the cytochrome P 2E1 and inhibiting toll-like receptor 4 signaling-mediated inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhui; Ge, Kuang; Mu, Junhuan; Rong, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Bin; Wan, Jingyuan; Xia, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid which is abundant in vegetables and fruits, has been reported to exert anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, the pharmacological effects and the underlying mechanisms of FA in mice with acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity were investigated. Our results revealed that FA pretreatment inhibited the augments of serum aminotransferases in a dose-dependent manner and attenuated the hepatic histopathological abnormalities and hepatocellular apoptosis in acetaminophen (APAP) exposed mice. Moreover, FA inhibited the expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the contents of glutathione (GSH). Furthermore, FA markedly attenuated acetaminophen-induced serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β production, suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 expression and dampened p38 mitogen-activated (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activation. These data suggested that FA could effectively protect against APAP-induced liver injury by down-regulated expression of CYP 2E1 and the suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:27830004

  4. Lipid rafts as major platforms for signaling regulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino; Gajate, Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling does not apparently occur randomly over the cell surface, but it seems to be integrated very often into cholesterol-rich membrane domains, termed lipid rafts. Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains that are enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, and behave as major modulators of membrane geometry, lateral movement of molecules, traffic and signal transduction. Because the lipid and protein composition of membrane rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, they provide an additional level of compartmentalization, serving as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins. A wide number of signal transduction processes related to cell adhesion, migration, as well as to cell survival and proliferation, which play major roles in cancer development and progression, are dependent on lipid rafts. Despite lipid rafts harbor mainly critical survival signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, recent evidence suggests that these membrane domains can also house death receptor-mediated apoptotic signaling. Recruitment of this death receptor signaling pathway in membrane rafts can be pharmacologically modulated, thus opening up the possibility to regulate cell demise with a therapeutic use. The synthetic ether phospholipid edelfosine shows a high affinity for cholesterol and accumulates in lipid rafts in a number of malignant hematological cells, leading to an efficient in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity by inducing translocation of death receptors and downstream signaling molecules to these membrane domains. Additional antitumor drugs have also been shown to act, at least in part, by recruiting death receptors in lipid rafts. The partition of death receptors together with downstream apoptotic signaling molecules in membrane rafts has led us to postulate the concept of a special liquid-ordered membrane platform coined as

  5. Regulation of NMDA-receptor synaptic transmission by Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cerpa, Waldo; Gambrill, Abigail; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Barria, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Wnt ligands are secreted glycoproteins controlling gene expression and cytoskeleton reorganization involved in embryonic development of the nervous system. However, their role in later stages of brain development, particularly in the regulation of established synaptic connections is not known. We found that Wnt-5a acutely and specifically up-regulates synaptic NMDAR currents in rat hippocampal slices facilitating induction of LTP, a cellular model of learning and memory. This effect requires an increase in postsynaptic Ca2+ and activation of non-canonical downstream effectors of the Wnt signaling pathway. In contrast, Wnt-7a, an activator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, has no effect on NMDAR mediated synaptic transmission. Moreover, endogenous Wnt ligands are necessary to maintain basal NMDAR synaptic transmission adjusting the threshold for synaptic potentiation. This novel role for Wnt ligands provides a mechanism for Wnt signaling to acutely modulate synaptic plasticity and brain function in later stages of development and in the mature organism. PMID:21715611

  6. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules. PMID:25755281

  7. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Iwata, Junichi

    2015-05-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules.

  8. Wnt signaling in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain new neurons are continuously generated mainly in two regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the SGZ, radial neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to granule cells that integrate into the hippocampal circuitry and are relevant for the plasticity of the hippocampus. Loss of neurogenesis impairs learning and memory, suggesting that this process is important for adult hippocampal function. Adult neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple signaling pathways, including the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. This pathway plays important roles during the development of neuronal circuits and in the adult brain it modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we review current knowledge on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade and the potential mechanisms involved in this regulation. Also we discuss the evidence supporting that the canonical Wnt pathway is part of the signaling mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurogenesis in different physiological conditions. Finally, some unsolved questions regarding the Wnt-mediated regulation of neurogenesis are discussed. PMID:23805076

  9. Cortisol Regulates Acid Secretion of H+-ATPase-rich Ionocytes in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Shih, Tin-Han; Liu, Sian-Tai; Hsu, Hao-Hsuan; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acid-base regulation is vital for physiological processes in vertebrates. Freshwater (FW) fish live in an inconstant environment, and thus frequently face ambient acid stress. FW fish have to efficiently modulate their acid secretion processes for body fluid acid-base homeostasis during ambient acid challenge; hormonal control plays an important role in such physiological regulation. The hormone cortisol was previously proposed to be associated with acid base regulation in FW fish; however, the underlying mechanism has not been fully described. In the present study, mRNA expression of acid-secreting related transporters and cyp11b (encoding an enzyme involved in cortisol synthesis) in zebrafish embryos was stimulated by treatment with acidic FW (AFW, pH 4.0) for 3 d. Exogenous cortisol treatment (20 mg/L, 3 d) resulted in upregulated expression of transporters related to acid secretion and increased acid secretion function at the organism level in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, cortisol treatment also significantly increased the acid secretion capacity of H+-ATPase-rich cells (HRCs) at the cellular level. In loss-of-function experiments, microinjection of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) morpholino (MO) suppressed the expression of acid-secreting related transporters, and decreased acid secretion function at both the organism and cellular levels; on the other hand, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) MO did not induce any effects. Such evidence supports the hypothesized role of cortisol in fish acid-base regulation, and provides new insights into the roles of cortisol; cortisol-GR signaling stimulates zebrafish acid secretion function through transcriptional/translational regulation of the transporters and upregulation of acid secretion capacity in each acid-secreting ionocyte. PMID:26635615

  10. FGF Signalling Regulates Chromatin Organisation during Neural Differentiation via Mechanisms that Can Be Uncoupled from Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nishal S.; Rhinn, Muriel; Semprich, Claudia I.; Halley, Pamela A.; Dollé, Pascal; Bickmore, Wendy A.; Storey, Kate G.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR) signalling in Raldh2−/− embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that can direct

  11. Temporal regulation of Dpp signaling output in the Drosophila wing

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, David D.; Thomas, Sean; Edgar, Bruce A.; Buttitta, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background The Decapentaplegic (Dpp) signaling pathway is used in many developmental and homeostatic contexts, each time resulting in cellular responses particular to that biological niche. The flexibility of Dpp signaling is clearly evident in epithelial cells of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc. During larval stages of development Dpp functions as a morphogen, patterning the wing developmental field and stimulating tissue growth. A short time later however, as wing-epithelial cells exit the cell cycle and begin to differentiate, Dpp is a critical determinant of vein-cell fate. It is likely that the Dpp signaling pathway regulates different sets of target genes at these two developmental time points. Results To identify mechanisms that temporally control the transcriptional output of Dpp signaling in this system, we have taken a gene expression profiling approach. We identified genes affected by Dpp signaling at late larval or early pupal developmental time points, thereby identifying patterning- and differentiation-specific downstream targets, respectively. Conclusions Analysis of target genes and transcription factor binding sites associated with these groups of genes revealed potential mechanisms by which target-gene specificity of the Dpp signaling pathway is temporally regulated. In addition, this approach revealed novel mechanisms by which Dpp affects the cellular differentiation of wing-veins. PMID:24591046

  12. Copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Grubman, Alexandra; White, Anthony R

    2014-05-22

    Copper is an essential element in many biological processes. The critical functions associated with copper have resulted from evolutionary harnessing of its potent redox activity. This same property also places copper in a unique role as a key modulator of cell signal transduction pathways. These pathways are the complex sequence of molecular interactions that drive all cellular mechanisms and are often associated with the interplay of key enzymes including kinases and phosphatases but also including intracellular changes in pools of smaller molecules. A growing body of evidence is beginning to delineate the how, when and where of copper-mediated control over cell signal transduction. This has been driven by research demonstrating critical changes to copper homeostasis in many disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration and therapeutic potential through control of disease-associated cell signalling changes by modulation of copper-protein interactions. This timely review brings together for the first time the diverse actions of copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways and discusses the potential strategies for controlling disease-associated signalling processes using copper modulators. It is hoped that this review will provide a valuable insight into copper as a key signal regulator and stimulate further research to promote our understanding of copper in disease and therapy.

  13. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya; Li, Ming-Yang; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Yu, Jenn-Yah

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  14. Retinoid signaling regulates breast cancer stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Wicinski, Julien; Cervera, Nathalie; Monville, Florence; Finetti, Pascal; Bertucci, François; Wicha, Max S.; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis implicates the development of new therapeutic approaches to target the CSC population. Characterization of the pathways that regulate CSCs activity will facilitate the development of targeted therapies. We recently reported that the enzymatic activity of ALDH1, as measured by the ALDELFUOR assay, can be utilized to isolate normal and malignant breast stem cells in both primary tumors and cell lines. In this study, utilizing a tumorsphere assay, we have demonstrated the role of retinoid signaling in the regulation of breast CSCs self-renewal and differentiation. Utilizing the gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) algorithm we identified gene sets and pathways associated with retinoid signaling. These pathways regulate breast CSCs biology and their inhibition may provide novel therapeutic approaches to target breast CSCs. PMID:19806016

  15. Calcineurin mediates homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating retinoic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Kristin L.; Zhang, Zhenjie; Ganesan, Subhashree; Hintze, Maik; Shin, Maggie M.; Tang, Yitai; Cho, Ahryon; Graef, Isabella A.; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a form of non-Hebbian plasticity that maintains stability of the network and fidelity for information processing in response to prolonged perturbation of network and synaptic activity. Prolonged blockade of synaptic activity decreases resting Ca2+ levels in neurons, thereby inducing retinoic acid (RA) synthesis and RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity; however, the signal transduction pathway that links reduced Ca2+-levels to RA synthesis remains unknown. Here we identify the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) as a key regulator for RA synthesis and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Prolonged inhibition of CaN activity promotes RA synthesis in neurons, and leads to increased excitatory and decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission. These effects of CaN inhibitors on synaptic transmission are blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of RA synthesis or acute genetic deletion of the RA receptor RARα. Thus, CaN, acting upstream of RA, plays a critical role in gating RA signaling pathway in response to synaptic activity. Moreover, activity blockade-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity is absent in CaN knockout neurons, demonstrating the essential role of CaN in RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, in GluA1 S831A and S845A knockin mice, CaN inhibitor- and RA-induced regulation of synaptic transmission is intact, suggesting that phosphorylation of GluA1 C-terminal serine residues S831 and S845 is not required for CaN inhibitor- or RA-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Thus, our study uncovers an unforeseen role of CaN in postsynaptic signaling, and defines CaN as the Ca2+-sensing signaling molecule that mediates RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:26443861

  16. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  17. Sensitivity control through attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by negative regulation of cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yu; Kakuda, Hiroaki; Fujita, Kazuhiro A; Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2012-03-13

    Sensitivity is one of the hallmarks of biological and pharmacological responses. However, the principle of controlling sensitivity remains unclear. Here we theoretically analyse a simple biochemical reaction and find that the signal transfer efficiency of the transient peak amplitude attenuates depending on the strength of negative regulation. We experimentally find that many signalling pathways in various cell lines, including the Akt and ERK pathways, can be approximated by simple biochemical reactions and that the same property of the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency was observed for such pathways. Because of this property, a downstream molecule should show higher sensitivity to an activator and lower sensitivity to an inhibitor than an upstream molecule. Indeed, we experimentally verify that S6, which lies downstream of Akt, shows lower sensitivity to an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor than Akt. Thus, cells can control downstream sensitivity through the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by changing the expression level of negative regulators.

  18. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signalling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signalling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signalling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signalling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. PMID:25134739

  19. Signaling through retinoic acid receptors in cardiac development: Doing the right things at the right times.

    PubMed

    Xavier-Neto, José; Sousa Costa, Ângela M; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; Amaral, Fabio Neves do; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinical and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signaling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signaling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signaling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signaling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signaling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  20. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  1. Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Regulates Growth in Response to Nutritional Signals.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Ronit

    2016-10-01

    All organisms can respond to the availability of nutrients by regulating their metabolism, growth, and cell division. Central to the regulation of growth in response to nutrient availability is the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling that is composed of two structurally distinct complexes: TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). The TOR genes were first identified in yeast as target of rapamycin, a natural product of a soil bacterium, which proved beneficial as an immunosuppressive and anticancer drug and is currently being tested for a handful of other pathological conditions including diabetes, neurodegeneration, and age-related diseases. Studies of the TOR pathway unraveled a complex growth-regulating network. TOR regulates nutrient uptake, transcription, protein synthesis and degradation, as well as metabolic pathways, in a coordinated manner that ensures that cells grow or cease growth in response to nutrient availability. The identification of specific signals and mechanisms that stimulate TOR signaling is an active and exciting field of research that has already identified nitrogen and amino acids as key regulators of TORC1 activity. The signals, as well as the cellular functions of TORC2, are far less well understood. Additional open questions in the field concern the relationships between TORC1 and TORC2, as well as the links with other nutrient-responsive pathways. Here I review the main features of TORC1 and TORC2, with a particular focus on yeasts as model organisms.

  2. ASIC1 promotes differentiation of neuroblastoma by negatively regulating Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingli; Inoue, Koichi; Leng, Tiandong; Zhou, An; Guo, Shanchun; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2017-01-31

    In neurons, up-regulation of Notch activity either inhibits neurite extension or causes retraction of neurites. Conversely, inhibition of Notch1 facilitates neurite extension. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-gated cation channels, which play critical roles in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and spine morphogenesis. Our pilot proteomics data from ASIC1a knock out mice implicated that ASIC1a may play a role in regulating Notch signaling, therefore, we explored whether or not ASIC1a regulates neurite growth during neuronal development through Notch signaling. In this study, we determined the effects of ASIC1a on neurite growth in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line, NS20Y cells, by modulating ASIC1a expression. We also determined the relationship between ASIC1a and Notch signaling on neuronal differentiation. Our results showed that down-regulation of ASIC1a in NS20Y cells inhibits CPT-cAMP induced neurite growth, while over expression of ASIC1a promotes its growth. In addition, down-regulation of ASIC1a increased the expression of Notch1 and its target gene Survivin while inhibitor of Notch significantly prevented the neurite extension induced by ASIC1a in NS20Y cells. These data indicate that Notch1 signaling may be required for ASIC1a-mediated neurite growth and neuronal differentiation.

  3. Regulation of Chemokine Signal Integration by Activator of G-Protein Signaling 4 (AGS4)

    PubMed Central

    Robichaux, William G.; Branham-O’Connor, Melissa; Hwang, Il-Young; Vural, Ali; Kehrl, Johne H.

    2017-01-01

    Activator of G-protein signaling 4 (AGS4)/G-protein signaling modulator 3 (Gpsm3) contains three G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs, each of which can bind Gαi-GDP free of Gβγ. We previously demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi interaction is regulated by seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7-TMR), which may reflect direct coupling of the GPR-Gαi module to the receptor analogous to canonical Gαβγ heterotrimer. We have demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi complex is regulated by chemokine receptors in an agonist-dependent manner that is receptor-proximal. As an initial approach to investigate the functional role(s) of this regulated interaction in vivo, we analyzed leukocytes, in which AGS4/Gpsm3 is predominantly expressed, from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice. Loss of AGS4/Gpsm3 resulted in mild but significant neutropenia and leukocytosis. Dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and neutrophils from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice also exhibited significant defects in chemoattractant-directed chemotaxis and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. An in vivo peritonitis model revealed a dramatic reduction in the ability of AGS4/Gpsm3-null neutrophils to migrate to primary sites of inflammation. Taken together, these data suggest that AGS4/Gpsm3 is required for proper chemokine signal processing in leukocytes and provide further evidence for the importance of the GPR-Gαi module in the regulation of leukocyte function. PMID:28062526

  4. Notch signaling regulates gastric antral LGR5 stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Demitrack, Elise S; Gifford, Gail B; Keeley, Theresa M; Carulli, Alexis J; VanDussen, Kelli L; Thomas, Dafydd; Giordano, Thomas J; Liu, Zhenyi; Kopan, Raphael; Samuelson, Linda C

    2015-10-14

    The major signaling pathways regulating gastric stem cells are unknown. Here we report that Notch signaling is essential for homeostasis of LGR5(+) antral stem cells. Pathway inhibition reduced proliferation of gastric stem and progenitor cells, while activation increased proliferation. Notch dysregulation also altered differentiation, with inhibition inducing mucous and endocrine cell differentiation while activation reduced differentiation. Analysis of gastric organoids demonstrated that Notch signaling was intrinsic to the epithelium and regulated growth. Furthermore, in vivo Notch manipulation affected the efficiency of organoid initiation from glands and single Lgr5-GFP stem cells, suggesting regulation of stem cell function. Strikingly, constitutive Notch activation in LGR5(+) stem cells induced tissue expansion via antral gland fission. Lineage tracing using a multi-colored reporter demonstrated that Notch-activated stem cells rapidly generate monoclonal glands, suggesting a competitive advantage over unmanipulated stem cells. Notch activation was associated with increased mTOR signaling, and mTORC1 inhibition normalized NICD-induced increases in proliferation and gland fission. Chronic Notch activation induced undifferentiated, hyper-proliferative polyps, suggesting that aberrant activation of Notch in gastric stem cells may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis.

  5. Strigolactone regulates shoot development through a core signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dörte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strigolactones are a recently identified class of hormone that regulate multiple aspects of plant development. The DWARF14 (D14) α/β fold protein has been identified as a strigolactone receptor, which can act through the SCFMAX2 ubiquitin ligase, but the universality of this mechanism is not clear. Multiple proteins have been suggested as targets for strigolactone signalling, including both direct proteolytic targets of SCFMAX2, and downstream targets. However, the relevance and importance of these proteins to strigolactone signalling in many cases has not been fully established. Here we assess the contribution of these targets to strigolactone signalling in adult shoot developmental responses. We find that all examined strigolactone responses are regulated by SCFMAX2 and D14, and not by other D14-like proteins. We further show that all examined strigolactone responses likely depend on degradation of SMXL proteins in the SMXL6 clade, and not on the other proposed proteolytic targets BES1 or DELLAs. Taken together, our results suggest that in the adult shoot, the dominant mode of strigolactone signalling is D14-initiated, MAX2-mediated degradation of SMXL6-related proteins. We confirm that the BRANCHED1 transcription factor and the PIN-FORMED1 auxin efflux carrier are plausible downstream targets of this pathway in the regulation of shoot branching, and show that BRC1 likely acts in parallel to PIN1. PMID:27793831

  6. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC.

  7. TGF-β Signaling Regulates Cementum Formation through Osterix Expression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hwajung; Ahn, Yu-Hyun; Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Chae; You, Hyung-Keun; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β/BMPs have widely recognized roles in mammalian development, including in bone and tooth formation. To define the functional relevance of the autonomous requirement for TGF-β signaling in mouse tooth development, we analyzed osteocalcin-Cre mediated Tgfbr2 (OCCreTgfbr2fl/fl) conditional knockout mice, which lacks functional TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) in differentiating cementoblasts and cementocytes. Strikingly, OCCreTgfbr2fl/fl mutant mice exhibited a sharp reduction in cellular cementum mass with reduced matrix secretion and mineral apposition rates. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the roles of TGF-β signaling through TβRII in cementogenesis, we established a mouse cementoblast model with decreased TβRII expression using OCCM-30 cells. Interestingly, the expression of osterix (Osx), one of the major regulators of cellular cementum formation, was largely decreased in OCCM-30 cells lacking TβRII. Consequently, in those cells, functional ALP activity and the expression of genes associated with cementogenesis were reduced and the cells were partially rescued by Osx transduction. We also found that TGF-β signaling directly regulates Osx expression through a Smad-dependent pathway. These findings strongly suggest that TGF-β signaling plays a major role as one of the upstream regulators of Osx in cementoblast differentiation and cementum formation. PMID:27180803

  8. Shank Modulates Postsynaptic Wnt Signaling to Regulate Synaptic Development

    PubMed Central

    Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W.; Baas-Thomas, Maximilien S.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2016-01-01

    Prosap/Shank scaffolding proteins regulate the formation, organization, and plasticity of excitatory synapses. Mutations in SHANK family genes are implicated in autism spectrum disorder and other neuropsychiatric conditions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Shank function are not fully understood, and no study to date has examined the consequences of complete loss of all Shank proteins in vivo. Here we characterize the single Drosophila Prosap/Shank family homolog. Shank is enriched at the postsynaptic membrane of glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions and controls multiple parameters of synapse biology in a dose-dependent manner. Both loss and overexpression of Shank result in defects in synaptic bouton number and maturation. We find that Shank regulates a noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway in the postsynaptic cell by modulating the internalization of the Wnt receptor Fz2. This study identifies Shank as a key component of synaptic Wnt signaling, defining a novel mechanism for how Shank contributes to synapse maturation during neuronal development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Haploinsufficiency for SHANK3 is one of the most prevalent monogenic causes of autism spectrum disorder, making it imperative to understand how the Shank family regulates neurodevelopment and synapse function. We created the first animal model lacking all Shank proteins and used the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, a model glutamatergic synapse, to characterize the role of Shank at synapses. We identified a novel function of Shank in synapse maturation via regulation of Wnt signaling in the postsynaptic cell. PMID:27225771

  9. Regulators of G protein signalling proteins in the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Ladds, Graham; Zervou, Sevasti; Vatish, Manu; Thornton, Steven; Davey, John

    2009-05-21

    The contractile state of the human myometrium is controlled by extracellular signals that promote relaxation or contraction. Many of these signals function through G protein-coupled receptors at the cell surface, stimulating heterotrimeric G proteins and leading to changes in the activity of effector proteins responsible for bringing about the response. G proteins can interact with multiple receptors and many different effectors and are key players in the response. Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase activating proteins for heterotrimeric G proteins and help terminate the signal. Little is known about the function of RGS proteins in human myometrium and we have therefore analysed transcript levels for RGS proteins at various stages of pregnancy (non-pregnant, preterm, term non-labouring, term labouring). RGS2 and RGS5 were the most abundantly expressed isolates in each of the patient groups. The levels of RGS4 and RGS16 (and to a lesser extent RGS2 and RGS14) increased in term labouring samples relative to the other groups. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation in myometrial cells revealed that both RGS2 and RGS5 interact directly with the cytoplasmic tail of the oxytocin receptor, suggesting they might help regulate signalling through this receptor.

  10. Regulation of Golgi signaling and trafficking by the KDEL receptor.

    PubMed

    Cancino, Jorge; Jung, Juan E; Luini, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular membrane transport involves the well-coordinated engagement of a series of organelles and molecular machineries that ensure that proteins are delivered to their correct cellular locations according to their function. To maintain the homeostasis of the secretory system, the fluxes of membranes and protein across the transport compartments must be precisely balanced. This control should rely on a mechanism that senses the movement of the traffic and generates the required homeostatic response. Due to its central position in the secretory pathway and to the large amounts of signaling molecules associated with it, the Golgi complex represents the ideal candidate for this regulation. The generation of autonomous signaling by the Golgi complex in response to the arrival of cargo from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been experimentally addressed only in recent years. These studies have revealed that cargo moving from the ER to the Golgi activates a series of signaling pathways, the functional significance of which appears to be to maintain the homeostasis of the Golgi complex and to activate Golgi trafficking according to internal demand. We have termed this regulatory mechanism the Golgi control system. A key player in this Golgi control system is the KDEL receptor, which has previously been shown to retrieve chaperones back to the endoplasmic reticulum and more recently to behave as a signaling receptor. Here, we discuss the particular role of KDEL receptor signaling in the regulation of important pathways involved in the maintenance of the homeostasis of the transport apparatus, and in particular, of the Golgi complex.

  11. Notch Signaling Pathway Regulates Progesterone Secretion in Murine Luteal Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Dong, Qiming; Bao, Riqiang; Lv, Qiulan; Tang, Min; Hu, Chuan; Li, Gang; Liang, Shangdong; Zhang, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway, which involves in various cell life activities. Other studies and our report showed that the Notch signaling plays very important role in follicle development in mammalian ovaries. In luteal cells, Notch ligand, delta-like ligand 4, is involved in normal luteal vasculature. In this study, murine luteal cells were cultured in vitro and treated with Notch signaling inhibitors, L-658,458 and N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester (DAPT). We found that L-658,458 and DAPT treatment decrease basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated progesterone secretion. On the contrary, overexpression of intracellular domain of Notch3 increased basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone secretion. Further studies demonstrated that Notch signaling regulated the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11A, 2 key enzymes for progesterone synthesis. In conclusion, Notch signaling plays important role in regulating progesterone secretion in murine luteal cells.

  12. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process.

  13. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  14. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Joshua; Ogretmen, Besim

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein. PMID:25642418

  15. A novel co-drug of aspirin and ursolic acid interrupts adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via regulating EMT and EGFR-mediated signaling pathways: multiple targets for cancer metastasis prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiao; Liu, Yajun; Li, Tao; Yang, Xiang; Zheng, Guirong; Chen, Hongning; Jia, Lee; Shao, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis currently remains the predominant cause of breast carcinoma treatment failure. The effective targeting of metastasis-related-pathways in cancer holds promise for a new generation of therapeutics. In this study, we developed an novel Asp-UA conjugate, which was composed of classical “old drug” aspirin and low toxicity natural product ursolic acid for targeting breast cancer metastasis. Our results showed that Asp-UA could attenuate the adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in a more safe and effective manner in vitro. Molecular and cellular study demonstrated that Asp-UA significantly down-regulated the expression of cell adhesion and invasion molecules including integrin α6β1, CD44, MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, EGFR and ERK proteins, and up-regulated the epithelial markers “E-cadherin” and “β-catenin”, and PTEN proteins. Furthermore, Asp-UA (80 mg/kg) reduced lung metastasis in a 4T1 murine breast cancer metastasis model more efficiently, which was associated with a decrease in the expression of CD44. More importantly, we did not detect side effects with Asp-UA in mice such as weight loss and main viscera tissues toxicity. Overall, our research suggested that co-drug Asp-UA possessed potential metastasis chemoprevention abilities via influencing EMT and EGFR-mediated pathways and could be a more promising drug candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27683033

  16. Regulation of PCP by the Fat signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Matis, Maja; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelia, orthogonal to the apical–basal axis, is essential for numerous developmental events and physiological functions. Drosophila model systems have been at the forefront of studies revealing insights into mechanisms regulating PCP and have revealed distinct signaling modules. One of these, involving the atypical cadherins Fat and Dachsous and the ectokinase Four-jointed, appears to link the direction of cell polarization to the tissue axes. We discuss models for the function of this signaling module as well as several unanswered questions that may guide future investigations. PMID:24142873

  17. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Alan R.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2001-12-01

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Structural Conservation of Ligand Binding Reveals a Bile Acid-like Signaling Pathway in Nematodes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Motola, Daniel L.; Gelmedin, Verena; Hawdon, John; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Bile acid-like molecules named dafachronic acids (DAs) control the dauer formation program in Caenorhabditis elegans through the nuclear receptor DAF-12. This mechanism is conserved in parasitic nematodes to regulate their dauer-like infective larval stage, and as such, the DAF-12 ligand binding domain has been identified as an important therapeutic target in human parasitic hookworm species that infect more than 600 million people worldwide. Here, we report two x-ray crystal structures of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum DAF-12 ligand binding domain in complex with DA and cholestenoic acid (a bile acid-like metabolite), respectively. Structure analysis and functional studies reveal key residues responsible for species-specific ligand responses of DAF-12. Furthermore, DA binds to DAF-12 mechanistically and is structurally similar to bile acids binding to the mammalian bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor. Activation of DAF-12 by cholestenoic acid and the cholestenoic acid complex structure suggest that bile acid-like signaling pathways have been conserved in nematodes and mammals. Together, these results reveal the molecular mechanism for the interplay between parasite and host, provide a structural framework for DAF-12 as a promising target in treating nematode parasitism, and provide insight into the evolution of gut parasite hormone-signaling pathways. PMID:22170062

  19. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling pathway regulates liver homeostasis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Mei; Liu, Da-Wei; Wang, Wen-Pin

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling controls liver specification and regulates the metabolism of lipids, cholesterol, and bile acids. FGF signaling also promotes hepatocyte proliferation, and helps detoxify hepatotoxin during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. However, the function of Fgf in zebrafish liver is not yet well understood, specifically for postnatal homeostasis. The current study analyzed the expression of fgf receptors (fgfrs) in the liver of zebrafish. We then investigated the function of Fgf signaling in the zebrafish liver by expressing a dominant-negative Fgf receptor in hepatocytes (lfabp:dnfgfr1-egfp, lf:dnfr). Histological analysis showed that our genetic intervention resulted in a small liver size with defected medial expansion of developing livers in transgenic (Tg) larvae. Morphologically, the liver lobe of lf:dnfr adult fish was shorter than that of control. Ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes was observed in fish as young as 3 months. Further examination revealed the development of hepatic steatosis and cholestasis. In adult Tg fish, we unexpectedly observed increased liver-to-body-weight ratios, with higher percentages of proliferating hepatocytes. Considering all these findings, we concluded that as in mammals, in adult zebrafish the metabolism of lipid and bile acids in the liver are regulated by Fgf signaling. Disruption of the Fgf signal-mediated metabolism might indirectly affect hepatocyte proliferation.

  20. Merlin, a regulator of Hippo signaling, regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyoung; Jho, Eek-hoon

    2016-01-01

    Merlin, encoded by the NF2 gene, is a tumor suppressor that exerts its function via inhibiting mitogenic receptors at the plasma membrane. Although multiple mutations in Merlin have been identified in Neurofibromatosis type II (NF2) disease, its molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that Merlin interacts with LRP6 and inhibits LRP6 phosphorylation, a critical step for the initiation of Wnt signaling. We found that treatment of Wnt3a caused phosphorylation of Merlin by PAK1, leading to detachment of Merlin from LRP6 and allowing the initiation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. A higher level of β-catenin was found in tissues from NF2 patients. Enhanced proliferation and migration caused by knockdown of Merlin in glioblastoma cells were inhibited by suppression of β-catenin. Conclusively, these results suggest that sustained Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity induced by abrogation of Merlin-mediated inhibition of LRP6 phosphorylation might be a cause of NF2 disease. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 357-358] PMID:27345717

  1. Circadian regulation of hormone signaling and plant physiology.

    PubMed

    Atamian, Hagop S; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    The survival and reproduction of plants depend on their ability to cope with a wide range of daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations during their life cycle. Phytohormones are plant growth regulators that are involved in almost every aspect of growth and development as well as plant adaptation to myriad abiotic and biotic conditions. The circadian clock, an endogenous and cell-autonomous biological timekeeper that produces rhythmic outputs with close to 24-h rhythms, provides an adaptive advantage by synchronizing plant physiological and metabolic processes to the external environment. The circadian clock regulates phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling pathways to generate daily rhythms in hormone activity that fine-tune a range of plant processes, enhancing adaptation to local conditions. This review explores our current understanding of the interplay between the circadian clock and hormone signaling pathways.

  2. Redox regulation of cancer metastasis: molecular signaling and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenyong; Zou, Linzhi; Huang, Canhua; Lei, Yunlong

    2014-08-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related mortality. Accumulated evidence has shown that high-metastasis potential cancer cells have more reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation compared with low-metastasis potential cancer cells. ROS can function as second messengers to regulate multiple cancer metastasis-related signaling pathways via reversible oxidative posttranslational modifications of cysteine in key redox-sensitive proteins, which leads to the structural and functional change of these proteins. Because ROS can promote cancer metastasis, therapeutic strategies aiming at inducing/reducing cellular ROS level or targeting redox sensors involved in metastasis hold great potential in developing new efficient approaches for anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarize recent findings on regulation of tumor metastasis by key redox sensors and describe the potential of targeting redox signaling pathways for cancer therapy.

  3. Metabolic control of signalling pathways and metabolic auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Christen, Stefan; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic alterations have emerged as an important hallmark in the development of various diseases. Thus, understanding the complex interplay of metabolism with other cellular processes such as cell signalling is critical to rationally control and modulate cellular physiology. Here, we review in the context of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase and p53, the orchestrated interplay between metabolism and cellular signalling as well as transcriptional regulation. Moreover, we discuss recent discoveries in auto-regulation of metabolism (i.e. how metabolic parameters such as metabolite levels activate or inhibit enzymes and thus metabolic pathways). Finally, we review functional consequences of post-translational modification on metabolic enzyme abundance and/or activities.

  4. Gap Junctional Regulation of Signal Transduction in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M.; Stains, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    The role of gap junctions, particularly that of connexin43 (Cx43), has become an area of increasing interest in bone physiology. An abundance of studies have shown that Cx43 influences the function of osteoblasts and osteocytes, which ultimately impacts bone mass acquisition and skeletal homeostasis. However, the molecular details underlying how Cx43 regulates bone are only coming into focus and have proven to be more complex than originally thought. In this review, we focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms by which Cx43 gap junctions and hemichannels regulate cell signaling pathways, gene expression, mechanotransduction and cell survival in bone cells. This review will highlight key signaling factors that have been identified as downstream effectors of Cx43 and the impact of these pathways on distinct osteoblast and osteocyte functions. PMID:24486014

  5. PDGFRalphaalpha signaling is regulated through the primary cilium in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Linda; Clement, Christian A; Teilmann, Stefan C; Pazour, Gregory J; Hoffmann, Else K; Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren T

    2005-10-25

    Recent findings show that cilia are sensory organelles that display specific receptors and ion channels, which transmit signals from the extracellular environment via the cilium to the cell to control tissue homeostasis and function. Agenesis of primary cilia or mislocation of ciliary signal components affects human pathologies, such as polycystic kidney disease and disorders associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Primary cilia are essential for hedgehog ligand-induced signaling cascade regulating growth and patterning. Here, we show that the primary cilium in fibroblasts plays a critical role in growth control via platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha), which localizes to the primary cilium during growth arrest in NIH3T3 cells and primary cultures of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Ligand-dependent activation of PDGFRalphaalpha is followed by activation of Akt and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathways, with Mek1/2 being phosphorylated within the cilium and at the basal body. Fibroblasts derived from Tg737(orpk) mutants fail to form normal cilia and to upregulate the level of PDGFRalpha; PDGF-AA fails to activate PDGFRalphaalpha and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathway. Signaling through PDGFRbeta, which localizes to the plasma membrane, is maintained at comparable levels in wild-type and mutant cells. We propose that ciliary PDGFRalphaalpha signaling is linked to tissue homeostasis and to mitogenic signaling pathways.

  6. Redox signaling regulated by electrophiles and reactive sulfur species

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Motohiro; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ihara, Hideshi; Fujii, Shigemoto; Motohashi, Hozumi; Akaike, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Redox signaling is a key modulator of oxidative stress induced by nonspecific insults of biological molecules generated by reactive oxygen species. Current redox biology is revisiting the traditional concept of oxidative stress, such that toxic effects of reactive oxygen species are protected by diverse antioxidant systems upregulated by oxidative stress responses that are physiologically mediated by redox-dependent cell signaling pathways. Redox signaling is thus precisely regulated by endogenous electrophilic substances that are generated from reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide and its derivative reactive species during stress responses. Among electrophiles formed endogenously, 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) has unique cell signaling functions, and pathways for its biosynthesis, signaling mechanism, and metabolism in cells have been clarified. Reactive sulfur species such as cysteine hydropersulfides that are abundant in cells are likely involved in 8-nitro-cGMP metabolism. These new aspects of redox biology may stimulate innovative and multidisciplinary research in cell and stem cell biology; infectious diseases, cancer, metabolic syndrome, ageing, and neurodegenerative diseases; and other oxidative stress-related disorders. This review focuses on the most recent progress in the biosynthesis, cell signaling, and metabolism of 8-nitro-cGMP, which is a likely target for drug development and lead to discovery of novel therapeutics for many diseases. PMID:27013774

  7. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  8. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuting; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W; Wines, Pamela G; Cryan, Ellen V; Demarest, Keith T

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2))/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca(2+)-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca(2+)-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  9. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  10. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling.

  11. Mesolimbic leptin signaling negatively regulates cocaine-conditioned reward.

    PubMed

    Shen, M; Jiang, C; Liu, P; Wang, F; Ma, L

    2016-12-06

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the response to addictive drugs are complex, and increasing evidence indicates that there is a role for appetite-regulating pathways in substance abuse. Leptin, an important adipose hormone that regulates energy balance and appetite, exerts its physiological functions via leptin receptors. However, the role of leptin signaling in regulating the response to cocaine remains unclear. Here we examined the potential role of leptin signaling in cocaine reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. Our results showed that inhibition of leptin signaling by intracerebroventricular infusion of the leptin receptor (LepR) antagonist SMLA during cocaine conditioning increased the cocaine-CPP and upregulated the level of dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We then selectively knocked down the LepR in the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area (VTA), NAc core and central amygdala (CeA) by injecting AAV-Cre into Lepr(flox/flox) mice. LepR deletion in the VTA increased the dopamine levels in the NAc and enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward. LepR deletion in the NAc core enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward and impaired the effect of the D2-dopamine receptor on cocaine-CPP, whereas LepR deletion in the CeA had no effect on cocaine-CPP but increased the anxiety level of mice. In addition, prior exposure to saccharin increased LepR mRNA and STAT3 phosphorylation in the NAc and VTA and impaired cocaine-CPP. These results indicate that leptin signaling is critically involved in cocaine-conditioned reward and the regulation of drug reward by a natural reward and that these effects are dependent on mesolimbic LepR.

  12. Mesolimbic leptin signaling negatively regulates cocaine-conditioned reward

    PubMed Central

    Shen, M; Jiang, C; Liu, P; Wang, F; Ma, L

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the response to addictive drugs are complex, and increasing evidence indicates that there is a role for appetite-regulating pathways in substance abuse. Leptin, an important adipose hormone that regulates energy balance and appetite, exerts its physiological functions via leptin receptors. However, the role of leptin signaling in regulating the response to cocaine remains unclear. Here we examined the potential role of leptin signaling in cocaine reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. Our results showed that inhibition of leptin signaling by intracerebroventricular infusion of the leptin receptor (LepR) antagonist SMLA during cocaine conditioning increased the cocaine-CPP and upregulated the level of dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We then selectively knocked down the LepR in the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area (VTA), NAc core and central amygdala (CeA) by injecting AAV-Cre into Leprflox/flox mice. LepR deletion in the VTA increased the dopamine levels in the NAc and enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward. LepR deletion in the NAc core enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward and impaired the effect of the D2-dopamine receptor on cocaine-CPP, whereas LepR deletion in the CeA had no effect on cocaine-CPP but increased the anxiety level of mice. In addition, prior exposure to saccharin increased LepR mRNA and STAT3 phosphorylation in the NAc and VTA and impaired cocaine-CPP. These results indicate that leptin signaling is critically involved in cocaine-conditioned reward and the regulation of drug reward by a natural reward and that these effects are dependent on mesolimbic LepR. PMID:27922639

  13. Autocrine and Paracrine Hh Signaling Regulate Prostate Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    development and tumorigenesis (13). The forkhead transcription factor Foxe1 was established as a downstream target of the Shh pathway in hair follicle morpho...in the epithelium of the developing prostate; activate Hh target genes expressed in the surrounding mesenchyme and influence prostate ductal growth...postanatally. We propose this temporal growth effects is mediated by the discordant regulation of a subset of target genes by Hh signaling in the prenatal and

  14. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Notch1 signaling: the fulcrum of Notch1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jin; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hee-Sae

    2015-08-01

    Notch signaling plays a pivotal role in cell fate determination, cellular development, cellular self-renewal, tumor progression, and has been linked to developmental disorders and carcinogenesis. Notch1 is activated through interactions with the ligands of neighboring cells, and acts as a transcriptional activator in the nucleus. The Notch1 intracellular domain (Notch1-IC) regulates the expression of target genes related to tumor development and progression. The Notch1 protein undergoes modification after translation by posttranslational modification enzymes. Phosphorylation modification is critical for enzymatic activation, complex formation, degradation, and subcellular localization. According to the nuclear cycle, Notch1-IC is degraded by E3 ligase, FBW7 in the nucleus via phosphorylation-dependent degradation. Here, we summarize the Notch signaling pathway, and resolve to understand the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of Notch signaling as well as to understand its relation to cancer.

  15. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells.

  16. Cannabinoid receptor signaling regulates liver development and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Leah Y; Alexa, Kristen; Cortes, Mauricio; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Kim, Andrew J; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; North, Trista E; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-02-15

    Endocannabinoid (EC) signaling mediates psychotropic effects and regulates appetite. By contrast, potential roles in organ development and embryonic energy consumption remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that genetic or chemical inhibition of cannabinoid receptor (Cnr) activity disrupts liver development and metabolic function in zebrafish (Danio rerio), impacting hepatic differentiation, but not endodermal specification: loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and cnr2 activity leads to smaller livers with fewer hepatocytes, reduced liver-specific gene expression and proliferation. Functional assays reveal abnormal biliary anatomy and lipid handling. Adult cnr2 mutants are susceptible to hepatic steatosis. Metabolomic analysis reveals reduced methionine content in Cnr mutants. Methionine supplementation rescues developmental and metabolic defects in Cnr mutant livers, suggesting a causal relationship between EC signaling, methionine deficiency and impaired liver development. The effect of Cnr on methionine metabolism is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors (Srebfs), as their overexpression rescues Cnr mutant liver phenotypes in a methionine-dependent manner. Our work describes a novel developmental role for EC signaling, whereby Cnr-mediated regulation of Srebfs and methionine metabolism impacts liver development and function.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor signaling regulates liver development and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Leah Y.; Alexa, Kristen; Cortes, Mauricio; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Kim, Andrew J.; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoid (EC) signaling mediates psychotropic effects and regulates appetite. By contrast, potential roles in organ development and embryonic energy consumption remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that genetic or chemical inhibition of cannabinoid receptor (Cnr) activity disrupts liver development and metabolic function in zebrafish (Danio rerio), impacting hepatic differentiation, but not endodermal specification: loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and cnr2 activity leads to smaller livers with fewer hepatocytes, reduced liver-specific gene expression and proliferation. Functional assays reveal abnormal biliary anatomy and lipid handling. Adult cnr2 mutants are susceptible to hepatic steatosis. Metabolomic analysis reveals reduced methionine content in Cnr mutants. Methionine supplementation rescues developmental and metabolic defects in Cnr mutant livers, suggesting a causal relationship between EC signaling, methionine deficiency and impaired liver development. The effect of Cnr on methionine metabolism is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors (Srebfs), as their overexpression rescues Cnr mutant liver phenotypes in a methionine-dependent manner. Our work describes a novel developmental role for EC signaling, whereby Cnr-mediated regulation of Srebfs and methionine metabolism impacts liver development and function. PMID:26884397

  18. Regulation of interferon gamma signaling by suppressors of cytokine signaling and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Wilson, Tenisha D; Johnson, Howard M

    2013-12-18

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1(-/-)) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function.

  19. Regulation of Interferon Gamma Signaling by Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Wilson, Tenisha D.; Johnson, Howard M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1−/−) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function. PMID:24391643

  20. Endothelial HIF signaling regulates pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Ryan P.; McConaha, Melinda E.; Jones, Brittany R.; Shay, Sheila D.; Moore, Christy S.; Blackwell, Thomas R.; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L.; Burman, Ankita; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Hemnes, Anna R.; Karwandyar, Ayub K.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Talati, Megha A.; Dong, Hui-Jia; Gleaves, Linda A.; Carrier, Erica J.; Gaskill, Christa; Scott, Edward W.; Majka, Susan M.; Fessel, Joshua P.; West, James D.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicating chronic parenchymal lung disease, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Since the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling pathway is important for development of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hypoxia, we investigated whether HIF signaling in vascular endothelium regulates development of PH related to pulmonary fibrosis. We generated a transgenic model in which HIF is deleted within vascular endothelial cells and then exposed these mice to chronic intraperitoneal bleomycin to induce PH associated with lung fibrosis. Although no differences in the degree of fibrotic remodeling were observed, we found that endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected against development of PH, including right ventricle and pulmonary vessel remodeling. Similarly, endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected from PH after a 4-wk exposure to normobaric hypoxia. In vitro studies of pulmonary vascular endothelial cells isolated from the HIF-targeted mice and controls revealed that endothelial HIF signaling increases endothelial cell expression of connective tissue growth factor, enhances vascular permeability, and promotes pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and wound healing ability, all of which have the potential to impact the development of PH in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that vascular endothelial cell HIF signaling is necessary for development of hypoxia and pulmonary fibrosis associated PH. As such, HIF and HIF-regulated targets represent a therapeutic target in these conditions. PMID:26637636

  1. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  2. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation. PMID:24357229

  3. Soluble klotho binds monosialoganglioside to regulate membrane microdomains and growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, George; An, Sung-Wan; Al-Juboori, Saif I.; Nischan, Nicole; Yoon, Joonho; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Hilgemann, Donald W.; Xie, Jian; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Kohler, Jennifer J.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Huang, Chou-Long

    2017-01-01

    Soluble klotho, the shed ectodomain of the antiaging membrane protein α-klotho, is a pleiotropic endocrine/paracrine factor with no known receptors and poorly understood mechanism of action. Soluble klotho down-regulates growth factor-driven PI3K signaling, contributing to extension of lifespan, cardioprotection, and tumor inhibition. Here we show that soluble klotho binds membrane lipid rafts. Klotho binding to rafts alters lipid organization, decreases membrane’s propensity to form large ordered domains for endocytosis, and down-regulates raft-dependent PI3K/Akt signaling. We identify α2-3-sialyllactose present in the glycan of monosialogangliosides as targets of soluble klotho. α2-3-Sialyllactose is a common motif of glycans. To explain why klotho preferentially targets lipid rafts we show that clustering of gangliosides in lipid rafts is important. In vivo, raft-dependent PI3K signaling is up-regulated in klotho-deficient mouse hearts vs. wild-type hearts. Our results identify ganglioside-enriched lipid rafts to be receptors that mediate soluble klotho regulation of PI3K signaling. Targeting sialic acids may be a general mechanism for pleiotropic actions of soluble klotho. PMID:28069944

  4. GABA Not Only a Neurotransmitter: Osmotic Regulation by GABAAR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cesetti, Tiziana; Ciccolini, Francesca; Li, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Mature macroglia and almost all neural progenitor types express γ-aminobutyric (GABA) A receptors (GABAARs), whose activation by ambient or synaptic GABA, leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl−) depending on its electro-chemical gradient (ECl). Since the flux of Cl− is indissolubly associated to that of osmotically obliged water, GABAARs regulate water movements by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signaling could affect the movement of water by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. We will here review recent observations indicating that in neural cells GABAAR-mediated osmotic regulation affects the cellular volume thereby activating multiple intracellular signaling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation, and survival. In addition, we will discuss evidence that the osmotic regulation exerted by GABA may contribute to brain water homeostasis in physiological and in pathological conditions causing brain edema, in which the GABAergic transmission is often altered. PMID:22319472

  5. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  6. Signal integration by Ca2+ regulates intestinal stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hansong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic stem cells (SCs) maintain tissue homeostasis by dynamically adjusting proliferation and differentiation in response to stress and metabolic cues. Here, we identify Ca2+ signaling as a central regulator of intestinal SC (ISC) activity in Drosophila. We find that dietary L-glutamate stimulates ISC division and gut growth. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required in ISCs for this response and for an associated modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that results in sustained high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. High cytosolic Ca2+ induces ISC proliferation by regulating Calcineurin and CREB - regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). In response to a wide range of dietary and stress stimuli, ISCs reversibly transition between Ca2+ oscillation states that represent poised or activated modes of proliferation, respectively. We propose that the dynamic regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels allows effective integration of diverse mitogenic signals in ISCs to tailor their proliferative activity to the needs of the tissue. PMID:26633624

  7. CITED2 links hormonal signaling to PGC-1α acetylation in the regulation of gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Mashito; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Tujimura, Tomoko; Yongheng, Cao; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Inagaki, Kenjiro; Inoue, Hiroshi; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Takazawa, Kazuo; Kido, Yoshiaki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Hiramatsu, Ryuji; Matsuki, Yasushi; Kasuga, Masato

    2012-03-18

    During fasting, induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial to ensure proper energy homeostasis. Such induction is dysregulated in type 2 diabetes, resulting in the development of fasting hyperglycemia. Hormonal and nutrient regulation of metabolic adaptation during fasting is mediated predominantly by the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferative activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in concert with various other transcriptional regulators. Although CITED2 (CBP- and p300-interacting transactivator with glutamic acid- and aspartic acid-rich COOH-terminal domain 2) interacts with many of these molecules, the role of this protein in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis was previously unknown. Here we show that CITED2 is required for the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis through PGC-1α. The abundance of CITED2 was increased in the livers of mice by fasting and in cultured hepatocytes by glucagon-cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, and the amount of CITED2 in liver was higher in mice with type 2 diabetes than in non-diabetic mice. CITED2 inhibited the acetylation of PGC-1α by blocking its interaction with the acetyltransferase general control of amino acid synthesis 5-like 2 (GCN5). The consequent downregulation of PGC-1α acetylation resulted in an increase in its transcriptional coactivation activity and an increased expression of gluconeogenic genes. The interaction of CITED2 with GCN5 was disrupted by insulin in a manner that was dependent on phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-thymoma viral proto-oncogene (Akt) signaling. Our results show that CITED2 functions as a transducer of glucagon and insulin signaling in the regulation of PGC-1α activity that is associated with the transcriptional control of gluconeogenesis and that this function is mediated through the modulation of GCN5-dependent PGC-1α acetylation. We also found that loss of hepatic CITED2 function suppresses gluconeogenesis in diabetic mice, suggesting it as a

  8. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  9. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation.

    PubMed

    El Sahili, Abbas; Kwasiborski, Anthony; Mothe, Nicolas; Velours, Christophe; Legrand, Pierre; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-quenching (QQ) are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS) signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm) in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL). Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation) which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated.

  10. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mothe, Nicolas; Velours, Christophe; Legrand, Pierre; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-quenching (QQ) are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS) signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm) in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL). Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation) which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated. PMID:26554837

  11. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaqin; Liu, Jiane; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s) underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA) treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade. PMID:26263390

  12. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  13. Oleanolic Acid Alters Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways: Implication in Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Žiberna, Lovro; Šamec, Dunja; Mocan, Andrei; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Bishayee, Anupam; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-03-16

    Nowadays, much attention has been paid to diet and dietary supplements as a cost-effective therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of a myriad of chronic and degenerative diseases. Rapidly accumulating scientific evidence achieved through high-throughput technologies has greatly expanded the understanding about the multifaceted nature of cancer. Increasingly, it is being realized that deregulation of spatio-temporally controlled intracellular signaling cascades plays a contributory role in the onset and progression of cancer. Therefore, targeting regulators of oncogenic signaling cascades is essential to prevent and treat cancer. A plethora of preclinical and epidemiological evidences showed promising role of phytochemicals against several types of cancer. Oleanolic acid, a common pentacyclic triterpenoid, is mainly found in olive oil, as well as several plant species. It is a potent inhibitor of cellular inflammatory process and a well-known inducer of phase 2 xenobiotic biotransformation enzymes. Main molecular mechanisms underlying anticancer effects of oleanolic acid are mediated by caspases, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, pro-apoptotic Bax and bid, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt1/mechanistic target of rapamycin, reactive oxygen species/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, cluster of differentiation 1, CKD4, s6k, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, as well as aforementioned signaling pathways . In this work, we critically review the scientific literature on the molecular targets of oleanolic acid implicated in the prevention and treatment of several types of cancer. We also discuss chemical aspects, natural sources, bioavailability, and safety of this bioactive phytochemical.

  14. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G.; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-01-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  15. Localized JNK signaling regulates organ size during development

    PubMed Central

    Willsey, Helen Rankin; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Carlos Pastor-Pareja, José; Willsey, A Jeremy; Beachy, Philip A; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question of biology is what determines organ size. Despite demonstrations that factors within organs determine their sizes, intrinsic size control mechanisms remain elusive. Here we show that Drosophila wing size is regulated by JNK signaling during development. JNK is active in a stripe along the center of developing wings, and modulating JNK signaling within this stripe changes organ size. This JNK stripe influences proliferation in a non-canonical, Jun-independent manner by inhibiting the Hippo pathway. Localized JNK activity is established by Hedgehog signaling, where Ci elevates dTRAF1 expression. As the dTRAF1 homolog, TRAF4, is amplified in numerous cancers, these findings provide a new mechanism for how the Hedgehog pathway could contribute to tumorigenesis, and, more importantly, provides a new strategy for cancer therapies. Finally, modulation of JNK signaling centers in developing antennae and legs changes their sizes, suggesting a more generalizable role for JNK signaling in developmental organ size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11491.001 PMID:26974344

  16. Stra13 regulates satellite cell activation by antagonizing Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Li, Li; Vercherat, Cécile; Gulbagci, Neriman Tuba; Acharjee, Sujata; Li, Jiali; Chung, Teng-Kai; Thin, Tin Htwe; Taneja, Reshma

    2007-01-01

    Satellite cells play a critical role in skeletal muscle regeneration in response to injury. Notch signaling is vital for satellite cell activation and myogenic precursor cell expansion but inhibits myogenic differentiation. Thus, precise spatial and temporal regulation of Notch activity is necessary for efficient muscle regeneration. We report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Stra13 modulates Notch signaling in regenerating muscle. Upon injury, Stra13−/− mice exhibit increased cellular proliferation, elevated Notch signaling, a striking regeneration defect characterized by degenerated myotubes, increased mononuclear cells, and fibrosis. Stra13−/− primary myoblasts also exhibit enhanced Notch activity, increased proliferation, and defective differentiation. Inhibition of Notch signaling ex vivo and in vivo ameliorates the phenotype of Stra13−/− mutants. We demonstrate in vitro that Stra13 antagonizes Notch activity and reverses the Notch-imposed inhibition of myogenesis. Thus, Stra13 plays an important role in postnatal myogenesis by attenuating Notch signaling to reduce myoblast proliferation and promote myogenic differentiation. PMID:17502421

  17. An Nfic-hedgehog signaling cascade regulates tooth root development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Coordination between the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and apical papilla (AP) is crucial for proper tooth root development. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and Nfic are both involved in tooth root development; however, their relationship has yet to be elucidated. Here, we establish a timecourse of mouse molar root development by histological staining of sections, and we demonstrate that Hh signaling is active before and during root development in the AP and HERS using Gli1 reporter mice. The proper pattern of Hh signaling activity in the AP is crucial for the proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells, because either inhibition with Hh inhibitors or constitutive activation of Hh signaling activity in transgenic mice leads to decreased proliferation in the AP and shorter roots. Moreover, Hh activity is elevated in Nfic−/− mice, a root defect model, whereas RNA sequencing and in situ hybridization show that the Hh attenuator Hhip is downregulated. ChIP and RNAscope analyses suggest that Nfic binds to the promoter region of Hhip. Treatment of Nfic−/− mice with Hh inhibitor partially restores cell proliferation, AP growth and root development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an Nfic-Hhip-Hh signaling pathway is crucial for apical papilla growth and proper root formation. This discovery provides insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth root development. PMID:26293299

  18. Saturated fatty acids activate ERK signaling to downregulate hepatic sortilin 1 in obese and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lipeng; Chiang, John Y L; Ding, Wen-Xing; Dunn, Winston; Roberts, Benjamin; Li, Tiangang

    2013-10-01

    Hepatic VLDL overproduction is a characteristic feature of diabetes and an important contributor to diabetic dyslipidemia. Hepatic sortilin 1 (Sort1), a cellular trafficking receptor, is a novel regulator of plasma lipid metabolism and reduces plasma cholesterol and triglycerides by inhibiting hepatic apolipoprotein B production. Elevated circulating free fatty acids play key roles in hepatic VLDL overproduction and the development of dyslipidemia. This study investigated the regulation of hepatic Sort1 in obesity and diabetes and the potential implications in diabetic dyslipidemia. Results showed that hepatic Sort1 protein was markedly decreased in mouse models of type I and type II diabetes and in human individuals with obesity and liver steatosis, whereas increasing hepatic Sort1 expression reduced plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the saturated fatty acid palmitate activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and inhibited Sort1 protein by mechanisms involving Sort1 protein ubiquitination and degradation. Consistently, hepatic ERK signaling was activated in diabetic mice, whereas blocking ERK signaling by an ERK inhibitor increased hepatic Sort1 protein in mice. These results suggest that increased saturated fatty acids downregulate liver Sort1 protein, which may contribute to the development of dyslipidemia in obesity and diabetes.

  19. Mechanisms of retinoic acid signalling and its roles in organ and limb development

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Duester, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) signalling has a central role during vertebrate development. RA synthesized in specific locations regulates transcription by interacting with nuclear RA receptors (RARs) bound to RA response elements (RAREs) near target genes. RA was first implicated in signalling on the basis of its teratogenic effects on limb development. Genetic studies later revealed that endogenous RA promotes forelimb initiation by repressing fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8). Insights into RA function in the limb serve as a paradigm for understanding how RA regulates other developmental processes. In vivo studies have identified RAREs that control repression of Fgf8 during body axis extension or activation of homeobox (Hox) genes and other key regulators during neuronal differentiation and organogenesis. PMID:25560970

  20. Emerging roles of protein kinase CK2 in abscisic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Belmiro; Pagès, Montserrat; Riera, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many aspects of plant growth and development as well as responses to multiple stresses. Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation or ubiquitination have pivotal roles in the regulation of ABA signaling. In addition to the positive regulator sucrose non-fermenting-1 related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2), the relevance of the role of other protein kinases, such as CK2, has been recently highlighted. We have recently established that CK2 phosphorylates the maize ortholog of open stomata 1 OST1, ZmOST1, suggesting a role of CK2 phosphorylation in the control of ZmOST1 protein degradation (Vilela et al., 2015). CK2 is a pleiotropic enzyme involved in multiple developmental and stress-responsive pathways. This review summarizes recent advances that taken together suggest a prominent role of protein kinase CK2 in ABA signaling and related processes. PMID:26579189

  1. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Böhmer, Maik; Hu, Honghong; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms. PMID:20192751

  2. Signaling by bone morphogenetic proteins directs formation of an ectodermal signaling center that regulates craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Foppiano, Silvia; Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2007-12-01

    We previously described a signaling center, the Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone (FEZ) that regulates growth and patterning of the frontonasal process (FNP). The FEZ is comprised of FNP ectoderm flanking a boundary between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression domains. Our objective was to examine BMP signaling during formation of the FEZ. We blocked BMP signaling throughout the FNP prior to FEZ formation by infecting chick embryos at stage 10 (HH10) with a replication-competent avian retrovirus encoding the BMP antagonist Noggin. We assessed gene expression patterns in the FNP 72 h after infection (approximately HH22) and observed that Shh expression was reduced or absent. In the mesenchyme, we observed that Bmp2 transcripts were absent while the Bmp4 expression domain was expanded proximally. In addition to the molecular changes, infected embryos also exhibited facial malformations at 72 and 96 h after infection suggesting that the FEZ did not form. Our data indicate that reduced cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, in the mesenchyme contributed to the phenotype that we observed. Additionally, adding exogenous SHH into the mesenchyme of RCAS-Noggin-infected embryos did not restore Bmp2 and Bmp4 to a normal pattern of expression. These data indicate that BMP signaling mediates interactions between tissues in the FNP that regulate FEZ formation; and that the correct pattern of Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not Bmp7, expression in the FNP mesenchyme requires signaling by the BMP pathway.

  3. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  4. Lysophosphatidic Acid Regulation and Roles in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    be generated by other pathways. LPA is produced from phosphatidic acid 4 ") (PA) in activated platelets and ovarian and prostate cancer cells by...material. Appendix 1 JCB in revision 2 ABSTRACT The bioactive phospholipids, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and phosphatidic acid (PA), regulate pivotal...glycerolipid synthesis, abundant evidence now indicates that bioactive LPA can also be generated by other pathways. LPA is produced from phosphatidic acid (PA

  5. Acidic calcium stores open for business: expanding the potential for intracellular Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandip; Docampo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cytosolic calcium concentration are crucial for a variety of cellular processes in all cells. It has long been appreciated that calcium is stored and released from intracellular calcium stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum. However, emerging evidence indicates that calcium is also dynamically regulated by a seemingly disparate collection of acidic organelles. Here, we review the defining features of these acidic calcium stores and highlight recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of uptake and release of calcium from these stores. We also examine the nature of calcium buffering within the stores and summarize the physiological and patho-physiological significance of these ubiquitous organelles in calcium signaling. PMID:20303271

  6. CoupTFI interacts with retinoic acid signaling during cortical development.

    PubMed

    Harrison-Uy, Susan J; Siegenthaler, Julie A; Faedo, Andrea; Rubenstein, John L R; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of the orphan nuclear hormone receptor CoupTFI in mediating cortical development downstream of meningeal retinoic acid signaling. CoupTFI is a regulator of cortical development known to collaborate with retinoic acid (RA) signaling in other systems. To examine the interaction of CoupTFI and cortical RA signaling we utilized Foxc1-mutant mice in which defects in meningeal development lead to alterations in cortical development due to a reduction of RA signaling. By analyzing CoupTFI(-/-);Foxc1(H/L) double mutant mice we provide evidence that CoupTFI is required for RA rescue of the ventricular zone and the neurogenic phenotypes in Foxc1-mutants. We also found that overexpression of CoupTFI in Foxc1-mutants is sufficient to rescue the Foxc1-mutant cortical phenotype in part. These results suggest that CoupTFI collaborates with RA signaling to regulate both cortical ventricular zone progenitor cell behavior and cortical neurogenesis.

  7. Tomato susceptibility to root-knot nematodes requires an intact jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Kishor K; Xie, Qi-Guang; Mantelin, Sophie; Bishnoi, Usha; Girke, Thomas; Navarre, Duroy A; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2008-09-01

    Responses of resistant (Mi-1/Mi-1) and susceptible (mi-1/ mi-1) tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to root-knot nematodes (RKNs; Meloidogyne spp.) infection were monitored using cDNA microarrays, and the roles of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense signaling were evaluated in these interactions. Array analysis was used to compare transcript profiles in incompatible and compatible interactions of tomato roots 24 h after RKN infestation. The jai1 and def1 tomato mutant, altered in JA signaling, and tomato transgenic line NahG, altered in SA signaling, in the presence or absence of the RKN resistance gene Mi-1, were evaluated. The array analysis identified 1,497 and 750 genes differentially regulated in the incompatible and compatible interactions, respectively. Of the differentially regulated genes, 37% were specific to the incompatible interactions. NahG affected neither Mi-1 resistance nor basal defenses to RKNs. However, jai1 reduced tomato susceptibility to RKNs while not affecting Mi-1 resistance. In contrast, the def1 mutant did not affect RKN susceptibility. These results indicate that JA-dependent signaling does not play a role in Mi-1-mediated defense; however, an intact JA signaling pathway is required for tomato susceptibility to RKNs. In addition, low levels of SA might be sufficient for basal and Mi-1 resistance to RKNs.

  8. The Spectrin cytoskeleton regulates the Hippo signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Georgina C; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Khanal, Ichha; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Tapon, Nic; Thompson, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The Spectrin cytoskeleton is known to be polarised in epithelial cells, yet its role remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the Spectrin cytoskeleton controls Hippo signalling. In the developing Drosophila wing and eye, loss of apical Spectrins (alpha/beta-heavy dimers) produces tissue overgrowth and mis-regulation of Hippo target genes, similar to loss of Crumbs (Crb) or the FERM-domain protein Expanded (Ex). Apical beta-heavy Spectrin binds to Ex and co-localises with it at the apical membrane to antagonise Yki activity. Interestingly, in both the ovarian follicular epithelium and intestinal epithelium of Drosophila, apical Spectrins and Crb are dispensable for repression of Yki, while basolateral Spectrins (alpha/beta dimers) are essential. Finally, the Spectrin cytoskeleton is required to regulate the localisation of the Hippo pathway effector YAP in response to cell density human epithelial cells. Our findings identify both apical and basolateral Spectrins as regulators of Hippo signalling and suggest Spectrins as potential mechanosensors. PMID:25712476

  9. Spatial regulation of Raf kinase signaling by RKTG

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Xie, Xiaoduo; Ding, Qiurong; Luo, Xiaolin; He, Jing; Fan, Fengjuan; Liu, Weizhong; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2007-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentalization has become an important theme in cell signaling such as spatial regulation of Ras by RasGRP1 and MEK/ERK by Sef. Here, we report spatial regulation of Raf kinase by RKTG (Raf kinase trapping to Golgi). RKTG is a seven-transmembrane protein localized at the Golgi apparatus. RKTG expression inhibits EGF-stimulated ERK and RSK phosphorylation, blocks NGF-mediated PC12 cell differentiation, and antagonizes Ras- and Raf-1-stimulated Elk-1 transactivation. Through interaction with Raf-1, RKTG changes the localization of Raf-1 from cytoplasm to the Golgi apparatus, blocks EGF-stimulated Raf-1 membrane translocation, and reduces the interaction of Raf-1 with Ras and MEK1. In RKTG-null mice, the basal ERK phosphorylation level is increased in the brain and liver. In RKTG-deleted mouse embryonic fibroblasts, EGF-induced ERK phosphorylation is enhanced. Collectively, our results reveal a paradigm of spatial regulation of Raf kinase by RKTG via sequestrating Raf-1 to the Golgi apparatus and thereby inhibiting the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:17724343

  10. The Multiple Signaling Systems Regulating Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Thompson, Jessica A.; Xavier, Karina B.; Cool, Robbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Cell-to-cell communication is a major process that allows bacteria to sense and coordinately react to the fluctuating conditions of the surrounding environment. In several pathogens, this process triggers the production of virulence factors and/or a switch in bacterial lifestyle that is a major determining factor in the outcome and severity of the infection. Understanding how bacteria control these signaling systems is crucial to the development of novel antimicrobial agents capable of reducing virulence while allowing the immune system of the host to clear bacterial infection, an approach likely to reduce the selective pressures for development of resistance. We provide here an up-to-date overview of the molecular basis and physiological implications of cell-to-cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the well-studied bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the known cell-to-cell signaling systems in this bacterium are described, from the most-studied systems, i.e., N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), the 4-quinolones, the global activator of antibiotic and cyanide synthesis (GAC), the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) systems, and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp), to less-well-studied signaling molecules, including diketopiperazines, fatty acids (diffusible signal factor [DSF]-like factors), pyoverdine, and pyocyanin. This overview clearly illustrates that bacterial communication is far more complex than initially thought and delivers a clear distinction between signals that are quorum sensing dependent and those relying on alternative factors for their production. PMID:22390972

  11. Simultaneous detection of gastric acid and histamine release to unravel the regulation of acid secretion from the guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Bitziou, Eleni; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2012-08-01

    Gastric acid secretion is regulated by three primary components that activate the parietal cell: histamine, gastrin, and acetylcholine (ACh). Although much is known about these regulatory components individually, little is known on the interplay of these multiple activators and the degree of regulation they pose on the gastric acid secretion mechanism. We utilized a novel dual-sensing approach, where an iridium oxide sensor was used to monitor pH and a boron-doped diamond electrode was used for the detection of histamine from in vitro guinea pig stomach mucosal sections. Under basal conditions, gastrin was shown to be the main regulatory component of the total acid secretion and directly activated the parietal cell rather than by mediating gastric acid secretion through the release of histamine from the enterochromaffin-like cell, although both pathways were active. Under stimulated conditions with ACh, the gastrin and histamine components of the total acid secretion were not altered compared with levels observed under basal conditions, suggestive that ACh had no direct effect on the enterochromaffin-like cell and G cell. These data identify a new unique approach to investigate the regulation pathways active during acid secretion and the degree that they are utilized to drive total gastric acid secretion. The findings of this study will enhance our understanding on how these signaling mechanisms vary under pathophysiology or therapeutic management.

  12. Control of TSC2-Rheb signaling axis by arginine regulates mTORC1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Maddocks, Oliver DK; Otten, Gisela; Ratcliff, Matthew; Smith, Graham R; Dunlop, Elaine A; Passos, João F; Davies, Owen R; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Tee, Andrew R; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is the key signaling hub that regulates cellular protein homeostasis, growth, and proliferation in health and disease. As a prerequisite for activation of mTORC1 by hormones and mitogens, there first has to be an available pool of intracellular amino acids. Arginine, an amino acid essential during mammalian embryogenesis and early development is one of the key activators of mTORC1. Herein, we demonstrate that arginine acts independently of its metabolism to allow maximal activation of mTORC1 by growth factors via a mechanism that does not involve regulation of mTORC1 localization to lysosomes. Instead, arginine specifically suppresses lysosomal localization of the TSC complex and interaction with its target small GTPase protein, Rheb. By interfering with TSC-Rheb complex, arginine relieves allosteric inhibition of Rheb by TSC. Arginine cooperates with growth factor signaling which further promotes dissociation of TSC2 from lysosomes and activation of mTORC1. Arginine is the main amino acid sensed by the mTORC1 pathway in several cell types including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Dependence on arginine is maintained once hESCs are differentiated to fibroblasts, neurons, and hepatocytes, highlighting the fundamental importance of arginine-sensing to mTORC1 signaling. Together, our data provide evidence that different growth promoting cues cooperate to a greater extent than previously recognized to achieve tight spatial and temporal regulation of mTORC1 signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11058.001 PMID:26742086

  13. CGI-58, a key regulator of lipid homeostasis and signaling in plants, also regulates polyamine metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58) is an alpha/beta hydrolase-type protein that regulates lipid homeostasis and signaling in eukaryotes by interacting with and stimulating the activity of several different types of proteins, including a lipase in mammalian cells and a peroxisomal ABC transp...

  14. Regulation of neuronal PKA signaling through AKAP targeting dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Smith, Karen E; Gorski, Jessica A; Horne, Eric A; Gibson, Emily S; Gomez, Lisa L

    2006-07-01

    Central to organization of signaling pathways are scaffolding, anchoring and adaptor proteins that mediate localized assembly of multi-protein complexes containing receptors, second messenger-generating enzymes, kinases, phosphatases, and substrates. At the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory synapses, AMPA (AMPAR) and NMDA (NMDAR) glutamate receptors are linked to signaling proteins, the actin cytoskeleton, and synaptic adhesion molecules on dendritic spines through a network of scaffolding proteins that may play important roles regulating synaptic structure and receptor functions in synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory. AMPARs are rapidly recruited to dendritic spines through NMDAR activation during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) through pathways that also increase the size and F-actin content of spines. Phosphorylation of AMPAR-GluR1 subunits by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) helps stabilize AMPARs recruited during LTP. In contrast, induction of long-term depression (LTD) leads to rapid calcineurin-protein phosphatase 2B (CaN) mediated dephosphorylation of PKA-phosphorylated GluR1 receptors, endocytic removal of AMPAR from synapses, and a reduction in spine size. However, mechanisms for coordinately regulating AMPAR localization, phosphorylation, and synaptic structure by PKA and CaN are not well understood. A kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150 is a PKA- and CaN-anchoring protein that is linked to NMDARs and AMPARs through PSD-95 and SAP97 membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) scaffolds. Importantly, disruption of PKA-anchoring in neurons and functional analysis of GluR1-MAGUK-AKAP79 complexes in heterologous cells suggests that AKAP79/150-anchored PKA and CaN may regulate AMPARs in LTD. In the work presented at the "First International Meeting on Anchored cAMP Signaling Pathways" (Berlin-Buch, Germany, October 15-16, 2005), we demonstrate that AKAP79/150 is targeted to dendritic spines by an N-terminal basic

  15. Grass Carp Laboratory of Genetics and Physiology 2 Serves As a Negative Regulator in Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene I- and Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5-Mediated Antiviral Signaling in Resting State and Early Stage of Grass Carp Reovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Youliang; Wan, Quanyuan; Yang, Chunrong; Su, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2) is a key component of RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). However, the lack of the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) results in its controversial functional performance as a negative or positive regulator in antiviral responses. Especially, no sufficient evidence uncovers the functional mechanisms of LGP2 in RLR signaling pathways in teleost. Here, negative regulation mechanism of LGP2 in certain situations in retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5)-mediated antiviral responses was identified in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney cells. LGP2 overexpression inhibits synthesis and phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF3/7), and mRNA levels and promoter activities of IFNs and NF-κBs in resting state and early phase of grass carp reovirus (GCRV) infection. Knockdown of LGP2 obtains opposite effects. Luciferase report assay indicates that LGP2 works at the upstream of RIG-I and MDA5. LGP2 binds to RIG-I and MDA5 with diverse domain preference and which is independent of GCRV infection. Furthermore, LGP2 restrains K63-linked ubiquitination of RIG-I and MDA5 in various degrees. These differences result in disparate repressive mechanisms of LGP2 to RIG-I- and MDA5-mediated signal activations of IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 and mediator of IRF3 activation. Interestingly, LGP2 also inhibits K48-linked RIG-I and MDA5 ubiquitination to suppress proteins degradation, which guarantees the basal protein levels for subsequently rapid signal activation. All these results reveal a mechanism that LGP2 functions as a suppressor in RLR signaling pathways to maintain cellular homeostasis in resting state and early phase during GCRV infection.

  16. Grass Carp Laboratory of Genetics and Physiology 2 Serves As a Negative Regulator in Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene I- and Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5-Mediated Antiviral Signaling in Resting State and Early Stage of Grass Carp Reovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, Youliang; Wan, Quanyuan; Yang, Chunrong; Su, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2) is a key component of RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). However, the lack of the caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) results in its controversial functional performance as a negative or positive regulator in antiviral responses. Especially, no sufficient evidence uncovers the functional mechanisms of LGP2 in RLR signaling pathways in teleost. Here, negative regulation mechanism of LGP2 in certain situations in retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5)-mediated antiviral responses was identified in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney cells. LGP2 overexpression inhibits synthesis and phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF3/7), and mRNA levels and promoter activities of IFNs and NF-κBs in resting state and early phase of grass carp reovirus (GCRV) infection. Knockdown of LGP2 obtains opposite effects. Luciferase report assay indicates that LGP2 works at the upstream of RIG-I and MDA5. LGP2 binds to RIG-I and MDA5 with diverse domain preference and which is independent of GCRV infection. Furthermore, LGP2 restrains K63-linked ubiquitination of RIG-I and MDA5 in various degrees. These differences result in disparate repressive mechanisms of LGP2 to RIG-I- and MDA5-mediated signal activations of IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 and mediator of IRF3 activation. Interestingly, LGP2 also inhibits K48-linked RIG-I and MDA5 ubiquitination to suppress proteins degradation, which guarantees the basal protein levels for subsequently rapid signal activation. All these results reveal a mechanism that LGP2 functions as a suppressor in RLR signaling pathways to maintain cellular homeostasis in resting state and early phase during GCRV infection.

  17. Wnt signaling regulates pulp volume and dentin thickness

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Won Hee; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Du; Hunter, Daniel J; Zhong, Zhendong; Ramos, Daniel M; Williams, Bart O; Sharpe, Paul T; Bardet, Claire; Mah, Su-jung; Helms, Jill A

    2015-01-01

    Odontoblasts, cementoblasts, ameloblasts and osteoblasts all form mineralized tissues in the craniofacial complex, and all these cell types exhibit active Wnt signaling during postnatal life. We set out to understand the functions of this Wnt signaling, by evaluating the phenotypes of mice in which the essential Wnt chaperone protein, Wingless was eliminated. The deletion of Wls was restricted to cells expressing Osteocalcin, which in addition to osteoblasts includes odontoblasts, cementoblasts, and ameloblasts. Dentin, cementum, enamel, and bone all formed in OCN-Cre;Wlsfl/fl mice but their homeostasis was dramatically affected. The most notable feature was a significant increase in dentin volume and density. We attribute this gain in dentin volume to a Wnt-mediated mis-regulation of Runx2. Normally, Wnt signaling stimulates Runx2, which in turn inhibits DSP; this inhibition must be relieved for odontoblasts to differentiate. In OCN-Cre;Wlsfl/fl mice, Wnt pathway activation is reduced and Runx2 levels decline. The Runx2-mediated repression of DSP is relieved and odontoblast differentiation is accordingly enhanced. This study demonstrates the importance of Wnt signaling in the homeostasis of mineralized tissues of the craniofacial complex. PMID:23996396

  18. Mnk Kinases in Cytokine Signaling and Regulation of Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonali; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinases Mnk1 and Mnk2 are activated downstream of the p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Extensive work over the years has shown that these kinases control phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and regulate engagement of other effector elements, including hnRNPA1 and PSF. Mnk kinases are ubiquitously expressed and play critical roles in signaling for various cytokine receptors, while there is emerging evidence that they have important functions as mediators of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. In this review the mechanisms of activation of MNK pathways by cytokine receptors are addressed and their roles in diverse cytokine-dependent biological processes are reviewed. The clinical-translational implications of such work and the relevance of future development of specific MNK inhibitors for the treatment of malignancies and auto-immune disorders are discussed. PMID:23710261

  19. Emerging EPO and EPO receptor regulators and signal transducers.

    PubMed

    Kuhrt, David; Wojchowski, Don M

    2015-06-04

    As essential mediators of red cell production, erythropoietin (EPO) and its cell surface receptor (EPO receptor [EPOR]) have been intensely studied. Early investigations defined basic mechanisms for hypoxia-inducible factor induction of EPO expression, and within erythroid progenitors EPOR engagement of canonical Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (JAK2/STAT5), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (RAS/MEK/ERK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Contemporary genetic, bioinformatic, and proteomic approaches continue to uncover new clinically relevant modulators of EPO and EPOR expression, and EPO's biological effects. This Spotlight review highlights such factors and their emerging roles during erythropoiesis and anemia.

  20. SREBP-1c, regulated by the insulin and AMPK signaling pathways, plays a role in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kohjima, Motoyuki; Higuchi, Nobito; Kato, Masaki; Kotoh, Kazuhiro; Yoshimoto, Tsuyoshi; Fujino, Tatsuya; Yada, Masayoshi; Yada, Ryoko; Harada, Naohiko; Enjoji, Munechika; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Nakamuta, Makoto

    2008-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease whose prevalence has increased markedly. We reported previously that fatty acid synthesis was enhanced in NAFLD with the accumulation of fatty acids. To clarify the disorder, we evaluated the expression of genes regulating fatty acid synthesis by real-time PCR using samples from NAFLD (n=22) and normal liver (control; n=10). A major regulator of fatty acids synthesis is sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Its expression was significantly higher in NAFLD, nearly 5-fold greater than the controls. SREBP-1c is positively regulated by insulin signaling pathways, including insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and -2. In NAFLD, IRS-1 expression was enhanced and correlated positively with SREBP-1c expression. In contrast, IRS-2 expression decreased by 50% and was not correlated with SREBP-1c. Forkhead box protein A2 (Foxa2) is a positive regulator of fatty acid oxidation and is itself negatively regulated by IRSs. Foxa2 expression increased in NAFLD and showed a negative correlation with IRS-2, but not with IRS-1, expression. It is known that SREBP-1c is negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but expression levels of AMPK in NAFLD were almost equal to those of the controls. These data indicate that, in NAFLD, insulin signaling via IRS-1 causes the up-regulation of SREBP1-c, leading to the increased synthesis of fatty acids by the hepatocytes; negative feedback regulation via AMPK does not occur and the activation of Foxa2, following a decrease of IRS-2, up-regulates fatty acid oxidation.

  1. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids regulate bovine whole-body protein metabolism by promoting muscle insulin signalling to the Akt-mTOR-S6K1 pathway and insulin sensitivity.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of the skeletal musculature to use amino acids to build or renew constitutive proteins is gradually lost with age and this is partly due to a decline in skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity. Since long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC"n"-3PUFA) from fish oil are known to impr...

  2. Oleanolic Acid Alters Multiple Cell Signaling Pathways: Implication in Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Žiberna, Lovro; Šamec, Dunja; Mocan, Andrei; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Bishayee, Anupam; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, much attention has been paid to diet and dietary supplements as a cost-effective therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of a myriad of chronic and degenerative diseases. Rapidly accumulating scientific evidence achieved through high-throughput technologies has greatly expanded the understanding about the multifaceted nature of cancer. Increasingly, it is being realized that deregulation of spatio-temporally controlled intracellular signaling cascades plays a contributory role in the onset and progression of cancer. Therefore, targeting regulators of oncogenic signaling cascades is essential to prevent and treat cancer. A plethora of preclinical and epidemiological evidences showed promising role of phytochemicals against several types of cancer. Oleanolic acid, a common pentacyclic triterpenoid, is mainly found in olive oil, as well as several plant species. It is a potent inhibitor of cellular inflammatory process and a well-known inducer of phase 2 xenobiotic biotransformation enzymes. Main molecular mechanisms underlying anticancer effects of oleanolic acid are mediated by caspases, 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, pro-apoptotic Bax and bid, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt1/mechanistic target of rapamycin, reactive oxygen species/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, cluster of differentiation 1, CKD4, s6k, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, as well as aforementioned signaling pathways . In this work, we critically review the scientific literature on the molecular targets of oleanolic acid implicated in the prevention and treatment of several types of cancer. We also discuss chemical aspects, natural sources, bioavailability, and safety of this bioactive phytochemical. PMID:28300756

  3. AKT Regulates BRCA1 Stability in Response to Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew C.; Lyons, Traci R.; Young, Christian D.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Anderson, Steven M.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, with its binding partner BARD1, regulates the cellular response to DNA damage in multiple tissues, yet inherited mutations within BRCA1 result specifically in breast and ovarian cancers. This observation, along with several other lines of evidence, suggests a functional relationship may exist between hormone signaling and BRCA1 function. Our data demonstrates that AKT activation promotes the expression of BRCA1 in response to estrogen and IGF-1 receptor signaling. Further, we have identified a novel AKT phosphorylation site in BRCA1 at S694 which is responsive to activation of these signaling pathways. This rapid increase in BRCA1 protein levels appears to occur independently of new protein synthesis and treatment with the clinically utilized proteasome inhibitor bortezomib similarly leads to a rapid increase in BRCA1 protein levels. Together, these data suggest that AKT phosphorylation of BRCA1 increases total protein expression by preventing proteasomal degradation. AKT activation also appears to support nuclear localization of BRCA1, and co-expression of activated AKT with BRCA1 decreases radiation sensitivity, suggesting this interaction has functional consequences for BRCA1's role in DNA repair. We conclude that AKT regulates BRCA1 protein stability and function through direct phosphorylation of BRCA1. Further, the responsiveness of the AKT-BRCA1 regulatory pathway to hormone signaling may, in part, underlie the tissue specificity of BRCA1 mutant cancers. Pharmacological targets within this pathway could provide strategies for modulation of BRCA1 protein, which may prove therapeutically beneficial for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers. PMID:20085797

  4. Fisetin regulates obesity by targeting mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hwa; Kim, Heemun; Ahn, Jiyun; Jeon, Tae-Il; Lee, Dae-Hee; Ha, Tae-Youl

    2013-08-01

    Fisetin, a flavonol present in vegetables and fruits, possesses antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we have demonstrated that fisetin prevents diet-induced obesity through regulation of the signaling of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a central mediator of cellular growth, cellular proliferation and lipid biosynthesis. To evaluate whether fisetin regulates mTORC1 signaling, we investigated the phosphorylation and kinase activity of the 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and mTORC1 in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Fisetin treatment of preadipocytes reduced the phosphorylation of S6K1 and mTORC1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. To further our understanding of how fisetin negatively regulates mTORC1 signaling, we analyzed the phosphorylation of S6K1, mTOR and Akt in fisetin-treated TSC2-knockdown cells. The results suggested that fisetin treatment inhibits mTORC1 activity in an Akt-dependent manner. Recent studies have shown that adipocyte differentiation is dependent on mTORC1 activity. Fisetin treatment inhibited adipocyte differentiation, consistent with the negative effect of fisetin on mTOR. The inhibitory effect of fisetin on adipogenesis is dependent of mTOR activity, suggesting that fisetin inhibits adipogenesis and the accumulation of intracellular triglycerides during adipocyte differentiation by targeting mTORC1 signaling. Fisetin supplementation in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) significantly attenuated HFD-induced increases in body weight and white adipose tissue. We also observed that fisetin efficiently suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt, S6K1 and mTORC1 in adipose tissue. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by fisetin prevents adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and obesity in HFD-fed mice. Therefore, fisetin may be a useful phytochemical agent for attenuating diet-induced obesity.

  5. DELLA-mediated gibberellin signalling regulates Nod factor signalling and rhizobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Fonouni-Farde, Camille; Tan, Sovanna; Baudin, Maël; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Niebel, Andreas; Frugier, Florian; Diet, Anouck

    2016-01-01

    Legumes develop symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Bacterial Nod factors (NFs) and plant regulatory pathways modulating NF signalling control rhizobial infections and nodulation efficiency. Here we show that gibberellin (GA) signalling mediated by DELLA proteins inhibits rhizobial infections and controls the NF induction of the infection marker ENOD11 in Medicago truncatula. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active DELLA protein in the epidermis is sufficient to promote ENOD11 expression in the absence of symbiotic signals. We show using heterologous systems that DELLA proteins can interact with the nodulation signalling pathway 2 (NSP2) and nuclear factor-YA1 (NF-YA1) transcription factors that are essential for the activation of NF responses. Furthermore, MtDELLA1 can bind the ERN1 (ERF required for nodulation 1) promoter and positively transactivate its expression. Overall, we propose that GA-dependent action of DELLA proteins may directly regulate the NSP1/NSP2 and NF-YA1 activation of ERN1 transcription to regulate rhizobial infections. PMID:27586842

  6. Oxylipin Signaling: A Distinct Role for the Jasmonic Acid Precursor cis-(+)-12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid (cis-OPDA)

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Anuja; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxylipins are lipid-derived compounds, many of which act as signals in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stress. They include the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and related jasmonate metabolites cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), methyl jasmonate, and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). Besides the defense response, jasmonates are involved in plant growth and development and regulate a range of processes including glandular trichome development, reproduction, root growth, and senescence. cis-OPDA is known to possess a signaling role distinct from JA-Ile. The non-enzymatically derived phytoprostanes are structurally similar to cis-OPDA and induce a common set of genes that are not responsive to JA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A novel role for cis-OPDA in seed germination regulation has recently been uncovered based on evidence from double mutants and feeding experiments showing that cis-OPDA interacts with abscisic acid (ABA), inhibits seed germination, and increases ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5) protein abundance. Large amounts of cis-OPDA are esterified to galactolipids in A. thaliana and the resulting compounds, known as Arabidopsides, are thought to act as a rapidly available source of cis-OPDA. PMID:22645585

  7. Calcium specificity signaling mechanisms in abscisic acid signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Benjamin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Wang, Cun; Nguyen, Desiree; Yong, Taiming; Yang, Paul G; Poretsky, Elly; Belknap, Thomas F; Waadt, Rainer; Alemán, Fernando; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-01-01

    A central question is how specificity in cellular responses to the eukaryotic second messenger Ca2+ is achieved. Plant guard cells, that form stomatal pores for gas exchange, provide a powerful system for in depth investigation of Ca2+-signaling specificity in plants. In intact guard cells, abscisic acid (ABA) enhances (primes) the Ca2+-sensitivity of downstream signaling events that result in activation of S-type anion channels during stomatal closure, providing a specificity mechanism in Ca2+-signaling. However, the underlying genetic and biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show impairment of ABA signal transduction in stomata of calcium-dependent protein kinase quadruple mutant plants. Interestingly, protein phosphatase 2Cs prevent non-specific Ca2+-signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate an unexpected interdependence of the Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent ABA-signaling branches and the in planta requirement of simultaneous phosphorylation at two key phosphorylation sites in SLAC1. We identify novel mechanisms ensuring specificity and robustness within stomatal Ca2+-signaling on a cellular, genetic, and biochemical level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03599.001 PMID:26192964

  8. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  9. Transcriptomics of Environmental Enrichment Reveals a Role for Retinoic Acid Signaling in Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yafang; Kong, Fanping; Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Dragosljvich, Steven N.; Sinha, Mala; Li, Dingge; Fan, Xiuzhen; Koshy, Shyny; Hommel, Jonathan D.; Spratt, Heidi M.; Luxon, Bruce A.; Green, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    There exists much variability in susceptibility/resilience to addiction in humans. The environmental enrichment paradigm is a rat model of resilience to addiction-like behavior, and understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this protective phenotype may lead to novel targets for pharmacotherapeutics to treat cocaine addiction. We investigated the differential regulation of transcript levels using RNA sequencing of the rat nucleus accumbens after environmental enrichment/isolation and cocaine/saline self-administration. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis of 14,309 transcripts demonstrated that many biofunctions and pathways were differentially regulated. New functional pathways were also identified for cocaine modulation (e.g., Rho GTPase signaling) and environmental enrichment (e.g., signaling of EIF2, mTOR, ephrin). However, one novel pathway stood out above the others, the retinoic acid (RA) signaling pathway. The RA signaling pathway was identified as one likely mediator of the protective enrichment addiction phenotype, an interesting result given that nine RA signaling-related genes are expressed selectively and at high levels in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh). Subsequent knockdown of Cyp26b1 (an RA degradation enzyme) in the NAcSh of rats confirmed this role by increasing cocaine self-administration as well as cocaine seeking. These results provide a comprehensive account of enrichment effects on the transcriptome and identify RA signaling as a contributing factor for cocaine addiction. PMID:27899881

  10. TGFβ signaling regulates lipogenesis in human sebaceous glands cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sebaceous glands are components of the skin essential for its normal lubrication by the production of sebum. This contributes to skin health and more importantly is crucial for the skin barrier function. A mechanistic understanding of sebaceous gland cells growth and differentiation has lagged behind that for keratinocytes, partly because of a lack of an in vitro model that can be used for experimental manipulation. Methods We have developed an in vitro culture model to isolate and grow primary human sebocytes without transformation that display functional characteristics of sebocytes. We used this novel method to probe the effect of Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) signaling on sebocyte differentiation, by examining the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis upon treatment with TGFβ1. We also repressed TGFβ signaling through knockdown of the TGFβ Receptor II to address if the effect of TGFβ activation is mediated via canonical Smad signal transduction. Results We find that activation of the TGFβ signaling pathway is necessary and sufficient for maintaining sebocytes in an undifferentiated state. The presence of TGFβ ligand triggered decreased expression in genes required for the production of characteristics sebaceous lipids and for sebocyte differentiation such as FADS2 and PPARγ, thereby decreasing lipid accumulation through the TGFβ RII-Smad2 dependent pathway. Conclusion TGFβ signaling plays an essential role in sebaceous gland regulation by maintaining sebocytes in an undifferentiated state. This data was generated using a novel method for human sebocyte culture, which is likely to prove generally useful in investigations of sebaceous gland growth and differentiation. These findings open a new paradigm in human skin biology with important implications for skin therapies. PMID:23343495

  11. Lysophospholipid receptors: signalling, pharmacology and regulation by lysophospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Jakobs, Karl H

    2007-04-01

    The lysophospholipids, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), activate diverse groups of G-protein-coupled receptors that are widely expressed and regulate decisive cellular functions. Receptors of the endothelial differentiation gene family are activated by S1P (S1P(1-5)) or LPA (LPA(1-3)); two more distantly related receptors are activated by LPA (LPA(4/5)); the GPR(3/6/12) receptors have a high constitutive activity but are further activated by S1P and/or SPC; and receptors of the OGR1 cluster (OGR1, GPR4, G2A, TDAG8) appear to be activated by SPC, LPC, psychosine and/or protons. G-protein-coupled lysophospholipid receptors regulate cellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis and the cytoskeleton, proliferation and survival, migration and adhesion. They have been implicated in development, regulation of the cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems, inflammation, arteriosclerosis and cancer. The availability of S1P and LPA at their G-protein-coupled receptors is regulated by enzymes that generate or metabolize these lysophospholipids, and localization plays an important role in this process. Besides FTY720, which is phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase-2 and then acts on four of the five S1P receptors of the endothelial differentiation gene family, other compounds have been identified that interact with more ore less selectivity with lysophospholipid receptors.

  12. Regulation of hormone metabolism in Arabidopsis seeds: phytochrome regulation of abscisic acid metabolism and abscisic acid regulation of gibberellin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mitsunori; Hanada, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Endo, Akira; Okamoto, Masanori; Yamauchi, Yukika; North, Helen; Marion-Poll, Annie; Sun, Tai-Ping; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Nambara, Eiji

    2006-11-01

    In a wide range of plant species, seed germination is regulated antagonistically by two plant hormones, abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA). In the present study, we have revealed that ABA metabolism (both biosynthesis and inactivation) was phytochrome-regulated in an opposite fashion to GA metabolism during photoreversible seed germination in Arabidopsis. Endogenous ABA levels were decreased by irradiation with a red (R) light pulse in dark-imbibed seeds pre-treated with a far-red (FR) light pulse, and the reduction in ABA levels in response to R light was inhibited in a phytochrome B (PHYB)-deficient mutant. Expression of an ABA biosynthesis gene, AtNCED6, and the inactivation gene, CYP707A2, was regulated in a photoreversible manner, suggesting a key role for the genes in PHYB-mediated regulation of ABA metabolism. Abscisic acid-deficient mutants such as nced6-1, aba2-2 and aao3-4 exhibited an enhanced ability to germinate relative to wild type when imbibed in the dark after irradiation with an FR light pulse. In addition, the ability to synthesize GA was improved in the aba2-2 mutant compared with wild type during dark-imbibition after an FR light pulse. Activation of GA biosynthesis in the aba2-2 mutant was also observed during seed development. These data indicate that ABA is involved in the suppression of GA biosynthesis in both imbibed and developing seeds. Spatial expression patterns of the AtABA2 and AAO3 genes, responsible for last two steps of ABA biosynthesis, were distinct from that of the GA biosynthesis gene, AtGA3ox2, in both imbibed and developing seeds, suggesting that biosynthesis of ABA and GA in seeds occurs in different cell types.

  13. GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS (GIS) is required for trichome branching through gibberellic acid signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    An, Lijun; Zhou, Zhongjing; Su, Sha; Yan, An; Gan, Yinbo

    2012-02-01

    Cell differentiation generally corresponds to the cell cycle, typically forming a non-dividing cell with a unique differentiated morphology, and Arabidopsis trichome is an excellent model system to study all aspects of cell differentiation. Although gibberellic acid is reported to be involved in trichome branching in Arabidopsis, the mechanism for such signaling is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS (GIS) is required for the control of trichome branching through gibberellic acid signaling. The phenotypes of a loss-of-function gis mutant and an overexpressor showed that GIS acted as a repressor to control trichome branching. Our results also show that GIS is not required for cell endoreduplication, and our molecular and genetic study results have shown that GIS functions downstream of the key regulator of trichome branching, STICHEL (STI), to control trichome branching through the endoreduplication-independent pathway. Furthermore, our results also suggest that GIS controls trichome branching in Arabidopsis through two different pathways and acts either upstream or downstream of the negative regulator of gibbellic acid signaling SPINDLY (SPY).

  14. Promoter nucleosome dynamics regulated by signalling through the CTD code

    PubMed Central

    Materne, Philippe; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Soriano, Ignacio; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Hidalgo, Elena; Mignion, Carole; Quintales, Luis; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in delineating transcribed regions within chromatin by recruiting histone methylases and deacetylases. Using genome-wide nucleosome mapping, we show that CTD S2 phosphorylation controls nucleosome dynamics in the promoter of a subset of 324 genes, including the regulators of cell differentiation ste11 and metabolic adaptation inv1. Mechanistic studies on these genes indicate that during gene activation a local increase of phospho-S2 CTD nearby the promoter impairs the phospho-S5 CTD-dependent recruitment of Set1 and the subsequent recruitment of specific HDACs, which leads to nucleosome depletion and efficient transcription. The early increase of phospho-S2 results from the phosphorylation of the CTD S2 kinase Lsk1 by MAP kinase in response to cellular signalling. The artificial tethering of the Lsk1 kinase at the ste11 promoter is sufficient to activate transcription. Therefore, signalling through the CTD code regulates promoter nucleosomes dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09008.001 PMID:26098123

  15. Bidirectional Ca2+ signaling occurs between the endoplasmic reticulum and acidic organelles

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lianne C.; Wagner, Siegfried K.T.Y.; Lewis, Alexander M.; Parrington, John; Churchill, Grant C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and acidic organelles (endo-lysosomes) act as separate Ca2+ stores that release Ca2+ in response to the second messengers IP3 and cADPR (ER) or NAADP (acidic organelles). Typically, trigger Ca2+ released from acidic organelles by NAADP subsequently recruits IP3 or ryanodine receptors on the ER, an anterograde signal important for amplification and Ca2+ oscillations/waves. We therefore investigated whether the ER can signal back to acidic organelles, using organelle pH as a reporter of NAADP action. We show that Ca2+ released from the ER can activate the NAADP pathway in two ways: first, by stimulating Ca2+-dependent NAADP synthesis; second, by activating NAADP-regulated channels. Moreover, the differential effects of EGTA and BAPTA (slow and fast Ca2+ chelators, respectively) suggest that the acidic organelles are preferentially activated by local microdomains of high Ca2+ at junctions between the ER and acidic organelles. Bidirectional organelle communication may have wider implications for endo-lysosomal function as well as the generation of Ca2+ oscillations and waves. PMID:23479744

  16. Reconstruction of signaling networks regulating fungal morphogenesis by transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Vera; Arentshorst, Mark; Flitter, Simon J; Nitsche, Benjamin M; Kwon, Min Jin; Reynaga-Peña, Cristina G; Bartnicki-Garcia, Salomon; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2009-11-01

    Coordinated control of hyphal elongation and branching is essential for sustaining mycelial growth of filamentous fungi. In order to study the molecular machinery ensuring polarity control in the industrial fungus Aspergillus niger, we took advantage of the temperature-sensitive (ts) apical-branching ramosa-1 mutant. We show here that this strain serves as an excellent model system to study critical steps of polar growth control during mycelial development and report for the first time a transcriptomic fingerprint of apical branching for a filamentous fungus. This fingerprint indicates that several signal transduction pathways, including TORC2, phospholipid, calcium, and cell wall integrity signaling, concertedly act to control apical branching. We furthermore identified the genetic locus affected in the ramosa-1 mutant by complementation of the ts phenotype. Sequence analyses demonstrated that a single amino acid exchange in the RmsA protein is responsible for induced apical branching of the ramosa-1 mutant. Deletion experiments showed that the corresponding rmsA gene is essential for the growth of A. niger, and complementation analyses with Saccharomyces cerevisiae evidenced that RmsA serves as a functional equivalent of the TORC2 component Avo1p. TORC2 signaling is required for actin polarization and cell wall integrity in S. cerevisiae. Congruently, our microscopic investigations showed that polarized actin organization and chitin deposition are disturbed in the ramosa-1 mutant. The integration of the transcriptomic, genetic, and phenotypic data obtained in this study allowed us to reconstruct a model for cellular events involved in apical branching.

  17. Insulin signaling and the regulation of insect diapause

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Cheolho; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    A rich chapter in the history of insect endocrinology has focused on hormonal control of diapause, especially the major roles played by juvenile hormones (JHs), ecdysteroids, and the neuropeptides that govern JH and ecdysteroid synthesis. More recently, experiments with adult diapause in Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Culex pipiens, and pupal diapause in the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis provide strong evidence that insulin signaling is also an important component of the regulatory pathway leading to the diapause phenotype. Insects produce many different insulin-like peptides (ILPs), and not all are involved in the diapause response; ILP-1 appears to be the one most closely linked to diapause in C. pipiens. Many steps in the pathway leading from perception of daylength (the primary environmental cue used to program diapause) to generation of the diapause phenotype remain unknown, but the role for insulin signaling in mosquito diapause appears to be upstream of JH, as evidenced by the fact that application of exogenous JH can rescue the effects of knocking down expression of ILP-1 or the Insulin Receptor. Fat accumulation, enhancement of stress tolerance, and other features of the diapause phenotype are likely linked to the insulin pathway through the action of a key transcription factor, FOXO. This review highlights many parallels for the role of insulin signaling as a regulator in insect diapause and dauer formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:23885240

  18. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    PubMed Central

    van Faassen, Ernst E.; Bahrami, Soheyl; Feelisch, Martin; Hogg, Neil; Kelm, Malte; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Kozlov, Andrey V.; Li, Haitao; Lundberg, Jon O.; Mason, Ron; Nohl, Hans; Rassaf, Tienush; Samouilov, Alexandre; Slama-Schwok, Anny; Shiva, Sruti; Vanin, Anatoly F.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Zweier, Jay; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the physiological effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade was thought to be irreversible under physiological conditions. However, a growing body of experimental observations attests that the presence of endogenous nitrite regulates a number of signaling events along the physiological and pathophysiological oxygen gradient. Hypoxic signaling events include vasodilation, modulation of mitochondrial respiration, and cytoprotection following ischemic insult. These phenomena are attributed to the reduction of nitrite anions to nitric oxide if local oxygen levels in tissues decrease. Recent research identified a growing list of enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for this endogenous reduction of nitrite. Additional direct signaling events not involving free nitric oxide are proposed. We here discuss the mechanisms and properties of these various pathways and the role played by the local concentration of free oxygen in the affected tissue. PMID:19219851

  19. [Structural Life Science towards the Regulation of Selective GPCR Signaling].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors in the human genome. They are involved in many diseases and also the target of approximately 30% of all modern medicinal drugs. GPCRs respond to a broad spectrum of chemical entities, ranging from photons, protons, and calcium ions to small organic molecules (including odorants and neurotransmitters), peptides, and glycoproteins. Many GPCRs are members of closely related subfamilies that respond to the same hormone or neurotransmitter. However, they have different physiologic functions based on the cells in which they are expressed and the different signaling pathways that they exploit (e.g., coupling through heterotrimeric G-proteins such as Gs, Gi, and Gq, as well as β-arrestins). Antibody fragments including Fab and Fv can effectively stabilize and crystallize membrane proteins. However, using the mouse hybridoma technology it has been difficult to develop monoclonal antibodies that can recognize conformational epitopes of native GPCRs. We have recently succeeded in developing antibodies against native GPCRs using this technology in combination with our improved immunization and screening methods. In this symposium review, I present a successful example of prostaglandin E2 receptor (one of the GPCRs) crystallization using antibody fragments. To avoid several adverse effects of current therapeutics, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanism of GPCR signaling in a monomeric, dimeric, or oligomeric state. Also, we are interested in selectively regulating GPCR signaling via functional antibodies developed using our methods and/or the designed small organic molecules depending on the GPCR structure.

  20. praja2 regulates KSR1 stability and mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, L; Delle Donne, R; Sepe, M; Porpora, M; Garbi, C; Chiuso, F; Gallo, A; Parisi, S; Russo, L; Bachmann, V; Huber, R G; Stefan, E; Russo, T; Feliciello, A

    2016-01-01

    The kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) has a fundamental role in mitogenic signaling by scaffolding components of the Ras/MAP kinase pathway. In response to Ras activation, KSR1 assembles a tripartite kinase complex that optimally transfers signals generated at the cell membrane to activate ERK. We describe a novel mechanism of ERK attenuation based on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of KSR1. Stimulation of membrane receptors by hormones or growth factors induced KSR1 polyubiquitination, which paralleled a decline of ERK1/2 signaling. We identified praja2 as the E3 ligase that ubiquitylates KSR1. We showed that praja2-dependent regulation of KSR1 is involved in the growth of cancer cells and in the maintenance of undifferentiated pluripotent state in mouse embryonic stem cells. The dynamic interplay between the ubiquitin system and the kinase scaffold of the Ras pathway shapes the activation profile of the mitogenic cascade. By controlling KSR1 levels, praja2 directly affects compartmentalized ERK activities, impacting on physiological events required for cell proliferation and maintenance of embryonic stem cell pluripotency. PMID:27195677

  1. Nontranscriptional regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling by IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inhwa; Yang, Jungmin; Hong, Sujeong; Lee, Eun Ju; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Fernandes-Alnemri, Teresa; Alnemri, Emad S; Yu, Je-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Th2 cytokine IL-4 has been previously shown to suppress the production of proinflammatory cytokines in monocytes. However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which IL-4 signaling antagonizes proinflammatory responses is poorly characterized. In particular, whether IL-4 can modulate inflammasome signaling is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that IL-4 suppresses NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation and the subsequent IL-1β secretion but does not inhibit AIM2- or NLRC4-dependent caspase-1 activation in THP-1 and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Upon LPS or LPS/ATP stimulation, IL-4 markedly inhibited the assembly of NLRP3 inflammasome, including NLRP3-dependent ASC oligomerization, NLRP3-ASC interaction, and NLRP3 speck-like oligomeric structure formation. The negative regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome by IL-4 was not due to the impaired mRNA or protein production of NLRP3 and proinflammatory cytokines. Supporting this observation, IL-4 attenuated NLRP3 inflammasome activation even in reconstituted NLRP3-expressing macrophages in which NLRP3 expression is not transcriptionally regulated by TLR-NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, the IL-4-mediated suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome was independent of STAT6-dependent transcription and mitochondrial ROS. Instead, IL-4 inhibited subcellular redistribution of NLRP3 into mitochondria and microtubule polymerization upon NLRP3-activating stimulation. Our results collectively suggest that IL-4 could suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a transcription-independent manner, thus providing an endogenous regulatory machinery to prevent excessive inflammasome activation. PMID:25601272

  2. The sweet side of AMPK signaling: regulation of GFAT1.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Oakhill, Jonathan S

    2017-03-23

    Maintaining a steady balance between nutrient supply and energy demand is essential for all living organisms and is achieved through the dynamic control of metabolic processes that produce and consume adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), the universal currency of energy in all cells. A key sensor of cellular energy is the adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is the core component of a signaling network that regulates energy and nutrient metabolism. AMPK is activated by metabolic stresses that decrease cellular ATP, and functions to restore energy balance by orchestrating a switch in metabolism away from anabolic pathways toward energy-generating catabolic processes. A new study published in a recent issue of Biochemical Journal by Zibrova et al. shows that glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase-1 (GFAT1), the rate-limiting enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), is a physiological substrate of AMPK. The HBP is an offshoot of the glycolytic pathway that drives the synthesis of uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine, the requisite donor metabolite needed for dynamic β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of cellular proteins. O-GlcNAcylation is a nutrient-sensitive post-translational modification that, like phosphorylation, regulates numerous intracellular processes. Zibrova et al. show that inhibitory phosphorylation of the GFAT1 residue Ser243 by AMPK in response to physiological or small-molecule activators leads to a reduction in cellular protein O-GlcNAcylation. Further work revealed that AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of GFAT1 promotes angiogenesis in endothelial cells. This elegant study demonstrates that the AMPK-GFAT1 signaling axis serves as an important communication point between two nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways and is likely to play a significant role in controlling physiological processes in many other tissues.

  3. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Devanna, Paolo; Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-01-01

    FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells. PMID:25309332

  4. Non-Canonical Role of IKKα in the Regulation of STAT1 Phosphorylation in Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Shiba, Yuko; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Non-self RNA is recognized by retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), inducing type I interferons (IFNs). Type I IFN promotes the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which requires the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1). We previously reported that dsRNA induced STAT1 phosphorylation via a type I IFN-independent pathway in addition to the well-known type I IFN-dependent pathway. IκB kinase α (IKKα) is involved in antiviral signaling induced by dsRNA; however, its role is incompletely understood. Here, we explored the function of IKKα in RLR-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation. Silencing of IKKα markedly decreased the level of IFN-β and STAT1 phosphorylation inHeH response to dsRNA. However, the inhibition of IKKα did not alter the RLR signaling-mediated dimerization of interferon responsive factor 3 (IRF3) or the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB). These results suggest a non-canonical role of IKKα in RLR signaling. Furthermore, phosphorylation of STAT1 was suppressed by IKKα knockdown in cells treated with a specific neutralizing antibody for the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) and in IFNAR-deficient cells. Collectively, the dual regulation of STAT1 by IKKα in antiviral signaling suggests a role for IKKα in the fine-tuning of antiviral signaling in response to non-self RNA. PMID:27992555

  5. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) can inhibit deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis via modulation of EGFR/Raf-1/ERK signaling in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunok; Martinez, Jesse D

    2004-02-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, is known as a cytoprotective agent. UDCA prevents apoptosis induced by a variety of stress stimuli including cytotoxic bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA). Here we examined the molecular mechanism by which UDCA can antagonize DCA-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells. UDCA pretreatment decreases the number of apoptotic cells caused by exposure to DCA and UDCA. Further studies of the signaling pathway showed that UDCA pretreatment suppressed DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 and this was accompanied by downregulation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Raf-1 kinase activities stimulated by exposure to DCA. DCA was also found to activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity and UDCA inhibited this. Collectively, these findings suggest that the inhibitory effect of UDCA in DCA-induced apoptosis is partly mediated by modulation of EGFR/Raf-1/ERK signaling.

  6. A divergent canonical WNT-signaling pathway regulates microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Krylova, Olga; Smalley, Matthew J.; Dale, Trevor C.; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2004-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) is associated with axonal microtubules and regulates microtubule stability through the inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In the canonical WNT pathway, the negative regulator Axin forms a complex with β-catenin and GSK-3β, resulting in β-catenin degradation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by DVL increases β-catenin stability and TCF transcriptional activation. Here, we show that Axin associates with microtubules and unexpectedly stabilizes microtubules through DVL. In turn, DVL stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting GSK-3β through a transcription- and β-catenin–independent pathway. More importantly, axonal microtubules are stabilized after DVL localizes to axons. Increased microtubule stability is correlated with a decrease in GSK-3β–mediated phosphorylation of MAP-1B. We propose a model in which Axin, through DVL, stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting a pool of GSK-3β, resulting in local changes in the phosphorylation of cellular targets. Our data indicate a bifurcation in the so-called canonical WNT-signaling pathway to regulate microtubule stability. PMID:14734535

  7. Regulation of ERBB3/HER3 signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Huang, Zhao; Zhang, Ningyan; An, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    ERBB3/HER3 is emerging as a molecular target for various cancers. HER3 is overexpressed and activated in a number of cancer types under the conditions of acquired resistance to other HER family therapeutic interventions such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antibody therapies. Regulation of the HER3 expression and signaling involves numerous HER3 interacting proteins. These proteins include PI3K, Shc, and E3 ubiquitin ligases NEDD4 and Nrdp1. Furthermore, recent identification of a number of HER3 oncogenic mutations in colon and gastric cancers elucidate the role of HER3 in cancer development. Despite the strong evidence regarding the role of HER3 in cancer, the current understanding of the regulation of HER3 expression and activation requires additional research. Moreover, the lack of biomarkers for HER3-driven cancer poses a big challenge for the clinical development of HER3 targeting antibodies. Therefore, a better understanding of HER3 regulation should improve the strategies to therapeutically target HER3 for cancer therapy. PMID:25400118

  8. Structure-Function of CD36 and Importance of Fatty Acid Signal Transduction in Fat Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Kuda, Ondrej; Samovski, Dmitri; Abumrad, Nada A

    2015-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor that functions in high affinity tissue uptake of long chain fatty acids (FA) and contributes under excessive fat supply to lipid accumulation and metabolic dysfunction. This review describes recent evidence regarding the CD36 FA binding site and a potential mechanism for FA transfer. It also presents the view that CD36 and FA signaling coordinate fat utilization based on newly identified CD36 actions that involve oral fat perception, intestinal fat absorption, secretion of the peptides cholecystokinin and secretin, regulation of hepatic lipoprotein output, activation of beta oxidation by muscle and regulation of the production of the FA derived bioactive eicosanoids. Thus abnormalities of fat metabolism and the associated pathology might involve dysfunction of CD36-mediated signal transduction in addition to the changes of FA uptake. PMID:24850384

  9. Regulation of Arabidopsis defense responses against Spodoptera littoralis by CPK-mediated calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant Ca2+ signals are involved in a wide array of intracellular signaling pathways after pest invasion. Ca2+-binding sensory proteins such as Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) have been predicted to mediate the signaling following Ca2+ influx after insect herbivory. However, until now this prediction was not testable. Results To investigate the roles CPKs play in a herbivore response-signaling pathway, we screened the characteristics of Arabidopsis CPK mutants damaged by a feeding generalist herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis. Following insect attack, the cpk3 and cpk13 mutants showed lower transcript levels of plant defensin gene PDF1.2 compared to wild-type plants. The CPK cascade was not directly linked to the herbivory-induced signaling pathways that were mediated by defense-related phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and ethylene. CPK3 was also suggested to be involved in a negative feedback regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ levels after herbivory and wounding damage. In vitro kinase assays of CPK3 protein with a suite of substrates demonstrated that the protein phosphorylates transcription factors (including ERF1, HsfB2a and CZF1/ZFAR1) in the presence of Ca2+. CPK13 strongly phosphorylated only HsfB2a, irrespective of the presence of Ca2+. Furthermore, in vivo agroinfiltration assays showed that CPK3-or CPK13-derived phosphorylation of a heat shock factor (HsfB2a) promotes PDF1.2 transcriptional activation in the defense response. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of two Arabidopsis CPKs (CPK3 and CPK13) in the herbivory-induced signaling network via HsfB2a-mediated regulation of the defense-related transcriptional machinery. This cascade is not involved in the phytohormone-related signaling pathways, but rather directly impacts transcription factors for defense responses. PMID:20504319

  10. Tannic acid modulates NFκB signaling pathway and skin inflammation in NC/Nga mice through PPARγ expression.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Masahiko; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Polyphenolic compound tannic acid, which is mainly found in grapes and green tea, is a potent antioxidant with anticarcinogenic activities. In this present study, we hypothesized that tannic acid could inhibit nuclear factor (NF)κB signaling and inflammation in atopic dermatitis (AD) NC/Nga mice. We have analyzed the effects of tannic acid on dermatitis severity, histopathology and expression of inflammatory signaling proteins in house dust mite extract induced AD mouse skin. In addition, serum levels of T helper (Th) cytokines (interferon (IFN)γ, interleukin (IL)-4) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with tannic acid ameliorated the development of AD-like clinical symptoms and effectively inhibited hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, acanthosis, mast cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the AD mouse skin. Serum levels of IFNγ and IL-4 were significantly down-regulated by tannic acid. Furthermore, tannic acid treatment inhibited DfE induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, high mobility group protein (HMG)B1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, NFκB, cyclooxygenase (COX)2, IL-1β and increased the protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, DfE induced skin inflammation might be mediated through NFκB signaling and tannic acid may be a potential therapeutic agent for AD, which may possibly act via induction of PPARγ protein.

  11. Regulation of mTOR by mechanically induced signaling events in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Troy Alan; Sukhija, Kunal Balu; Chien, Shu

    2006-07-01

    Mechanical stimuli play a major role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass contributes significantly to disease prevention and the quality of life. Although a link between mechanical stimuli and the regulation of muscle mass has been recognized for decades, the mechanisms involved in converting mechanical information into the molecular events that control this process have not been defined. Nevertheless, significant advancements are being made in this field, and it has recently been established that signaling through a rapamycin-sensitive pathway is necessary for mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. Since rapamycin is a highly specific inhibitor of a protein kinase called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), many investigators have concluded that mTOR signaling is necessary for the mechanically induced growth of skeletal muscle. In this review, we have summarized the current knowledge regarding how mechanical stimuli activate mTOR signaling, discussed the newly discovered role of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this pathway, and considered the potential roles of PLD and PA in the mechanical regulation of skeletal muscle mass.

  12. Regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis by branched-chain amino acids in Enterobacter cloacae UW5.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Cassandra V; Harris, Danielle M M; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-09-01

    The soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae UW5 produces the rhizosphere signaling molecule indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) via the indolepyruvate pathway. Expression of indolepyruvate decarboxylase, a key pathway enzyme encoded by ipdC, is upregulated by the transcription factor TyrR in response to aromatic amino acids. Some members of the TyrR regulon may also be controlled by branched-chain amino acids and here we show that expression from the ipdC promoter and production of IAA are downregulated by valine, leucine and isoleucine. Regulation of the IAA synthesis pathway by both aromatic and branched-chain amino acids suggests a broader role for this pathway in bacterial physiology, beyond plant interactions.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  14. Abscisic Acid: a versatile phytohormone in plant signaling and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Vives, Vicente; Zandalinas, Sara I; Manzi, Matias; Sanchez-Perez, Ana M; Perez-Clemente, Rosa M; Arbona, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants cannot escape from adverse conditions and, therefore, they have developed complex responses to the changing environment. Plant responses to abiotic cues involve changes in metabolism, photosynthesis, gene expression, ion levels, etc., and must be perfectly coordinated by phytohormones. The abscisic acid (ABA) is the main phytohormone involved in abiotic stress responses although it is nowadays clear that its signaling pathways are not isolated but interconnected with other hormone signals in complex networks. This article revises molecular mechanisms involved in the crosstalks of ABA with other phytohormones in response to different physiological processes. Moreover, ABA is not a molecule exclusive from plants but it can be found in many other organisms including bacteria, algae, fungi, animals, etc. Interestingly, it can be synthesized and secreted by a variety of human cells. These aspects that confer to the ABA a range of ubiquitous molecule will be also revised in this article.

  15. Necrotrophic pathogens use the salicylic acid signaling pathway to promote disease development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Taha Abd El; Oirdi, Mohamed El; Gonzalez-Lamothe, Rocio; Bouarab, Kamal

    2012-12-01

    Plants use different immune pathways to combat pathogens. The activation of the jasmonic acid (JA)-signaling pathway is required for resistance against necrotrophic pathogens; however, to combat biotrophic pathogens, the plants activate mainly the salicylic acid (SA)-signaling pathway. SA can antagonize JA signaling and vice versa. NPR1 (noninducible pathogenesis-related 1) is considered a master regulator of SA signaling. NPR1 interacts with TGA transcription factors, ultimately leading to the activation of SA-dependent responses. SA has been shown to promote disease development caused by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea through NPR1, by suppressing the expression of two JA-dependent defense genes, proteinase inhibitors I and II. We show here that the transcription factor TGA1.a contributes to disease development caused by B. cinerea in tomato by suppressing the expression of proteinase inhibitors I and II. Finally, we present evidence that the SA-signaling pathway contributes to disease development caused by another necrotrophic pathogen, Alternaria solani, in tomato. Disease development promoted by SA through NPR1 requires the TGA1.a transcription factor. These data highlight how necrotrophs manipulate the SAsignaling pathway to promote their disease in tomato.

  16. Retinoic acid signaling and the evolution of chordates.

    PubMed

    Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Holland, Linda Z; Laudet, Vincent; Schubert, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In chordates, which comprise urochordates, cephalochordates and vertebrates, the vitamin A-derived morphogen retinoic acid (RA) has a pivotal role during development. Altering levels of endogenous RA signaling during early embryology leads to severe malformations, mainly due to incorrect positional codes specifying the embryonic anteroposterior body axis. In this review, we present our current understanding of the RA signaling pathway and its roles during chordate development. In particular, we focus on the conserved roles of RA and its downstream mediators, the Hox genes, in conveying positional patterning information to different embryonic tissues, such as the endoderm and the central nervous system. We find that some of the control mechanisms governing RA-mediated patterning are well conserved between vertebrates and invertebrate chordates, such as the cephalochordate amphioxus. In contrast, outside the chordates, evidence for roles of RA signaling is scarce and the evolutionary origin of the RA pathway itself thus remains elusive. In sum, to fully understand the evolutionary history of the RA pathway, future research should focus on identification and study of components of the RA signaling cascade in non-chordate deuterostomes (such as hemichordates and echinoderms) and other invertebrates, such as insects, mollusks and cnidarians.

  17. [COX-2 regulation of prostaglandins in synaptic signaling].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-Wei

    2009-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a rate-limiting enzyme converting arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs), which is a key messenger in traumatic brain injury- and ischemia-induced neuronal damage and in neuroinflammation. COX-2 is implicated in the pathogeneses of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence implies that the contribution of COX-2 to neuropathology is associated with its involvement in synaptic alteration. Elevation or inhibition of COX-2 has been shown to enhance or suppress excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). These events are mainly mediated via PGE2, the predominant reaction product of COX-2, and the PGE2 subtype 2 receptor (EP2). Thus, elucidation of COX-2 in synaptic signaling may provide a mechanistic basis for designing new drugs aimed at preventing, treating or alleviating neuroinflammation-associated neurological disorders.

  18. period-Regulated Feeding Behavior and TOR Signaling Modulate Survival of Infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Victoria W; O'Connor, Reed M; Ulgherait, Matthew; Zhou, Clarice G; Stone, Elizabeth F; Hill, Vanessa M; Murphy, Keith R; Canman, Julie C; Ja, William W; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi M

    2016-01-25

    Most metazoans undergo dynamic, circadian-regulated changes in behavior and physiology. Currently, it is unknown how circadian-regulated behavior impacts immunity against infection. Two broad categories of defense against bacterial infection are resistance, control of microbial growth, and tolerance, control of the pathogenic effects of infection. Our study of behaviorally arrhythmic Drosophila circadian period mutants identified a novel link between nutrient intake and tolerance of infection with B. cepacia, a bacterial pathogen of rising importance in hospital-acquired infections. We found that infection tolerance in wild-type animals is stimulated by acute exposure to dietary glucose and amino acids. Glucose-stimulated tolerance was induced by feeding or direct injection; injections revealed a narrow window for glucose-stimulated tolerance. In contrast, amino acids stimulated tolerance only when ingested. We investigated the role of a known amino-acid-sensing pathway, the TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway, in immunity. TORC1 is circadian regulated and inhibition of TORC1 decreased resistance, as in vertebrates. Surprisingly, inhibition of the less well-characterized TOR complex 2 (TORC2) dramatically increased survival, through both resistance and tolerance mechanisms. This work suggests that dietary intake on the day of infection by B. cepacia can make a significant difference in long-term survival. We further demonstrate that TOR signaling mediates both resistance and tolerance of infection and identify TORC2 as a novel potential therapeutic target for increasing survival of infection.

  19. Period-regulated feeding behavior and TOR signaling modulate survival of infection

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Victoria W.; O’Connor, Reed M.; Ulgherait, Matt; Zhou, Clarice G.; Stone, Elizabeth F.; Hill, Vanessa M.; Murphy, Keith R.; Canman, Julie C.; Ja, William W.; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Most metazoans undergo dynamic, circadian-regulated changes in behavior and physiology. Currently it is unknown how circadian-regulated behavior impacts immunity against infection. Two broad categories of defense against bacterial infection are resistance, control of microbial growth, and tolerance, control of the pathogenic effects of infection. Our study of behaviorally arrhythmic Drosophila circadian Period mutants identified a novel link between nutrient intake and tolerance of infection with B. cepacia, a bacterial pathogen of rising importance in hospital-acquired infections. We found that infection tolerance in wild-type animals is stimulated by acute exposure to dietary glucose and amino acids. Glucose-stimulated tolerance was induced by feeding or direct injection; injections revealed a narrow window for glucose-stimulated tolerance. In contrast, amino acids stimulated tolerance only when ingested. We investigated the role of a known amino acid-sensing pathway, the TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway, in immunity. TORC1 is circadian-regulated and inhibition of TORC1 decreased resistance, as in vertebrates. Surprisingly, inhibition of the less well-characterized TOR complex 2 (TORC2) dramatically increased survival, through both resistance and tolerance mechanisms. This work suggests that dietary intake on the day of infection by B. cepacia can make a significant difference in long-term survival. We further demonstrate that TOR signaling mediates both resistance and tolerance of infection and identify TORC2 as a novel potential therapeutic target for increasing survival of infection. PMID:26748856

  20. Dissection of the cis-2-decenoic acid signaling network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using microarray technique

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani-Badi, Azadeh; Sepehr, Shayesteh; Fallahi, Hossein; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use quorum-sensing (QS) signaling to regulate the expression of factors contributing to virulence and persistence. Bacteria produce signals of different chemical classes. The signal molecule, known as diffusible signal factor (DSF), is a cis-unsaturated fatty acid that was first described in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris. Previous works have shown that human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also synthesizes a structurally related molecule, characterized as cis-2-decenoic acid (C10: Δ2, CDA) that induces biofilm dispersal by multiple types of bacteria. Furthermore, CDA has been shown to be involved in inter-kingdom signaling that modulates fungal behavior. Therefore, an understanding of its signaling mechanism could suggest strategies for interference, with consequences for disease control. To identify the components of CDA signaling pathway in this pathogen, a comparative transcritpome analysis was conducted, in the presence and absence of CDA. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for differentially expressed (DE) genes with known function was then constructed by STRING and Cytoscape. In addition, the effects of CDA in combination with antimicrobial agents on the biofilm surface area and bacteria viability were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and digital image analysis. Microarray analysis identified 666 differentially expressed genes in the presence of CDA and gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that in P. aeruginosa, CDA mediates dispersion of biofilms through signaling pathways, including enhanced motility, metabolic activity, virulence as well as persistence at different temperatures. PPI data suggested that a cluster of five genes (PA4978, PA4979, PA4980, PA4982, PA4983) is involved in the CDA synthesis and perception. Combined treatments using both CDA and antimicrobial agents showed that following exposure of the biofilms to CDA, remaining cells on the surface were easily removed and killed by

  1. FAK signalling controls insulin sensitivity through regulation of adipocyte survival

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Cynthia T.; Shi, Sally Yu; Cai, Erica P.; Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Krishnamurthy, Mansa; Brunt, Jara J.; Schroer, Stephanie A.; Winer, Daniel A.; Woo, Minna

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a central role in integrin signalling, which regulates growth and survival of tumours. Here we show that FAK protein levels are increased in adipose tissue of insulin-resistant obese mice and humans. Disruption of adipocyte FAK in mice or in 3T3 L1 cells decreases adipocyte survival. Adipocyte-specific FAK knockout mice display impaired adipose tissue expansion and insulin resistance on prolonged metabolic stress from a high-fat diet or when crossed on an obese db/db or ob/ob genetic background. Treatment of these mice with a PPARγ agonist does not restore adiposity or improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, inhibition of apoptosis, either genetically or pharmacologically, attenuates adipocyte death, restores normal adiposity and improves insulin sensitivity. Together, these results demonstrate that FAK is required for adipocyte survival and maintenance of insulin sensitivity, particularly in the context of adipose tissue expansion as a result of caloric excess. PMID:28165007

  2. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  3. Regulation of organismal proteostasis by trans-cellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Porter, Robert S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge for metazoans is to ensure that different tissues each expressing distinctive proteomes are, nevertheless, well protected at an organismal level from proteotoxic stress. We have examined this and show that expression of endogenous metastable protein sensors in muscle cells induces a systemic stress response throughout multiple tissues of C. elegans. Suppression of misfolding in muscle cells can be achieved not only by enhanced expression of HSP90 in muscle cells, but as effective by elevated expression of HSP90 in intestine or neuronal cells. This cell-non-autonomous control of HSP90 expression relies upon transcriptional feedback between somatic tissues that is regulated by the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4. This trans-cellular chaperone signaling response maintains organismal proteostasis when challenged by a local tissue imbalance in folding and provides the basis for a novel form of organismal stress sensing surveillance. PMID:23746847

  4. Role of oxytocin signaling in the regulation of body weight.

    PubMed

    Blevins, James E; Ho, Jacqueline M

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are growing health concerns in the US and worldwide. In the US alone, more than two-thirds of the adult population is classified as either overweight or obese [1], highlighting the need to develop new, effective treatments for these conditions. Whereas the hormone oxytocin is well known for its peripheral effects on uterine contraction during parturition and milk ejection during lactation, release of oxytocin from somatodendrites and axonal terminals within the central nervous system (CNS) is implicated in both the formation of prosocial behaviors and in the control of energy balance. Recent findings demonstrate that chronic administration of oxytocin reduces food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) and genetically obese rodents with impaired or defective leptin signaling. Importantly, chronic systemic administration of oxytocin out to 6 weeks recapitulates the effects of central administration on body weight loss in DIO rodents at doses that do not result in the development of tolerance. Furthermore, these effects are coupled with induction of Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) in hindbrain areas (e.g. dorsal vagal complex (DVC)) linked to the control of meal size and forebrain areas (e.g. hypothalamus, amygdala) linked to the regulation of food intake and body weight. This review assesses the potential central and peripheral targets by which oxytocin may inhibit body weight gain, its regulation by anorexigenic and orexigenic signals, and its potential use as a therapy that can circumvent leptin resistance and reverse the behavioral and metabolic abnormalities associated with DIO and genetically obese models.

  5. Hedgehog signaling regulates gene expression in planarian glia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Irving E; Lapan, Sylvain W; Scimone, M Lucila; Clandinin, Thomas R; Reddien, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) development, but its role in CNS biology in other organisms is poorly characterized. In the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, hedgehog (hh) is expressed in medial cephalic ganglia neurons, suggesting a possible role in CNS maintenance or regeneration. We performed RNA sequencing of planarian brain tissue following RNAi of hh and patched (ptc), which encodes the Hh receptor. Two misregulated genes, intermediate filament-1 (if-1) and calamari (cali), were expressed in a previously unidentified non-neural CNS cell type. These cells expressed orthologs of astrocyte-associated genes involved in neurotransmitter uptake and metabolism, and extended processes enveloping regions of high synapse concentration. We propose that these cells are planarian glia. Planarian glia were distributed broadly, but only expressed if-1 and cali in the neuropil near hh+ neurons. Planarian glia and their regulation by Hedgehog signaling present a novel tractable system for dissection of glia biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16996.001 PMID:27612382

  6. Repair Injured Heart by Regulating Cardiac Regenerative Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Paul, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac regeneration is a homeostatic cardiogenic process by which the sections of malfunctioning adult cardiovascular tissues are repaired and renewed employing a combination of both cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, while high-quality regeneration can be performed in amphibians and zebrafish hearts, mammalian hearts do not respond in kind. Indeed, a long-term loss of proliferative capacity in mammalian adult cardiomyocytes in combination with dysregulated induction of tissue fibrosis impairs mammalian endogenous heart regenerative capacity, leading to deleterious cardiac remodeling at the end stage of heart failure. Interestingly, several studies have demonstrated that cardiomyocyte proliferation capacity is retained in mammals very soon after birth, and cardiac regeneration potential is correspondingly preserved in some preadolescent vertebrates after myocardial infarction. There is therefore great interest in uncovering the molecular mechanisms that may allow heart regeneration during adult stages. This review will summarize recent findings on cardiac regenerative regulatory mechanisms, especially with respect to extracellular signals and intracellular pathways that may provide novel therapeutics for heart diseases. Particularly, both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidences will be presented to highlight the functional role of these signaling cascades in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation, cardiomyocyte growth, and maturation, with special emphasis on their responses to heart tissue injury. PMID:27799944

  7. Bradyoxetin, a unique chemical signal involved in symbiotic gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, John; Carlson, Russell W.; York, William S.; Stacey, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic bacterium that nodulates soybean. Critical for the infection and establishment of this symbiosis are the bacterial nodulation genes (nod, nol, noe), which are induced in the presence of plant produced isoflavones. Transcription of the nodulation genes is also controlled in a population density-dependent fashion. Expression of the nod genes is maximal at low population densities, and decreases significantly at higher culture densities. Population density control of the nodulation genes involves NolA and NodD2, both of which function in tandem to repress nod gene expression. An extracellular secreted factor (CDF) is known to mediate this repression. Here, we report that CDF is a novel signaling molecule, designated bradyoxetin, different from other Gram-negative quorum signals. The proposed structure of bradyoxetin is 2-{4-[[4-(3-aminooxetan-2-yl)phenyl](imino)methyl]phenyl}oxetan-3-ylamine. Interestingly, expression of bradyoxetin is iron-regulated, and is maximally produced under iron-starved conditions. Consistent with this, expression of the nodulation genes occurred in an iron-dependent fashion. Addition of iron to B. japonicum cultures at high optical densities resulted in decreased bradyoxetin production, and a concomitant reduction in nolA expression. A corresponding increase in nodY–lacZ expression was observed with iron treatment. PMID:12393811

  8. CD147: regulator of hyaluronan signaling in invasiveness and chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Grass, G Daniel; Dai, Lu; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris; Toole, Bryan P

    2014-01-01

    Major determinants that influence negative outcome in cancer patients are the abilities of cancer cells to resist current therapies and to invade surrounding host tissue, consequently leading to local and metastatic dissemination. Hyaluronan (HA), a prominent constituent of the tumor microenvironment, not only provides structural support but also interacts with cell surface receptors, especially CD44, that influence cooperative signaling pathways leading to chemoresistance and invasiveness. CD147 (emmprin; basigin) is a member of the Ig superfamily that has also been strongly implicated in chemoresistance and invasiveness. CD147 both regulates HA synthesis and interacts with the HA receptors, CD44, and LYVE-1. Increased CD147 expression induces formation of multiprotein complexes containing CD44 (or LYVE-1) as well as members of the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase, receptor tyrosine kinase, ABC drug transporter, or monocarboxylate transporter families, which become assembled in specialized lipid raft domains along with CD147 itself. In each case, multivalent HA-receptor interactions are essential for formation or stabilization of the lipid raft complexes and for downstream signaling pathways or transporter activities that are driven by these complexes. We conclude that cooperativity between HA, HA receptors, and CD147 may be a major driver of the interconnected pathways of invasiveness and chemoresistance widely critical to malignancy.

  9. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  10. Integrin signalling regulates YAP and TAZ to control skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Vincent-Mistiaen, Zoé I.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Stone, Richard K.; Boeing, Stefan; Wculek, Stefanie K.; Cordero, Julia; Tan, Ee H.; Ridgway, Rachel; Brunton, Val G.; Sahai, Erik; Gerhardt, Holger; Behrens, Axel; Malanchi, Ilaria; Sansom, Owen J.; Thompson, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The skin is a squamous epithelium that is continuously renewed by a population of basal layer stem/progenitor cells and can heal wounds. Here, we show that the transcription regulators YAP and TAZ localise to the nucleus in the basal layer of skin and are elevated upon wound healing. Skin-specific deletion of both YAP and TAZ in adult mice slows proliferation of basal layer cells, leads to hair loss and impairs regeneration after wounding. Contact with the basal extracellular matrix and consequent integrin-Src signalling is a key determinant of the nuclear localisation of YAP/TAZ in basal layer cells and in skin tumours. Contact with the basement membrane is lost in differentiating daughter cells, where YAP and TAZ become mostly cytoplasmic. In other types of squamous epithelia and squamous cell carcinomas, a similar control mechanism is present. By contrast, columnar epithelia differentiate an apical domain that recruits CRB3, Merlin (also known as NF2), KIBRA (also known as WWC1) and SAV1 to induce Hippo signalling and retain YAP/TAZ in the cytoplasm despite contact with the basal layer extracellular matrix. When columnar epithelial tumours lose their apical domain and become invasive, YAP/TAZ becomes nuclear and tumour growth becomes sensitive to the Src inhibitor Dasatinib. PMID:26989177

  11. Ethylene Signaling Influences Light-Regulated Development in Pea.

    PubMed

    Weller, James L; Foo, Eloise M; Hecht, Valérie; Ridge, Stephen; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K; Reid, James B

    2015-09-01

    Plant responses to light involve a complex network of interactions among multiple plant hormones. In a screen for mutants showing altered photomorphogenesis under red light, we identified a mutant with dramatically enhanced leaf expansion and delayed petal senescence. We show that this mutant exhibits reduced sensitivity to ethylene and carries a nonsense mutation in the single pea (Pisum sativum) ortholog of the ethylene signaling gene ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2). Consistent with this observation, the ein2 mutation rescues the previously described effects of ethylene overproduction in mature phytochrome-deficient plants. In seedlings, ein2 confers a marked increase in leaf expansion under monochromatic red, far-red, or blue light, and interaction with phytochromeA, phytochromeB, and long1 mutants confirms that ein2 enhances both phytochrome- and cryptochrome-dependent responses in a LONG1-dependent manner. In contrast, minimal effects of ein2 on seedling development in darkness or high-irradiance white light show that ethylene is not limiting for development under these conditions. These results indicate that ethylene signaling constrains leaf expansion during deetiolation in pea and provide further evidence that down-regulation of ethylene production may be an important component mechanism in the broader control of photomorphogenic development by phytochrome and cryptochrome.

  12. Neuropeptide Regulation of Signaling and Behavior in the BNST

    PubMed Central

    Kash, Thomas L.; Pleil, Kristen E.; Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G.; Crowley, Nicole; Mazzone, Christopher; Sugam, Jonathan; Hardaway, J. Andrew; McElligott, Zoe A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical developments have transformed how neuroscientists can probe brain function. What was once thought to be difficult and perhaps impossible, stimulating a single set of long range inputs among many, is now relatively straight-forward using optogenetic approaches. This has provided an avalanche of data demonstrating causal roles for circuits in a variety of behaviors. However, despite the critical role that neuropeptide signaling plays in the regulation of behavior and physiology of the brain, there have been remarkably few studies demonstrating how peptide release is causally linked to behaviors. This is likely due to both the different time scale by which peptides act on and the modulatory nature of their actions. For example, while glutamate release can effectively transmit information between synapses in milliseconds, peptide release is potentially slower [See the excellent review by Van Den Pol on the time scales and mechanisms of release (van den Pol, 2012)] and it can only tune the existing signals via modulation. And while there have been some studies exploring mechanisms of release, it is still not as clearly known what is required for efficient peptide release. Furthermore, this analysis could be complicated by the fact that there are multiple peptides released, some of which may act in contrast. Despite these limitations, there are a number of groups making progress in this area. The goal of this review is to explore the role of peptide signaling in one specific structure, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, that has proven to be a fertile ground for peptide action. PMID:25475545

  13. Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases in salicylic acid-mediated plant immune signaling

    PubMed Central

    Furniss, James J.; Spoel, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Plant immune responses against biotrophic pathogens are regulated by the signaling hormone salicylic acid (SA). SA establishes immunity by regulating a variety of cellular processes, including programmed cell death (PCD) to isolate and kill invading pathogens, and development of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) which provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum resistance throughout the plant. Central to these processes is post-translational modification of SA-regulated signaling proteins by ubiquitination, i.e., the covalent addition of small ubiquitin proteins. Emerging evidence indicates SA-induced protein ubiquitination is largely orchestrated by Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which recruit specific substrates for ubiquitination using interchangeable adaptors. Ligation of ubiquitin chains interlinked at lysine 48 leads to substrate degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here we discuss how CRL-mediated degradation of both nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich repeat domain containing immune receptors and SA-induced transcription regulators are critical for functional PCD and SAR responses, respectively. By placing these recent findings in context of knowledge gained in other eukaryotic model species, we highlight potential alternative roles for processive ubiquitination in regulating the activity of SA-mediated immune responses. PMID:25821454

  14. Sensor–response regulator interactions in a cross-regulated signal transduction network

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Chen, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction involves phosphoryl transfer between a histidine kinase sensor and a response regulator effector. The nitrate-responsive two-component signal transduction systems in Escherichia coli represent a paradigm for a cross-regulation network, in which the paralogous sensor–response regulator pairs, NarX–NarL and NarQ–NarP, exhibit both cognate (e.g. NarX–NarL) and non-cognate (e.g. NarQ–NarL) interactions to control output. Here, we describe results from bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid (BACTH) analysis to examine sensor dimerization as well as interaction between sensor–response regulator cognate and non-cognate pairs. Although results from BACTH analysis indicated that the NarX and NarQ sensors interact with each other, results from intragenic complementation tests demonstrate that they do not form functional heterodimers. Additionally, intragenic complementation shows that both NarX and NarQ undergo intermolecular autophosphorylation, deviating from the previously reported correlation between DHp (dimerization and histidyl phosphotransfer) domain loop handedness and autophosphorylation mode. Results from BACTH analysis revealed robust interactions for the NarX–NarL, NarQ–NarL and NarQ–NarP pairs but a much weaker interaction for the NarX–NarP pair. This demonstrates that asymmetrical cross-regulation results from differential binding affinities between different sensor–regulator pairs. Finally, results indicate that the NarL effector (DNA-binding) domain inhibits NarX–NarL interaction. Missense substitutions at receiver domain residue Ser-80 enhanced NarX–NarL interaction, apparently by destabilizing the NarL receiver–effector domain interface. PMID:25873583

  15. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peizhen Rockwell, Cheryl E. Cui, Julia Yue Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  16. Structure, functional regulation and signaling properties of Rap2B

    PubMed Central

    QU, DEBAO; HUANG, HUI; DI, JIEHUI; GAO, KEYU; LU, ZHENG; ZHENG, JUNNIAN

    2016-01-01

    The Ras family small guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein Rap2B is is a member of the Ras oncogene family and a novel target of p53 that regulates the p53-mediated pro-survival function of cells. The Rap2B protein shares ~90% homology with Rap2A, and its sequence is 70% identical to other members of the Rap family such as RaplA and RaplB. As a result, Rap2B has been theorized to have similar signaling effectors to the GTPase-binding protein Rap, which mediates various biological functions, including the regulation of sterile 20/mitogen-activated proteins. Since its identification in the early 1990s, Rap2B has elicited a considerable interest. Numerous studies indicate that Rap2B exerts specific biological functions, including binding and stimulating phospholipase C-ε and interferon-γ. In addition, downregulation of Rap2B affects the growth of melanoma cells. The present review summarizes the possible effectors and biological functions of Rap2B. Increasing evidence clearly supports the association between Rap2B function and tumor development. Therefore, it is conceivable that anticancer drugs targeting Rap2B may be generated as novel therapies against cancer. PMID:27073477

  17. TLR signals posttranscriptionally regulate the cytokine trafficking mediator sortilin

    PubMed Central

    Yabe-Wada, Toshiki; Matsuba, Shintaro; Takeda, Kazuya; Sato, Tetsuya; Suyama, Mikita; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Takai, Toshiyuki; Shi, Haifeng; Philpott, Caroline C.; Nakamura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of cytokines is crucial for controlling the appropriate balance of inflammation. Here we report that the sorting receptor sortilin plays a key role in cytokine production. We observed interactions of sortilin with multiple cytokines including IFN-α, and sortilin depletion in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) led to a reduction of IFN-α secretion, suggesting a pivotal role of sortilin in the exocytic trafficking of IFN-α in pDCs. Moreover, sortilin mRNA was degraded posttranscriptionally upon stimulation with various TLR ligands. Poly-rC-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) recognized the C-rich element (CRE) in the 3′ UTR of sortilin mRNA, and depletion of PCBP1 enhanced the degradation of sortilin transcripts, suggesting that PCBP1 can act as a trans-acting factor to stabilize sortilin transcripts. The nucleotide-binding ability of PCBP1 was impaired by zinc ions and alterations of intracellular zinc affect sortilin expression. PCBP1 may therefore control the stability of sortilin transcripts by sensing intracellular zinc levels. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the posttranslational regulation of cytokine production through the posttranscriptional control of sortilin expression by TLR signals. PMID:27220277

  18. Ihh signaling regulates mandibular symphysis development and growth.

    PubMed

    Sugito, H; Shibukawa, Y; Kinumatsu, T; Yasuda, T; Nagayama, M; Yamada, S; Minugh-Purvis, N; Pacifici, M; Koyama, E

    2011-05-01

    Symphyseal secondary cartilage is important for mandibular development, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its formation remain largely unknown. Here we asked whether Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates symphyseal cartilage development and growth. By embryonic days 16.5 to 18.5, Sox9-expressing chondrocytes formed within condensed Tgfβ-1/Runx2-expressing mesenchymal cells at the prospective symphyseal joint site, and established a growth-plate-like structure with distinct Ihh, collagen X, and osteopontin expression patterns. In post-natal life, mesenchymal cells expressing the Ihh receptor Patched1 were present anterior to the Ihh-expressing secondary cartilage, proliferated, differentiated into chondrocytes, and contributed to anterior growth of alveolar bone. In Ihh-null mice, however, symphyseal development was defective, mainly because of enhanced chondrocyte maturation and reduced proliferation of chondroprogenitor cells. Proliferation was partially restored in dual Ihh;Gli3 mutants, suggesting that Gli3 is normally a negative regulator of symphyseal development. Thus, Ihh signaling is essential for symphyseal cartilage development and anterior mandibular growth.

  19. Structure, Regulation, Signaling, and Targeting of Abl Kinases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abl kinases are prototypic cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases and are involved in a variety of chromosomal aberrations in different cancers. This causes the expression of Abl fusion proteins, such as Bcr-Abl, that are constitutively activated and drivers of tumorigenesis. Over the past decades, biochemical and functional studies on the molecular mechanisms of Abl regulation have gone hand in hand with progression of our structural understanding of autoinhibited and active Abl conformations. In parallel, Abl oncoproteins have become prime molecular targets for cancer therapy, using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–competitive kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib. Abl-targeting drugs serve as a paradigm for our understanding of kinase inhibitor action, specificity, and resistance development. In this review article, I will review the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the regulation of Abl kinase activity and how oncogenic Abl fusions signal. Furthermore, past and ongoing efforts to target Abl oncoproteins using ATP-competitive and allosteric inhibitors, as well as future possibilities using combination therapy, will be discussed. PMID:23226581

  20. A MAP4 kinase related to Ste20 is a nutrient-sensitive regulator of mTOR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Greg M.; Yan, Lijun; Procter, Julia; Mieulet, Virginie; Lamb, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway is a key regulator of cell growth and is controlled by growth factors and nutrients such as amino acids. Although signalling pathways from growth factor receptors to mTOR have been elucidated, the pathways mediating signalling by nutrients are poorly characterized. Through a screen for protein kinases active in the mTOR signalling pathway in Drosophila we have identified a Ste20 family member (MAP4K3) that is required for maximal S6K (S6 kinase)/4E-BP1 [eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E)-binding protein 1] phosphorylation and regulates cell growth. Importantly, MAP4K3 activity is regulated by amino acids, but not the growth factor insulin and is not regulated by the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Our results therefore suggest a model whereby nutrients signal to mTORC1 via activation of MAP4K3. PMID:17253963

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  2. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  3. Uncoupling of retinoic acid signaling from tailbud development before termination of body axis extension.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Thomas J; Zhao, Xianling; Duester, Gregg

    2011-10-01

    During the early stages of body axis extension, retinoic acid (RA) synthesized in somites by Raldh2 represses caudal fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling to limit the tailbud progenitor zone. Excessive RA down-regulates Fgf8 and triggers premature termination of body axis extension, suggesting that endogenous RA may function in normal termination of body axis extension. Here, we demonstrate that Raldh2-/- mouse embryos undergo normal down-regulation of tailbud Fgf8 expression and termination of body axis extension in the absence of RA. Interestingly, Raldh2 expression in wild-type tail somites and tailbud from E10.5 onwards does not result in RA activity monitored by retinoic acid response element (RARE)-lacZ. Treatment of wild-type tailbuds with physiological levels of RA or retinaldehyde induces RARE-lacZ activity, validating the sensitivity of RARE-lacZ and demonstrating that deficient RA synthesis in wild-type tail somites and tailbud is due to a lack of retinaldehyde synthesis. These studies demonstrate an early uncoupling of RA signaling from mouse tailbud development and show that termination of body axis extension occurs in the absence of RA signaling.

  4. The Arabidopsis GAI gene defines a signaling pathway that negatively regulates gibberellin responses 

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jinrong; Carol, Pierre; Richards, Donald E.; King, Kathryn E.; Cowling, Rachel J.; Murphy, George P.; Harberd, Nicholas P.

    1997-01-01

    The Arabidopsis gai mutant allele confers a reduction in gibberellin (GA) responsiveness. Here we report the molecular cloning of GAI and a closely related gene GRS. The predicted GAI (wild-type) and gai (mutant) proteins differ only by the deletion of a 17-amino-acid segment from within the amino-terminal region. GAI and GRS contain nuclear localization signals, a region of homology to a putative transcription factor, and motifs characteristic of transcriptional coactivators. Genetic analysis indicates that GAI is a repressor of GA responses, that GA can release this repression, and that gai is a mutant repressor that is relatively resistant to the effects of GA. Mutations at SPY and GAR2 suppress the gai phenotype, indicating the involvement of GAI, SPY, and GAR2 in a signaling pathway that regulates GA responses negatively. The existence of this pathway suggests that GA modulates plant growth through derepression rather than through simple stimulation. PMID:9389651

  5. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-03-10

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog.

  6. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog. PMID:28281543

  7. FGF15/FGFR4 integrates growth factor signaling with hepatic bile acid metabolism and insulin action.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F

    2009-04-24

    The current studies show FGF15 signaling decreases hepatic forkhead transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) activity through phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation. The bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) activates expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15 in the intestine, which acts through hepatic FGFR4 to suppress cholesterol-7alpha hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and limit bile acid production. Because FoxO1 activity and CYP7A1 gene expression are both increased by fasting, we hypothesized CYP7A1 might be a FoxO1 target gene. Consistent with recently reported results, we show CYP7A1 is a direct target of FoxO1. Additionally, we show that the PI 3-kinase pathway is key for both the induction of CYP7A1 by fasting and the suppression by FGF15. FGFR4 is the major hepatic FGF receptor isoform and is responsible for the hepatic effects of FGF15. We also show that expression of FGFR4 in liver was decreased by fasting, increased by insulin, and reduced by streptozotocin-induced diabetes, implicating FGFR4 as a primary target of insulin regulation. Because insulin and FGF both target the PI 3-kinase pathway, these observations suggest FoxO1 is a key node in the convergence of FGF and insulin signaling pathways and functions as a key integrator for the regulation of glucose and bile acid metabolism.

  8. Two distinct EIN2 genes cooperatively regulate ethylene signaling in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kana; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Tomomi

    2013-09-01

    Leguminous plants establish a mutualistic symbiosis with bacteria, collectively referred to as rhizobia. Host plants positively and negatively regulate the symbiotic processes to keep the symbiosis at an appropriate level. Although the plant hormone ethylene is known as a negative regulator of symbiotic processes, the molecular mechanisms of ethylene signaling remain unresolved, especially in the model plant Lotus japonicus. Here, we identified two genes, LjEIN2-1 and LjEIN2-2, from L. japonicus. These genes share moderate similarity in their amino acid sequences, are located on different chromosomes and are composed of different numbers of exons. Suppression of either LjEIN2-1 or LjEIN2-2 expression significantly promoted the root growth of transformed plants on plates containing 1-amino-cyclopropane-carboxylic acid (ACC), the biosynthetic precursor of ethylene. Simultaneous suppression of both LjEIN2-1 and LjEIN2-2 markedly increased the ethylene insensitivity of transgenic roots and resulted in an increased nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that LjEIN2-1 and LjEIN2-2 concertedly regulate ethylene signaling in L. japonicus. We also observed that Nod factor (NF) induced the expression of the ethylene-responsive gene LjACO2, and simultaneous treatment with NF and ACC markedly increases its transcript level compared with either NF or ACC alone. Because LjACO2 encodes ACC oxidase, which is a key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis, this result suggests the existence of an NF-triggered negative feedback mechanism through ethylene signaling.

  9. Myostatin signaling regulates Akt activity via the regulation of miR-486 expression.

    PubMed

    Hitachi, Keisuke; Nakatani, Masashi; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2014-02-01

    Myostatin, also known as growth and differentiation factor-8, is a pivotal negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass and reduces muscle protein synthesis by inhibiting the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. However, the precise mechanism by which myostatin inhibits the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the global microRNA expression profile in myostatin knockout mice and identified miR-486, a positive regulator of the IGF-1/Akt pathway, as a novel target of myostatin signaling. In myostatin knockout mice, the expression level of miR-486 in skeletal muscle was significantly increased. In addition, we observed increased expression of the primary transcript of miR-486 (pri-miR-486) and Ankyrin 1.5 (Ank1.5), the host gene of miR-486, in myostatin knockout mice. In C2C12 cells, myostatin negatively regulated the expression of Ank1.5. Moreover, canonical myostatin signaling repressed the skeletal muscle-specific promoter activity of miR-486/Ank1.5. This repression was partially mediated by the E-box elements in the proximal region of the promoter. We also show that overexpression of miR-486 induced myotube hypertrophy in vitro and that miR-486 was essential to maintain skeletal muscle size both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, inhibition of miR-486 led to a decrease in Akt activity in C2C12 myotubes. Our findings indicate that miR-486 is one of the intermediary molecules connecting myostatin signaling and the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway in the regulation of skeletal muscle size.

  10. MicroRNAs: New Regulators of Toll-Like Receptor Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobing; Jing, Zhizhong; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a critical family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are responsible for the innate immune responses via signalling pathways to provide effective host defence against pathogen infections. However, TLR-signalling pathways are also likely to stringently regulate tissue maintenance and homeostasis by elaborate modulatory mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators and as an essential part of the networks involved in regulating TLR-signalling pathways. In this review, we highlight our understanding of the regulation of miRNA expression profiles by TLR-signalling pathways and the regulation of TLR-signalling pathways by miRNAs. We focus on the roles of miRNAs in regulating TLR-signalling pathways by targeting multiple molecules, including TLRs themselves, their associated signalling proteins and regulatory molecules, and transcription factors and functional cytokines induced by them, at multiple levels. PMID:24772440

  11. Somite-Derived Retinoic Acid Regulates Zebrafish Hematopoietic Stem Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Laura M.; Mackowetzky, Kacey J.; Widen, Sonya A.; Waskiewicz, Andrew Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are multipotent progenitors that generate all vertebrate adult blood lineages. Recent analyses have highlighted the importance of somite-derived signaling factors in regulating HSC specification and emergence from dorsal aorta hemogenic endothelium. However, these factors remain largely uncharacterized. We provide evidence that the vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) functions as an essential regulator of zebrafish HSC formation. Temporal analyses indicate that RA is required for HSC gene expression prior to dorsal aorta formation, at a time when the predominant RA synthesis enzyme, aldh1a2, is strongly expressed within the paraxial mesoderm and somites. Previous research implicated the Cxcl12 chemokine and Notch signaling pathways in HSC formation. Consequently, to understand how RA regulates HSC gene expression, we surveyed the expression of components of these pathways in RA-depleted zebrafish embryos. During somitogenesis, RA-depleted embryos exhibit altered expression of jam1a and jam2a, which potentiate Notch signaling within nascent endothelial cells. RA-depleted embryos also exhibit a severe reduction in the expression of cxcr4a, the predominant Cxcl12b receptor. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibitors of RA synthesis and Cxcr4 signaling act in concert to reduce HSC formation. Our analyses demonstrate that somite-derived RA functions to regulate components of the Notch and Cxcl12 chemokine signaling pathways during HSC formation. PMID:27861498

  12. Abscisic acid and other plant hormones: Methods to visualize distribution and signaling.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Hsu, Po-Kai; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-12-01

    The exploration of plant behavior on a cellular scale in a minimal invasive manner is key to understanding plant adaptations to their environment. Plant hormones regulate multiple aspects of growth and development and mediate environmental responses to ensure a successful life cycle. To monitor the dynamics of plant hormone actions in intact tissue, we need qualitative and quantitative tools with high temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we describe a set of biological instruments (reporters) for the analysis of the distribution and signaling of various plant hormones. Furthermore, we provide examples of their utility for gaining novel insights into plant hormone action with a deeper focus on the drought hormone abscisic acid.

  13. PI3K target based novel cyano derivative of betulinic acid induces its signalling inhibition by down-regulation of pGSK3β and cyclin D1 and potentially checks cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Rabiya; Hussain, Aashiq; Sangwan, Payare L; Chinthakindi, Praveen K; Khan, Imran; Sharma, Parduman R; Koul, Surrinder; Saxena, Ajit K; Hamid, Abid

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the Betulinic acid (BA) being recognized as anticancerous source; its further use in clinical development is greatly hampered because of its poor pharmacokinetic properties. To circumvent these limitations, we synthesized a PI3K target based library of 18 triazole based derivatives and we identified a C-3 cyano analog of betulinic acid (CBA) with significant cell death effects with 5-7 fold higher potency than BA in various cancers. Importantly, no such report is available demonstrating the involvement of BA or its structural analogs in the modulation of PI3K pathway. Using, human leukemia HL-60 cells as a model, we for the first time report that CBA decreased expression of PI3K p110α, p85α, and pAKT in HL-60. Furthermore, we could find significant depletion of pGSK3β, cyclin D1 and increased expression of p21/cip, p27/Kip proteins. CBA induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, increased sub-G0 DNA fraction and annexin V binding of the cells besides imparting the typical surface features of cell death. Also, this target specific inhibition was associated with mitochondrial apoptosis as was reflected by expression studies of various proteins together with reactive oxygen species generation and decline in mitochondrial trans membrane potential. The apoptotic effectors i.e., caspase 8 and caspase 9 were found to get upregulated besides PI3K associated DNA repair enzyme i.e., PARP cleavage was observed. Thus, our results elucidated that CBA or other BA based small molecules inhibit PI3K/AKT pathway with induction of subsequent cancer cell death which may be useful therapeutic strategy against leukemias and possibly other cancers.

  14. Regulation of longevity by regulator of G-protein signaling protein, Loco.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuh-Ru; Kim, Keetae; Yang, Yanfei; Ivessa, Andreas; Sadoshima, Junichi; Park, Yongkyu

    2011-06-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins contribute to G-protein signaling pathways as activators or repressors with GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity. To characterize whether regulation of RGS proteins influences longevity in several species, we measured stress responses and lifespan of RGS-overexpressing and RGS-lacking mutants. Reduced expression of Loco, a RGS protein of Drosophila melanogaster, resulted in a longer lifespan for both male and female flies, also exhibiting stronger resistance to three different stressors (starvation, oxidation, and heat) and higher manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity. In addition, this reduction in Loco expression increased fat content and diminished cAMP levels. In contrast, overexpression of both genomic and cDNA loco gene significantly shortened the lifespan with weaker stress resistance and lower fat content. Deletion analysis of the Loco demonstrated that its RGS domain is required for the regulation of longevity. Consistently, when expression of RGS14, mammalian homologue of Loco, was reduced in rat fibroblast cells, the resistance to oxidative stress increased with higher MnSOD expression. The changes of yeast Rgs2 expression, which shares a conserved RGS domain with the fly Loco protein, also altered lifespan and stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide the first evidence that RGS proteins with GAP activity affect both stress resistance and longevity in several species.

  15. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca2+ in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca2+ stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca2+ is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca2+/H+ exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca2+ signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca2+ is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca2+ stores in the control of Ca2+-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  16. Down-regulation apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 gene reduced the Litopenaeus vannamei hemocyte apoptosis in WSSV infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feng-Hua; Chen, Yong-Gui; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yue, Hai-Tao; Bi, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Kai; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase, is crucial in various cellular responses. In the present study, we identified and characterized an ASK1 homolog from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvASK1). The full-length cDNA of LvASK1 was 5400 bp long, with an open reading frame encoding a putative 1420 amino acid protein. LvASK1 was highly expressed in muscle, hemocyte, eyestalk and heart. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the LvASK1 was upregulated during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The knocked-down expression of LvASK1 by RNA interference significantly reduced the apoptotic ratio of the hemocytes collected from WSSV-infected L. vannamei. Furthermore, the down-regulation of LvASK1 also decreased the cumulative mortality of WSSV-infected L. vannamei. These results suggested that down-regulation of LvASK1 decreased the apoptotic rate of hemocytes in WSSV-infected shrimp, and that it could contribute to the reduction of cumulative mortality in WSSV-infected L. vannamei.

  17. Plakophilin-1, a Novel Wnt Signaling Regulator, Is Critical for Tooth Development and Ameloblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Chieko; Yamada, Aya; Saito, Kan; Ishikawa, Masaki; Xue, Han; Funada, Keita; Haruyama, Naoto; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Tooth morphogenesis is initiated by reciprocal interactions between the ectoderm and neural crest-derived mesenchyme, and the Wnt signaling pathway is involved in this process. We found that Plakophilin (PKP)1, which is associated with diseases such as ectodermal dysplasia/skin fragility syndrome, was highly expressed in teeth and skin, and was upregulated during tooth development. We hypothesized that PKP1 regulates Wnt signaling via its armadillo repeat domain in a manner similar to β-catenin. To determine its role in tooth development, we performed Pkp1 knockdown experiments using ex vivo organ cultures and cell cultures. Loss of Pkp1 reduced the size of tooth germs and inhibited dental epithelial cell proliferation, which was stimulated by Wnt3a. Furthermore, transfected PKP1-emerald green fluorescent protein was translocated from the plasma membrane to the nucleus upon stimulation with Wnt3a and LiCl, which required the PKP1 N terminus (amino acids 161 to 270). Localization of PKP1, which is known as an adhesion-related desmosome component, shifted to the plasma membrane during ameloblast differentiation. In addition, Pkp1 knockdown disrupted the localization of Zona occludens 1 in tight junctions and inhibited ameloblast differentiation; the two proteins were shown to directly interact by immunoprecipitation. These results implicate the participation of PKP1 in early tooth morphogenesis as an effector of canonical Wnt signaling that controls ameloblast differentiation via regulation of the cell adhesion complex. PMID:27015268

  18. Thyroid hormone signalling genes are regulated by photoperiod in the hypothalamus of F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alexander W; Helfer, Gisela; Russell, Laura; Darras, Veerle M; Morgan, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Seasonal animals adapt their physiology and behaviour in anticipation of climate change to optimise survival of their offspring. Intra-hypothalamic thyroid hormone signalling plays an important role in seasonal responses in mammals and birds. In the F344 rat, photoperiod stimulates profound changes in food intake, body weight and reproductive status. Previous investigations of the F344 rat have suggested a role for thyroid hormone metabolism, but have only considered Dio2 expression, which was elevated in long day photoperiods. Microarray analysis was used to identify time-dependent changes in photoperiod responsive genes, which may underlie the photoperiod-dependent phenotypes of the juvenile F344 rat. The most significant changes are those related to thyroid hormone metabolism and transport. Using photoperiod manipulations and melatonin injections into long day photoperiod (LD) rats to mimic short day (SD), we show photoinduction and photosuppression gene expression profiles and melatonin responsiveness of genes by in situ hybridization; TSHβ, CGA, Dio2 and Oatp1c1 genes were all elevated in LD whilst in SD, Dio3 and MCT-8 mRNA were increased. NPY was elevated in SD whilst GALP increased in LD. The photoinduction and photosuppression profiles for GALP were compared to that of GHRH with GALP expression following GHRH temporally. We also reveal gene sets involved in photoperiodic responses, including retinoic acid and Wnt/ß-catenin signalling. This study extends our knowledge of hypothalamic regulation by photoperiod, by revealing large temporal changes in expression of thyroid hormone signalling genes following photoperiod switch. Surprisingly, large changes in hypothalamic thyroid hormone levels or TRH expression were not detected. Expression of NPY and GALP, two genes known to regulate GHRH, were also changed by photoperiod. Whether these genes could provide links between thyroid hormone signalling and the regulation of the growth axis remains to be

  19. TGF-β signaling in insects regulates metamorphosis via juvenile hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Tomonari, Sayuri; Matsuoka, Yuji; Watanabe, Takahito; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Bando, Tetsuya; Tomioka, Kenji; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2016-05-17

    Although butterflies undergo a dramatic morphological transformation from larva to adult via a pupal stage (holometamorphosis), crickets undergo a metamorphosis from nymph to adult without formation of a pupa (hemimetamorphosis). Despite these differences, both processes are regulated by common mechanisms that involve 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). JH regulates many aspects of insect physiology, such as development, reproduction, diapause, and metamorphosis. Consequently, strict regulation of JH levels is crucial throughout an insect's life cycle. However, it remains unclear how JH synthesis is regulated. Here, we report that in the corpora allata of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, Myoglianin (Gb'Myo), a homolog of Drosophila Myoglianin/vertebrate GDF8/11, is involved in the down-regulation of JH production by suppressing the expression of a gene encoding JH acid O-methyltransferase, Gb'jhamt In contrast, JH production is up-regulated by Decapentaplegic (Gb'Dpp) and Glass-bottom boat/60A (Gb'Gbb) signaling that occurs as part of the transcriptional activation of Gb'jhamt Gb'Myo defines the nature of each developmental transition by regulating JH titer and the interactions between JH and 20E. When Gb'myo expression is suppressed, the activation of Gb'jhamt expression and secretion of 20E induce molting, thereby leading to the next instar before the last nymphal instar. Conversely, high Gb'myo expression induces metamorphosis during the last nymphal instar through the cessation of JH synthesis. Gb'myo also regulates final insect size. Because Myo/GDF8/11 and Dpp/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2/4-Gbb/BMP5-8 are conserved in both invertebrates and vertebrates, the present findings provide common regulatory mechanisms for endocrine control of animal development.

  20. TGF-β signaling in insects regulates metamorphosis via juvenile hormone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Tomonari, Sayuri; Matsuoka, Yuji; Watanabe, Takahito; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Bando, Tetsuya; Tomioka, Kenji; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Although butterflies undergo a dramatic morphological transformation from larva to adult via a pupal stage (holometamorphosis), crickets undergo a metamorphosis from nymph to adult without formation of a pupa (hemimetamorphosis). Despite these differences, both processes are regulated by common mechanisms that involve 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). JH regulates many aspects of insect physiology, such as development, reproduction, diapause, and metamorphosis. Consequently, strict regulation of JH levels is crucial throughout an insect’s life cycle. However, it remains unclear how JH synthesis is regulated. Here, we report that in the corpora allata of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, Myoglianin (Gb’Myo), a homolog of Drosophila Myoglianin/vertebrate GDF8/11, is involved in the down-regulation of JH production by suppressing the expression of a gene encoding JH acid O-methyltransferase, Gb’jhamt. In contrast, JH production is up-regulated by Decapentaplegic (Gb’Dpp) and Glass-bottom boat/60A (Gb’Gbb) signaling that occurs as part of the transcriptional activation of Gb’jhamt. Gb’Myo defines the nature of each developmental transition by regulating JH titer and the interactions between JH and 20E. When Gb’myo expression is suppressed, the activation of Gb’jhamt expression and secretion of 20E induce molting, thereby leading to the next instar before the last nymphal instar. Conversely, high Gb’myo expression induces metamorphosis during the last nymphal instar through the cessation of JH synthesis. Gb’myo also regulates final insect size. Because Myo/GDF8/11 and Dpp/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2/4-Gbb/BMP5–8 are conserved in both invertebrates and vertebrates, the present findings provide common regulatory mechanisms for endocrine control of animal development. PMID:27140602

  1. Bile acids in regulation of inflammation and immunity: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ci; Fuchs, Claudia D; Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Apart from their pivotal role in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, bile acids (BAs) are increasingly recognised as important signalling molecules in the regulation of systemic endocrine functions. As such BAs are natural ligands for several nuclear hormone receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors. Through activating various signalling pathways, BAs not only regulate their own synthesis, enterohepatic recirculation and metabolism, but also immune homeostasis. This makes BAs attractive therapeutic agents for managing metabolic and inflammatory liver disorders. Recent experimental and clinical evidence indicates that BAs exert beneficial effects in cholestatic and metabolically driven inflammatory diseases. This review elucidates how different BAs function as pathogenetic factors and potential therapeutic agents for inflammation-driven liver diseases, focusing on their role in regulation of inflammation and immunity.

  2. A Signaling-Regulated, Short-Chain Dehydrogenase of Stagonospora nodorum Regulates Asexual Development ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kar-Chun; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Millar, A. Harvey; Thomson, Gordon; Oliver, Richard P.; Solomon, Peter S.

    2008-01-01

    The fungus Stagonospora nodorum is a causal agent of leaf and glume blotch disease of wheat. It has been previously shown that inactivation of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in Stagonospora nodorum caused development defects and reduced pathogenicity [P. S. Solomon et al., Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 17:456-466, 2004]. In this study, we sought to identify targets of the signaling pathway that may have contributed to phenotypic defects of the signaling mutants. A comparative analysis of Stagonospora nodorum wild-type and Gα-defective mutant (gna1) intracellular proteomes was performed via two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Several proteins showed significantly altered abundances when comparing the two strains. One such protein, the short-chain dehydrogenase Sch1, was 18-fold less abundant in the gna1 strain, implying that it is positively regulated by Gα signaling. Gene expression and transcriptional enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion analyses of Sch1 indicates strong expression during asexual development. Mutant strains of Stagonospora nodorum lacking Sch1 demonstrated poor growth on minimal media and exhibited a significant reduction in asexual sporulation on all growth media examined. Detailed histological experiments on sch1 pycnidia revealed that the gene is required for the differentiation of the subparietal layers of asexual pycnidia resulting in a significant reduction in both pycnidiospore size and numbers. PMID:18776038

  3. Role of Vitamin A/Retinoic Acid in Regulation of Embryonic and Adult Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Carmona, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin A is an essential micronutrient throughout life. Its physiologically active metabolite retinoic acid (RA), acting through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), is a potent regulator of patterning during embryonic development, as well as being necessary for adult tissue homeostasis. Vitamin A deficiency during pregnancy increases risk of maternal night blindness and anemia and may be a cause of congenital malformations. Childhood Vitamin A deficiency can cause xerophthalmia, lower resistance to infection and increased risk of mortality. RA signaling appears to be essential for expression of genes involved in developmental hematopoiesis, regulating the endothelial/blood cells balance in the yolk sac, promoting the hemogenic program in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros area and stimulating eryrthropoiesis in fetal liver by activating the expression of erythropoietin. In adults, RA signaling regulates differentiation of granulocytes and enhances erythropoiesis. Vitamin A may facilitate iron absorption and metabolism to prevent anemia and plays a key role in mucosal immune responses, modulating the function of regulatory T cells. Furthermore, defective RA/RARα signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia due to a failure in differentiation of promyelocytes. This review focuses on the different roles played by vitamin A/RA signaling in physiological and pathological mouse hematopoiesis duddurring both, embryonic and adult life, and the consequences of vitamin A deficiency for the blood system. PMID:28230720

  4. Minireview: Ubiquitination-regulated G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Verónica

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest and most diverse superfamily of membrane proteins and mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. Posttranslational modifications are considered the main regulators of all GPCRs. In addition to phosphorylation, glycosylation, and palmitoylation, increasing evidence as reviewed here reveals that ubiquitination also regulates the magnitude and temporospatial aspects of GPCR signaling. Posttranslational protein modification by ubiquitin is a key molecular mechanism governing proteins degradation. Ubiquitination mediates the covalent conjugation of ubiquitin, a highly conserved polypeptide of 76 amino acids, to protein substrates. This process is catalyzed by 3 enzymes acting in tandem: an E1, ubiquitin-activating enzyme; an E2, ubiquitin-carrying enzyme; and an E3, ubiquitin ligase. Ubiquitination is counteracted by deubiquitinating enzymes that deconjugate ubiquitin-modified proteins and rescue the substrate from proteasomal degradation. Although ubiquitination is known to target many GPCRs for lysosomal or proteasomal degradation, emerging findings define novel roles for the basal status of ubiquitination and for rapid deubiquitination and transubiquitination controlling cell surface expression and cellular responsiveness of some GPCRs. In this review, we highlight the classical and novel roles of ubiquitin in the regulation of GPCR function, signaling, and trafficking. PMID:23471539

  5. Ohgata, the Single Drosophila Ortholog of Human Cereblon, Regulates Insulin Signaling-dependent Organismic Growth.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Satoru; Sawamura, Naoya; Voelzmann, André; Broemer, Meike; Asahi, Toru; Hoch, Michael

    2016-11-25

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that is highly conserved in animals and plants. CRBN proteins have been implicated in various biological processes such as development, metabolism, learning, and memory formation, and their impairment has been linked to autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability and cancer. Furthermore, human CRBN was identified as the primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Data on functional analysis of CRBN family members in vivo, however, are still scarce. Here we identify Ohgata (OHGT), the Drosophila ortholog of CRBN, as a regulator of insulin signaling-mediated growth. Using ohgt mutants that we generated by targeted mutagenesis, we show that its loss results in increased body weight and organ size without changes of the body proportions. We demonstrate that ohgt knockdown in the fat body, an organ analogous to mammalian liver and adipose tissue, phenocopies the growth phenotypes. We further show that overgrowth is due to an elevation of insulin signaling in ohgt mutants and to the down-regulation of inhibitory cofactors of circulating Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs), named acid-labile subunit and imaginal morphogenesis protein-late 2. The two inhibitory proteins were previously shown to be components of a heterotrimeric complex with growth-promoting DILP2 and DILP5. Our study reveals OHGT as a novel regulator of insulin-dependent organismic growth in Drosophila.

  6. Multilevel regulation and signalling processes associated with adaptation to terminal drought in wild emmer wheat.

    PubMed

    Krugman, Tamar; Chagué, Véronique; Peleg, Zvi; Balzergue, Sandrine; Just, Jérémy; Korol, Abraham B; Nevo, Eviatar; Saranga, Yehoshua; Chalhoub, Boulos; Fahima, Tzion

    2010-05-01

    Low water availability is the major environmental factor limiting crop productivity. Transcriptome analysis was used to study terminal drought response in wild emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccoides, genotypes contrasting in their productivity and yield stability under drought stress. A total of 5,892 differentially regulated transcripts were identified between drought and well-watered control and/or between drought resistant (R) and drought susceptible (S) genotypes. Functional enrichment analyses revealed that multilevel regulatory and signalling processes were significantly enriched among the drought-induced transcripts, in particular in the R genotype. Therefore, further analyses were focused on selected 221 uniquely expressed or highly abundant transcripts in the R genotype, as potential candidates for drought resistance genes. Annotation of the 221 genes revealed that 26% of them are involved in multilevel regulation, including: transcriptional regulation, RNA binding, kinase activity and calcium and abscisic acid signalling implicated in stomatal closure. Differential expression patterns were also identified in genes known to be involved in drought adaptation pathways, such as: cell wall adjustment, cuticular wax deposition, lignification, osmoregulation, redox homeostasis, dehydration protection and drought-induced senescence. These results demonstrate the potential of wild emmer wheat as a source for candidate genes for improving drought resistance.

  7. Vhnf1 acts downstream of Bmp, Fgf, and RA signals to regulate endocrine beta cell development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianbo; Kim, Hyon J; Gong, Zhiyuan; Liu, Ning-Ai; Lin, Shuo

    2007-03-15

    Bmp, Fgf, and retinoic acid (RA) signals have been implicated as regulators of pancreas development. However, the integration of these signaling pathways in vivo is not fully understood. Variant hnf1 (Vhnf1) is a transcription factor involved in pancreas, liver, and kidney development and its mutation in zebrafish causes underdeveloped pancreas and liver. We investigated the signaling pathways that regulate vhnf1 expression during pancreas development. First, we showed that Bmp activity is required for vhnf1 expression in the endoderm. In chordin (a Bmp antagonist) morpholino (MO)-injected embryos, vhnf1 expression in endoderm and in endocrine beta cells is expanded. On the other hand, in alk8 (a type I TGFbeta receptor) MO-injected embryos, vhnf1 expression in the endoderm is significantly reduced. Second, we showed that Fgf signaling participates in regulation of pancreas development through the vhnf1 pathway. Third, we demonstrated that RA fails to rescue reduction of insulin expression in vhnf1 mutants, whereas overexpression of vhnf1 restores insulin expression that is repressed by treatment with a RA receptor inhibitor. And finally, we revealed that both Bmp and Fgf signals act genetically upstream of RA in directing pancreas development. Taken together, our data establish that vhnf1 acts downstream of the signaling pathways of RA, Bmp, and Fgf to regulate pancreas development in zebrafish.

  8. Defective phosphatidic acid-phospholipase C signaling in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Dibrov, Elena; Austria, J Alejandro; Sahi, Nidhi; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2004-03-26

    The effects of exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) on Ca2+ transients and contractile activity were studied in cardiomyocytes isolated from chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In control cells, 25 microM PA induced a significant increase in active cell shortening and Ca2+ transients. PA increased IP3 generation in the control cardiomyocytes and its inotropic effects were blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In cardiomyocytes from diabetic rats, PA induced a 25% decrease in active cell shortening and no significant effect on Ca2+ transients. Basal and PA-induced IP3 generation in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes was 3-fold lower as compared to control cells. Sarcolemmal membrane PLC activity was impaired. Insulin treatment of the diabetic animals resulted in a partial recovery of PA responses. Our results, therefore, identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for heart dysfunction during diabetes.

  9. Disruption of Abscisic Acid Signaling Constitutively Activates Arabidopsis Resistance to the Necrotrophic Fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina1[W

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; López, Gemma; Ramos, Brisa; Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; Riviere, Marie-Pierre; Llorente, Francisco; Fernández, Paula Virginia; Miedes, Eva; Estevez, José Manuel; Grant, Murray; Molina, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Plant resistance to necrotrophic fungi is regulated by a complex set of signaling pathways that includes those mediated by the hormones salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ET), jasmonic acid (JA), and abscisic acid (ABA). The role of ABA in plant resistance remains controversial, as positive and negative regulatory functions have been described depending on the plant-pathogen interaction analyzed. Here, we show that ABA signaling negatively regulates Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina. Arabidopsis plants impaired in ABA biosynthesis, such as the aba1-6 mutant, or in ABA signaling, like the quadruple pyr/pyl mutant (pyr1pyl1pyl2pyl4), were more resistant to P. cucumerina than wild-type plants. In contrast, the hab1-1abi1-2abi2-2 mutant impaired in three phosphatases that negatively regulate ABA signaling displayed an enhanced susceptibility phenotype to this fungus. Comparative transcriptomic analyses of aba1-6 and wild-type plants revealed that the ABA pathway negatively regulates defense genes, many of which are controlled by the SA, JA, or ET pathway. In line with these data, we found that aba1-6 resistance to P. cucumerina was partially compromised when the SA, JA, or ET pathway was disrupted in this mutant. Additionally, in the aba1-6 plants, some genes encoding cell wall-related proteins were misregulated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and biochemical analyses of cell walls from aba1-6 and wild-type plants revealed significant differences in their Fourier transform infrared spectratypes and uronic acid and cellulose contents. All these data suggest that ABA signaling has a complex function in Arabidopsis basal resistance, negatively regulating SA/JA/ET-mediated resistance to necrotrophic fungi. PMID:23037505

  10. The Ski protein can inhibit ligand induced RARα and HDAC3 degradation in the Retinoic acid signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongling; Ueki, Nobuhide; Marcelain, Katherine; Hayman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent data has implicated the Ski protein as being a physiologically relevant negative regulator of signaling by Retinoic Acid (RA). The mechanism by which Ski represses RA signaling is unknown. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay showed that Ski and RARα are in the same complex in both the absence and presence of RA, which makes Ski different from other corepressors. We determined that Ski can stabilize RARα and HDAC3. These results suggest that Ski represses RA signaling by stabilizing corepressor complex. PMID:19341714

  11. Drosophila Spidey/Kar Regulates Oenocyte Growth via PI3-Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cinnamon, Einat; Sawala, Annick; Tittiger, Claus; Paroush, Ze'ev

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth and proliferation depend upon many different aspects of lipid metabolism. One key signaling pathway that is utilized in many different anabolic contexts involves Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and its membrane lipid products, the Phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphates. It remains unclear, however, which other branches of lipid metabolism interact with the PI3K signaling pathway. Here, we focus on specialized fat metabolizing cells in Drosophila called larval oenocytes. In the presence of dietary nutrients, oenocytes undergo PI3K-dependent cell growth and contain very few lipid droplets. In contrast, during starvation, oenocytes decrease PI3K signaling, shut down cell growth and accumulate abundant lipid droplets. We now show that PI3K in larval oenocytes, but not in fat body cells, functions to suppress lipid droplet accumulation. Several enzymes of fatty acid, triglyceride and hydrocarbon metabolism are required in oenocytes primarily for lipid droplet induction rather than for cell growth. In contrast, a very long chain fatty-acyl-CoA reductase (FarO) and a putative lipid dehydrogenase/reductase (Spidey, also known as Kar) not only promote lipid droplet induction but also inhibit oenocyte growth. In the case of Spidey/Kar, we show that the growth suppression mechanism involves inhibition of the PI3K signaling pathway upstream of Akt activity. Together, the findings in this study show how Spidey/Kar and FarO regulate the balance between the cell growth and lipid storage of larval oenocytes. PMID:27500738

  12. Fgf19 regulated by Hh signaling is required for zebrafish forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayumi; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2005-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling plays important roles in brain development. Fgf3 and Fgf8 are crucial for the formation of the forebrain and hindbrain. Fgf8 is also required for the midbrain to form. Here, we identified zebrafish Fgf19 and examined its roles in brain development by knocking down Fgf19 function. We found that Fgf19 expressed in the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain was involved in cell proliferation and cell survival during embryonic brain development. Fgf19 was also essential for development of the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. Regional specification is linked to cell type specification. Fgf19 was also essential for the specification of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons and oligodendrocytes generated in the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. The cross talk between Fgf and Hh signaling is critical for brain development. In the forebrain, Fgf19 expression was down-regulated on inhibition of Hh but not of Fgf3/Fgf8, and overexpression of Fgf19 rescued partially the phenotype on inhibition of Hh. The present findings indicate that Fgf19 signaling is crucial for forebrain development by interacting with Hh and provide new insights into the roles of Fgf signaling in brain development.

  13. Syndecan-4 negatively regulates antiviral signalling by mediating RIG-I deubiquitination via CYLD

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Zexing; Sun, Xiaofeng; Xin, Di; Yang, Meng; Sun, Liwei; Li, Lin; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) plays important roles in pathogen recognition and antiviral signalling transduction. Here we show that syndecan-4 (SDC4) is a RIG-I-interacting partner identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen. We find that SDC4 negatively regulates the RIG-I-mediated antiviral signalling in a feedback-loop control manner. The genetic evidence obtained by using knockout mice further emphasizes this biological role of SDC4 in antiviral signalling. Mechanistically, we show that SDC4 interacts with both RIG-I and deubiquitinase CYLD via its carboxyl-terminal intracellular region. SDC4 likely promotes redistribution of RIG-I and CYLD in a perinuclear pattern post viral infection, and thus enhances the RIG-I–CYLD interaction and potentiates the K63-linked deubiquitination of RIG-I. Collectively, our findings uncover a mechanism by which SDC4 antagonizes the activation of RIG-I in a CYLD-mediated deubiquitination-dependent process, thereby balancing antiviral signalling to avoid deleterious effects on host cells. PMID:27279133

  14. Systemic Regulation of RAS/MAPK Signaling by the Serotonin Metabolite 5-HIAA

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Tobias; Snoek, L. Basten; Fröhli, Erika; van der Bent, M. Leontien; Kammenga, Jan; Hajnal, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer is caused by the interplay of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and inherited variations in cancer susceptibility genes. While many of the tumor initiating mutations are well characterized, the effect of genetic background variation on disease onset and progression is less understood. We have used C. elegans genetics to identify genetic modifiers of the oncogenic RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. Quantitative trait locus analysis of two highly diverged C. elegans isolates combined with allele swapping experiments identified the polymorphic monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene amx-2 as a negative regulator of RAS/MAPK signaling. We further show that the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), which is a product of MAOA catalysis, systemically inhibits RAS/MAPK signaling in different organs of C. elegans. Thus, MAOA activity sets a global threshold for MAPK activation by controlling 5-HIAA levels. To our knowledge, 5-HIAA is the first endogenous small molecule that acts as a systemic inhibitor of RAS/MAPK signaling. PMID:25978500

  15. Regulation of PKC Mediated Signaling by Calcium during Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  16. AKAP signaling complexes in regulation of excitatory synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Jennifer L; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2011-06-01

    Plasticity at excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the central nervous system is believed to be critical for neuronal circuits to process and encode information, allowing animals to perform complex behaviors such as learning and memory. In addition, alterations in synaptic plasticity are associated with human diseases, including Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, chronic pain, drug addiction, and schizophrenia. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) in the hippocampal region of the brain are two forms of synaptic plasticity that increase or decrease, respectively, the strength of synaptic transmission by postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Both LTP and LTD are induced by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors but differ in the level and duration of Ca(2+) influx through the NMDA receptor and the subsequent engagement of downstream signaling by protein kinases, including PKA, PKC, and CaMKII, and phosphatases, including PP1 and calcineurin-PP2B (CaN). This review addresses the important emerging roles of the A-kinase anchoring protein family of scaffold proteins in regulating localization of PKA and other kinases and phosphatases to postsynaptic multiprotein complexes that control NMDA and AMPA receptor function during LTP and LTD.

  17. AKAP Signaling Complexes in Regulation of Excitatory Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Jennifer L.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the central nervous system is believed to be critical for neuronal circuits to process and encode information allowing animals to perform complex behaviors such as learning and memory. In addition, alterations in synaptic plasticity are associated with human diseases including Alzheimer's, epilepsy, chronic pain, drug addiction, and schizophrenia. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) in the hippocampal region of the brain are two forms of synaptic plasticity that increase or decrease, respectively, the strength of synaptic transmission by postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Both LTP and LTD are induced by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors but differ in the level and duration of Ca2+ influx through the NMDA receptor and the subsequent engagement of downstream signaling by protein kinases including PKA, PKC, and CaMKII and phosphatases including PP1 and calcineurin-PP2B (CaN). This review addresses the important emerging roles of the A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) family of scaffold proteins in regulating localization of PKA and other kinases and phosphatases to postsynaptic multi-protein complexes that control NMDA and AMPA receptor function during LTP and LTD. PMID:21498812

  18. BMP signaling and microtubule organization regulate synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Robin W.; Peled, Einat; Guerrero, Giovanna; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2015-01-01

    The strength of synaptic transmission between a neuron and multiple postsynaptic partners can vary considerably. We have studied synaptic heterogeneity using the glutamatergic Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), which contains multiple synaptic connections of varying strength between a motor axon and muscle fiber. In larval NMJs, there is a gradient of synaptic transmission from weak proximal to strong distal boutons. We imaged synaptic transmission with the postsynaptically targeted fluorescent calcium sensor SynapCam, to investigate the molecular pathways that determine synaptic strength and set up this gradient. We discovered that mutations in the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway disrupt production of strong distal boutons. We find that strong connections contain unbundled microtubules in the boutons, suggesting a role for microtubule organization in transmission strength. The spastin mutation, which disorganizes microtubules, disrupted the transmission gradient, supporting this interpretation. We propose that the BMP pathway, shown previously to function in the homeostatic regulation of synaptic growth, also boosts synaptic transmission in a spatially selective manner that depends on the microtubule system. PMID:25681521

  19. Feedback control of AHR signalling regulates intestinal immunity.

    PubMed

    Schiering, Chris; Wincent, Emma; Metidji, Amina; Iseppon, Andrea; Li, Ying; Potocnik, Alexandre J; Omenetti, Sara; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Nebert, Daniel W; Stockinger, Brigitta

    2017-02-09

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) recognizes xenobiotics as well as natural compounds such as tryptophan metabolites, dietary components and microbiota-derived factors, and it is important for maintenance of homeostasis at mucosal surfaces. AHR activation induces cytochrome P4501 (CYP1) enzymes, which oxygenate AHR ligands, leading to their metabolic clearance and detoxification. Thus, CYP1 enzymes have an important feedback role that curtails the duration of AHR signalling, but it remains unclear whether they also regulate AHR ligand availability in vivo. Here we show that dysregulated expression of Cyp1a1 in mice depletes the reservoir of natural AHR ligands, generating a quasi AHR-deficient state. Constitutive expression of Cyp1a1 throughout the body or restricted specifically to intestinal epithelial cells resulted in loss of AHR-dependent type 3 innate lymphoid cells and T helper 17 cells and increased susceptibility to enteric infection. The deleterious effects of excessive AHR ligand degradation on intestinal immune functions could be counter-balanced by increasing the intake of AHR ligands in the diet. Thus, our data indicate that intestinal epithelial cells serve as gatekeepers for the supply of AHR ligands to the host and emphasize the importance of feedback control in modulating AHR pathway activation.

  20. Regulation of cell signaling and apoptosis by tumor suppressor WWOX

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jui-Yen; Chou, Ying-Tsen; Lai, Feng-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Human fragile WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (named WWOX, FOR, or WOX1). Functional suppression of WWOX prevents apoptotic cell death induced by a variety of stress stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor, UV radiation, and chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Loss of WWOX gene expression due to gene deletions, loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, or epigenetic silencing is frequently observed in human malignant cancer cells. Acquisition of chemoresistance in squamous cell carcinoma, osteosarcoma, and breast cancer cells is associated with WWOX deficiency. WWOX protein physically interacts with many signaling molecules and exerts its regulatory effects on gene transcription and protein stability and subcellular localization to control cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, and metabolism. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which WWOX regulates cellular functions and stress responses. A potential scenario is that activation of WWOX by anticancer drugs is needed to overcome chemoresistance and trigger cancer cell death, suggesting that WWOX can be regarded as a prognostic marker and a candidate molecule for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:25595191

  1. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) Protein Ensures Coordination of Motor Movement by Modulating GABAB Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; Yang, Jianqi; Loo, Lipin; Sheff, David; Shepherd, Andrew J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Fisher,