Science.gov

Sample records for acid signature analysis

  1. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  2. Distance measures and optimization spaces in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis.

    PubMed

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F; Rode, Karyn D; Budge, Suzanne M; Thiemann, Gregory W

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis has become an important method of diet estimation in ecology, especially marine ecology. Controlled feeding trials to validate the method and estimate the calibration coefficients necessary to account for differential metabolism of individual fatty acids have been conducted with several species from diverse taxa. However, research into potential refinements of the estimation method has been limited. We compared the performance of the original method of estimating diet composition with that of five variants based on different combinations of distance measures and calibration-coefficient transformations between prey and predator fatty acid signature spaces. Fatty acid signatures of pseudopredators were constructed using known diet mixtures of two prey data sets previously used to estimate the diets of polar bears Ursus maritimus and gray seals Halichoerus grypus, and their diets were then estimated using all six variants. In addition, previously published diets of Chukchi Sea polar bears were re-estimated using all six methods. Our findings reveal that the selection of an estimation method can meaningfully influence estimates of diet composition. Among the pseudopredator results, which allowed evaluation of bias and precision, differences in estimator performance were rarely large, and no one estimator was universally preferred, although estimators based on the Aitchison distance measure tended to have modestly superior properties compared to estimators based on the Kullback-Leibler distance measure. However, greater differences were observed among estimated polar bear diets, most likely due to differential estimator sensitivity to assumption violations. Our results, particularly the polar bear example, suggest that additional research into estimator performance and model diagnostics is warranted. PMID:25859330

  3. Distance measures and optimization spaces in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Rode, Karyn D.; Budge, Suzanne M.; Thiemann, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis has become an important method of diet estimation in ecology, especially marine ecology. Controlled feeding trials to validate the method and estimate the calibration coefficients necessary to account for differential metabolism of individual fatty acids have been conducted with several species from diverse taxa. However, research into potential refinements of the estimation method has been limited. We compared the performance of the original method of estimating diet composition with that of five variants based on different combinations of distance measures and calibration-coefficient transformations between prey and predator fatty acid signature spaces. Fatty acid signatures of pseudopredators were constructed using known diet mixtures of two prey data sets previously used to estimate the diets of polar bears Ursus maritimus and gray seals Halichoerus grypus, and their diets were then estimated using all six variants. In addition, previously published diets of Chukchi Sea polar bears were re-estimated using all six methods. Our findings reveal that the selection of an estimation method can meaningfully influence estimates of diet composition. Among the pseudopredator results, which allowed evaluation of bias and precision, differences in estimator performance were rarely large, and no one estimator was universally preferred, although estimators based on the Aitchison distance measure tended to have modestly superior properties compared to estimators based on the Kullback-Leibler distance measure. However, greater differences were observed among estimated polar bear diets, most likely due to differential estimator sensitivity to assumption violations. Our results, particularly the polar bear example, suggest that additional research into estimator performance and model diagnostics is warranted.

  4. Distance measures and optimization spaces in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F; Rode, Karyn D; Budge, Suzanne M; Thiemann, Gregory W

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis has become an important method of diet estimation in ecology, especially marine ecology. Controlled feeding trials to validate the method and estimate the calibration coefficients necessary to account for differential metabolism of individual fatty acids have been conducted with several species from diverse taxa. However, research into potential refinements of the estimation method has been limited. We compared the performance of the original method of estimating diet composition with that of five variants based on different combinations of distance measures and calibration-coefficient transformations between prey and predator fatty acid signature spaces. Fatty acid signatures of pseudopredators were constructed using known diet mixtures of two prey data sets previously used to estimate the diets of polar bears Ursus maritimus and gray seals Halichoerus grypus, and their diets were then estimated using all six variants. In addition, previously published diets of Chukchi Sea polar bears were re-estimated using all six methods. Our findings reveal that the selection of an estimation method can meaningfully influence estimates of diet composition. Among the pseudopredator results, which allowed evaluation of bias and precision, differences in estimator performance were rarely large, and no one estimator was universally preferred, although estimators based on the Aitchison distance measure tended to have modestly superior properties compared to estimators based on the Kullback–Leibler distance measure. However, greater differences were observed among estimated polar bear diets, most likely due to differential estimator sensitivity to assumption violations. Our results, particularly the polar bear example, suggest that additional research into estimator performance and model diagnostics is warranted. PMID:25859330

  5. Water O–H Stretching Raman Signature for Strong Acid Monitoring via Multivariate Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Amanda J.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2013-04-16

    Spectroscopic techniques have been applied extensively for quantification and analysis of solution compositions. In addition to static measurements, these techniques have been implemented in flow systems providing real-time solution information. A distinct need exists for information regarding acid concentration as it affects extraction efficiency and selectivity of many separation processes. Despite of the seeming simplicity of the problem, no practical solution has been offered yet particularly for the large-scale schemes involving toxic streams such as highly radioactive nuclear wastes. Classic potentiometric technique is not amiable for on-line measurements in nuclear fuel reprocessing due to requirements of frequent calibration/maintenance and poor long-term stability in the aggressive chemical and radiation environments. In this work, the potential of using Raman spectroscopic measurements for on-line monitoring of strong acid concentration in the solutions relevant to the dissolved used fuel was investigated. The Raman water signature was monitored and recorded for nitric and hydrochloric acid solution systems of systematically varied chemical composition, ionic strength, and temperature. The generated Raman spectroscopic database was used to develop predictive chemometric models for the quantification of the acid concentration (H+), neodymium concentration (Nd3+), nitrate concentration (NO3-), density, and ionic strength. This approach was validated using a flow solvent extraction system.

  6. Trophic relationships in an estuarine environment: A quantitative fatty acid analysis signature approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnone, Larisa; Bessonart, Martin; Gadea, Juan; Salhi, María

    2015-12-01

    In order to better understand the functioning of aquatic environments, it is necessary to obtain accurate diet estimations in food webs. Their description should incorporate information about energy flow and the relative importance of trophic pathways. Fatty acids have been extensively used in qualitative studies on trophic relationships in food webs. Recently a new method to estimate quantitatively single predator diet has been developed. In this study, a model of aquatic food web through quantitative fatty acid signature analysis was generated to identify the trophic interactions among the species in the Rocha Lagoon. The biological sampling over two consecutive annual periods was comprehensive enough to identify all functional groups in the aquatic food web (except birds and mammals). Heleobia australis seemed to play a central role in this estuarine ecosystem. As both, a grazer and a prey to several other species, probably H. australis is transferring a great amount of energy to upper trophic levels. Most of the species at Rocha Lagoon have a wide range of prey items in their diet reflecting a complex food web, which is characteristic of extremely dynamic environment as estuarine ecosystems. QFASA is a model in tracing and quantitative estimate trophic pathways among species in an estuarine food web. The results obtained in the present work are a valuable contribution in the understanding of trophic relationships in Rocha Lagoon.

  7. Assessing the robustness of quantitative fatty acid signature analysis to assumption violations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey; Budge, Suzanne M.; Thiemann, Gregory W.; Rode, Karyn D.

    2016-01-01

    In most QFASA applications, investigators will generally have some knowledge of the prey available to predators and be able to assess the completeness of prey signature data and sample additional prey as necessary. Conversely, because calibration coefficients are derived from feeding trials with captive animals and their values may be sensitive to consumer physiology and nutritional status, their applicability to free-ranging animals is difficult to establish. We therefore recommend that investigators first make any improvements to the prey signature data that seem warranted and then base estimation on the Aitchison distance measure, as it appears to minimize risk from violations of the assumption that is most difficult to verify.

  8. New insights into the diets of harbor seals in the Salish Sea revealed by quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Lance, Monique M.; Elliott, Elizabeth W.; Jeffries, Steven J.; Acevedo-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Kennish, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) are an abundant predator along the west coast of North America, and there is considerable interest in their diet composition, especially in regard to predation on valued fish stocks. Available information on harbor seal diets, primarily derived from scat analysis, suggests that adult salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii), and gadids predominate. Because diet assessments based on scat analysis may be biased, we investigated diet composition through quantitative analysis of fatty acid signatures. Blubber samples from 49 harbor seals captured in western North America from haul-outs within the area of the San Juan Islands and southern Strait of Georgia in the Salish Sea were analyzed for fatty acid composition, along with 269 fish and squid specimens representing 27 potential prey classes. Diet estimates varied spatially, demographically, and among individual harbor seals. Findings confirmed the prevalence of previously identified prey species in harbor seal diets, but other species also contributed significantly. In particular, Black (Sebastes melanops) and Yellowtail (S. flavidus) Rockfish were estimated to compose up to 50% of some individual seal diets. Specialization and high predation rates on Black and Yellowtail Rockfish by a subset of harbor seals may play a role in the population dynamics of these regional rockfish stocks that is greater than previously realized.

  9. Fatty acid signatures of stomach oil and adipose tissue of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) in Alaska: Implications for diet analysis of Procellariiform birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, S.W.; Iverson, S.J.; Springer, A.M.; Hatch, Shyla A.

    2007-01-01

    Procellariiforms are unique among seabirds in storing dietary lipids in both adipose tissue and stomach oil. Thus, both lipid sources are potentially useful for trophic studies using fatty acid (FA) signatures. However, little is known about the relationship between FA signatures in stomach oil and adipose tissue of individuals or whether these signatures provide similar information about diet and physiology. We compared the FA composition of stomach oil and adipose tissue biopsies of individual northern fulmars (N = 101) breeding at three major colonies in Alaska. Fatty acid signatures differed significantly between the two lipid sources, reflecting differences in dietary time scales, metabolic processing, or both. However, these signatures exhibited a relatively consistent relationship between individuals, such that the two lipid sources provided a similar ability to distinguish foraging differences among individuals and colonies. Our results, including the exclusive presence of dietary wax esters in stomach oil but not adipose tissue, are consistent with the notion that stomach oil FA signatures represent lipids retained from prey consumed during recent foraging and reflect little metabolic processing, whereas adipose tissue FA signatures represent a longer-term integration of dietary intake. Our study illustrates the potential for elucidating short- versus longer-term diet information in Procellariiform birds using different lipid sources. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Block truncation signature coding for hyperspectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces a new signature coding which is designed based on the well-known Block Truncation Coding (BTC). It comprises of bit-maps of the signature blocks generated by different threshold criteria. Two new BTC-based algorithms are developed for signature coding, to be called Block Truncation Signature Coding (BTSC) and 2-level BTSC (2BTSC). In order to compare the developed BTC based algorithms with current binary signature coding schemes such as Spectral Program Analysis Manager (SPAM) developed by Mazer et al. and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) by Qian et al., three different thresholding functions, local block mean, local block gradient, local block correlation are derived to improve the BTSC performance where the combined bit-maps generated by these thresholds can provide better spectral signature characterization. Experimental results reveal that the new BTC-based signature coding performs more effectively in characterizing spectral variations than currently available binary signature coding methods.

  11. An Analysis of Diet Quality, How It Controls Fatty Acid Profiles, Isotope Signatures and Stoichiometry in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles arabiensis

    PubMed Central

    Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca; Schwarzinger, Bettina; Schwarzinger, Clemens; Soliban, Sharon; Madakacherry, Odessa; Aigner, Martina; Watzka, Margarete; Gilles, Jeremie

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowing the underlying mechanisms of mosquito ecology will ensure effective vector management and contribute to the overall goal of malaria control. Mosquito populations show a high degree of population plasticity in response to environmental variability. However, the principle factors controlling population size and fecundity are for the most part unknown. Larval habitat and diet play a crucial role in subsequent mosquito fitness. Developing the most competitive insects for sterile insect technique programmes requires a “production” orientated perspective, to deduce the most effective larval diet formulation; the information gained from this process offers us some insight into the mechanisms and processes taking place in natural native mosquito habitats. Methodology/Principal Findings Fatty acid profiles and de-novo or direct assimilation pathways, of whole-individual mosquitoes reared on a range of larval diets were determined using pyrolysis gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. We used elemental analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure individual-whole-body carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous values and to assess the impact of dietary quality on subsequent population stoichiometry, size, quality and isotopic signature. Diet had the greatest impact on fatty acid (FA) profiles of the mosquitoes, which exhibited a high degree of dietary routing, characteristic of generalist feeders. De-novo synthesis of a number of important FAs was observed. Mosquito C:N stoichiometry was fixed in the teneral stage. Dietary N content had significant influence on mosquito size, and P was shown to be a flexible pool which limited overall population size. Conclusions/Significance Direct routing of FAs was evident but there was ubiquitous de-novo synthesis suggesting mosquito larvae are competent generalist feeders capable of survival on diet with varying characteristics. It was concluded that nitrogen availability in the larval diet controlled teneral

  12. SIRUS spectral signature analysis code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Gary J.; Caola, Mike J.; Geatches, Rachel M.; Roberts, Nick C.

    2003-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Centre (ATC) is responsible for developing IR signature prediction capabilities for its parent body, BAE SYSTEMS. To achieve this, the SIRUS code has been developed and used on a variety of projects for well over a decade. SIRUS is capable of providing accurate IR predictions for air breathing and rocket motor propelled vehicles. SIRUS models various physical components to derive its predictions. A key component is the radiance reflected from the surface of the modeled vehicle. This is modeled by fitting parameters to the measured Bi-Directional Reflectance Function (BDRF) of the surface material(s). The ATC have successfully implemented a parameterization scheme based on the published OPTASM model, and this is described. However, inconsistencies between reflectance measurements and values calculated from the parameterized fit have led to an elliptical parameter enhancement. The implementation of this is also described. Finally, an end-to-end measurement-parameterization capability is described, based on measurements taken with SOC600 instrumentation.

  13. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  14. Should fatty acid signature proportions sum to 1 for diet estimation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey; Budge, Suzanne M.; Thiemann, Gregory W.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of predator diets, including how diets might change through time or differ among predators, provides essential insights into their ecology. Diet estimation therefore remains an active area of research within quantitative ecology. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is an increasingly common method of diet estimation. QFASA is based on a data library of prey signatures, which are vectors of proportions summarizing the fatty acid composition of lipids, and diet is estimated as the mixture of prey signatures that most closely approximates a predator’s signature. Diets are typically estimated using proportions from a subset of all fatty acids that are known to be solely or largely influenced by diet. Given the subset of fatty acids selected, the current practice is to scale their proportions to sum to 1.0. However, scaling signature proportions has the potential to distort the structural relationships within a prey library and between predators and prey. To investigate that possibility, we compared the practice of scaling proportions with two alternatives and found that the traditional scaling can meaningfully bias diet estimators under some conditions. Two aspects of the prey types that contributed to a predator’s diet influenced the magnitude of the bias: the degree to which the sums of unscaled proportions differed among prey types and the identifiability of prey types within the prey library. We caution investigators against the routine scaling of signature proportions in QFASA.

  15. Hyperspectral signature analysis of skin parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Garza, Luis; Kang, Sewon; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The temporal analysis of changes in biological skin parameters, including melanosome concentration, collagen concentration and blood oxygenation, may serve as a valuable tool in diagnosing the progression of malignant skin cancers and in understanding the pathophysiology of cancerous tumors. Quantitative knowledge of these parameters can also be useful in applications such as wound assessment, and point-of-care diagnostics, amongst others. We propose an approach to estimate in vivo skin parameters using a forward computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel Equations. We use this model to map the skin parameters to their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We then use machine learning based regression to develop an inverse map from hyperspectral signatures to skin parameters. In particular, we employ support vector machine based regression to estimate the in vivo skin parameters given their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We build on our work from SPIE 2012, and validate our methodology on an in vivo dataset. This dataset consists of 241 signatures collected from in vivo hyperspectral imaging of patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian and African American ethnicities. In addition, we also extend our methodology past the visible region and through the short-wave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find promising results when comparing the estimated skin parameters to the ground truth, demonstrating good agreement with well-established physiological precepts. This methodology can have potential use in non-invasive skin anomaly detection and for developing minimally invasive pre-screening tools.

  16. Seismic signature analysis for discrimination of people from animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Cadence analysis has been the main focus for discriminating between the seismic signatures of people and animals. However, cadence analysis fails when multiple targets are generating the signatures. We analyze the mechanism of human walking and the signature generated by a human walker, and compare it with the signature generated by a quadruped. We develop Fourier-based analysis to differentiate the human signatures from the animal signatures. We extract a set of basis vectors to represent the human and animal signatures using non-negative matrix factorization, and use them to separate and classify both the targets. Grazing animals such as deer, cows, etc., often produce sporadic signals as they move around from patch to patch of grass and one must characterize them so as to differentiate their signatures from signatures generated by a horse steadily walking along a path. These differences in the signatures are used in developing a robust algorithm to distinguish the signatures of animals from humans. The algorithm is tested on real data collected in a remote area.

  17. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Prostate Cancer Tissues by SWATH Mass Spectrometry Discovers N-acylethanolamine Acid Amidase and Protein Tyrosine Kinase 7 as Signatures for Tumor Aggressiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yansheng; Chen, Jing; Sethi, Atul; Li, Qing K.; Chen, Lijun; Collins, Ben; Gillet, Ludovic C. J.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers indicating the level of aggressiveness of prostate cancer (PCa) will address the urgent clinical need to minimize the general overtreatment of patients with non-aggressive PCa, who account for the majority of PCa cases. Here, we isolated formerly N-linked glycopeptides from normal prostate (n = 10) and from non-aggressive (n = 24), aggressive (n = 16), and metastatic (n = 25) PCa tumor tissues and analyzed the samples using SWATH mass spectrometry, an emerging data-independent acquisition method that generates a single file containing fragment ion spectra of all ionized species of a sample. The resulting datasets were searched using a targeted data analysis strategy in which an a priori spectral reference library representing known N-glycosites of the human proteome was used to identify groups of signals in the SWATH mass spectrometry data. On average we identified 1430 N-glycosites from each sample. Out of those, 220 glycoproteins showed significant quantitative changes associated with diverse biological processes involved in PCa aggressiveness and metastasis and indicated functional relationships. Two glycoproteins, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7, that were significantly associated with aggressive PCa in the initial sample cohort were further validated in an independent set of patient tissues using tissue microarray analysis. The results suggest that N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7 may be used as potential tissue biomarkers to avoid overtreatment of non-aggressive PCa. PMID:24741114

  18. Spectral signatures and molecular origin of acid dissociation intermediates.

    PubMed

    Iftimie, Radu; Thomas, Vibin; Plessis, Sylvain; Marchand, Patrick; Ayotte, Patrick

    2008-05-01

    The existence of a broad, mid-infrared absorption ranging from 1000 to 3000 cm(-1) is usually interpreted as a signature for the existence of protonated water networks. Herein, we use cryogenic mixtures of water and hydrogen fluoride (HF) and show experimental and computational evidence that similarly wide absorptions can be generated by a broad distribution of proton-shared and ion pair complexes. In the present case, we demonstrate that the broadening is mainly inhomogeneous, reflecting the fact that the topology of the first solvation shell determines the local degree of ionization and the shared-proton asymmetric stretching frequency within H2O x HF complexes. The extreme sensitivity of the proton transfer potential energy hypersurface to local hydrogen bonding topologies modulates its vibrational frequency from 2800 down to approximately 1300 cm(-1), the latter value being characteristic of solvation geometries that yield similar condensed-phase proton affinities for H2O and fluoride. By linking the local degree of ionization to the solvation pattern, we are able to propose a mechanism of ionization for HF in aqueous solutions and to explain some of their unusual properties at large concentrations. However, an important conclusion of broad scientific interest is our prediction that spectral signatures that are normally attributed to protonated water networks could also reveal the presence of strong hydrogen bonds between un-ionized acids and water molecules, with important consequences to spectroscopic investigations of biologically relevant proton channels and pumps.

  19. Advanced techniques in current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

    1992-03-01

    In general, both ac and dc motors can be characterized as weakly nonlinear systems, in which both linear and nonlinear effects occur simultaneously. Fortunately, the nonlinearities are generally well behaved and understood and an be handled via several standard mathematical techniques already well developed in the systems modeling area; examples are piecewise linear approximations and Volterra series representations. Field measurements of numerous motors and motor-driven systems confirm the rather complex nature of motor current spectra and illustrate both linear and nonlinear effects (including line harmonics and modulation components). Although previous current signature analysis (CSA) work at Oak Ridge and other sites has principally focused on the modulation mechanisms and detection methods (AM, PM, and FM), more recent studies have been conducted on linear spectral components (those appearing in the electric current at their actual frequencies and not as modulation sidebands). For example, large axial-flow compressors ({approximately}3300 hp) in the US gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants exhibit running-speed ({approximately}20 Hz) and high-frequency vibrational information (>1 kHz) in their motor current spectra. Several signal-processing techniques developed to facilitate analysis of these components, including specialized filtering schemes, are presented. Finally, concepts for the designs of advanced digitally based CSA units are offered, which should serve to foster the development of much more computationally capable ``smart`` CSA instrumentation in the next several years. 3 refs.

  20. Analysis of multispectral signatures of the shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, Mariusz; Dulski, Rafał; Piątkowski, Tadeusz; Madura, Henryk; Bareła, Jarosław; Polakowski, Henryk

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents some practical aspects of sniper IR signature measurements. Description of particular signatures for sniper shot in typical scenarios has been presented. We take into consideration sniper activities in the open area as well as in urban environment. The measurements were made at field test ground. High precision laboratory measurements were also performed. Several infrared cameras were used during measurements to cover all measurement assumptions. Some of the cameras are measurement-class devices with high accuracy and frame rates. The registrations were simultaneously made in UV, NWIR, SWIR and LWIR spectral bands. The infrared cameras have possibilities to install optical filters for multispectral measurement. An ultra fast visual camera was also used for visible spectra registration. Exemplary sniper IR signatures for typical situation were presented. LWIR imaging spectroradiometer HyperCam was also used during the laboratory measurements and field experiments. The signatures collected by HyperCam were useful for the determination of spectral characteristics of shot.

  1. Characteristic vector analysis as a technique for signature extraction of remote ocean color data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grew, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Characteristic vector analysis is being used to extract spectral signatures of suspended matter in the ocean from remote ocean color data collected with MOCS (Multichannel Ocean Color Sensor), a multispectral scanner. Spectral signatures appear to be obtainable either directly from characteristic vectors or through a transformation of these eigenvectors. Quantification of the suspended matter associated with each resulting signature seems feasible using associated coefficients generated by the technique. This paper presents eigenvectors associated with algae, 'sediment', acid waste, sewage sludge, and oil. The results suggest an efficient method of transmitting from satellites multispectral data of pollution in our oceans.

  2. Energy signature analysis: Radar for energy managers

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, L.

    1998-07-01

    Energy Signature Analysis (ESA) acts as a noise filter, to enhance usefulness of energy data. It provides vital feedback on operating and maintenance (O{ampersand}M) consistency and strategies, trends, and on conservation changes to facilities and equipment. Energy and temperatures characterize building performance, Energy use drivers fall in one of two groups: (1) weather and inside temperature, or (2) building characteristics, occupancy, and O and M practices. ESA weather-normalizes with delta T, and uses optimal smoothing to minimize weather, occupancy, and thermostat-driven scatter in energy use. The remaining variability arises from causes of great interest--changes in building characteristics, occupancy patterns, and O and M practices. Energy use rate is plotted versus coincident delta T, for sequenced typical weeks. When nothing but weather changes, consistently managed buildings show low scatter; r{sup 2} for regular occupancy is often 0.96 or better. Efficiency requires consistency; energy use should only change with weather and thermostat settings. Inconsistent management or equipment faults cause scatter, outliers, or an uptrend to alert management. Improved consistence reduces scatter. Worthwhile retrofits, HVAC tuning, and improved management strategies lower the curve. Important changes show merit in a week. High scatter cripples purely statistical uses of building energy data. For ESA, outliers are chances to find inconsistency and behaviors to avoid (high outliers) or foster (low outliers). Area-normalized ESA permits comparing facilities with different size or weather. Model output for new buildings, recast in ESA format, can help track building commissioning or give modelers feedback. Example ESAs use hourly total energy, outside and sampled inside temperatures. Problems found are investigated using hourly HVAC and baseload data. Baseload and HVAC loadshapes show peak-shaving, shut-down and tuning opportunities. New weekly data points show results

  3. Temporal shape analysis via the spectral signature.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, Elena; Konukoglu, Ender; Ou, Yangming; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Desjardins, Benoit; Pohl, Kilian M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we adapt spectral signatures for capturing morphological changes over time. Advanced techniques for capturing temporal shape changes frequently rely on first registering the sequence of shapes and then analyzing the corresponding set of high dimensional deformation maps. Instead, we propose a simple encoding motivated by the observation that small shape deformations lead to minor refinements in the spectral signature composed of the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator. The proposed encoding does not require registration, since spectral signatures are invariant to pose changes. We apply our representation to the shapes of the ventricles extracted from 22 cine MR scans of healthy controls and Tetralogy of Fallot patients. We then measure the accuracy score of our encoding by training a linear classifier, which outperforms the same classifier based on volumetric measurements. PMID:23286031

  4. Remotely sensed and laboratory spectral signatures of an ocean-dumped acid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Collins, V. G.

    1977-01-01

    An ocean-dumped acid waste plume was studied by using a rapid scanning spectrometer to remotely measure ocean radiance from a helicopter. The results of these studies are presented and compared with results from sea truth samples and laboratory experiments. An ocean spectral reflectance signature and a laboratory spectral transmission signature were established for the iron-acid waste pollutant. The spectrally and chemically significant component of the acid waste pollutant was determined to be ferric iron.

  5. An integrated spatial signature analysis and automatic defect classification system

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Tobin, K.W.; Karnowski, T.P.

    1997-08-01

    An integrated Spatial Signature Analysis (SSA) and automatic defect classification (ADC) system for improved automatic semiconductor wafer manufacturing characterization is presented. Both concepts of SSA and ADC methodologies are reviewed and then the benefits of an integrated system are described, namely, focused ADC and signature-level sampling. Focused ADC involves the use of SSA information on a defect signature to reduce the number of possible classes that an ADC system must consider, thus improving the ADC system performance. Signature-level sampling improved the ADC system throughput and accuracy by intelligently sampling defects within a given spatial signature for subsequent off-line, high-resolution ADC. A complete example of wafermap characterization via an integrated SSA/ADC system is presented where a wafer with 3274 defects is completely characterized by revisiting only 25 defects on an off-line ADC review station. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Motor current signature analysis method for diagnosing motor operated devices

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Eissenberg, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A motor current noise signature analysis method and apparatus for remotely monitoring the operating characteristics of an electric motor-operated device such as a motor-operated valve. Frequency domain signal analysis techniques are applied to a conditioned motor current signal to distinctly identify various operating parameters of the motor driven device from the motor current signature. The signature may be recorded and compared with subsequent signatures to detect operating abnormalities and degradation of the device. This diagnostic method does not require special equipment to be installed on the motor-operated device, and the current sensing may be performed at remote control locations, e.g., where the motor-operated devices are used in accessible or hostile environments.

  7. Discrimination of prey species of juvenile swordfish Xiphias gladius (Linnaeus, 1758) using signature fatty acid analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jock W.; Guest, Michaela A.; Lansdell, Matt; Phleger, Charles F.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2010-07-01

    Signature lipid and fatty acid analysis were used to discriminate the diet of swordfish ( Xiphias gladius, orbital fork length: 60-203 cm) from waters off eastern Australia. The fatty acid (FA) composition of a range of known prey (squid, myctophids, and other fishes) of swordfish, taken from stomach samples and from net tows, was compared with that of the white muscle tissue (WMT) of swordfish from the same region. Swordfish muscle was lipid rich (average 24-42% dry weight), as was the skeleton (28-41%). The robustness of the approach was also tested by comparison against a key squid prey species that was collected and stored using different protocols: (i) fresh frozen, (ii) fresh frozen, then thawed, and (iii) stomach content collection. The FA profiles were generally similar, with the ratio of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and palmitic acid (16:0) in particular showing no significant difference. Major fatty acids in swordfish WMT were 18:1ω9c, 16:0, 22:6ω3, and 18:0. Multidimensional scaling showed that the swordfish WMT grouped closely with small fish prey including myctophids, and not with squid. Squid contained markedly higher 22:6ω3 than swordfish. Individual prey species of the myctophidae could also be separated by the same technique. These results were supported by traditional stomach content analyses (SCA) that showed fish were the dominant prey for small swordfish sampled from southern waters whereas squid were the main prey in more northern waters, matching the FA patterns we found for the two regions. We propose that where general diet patterns are established, signature FA analysis has good potential to compliment or in some cases, replace temporal and spatial monitoring of trophic pathways for swordfish and other marine species.

  8. CRISPR Spacer Arrays for Detection of Viral Signatures from Acidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. C.; Bateson, M. M.; Suciu, D.; Young, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    Viruses are the most abundant life-like entities on the planet Earth. Using CRISPR spacer sequences, we have developed a microarray-based approach to detecting viral signatures in the acidic hot springs of Yellowstone.

  9. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Strunnikova, N.V.; Maminishkis, A.; Barb, J.J.; Wang, F.; Zhi, C.; Sergeev, Y.; Chen, W.; Edwards, A.O.; Stambolian, D.; Abecasis, G.; Swaroop, A.; Munson, P.J.; Miller, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized cell layer critical for photoreceptor function and survival. The unique physiology and relationship to the photoreceptors make the RPE a critical determinant of human vision. Therefore, we performed a global expression profiling of native and cultured human fetal and adult RPE and determined a set of highly expressed ‘signature’ genes by comparing the observed RPE gene profiles to the Novartis expression database (SymAtlas: http://wombat.gnf.org/index.html) of 78 tissues. Using stringent selection criteria of at least 10-fold higher expression in three distinct preparations, we identified 154 RPE signature genes, which were validated by qRT-PCR analysis in RPE and in an independent set of 11 tissues. Several of the highly expressed signature genes encode proteins involved in visual cycle, melanogenesis and cell adhesion and Gene ontology analysis enabled the assignment of RPE signature genes to epithelial channels and transporters (ClCN4, BEST1, SLCA20) or matrix remodeling (TIMP3, COL8A2). Fifteen RPE signature genes were associated with known ophthalmic diseases, and 25 others were mapped to regions of disease loci. An evaluation of the RPE signature genes in a recently completed AMD genomewide association (GWA) data set revealed that TIMP3, GRAMD3, PITPNA and CHRNA3 signature genes may have potential roles in AMD pathogenesis and deserve further examination. We propose that RPE signature genes are excellent candidates for retinal diseases and for physiological investigations (e.g. dopachrome tautomerase in melanogenesis). The RPE signature gene set should allow the validation of RPE-like cells derived from human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells for cell-based therapies of degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:20360305

  10. Spatial and temporal diet segregation in northern fulmars Fulmarus glacialis breeding in Alaska: Insights from fatty acid signatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, S.W.; Iverson, S.J.; Springer, A.M.; Hatch, Shyla A.

    2009-01-01

    Northern fulmars Fulmarus glacialis in the North Pacific Ocean are opportunistic, generalist predators, yet their diets are poorly described; thus, relationships of fulmars to supporting food webs, their utility as indicators of variability in forage fish abundances, and their sensitivity to ecosystem change are not known. We employed fatty acid (FA) signature analysis of adipose tissue from adults (n = 235) and chicks (n = 33) to compare spatial, temporal, and age-related variation in diets of fulmars breeding at 3 colonies in Alaska. FA signatures of adult fulmars differed between colonies within years, and between seasons at individual colonies. Seasonal and spatial differences in signatures were greater than interannual differences at all colonies. Differences in FA signatures reflect differences in diets, probably because the breeding colonies are located in distinct ecoregions which create unique habitats for prey assemblages, and because interannual variation in the physical environment affects the availability of forage species. Differences between FA signatures of adults and chicks in 2003 and 2004 suggest that adults fed chicks different prey than they consumed themselves. Alternatively, if adults relied on the same prey as those fed to chicks, the differences in signatures could have resulted from partial digestion of prey items by adults before chicks were fed, or direct metabolism of FAs by chicks for tissue synthesis before FAs could be deposited into adipose tissue. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  11. Gene Expression Signature of DMBA-Induced Hamster Buccal Pouch Carcinomas: Modulation by Chlorophyllin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:22485181

  12. Gene expression signature of DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinomas: modulation by chlorophyllin and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Vidya Priyadarsini, Ramamurthi; Kumar, Neeraj; Khan, Imran; Thiyagarajan, Paranthaman; Kondaiah, Paturu; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble, semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll and ellagic acid (EA), a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in berries, grapes, and nuts have been reported to exert anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines and in animal tumour models. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism underlying chemoprevention and changes in gene expression pattern induced by dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model by whole genome profiling using pangenomic microarrays. In hamsters painted with DMBA, the expression of 1,700 genes was found to be altered significantly relative to control. Dietary supplementation of chlorophyllin and ellagic acid modulated the expression profiles of 104 and 37 genes respectively. Microarray analysis also revealed changes in the expression of TGFβ receptors, NF-κB, cyclin D1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that may play a crucial role in the transformation of the normal buccal pouch to a malignant phenotype. This gene expression signature was altered on treatment with chlorophyllin and ellagic acid. Our study has also revealed patterns of gene expression signature specific for chlorophyllin and ellagic acid exposure. Thus dietary chlorophyllin and ellagic acid that can reverse gene expression signature associated with carcinogenesis are novel candidates for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:22485181

  13. Photon signature analysis using template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Hashim, S.; Saripan, M. I.; Wells, K.; Dunn, W. L.

    2011-10-01

    We describe an approach to detect improvised explosive devices (IEDs) by using a template matching procedure. This approach relies on the signature due to backstreaming γ photons from various targets. In this work we have simulated cylindrical targets of aluminum, iron, copper, water and ammonium nitrate (nitrogen-rich fertilizer). We simulate 3.5 MeV source photons distributed on a plane inside a shielded area using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP TM) code version 5 (V5). The 3.5 MeV source gamma rays yield 511 keV peaks due to pair production and scattered gamma rays. In this work, we simulate capture of those photons that backstream, after impinging on the target element, toward a NaI detector. The captured backstreamed photons are expected to produce a unique spectrum that will become part of a simple signal processing recognition system based on the template matching method. Different elements were simulated using different sets of random numbers in the Monte Carlo simulation. To date, the sum of absolute differences (SAD) method has been used to match the template. In the examples investigated, template matching was found to detect all elements correctly.

  14. Spectral derivative feature coding for hyperspectral signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chein-I.; Chakravarty, Sumit

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents a new approach to hyperspectral signature analysis, called Spectral Derivative Feature Coding (SDFC). It makes use of gradient changes in adjacent bands to characterize spectral variations so as to improve spectral discrimination and identification. In order to evaluate its performance, two binary coding methods, SPectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) are used to conduct comparative analysis. The experimental results demonstrate the proposed SDFC performs more effectively in capturing spectral characteristics.

  15. Infrared Signature Modeling and Analysis of Aircraft Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Arvind G.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the survivability of an aircraft has been put to task more than ever before. One of the main reasons is the increase in the usage of Infrared (IR) guided Anti-Aircraft Missiles, especially due to the availability of Man Portable Air Defence System (MANPADS) with some terrorist groups. Thus, aircraft IR signatures are gaining more importance as compared to their radar, visual, acoustic, or any other signatures. The exhaust plume ejected from the aircraft is one of the important sources of IR signature in military aircraft that use low bypass turbofan engines for propulsion. The focus of the present work is modelling of spectral IR radiation emission from the exhaust jet of a typical military aircraft and to evaluate the aircraft susceptibility in terms of the aircraft lock-on range due to its plume emission, for a simple case against a typical Surface to Air Missile (SAM). The IR signature due to the aircraft plume is examined in a holistic manner. A comprehensive methodology of computing IR signatures and its affect on aircraft lock-on range is elaborated. Commercial CFD software has been used to predict the plume thermo-physical properties and subsequently an in-house developed code was used for evaluating the IR radiation emitted by the plume. The LOWTRAN code has been used for modeling the atmospheric IR characteristics. The results obtained from these models are in reasonable agreement with some available experimental data. The analysis carried out in this paper succinctly brings out the intricacy of the radiation emitted by various gaseous species in the plume and the role of atmospheric IR transmissivity in dictating the plume IR signature as perceived by an IR guided SAM.

  16. Proteomic Signature of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibition Available for In Vivo Mechanism-of-Action Studies▿

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Patra, Malay; Albrecht, Dirk; Chen, David Y.-K.; Nicolaou, K. C.; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Bandow, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is a promising novel antibiotic target. Two inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis, platencin and platensimycin, were recently discovered and their molecular targets identified. Numerous structure-activity relationship studies for both platencin and platensimycin are currently being undertaken. We established a proteomic signature for fatty acid biosynthesis inhibition in Bacillus subtilis using platencin, platensimycin, cerulenin, and triclosan. The induced proteins, FabHA, FabHB, FabF, FabI, PlsX, and PanB, are enzymes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and thus linked directly to the target pathway. The proteomic signature can now be used to assess the in vivo mechanisms of action of compounds derived from structure-activity relationship programs, as demonstrated for the platensimycin-inspired chromium bioorganometallic PM47. It will further serve as a reference signature for structurally novel natural and synthetic antimicrobial compounds with unknown mechanisms of action. In summary, we described a proteomic signature in B. subtilis consisting of six upregulated proteins that is diagnostic of fatty acid biosynthesis inhibition and thus can be applied to advance antibacterial drug discovery programs. PMID:21383089

  17. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  18. Gene Expression Signature in Endemic Osteoarthritis by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Ning, Yujie; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Fangfang; Tan, Wuhong; Lei, Yanxia; Wu, Cuiyan; Zheng, Jingjing; Wang, Sen; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Lammi, Mikko J.; Guo, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Kashin-Beck Disease (KBD) is an endemic osteochondropathy with an unknown pathogenesis. Diagnosis of KBD is effective only in advanced cases, which eliminates the possibility of early treatment and leads to an inevitable exacerbation of symptoms. Therefore, we aim to identify an accurate blood-based gene signature for the detection of KBD. Previously published gene expression profile data on cartilage and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from adults with KBD were compared to select potential target genes. Microarray analysis was conducted to evaluate the expression of the target genes in a cohort of 100 KBD patients and 100 healthy controls. A gene expression signature was identified using a training set, which was subsequently validated using an independent test set with a minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) algorithm and support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. Fifty unique genes were differentially expressed between KBD patients and healthy controls. A 20-gene signature was identified that distinguished between KBD patients and controls with 90% accuracy, 85% sensitivity, and 95% specificity. This study identified a 20-gene signature that accurately distinguishes between patients with KBD and controls using peripheral blood samples. These results promote the further development of blood-based genetic biomarkers for detection of KBD. PMID:25997002

  19. GENSTYLE: exploration and analysis of DNA sequences with genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Fertil, Bernard; Massin, Matthieu; Lespinats, Sylvain; Devic, Caroline; Dumee, Philippe; Giron, Alain

    2005-07-01

    GENSTYLE (http://Genstyle.imed.jussieu.fr) is a workspace designed for the characterization and classification of nucleotide sequences. Based on the genomic signature paradigm, GENSTYLE focuses on oligonucleotide frequencies in DNA sequences. Users can select sequences of interest in the GENSTYLE companion database, where the whole set of GenBank sequences is grouped per species, or upload their own sequences to work with. Tools for the exploration and analysis of signatures allow (i) identification of the origin of DNA segments (detection of rare species or species for which technical problems prevent fast characterization, such as micro-organisms with slow growth), (ii) analysis of the homogeneity of a genome and isolation of areas with novel functionality (horizontal transfers for example)--and (iii) molecular phylogeny and taxonomy.

  20. Oscillation signature from multi-wavelength analysis on solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2014-03-24

    In this work, we investigate how the solar chromosphere responds to the photospheric dynamics by using tomography study, implementing multiwavelength analysis observations obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. By using high resolution, high-quality, simultaneous image sequences of multi-wavelength data, we try to obtain the oscillation signature that might play important role on chromospheric dynamic by using H-alpha (Hα) as primary diagnostic tool.

  1. Relation of laboratory and remotely sensed spectral signatures of ocean-dumped acid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.

    1978-01-01

    Results of laboratory transmission and remotely sensed ocean upwelled spectral signatures of acid waste ocean water solutions are presented. The studies were performed to establish ocean-dumped acid waste spectral signatures and to relate them to chemical and physical interactions occurring in the dump plume. The remotely sensed field measurements and the laboratory measurements were made using the same rapid-scanning spectrometer viewing a dump plume and with actual acid waste and ocean water samples, respectively. Laboratory studies showed that the signatures were produced by soluble ferric iron being precipitated in situ as ferric hydroxide upon dilution with ocean water. Sea-truth water samples were taken and analyzed for pertinent major components of the acid waste. Relationships were developed between the field and laboratory data both for spectral signatures and color changes with concentration. The relationships allow for the estimation of concentration of the indicator iron from remotely sensed spectral data and the laboratory transmission concentration data without sea-truth samples.

  2. IRMPD signature of protonated pantothenic acid, an ubiquitous nutrient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corinti, Davide; Mannina, Luisa; Chiavarino, Barbara; Steinmetz, Vincent; Fornarini, Simonetta; Crestoni, Maria Elisa

    2016-02-01

    Intrinsic properties of pantothenic acid, an essential nutraceutical, are examined. The effect of protonation on the energetic and geometric features of pantothenic acid, generated as gaseous protonated species, are investigated by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy over an extended frequency range (800-2000 cm-1 and 2800-3700 cm-1). DFT calculations are exploited to identify the possible structures and predict the absorption spectra at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. Two amide-protonated structures, characterized by the most stable binding motifs, account well for the experimental spectrum, thus revealing structurally diagnostic features of potential benefit for the development of highly sensitive and selective nutrient screening.

  3. Diagnostic marker signature for esophageal cancer from transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Warnecke-Eberz, Ute; Metzger, Ralf; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Drebber, Uta; Bollschweiler, Elfriede

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Diagnostic markers are needed for achieving a cure in esophageal cancer detecting and treating tumor cells earlier. In patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), we profiled the gene expression of ESCC compared to corresponding normal biopsies for diagnostic markers by genome microarrays. Profiling of gene expression identified 4844 genes differentially expressed, 2122 upregulated and 2722 downregulated in ESCC. Twenty-three overexpressed candidates with best scores from significance analysis have been selected for further analysis by TaqMan low-density array-technique using a validation cohort of 40 patients. The verification rate was 100 % for ESCC. Twenty-two markers were additionally overexpressed in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (EAC). The markers significantly overexpressed already in earlier tumor stages (pT1-2) of both histological subtypes (n = 19) have been clustered in a "diagnostic signature": PLA2G7, PRAME, MMP1, MMP3, MMP12, LIlRB2, TREM2, CHST2, IGFBP2, IGFBP7, KCNJ8, EMILIN2, CTHRC1, EMR2, WDR72, LPCAT1, COL4A2, CCL4, and SNX10. The marker signature will be translated to clinical practice to prove its diagnostic impact. This diagnostic signature may contribute to the earlier detection of tumor cells, with the aim to complement clinical techniques resulting in the development of better detection of concepts of esophageal cancer for earlier therapy and more favorite prognosis. PMID:26631031

  4. Analysis of Nozzle Jet Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong

    2010-01-01

    An axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock (LaNCETS) research airplane, was considered. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature, similar to what was observed in the LaNCETS flight data, is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. The CFD results provide a detailed description of the nozzle flow physics involved in the LaNCETS nozzle at different nozzle expansion conditions and help in interpreting LaNCETS flight data as well as in the eventual CFD analysis of a full LaNCETS aircraft. The current study also provided important information on proper modeling of the LaNCETS aircraft nozzle. The primary objective of the current CFD research effort was to support the LaNCETS flight research data analysis effort by studying the detailed nozzle exhaust jet plume s imperfect expansion effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. Figure 1 illustrates the primary flow physics present in the interaction between the exhaust jet plume shock and the sonic boom coming off of an axisymmetric body in supersonic flight. The steeper tail shock from highly expanded jet plume reduces the dip of the sonic boom N-wave signature. A structured finite-volume compressible full Navier-Stokes CFD code was used in the current study. This approach is not limited by the simplifying assumptions inherent in previous sonic boom analysis efforts. Also, this study was the first known jet plume sonic boom CFD study in which the full viscous nozzle flow field was modeled, without

  5. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  6. Instrumentation for motor-current signature analysis using synchronous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Castleberry, K.N.

    1996-07-01

    Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in association with the United States Enrichment Corporation, the U.S. Navy, and various Department of Energy sponsors, have been involved in the development and application of motor-current signature analysis for several years. In that time, innovation in the field has resulted in major improvements in signal processing, analysis, and system performance and capabilities. Recent work has concentrated on industrial implementation of one of the most promising new techniques. This report describes the developed method and the instrumentation package that is being used to investigate and develop potential applications.

  7. Power Signature Analysis of the SPECpower_ssj2008 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Poole, Stephen W

    2011-01-01

    As the power consumption of a server system becomes a mainstream concern in enterprise environments, understanding the system's power behavior at varying utilization levels provides us a key to select appropriate energy-efficiency optimizations. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of 177 SPECpower_ssj2008 results published between 2007--2010 to understand the changes of server's power behavior over time. In particular, we identified simple nonlinear functions appropriate for modeling the power behavior of today's, aggressively power-managed, machines. We consider this work as an important first step towards developing capability for power signature analysis of a high-end computer system.

  8. Wheat signature modeling and analysis for improved training statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Malila, W. A.; Cicone, R. C.; Gleason, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of wheat and other signatures in LANDSAT multispectral scanner data were examined through empirical analysis and simulation. Irrigation patterns varied widely within Kansas; 88 percent of wheat acreage in Finney was irrigated and 24 percent in Morton, as opposed to less than 3 percent for western 2/3's of the State. The irrigation practice was definitely correlated with the observed spectral response; wheat variety differences produced observable spectral differences due to leaf coloration and different dates of maturation. Between-field differences were generally greater than within-field differences, and boundary pixels produced spectral features distinct from those within field centers. Multiclass boundary pixels contributed much of the observed bias in proportion estimates. The variability between signatures obtained by different draws of training data decreased as the sample size became larger; also, the resulting signatures became more robust and the particular decision threshold value became less important.

  9. Unique plasma metabolomic signatures of individuals with inherited disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    McCoin, Colin S; Piccolo, Brian D; Knotts, Trina A; Matern, Dietrich; Vockley, Jerry; Gillingham, Melanie B; Adams, Sean H

    2016-05-01

    Blood and urine acylcarnitine profiles are commonly used to diagnose long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAOD: i.e., long-chain hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [LCHAD] and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 [CPT2] deficiency), but the global metabolic impact of long-chain FAOD has not been reported. We utilized untargeted metabolomics to characterize plasma metabolites in 12 overnight-fasted individuals with FAOD (10 LCHAD, two CPT2) and 11 healthy age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls, with the caveat that individuals with FAOD consume a low-fat diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) while matched controls consume a typical American diet. In plasma 832 metabolites were identified, and partial least squared-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) identified 114 non-acylcarnitine variables that discriminated FAOD subjects and controls. FAOD individuals had significantly higher triglycerides and lower specific phosphatidylethanolamines, ceramides, and sphingomyelins. Differences in phosphatidylcholines were also found but the directionality differed by metabolite species. Further, there were few differences in non-lipid metabolites, indicating the metabolic impact of FAOD specifically on lipid pathways. This analysis provides evidence that LCHAD/CPT2 deficiency significantly alters complex lipid pathway flux. This metabolic signature may provide new clinical tools capable of confirming or diagnosing FAOD, even in subjects with a mild phenotype, and may provide clues regarding the biochemical and metabolic impact of FAOD that is relevant to the etiology of FAOD symptoms. PMID:26907176

  10. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  11. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses suggest reef manta rays feed on demersal zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Lydie I E; Rohner, Christoph A; Richardson, Anthony J; Marshall, Andrea D; Jaine, Fabrice R A; Bennett, Michael B; Townsend, Kathy A; Weeks, Scarla J; Nichols, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the trophic role and interaction of an animal is key to understanding its general ecology and dynamics. Conventional techniques used to elucidate diet, such as stomach content analysis, are not suitable for large threatened marine species. Non-lethal sampling combined with biochemical methods provides a practical alternative for investigating the feeding ecology of these species. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different zooplankton functional groups (i.e. near-surface zooplankton collected during manta ray feeding events and non-feeding periods, epipelagic zooplankton, demersal zooplankton and several different zooplankton taxa). Stable isotope δ(15)N values confirmed that the reef manta ray is a secondary consumer. This species had relatively high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) indicating a flagellate-based food source in the diet, which likely reflects feeding on DHA-rich near-surface and epipelagic zooplankton. However, high levels of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and slightly enriched δ(13)C values in reef manta ray tissue suggest that they do not feed solely on pelagic zooplankton, but rather obtain part of their diet from another origin. The closest match was with demersal zooplankton, suggesting it is an important component of the reef manta ray diet. The ability to feed on demersal zooplankton is likely linked to the horizontal and vertical movement patterns of this giant planktivore. These new insights into the habitat use and feeding ecology of the reef manta ray will assist in the effective evaluation of its conservation needs.

  12. Stable Isotope and Signature Fatty Acid Analyses Suggest Reef Manta Rays Feed on Demersal Zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Lydie I. E.; Rohner, Christoph A.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Jaine, Fabrice R. A.; Bennett, Michael B.; Townsend, Kathy A.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the trophic role and interaction of an animal is key to understanding its general ecology and dynamics. Conventional techniques used to elucidate diet, such as stomach content analysis, are not suitable for large threatened marine species. Non-lethal sampling combined with biochemical methods provides a practical alternative for investigating the feeding ecology of these species. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different zooplankton functional groups (i.e. near-surface zooplankton collected during manta ray feeding events and non-feeding periods, epipelagic zooplankton, demersal zooplankton and several different zooplankton taxa). Stable isotope δ15N values confirmed that the reef manta ray is a secondary consumer. This species had relatively high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) indicating a flagellate-based food source in the diet, which likely reflects feeding on DHA-rich near-surface and epipelagic zooplankton. However, high levels of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and slightly enriched δ13C values in reef manta ray tissue suggest that they do not feed solely on pelagic zooplankton, but rather obtain part of their diet from another origin. The closest match was with demersal zooplankton, suggesting it is an important component of the reef manta ray diet. The ability to feed on demersal zooplankton is likely linked to the horizontal and vertical movement patterns of this giant planktivore. These new insights into the habitat use and feeding ecology of the reef manta ray will assist in the effective evaluation of its conservation needs. PMID:24167562

  13. Using fractal analysis of thermal signatures for thyroid disease evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe; Sofron, Emil; Gavriloaia, Mariuca-Roxana; Ghemigean, Adina-Mariana

    2010-11-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and it protects against heat, light, injury and infection. Skin temperature is an important parameter for diagnosing diseases. Thermal analysis is non-invasive, painless, and relatively inexpensive, showing a great potential research. Since the thyroid regulates metabolic rate it is intimately connected to body temperature, more than, any modification of its function generates a specific thermal image on the neck skin. The shapes of thermal signatures are often irregular in size and shape. Euclidean geometry is not able to evaluate their shape for different thyroid diseases, and fractal geometry is used in this paper. Different thyroid diseases generate different shapes, and their complexity are evaluated by specific mathematical approaches, fractal analysis, in order to the evaluate selfsimilarity and lacunarity. Two kinds of thyroid diseases, hyperthyroidism and papillary cancer are analyzed in this paper. The results are encouraging and show the ability to continue research for thermal signature to be used in early diagnosis of thyroid diseases.

  14. Identifying signatures of sexual selection using genomewide selection components analysis

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Sarah P; Jones, Adam G

    2015-01-01

    Sexual selection must affect the genome for it to have an evolutionary impact, yet signatures of selection remain elusive. Here we use an individual-based model to investigate the utility of genome-wide selection components analysis, which compares allele frequencies of individuals at different life history stages within a single population to detect selection without requiring a priori knowledge of traits under selection. We modeled a diploid, sexually reproducing population and introduced strong mate choice on a quantitative trait to simulate sexual selection. Genome-wide allele frequencies in adults and offspring were compared using weighted FST values. The average number of outlier peaks (i.e., those with significantly large FST values) with a quantitative trait locus in close proximity (“real” peaks) represented correct diagnoses of loci under selection, whereas peaks above the FST significance threshold without a quantitative trait locus reflected spurious peaks. We found that, even with moderate sample sizes, signatures of strong sexual selection were detectable, but larger sample sizes improved detection rates. The model was better able to detect selection with more neutral markers, and when quantitative trait loci and neutral markers were distributed across multiple chromosomes. Although environmental variation decreased detection rates, the identification of real peaks nevertheless remained feasible. We also found that detection rates can be improved by sampling multiple populations experiencing similar selection regimes. In short, genome-wide selection components analysis is a challenging but feasible approach for the identification of regions of the genome under selection. PMID:26257884

  15. Dimensionality analysis of facial signatures in visible and thermal spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Nathan; Hu, Shuowen; Gurram, Prudhvi

    2015-06-01

    Face images are an important source of information for biometric recognition and intelligence gathering. While face recognition research has made significant progress over the past few decades, recognition of faces at extended ranges is still highly problematic. Recognition of a low-resolution probe face image from a gallery database, typically containing high resolution facial imagery, leads to lowered performance than traditional face recognition techniques. Learning and super-resolution based approaches have been proposed to improve face recognition at extended ranges; however, the resolution threshold for face recognition has not been examined extensively. Establishing a threshold resolution corresponding to the theoretical and empirical limitations of low resolution face recognition will allow algorithm developers to avoid focusing on improving performance where no distinguishable information for identification exists in the acquired signal. This work examines the intrinsic dimensionality of facial signatures and seeks to estimate a lower bound for the size of a face image required for recognition. We estimate a lower bound for face signatures in the visible and thermal spectra by conducting eigenanalysis using principal component analysis (PCA) (i.e., eigenfaces approach). We seek to estimate the intrinsic dimensionality of facial signatures, in terms of reconstruction error, by maximizing the amount of variance retained in the reconstructed dataset while minimizing the number of reconstruction components. Extending on this approach, we also examine the identification error to estimate the dimensionality lower bound for low-resolution to high-resolution (LR-to-HR) face recognition performance. Two multimodal face datasets are used for this study to evaluate the effects of dataset size and diversity on the underlying intrinsic dimensionality: 1) 50-subject NVESD face dataset (containing visible, MWIR, LWIR face imagery) and 2) 119-subject WSRI face dataset

  16. Extraction and analysis of signatures from the Gene Expression Omnibus by the crowd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zichen; Monteiro, Caroline D.; Jagodnik, Kathleen M.; Fernandez, Nicolas F.; Gundersen, Gregory W.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Jenkins, Sherry L.; Feldmann, Axel S.; Hu, Kevin S.; McDermott, Michael G.; Duan, Qiaonan; Clark, Neil R.; Jones, Matthew R.; Kou, Yan; Goff, Troy; Woodland, Holly; Amaral, Fabio M. R.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Fuchs, Oliver; Schüssler-Fiorenza Rose, Sophia M.; Sharma, Shvetank; Schwartz, Uwe; Bausela, Xabier Bengoetxea; Szymkiewicz, Maciej; Maroulis, Vasileios; Salykin, Anton; Barra, Carolina M.; Kruth, Candice D.; Bongio, Nicholas J.; Mathur, Vaibhav; Todoric, Radmila D.; Rubin, Udi E.; Malatras, Apostolos; Fulp, Carl T.; Galindo, John A.; Motiejunaite, Ruta; Jüschke, Christoph; Dishuck, Philip C.; Lahl, Katharina; Jafari, Mohieddin; Aibar, Sara; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Steenhuizen, Linda H.; Allison, Lindsey R.; Gamallo, Pablo; de Andres Segura, Fernando; Dae Devlin, Tyler; Pérez-García, Vicente; Ma'Ayan, Avi

    2016-09-01

    Gene expression data are accumulating exponentially in public repositories. Reanalysis and integration of themed collections from these studies may provide new insights, but requires further human curation. Here we report a crowdsourcing project to annotate and reanalyse a large number of gene expression profiles from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Through a massive open online course on Coursera, over 70 participants from over 25 countries identify and annotate 2,460 single-gene perturbation signatures, 839 disease versus normal signatures, and 906 drug perturbation signatures. All these signatures are unique and are manually validated for quality. Global analysis of these signatures confirms known associations and identifies novel associations between genes, diseases and drugs. The manually curated signatures are used as a training set to develop classifiers for extracting similar signatures from the entire GEO repository. We develop a web portal to serve these signatures for query, download and visualization.

  17. Extraction and analysis of signatures from the Gene Expression Omnibus by the crowd

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zichen; Monteiro, Caroline D.; Jagodnik, Kathleen M.; Fernandez, Nicolas F.; Gundersen, Gregory W.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Jenkins, Sherry L.; Feldmann, Axel S.; Hu, Kevin S.; McDermott, Michael G.; Duan, Qiaonan; Clark, Neil R.; Jones, Matthew R.; Kou, Yan; Goff, Troy; Woodland, Holly; Amaral, Fabio M R.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Fuchs, Oliver; Schüssler-Fiorenza Rose, Sophia M.; Sharma, Shvetank; Schwartz, Uwe; Bausela, Xabier Bengoetxea; Szymkiewicz, Maciej; Maroulis, Vasileios; Salykin, Anton; Barra, Carolina M.; Kruth, Candice D.; Bongio, Nicholas J.; Mathur, Vaibhav; Todoric, Radmila D; Rubin, Udi E.; Malatras, Apostolos; Fulp, Carl T.; Galindo, John A.; Motiejunaite, Ruta; Jüschke, Christoph; Dishuck, Philip C.; Lahl, Katharina; Jafari, Mohieddin; Aibar, Sara; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Steenhuizen, Linda H.; Allison, Lindsey R.; Gamallo, Pablo; de Andres Segura, Fernando; Dae Devlin, Tyler; Pérez-García, Vicente; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression data are accumulating exponentially in public repositories. Reanalysis and integration of themed collections from these studies may provide new insights, but requires further human curation. Here we report a crowdsourcing project to annotate and reanalyse a large number of gene expression profiles from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Through a massive open online course on Coursera, over 70 participants from over 25 countries identify and annotate 2,460 single-gene perturbation signatures, 839 disease versus normal signatures, and 906 drug perturbation signatures. All these signatures are unique and are manually validated for quality. Global analysis of these signatures confirms known associations and identifies novel associations between genes, diseases and drugs. The manually curated signatures are used as a training set to develop classifiers for extracting similar signatures from the entire GEO repository. We develop a web portal to serve these signatures for query, download and visualization. PMID:27667448

  18. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Leahy, Richard M; Wise, Barton L; Lane, Nancy E; Badawi, Ramsey D; Joshi, Anand A

    2014-01-01

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric—global point signature (GPS)—that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GPS representation—such as stability, a standard Euclidean (ℓ2) metric definition, and invariance to scaling, translation and rotation—to perform shape analysis of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed GPS representation to provide a means for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations. PMID:24503490

  19. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Leahy, Richard M; Wise, Barton L; Lane, Nancy E; Badawi, Ramsey D; Joshi, Anand A

    2014-02-21

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric--global point signature (GPS)--that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GPS representation--such as stability, a standard Euclidean (ℓ(2)) metric definition, and invariance to scaling, translation and rotation--to perform shape analysis of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed GPS representation to provide a means for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations.

  20. Global point signature for shape analysis of carpal bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Leahy, Richard M.; Wise, Barton L.; Lane, Nancy E.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Joshi, Anand A.

    2014-02-01

    We present a method based on spectral theory for the shape analysis of carpal bones of the human wrist. We represent the cortical surface of the carpal bone in a coordinate system based on the eigensystem of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation. We employ a metric—global point signature (GPS)—that exploits the scale and isometric invariance of eigenfunctions to quantify overall bone shape. We use a fast finite-element-method to compute the GPS metric. We capitalize upon the properties of GPS representation—such as stability, a standard Euclidean (ℓ2) metric definition, and invariance to scaling, translation and rotation—to perform shape analysis of the carpal bones of ten women and ten men from a publicly-available database. We demonstrate the utility of the proposed GPS representation to provide a means for comparing shapes of the carpal bones across populations.

  1. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryter, R. C.; Haynes, H. D.

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment, including altered conditions in the process downstream of the motor-driven equipment. It was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the effects of aging and service wear systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. These motor current variations are carried by the electrical cables processes as desired. Motor current signatures, obtained in both time and over time to provide early indication of degradation. Successful applications of MCSA technology (patent applied for) include not only motor-operated valves but also pumps of various designs, blowers, and air conditioning systems. Examples are presented briefly, and speculation regarding the applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also given.

  2. Condition monitoring of machinery using motor current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kryter, R.C.; Haynes, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a powerful monitoring tool for motor-driven equipment that provides a nonintrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment, including altered conditions in the process ''downstream'' of the motor-driven equipment. It was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the effects of aging and service wear systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. These motor current variations are carried by the electrical cables processes as desired. Motor current signatures, obtained in both time and over time to provide early indication of degradation. Successful applications of MCSA technology (patent applied for) include not only motor-operated valves but also pumps of various designs, blowers, and air conditioning systems. Examples are presented briefly, and speculation regarding the applicability of MCSA to a broader range of equipment monitoring and production line testing is also given. 1 ref., 13 figs.

  3. Reactor coolant pump testing using motor current signatures analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, N.; Bellamy, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes reactor coolant pump motor testing carried out at Florida Power Corporation`s Crystal River plant using Framatome Technologies` new EMPATH (Electric Motor Performance Analysis and Trending Hardware) system. EMPATH{trademark} uses an improved form of Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, for detecting deterioration in the rotors of AC induction motors. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA) is a monitoring tool for motor driven equipment that provides a non-intrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment. The base technology was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the affects of aging and service wear specifically on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plant safety systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of electric machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. The motor current variations, resulting from changes in load caused by gears, pulleys, friction, bearings, and other conditions that may change over the life of the motor, are carried by the electrical cables powering the motor and are extracted at any convenient location along the motor lead. These variations modulate the 60 Hz carrier frequency and appear as sidebands in the spectral plot.

  4. New Suns in the Cosmos. III. Multifractal Signature Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, D. B.; Nepomuceno, M. M. F.; de Moraes Junior, P. R. V.; Lopes, C. E. F.; Das Chagas, M. L.; Bravo, J. P.; Costa, A. D.; Canto Martins, B. L.; De Medeiros, J. R.; Leão, I. C.

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the multifractality signatures in hourly time series extracted from the CoRoTspacecraft database. Our analysis is intended to highlight the possibility that astrophysical time series can be members of a particular class of complex and dynamic processes, which require several photometric variability diagnostics to characterize their structural and topological properties. To achieve this goal, we search for contributions due to a nonlinear temporal correlation and effects caused by heavier tails than the Gaussian distribution, using a detrending moving average algorithm for one-dimensional multifractal signals (MFDMA). We observe that the correlation structure is the main source of multifractality, while heavy-tailed distribution plays a minor role in generating the multifractal effects. Our work also reveals that the rotation period of stars is inherently scaled by the degree of multifractality. As a result, analyzing the multifractal degree of the referred series, we uncover an evolution of multifractality from shorter to larger periods.

  5. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ida E; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T; Morgan, Kate V; Meddle, Simone L; Healy, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests.

  6. Sensitive quantitative detection/identification of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by signature lipid biomarker analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. |; Alugupalli, S.; Schrum, D.P.

    1997-08-01

    Unique signature lipid biomarkers were found in the acid-fast oocytes of Cryptosporidium parvum. This makes possible the rapid detection/identification and potential infectivity directly from drinking water membrane filtrates.

  7. Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

  8. Geomorphic signatures on Brutsaert base flow recession analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutzner, Raphaël.; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Tarolli, Paolo; Weijs, Steven V.; Nicotina, Ludovico; Ceola, Serena; Tomasic, Nevena; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Parlange, Marc B.; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    This paper addresses the signatures of catchment geomorphology on base flow recession curves. Its relevance relates to the implied predictability of base flow features, which are central to catchment-scale transport processes and to ecohydrological function. Moving from the classical recession curve analysis method, originally applied in the Finger Lakes Region of New York, a large set of recession curves has been analyzed from Swiss streamflow data. For these catchments, digital elevation models have been precisely analyzed and a method aimed at the geomorphic origins of recession curves has been applied to the Swiss data set. The method links river network morphology, epitomized by time-varying distribution of contributing channel sites, with the classic parameterization of recession events. This is done by assimilating two scaling exponents, β and bG, with |dQ/dt| ∝ Qβ where Q is at-a-station gauged flow rate and N(l) ∝ N>(l>)∝G>(l>)bG where l is the downstream distance from the channel heads receding in time, N(l) is the number of draining channel reaches located at distance l from their heads, and G(l) is the total drainage network length at a distance greater or equal to l, the active drainage network. We find that the method provides good results in catchments where drainage density can be regarded as spatially constant. A correction to the method is proposed which accounts for arbitrary local drainage densities affecting the local drainage inflow per unit channel length. Such corrections properly vanish when the drainage density become spatially constant. Overall, definite geomorphic signatures are recognizable for recession curves, with notable theoretical and practical implications.

  9. Proximate composition and fatty acid signatures of selected forage fish species in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Restoration Project 95121. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Worth, G.A.J.; Miculka, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    The proximate composition and fatty acid signatures of several prey species, which are important for sea birds and marine mammals in Prince William Sound, Alaska, were determined. Fish were collected as part of the SEA cruises in the fall of 1995 and were frozen immediately and then shipped to Galveston for analysis. Fatty acid signatures of herring, pollock, and tomcod were consistent with previously reported data, Three different species of sole (English, rock, and flathead) were also consistent with previously reported data for yellowfin sole. Detailed analyses of individual rock fish suggest that this species may exhibit trends in some specific fatty acids (20:5 n-3, 22:6 n-3) which differ from herring or pollock.

  10. Protein meta-functional signatures from combining sequence, structure, evolution, and amino acid property information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Horst, Jeremy A; Cheng, Gong; Nickle, David C; Samudrala, Ram

    2008-09-26

    Protein function is mediated by different amino acid residues, both their positions and types, in a protein sequence. Some amino acids are responsible for the stability or overall shape of the protein, playing an indirect role in protein function. Others play a functionally important role as part of active or binding sites of the protein. For a given protein sequence, the residues and their degree of functional importance can be thought of as a signature representing the function of the protein. We have developed a combination of knowledge- and biophysics-based function prediction approaches to elucidate the relationships between the structural and the functional roles of individual residues and positions. Such a meta-functional signature (MFS), which is a collection of continuous values representing the functional significance of each residue in a protein, may be used to study proteins of known function in greater detail and to aid in experimental characterization of proteins of unknown function. We demonstrate the superior performance of MFS in predicting protein functional sites and also present four real-world examples to apply MFS in a wide range of settings to elucidate protein sequence-structure-function relationships. Our results indicate that the MFS approach, which can combine multiple sources of information and also give biological interpretation to each component, greatly facilitates the understanding and characterization of protein function.

  11. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, G.; Stanfield, R.

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  12. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres. PMID:26263321

  13. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres.

  14. Signatures of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Metabolic Activity in Enrichment Cultures from a Sulphur Oxidizing Acid Mine Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G. F.; Bernier, L.; Cowie, B. R.; Warren, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Delineating the role of microorganisms in geochemical processes of interest in natural environments requires the development of tools that provide the ability to distinguish amongst microbial activity associated with different metabolic guilds. The gap between phylogenetic characterization and phenotypic understanding remains, underscoring the need to consider alternative methods. Compound specific analysis of cellular components has the potential to differentiate between active metabolic processes supporting microbial communities and may be especially useful in extreme environments. The goal of this study was to determine whether the phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) distribution and isotopic signatures associated with autotrophs and heterotrophs enriched from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system differed, and further whether natural consortial autotrophic isolates showed similar signatures to autotrophic pure strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans. Two distinct initial enrichments with tetrathionate and CO2 yielded primarily autotrophic (95%) Acidithiobaccillus spp. sulphur oxidizing communities. The remaining microbial members of theses enrichments (<5%) were morphologically distinct and heterotrophic, as subculture of the consortial isolates in a medium amended with glucose but without tetrathionate selectively resulted in their visible growth. PLFA profiles and δ13C signatures from autotrophic (1) natural enrichments, pure cultures of (2) A. ferrooxidans and (3) A. thiooxidans were similar, but collectively differed from those of the natural heterotrophic enrichment cultures. The PLFA profiles for the heterotrophic communities were made up of primarily (88-99%) C16:0 and two isomers of C18:1. In contrast, the autotrophic communities had high proportions of C16:1 (up to 18%) as well as cyclo C17 and cyclo C19 PLFA that combined comprised 18 to 58% of the observed PLFA. The δ13C signatures of the PLFA also differed strongly between the two

  15. The effects of different representations on static structure analysis of computer malware signatures.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ajit; Chen, Yi; Pang, Shaoning; Tao, Ban

    2013-01-01

    The continuous growth of malware presents a problem for internet computing due to increasingly sophisticated techniques for disguising malicious code through mutation and the time required to identify signatures for use by antiviral software systems (AVS). Malware modelling has focused primarily on semantics due to the intended actions and behaviours of viral and worm code. The aim of this paper is to evaluate a static structure approach to malware modelling using the growing malware signature databases now available. We show that, if malware signatures are represented as artificial protein sequences, it is possible to apply standard sequence alignment techniques in bioinformatics to improve accuracy of distinguishing between worm and virus signatures. Moreover, aligned signature sequences can be mined through traditional data mining techniques to extract metasignatures that help to distinguish between viral and worm signatures. All bioinformatics and data mining analysis were performed on publicly available tools and Weka. PMID:23983644

  16. The Effects of Different Representations on Static Structure Analysis of Computer Malware Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ajit; Chen, Yi; Pang, Shaoning; Tao, Ban

    2013-01-01

    The continuous growth of malware presents a problem for internet computing due to increasingly sophisticated techniques for disguising malicious code through mutation and the time required to identify signatures for use by antiviral software systems (AVS). Malware modelling has focused primarily on semantics due to the intended actions and behaviours of viral and worm code. The aim of this paper is to evaluate a static structure approach to malware modelling using the growing malware signature databases now available. We show that, if malware signatures are represented as artificial protein sequences, it is possible to apply standard sequence alignment techniques in bioinformatics to improve accuracy of distinguishing between worm and virus signatures. Moreover, aligned signature sequences can be mined through traditional data mining techniques to extract metasignatures that help to distinguish between viral and worm signatures. All bioinformatics and data mining analysis were performed on publicly available tools and Weka. PMID:23983644

  17. The effects of different representations on static structure analysis of computer malware signatures.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ajit; Chen, Yi; Pang, Shaoning; Tao, Ban

    2013-01-01

    The continuous growth of malware presents a problem for internet computing due to increasingly sophisticated techniques for disguising malicious code through mutation and the time required to identify signatures for use by antiviral software systems (AVS). Malware modelling has focused primarily on semantics due to the intended actions and behaviours of viral and worm code. The aim of this paper is to evaluate a static structure approach to malware modelling using the growing malware signature databases now available. We show that, if malware signatures are represented as artificial protein sequences, it is possible to apply standard sequence alignment techniques in bioinformatics to improve accuracy of distinguishing between worm and virus signatures. Moreover, aligned signature sequences can be mined through traditional data mining techniques to extract metasignatures that help to distinguish between viral and worm signatures. All bioinformatics and data mining analysis were performed on publicly available tools and Weka.

  18. A dedicated compressor monitoring system employing current signature analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castleberry, K.N.; Smith, S.F.

    1993-04-15

    The use of motor current signature analysis (CSA) has been established as a useful method for periodic monitoring of electrically driven equipment. CSA is, moreover, especially well suited as the basis for a dedicated continuous monitoring system in an industrial setting. This paper presents just such an application that has been developed and installed in the US government uranium enrichment plant at Portsmouth, Ohio. The system, which is designed to detect specific axial-flow compressor problems in 1700-hp gaseous diffusion compressors, is described in detail along with an explanation of detected fault conditions and the required signal manipulations. Amplitude demodulation and subsequent digital processing of motor signals sensed from area control room ammeter loops are used to accomplish the desired monitoring task. Using modified off-the-shelf multiplexing equipment, a 386-type personal computer, and special digital signal processing hardware, the system is presently configured to monitor ten compressors but is expandable to monitor more than 100. Within its first few days of operation in September 1992, the system detected a compressor problem that, when corrected, resulted in a cost avoidance of about $150,000, which more than paid for the hardware and software development costs. Finally, plans to expand system coverage in the coming year are also discussed.

  19. Analysis of Bile Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjövall, Jan; Griffiths, William J.; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi

    Bile acids constitute a large family of steroids in vertebrates, normally formed from cholesterol and carrying a carboxyl group in a side-chain of variable length. Bile alcohols, also formed from cholesterol, have similar structures as bile acids, except for the absence of a carboxyl group in the steroid skeleton. The conversion of cholesterol to bile acids and/or bile alcohols is of major importance for maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, both from quantitative and regulatory points of view (Chiang, 2004; Kalaany and Mangelsdorf, 2006; Moore, Kato, Xie, et al., 2006; Scotti, Gilardi, Godio, et al., 2007). Appropriately conjugated bile acids and bile alcohols (also referred to as bile salts) are secreted in bile and serve vital functions in the absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble compounds (Hofmann, 2007). Reliable analytical methods are required for studies of the functions and pathophysiological importance of the variety of bile acids and bile alcohols present in living organisms. When combined with genetic and proteomic studies, analysis of these small molecules (in today's terminology: metabolomics, steroidomics, sterolomics, cholanoidomics, etc.) will lead to a deeper understanding of the integrated metabolic processes in lipid metabolism.

  20. 13C Incorporation into Signature Fatty Acids as an Assay for Carbon Allocation in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Pål Axel; van Aarle, Ingrid M.; Gavito, Mayra E.; Bengtson, Per; Bengtsson, Göran

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi consume significant amounts of plant assimilated C, but this C flow has been difficult to quantify. The neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 is a quantitative signature for most arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots and soil. We measured carbon transfer from four plant species to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices by estimating 13C enrichment of 16:1ω5 and compared it with 13C enrichment of total root and mycelial C. Carbon allocation to mycelia was detected within 1 day in monoxenic arbuscular mycorrhizal root cultures labeled with [13C]glucose. The 13C enrichment of neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 extracted from roots increased from 0.14% 1 day after labeling to 2.2% 7 days after labeling. The colonized roots usually were more enriched for 13C in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 than for the root specific neutral lipid fatty acid 18:2ω6,9. We labeled plant assimilates by using 13CO2 in whole-plant experiments. The extraradical mycelium often was more enriched for 13C than was the intraradical mycelium, suggesting rapid translocation of carbon to and more active growth by the extraradical mycelium. Since there was a good correlation between 13C enrichment in neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 and total 13C in extraradical mycelia in different systems (r2 = 0.94), we propose that the total amount of labeled C in intraradical and extraradical mycelium can be calculated from the 13C enrichment of 16:1ω5. The method described enables evaluation of C flow from plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to be made without extraction, purification and identification of fungal mycelia. PMID:15870350

  1. Longitudinal analysis of whole blood transcriptomes to explore molecular signatures associated with acute renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heesun; Günther, Oliver; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Wilson-McManus, Janet E; Ng, Raymond T; Balshaw, Robert; Keown, Paul A; McMaster, Robert; McManus, Bruce M; Isbel, Nicole M; Knoll, Greg; Tebbutt, Scott J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored a time course of peripheral whole blood transcriptomes from kidney transplantation patients who either experienced an acute rejection episode or did not in order to better delineate the immunological and biological processes measureable in blood leukocytes that are associated with acute renal allograft rejection. Using microarrays, we generated gene expression data from 24 acute rejectors and 24 nonrejectors. We filtered the data to obtain the most unambiguous and robustly expressing probe sets and selected a subset of patients with the clearest phenotype. We then performed a data-driven exploratory analysis using data reduction and differential gene expression analysis tools in order to reveal gene expression signatures associated with acute allograft rejection. Using a template-matching algorithm, we then expanded our analysis to include time course data, identifying genes whose expression is modulated leading up to acute rejection. We have identified molecular phenotypes associated with acute renal allograft rejection, including a significantly upregulated signature of neutrophil activation and accumulation following transplant surgery that is common to both acute rejectors and nonrejectors. Our analysis shows that this expression signature appears to stabilize over time in nonrejectors but persists in patients who go on to reject the transplanted organ. In addition, we describe an expression signature characteristic of lymphocyte activity and proliferation. This lymphocyte signature is significantly downregulated in both acute rejectors and nonrejectors following surgery; however, patients who go on to reject the organ show a persistent downregulation of this signature relative to the neutrophil signature.

  2. Bearing defect signature analysis using advanced nonlinear signal analysis in a controlled environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing high-frequency data from a highly instrumented rotor assembly, seeded bearing defect signatures are characterized using both conventional linear approaches, such as power spectral density analysis, and recently developed nonlinear techniques such as bicoherence analysis. Traditional low-frequency (less than 20 kHz) analysis and high-frequency envelope analysis of both accelerometer and acoustic emission data are used to recover characteristic bearing distress information buried deeply in acquired data. The successful coupling of newly developed nonlinear signal analysis with recovered wideband envelope data from accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors is the innovative focus of this research.

  3. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  4. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2016-07-12

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  5. Analysis of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature for Isolated Nozzle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to study the plume effects on sonic boom signature for isolated nozzle configurations. The objectives of these analyses were to provide comparison to past work using modern CFD analysis tools, to investigate the differences of high aspect ratio nozzles to circular (axisymmetric) nozzles, and to report the effects of underexpanded nozzle operation on boom signature. CFD analysis was used to address the plume effects on sonic boom signature from a baseline exhaust nozzle. Near-field pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) between 6 and 10. A computer code was used to extrapolate these signatures to a ground-observed sonic boom N-wave. Trends show that there is a reduction in sonic boom N-wave signature as NPR is increased from 6 to 10. The performance curve for this supersonic nozzle is flat, so there is not a significant loss in thrust coefficient as the NPR is increased. As a result, this benefit could be realized without significant loss of performance. Analyses were also collected for a high aspect ratio nozzle based on the baseline design for comparison. Pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios from 8 to 12. Signatures were nearly twice as strong for the two-dimensional case, and trends also show a reduction in sonic boom signature as NPR is increased from 8 to 12. As low boom designs are developed and improved, there will be a need for understanding the interaction between the aircraft boat tail shocks and the exhaust nozzle plume. These CFD analyses will provide a baseline study for future analysis efforts.

  6. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    PubMed Central

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFMTM (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM. PMID:24717228

  7. [Generation of nalidixic acid-resistant strains and signature-tagged mutants of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Shang, Lin; Li, Wei; Li, Liangjun; Li, Lu; Zhang, Sihua; Li, Tingting; Li, Yaokun; Liu, Lei; Guo, Zhiwei; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2008-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a very important respiratory pathogen for swine and causes great economic losses in pig industry worldwide. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is an effective method to identify virulence genes in bacteria. In this study, we selected nalidixic acid-resistant strains of APP serotypes 1 and 3 by in vitro cultivation, and used as receipt strains for constructing transposon mutants by mating with E. coli CC 118 lambdapir or S17-1 lambdapir containing mini-Tn10 tag plasmids pLOF/TAG1-48, with or without the help of E. coli DH5alpha (pRK2073). We screened mutant strains by antibiotics selection, PCR and Southern blot identification. Our data revealed that nalidixic acid-resistance of APP strains could easily be induced in vitro and the resistance was due to the mutation in the DNA gyrase A subunit gene gyrA. In the mating experiments, the bi-parental mating was more effective and easier than tri-parental mating. Different APP strains showed a different mating and transposon efficiency in the bi-parental mating, with the strains of serotype 1 much higher than serotype 3 and the reference strain of serotype 3 higher than the field strains. These data were helpful for the construction of STM mutants and pickup of virulence genes of APP. PMID:18338580

  8. Security analysis and improvements of arbitrated quantum signature schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiangfu; Qiu, Daowen

    2010-10-01

    A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or document. For signing quantum messages, some arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) schemes have been proposed. It was claimed that these AQS schemes could guarantee unconditional security. However, we show that they can be repudiated by the receiver Bob. To conquer this shortcoming, we construct an AQS scheme using a public board. The AQS scheme not only avoids being disavowed by the receiver but also preserves all merits in the existing schemes. Furthermore, we discover that entanglement is not necessary while all these existing AQS schemes depend on entanglement. Therefore, we present another AQS scheme without utilizing entangled states in the signing phase and the verifying phase. This scheme has three advantages: it does not utilize entangled states and it preserves all merits in the existing schemes; the signature can avoid being disavowed by the receiver; and it provides a higher efficiency in transmission and reduces the complexity of implementation.

  9. Exometabolom analysis of breast cancer cell lines: Metabolic signature

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Lucas; Erbes, Thalia; Halbach, Sebastian; Brummer, Tilman; Jäger, Markus; Hirschfeld, Marc; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells show characteristic effects on cellular turnover and DNA/RNA modifications leading to elevated levels of excreted modified nucleosides. We investigated the molecular signature of different subtypes of breast cancer cell lines and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. Prepurification of cell culture supernatants was performed by cis-diol specific affinity chromatography using boronate-derivatized polyacrylamide gel. Samples were analyzed by application of reversed phase chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Collectively, we determined 23 compounds from RNA metabolism, two from purine metabolism, five from polyamine/methionine cycle, one from histidine metabolism and two from nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. We observed major differences of metabolite excretion pattern between the breast cancer cell lines and MCF-10A, just as well as between the different breast cancer cell lines themselves. Differences in metabolite excretion resulting from cancerous metabolism can be integrated into altered processes on the cellular level. Modified nucleosides have great potential as biomarkers in due consideration of the heterogeneity of breast cancer that is reflected by the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Our data suggests that the metabolic signature of breast cancer cell lines might be a more subtype-specific tool to predict breast cancer, rather than a universal approach. PMID:26293811

  10. Online Handwritten Signature Verification Using Neural Network Classifier Based on Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iranmanesh, Vahab; Ahmad, Sharifah Mumtazah Syed; Adnan, Wan Azizun Wan; Arigbabu, Olasimbo Ayodeji; Malallah, Fahad Layth

    2014-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in designing online signature verification (OSV) system is to find the most distinctive features with high discriminating capabilities for the verification, particularly, with regard to the high variability which is inherent in genuine handwritten signatures, coupled with the possibility of skilled forgeries having close resemblance to the original counterparts. In this paper, we proposed a systematic approach to online signature verification through the use of multilayer perceptron (MLP) on a subset of principal component analysis (PCA) features. The proposed approach illustrates a feature selection technique on the usually discarded information from PCA computation, which can be significant in attaining reduced error rates. The experiment is performed using 4000 signature samples from SIGMA database, which yielded a false acceptance rate (FAR) of 7.4% and a false rejection rate (FRR) of 6.4%. PMID:25133227

  11. Online handwritten signature verification using neural network classifier based on principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Vahab; Ahmad, Sharifah Mumtazah Syed; Adnan, Wan Azizun Wan; Yussof, Salman; Arigbabu, Olasimbo Ayodeji; Malallah, Fahad Layth

    2014-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in designing online signature verification (OSV) system is to find the most distinctive features with high discriminating capabilities for the verification, particularly, with regard to the high variability which is inherent in genuine handwritten signatures, coupled with the possibility of skilled forgeries having close resemblance to the original counterparts. In this paper, we proposed a systematic approach to online signature verification through the use of multilayer perceptron (MLP) on a subset of principal component analysis (PCA) features. The proposed approach illustrates a feature selection technique on the usually discarded information from PCA computation, which can be significant in attaining reduced error rates. The experiment is performed using 4000 signature samples from SIGMA database, which yielded a false acceptance rate (FAR) of 7.4% and a false rejection rate (FRR) of 6.4%. PMID:25133227

  12. Online handwritten signature verification using neural network classifier based on principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Vahab; Ahmad, Sharifah Mumtazah Syed; Adnan, Wan Azizun Wan; Yussof, Salman; Arigbabu, Olasimbo Ayodeji; Malallah, Fahad Layth

    2014-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in designing online signature verification (OSV) system is to find the most distinctive features with high discriminating capabilities for the verification, particularly, with regard to the high variability which is inherent in genuine handwritten signatures, coupled with the possibility of skilled forgeries having close resemblance to the original counterparts. In this paper, we proposed a systematic approach to online signature verification through the use of multilayer perceptron (MLP) on a subset of principal component analysis (PCA) features. The proposed approach illustrates a feature selection technique on the usually discarded information from PCA computation, which can be significant in attaining reduced error rates. The experiment is performed using 4000 signature samples from SIGMA database, which yielded a false acceptance rate (FAR) of 7.4% and a false rejection rate (FRR) of 6.4%.

  13. Determining spatial changes in the diet of nearshore suspension-feeders along the South African coastline: Stable isotope and fatty acid signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, E. Louise; Ambrose, Shan T.; Richoux, Nicole B.; Froneman, P. William

    2010-04-01

    Mesoscale oceanographic features, such as upwellings, are known to play an important role in regulating the structure and productivity of nearshore marine communities. Stable isotope (δ 13C and δ 15N) and fatty acid analyses were employed to assess the influence of an upwelling cell along the south-eastern coastline of southern Africa on the diet of the mussel, Perna perna. Eight sites were sampled: two upstream, three in the vicinity and three downstream of the upwelling cell. Stable isotope and fatty acid signatures indicated that the mussels consumed a diet of detritus derived mainly from macroalgae, diatoms and dinoflagellates. One-way ANOVA on the δ 13C and δ 15N signatures and the principal component analysis of the fatty acid profiles of the mussels identified distinct groups corresponding to the above mentioned regions. The proportion of diatom biomarkers in the fatty acid profiles decreased downstream of the upwelling region while the proportion of dinoflagellate biomarkers increased. Upwelling regions are typically associated with elevated levels of productivity; however, these systems usually become silicon depleted and result in the replacement of diatoms with dinoflagellates. The highest proportions of the dinoflagellate markers were recorded in the two furthest sites downstream of the upwelling cell. The spatial variation in the diet of the mussels, therefore, appears to reflect the presence of the upwelling cell in the nearshore biology of the region.

  14. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.; Ojakangas, G.; Mulrooney, M.

    2012-09-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies (R/Bs), to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) studies to help remediate the LEO environment. Tumble rates are needed to plan and develop proximity and docking operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-W Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on ascertaining how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48) SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard Russian government "gray" scheme and the second target is white/orange as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each observed in three independent rotation states: (a) spin-stabilized rotation (about the long axis), (b) end-over-end rotation, and (c) a 10 degree wobble about the center of mass. The first two cases represent simple spin about either primary axis. The third - what we call "wobble" - represents maximum principal axis rotation, with an inertia tensor that is offset from the symmetry axes. By comparing the resultant phase and orientation-dependent laboratory signatures with actual lightcurves derived from telescopic observations of orbiting R/Bs, we intend to assess the intrinsic R/B rotation states. In the simplest case, simulated R/B behavior coincides with principal axis spin states, while more complex R

  15. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  16. Signature Based Detection of User Events for Post-mortem Forensic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Joshua Isaac; Gladyshev, Pavel; Zhu, Yuandong

    This paper introduces a novel approach to user event reconstruction by showing the practicality of generating and implementing signature-based analysis methods to reconstruct high-level user actions from a collection of low-level traces found during a post-mortem forensic analysis of a system. Traditional forensic analysis and the inferences an investigator normally makes when given digital evidence, are examined. It is then demonstrated that this natural process of inferring high-level events from low-level traces may be encoded using signature-matching techniques. Simple signatures using the defined method are created and applied for three popular Windows-based programs as a proof of concept.

  17. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids for Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie; Elsila, Jamie E.; Stern J. C.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    Significant portions of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory , including amino acids, could have been delivered to the Earth's sur face by comets and their fragments. Analysis of comets via spectrosc opic observations has identified many organic molecules, including me thane, ethane, arnmonia, cyanic acid, formaldehyde, formamide, acetal ehyde, acetonitrile, and methanol. Reactions between these identifie d molecules could allow the formation of more complex organics such a s amino acids. Isotopic analysis could reveal whether an extraterrest rial signature is present in the Stardust-exposed amines and amino ac ids. Although bulk isotopic analysis would be dominated by the EACA contaminant's terrestrial signature, compoundspecific isotope analysi s (CSIA) could determine the signature of each of the other individua l amines. Here, we report on progress made towards CSIA of the amino acids glycine and EACA in Stardustreturned samples.

  18. Trophic interactions in the benthic boundary layer of the Beaufort Sea shelf, Arctic Ocean: Combining bulk stable isotope and fatty acid signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Tara L.; Deibel, Don; Parrish, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The food web structure and diets of 26 taxa of benthic boundary layer (BBL) zooplankton on the Beaufort Sea shelf were studied using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and fatty acids. Mean δ15N values ranged from 7.3‰ for the amphipod Melita formosa to 14.9‰ for an unidentified polychaete, suggesting that taxa sampled came from three trophic levels. For 8 taxa, the lightest carbon signature occurred near the mouth of the Mackenzie River. Stable isotope ratios helped clarify the origin of signature fatty acids. Levels of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were negatively correlated with δ15N, with the exception of 22:6ω3, which was positively correlated with δ15N, suggesting that this essential PUFA was retained through the food web. Discriminant analysis proved to be a powerful tool, predicting taxa from fatty acid profiles with 99% accuracy, and revealing strong phylogenetic trends in fatty acid profiles. The amphipod Arrhis phyllonyx had higher levels of ω6 PUFA, especially 20:4ω6 with several possible sources, than other peracarid crustaceans. The holothurian had high levels of odd numbered and branched chain fatty acids, indicative of bacterial consumption, while fatty acids of phytoplankton origin were important discriminants for Calanus hyperboreus and the chaetognaths Eukrohnia hamata and Parasagitta elegans. This relationship indicates that the conventional phytoplankton-copepod-chaetognath food web found in the water column also exists in the BBL. This observation, as well as generally low δ15N and high levels of certain PUFA in samples with lower δ15N, strongly suggests that BBL zooplankton on the Beaufort Sea shelf have access to fresh material of phytoplankton origin either by feeding on sedimenting matter or by active migration to surface waters.

  19. Post-analysis report on Chesapeake Bay data processing. [spectral analysis and recognition computer signature extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F.

    1972-01-01

    The additional processing performed on data collected over the Rhode River Test Site and Forestry Site in November 1970 is reported. The techniques and procedures used to obtain the processed results are described. Thermal data collected over three approximately parallel lines of the site were contoured, and the results color coded, for the purpose of delineating important scene constituents and to identify trees attacked by pine bark beetles. Contouring work and histogram preparation are reviewed and the important conclusions from the spectral analysis and recognition computer (SPARC) signature extension work are summarized. The SPARC setup and processing records are presented and recommendations are made for future data collection over the site.

  20. Characterization of blubber fatty acid signatures in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) over the postweaning fast.

    PubMed

    Noren, Dawn P; Budge, Suzanne M; Iverson, Sara J; Goebel, Michael E; Costa, Daniel P; Williams, Terrie M

    2013-12-01

    Phocids routinely fast for extended periods. During these fasts, energetic requirements are met primarily through the catabolism of blubber lipid. To assess whether fatty acid (FA) composition changes during the postweaning fast in northern elephant seals, blubber biopsies were acquired longitudinally from 43 pups at 2.3 ± 1.5 and 55.2 ± 3.7 days postweaning in 1999 and 2000. At weaning, short-chain monounsaturated FA (SC-MUFA, ≤18 carbons) dominated the blubber while saturated FA (SFA) were found in the next highest proportion. The major FA (all ≥1 % by mass) comprised approximately 91 % of total blubber FA. In both years, 18:1n-9 and 16:0 were the most prevalent FA. Major FA mobilized during the fast consisted of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA), SFA, and SC-MUFA. Long-chain MUFA (>18 carbons) tended to be conserved. The fractional mobilization value of 20:5n-3 was the highest, resulting in significant reductions of this PUFA. Although concentrations of some blubber FA changed significantly during the postweaning fast, the general FA signature of blubber was similar at weaning and near the end of the fast. Changes in some FA differed across years. For example, the concentration of 20:4n-6, a minor PUFA, was significantly reduced in 1999 but not in 2000. FA mobilization patterns in northern elephant seal pups are somewhat similar to those reported previously for other fasting phocids and terrestrial mammals, though there are some notable differences. Differences in FA mobilization patterns across mammalian species may be related to differences in diets, geographical distribution, environmental factors, physiological adaptations, and life history stage.

  1. Characterization of blubber fatty acid signatures in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) over the postweaning fast.

    PubMed

    Noren, Dawn P; Budge, Suzanne M; Iverson, Sara J; Goebel, Michael E; Costa, Daniel P; Williams, Terrie M

    2013-12-01

    Phocids routinely fast for extended periods. During these fasts, energetic requirements are met primarily through the catabolism of blubber lipid. To assess whether fatty acid (FA) composition changes during the postweaning fast in northern elephant seals, blubber biopsies were acquired longitudinally from 43 pups at 2.3 ± 1.5 and 55.2 ± 3.7 days postweaning in 1999 and 2000. At weaning, short-chain monounsaturated FA (SC-MUFA, ≤18 carbons) dominated the blubber while saturated FA (SFA) were found in the next highest proportion. The major FA (all ≥1 % by mass) comprised approximately 91 % of total blubber FA. In both years, 18:1n-9 and 16:0 were the most prevalent FA. Major FA mobilized during the fast consisted of polyunsaturated FA (PUFA), SFA, and SC-MUFA. Long-chain MUFA (>18 carbons) tended to be conserved. The fractional mobilization value of 20:5n-3 was the highest, resulting in significant reductions of this PUFA. Although concentrations of some blubber FA changed significantly during the postweaning fast, the general FA signature of blubber was similar at weaning and near the end of the fast. Changes in some FA differed across years. For example, the concentration of 20:4n-6, a minor PUFA, was significantly reduced in 1999 but not in 2000. FA mobilization patterns in northern elephant seal pups are somewhat similar to those reported previously for other fasting phocids and terrestrial mammals, though there are some notable differences. Differences in FA mobilization patterns across mammalian species may be related to differences in diets, geographical distribution, environmental factors, physiological adaptations, and life history stage. PMID:23925408

  2. The Application of Spatial Signature Analysis to Electrical Test Data: Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Karnowski, T.P.; Lakhani, F.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-03-15

    This paper presents the results of the Spatial Signature Analysis (SSA) Electrical-test (e-test) validation study that was conducted between February and June, 1998. SSA is an automated procedure developed by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address the issue of intelligent data reduction while providing feedback on current manufacturing processes. SSA was initially developed to automate the analysis of optical defect data. Optical defects can form groups, or clusters, which may have a distinct shape. These patterns can reveal information about the manufacturing process. Optical defect SSA uses image processing algorithms and a classifier system to interpret and identify these patterns, or signatures. SSA has been extended to analyze and interpret electrical test data. The algorithms used for optical defect SSA have been adapted and applied to e-test binmaps. An image of the binmap is created, and features such as geometric and invariant moments are extracted and presented to a pair-wise, fuzzy, k-NN classifier. The classifier itself was prepared by manually training, which consists of storing example signatures of interest in a library, then executing an automated process which treats the examples as prototype signatures. The training process includes a procedure for automatically determining which features are most relevant to each class. The evaluation was performed by installing the SSA software as a batch process at three SEMATECH member company sites. Feedback from member company representatives was incorporated and classifiers were built to automatically assign labels to the binmap signatures. The three sites produced memory devices (DRAM) and microprocessors in a mature process fabrication environment. For all of these products, 5,620 signatures that encompassed approximately 552 wafers were human-classified and analyzed. The performance of the SSA E-test system indicates that the approach was successful in reliably classifying binmap

  3. Investigating population structure of Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, L.) in Western Iberian Peninsula using morphological characters and heart fatty acid signature analyses.

    PubMed

    Lança, Maria João; Machado, Maria; Mateus, Catarina S; Lourenço, Marta; Ferreira, Ana F; Quintella, Bernardo R; Almeida, Pedro R

    2014-01-01

    This study hypothesizes the existence of three groups of sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus L. in Portugal (North/Central group, Tagus group, and Guadiana group), possibly promoted by seabed topography isolation during the oceanic phase of the life cycle. Within this context, our purpose was to analyze the existence of a stock structure on sea lamprey populations sampled in the major Portuguese river basins using both morphological characters and heart tissue fatty acid signature. In both cases, the multiple discriminant analysis revealed statistically significant differences among groups, and the overall corrected classification rate estimated from cross-validation procedure was particularly high for the cardiac muscle fatty acid profiles (i.e. 83.8%). Morphometric characters were much more useful than meristic ones to discriminate stocks, and the most important variables for group differentiation were eye length, second dorsal fin length and branchial length. Fatty acid analysis showed that all lampreys from the southern Guadiana group were correctly classified and not mixing with individuals from any other group, reflecting a typical heart fatty acid signature. Our results revealed that 89.5% and 72.2% of the individuals from the Tagus and North/Central groups, respectively, were also correctly classified, despite some degree of overlap between individuals from these groups. The fatty acids that contributed to the observed segregation were C16:0; C17:0; C18:1ω9; C20:3ω6 and C22:2ω6. Detected differences are probably related with environmental variables to which lampreys may have been exposed, which leaded to different patterns of gene expression. These results suggest the existence of three different sea lamprey stocks in Portugal, with implication in terms of management and conservation. PMID:25259723

  4. Investigating Population Structure of Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, L.) in Western Iberian Peninsula Using Morphological Characters and Heart Fatty Acid Signature Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lança, Maria João; Machado, Maria; Mateus, Catarina S.; Lourenço, Marta; Ferreira, Ana F.; Quintella, Bernardo R.; Almeida, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    This study hypothesizes the existence of three groups of sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus L. in Portugal (North/Central group, Tagus group, and Guadiana group), possibly promoted by seabed topography isolation during the oceanic phase of the life cycle. Within this context, our purpose was to analyze the existence of a stock structure on sea lamprey populations sampled in the major Portuguese river basins using both morphological characters and heart tissue fatty acid signature. In both cases, the multiple discriminant analysis revealed statistically significant differences among groups, and the overall corrected classification rate estimated from cross-validation procedure was particularly high for the cardiac muscle fatty acid profiles (i.e. 83.8%). Morphometric characters were much more useful than meristic ones to discriminate stocks, and the most important variables for group differentiation were eye length, second dorsal fin length and branchial length. Fatty acid analysis showed that all lampreys from the southern Guadiana group were correctly classified and not mixing with individuals from any other group, reflecting a typical heart fatty acid signature. Our results revealed that 89.5% and 72.2% of the individuals from the Tagus and North/Central groups, respectively, were also correctly classified, despite some degree of overlap between individuals from these groups. The fatty acids that contributed to the observed segregation were C16:0; C17:0; C18:1ω9; C20:3ω6 and C22:2ω6. Detected differences are probably related with environmental variables to which lampreys may have been exposed, which leaded to different patterns of gene expression. These results suggest the existence of three different sea lamprey stocks in Portugal, with implication in terms of management and conservation. PMID:25259723

  5. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies, in order to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) task to help remediate the LEO environment. Rotation rates are needed to plan and develop proximity operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-watt Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The light source is mounted on a rotary arm, allowing access any phase angle between 0 -- 360 degrees. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48), SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard government "gray" scheme and the second target is primary white, as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each rotated about two primary axes: (a) a spin-stabilized rotation and (b) an end-over-end rotation. The two rotation states are being investigated as a basis for possible spin states of rocket bodies, beginning with simple spin states about the two primary axes. The data will be used to create a database of potential spin states for future works to convolve with more complex spin states. The optical signatures will be presented for specific phase angles for each rocket body and shown in conjunction with acquired optical data from multiple telescope sources.

  6. A reduction in ag/residential signature conflict using principal components analysis of LANDSAT temporal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. L.; Borden, F. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Methods to accurately delineate the types of land cover in the urban-rural transition zone of metropolitan areas were considered. The application of principal components analysis to multidate LANDSAT imagery was investigated as a means of reducing the overlap between residential and agricultural spectral signatures. The statistical concepts of principal components analysis were discussed, as well as the results of this analysis when applied to multidate LANDSAT imagery of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

  7. Signatures of positive selection in East African Shorthorn Zebu: a genome-wide SNP analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small East African Shorthorn Zebu is the main indigenous cattle across East Africa. A recent genome wide SNPs analysis has revealed their ancient stable African taurine x Asian zebu admixture. Here, we assess the presence of candidate signature of positive selection in their genome, with the aim...

  8. Electrical signature analysis (ESA) developments at the Oak Ridge Diagnostics Applied Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.D.

    1995-07-01

    Since 1985, researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed and patented several novel signal conditioning and signature analysis methods that have exploited the intrinsic abilities of conventional electric motors and generators to act as transducers. By using simple nonintrusive sensors such as clamp-on current and voltage probes, these new diagnostic techniques provide an improved means of detecting small time-dependent load and speed variations generated anywhere within an electromechanical system and converting them into revealing signatures that can be used to detect equipment degradation and incipient failures. These developments have been grouped under the general name of electrical signature analysis (ESA) and together provide a breakthrough in the ability to detect, analyze, and correct unwanted changes in process conditions or the presence of abnormalities in electrical and electromechanical equipment. Typical diagnostic information provided by ESA is comparable to that provided by conventional vibration analysis in that both time waveform and frequency spectrum signatures may be produced. The primary benefit of ESA is that an extensive range of diagnostic information can be obtained from a single transducer that may be installed several hundred feet or more from the monitored device on its electrical lines supplying input power (e.g., to a motor) or carrying output power (e.g., from a generator); thus, ESA is truly remote and nonintrusive.

  9. Fractal analysis of scatter imaging signatures to distinguish breast pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguizabal, Alma; Laughney, Ashley M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.; López-Higuera, José M.; Conde, Olga M.

    2013-02-01

    Fractal analysis combined with a label-free scattering technique is proposed for describing the pathological architecture of tumors. Clinicians and pathologists are conventionally trained to classify abnormal features such as structural irregularities or high indices of mitosis. The potential of fractal analysis lies in the fact of being a morphometric measure of the irregular structures providing a measure of the object's complexity and self-similarity. As cancer is characterized by disorder and irregularity in tissues, this measure could be related to tumor growth. Fractal analysis has been probed in the understanding of the tumor vasculature network. This work addresses the feasibility of applying fractal analysis to the scattering power map (as a physical modeling) and principal components (as a statistical modeling) provided by a localized reflectance spectroscopic system. Disorder, irregularity and cell size variation in tissue samples is translated into the scattering power and principal components magnitude and its fractal dimension is correlated with the pathologist assessment of the samples. The fractal dimension is computed applying the box-counting technique. Results show that fractal analysis of ex-vivo fresh tissue samples exhibits separated ranges of fractal dimension that could help classifier combining the fractal results with other morphological features. This contrast trend would help in the discrimination of tissues in the intraoperative context and may serve as a useful adjunct to surgeons.

  10. Vibration Signature Analysis of a Faulted Gear Transmission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data were obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA/Lewis. Time-synchronous-averaged vibration data were recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Wigner-Ville distribution was used to examine the time-averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques that include time-domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  11. Vibration Signature Analysis of a Faulted Gear Transmission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data was obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. Time synchronous averaged vibration data was recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Winger-Ville distribution was used to examine the time averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques which include time domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  12. Trimethylbenzoic acids as metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with jet fuel hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namocatcat, J. A.; Fang, J.; Barcelona, M. J.; Quibuyen, A. T. O.; Abrajano, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    Evolution of trimethylbenzoic acids in the KC-135 aquifer at the former Wurtsmith Air Force Base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI was examined to determine the functionality of trimethylbenzoic acids as key metabolite signatures in the biogeochemical evolution of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel hydrocarbons. Changes in the composition of trimethylbenzoic acids and the distribution and concentration profiles exhibited by 2,4,6- and 2,3,5-trimethylbenzoic acids temporally and between multilevel wells reflect processes indicative of an actively evolving contaminant plume. The concentration levels of trimethylbenzoic acids were 3-10 orders higher than their tetramethylbenzene precursors, a condition attributed to slow metabolite turnover under sulfidogenic conditions. The observed degradation of tetramethylbenzenes into trimethylbenzoic acids obviates the use of these alkylbenzenes as non-labile tracers for other degradable aromatic hydrocarbons, but provides rare field evidence on the range of high molecular weight alkylbenzenes and isomeric assemblages amenable to anaerobic degradation in situ. The coupling of actual tetramethylbenzene loss with trimethylbenzoic acid production and the general decline in the concentrations of these compounds demonstrate the role of microbially mediated processes in the natural attenuation of hydrocarbons and may be a key indicator in the overall rate of hydrocarbon degradation and the biogeochemical evolution of the KC-135 aquifer.

  13. Application of ultrasonic signature analysis for fatigue detection in complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrasonic signature analysis shows promise of being a singularly well-suited method for detecting fatigue in structures as complex as aircraft. The method employs instrumentation centered about a Fourier analyzer system, which features analog-to-digital conversion, digital data processing, and digital display of cross-correlation functions and cross-spectra. These features are essential to the analysis of ultrasonic signatures according to the procedure described here. In order to establish the feasibility of the method, the initial experiments were confined to simple plates with simulated and fatigue-induced defects respectively. In the first test the signature proved sensitive to the size of a small hole drilled into the plate. In the second test, performed on a series of fatigue-loaded plates, the signature proved capable of indicating both the initial appearance and subsequent growth of a fatigue crack. In view of these encouraging results it is concluded that the method has reached a sufficiently advanced stage of development to warrant application to small-scale structures or even actual aircraft.

  14. Interactome-transcriptome analysis discovers signatures complementary to GWAS Loci of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Woei; Lee, Heung-Man; Wang, Ying; Tong, Amy Hin-Yan; Yip, Kevin Y.; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Lok, Si; Ozaki, Risa; Luk, Andrea O; Kong, Alice P. S.; So, Wing-Yee; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Chan, Ting-Fung

    2016-01-01

    Protein interactions play significant roles in complex diseases. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) transcriptome using a multi-method strategy. We constructed a tissue-specific interactome (T2Di) and identified 420 molecular signatures associated with T2D-related comorbidity and symptoms, mainly implicated in inflammation, adipogenesis, protein phosphorylation and hormonal secretion. Apart from explaining the residual associations within the DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) study, the T2Di signatures were enriched in pathogenic cell type-specific regulatory elements related to fetal development, immunity and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). The T2Di revealed a novel locus near a well-established GWAS loci AChE, in which SRRT interacts with JAZF1, a T2D-GWAS gene implicated in pancreatic function. The T2Di also included known anti-diabetic drug targets (e.g. PPARD, MAOB) and identified possible druggable targets (e.g. NCOR2, PDGFR). These T2Di signatures were validated by an independent computational method, and by expression data of pancreatic islet, muscle and liver with some of the signatures (CEBPB, SREBF1, MLST8, SRF, SRRT and SLC12A9) confirmed in PBMC from an independent cohort of 66 T2D and 66 control subjects. By combining prior knowledge and transcriptome analysis, we have constructed an interactome to explain the multi-layered regulatory pathways in T2D. PMID:27752041

  15. Signature analysis of acoustic emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Henneke, E. G., II

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emissions were monitored for crack extension across and parallel to the fibers in a single ply and multiply laminates of graphite epoxy composites. Spectrum analysis was performed on the transient signal to ascertain if the fracture mode can be characterized by a particular spectral pattern. The specimens were loaded to failure quasistatically in a tensile machine. Visual observations were made via either an optical microscope or a television camera. The results indicate that several types of characteristics in the time and frequency domain correspond to different types of failure.

  16. Temporal and spatial analysis of solar signatures in cloud cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, M.; Usoskin, I.

    2012-12-01

    The persistence of solar signals in cloud cover is analyzed for the time interval, 1984 - 2009, covering two full solar cycles, 22 and 23. A spatial and temporal investigation of the response of low, middle and high cloud data to cosmic ray induced ionization (CRII) and UV irradiance (UVI) is performed in terms of coherence analysis of the two signals for various regions of the globe where correlation is observed between clouds and solar proxies. For some key geographical regions the response of clouds to UVI and CRII is persistent over the entire time interval, which indicates a real link. In other regions the relation is not consistent, being intermittent or out of phase, suggesting that some correlations are not real. However, constant in-phase or anti-phase relationship between clouds and solar proxies for some regions are observed. Low cloud cover correlates to both UVI and CRII, middle clouds seem to be related to UVI while high clouds respond to CRII. Correlation and coherence analysis cannot give definitive answers to questions related to solar effects on clouds but could, nonetheless, pinpoint some possible solar effects on climate and could suggests directions for future research.

  17. An Analysis of Immunoreactive Signatures in Early Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Long, Jiang; Li, Hai; Chen, Shuhong; Liu, Qiqi; Zhang, Bei; He, Xiaomin; Wang, Yan; Li, Hongyi; Li, Yimei; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Chenzhen; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Minli; Li, Qing; Cao, Bangwei; Bai, Zhigang; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Zhongtao; Zhu, Shengtao; Zheng, Jiasheng; Ou, Xiaojuan; Ma, Hong; Jia, Jidong; You, Hong; Wang, Shengqi; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is prevalent worldwide and early diagnosis of HCC is critical for effective treatment and optimal prognosis. Methods Serum was screened first by immunoproteomic analysis for HCC-related tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Selected TAAs were clinically evaluated retrospectively in patients with HCC, liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis and healthy controls. Levels of autoantibody to the selected TAAs were measured by protein microarrays containing protein antigens of the candidate TAAs. Analyses were done by using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) to calculate diagnostic accuracy. Findings Twenty-two candidate TAAs were assessed by protein microarray analysis in 914 participants with serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) available. Twelve candidate TAAs were statistically different in signal intensity between HCC and controls. Among them, CENPF, HSP60 and IMP-2 showed AUC (area under the curve) values of 0.826, 0.764 and 0.796 respectively for early HCC. The highest prevalence of autoantibody positivity was observed in HCC cases with BCLC tumor stage A, well-differentiated histology and Child-Pugh grade C. Specifically, 73.6% or 79.3% cases of early HCC with negative AFP were positive for autoantibody to CENPF or HSP60. Interpretation Tumor-associated autoimmune reactions may be triggered by early stage HCCs. Measurement of serum autoantibody to TAAs may be complementary to AFP measurements and improve diagnosis of early HCC. PMID:26137588

  18. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Wesley C.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P.; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P.; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D.; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E.; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Harris, Robert S.; Whittington, Camilla M.; Wong, Emily S. W.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M.; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J.; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M.; Sharp, Julie A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Ray, David A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H.; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C.; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N.; Pohl, Craig S.; Smith, Scott M.; Hou, Shunfeng; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation. PMID:18464734

  19. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Daniel E.; McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Souza, Renan P.; Crowley, James J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate < 0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent methamphetamine levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization. PMID:24034544

  20. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Adkins, D E; McClay, J L; Vunck, S A; Batman, A M; Vann, R E; Clark, S L; Souza, R P; Crowley, J J; Sullivan, P F; van den Oord, E J C G; Beardsley, P M

    2013-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In this study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine (MA)-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate, FDR <0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent MA levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization.

  1. Meta-analysis of age-related gene expression profiles identifies common signatures of aging

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, João Pedro; Curado, João; Church, George M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous microarray studies of aging have been conducted, yet given the noisy nature of gene expression changes with age, elucidating the transcriptional features of aging and how these relate to physiological, biochemical and pathological changes remains a critical problem. Results: We performed a meta-analysis of age-related gene expression profiles using 27 datasets from mice, rats and humans. Our results reveal several common signatures of aging, including 56 genes consistently overexpressed with age, the most significant of which was APOD, and 17 genes underexpressed with age. We characterized the biological processes associated with these signatures and found that age-related gene expression changes most notably involve an overexpression of inflammation and immune response genes and of genes associated with the lysosome. An underexpression of collagen genes and of genes associated with energy metabolism, particularly mitochondrial genes, as well as alterations in the expression of genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle and cellular senescence biomarkers, were also observed. By employing a new method that emphasizes sensitivity, our work further reveals previously unknown transcriptional changes with age in many genes, processes and functions. We suggest these molecular signatures reflect a combination of degenerative processes but also transcriptional responses to the process of aging. Overall, our results help to understand how transcriptional changes relate to the process of aging and could serve as targets for future studies. Availability: http://genomics.senescence.info/uarrays/signatures.html Contact: jp@senescence.info Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19189975

  2. Expression of a retinoic acid signature in circulating CD34 cells from coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Circulating CD34+ progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cells, including endothelial cells. Knowledge is still scarce about the transcriptional programs used by CD34+ cells from peripheral blood, and how these are affected in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Results We performed a whole genome transcriptome analysis of CD34+ cells, CD4+ T cells, CD14+ monocytes, and macrophages from 12 patients with CAD and 11 matched controls. CD34+ cells, compared to other mononuclear cells from the same individuals, showed high levels of KRAB box transcription factors, known to be involved in gene silencing. This correlated with high expression levels in CD34+ cells for the progenitor markers HOXA5 and HOXA9, which are known to control expression of KRAB factor genes. The comparison of expression profiles of CD34+ cells from CAD patients and controls revealed a less naïve phenotype in patients' CD34+ cells, with increased expression of genes from the Mitogen Activated Kinase network and a lowered expression of a panel of histone genes, reaching levels comparable to that in more differentiated circulating cells. Furthermore, we observed a reduced expression of several genes involved in CXCR4-signaling and migration to SDF1/CXCL12. Conclusions The altered gene expression profile of CD34+ cells in CAD patients was related to activation/differentiation by a retinoic acid-induced differentiation program. These results suggest that circulating CD34+ cells in CAD patients are programmed by retinoic acid, leading to a reduced capacity to migrate to ischemic tissues. PMID:20565948

  3. IRLooK: an advanced mobile infrared signature measurement, data reduction, and analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukur, Tamer; Altug, Yelda; Uzunoglu, Cihan; Kilic, Kayhan; Emir, Erdem

    2007-04-01

    Infrared signature measurement capability has a key role in the electronic warfare (EW) self protection systems' development activities. In this article, the IRLooK System and its capabilities will be introduced. IRLooK is a truly innovative mobile infrared signature measurement system with all its design, manufacturing and integration accomplished by an engineering philosophy peculiar to ASELSAN. IRLooK measures the infrared signatures of military and civil platforms such as fixed/rotary wing aircrafts, tracked/wheeled vehicles and navy vessels. IRLooK has the capabilities of data acquisition, pre-processing, post-processing, analysis, storing and archiving over shortwave, mid-wave and long wave infrared spectrum by means of its high resolution radiometric sensors and highly sophisticated software analysis tools. The sensor suite of IRLooK System includes imaging and non-imaging radiometers and a spectroradiometer. Single or simultaneous multiple in-band measurements as well as high radiant intensity measurements can be performed. The system provides detailed information on the spectral, spatial and temporal infrared signature characteristics of the targets. It also determines IR Decoy characteristics. The system is equipped with a high quality field proven two-axes tracking mount to facilitate target tracking. Manual or automatic tracking is achieved by using a passive imaging tracker. The system also includes a high quality weather station and field-calibration equipment including cavity and extended area blackbodies. The units composing the system are mounted on flat-bed trailers and the complete system is designed to be transportable by large body aircraft.

  4. Systems Analysis of Immunity to Influenza Vaccination across Multiple Years and in Diverse Populations Reveals Shared Molecular Signatures.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Helder I; Hagan, Thomas; Duraisingham, Sai S; Lee, Eva K; Kwissa, Marcin; Rouphael, Nadine; Frasca, Daniela; Gersten, Merril; Mehta, Aneesh K; Gaujoux, Renaud; Li, Gui-Mei; Gupta, Shakti; Ahmed, Rafi; Mulligan, Mark J; Shen-Orr, Shai; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Subramaniam, Shankar; Pulendran, Bali

    2015-12-15

    Systems approaches have been used to describe molecular signatures driving immunity to influenza vaccination in humans. Whether such signatures are similar across multiple seasons and in diverse populations is unknown. We applied systems approaches to study immune responses in young, elderly, and diabetic subjects vaccinated with the seasonal influenza vaccine across five consecutive seasons. Signatures of innate immunity and plasmablasts correlated with and predicted influenza antibody titers at 1 month after vaccination with >80% accuracy across multiple seasons but were not associated with the longevity of the response. Baseline signatures of lymphocyte and monocyte inflammation were positively and negatively correlated, respectively, with antibody responses at 1 month. Finally, integrative analysis of microRNAs and transcriptomic profiling revealed potential regulators of vaccine immunity. These results identify shared vaccine-induced signatures across multiple seasons and in diverse populations and might help guide the development of next-generation vaccines that provide persistent immunity against influenza.

  5. Security analysis of boolean algebra based on Zhang-Wang digital signature scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jinbin

    2014-10-06

    In 2005, Zhang and Wang proposed an improvement signature scheme without using one-way hash function and message redundancy. In this paper, we show that this scheme exits potential safety concerns through the analysis of boolean algebra, such as bitwise exclusive-or, and point out that mapping is not one to one between assembly instructions and machine code actually by means of the analysis of the result of the assembly program segment, and which possibly causes safety problems unknown to the software.

  6. Prioritizing therapeutics for lung cancer: an integrative meta-analysis of cancer gene signatures and chemogenomic data.

    PubMed

    Fortney, Kristen; Griesman, Joshua; Kotlyar, Max; Pastrello, Chiara; Angeli, Marc; Sound-Tsao, Ming; Jurisica, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Repurposing FDA-approved drugs with the aid of gene signatures of disease can accelerate the development of new therapeutics. A major challenge to developing reliable drug predictions is heterogeneity. Different gene signatures of the same disease or drug treatment often show poor overlap across studies, as a consequence of both biological and technical variability, and this can affect the quality and reproducibility of computational drug predictions. Existing algorithms for signature-based drug repurposing use only individual signatures as input. But for many diseases, there are dozens of signatures in the public domain. Methods that exploit all available transcriptional knowledge on a disease should produce improved drug predictions. Here, we adapt an established meta-analysis framework to address the problem of drug repurposing using an ensemble of disease signatures. Our computational pipeline takes as input a collection of disease signatures, and outputs a list of drugs predicted to consistently reverse pathological gene changes. We apply our method to conduct the largest and most systematic repurposing study on lung cancer transcriptomes, using 21 signatures. We show that scaling up transcriptional knowledge significantly increases the reproducibility of top drug hits, from 44% to 78%. We extensively characterize drug hits in silico, demonstrating that they slow growth significantly in nine lung cancer cell lines from the NCI-60 collection, and identify CALM1 and PLA2G4A as promising drug targets for lung cancer. Our meta-analysis pipeline is general, and applicable to any disease context; it can be applied to improve the results of signature-based drug repurposing by leveraging the large number of disease signatures in the public domain.

  7. Analysis of Unresolved Spectral Infrared Signature for the Extraction of Invariant Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, A.; Payne, T.; Wilhelm, S.; Gregory, S.; Skinner, M.; Rudy, R.; Russell, R.; Brown, J.; Dao, P.

    2010-09-01

    This paper demonstrates a simple analytical technique for extraction of spectral radiance values for the solar panel and body from an unresolved spectral infrared signature of 3-axis stabilized low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites. It uses data collected by The Aerospace Corporation’s Broad-band Array Spectrograph System (BASS) instrument at the Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing (AMOS) site. The observation conditions were such that the signatures were due to the emissive phenomenology and contribution of earthshine was negligible. The analysis is based on a two-facet orientation model of the satellite. This model captures the basic, known behavior of the satellite body and its solar panels. One facet points to nadir and the second facet tracks the sun. The facet areas are unknown. Special conditions are determined on the basis of observational geometry that allows separation of the spectral radiance values of the solar panel and body. These values remain unchanged (i.e., are invariant) under steady illumination conditions even if the signature appears different from one observation to another. In addition, they provide information on the individual spectral makeup of the satellite solar panel and body materials.

  8. Electro-optical signature analysis for personnel detection in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Harrell, J. Timothy; West, Tracy

    2007-04-01

    Georgia Tech has initiated a research program into the detection of covert personnel. This program focuses on the detection problem in scenarios focused on urban operations, tunnels, or convoys. These nontraditional operational scenarios present multiple opportunities for personnel to hide as well as a variety to clutter levels. The research program focuses on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables - initially in the context of urban environments. For this current effort, several electro-optical sensing modalities have been evaluated for use as a component in an unattended sensor suite designed to detect personnel. These modalities include active sensors (e.g., vibrometry) and passive sensors (e.g., multispectral, thermal). Particular emphasis has been given to the investigation of short wave infrared signatures and the comparison of this band to the other electro-optical wavebands. This paper will discuss the design of a multi-spectral signature model which forms a component of the evaluation process. Example results will be presented as well as a discussion of the issues to be addressed as part of the electro-optical sensor evaluation.

  9. Texture analysis of radiometric signatures of new sea ice forming in Arctic leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Duane T.; Farmer, L. Dennis

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of 33.6-GHz, high-resolution, passive microwave images suggests that new sea ice accumulating in open leads is characterized by a unique textural signature which can be used to discriminate new ice forming in this environment from adjacent surfaces of similar radiometric temperature. Ten training areas were selected from the data set, three of which consisted entirely of first-year ice, four entirely of multilayer ice, and three of new ice in open leads in the process of freezing. A simple gradient operator was used to characterize the radiometric texture in each training region in terms of the degree to which radiometric gradients are oriented. New ice in leads has a sufficiently high proportion of well-oriented features to distinguish it uniquely from first-year ice and multiyear ice. The predominance of well-oriented features probably reflects physical processes by which new ice accumulates in open leads. Banded structures, which are evident in aerial photographs of new ice, apparently give rise to the radiometric signature observed, in which the trend of brightness temperature gradients is aligned parallel to lead trends. First-year ice and multiyear ice, which have been subjected to a more random growth and process history, lack this banded structure and therefore are characterized by signatures in which well-aligned elements are less dominant.

  10. Multispectral signature analysis measurements of selected sniper rifles and small arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David B.; Carapezza, Edward M.; Csanadi, Christina J.; Edwards, Gerald D.; Hintz, Todd M.; Tong, Ronald M.

    1997-02-01

    During October 1995 - June 1996, the Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Center RDT&E Division (NRaD), under sponsorship from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), conducted an intensive series of multi-spectral signature analyses of typical sniper weapons. Multi-spectral signatures of the muzzle flashes from rifles and pistols and some imagery of the bullets in flight were collected. Multi- spectral signatures of the muzzle flash were collected in the infrared (2.5 - 14.5 microns), visible -- near-IR (400 - 1200 nanometers), and the ultra-violet (185 - 400 nanometers) wavelength regions. These measurements consisted of high spectral resolution (0.0159 micron) measurements of the spectral radiance of the muzzle flash. A time history plot of the muzzle flash as it evolves just forward of the end of the muzzle is provided. These measurements were performed with a CI Systems Model SR5000 IR/Visible spectroradiometer and an Ocean Optics Model PC1000 UV spectroradiometer. Muzzle flash infrared imagery is provided to show the effect that specific muzzle breaks have on the resulting muzzle flash. The following set of sniper weapons were included in this test: AK-47, SKS, M16A2, M-14, FN-FAL, SMLE IIa, 03 Springfield, SVD Dragunov, 50 caliber McMillan, and a 45 caliber ACP pistol. The results of this signature analysis show that important measurable electro-optical differences do exist between all these weapons in terms of spectral radiance of the flash, spectral content of the gun powders, and spectral shapes/geometries of the muzzle flashes. These differences were sufficient such that, after a more complete data base is collected, it will be possible to develop a passive electro-optical weapon and ammunition identifier.

  11. Technology Gap Analysis for the Detection of Process Signatures Using Less Than Remote Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, John S.; Atkinson, David A.; Lind, Michael A.; Maughan, A. D.; Kelly, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Although remote sensing methods offer advantages for monitoring important illicit process activities, remote and stand-off technologies cannot successfully detect all important processes with the sensitivity and certainty that is desired. The main scope of the program is observables, with a primary focus on chemical signatures. A number of key process signatures elude remote or stand-off detection for a variety of reasons (e.g., heavy particulate emissions that do not propagate far enough for detection at stand-off distances, semi-volatile chemicals that do not tend to vaporize and remain in the environment near the source, etc.). Some of these compounds can provide persistent, process-specific information that is not available through remote techniques; however, the associated measurement technologies have their own set of advantages, disadvantages and technical challenges that may need to be overcome before additional signature data can be effectively and reliably exploited. The main objective of this report is to describe a process to identify high impact technology gaps for important less-than-remote detection applications. The subsequent analysis focuses on the technology development needed to enable exploitation of important process signatures. The evaluation process that was developed involves three interrelated and often conflicting requirements generation activities: • Identification of target signature chemicals with unique intelligence value and their associated attributes as mitigated by environmentally influenced fate and transport effects (i.e., what can you expect to actually find that has intelligence value, where do you need to look for it and what sensitivity and selectivity do you need to see it) • Identification of end-user deployment scenario possibilities and constraints with a focus on alternative detection requirements, timing issues, logistical consideration, and training requirements for a successful measurement • Identification of

  12. Relative Amino Acid Concentrations as a Signature for Parent Body Processes of Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botta, Oliver; Glavin, Daniel P.; Kminek, Gerhard; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Most meteorites are thought to have originated from objects in the asteroid belt. Carbonaceous chondrites, which contain significant amounts of organic carbon including complex organic compounds, have also been suggested to be derived from comets. The current model for the synthesis of organic compounds found in carbonaceous chondrites includes the survival of interstellar organic compounds and the processing of some of these compounds on the meteoritic parent body. The amino acid composition of five CM carbonaceous chondrites, two CIs, one CR, and one CV3 have been measured using hot water extraction-vapor hydrolysis, OPA/NAC derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Total amino acid abundances in the bulk meteorites as well as the amino acid concentrations relative to glycine = 1.0 for beta-alanine, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and D-alanine were determined. Additional data for three Antarctic CM meteorites were obtained from the literature. All CM meteorites analyzed in this study show a complex distribution of amino acids and a high variability in total concentration ranging from approx. 15,300 to approx. 5800 parts per billion (ppb), while the CIs show a total amino acid abundance of approx. 4300 ppb. The relatively (compared to glycine) high AIB content found in all the CMs is a strong indicator that Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis is the dominant pathway for the formation of amino acids found in these meteorites. The data from the Antarctic CM carbonaceous chondrites are inconsistent with the results from the other CMs, perhaps due to influences from the Antarctic ice that were effective during their residence time. In contrast to CMs, the data from the CI carbonaceous chondrites indicate that the Strecker synthesis was not active on their parent bodies.

  13. Unique plasma metabolomic signatures of individuals with inherited disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blood and urine acylcarnitine profiles are commonly used to diagnose long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAOD: i.e., long-chain hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [LCHAD] and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 [CPT2] deficiency), but the global metabolic impact of long-chain FAOD has not been repor...

  14. A novel amino acid and metabolomics signature in mice overexpressing muscle uncoupling protein 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and is known to lower mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and promote fatty acid oxidation; however, the global impact of UCP3 activity on skeletal muscle and whole body metabolism has not been extensively studied. We utilized unt...

  15. Unique amino acid signatures that are evolutionarily conserved distinguish simple-type, epidermal and hair keratins

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Pavel; Usachov, Valentyn; Debes, Cedric; Gräter, Frauke; Parry, David A. D.; Omary, M. Bishr

    2011-01-01

    Keratins (Ks) consist of central α-helical rod domains that are flanked by non-α-helical head and tail domains. The cellular abundance of keratins, coupled with their selective cell expression patterns, suggests that they diversified to fulfill tissue-specific functions although the primary structure differences between them have not been comprehensively compared. We analyzed keratin sequences from many species: K1, K2, K5, K9, K10, K14 were studied as representatives of epidermal keratins, and compared with K7, K8, K18, K19, K20 and K31, K35, K81, K85, K86, which represent simple-type (single-layered or glandular) epithelial and hair keratins, respectively. We show that keratin domains have striking differences in their amino acids. There are many cysteines in hair keratins but only a small number in epidermal keratins and rare or none in simple-type keratins. The heads and/or tails of epidermal keratins are glycine and phenylalanine rich but alanine poor, whereas parallel domains of hair keratins are abundant in prolines, and those of simple-type epithelial keratins are enriched in acidic and/or basic residues. The observed differences between simple-type, epidermal and hair keratins are highly conserved throughout evolution. Cysteines and histidines, which are infrequent keratin amino acids, are involved in de novo mutations that are markedly overrepresented in keratins. Hence, keratins have evolutionarily conserved and domain-selectively enriched amino acids including glycine and phenylalanine (epidermal), cysteine and proline (hair), and basic and acidic (simple-type epithelial), which reflect unique functions related to structural flexibility, rigidity and solubility, respectively. Our findings also support the importance of human keratin ‘mutation hotspot’ residues and their wild-type counterparts. PMID:22215855

  16. Colon Cancer Cells Gene Expression Signature As Response to 5- Fluorouracil, Oxaliplatin, and Folinic Acid Treatment.

    PubMed

    Negrei, Carolina; Hudita, Ariana; Ginghina, Octav; Galateanu, Bianca; Voicu, Sorina Nicoleta; Stan, Miriana; Costache, Marieta; Fenga, Concettina; Drakoulis, Nikolaos; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-01-01

    5-FU cytotoxicity mechanism has been assigned both to the miss-incorporation of fluoronucleotides into RNA and DNA and to the inhibition of thymidylate synthase. 5-FU is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, although it has severe side effects that may vary between patients. Pharmacogenetic studies related to 5-FU have been traditionally focused on the rate-limiting catabolic enzyme, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase that breaks 80-85% of 5-FU into its inactive metabolite. Choosing the right dosing scheme and chemotherapy strategy for each individual patient remains challenging for personalized chemotherapy management. In the general effort toward reduction of colorectal cancer mortality, in vitro screening studies play a very important role. To accelerate translation research, increasing interest has been focused on using in vivo-like models such as three-dimensional spheroids. The development of higher throughput assays to quantify phenotypic changes in spheroids is an active research area. Consequently, in this study we used the microarray technology to reveal the HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells gene expression signature as response to 5-FU/OXP/FA treatment in a state of the art 3D culture system. We report here an increased reactive oxygen species production under treatment, correlated with a decrease in cell viability and proliferation potential. With respect to the HT-29 cells gene expression under the treatment with 5-FU/OXP/FA, we found 15.247 genes that were significantly differentially expressed (p < 0.05) with a fold change higher that two-fold. Among these, 7136 genes were upregulated and 8111 genes were downregulated under experimental conditions as compared to untreated cells. The most relevant and statistic significant (p < 0.01) pathways in the experiment are associated with the genes that displayed significant differential expression and are related to intracellular signaling, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cancer. PMID:27445811

  17. Colon Cancer Cells Gene Expression Signature As Response to 5- Fluorouracil, Oxaliplatin, and Folinic Acid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Negrei, Carolina; Hudita, Ariana; Ginghina, Octav; Galateanu, Bianca; Voicu, Sorina Nicoleta; Stan, Miriana; Costache, Marieta; Fenga, Concettina; Drakoulis, Nikolaos; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.

    2016-01-01

    5-FU cytotoxicity mechanism has been assigned both to the miss-incorporation of fluoronucleotides into RNA and DNA and to the inhibition of thymidylate synthase. 5-FU is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, although it has severe side effects that may vary between patients. Pharmacogenetic studies related to 5-FU have been traditionally focused on the rate-limiting catabolic enzyme, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase that breaks 80–85% of 5-FU into its inactive metabolite. Choosing the right dosing scheme and chemotherapy strategy for each individual patient remains challenging for personalized chemotherapy management. In the general effort toward reduction of colorectal cancer mortality, in vitro screening studies play a very important role. To accelerate translation research, increasing interest has been focused on using in vivo-like models such as three-dimensional spheroids. The development of higher throughput assays to quantify phenotypic changes in spheroids is an active research area. Consequently, in this study we used the microarray technology to reveal the HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells gene expression signature as response to 5-FU/OXP/FA treatment in a state of the art 3D culture system. We report here an increased reactive oxygen species production under treatment, correlated with a decrease in cell viability and proliferation potential. With respect to the HT-29 cells gene expression under the treatment with 5-FU/OXP/FA, we found 15.247 genes that were significantly differentially expressed (p < 0.05) with a fold change higher that two-fold. Among these, 7136 genes were upregulated and 8111 genes were downregulated under experimental conditions as compared to untreated cells. The most relevant and statistic significant (p < 0.01) pathways in the experiment are associated with the genes that displayed significant differential expression and are related to intracellular signaling, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cancer. PMID

  18. Discriminating the molecular basis of hepatotoxicity using the large-scale characteristic molecular signatures of toxicants by expression profiling analysis.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Ryu, So Yeon; Noh, Ji Heon; Lee, Min-Jae; Jang, Ja-Jun; Ryu, Jae Chun; Jung, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Bae, Hyun Jin; Xie, Hongjian; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Sug Hyung; Park, Won Sang; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2008-07-30

    Predicting the potential human health risk posed by chemical stressors has long been a major challenge for toxicologists, and the use of microarrays to measure responses to toxicologically relevant genes, and to identify selective, sensitive biomarkers of toxicity is a major application of predictive and discovery toxicology. To investigate this possibility, we investigated whether carcinogens (at doses known to induce liver tumors in chronic exposure bioassays) deregulate characteristic sets of genes in mice. Male C3H/He mice were dosed with two hepatocarcinogens (vinyl chloride (VC, 50-25 mg/kg), aldrin (AD, 0.8-0.4 mg/kg)), or two non-hepatocarcinogens (copper sulfate (CS, 150-60 mg/kg), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T, 150-60 mg/kg)). Large-scale molecular changes elicited by these four hepatotoxicants in liver tissues were analyzed using DNA microarray. Three days after administration, no significant phenotypic changes were induced by these four different hepatotoxicants in terms of histological examination or blood biochemical assay. However, unsupervised hierarchical analysis of gene expressional changes induced by hepatotoxicants resulted in two major gene subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., a carcinogen (VN, AD) and non-carcinogen group (CS, 2,4,5-T), and also revealed that distinct molecular signatures exist. These signatures were founded on well-defined functional gene categories and may differentiate genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Venn diagram analysis allowed us to identify carcinogen and non-carcinogen-associated molecular signatures. Using statistical methods, we analyzed outlier genes for four different classes (genotoxic-, non-genotoxic-carcinogen, genotoxic-, non-genotoxic non-carcinogen) in terms of their potential to predict different modes-of-action. In conclusion, the identification of large-scale molecular changes in different hepatocarcinogen exposure models revealed that different types of hepatotoxicants are

  19. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils. PMID:23332874

  20. Humic acids as proxies for assessing different Mediterranean forest soils signatures using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina M B O; Fernández-Getino, Ana P; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) of four representative forest soils profiles from Central Spain (two with different vegetation - pine and oak - but same parent material - granitie, and two with same vegetation - holm oak - but different parent material - granite and limestone) were investigated by solid-state cross polarization with magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The objectives included the investigation of the impact of different forest properties on HA composition, assessing how the structural characteristics of the HA vary with soil depth, and evaluating the role of HA as surrogates for mapping the different forest soils signatures using structural data derived from (13)C NMR spectroscopy. On average, alkyl C is the dominant C constituent (38-48% of the total NMR peak area) in all HA samples, followed by aromatic (12-22%) and O-alkyl C (12-19%), and finally carboxyl C (7.0-10%). The NMR data also indicated that HA composition is likely to be differently affected by the soil physico-chemical properties and type of forest vegetation. The structural characteristics of the HA from soil under oak did not differ broadly downward in the profile, whereas soil HA under pine forest exhibits a somewhat higher recalcitrant nature as a consequence of a higher degree of decomposition. The soil HA from holm oak forests differed from the other two forest soils, exhibiting a progressive decomposition of the alkyl C structures with increasing depth, while the carbohydrate-like indicator (O-alkyl C) is apparently being protected from mineralization in the horizons below the ground level. Overall, these differences in soil HA NMR signatures are an important diagnostic tool for understanding the role of different soil environmental factors on the structural composition of HA from Mediterranean forest soils.

  1. Segregation of acid plume pixels from background water pixels, signatures of background water and dispersed acid plumes, and implications for calculation of iron concentration in dense plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahn, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Two files of data, obtained with a modular multiband scanner, for an acid waste dump into ocean water, were analyzed intensively. Signatures were derived for background water at different levels of effective sunlight intensity, and for different iron concentrations in the dispersed plume from the dump. The effect of increased sunlight intensity on the calculated iron concentration was found to be relatively important at low iron concentrations and relatively unimportant at high values of iron concentration in dispersed plumes. It was concluded that the basic equation for iron concentration is not applicable to dense plumes, particularly because lower values are indicated at the very core of the plume, than in the surrounding sheath, whereas radiances increase consistently from background water to dispersed plume to inner sheath to innermost core. It was likewise concluded that in the dense plume the iron concentration would probably best be measured by the higher wave length radiances, although the suitable relationship remains unknown.

  2. Immune signatures and disorder-specific patterns in a cross-disorder gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Simone; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Patel, Hamel; Lee, Sanghyuck; Dempster, David; Curtis, Charles; Paya-Cano, Jose; Murphy, Declan; Wilson, C. Ellie; Horder, Jamie; Mendez, M. Andreina; Asherson, Philip; Rivera, Margarita; Costello, Helen; Maltezos, Stefanos; Whitwell, Susannah; Pitts, Mark; Tye, Charlotte; Ashwood, Karen L.; Bolton, Patrick; Curran, Sarah; McGuffin, Peter; Dobson, Richard; Breen, Gerome

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies point to overlap between neuropsychiatric disorders in symptomatology and genetic aetiology. Aims To systematically investigate genomics overlap between childhood and adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Method Analysis of whole-genome blood gene expression and genetic risk scores of 318 individuals. Participants included individuals affected with adult ADHD (n = 93), childhood ADHD (n = 17), MDD (n = 63), ASD (n = 51), childhood dual diagnosis of ADHD–ASD (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 78). Results Weighted gene co-expression analysis results reveal disorder-specific signatures for childhood ADHD and MDD, and also highlight two immune-related gene co-expression modules correlating inversely with MDD and adult ADHD disease status. We find no significant relationship between polygenic risk scores and gene expression signatures. Conclusions Our results reveal disorder overlap and specificity at the genetic and gene expression level. They suggest new pathways contributing to distinct pathophysiology in psychiatric disorders and shed light on potential shared genomic risk factors. PMID:27151072

  3. Screening of gene signatures for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis based on bioinformatics analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Peiheng; Zhang, Ziji; Liao, Weiming; Xu, Dongliang; Fu, Ming; Kang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify gene signatures during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), and used these to elucidate the underlying modular mechanisms. Using the Gene Expression Omnibus database, the present study obtained the GSE7669 mRNA expression microarray data from RA and OA synovial fibroblasts (n=6 each). The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in RA synovial samples compared with OA samples were identified using the Linear Models for Microarray Analysis package. The Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A protein-protein interaction network was constructed and the modules were further analyzed using the Molecular Complex Detection plugin of Cytoscape. A total of 181 DEGs were identified by comparing RA and OA synovial samples (96 up- and 85 downregulated genes). The significant DEGs in module 1, including collagen, type I, α 1 (COL1A1), COL3A1, COL4A1 and COL11A1, were predominantly enriched in the extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction and focal adhesion pathways. Additionally, significant DEGs in module 2, including radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (RSAD2), 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2), myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1) and ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier (ISG15), were predominantly associated with immune function pathways. In conclusion, the present study indicated that RSAD2, OAS2, MX1 and ISG15 may be notable gene signatures in RA development via regulation of the immune response. COL3A1, COL4A1, COL1A1 and COL11A1 may be important gene signatures in OA development via involvement in the pathways of ECM-receptor interactions and focal adhesions. PMID:27356888

  4. A new 12-gene diagnostic biomarker signature of melanoma revealed by integrated microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanting

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide microarray technology has facilitated the systematic discovery of diagnostic biomarkers of cancers and other pathologies. However, meta-analyses of published arrays often uncover significant inconsistencies that hinder advances in clinical practice. Here we present an integrated microarray analysis framework, based on a genome-wide relative significance (GWRS) and genome-wide global significance (GWGS) model. When applied to five microarray datasets on melanoma published between 2000 and 2011, this method revealed a new signature of 200 genes. When these were linked to so-called ‘melanoma driver’ genes involved in MAPK, Ca2+, and WNT signaling pathways we were able to produce a new 12-gene diagnostic biomarker signature for melanoma (i.e., EGFR, FGFR2, FGFR3, IL8, PTPRF, TNC, CXCL13, COL11A1, CHP2, SHC4, PPP2R2C, and WNT4). We have begun to experimentally validate a subset of these genes involved in MAPK signaling at the protein level, including CXCL13, COL11A1, PTPRF and SHC4 and found these to be over-expressed in metastatic and primary melanoma cells in vitro and in situ compared to melanocytes cultured from healthy skin epidermis and normal healthy human skin. While SHC4 has been reported previously to be associated to melanoma, this is the first time CXCL13, COL11A1, and PTPRF have been associated with melanoma on experimental validation. Our computational evaluation indicates that this 12-gene biomarker signature achieves excellent diagnostic power in distinguishing metastatic melanoma from normal skin and benign nevus. Further experimental validation of the role of these 12 genes in a new signaling network may provide new insights into the underlying biological mechanisms driving the progression of melanoma. PMID:23638386

  5. Screening of gene signatures for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis based on bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Peiheng; Zhang, Ziji; Liao, Weiming; Xu, Dongliang; Fu, Ming; Kang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    The current study aimed to identify gene signatures during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), and used these to elucidate the underlying modular mechanisms. Using the Gene Expression Omnibus database, the present study obtained the GSE7669 mRNA expression microarray data from RA and OA synovial fibroblasts (n=6 each). The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in RA synovial samples compared with OA samples were identified using the Linear Models for Microarray Analysis package. The Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A protein‑protein interaction network was constructed and the modules were further analyzed using the Molecular Complex Detection plugin of Cytoscape. A total of 181 DEGs were identified by comparing RA and OA synovial samples (96 up‑ and 85 downregulated genes). The significant DEGs in module 1, including collagen, type I, α 1 (COL1A1), COL3A1, COL4A1 and COL11A1, were predominantly enriched in the extracellular matrix (ECM)‑receptor interaction and focal adhesion pathways. Additionally, significant DEGs in module 2, including radical S‑adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (RSAD2), 2'‑5'‑oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2), myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1) and ISG15 ubiquitin‑like modifier (ISG15), were predominantly associated with immune function pathways. In conclusion, the present study indicated that RSAD2, OAS2, MX1 and ISG15 may be notable gene signatures in RA development via regulation of the immune response. COL3A1, COL4A1, COL1A1 and COL11A1 may be important gene signatures in OA development via involvement in the pathways of ECM-receptor interactions and focal adhesions. PMID:27356888

  6. Analysis of Infrared Signature Variation and Robust Filter-Based Supersonic Target Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sun-Gu; Kim, Kyung-Tae

    2014-01-01

    The difficulty of small infrared target detection originates from the variations of infrared signatures. This paper presents the fundamental physics of infrared target variations and reports the results of variation analysis of infrared images acquired using a long wave infrared camera over a 24-hour period for different types of backgrounds. The detection parameters, such as signal-to-clutter ratio were compared according to the recording time, temperature and humidity. Through variation analysis, robust target detection methodologies are derived by controlling thresholds and designing a temporal contrast filter to achieve high detection rate and low false alarm rate. Experimental results validate the robustness of the proposed scheme by applying it to the synthetic and real infrared sequences. PMID:24672290

  7. Large-scale phenome analysis defines a behavioral signature for Huntington's disease genotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Vadim; Brunner, Dani; Menalled, Liliana B; Kudwa, Andrea; Watson-Johnson, Judy; Mazzella, Matthew; Russell, Ian; Ruiz, Melinda C; Torello, Justin; Sabath, Emily; Sanchez, Ana; Gomez, Miguel; Filipov, Igor; Cox, Kimberly; Kwan, Mei; Ghavami, Afshin; Ramboz, Sylvie; Lager, Brenda; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Aaronson, Jeff; Rosinski, Jim; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Howland, David; Kwak, Seung

    2016-08-01

    Rapid technological advances for the frequent monitoring of health parameters have raised the intriguing possibility that an individual's genotype could be predicted from phenotypic data alone. Here we used a machine learning approach to analyze the phenotypic effects of polymorphic mutations in a mouse model of Huntington's disease that determine disease presentation and age of onset. The resulting model correlated variation across 3,086 behavioral traits with seven different CAG-repeat lengths in the huntingtin gene (Htt). We selected behavioral signatures for age and CAG-repeat length that most robustly distinguished between mouse lines and validated the model by correctly predicting the repeat length of a blinded mouse line. Sufficient discriminatory power to accurately predict genotype required combined analysis of >200 phenotypic features. Our results suggest that autosomal dominant disease-causing mutations could be predicted through the use of subtle behavioral signatures that emerge in large-scale, combinatorial analyses. Our work provides an open data platform that we now share with the research community to aid efforts focused on understanding the pathways that link behavioral consequences to genetic variation in Huntington's disease. PMID:27376585

  8. Eddy covariance captures four-phase crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) gas exchange signature in Agave.

    PubMed

    Owen, Nick A; Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Males, Jamie; Del Real Laborde, José Ignacio; Rubio-Cortés, Ramón; Griffiths, Howard; Lanigan, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mass and energy fluxes were measured over a field of Agave tequilana in Mexico using eddy covariance (EC) methodology. Data were gathered over 252 d, including the transition from wet to dry periods. Net ecosystem exchanges (FN,EC ) displayed a crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) rhythm that alternated from CO2 sink at night to CO2 source during the day, and partitioned canopy fluxes (FA,EC ) showed a characteristic four-phase CO2 exchange pattern. Results were cross-validated against diel changes in titratable acidity, leaf-unfurling rates, energy exchange fluxes and reported biomass yields. Projected carbon balance (g C m(-2)  year(-1) , mean ± 95% confidence interval) indicated the site was a net sink of -333 ± 24, of which contributions from soil respiration were +692 ± 7, and FA,EC was -1025 ± 25. EC estimated biomass yield was 20.1 Mg (dry) ha(-1)  year(-1) . Average integrated daily FA,EC was -234 ± 5 mmol CO2  m(-2)  d(-1) and persisted almost unchanged after 70 d of drought conditions. Regression analyses were performed on the EC data to identify the best environmental predictors of FA . Results suggest that the carbon acquisition strategy of Agave offers productivity and drought resilience advantages over conventional semi-arid C3 and C4 bioenergy candidates. PMID:26177873

  9. Salmonella transcriptional signature in Tetrahymena phagosomes and role of acid tolerance in passage through the protist

    PubMed Central

    Rehfuss, Marc Yi Ming; Parker, Craig Thomas; Brandl, Maria Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Typhimurium remains undigested in the food vacuoles of the common protist, Tetrahymena. Contrary to its interaction with Acanthamoeba spp., S. Typhimurium is not cytotoxic to Tetrahymena and is egested as viable cells in its fecal pellets. Through microarray gene expression profiling we investigated the factors in S. Typhimurium that are involved in its resistance to digestion by Tetrahymena. The transcriptome of S. Typhimurium in Tetrahymena phagosomes showed that 989 and 1282 genes were altered in expression compared with that in water and in LB culture medium, respectively. A great proportion of the upregulated genes have a role in anaerobic metabolism and the use of alternate electron acceptors. Many genes required for survival and replication within macrophages and human epithelial cells also had increased expression in Tetrahymena, including mgtC, one of the most highly induced genes in all three cells types. A ΔmgtC mutant of S. Typhimurium did not show decreased viability in Tetrahymena, but paradoxically, was egested at a higher cell density than the wild type. The expression of adiA and adiY, which are involved in arginine-dependent acid resistance, also was increased in the protozoan phagosome. A ΔadiAY mutant had lower viability after passage through Tetrahymena, and a higher proportion of S. Typhimurium wild-type cells within pellets remained viable after exposure to pH 3.4 as compared with uningested cells. Our results provide evidence that acid resistance has a role in the resistance of Salmonella to digestion by Tetrahymena and that passage through the protist confers physiological advantages relevant to its contamination cycle. PMID:20686510

  10. Eddy covariance captures four-phase crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) gas exchange signature in Agave.

    PubMed

    Owen, Nick A; Choncubhair, Órlaith Ní; Males, Jamie; Del Real Laborde, José Ignacio; Rubio-Cortés, Ramón; Griffiths, Howard; Lanigan, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mass and energy fluxes were measured over a field of Agave tequilana in Mexico using eddy covariance (EC) methodology. Data were gathered over 252 d, including the transition from wet to dry periods. Net ecosystem exchanges (FN,EC ) displayed a crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) rhythm that alternated from CO2 sink at night to CO2 source during the day, and partitioned canopy fluxes (FA,EC ) showed a characteristic four-phase CO2 exchange pattern. Results were cross-validated against diel changes in titratable acidity, leaf-unfurling rates, energy exchange fluxes and reported biomass yields. Projected carbon balance (g C m(-2)  year(-1) , mean ± 95% confidence interval) indicated the site was a net sink of -333 ± 24, of which contributions from soil respiration were +692 ± 7, and FA,EC was -1025 ± 25. EC estimated biomass yield was 20.1 Mg (dry) ha(-1)  year(-1) . Average integrated daily FA,EC was -234 ± 5 mmol CO2  m(-2)  d(-1) and persisted almost unchanged after 70 d of drought conditions. Regression analyses were performed on the EC data to identify the best environmental predictors of FA . Results suggest that the carbon acquisition strategy of Agave offers productivity and drought resilience advantages over conventional semi-arid C3 and C4 bioenergy candidates.

  11. Acousto-optic signature analysis for inspection of the orbiter thermal protection tile bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Julio G.; Tow, D. M.; Barna, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a viable NDE technique for the inspection of orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) tile bonds. Phase 2, discussed here, concentrated on developing an empirical understanding of the bonded and unbonded vibration signatures of acreage tiles. Controlled experiments in the laboratory have provided useful information on the dynamic response of TPS tiles. It has been shown that several signatures are common to all the pedigree tiles. This degree of consistency in the tile-SIP (strain isolation pad) dynamic response proves that an unbond can be detected for a known tile and establish the basis for extending the analysis capability to arbitrary tiles for which there are no historical data. The field tests of the noncontacting laser acoustic sensor system, conducted at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), investigated the vibrational environment of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) and its effect on the measurement and analysis techniques being developed. The data collected showed that for orbiter locations, such as the body flap and elevon, the data analysis scheme, and/or the sensor, will require modification to accommodate the ambient motion. Several methods were identified for accomplishing this, and a solution is seen as readily achievable. It was established that the tile response was similar to that observed in the laboratory. Of most importance, however, is that the field environment will not affect the physics of the dynamic response that is related to bond condition. All of this information is fundamental to any future design and development of a prototype system.

  12. Illumination analysis of the digital pattern recognition system by Bessel masks and one-dimensional signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solorza, S.; Álvarez-Borrego, J.

    2013-11-01

    The effects of illumination variations in digital images are a trend topic of the pattern recognition field. The luminance information of the objects help to classify them, however the environment illumination could cause a lot of problem if the system is not illumination invariant. Some applications of this topic include image and video quality, biometrics classification, etc. In this work an illumination analysis for a digital system invariant to position and rotation based on Fourier transform, Bessel masks, one-dimensional signatures and linear correlations are presented. The digital system was tested using a reference database of 21 fossil diatoms images of gray-scale and 307 x 307 pixels. The digital system has shown an excellent performance in the classification of 60,480 problem images which have different non-homogeneous illumination.

  13. Statistical analysis of infrasound signatures in airglow observations: Indications for acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilger, Christoph; Schmidt, Carsten; Bittner, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The detection of infrasonic signals in temperature time series of the mesopause altitude region (at about 80-100 km) is performed at the German Remote Sensing Data Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR-DFD) using GRIPS instrumentation (GRound-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometers). Mesopause temperature values with a temporal resolution of up to 10 s are derived from the observation of nocturnal airglow emissions and permit the identification of signals within the long-period infrasound range.Spectral intensities of wave signatures with periods between 2.5 and 10 min are estimated applying the wavelet analysis technique to one minute mean temperature values. Selected events as well as the statistical distribution of 40 months of observation are presented and discussed with respect to resonant modes of the atmosphere. The mechanism of acoustic resonance generated by strong infrasonic sources is a potential explanation of distinct features with periods between 3 and 5 min observed in the dataset.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of Antiviral Signature Genes in Porcine Macrophages at Different Activation Statuses

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Brichalli, Wyatt; Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages (MФs) can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1), alternative (M2), and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153–5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) and interferon (IFN)γ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL)-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20–50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK) and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis. PMID:24505295

  15. Security Analysis of the Unrestricted Identity-Based Aggregate Signature Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwangsu; Lee, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Aggregate signatures allow anyone to combine different signatures signed by different signers on different messages into a short signature. An ideal aggregate signature scheme is an identity-based aggregate signature (IBAS) scheme that supports full aggregation since it can reduce the total transmitted data by using an identity string as a public key and anyone can freely aggregate different signatures. Constructing a secure IBAS scheme that supports full aggregation in bilinear maps is an important open problem. Recently, Yuan et al. proposed such a scheme and claimed its security in the random oracle model under the computational Diffie-Hellman assumption. In this paper, we show that there is an efficient forgery on their IBAS scheme and that their security proof has a serious flaw. PMID:25993247

  16. Developments in target micro-Doppler signatures analysis: radar imaging, ultrasound and through-the-wall radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, Carmine; Balleri, Alessio; Woodbridge, Karl; Soraghan, John J.

    2013-12-01

    Target motions, other than the main bulk translation of the target, induce Doppler modulations around the main Doppler shift that form what is commonly called a target micro-Doppler signature. Radar micro-Doppler signatures are generally both target and action specific and hence can be used to classify and recognise targets as well as to identify possible threats. In recent years, research into the use of micro-Doppler signatures for target classification to address many defence and security challenges has been of increasing interest. In this article, we present a review of the work published in the last 10 years on emerging applications of radar target analysis using micro-Doppler signatures. Specifically we review micro-Doppler target signatures in bistatic SAR and ISAR, through-the-wall radar and ultrasound radar. This article has been compiled to provide radar practitioners with a unique reference source covering the latest developments in micro-Doppler analysis, extraction and mitigation techniques. The article shows that this research area is highly active and fast moving and demonstrates that micro-Doppler techniques can provide important solutions to many radar target classification challenges.

  17. Signature analysis of satellite derived SSHa, SST and chlorophyll concentration and their linkage with marine fishery resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, H. U.; Bhatpuria, Dhyey; Chauhan, Prakash

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to understand patterns, persistence and interrelationship between satellite derived oceanic variables. Time series near-synchronous sea surface height anomaly (SSHa), chlorophyll-a concentration (CC) and sea surface temperature (SST) derived from Topex/Poseidon altimeter, Oceansat-OCM and NOAA-AVHRR, respectively, were used for integrative signature analysis. Three dimensional surface and two dimensional spatial profiles of these variables were generated to understand the spatio-temporal variability. SST and SSHa were co-varying and CC shows an inverse correlation. The time series data analysis indicated bio-physical closely coupled processes. The patterns of variability in CC signatures were found to be associated with SSHa and SST signatures. High fish catch in terms of CPUE (catch-per-unit-effort) were found in low SSHa and corresponding high chlorophyll concentration area during the year 1998-2004 in the Northern Arabian Sea. SSHa signatures were detected earlier than CC and SST. Lower SSHa signatures were inferred as advanced information of the occurrence of productive sites in near future. This study would be useful to understand large scale bio-physical coupled processes for fishery resources exploration.

  18. How wide is a stream? Spatial extent of the potential "stream signature" in terrestrial food webs using meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Muehlbauer, Jeffrey D; Collins, Scott F; Doyle, Martin W; Tockner, Klement

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude of cross-ecosystem resource subsidies is increasingly well recognized; however, less is known about the distance these subsidies travel into the recipient landscape. In streams and rivers, this distance can delimit the "biological stream width," complementary to hydro-geomorphic measures (e.g., channel banks) that have typically defined stream ecosystem boundaries. In this study we used meta-analysis to define a "stream signature" on land that relates the stream-to-land subsidy to distance. The 50% stream signature, for example, identifies the point on the landscape where subsidy resources are still at half of their maximum (in- or near-stream) level. The decay curve for these data was best fit by a negative power function in which the 50% stream signature was concentrated near stream banks (1.5 m), but a non-trivial (10%) portion of the maximum subsidy level was still found > 0.5 km from the water's edge. The meta-analysis also identified explanatory variables that affect the stream signature. This improves our understanding of ecosystem conditions that permit spatially extensive subsidy transmission, such as in highly productive, middle-order streams and rivers. Resultant multivariate models from this analysis may be useful to managers implementing buffer rules and conservation strategies for stream and riparian function, as they facilitate prediction of the extent of subsidies. Our results stress that much of the subsidy remains near the stream, but also that subsidies (and aquatic organisms) are capable of long-distance dispersal into adjacent environments, and that the effective "biological stream width" of stream and river ecosystems is often much larger than has been defined by hydro-geomorphic metrics alone. Limited data available from marine and lake sources overlap well with the stream signature data, indicating that the "signature" approach may also be applicable to subsidy spatial dynamics across other ecosystems.

  19. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K.; Cheong, S. A.

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with α helix and β hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein

  20. Key residues approach to the definition of protein families and analysis of sparse family signatures.

    PubMed

    Ison, J C; Blades, M J; Bleasby, A J; Daniel, S C; Parish, J H; Findlay, J B

    2000-08-01

    We extend the concept of the motif as a tool for characterizing protein families and explore the feasibility of a sparse "motif" that is the length of the protein sequence itself. The type of motif discussed is a sparse family signature consisting of a set of N key residue positions (A1, A2...AN) preceded by gaps (G) thus G1A1G2A2. ...GNAN. Both a residue and gap can be variable. A signature is matched to a protein sequence and scored using a dynamic programming algorithm which permits variability in gap distance and residue type. Generating a signature involves identifying residues associated with points of contact in interactions between secondary structure elements. A raw signature consists of a set of positions with potential key structural roles sampled from a sequence alignment constructed with reference to this contact data. Raw signatures are refined by sampling different gap-residue pairs until the specificity of a signature for the family cannot be further improved. We summarize signatures for nine families of protein of diverse fold and function and present results of scans against the OWL protein sequence database. The implications of such signatures are discussed.

  1. Analysis of Forgery Attack on One-Time Proxy Signature and the Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tian-Yin; Wei, Zong-Li

    2016-02-01

    In a recent paper, Yang et al. (Quant. Inf. Process. 13(9), 2007-2016, 2014) analyzed the security of one-time proxy signature scheme Wang and Wei (Quant. Inf. Process. 11(2), 455-463, 2012) and pointed out that it cannot satisfy the security requirements of unforgeability and undeniability because an eavesdropper Eve can forge a valid proxy signature on a message chosen by herself. However, we find that the so-called proxy message-signature pair forged by Eve is issued by the proxy signer in fact, and anybody can obtain it as a requester, which means that the forgery attack is not considered as a successful attack. Therefore, the conclusion that this scheme cannot satisfy the security requirements of proxy signature against forging and denying is not appropriate in this sense. Finally, we study the reason for the misunderstanding and clarify the security requirements for proxy signatures.

  2. Transcriptome signatures in Helicobacter pylori-infected mucosa identifies acidic mammalian chitinase loss as a corpus atrophy marker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of gastric cancer cases are believed to be caused by chronic infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, and atrophic corpus gastritis is a predisposing condition to gastric cancer development. We aimed to increase understanding of the molecular details of atrophy by performing a global transcriptome analysis of stomach tissue. Methods Biopsies from patients with different stages of H. pylori infection were taken from both the antrum and corpus mucosa and analyzed on microarrays. The stages included patients without current H. pylori infection, H. pylori-infected without corpus atrophy and patients with current or past H. pylori-infection with corpus-predominant atrophic gastritis. Results Using clustering and integrated analysis, we found firm evidence for antralization of the corpus mucosa of atrophy patients. This antralization harbored gain of gastrin expression, as well as loss of expression of corpus-related genes, such as genes associated with acid production, energy metabolism and blood clotting. The analyses provided detailed molecular evidence for simultaneous intestinal metaplasia (IM) and spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in atrophic corpus tissue. Finally, acidic mammalian chitinase, a chitin-degrading enzyme produced by chief cells, was shown to be strongly down-regulated in corpus atrophy. Conclusions Transcriptome analysis revealed several gene groups which are related to development of corpus atrophy, some of which were increased also in H. pylori-infected non-atrophic patients. Furthermore, loss of acidic chitinase expression is a promising marker for corpus atrophy. PMID:24119614

  3. Multi-tissue microarray analysis identifies a molecular signature of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Sarah E; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Atkinson, Donald L; Krcmery, Jennifer; Guzman, Claudia E; Kent, David T; Zukor, Katherine; Marx, Kenneth A; Odelberg, Shannon J; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    The inability to functionally repair tissues that are lost as a consequence of disease or injury remains a significant challenge for regenerative medicine. The molecular and cellular processes involved in complete restoration of tissue architecture and function are expected to be complex and remain largely unknown. Unlike humans, certain salamanders can completely regenerate injured tissues and lost appendages without scar formation. A parsimonious hypothesis would predict that all of these regenerative activities are regulated, at least in part, by a common set of genes. To test this hypothesis and identify genes that might control conserved regenerative processes, we performed a comprehensive microarray analysis of the early regenerative response in five regeneration-competent tissues from the newt Notophthalmus viridescens. Consistent with this hypothesis, we established a molecular signature for regeneration that consists of common genes or gene family members that exhibit dynamic differential regulation during regeneration in multiple tissue types. These genes include members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and its regulators, extracellular matrix components, genes involved in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics, and a variety of immune response factors. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis validated and supported their functional activities in conserved regenerative processes. Surprisingly, dendrogram clustering and RadViz classification also revealed that each regenerative tissue had its own unique temporal expression profile, pointing to an inherent tissue-specific regenerative gene program. These new findings demand a reconsideration of how we conceptualize regenerative processes and how we devise new strategies for regenerative medicine.

  4. Multi-Tissue Microarray Analysis Identifies a Molecular Signature of Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Sarah E.; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Atkinson, Donald L.; Krcmery, Jennifer; Guzman, Claudia E.; Kent, David T.; Zukor, Katherine; Marx, Kenneth A.; Odelberg, Shannon J.; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    The inability to functionally repair tissues that are lost as a consequence of disease or injury remains a significant challenge for regenerative medicine. The molecular and cellular processes involved in complete restoration of tissue architecture and function are expected to be complex and remain largely unknown. Unlike humans, certain salamanders can completely regenerate injured tissues and lost appendages without scar formation. A parsimonious hypothesis would predict that all of these regenerative activities are regulated, at least in part, by a common set of genes. To test this hypothesis and identify genes that might control conserved regenerative processes, we performed a comprehensive microarray analysis of the early regenerative response in five regeneration-competent tissues from the newt Notophthalmus viridescens. Consistent with this hypothesis, we established a molecular signature for regeneration that consists of common genes or gene family members that exhibit dynamic differential regulation during regeneration in multiple tissue types. These genes include members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and its regulators, extracellular matrix components, genes involved in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics, and a variety of immune response factors. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis validated and supported their functional activities in conserved regenerative processes. Surprisingly, dendrogram clustering and RadViz classification also revealed that each regenerative tissue had its own unique temporal expression profile, pointing to an inherent tissue-specific regenerative gene program. These new findings demand a reconsideration of how we conceptualize regenerative processes and how we devise new strategies for regenerative medicine. PMID:23300656

  5. An Analysis of Measured Pressure Signatures From Two Theory-Validation Low-Boom Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Two wing/fuselage/nacelle/fin concepts were designed to check the validity and the applicability of sonic-boom minimization theory, sonic-boom analysis methods, and low-boom design methodology in use at the end of the 1980is. Models of these concepts were built, and the pressure signatures they generated were measured in the wind-tunnel. The results of these measurements lead to three conclusions: (1) the existing methods could adequately predict sonic-boom characteristics of wing/fuselage/fin(s) configurations if the equivalent area distributions of each component were smooth and continuous; (2) these methods needed revision so the engine-nacelle volume and the nacelle-wing interference lift disturbances could be accurately predicted; and (3) current nacelle-configuration integration methods had to be updated. With these changes in place, the existing sonic-boom analysis and minimization methods could be effectively applied to supersonic-cruise concepts for acceptable/tolerable sonic-boom overpressures during cruise.

  6. Systems analysis of eleven rodent disease models reveals an inflammatome signature and key drivers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ming; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Xia; Zhu, Jun; Stepaniants, Serguei; Zhang, Chunsheng; Meng, Qingying; Peters, Mette; He, Yudong; Ni, Chester; Slipetz, Deborah; Crackower, Michael A; Houshyar, Hani; Tan, Christopher M; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; O'Neill, Gary; Jane Luo, Mingjuan; Thieringer, Rolf; Yuan, Jeffrey; Chiu, Chi-Sung; Yee Lum, Pek; Lamb, John; Boie, Yves; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Schadt, Eric E; Dai, Hongyue; Roberts, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Common inflammatome gene signatures as well as disease-specific signatures were identified by analyzing 12 expression profiling data sets derived from 9 different tissues isolated from 11 rodent inflammatory disease models. The inflammatome signature significantly overlaps with known drug targets and co-expressed gene modules linked to metabolic disorders and cancer. A large proportion of genes in this signature are tightly connected in tissue-specific Bayesian networks (BNs) built from multiple independent mouse and human cohorts. Both the inflammatome signature and the corresponding consensus BNs are highly enriched for immune response-related genes supported as causal for adiposity, adipokine, diabetes, aortic lesion, bone, muscle, and cholesterol traits, suggesting the causal nature of the inflammatome for a variety of diseases. Integration of this inflammatome signature with the BNs uncovered 151 key drivers that appeared to be more biologically important than the non-drivers in terms of their impact on disease phenotypes. The identification of this inflammatome signature, its network architecture, and key drivers not only highlights the shared etiology but also pinpoints potential targets for intervention of various common diseases. PMID:22806142

  7. Integrative analysis of lung development-cancer expression associations reveals the roles of signatures with inverse expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Chunquan; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Shang, Desi; Yang, Xinmiao; Han, Junwei; Sun, Zeguo; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have focused on exploring the associations between organ development and malignant tumors; however, the clinical relevance of the development signatures was inadequately addressed in lung cancer. In this study, we explored the associations between lung development and lung cancer progression by analyzing a total of two development and seven cancer datasets. We identified representative expression patterns (continuously up- and down-regulated) from development and cancer profiles, and inverse pattern associations were observed at both the gene and functional levels. Furthermore, we dissected the biological processes dominating the associations, and found that proliferation and immunity were respectively involved in the two inverse development-cancer expression patterns. Through sub-pathway analysis of the signatures with inverse expression patterns, we finally identified a 13-gene risk signature from the cell cycle sub-pathway, and evaluated its predictive performance for lung cancer patient clinical outcome using independent cohorts. Our findings indicated that the integrative analysis of development and cancer expression patterns provided a framework for identifying effective molecular signatures for clinical utility.

  8. Integrative radiogenomic analysis for genomic signatures in glioblastomas presenting leptomeningeal dissemination.

    PubMed

    You, Hye Jin; Park, Ho-Young; Kim, Jinkuk; Lee, In-Hee; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Sung Tae; Kong, Doo-Sik; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis for glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor. In particular, leptomeningeal dissemination (LMD) has a dismal prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify tumor molecular phenotype, which has a great propensity to develop LMD. Between May 2004 and December 2012, a total of 145 GBM tumor samples were obtained from data registry. A total of 20 of the 145 patients with GBM were found to develop LMD. A specialized radiologist confirmed the diagnosis of LMD on magnetic resonance imaging. To clarify the genomic signatures in GBM with LMD, we performed integrative analysis of whole transcriptome sequencing and copy number alteration in the radiological features indicating LMD phenotypes in GBM. Eleven newly diagnosed patients with GBM with LMD had worse prognosis than those without LMD (median 5.55 vs. 12.94 months, P < 0.0001). Integrating analysis using gene expression based on the change of copy number revealed that SPOCK1, EHD2, SLC2A3, and ANXA11 were highly expressed with the gain of copy number, compared with the gene expression in the non-LMD group. In addition, it was demonstrated that NME2, TMEM100, and SIVA1 were downregulated with the loss of copy number. We also found that mesenchymal subtype accounted for 50% in LMD group, whereas mesenchymal subtype consisted of 29% in non-LMD group, even though there was no statistical significance (P = 0.06). Through this radiogenomic analysis, we suggested the possibility of finding candidate genes associated with LMD and highlighted the significance of integrating approach to clarify the molecular characteristics in LMD. PMID:27399113

  9. Comparative analysis of viral RNA signatures on different RIG-I-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez David, Raul Y; Combredet, Chantal; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Mura, Marie; Guerbois Galla, Mathilde; Despres, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Komarova, Anastassia V

    2016-01-01

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) play a major role in sensing RNA virus infection to initiate and modulate antiviral immunity. They interact with particular viral RNAs, most of them being still unknown. To decipher the viral RNA signature on RLRs during viral infection, we tagged RLRs (RIG-I, MDA5, LGP2) and applied tagged protein affinity purification followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of associated RNA molecules. Two viruses with negative- and positive-sense RNA genome were used: measles (MV) and chikungunya (CHIKV). NGS analysis revealed that distinct regions of MV genome were specifically recognized by distinct RLRs: RIG-I recognized defective interfering genomes, whereas MDA5 and LGP2 specifically bound MV nucleoprotein-coding region. During CHIKV infection, RIG-I associated specifically to the 3’ untranslated region of viral genome. This study provides the first comparative view of the viral RNA ligands for RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 in the presence of infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11275.001 PMID:27011352

  10. Analysis of the DNA Fourier transform-infrared microspectroscopic signature using an all-reflecting objective.

    PubMed

    Mello, Maria Luiza S; Vidal, Benedicto C

    2014-06-01

    The Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) signature of dry samples of DNA and DNA-polypeptide complexes, as studied by IR microspectroscopy using a diamond attenuated total reflection (ATR) objective, has revealed important discriminatory characteristics relative to the PO2(-) vibrational stretchings. However, DNA IR marks that provide information on the sample's richness in hydrogen bonds have not been resolved in the spectral profiles obtained with this objective. Here we investigated the performance of an "all reflecting objective" (ARO) for analysis of the FT-IR signal of hydrogen bonds in DNA samples differing in base richness types (salmon testis vs calf thymus). The results obtained using the ARO indicate prominent band peaks at the spectral region representative of the vibration of nitrogenous base hydrogen bonds and of NH and NH2 groups. The band areas at this spectral region differ in agreement with the DNA base richness type when using the ARO. A peak assigned to adenine was more evident in the AT-rich salmon DNA using either the ARO or the ATR objective. It is concluded that, for the discrimination of DNA IR hydrogen bond vibrations associated with varying base type proportions, the use of an ARO is recommended.

  11. Bayesian analysis of fingerprint, face and signature evidences with automatic biometric systems.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Joaquin; Fierrez-Aguilar, Julian; Ramos-Castro, Daniel; Ortega-Garcia, Javier

    2005-12-20

    The Bayesian approach provides a unified and logical framework for the analysis of evidence and to provide results in the form of likelihood ratios (LR) from the forensic laboratory to court. In this contribution we want to clarify how the biometric scientist or laboratory can adapt their conventional biometric systems or technologies to work according to this Bayesian approach. Forensic systems providing their results in the form of LR will be assessed through Tippett plots, which give a clear representation of the LR-based performance both for targets (the suspect is the author/source of the test pattern) and non-targets. However, the computation procedures of the LR values, especially with biometric evidences, are still an open issue. Reliable estimation techniques showing good generalization properties for the estimation of the between- and within-source variabilities of the test pattern are required, as variance restriction techniques in the within-source density estimation to stand for the variability of the source with the course of time. Fingerprint, face and on-line signature recognition systems will be adapted to work according to this Bayesian approach showing both the likelihood ratios range in each application and the adequacy of these biometric techniques to the daily forensic work.

  12. Proteomic analysis of pRb loss highlights a signature of decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nicolay, Brandon N; Danielian, Paul S; Kottakis, Filippos; Lapek, John D; Sanidas, Ioannis; Miles, Wayne O; Dehnad, Mantre; Tschöp, Katrin; Gierut, Jessica J; Manning, Amity L; Morris, Robert; Haigis, Kevin; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Lees, Jacqueline A; Haas, Wilhelm; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2015-09-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRb) protein associates with chromatin and regulates gene expression. Numerous studies have identified Rb-dependent RNA signatures, but the proteomic effects of Rb loss are largely unexplored. We acutely ablated Rb in adult mice and conducted a quantitative analysis of RNA and proteomic changes in the colon and lungs, where Rb(KO) was sufficient or insufficient to induce ectopic proliferation, respectively. As expected, Rb(KO) caused similar increases in classic pRb/E2F-regulated transcripts in both tissues, but, unexpectedly, their protein products increased only in the colon, consistent with its increased proliferative index. Thus, these protein changes induced by Rb loss are coupled with proliferation but uncoupled from transcription. The proteomic changes in common between Rb(KO) tissues showed a striking decrease in proteins with mitochondrial functions. Accordingly, RB1 inactivation in human cells decreased both mitochondrial mass and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function. RB(KO) cells showed decreased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and the accumulation of hypopolarized mitochondria. Additionally, RB/Rb loss altered mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation from (13)C-glucose through the TCA cycle in mouse tissues and cultured cells. Consequently, RB(KO) cells have an enhanced sensitivity to mitochondrial stress conditions. In summary, proteomic analyses provide a new perspective on Rb/RB1 mutation, highlighting the importance of pRb for mitochondrial function and suggesting vulnerabilities for treatment.

  13. Comparative analysis of viral RNA signatures on different RIG-I-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez David, Raul Y; Combredet, Chantal; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Mura, Marie; Guerbois Galla, Mathilde; Despres, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Komarova, Anastassia V

    2016-01-01

    The RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) play a major role in sensing RNA virus infection to initiate and modulate antiviral immunity. They interact with particular viral RNAs, most of them being still unknown. To decipher the viral RNA signature on RLRs during viral infection, we tagged RLRs (RIG-I, MDA5, LGP2) and applied tagged protein affinity purification followed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of associated RNA molecules. Two viruses with negative- and positive-sense RNA genome were used: measles (MV) and chikungunya (CHIKV). NGS analysis revealed that distinct regions of MV genome were specifically recognized by distinct RLRs: RIG-I recognized defective interfering genomes, whereas MDA5 and LGP2 specifically bound MV nucleoprotein-coding region. During CHIKV infection, RIG-I associated specifically to the 3' untranslated region of viral genome. This study provides the first comparative view of the viral RNA ligands for RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 in the presence of infection. PMID:27011352

  14. Molecular signature and pathway analysis of human primary squamous and adenocarcinoma lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daraselia, Nikolai; Wang, Yipeng; Budoff, Adam; Lituev, Alexander; Potapova, Olga; Vansant, Gordon; Monforte, Joseph; Mazo, Ilya; Ossovskaya, Valeria S

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, with a poor response to chemotherapy and low survival rate. This unfavorable treatment response is likely to derive from both late diagnosis and from complex, incompletely understood biology, and heterogeneity among NSCLC subtypes. To define the relative contributions of major cellular pathways to the biogenesis of NSCLC and highlight major differences between NSCLC subtypes, we studied the molecular signatures of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), based on analysis of gene expression and comparison of tumor samples with normal lung tissue. Our results suggest the existence of specific molecular networks and subtype-specific differences between lung ADC and SCC subtypes, mostly found in cell cycle, DNA repair, and metabolic pathways. However, we also observed similarities across major gene interaction networks and pathways in ADC and SCC. These data provide a new insight into the biology of ADC and SCC and can be used to explore novel therapeutic interventions in lung cancer chemoprevention and treatment. PMID:22206048

  15. Proteomic analysis of pRb loss highlights a signature of decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Nicolay, Brandon N.; Danielian, Paul S.; Kottakis, Filippos; Lapek, John D.; Sanidas, Ioannis; Miles, Wayne O.; Dehnad, Mantre; Tschöp, Katrin; Gierut, Jessica J.; Manning, Amity L.; Morris, Robert; Haigis, Kevin; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Lees, Jacqueline A.; Haas, Wilhelm; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRb) protein associates with chromatin and regulates gene expression. Numerous studies have identified Rb-dependent RNA signatures, but the proteomic effects of Rb loss are largely unexplored. We acutely ablated Rb in adult mice and conducted a quantitative analysis of RNA and proteomic changes in the colon and lungs, where RbKO was sufficient or insufficient to induce ectopic proliferation, respectively. As expected, RbKO caused similar increases in classic pRb/E2F-regulated transcripts in both tissues, but, unexpectedly, their protein products increased only in the colon, consistent with its increased proliferative index. Thus, these protein changes induced by Rb loss are coupled with proliferation but uncoupled from transcription. The proteomic changes in common between RbKO tissues showed a striking decrease in proteins with mitochondrial functions. Accordingly, RB1 inactivation in human cells decreased both mitochondrial mass and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function. RBKO cells showed decreased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and the accumulation of hypopolarized mitochondria. Additionally, RB/Rb loss altered mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation from 13C-glucose through the TCA cycle in mouse tissues and cultured cells. Consequently, RBKO cells have an enhanced sensitivity to mitochondrial stress conditions. In summary, proteomic analyses provide a new perspective on Rb/RB1 mutation, highlighting the importance of pRb for mitochondrial function and suggesting vulnerabilities for treatment. PMID:26314710

  16. Deciphering protein signatures using color, morphological, and topological analysis of immunohistochemically stained human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerhouni, Erwan; Prisacari, Bogdan; Zhong, Qing; Wild, Peter; Gabrani, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Images of tissue specimens enable evidence-based study of disease susceptibility and stratification. Moreover, staining technologies empower the evidencing of molecular expression patterns by multicolor visualization, thus enabling personalized disease treatment and prevention. However, translating molecular expression imaging into direct health benefits has been slow. Two major factors contribute to that. On the one hand, disease susceptibility and progression is a complex, multifactorial molecular process. Diseases, such as cancer, exhibit cellular heterogeneity, impeding the differentiation between diverse grades or types of cell formations. On the other hand, the relative quantification of the stained tissue selected features is ambiguous, tedious and time consuming, prone to clerical error, leading to intra- and inter-observer variability and low throughput. Image analysis of digital histopathology images is a fast-developing and exciting area of disease research that aims to address the above limitations. We have developed a computational framework that extracts unique signatures using color, morphological and topological information and allows the combination thereof. The integration of the above information enables diagnosis of disease with AUC as high as 0.97. Multiple staining show significant improvement with respect to most proteins, and an AUC as high as 0.99.

  17. Analysis of multispectral signatures and investigation of multi-aspect remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Hieber, R. H.; Sarno, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Two major aspects of remote sensing with multispectral scanners (MSS) are investigated. The first, multispectral signature analysis, includes the effects on classification performance of systematic variations found in the average signals received from various ground covers as well as the prediction of these variations with theoretical models of physical processes. The foremost effects studied are those associated with the time of day airborne MSS data are collected. Six data collection runs made over the same flight line in a period of five hours are analyzed, it is found that the time span significantly affects classification performance. Variations associated with scan angle also are studied. The second major topic of discussion is multi-aspect remote sensing, a new concept in remote sensing with scanners. Here, data are collected on multiple passes by a scanner that can be tilted to scan forward of the aircraft at different angles on different passes. The use of such spatially registered data to achieve improved classification of agricultural scenes is investigated and found promising. Also considered are the possibilities of extracting from multi-aspect data, information on the condition of corn canopies and the stand characteristics of forests.

  18. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  19. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  20. Tissue-specific robustness of fatty acid signatures in cultured gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) fed practical diets with a combined high replacement of fish meal and fish oil.

    PubMed

    Benedito-Palos, L; Navarro, J C; Kaushik, S; Pérez-Sánchez, J

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed to determine the tissue-specific robustness of fatty acid (FA) signatures of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) by analyzing the changes in lipid class and FA composition of skeletal muscle, brain, liver, and mesenteric adipose tissue. Triplicate groups of fish were fed to visual satiety over a 14-mo production cycle with 2 practical plant protein-based diets formulated with either fish oil or a blend of vegetable oils (66% of fish oil replacement) to contain 53% CP and 21% crude fat on a DM basis. Growth rates (P = 0.22) and tissue lipid class composition were not altered by the dietary treatment (P = 0.34 and 0.52 for neutral lipids and phospholipids, respectively). The FA signatures of neutral lipids reflected the composition of the diet, although the output of principal components analysis revealed a divergent FA profile for liver compared with skeletal muscle, brain, and mesenteric adipose tissue. Because the theoretical EFA needs were met by the 2 diets, the FA composition of phospholipids remained almost unaltered in all tissues. Interestingly, however, the brain showed the greatest robustness and regulatory capacity to preserve the phenotype of fish fed fish oil-based diets. The FA signatures of total lipids are a combinatory result of neutral and polar lipids, and the most relevant fat storage tissues (mesenteric adipose tissue and skeletal muscle) were more easily influenced by dietary FA composition. The present study provides new insights into fish tissue FA composition and reinforces the use of FA signatures as useful criteria in determining whether EFA requirements for a wide range of physiological processes, including those of neural tissues, can be met with practical fish feeds.

  1. Boric Acid in Kjeldahl Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    The use of boric acid in the Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen is a variant of the original method widely applied in many laboratories all over the world. Its use is recommended by control organizations such as ISO, IDF, and EPA because it yields reliable and accurate results. However, the chemical principles the method is based on are not…

  2. A meta-analysis of gene expression signatures of blood pressure and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tianxiao; Esko, Tõnu; Peters, Marjolein J; Pilling, Luke C; Schramm, Katharina; Schurmann, Claudia; Chen, Brian H; Liu, Chunyu; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D; Yao, Chen; Ying, Sai-Xia; Courchesne, Paul; Milani, Lili; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; Reinmaa, Eva; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Hernandez, Dena G; Bandinelli, Stefania; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Metspalu, Andres; Carstensen, Maren; Grallert, Harald; Herder, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Waldenberger, Melanie; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Munson, Peter J; Yang, Xia; Prokisch, Holger; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Levy, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05). Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%-9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2). Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. PMID:25785607

  3. A Meta-analysis of Gene Expression Signatures of Blood Pressure and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian H.; Liu, Chunyu; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Yao, Chen; Ying, Sai-xia; Courchesne, Paul; Milani, Lili; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; Reinmaa, Eva; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Metspalu, Andres; Carstensen, Maren; Grallert, Harald; Herder, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Waldenberger, Melanie; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B.; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Munson, Peter J.; Yang, Xia; Prokisch, Holger; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05). Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%–9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2). Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. PMID:25785607

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus in South America clade 1 reveals unique molecular signatures of the local epidemic.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cristine D B; Gräf, Tiago; Ikuta, Nilo; Lehmann, Fernanda K M; Passos, Daniel T; Makiejczuk, Aline; Silveira, Marcos A T; Fonseca, André S K; Canal, Cláudio W; Lunge, Vagner R

    2016-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious pathogen for domestic dogs and several wild carnivore species. In Brazil, natural infection of CDV in dogs is very high due to the large non-vaccinated dog population, a scenario that calls for new studies on the molecular epidemiology. This study investigates the phylodynamics and amino-acid signatures of CDV epidemic in South America by analyzing a large dataset compiled from publicly available sequences and also by collecting new samples from Brazil. A population of 175 dogs with canine distemper (CD) signs was sampled, from which 89 were positive for CDV, generating 42 new CDV sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the new and publicly available sequences revealed that Brazilian sequences mainly clustered in South America 1 (SA1) clade, which has its origin estimated to the late 1980's. The reconstruction of the demographic history in SA1 clade showed an epidemic expanding until the recent years, doubling in size every nine years. SA1 clade epidemic distinguished from the world CDV epidemic by the emergence of the R580Q strain, a very rare and potentially detrimental substitution in the viral genome. The R580Q substitution was estimated to have happened in one single evolutionary step in the epidemic history in SA1 clade, emerging shortly after introduction to the continent. Moreover, a high prevalence (11.9%) of the Y549H mutation was observed among the domestic dogs sampled here. This finding was associated (p<0.05) with outcome-death and higher frequency in mixed-breed dogs, the later being an indicator of a continuous exchange of CDV strains circulating among wild carnivores and domestic dogs. The results reported here highlight the diversity of the worldwide CDV epidemic and reveal local features that can be valuable for combating the disease.

  5. Are there molecular signatures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  6. Entropy based analysis of satellite magnetic data for searching possible e.m. signatures due to big earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchini, G.; de Santis, A.; Balasis, G.; Mandea, M.; Qamili, E.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of detecting possible electromagnetic signatures due to big earthquakes is self-evident, signatures which can be either anticipating, simultaneous or subsequent with respect to the main shock. Taking advantage of the present orbiting Champ satellite, we apply two "ad hoc" techniques both based on the Information Theory (after the seminal monography by Shannon, 1948) to the satellite magnetic data with the aim at extracting eventual time anomalies. These techniques have different time-space resolutions: the first technique requires a preliminary spherical harmonic analysis of daily magnetic data and, potentially, detects long-wavelength variations, while the second uses a preliminary wavelet analysis and can detect shorter-wavelength anomalies. Some examples are given for magnetic satellite data taken in correspondence with the two big earthquakes occurred in the Sumatra region on 24 December 2004 (M=9.1) and 28 March 2005 (M=8.6).

  7. Analysis of amino acid constituents of gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Lian-Lian; Xiao, Yu-Xia; Ni, Jing-Hua; Yu, Yan

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To seek drugs that will efficaciously dissolve bilirubin, glycoprotein and black stones and that will represent improved lithotriptic agents to resolve cholesterol stones, and to study the amino acid constituents of gallstones. METHODS: According to characteristics determined by infrared spectroscopy and to the contents of bilirubin determined by semi-quantitative chemical analysis, 30 of 148 cases of gallstones were selected and divided into 5 groups. Amino acids of the 30 cases were detected by high-speed chromatography. RESULTS: The quantity of amino acids was highest in black stones (226.9 mg/g) and lowest in pure cholesterol stones (1.4 mg/g). In the 5 groups of gallstones, the quantity of amino acids followed the hierarchy of black stone > mixed bilirubin stone and glucoprotein stone > mixed cholesterol stone > pure cholesterol stone. The proportions were: 95.95:29.02 and 28.05:5.78:1. Aliphatic amino acids accounted for approximately 50% of the total amino acids in the gallstones, with glycine accounting for 15.3% of the total amount of the 17 kinds of amino acids. CONCLUSION: For mixed stones, the higher level of bilirubin, the higher content of amino acids. Acidic amino acids were relatively higher in bilirubin stones than in cholesterol stones. PMID:27053886

  8. Focused and Steady-State Characteristics of Shaped Sonic Boom Signatures: Prediction and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, Domenic J.; Bobbitt, Percy J.; Massey, Steven J.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.; Kandil, Osama A.; Zheng, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of flight, at off-design conditions, on the propagated sonic boom pressure signatures of a small "low-boom" supersonic aircraft. The amplification, or focusing, of the low magnitude "shaped" signatures produced by maneuvers such as the accelerations from transonic to supersonic speeds, climbs, turns, pull-up and pushovers is the concern. To analyze these effects, new and/or improved theoretical tools have been developed, in addition to the use of existing methodology. Several shaped signatures are considered in the application of these tools to the study of selected maneuvers and off-design conditions. The results of these applications are reported in this paper as well as the details of the new analytical tools. Finally, the magnitude of the focused boom problem for "low boom" supersonic aircraft designs has been more accurately quantified and potential "mitigations" suggested. In general, "shaped boom" signatures, designed for cruise flight, such as asymmetric and symmetric flat-top and initial-shock ramp waveforms retain their basic shape during transition flight. Complex and asymmetric and symmetric initial shock ramp waveforms provide lower magnitude focus boom levels than N-waves or asymmetric and symmetric flat-top signatures.

  9. Modeling and Analysis of Scatterometry Signatures for Optical Critical Dimension Reference Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Heather J.; Germer, Thomas A.; Cresswell, Michael W.; Allen, Richard A.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Bishop, Michael

    2007-09-01

    We use an optical critical dimension (OCD) technique, matching modeled to measured scatterometry signatures, to obtain critical dimension linewidth of lines in grating targets fabricated on SIMOX (separation by implantation of oxygen) substrates using the single-crystal critical dimension reference materials (SCCDRM) process. We first compare experimentally obtained reflectance signatures for areas of the unpatterned substrate with signatures modeled using Fresnel theory, and show that the buried oxide (BOX) layer of the SIMOX is not well described optically by a single homogeneous layer of SiO2, but can be so described if a mixed Si-SiO2 boundary layer is included between the Si wafer and the BOX layer. We then obtain linewidths from OCD measurements on a series of grating targets with a range of design linewidths and pitches, and show that the linewidth obtained from the OCD technique is linearly related to the linewidth obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with a slope near unity and zero offset. While these results are very promising, further work in improving the fit of the simulated signatures to the measured signatures for some of the targets, reducing the target line roughness, and analyzing the uncertainties for potential optical critical dimension reference materials, is anticipated.

  10. miRNA and mRNA cancer signatures determined by analysis of expression levels in large cohorts of patients

    PubMed Central

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    Toward identifying a cancer-specific gene signature we applied surprisal analysis to the RNAs expression behavior for a large cohort of breast, lung, ovarian, and prostate carcinoma patients. We characterize the cancer phenotypic state as a shared response of a set of mRNA or microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer patients versus noncancer controls. The resulting signature is robust with respect to individual patient variability and distinguishes with high fidelity between cancer and noncancer patients. The mRNAs and miRNAs that are implicated in the signature are correlated and are known to contribute to the regulation of cancer-signaling pathways. The miRNA and mRNA networks are common to the noncancer and cancer patients, but the disease modulates the strength of the connectivities. Furthermore, we experimentally assessed the cancer-specific signatures as possible therapeutic targets. Specifically we restructured a single dominant connectivity in the cancer-specific gene network in vitro. We find a deflection from the cancer phenotype, significantly reducing cancer cell proliferation and altering cancer cellular physiology. Our approach is grounded in thermodynamics augmented by information theory. The thermodynamic reasoning is demonstrated to ensure that the derived signature is bias-free and shows that the most significant redistribution of free energy occurs in programming a system between the noncancer and cancer states. This paper introduces a platform that can elucidate miRNA and mRNA behavior on a systems level and provides a comprehensive systematic view of both the energetics of the expression levels of RNAs and of their changes during tumorigenicity. PMID:24101511

  11. Ontology based molecular signatures for immune cell types via gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New technologies are focusing on characterizing cell types to better understand their heterogeneity. With large volumes of cellular data being generated, innovative methods are needed to structure the resulting data analyses. Here, we describe an ‘Ontologically BAsed Molecular Signature’ (OBAMS) method that identifies novel cellular biomarkers and infers biological functions as characteristics of particular cell types. This method finds molecular signatures for immune cell types based on mapping biological samples to the Cell Ontology (CL) and navigating the space of all possible pairwise comparisons between cell types to find genes whose expression is core to a particular cell type’s identity. Results We illustrate this ontological approach by evaluating expression data available from the Immunological Genome project (IGP) to identify unique biomarkers of mature B cell subtypes. We find that using OBAMS, candidate biomarkers can be identified at every strata of cellular identity from broad classifications to very granular. Furthermore, we show that Gene Ontology can be used to cluster cell types by shared biological processes in order to find candidate genes responsible for somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells. Moreover, through in silico experiments based on this approach, we have identified genes sets that represent genes overexpressed in germinal center B cells and identify genes uniquely expressed in these B cells compared to other B cell types. Conclusions This work demonstrates the utility of incorporating structured ontological knowledge into biological data analysis – providing a new method for defining novel biomarkers and providing an opportunity for new biological insights. PMID:24004649

  12. Transcriptional analysis of the Arabidopsis ovule by massively parallel signature sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-León, Nidia; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Alvarez-Mejía, César; Mendiola-Soto, Javier; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; García-Campayo, Vicenta; García-Aguilar, Marcelina; Olmedo-Monfil, Vianey; Arteaga-Sánchez, Mario; de la Vega, Octavio Martínez; Nobuta, Kan; Vemaraju, Kalyan; Meyers, Blake C; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2012-06-01

    The life cycle of flowering plants alternates between a predominant sporophytic (diploid) and an ephemeral gametophytic (haploid) generation that only occurs in reproductive organs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the female gametophyte is deeply embedded within the ovule, complicating the study of the genetic and molecular interactions involved in the sporophytic to gametophytic transition. Massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) was used to conduct a quantitative large-scale transcriptional analysis of the fully differentiated Arabidopsis ovule prior to fertilization. The expression of 9775 genes was quantified in wild-type ovules, additionally detecting >2200 new transcripts mapping to antisense or intergenic regions. A quantitative comparison of global expression in wild-type and sporocyteless (spl) individuals resulted in 1301 genes showing 25-fold reduced or null activity in ovules lacking a female gametophyte, including those encoding 92 signalling proteins, 75 transcription factors, and 72 RNA-binding proteins not reported in previous studies based on microarray profiling. A combination of independent genetic and molecular strategies confirmed the differential expression of 28 of them, showing that they are either preferentially active in the female gametophyte, or dependent on the presence of a female gametophyte to be expressed in sporophytic cells of the ovule. Among 18 genes encoding pentatricopeptide-repeat proteins (PPRs) that show transcriptional activity in wild-type but not spl ovules, CIHUATEOTL (At4g38150) is specifically expressed in the female gametophyte and necessary for female gametogenesis. These results expand the nature of the transcriptional universe present in the ovule of Arabidopsis, and offer a large-scale quantitative reference of global expression for future genomic and developmental studies.

  13. Aging in biometrics: an experimental analysis on on-line signature.

    PubMed

    Galbally, Javier; Martinez-Diaz, Marcos; Fierrez, Julian

    2013-01-01

    The first consistent and reproducible evaluation of the effect of aging on dynamic signature is reported. Experiments are carried out on a database generated from two previous datasets which were acquired, under very similar conditions, in 6 sessions distributed in a 15-month time span. Three different systems, representing the current most popular approaches in signature recognition, are used in the experiments, proving the degradation suffered by this trait with the passing of time. Several template update strategies are also studied as possible measures to reduce the impact of aging on the system's performance. Different results regarding the way in which signatures tend to change with time, and their most and least stable features, are also given.

  14. Aging in Biometrics: An Experimental Analysis on On-Line Signature

    PubMed Central

    Galbally, Javier; Martinez-Diaz, Marcos; Fierrez, Julian

    2013-01-01

    The first consistent and reproducible evaluation of the effect of aging on dynamic signature is reported. Experiments are carried out on a database generated from two previous datasets which were acquired, under very similar conditions, in 6 sessions distributed in a 15-month time span. Three different systems, representing the current most popular approaches in signature recognition, are used in the experiments, proving the degradation suffered by this trait with the passing of time. Several template update strategies are also studied as possible measures to reduce the impact of aging on the system’s performance. Different results regarding the way in which signatures tend to change with time, and their most and least stable features, are also given. PMID:23894557

  15. Structural Monitoring of a Weapons Test Unit Using Imaging Methods for Dynamic Signature Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, S A; Malsbury, T N; Leach Jr., R R; Tsap, L V

    2004-09-23

    A methodology to identify structural changes in weapons systems during environmental tests is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The method is coherence based and relies on comparing the ''dynamic signature'' response of the test article before and after an environmental test or test series. Physical changes in the test article result in changes in the dynamic signature and are mapped to an image matrix where a color scale represents changes in sensor-to-sensor coherence. This methodology is convenient because it allows an image to represent large amounts of information in a very compact form, where even subtle system changes may be easily and quickly identified. Furthermore, comparison of the dynamic signature response data before and after any test event can be made on a quasi-real-time basis. This approach is particularly useful on large and/or complex test articles where many sensors are present, and large volumes of data are generated.

  16. Determination of spectral signatures of substances in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.; Philpot, W. D.; Davis, G.

    1978-01-01

    Optical remote sensing of water pollution offers the possibility of fast, large scale coverage at a relatively low cost. The possibility of using the spectral characteristics of the upwelling light from water for the purpose of ocean water quality monitoring was explained. The work was broken into several broad tasks as follows: (1) definition of a remotely measured spectral signature of water, (2) collection of field data and testing of the signature analysis, and (3) the possibility of using LANDSAT data for the identification of substances in water. An attempt to extract spectral signatures of acid waste and sediment was successful.

  17. Paired-end genomic signature tags: a method for the functional analysis of genomes and epigenomes.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John J; McCorkle, Sean R; Everett, Logan; Anderson, Carl W

    2007-01-01

    Because paired-end genomic signature tags are sequenced-based, they have the potential to become an alternate tool to tiled microarray hybridization as a method for genome-wide localization of transcription factors and other sequence-specific DNA binding proteins. As outlined here the method also can be used for global analysis of DNA methylation. One advantage of this approach is the ability to easily switch between different genome types without having to fabricate a new microarray for each and every DNA type. However, the method does have some disadvantages. Among the most rate-limiting steps of our PE-GST protocol are the need to concatemerize the diTAGs, size fractionate them and then clone them prior to sequencing. This is usually followed by additional steps to amplify and size select for long (> or = 500) concatemer inserts prior to sequencing. These time-consuming steps are important for standard DNA sequencing as they increase efficiency approximately 20-30-fold since each amplified concatemer can now provide information on multiple tags; the limitation on data acqui- sition is read length during sequencing. However, the development of new sequencing methods such as Life Sciences' 454 new nanotechnology-based sequencing instrument (41) could increase tag sequencing efficiency by several orders of magnitude (> or = 100,000 diTAG reads/run), which is sufficient to provide in-depth global analysis of all ChIP PE-GSTs in a single run. This is because the lengths of our paired-end diTAGs (approximately 60 bp) fall well within the region of high accuracy for read lengths on this instrument. In principle, sequence analysis of diTAGs could begin as soon as they are generated, thereby completely bypassing the need for the concatemerization, sizing, downstream cloning steps and sequencing template purification. In addition, our protocol places any one of several unique four-base long nucleotide sequences, such as GATC, between each and every diTAG pair, which could

  18. Identification of Candidate Adherent-Invasive E. coli Signature Transcripts by Genomic/Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanhao; Rowehl, Leahana; Krumsiek, Julia M.; Orner, Erika P.; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Tarr, Phillip I.; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Boedeker, Edgar C.; Xiong, Xuejian; Parkinson, John; Frank, Daniel N.; Li, Ellen; Gathungu, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains are detected more frequently within mucosal lesions of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). The AIEC phenotype consists of adherence and invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and survival within macrophages of these bacteria in vitro. Our aim was to identify candidate transcripts that distinguish AIEC from non-invasive E. coli (NIEC) strains and might be useful for rapid and accurate identification of AIEC by culture-independent technology. We performed comparative RNA-Sequence (RNASeq) analysis using AIEC strain LF82 and NIEC strain HS during exponential and stationary growth. Differential expression analysis of coding sequences (CDS) homologous to both strains demonstrated 224 and 241 genes with increased and decreased expression, respectively, in LF82 relative to HS. Transition metal transport and siderophore metabolism related pathway genes were up-regulated, while glycogen metabolic and oxidation-reduction related pathway genes were down-regulated, in LF82. Chemotaxis related transcripts were up-regulated in LF82 during the exponential phase, but flagellum-dependent motility pathway genes were down-regulated in LF82 during the stationary phase. CDS that mapped only to the LF82 genome accounted for 747 genes. We applied an in silico subtractive genomics approach to identify CDS specific to AIEC by incorporating the genomes of 10 other previously phenotyped NIEC. From this analysis, 166 CDS mapped to the LF82 genome and lacked homology to any of the 11 human NIEC strains. We compared these CDS across 13 AIEC, but none were homologous in each. Four LF82 gene loci belonging to clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats region (CRISPR)—CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes were identified in 4 to 6 AIEC and absent from all non-pathogenic bacteria. As previously reported, AIEC strains were enriched for pdu operon genes. One CDS, encoding an excisionase, was shared by 9 AIEC strains. Reverse transcription

  19. Trophic Hierarchies Illuminated via Amino Acid Isotopic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steffan, Shawn A.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Horton, David R.; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Singleton, Merritt E.; Miliczky, Eugene; Hogg, David B.; Jones, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    Food web ecologists have long sought to characterize the trophic niches of animals using stable isotopic analysis. However, distilling trophic position from isotopic composition has been difficult, largely because of the variability associated with trophic discrimination factors (inter-trophic isotopic fractionation and routing). We circumvented much of this variability using compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA). We examined the 15N signatures of amino acids extracted from organisms reared in pure culture at four discrete trophic levels, across two model communities. We calculated the degree of enrichment at each trophic level and found there was a consistent trophic discrimination factor (~7.6‰). The constancy of the CSIA-derived discrimination factor permitted unprecedented accuracy in the measurement of animal trophic position. Conversely, trophic position estimates generated via bulk-15N analysis significantly underestimated trophic position, particularly among higher-order consumers. We then examined the trophic hierarchy of a free-roaming arthropod community, revealing the highest trophic position (5.07) and longest food chain ever reported using CSIA. High accuracy in trophic position estimation brings trophic function into sharper focus, providing greater resolution to the analysis of food webs. PMID:24086703

  20. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Spacecraft Circuit Diagnostics by Analog and Complex Signature Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Wade, Raymond P.; Izadnegahdar, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is aimed at developing technologies that will enable space-flight crews to perform in situ component-level repair of electronics on Moon and Mars outposts, where there is no existing infrastructure for logistics spares. These technologies must provide effective repair capabilities yet meet the payload and operational constraints of space facilities. Effective repair depends on a diagnostic capability that is versatile but easy to use by crew members that have limited training in electronics. CLEAR studied two techniques that involve extensive precharacterization of "known good" circuits to produce graphical signatures that provide an easy-to-use comparison method to quickly identify faulty components. Analog Signature Analysis (ASA) allows relatively rapid diagnostics of complex electronics by technicians with limited experience. Because of frequency limits and the growing dependence on broadband technologies, ASA must be augmented with other capabilities. To meet this challenge while preserving ease of use, CLEAR proposed an alternative called Complex Signature Analysis (CSA). Tests of ASA and CSA were used to compare capabilities and to determine if the techniques provided an overlapping or complementary capability. The results showed that the methods are complementary.

  1. Application of signature analysis for determining the operational readiness of motor-operated valves under blowdown test conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the NRC-funded Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has carried out a comprehensive aging assessment of Motor-Operated Valves (MOVs). As part of this work, ORNL participated in the Gate Valve Flow Interruption Blowdown (GVFIB) tests carried out in Huntsville, Alabama. The GVFIB tests were intended primarily to determine the behavior of motor-operated gate valves under the temperature, pressure, and flow conditions expected to be experienced by isolation valves in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) during a high energy line break (blowdown) outside of containment. In addition, the tests provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate signature analysis methods for determining the operational readiness of the MOVs under those accident conditions. ORNL acquired motor current and torque switch shaft angular position data on two test MOVs during various times of the GVFIB tests. The reduction in operating ''margin'' of both MOVs due to the presence of additional valve running loads imposed by high flow was clearly observed in motor current and torque switch angular position signatures. In addition, the effects of differential pressure, fluid temperature, and line voltage on MOV operations were observed and more clearly understood as a result of utilizing signature analysis techniques. 1 ref.; 16 figs.

  2. Analysis of Chiral Carboxylic Acids in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Hein, J. E.; Aponte, J. C.; Parker, E. T.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    our efforts to develop highly sensitive LC-MS methods for the analysis of chiral carboxylic acids including hydroxy acids.

  3. Selection signature analysis in Holstein cattle identified genes known to affect reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using direct comparison of 45,878 SNPs between a group of Holstein cattle unselected since 1964 and contemporary Holsteins that on average take 30 days longer for successful conception than the 1964 Holsteins, we conducted selection signature analyses to identify genomic regions associated with dair...

  4. CFD Analysis of Nozzle Jet Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study is conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the Sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock research airplane, is considered. The computational fluid dynamics code is validated using available wind-tunnel sonic boom experimental data. The effects of grid size, spatial order of accuracy. grid type, and flow viscosity on the accuracy of the predicted sonic boom pressure signature are quantified. Grid lines parallel to the Mach wave direction are found to give the best results. Second-order accurate upwind methods are required as a minimum for accurate sonic boom simulations. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics simulations show the flow physics inside the F-15 nozzle to be nonisentropic and complex.

  5. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr(136) and Thr(330)) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys(84) as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser(187) nucleophile in the catalytic triad.

  6. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr(136) and Thr(330)) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys(84) as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser(187) nucleophile in the catalytic triad. PMID:26454172

  7. CFD Analysis of Nozzle Jet Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2009-01-01

    An axisymmetric full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics study is conducted to examine nozzle exhaust jet plume effects on the sonic boom signature of a supersonic aircraft. A simplified axisymmetric nozzle geometry, representative of the nozzle on the NASA Dryden NF-15B Lift and Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock research airplane, is considered. The computational fluid dynamics code is validated using available wind-tunnel sonic boom experimental data. The effects of grid size, spatial order of accuracy, grid type, and flow viscosity on the accuracy of the predicted sonic boom pressure signature are quantified. Grid lines parallel to the Mach wave direction are found to give the best results. Second-order accurate upwind methods are required as a minimum for accurate sonic boom simulations. The highly underexpanded nozzle flow is found to provide significantly more reduction in the tail shock strength in the sonic boom N-wave pressure signature than perfectly expanded and overexpanded nozzle flows. A tail shock train in the sonic boom signature is observed for the highly underexpanded nozzle flow. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics simulations show the flow physics inside the F-15 nozzle to be nonisentropic and complex. Although the one-dimensional isentropic nozzle plume results look reasonable, they fail to capture the sonic boom shock train in the highly underexpanded nozzle flow.

  8. Signature extraction of ocean pollutants by eigenvector transformation of remote spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grew, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral signatures of suspended matter in the ocean are being extracted through characteristic vector analysis of remote ocean color data collected with MOCS (Multichannel Ocean Color Sensor). Spectral signatures appear to be obtainable through analyses of 'linear' clusters that appear on scatter diagrams associated with eigenvectors. Signatures associated with acid waste, sewage sludge, oil, and algae are presented. The application of vector analysis to two acid waste dumps overflown two years apart is examined in some detail. The relationships between eigenvectors and spectral signatures for these examples are analyzed. These cases demonstrate the value of characteristic vector analysis in remotely identifying pollutants in the ocean and in determining the consistency of their spectral signatures.

  9. Compound Specific Isotope Analysis of Fatty Acids in Southern African Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmark, K. A.; Macko, S. A.; Swap, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    This study, conducted as a part of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), applied compound specific isotope analysis to describe aerosols at source regions and rural locations. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual fatty acids were determined for aerosol samples collected at four sites throughout southern Africa. Mongu, Zambia and Skukuza, South Africa were chosen for their location within intense seasonal Miombo woodland savanna and bushveld savanna biomass burning source regions, respectively. Urban aerosols were collected at Johannesburg, South Africa and rural samples were collected at Sua Pan, Botswana. Fatty acid isotopic compositions varied temporally. Urban aerosols showed significant isotopic enrichment of selected short chain fatty acids (C < 20) compared to aerosols produced during biomass combustion. Sua Pan short chain fatty acid signatures were significantly different from the other non-urban sites, which suggests that sources other than biomass combustion products, such as organic eolian material, impact the Sua Pan aerosol profile. However, a high degree of correlation between Sua Pan and Skukuza long chain fatty acid δ 13C values confirm atmospheric linkages between the two areas and that isotopic signatures of combusted fatty acids are unaltered during atmospheric transport highlighting their potential for use as a conservative tracer.

  10. Multi-dimensional reliability assessment of fractal signature analysis in an outpatient sports medicine population.

    PubMed

    Jarraya, Mohamed; Guermazi, Ali; Niu, Jingbo; Duryea, Jeffrey; Lynch, John A; Roemer, Frank W

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study has been to test reproducibility of fractal signature analysis (FSA) in a young, active patient population taking into account several parameters including intra- and inter-reader placement of regions of interest (ROIs) as well as various aspects of projection geometry. In total, 685 patients were included (135 athletes and 550 non-athletes, 18-36 years old). Regions of interest (ROI) were situated beneath the medial tibial plateau. The reproducibility of texture parameters was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Multi-dimensional assessment included: (1) anterior-posterior (A.P.) vs. posterior-anterior (P.A.) (Lyon-Schuss technique) views on 102 knees; (2) unilateral (single knee) vs. bilateral (both knees) acquisition on 27 knees (acquisition technique otherwise identical; same A.P. or P.A. view); (3) repetition of the same image acquisition on 46 knees (same A.P. or P.A. view, and same unitlateral or bilateral acquisition); and (4) intra- and inter-reader reliability with repeated placement of the ROIs in the subchondral bone area on 99 randomly chosen knees. ICC values on the reproducibility of texture parameters for A.P. vs. P.A. image acquisitions for horizontal and vertical dimensions combined were 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-0.74) ranging from 0.47 to 0.81 for the different dimensions. For unilateral vs. bilateral image acquisitions, the ICCs were 0.79 (95% CI 0.76-0.82) ranging from 0.55 to 0.88. For the repetition of the identical view, the ICCs were 0.82 (95% CI 0.80-0.84) ranging from 0.67 to 0.85. Intra-reader reliability was 0.93 (95% CI 0.92-0.94) and inter-observer reliability was 0.96 (95% CI 0.88-0.99). A decrease in reliability was observed with increasing voxel sizes. Our study confirms excellent intra- and inter-reader reliability for FSA, however, results seem to be affected by acquisition technique, which has not been previously recognized.

  11. UV Signature Mutations †

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  12. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  13. An archaeal genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Graham, D E; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Woese, C R

    2000-03-28

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  14. Chemopreventive n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Reprogram Genetic Signatures during Colon Cancer Initiation and Progression in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Laurie A.; Nguyen, Danh V.; Hokanson, Regina M.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Isett, Robert B.; Turner, Nancy D.; Dougherty, Edward R.; Wang, Naisyin; Lupton, Joanne R.; Carroll, Raymond J.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) decrease colon tumor formation have not been fully elucidated. Examination of genes up- or down-regulated at various stages of tumor development via the monitoring of gene expression relationships will help to determine the biological processes ultimately responsible for the protective effects of n-3 PUFA. Therefore, using a 3 × × × 2 factorial design, we used Codelink DNA microarrays containing ∼9000 genes to help decipher the global changes in colonocyte gene expression profiles in carcinogen-injected Sprague Dawley rats. Animals were assigned to three dietary treatments differing only in the type of fat (corn oil/n-6 PUFA, fish oil/n-3 PUFA, or olive oil/n-9 monounsaturated fatty acid), two treatments (injection with the carcinogen azoxymethane or with saline), and two time points (12 hours and 10 weeks after first injection). Only the consumption of n-3 PUFA exerted a protective effect at the initiation (DNA adduct formation) and promotional (aberrant crypt foci) stages. Importantly, microarray analysis of colonocyte gene expression profiles discerned fundamental differences among animals treated with n-3 PUFA at both the 12 hours and 10-week time points. Thus, in addition to demonstrating that dietary fat composition alters the molecular portrait of gene expression profiles in the colonic epithelium at both the initiation and promotional stages of tumor development, these findings indicate that the chemopreventive effect of fish oil is due to the direct action of n-3 PUFA and not to a reduction in the content of n-6 PUFA. PMID:15374999

  15. Design and Signature Analysis of Remote Trace-Gas Identification Methodology Based on Infrared-Terahertz Double-Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Phillips, Dane J.; Persons, Christopher M.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2014-11-01

    The practicality of a newly proposed infrared-terahertz (IR-THz) double-resonance (DR) spectroscopic technique for remote trace-gas identification is explored. The strength of the DR signatures depends on known molecular parameters from which a combination of pump-probe transitions may be identified to recognize a specific analyte. Atmospheric pressure broadening of the IR and THz trace-gas spectra relaxes the stringent pump coincidence requirement, allowing many DR signatures to be excited, some of which occur in the favorable atmospheric transmission windows below 500 GHz. By designing the DR spectrometer and performing a detailed signal analysis, the pump-probe power requirements for detecting trace amounts of methyl fluoride, methyl chloride, or methyl bromide may be estimated for distances up to 1 km. The strength of the DR signature increases linearly with pump intensity but only as the square root of the probe power because the received signal is in the Townes noise limit. The concept of a specificity matrix is introduced and used to quantify the recognition specificity and calculate the probability of false positive detection of an interferent.

  16. Māori identity signatures: A latent profile analysis of the types of Māori identity.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Lara M; Houkamau, Carla; Sibley, Chris G

    2015-10-01

    Māori are the indigenous peoples of New Zealand. However, the term 'Māori' can refer to a wide range of people of varying ethnic compositions and cultural identity. We present a statistical model identifying 6 distinct types, or 'Māori Identity Signatures,' and estimate their proportion in the Māori population. The model is tested using a Latent Profile Analysis of a national probability sample of 686 Māori drawn from the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study. We identify 6 distinct signatures: Traditional Essentialists (22.6%), Traditional Inclusives (16%), High Moderates (31.7%), Low Moderates (18.7%), Spiritually Orientated (4.1%), and Disassociated (6.9%). These distinct Identity Signatures predicted variation in deprivation, age, mixed-ethnic affiliation, and religion. This research presents the first formal statistical model assessing how people's identity as Māori is psychologically structured, documents the relative proportion of these different patterns of structures, and shows that these patterns reliably predict differences in core demographics. We identify a range of patterns of Māori identity far more diverse than has been previously proposed based on qualitative data, and also show that the majority of Māori fit a moderate or traditional identity pattern. The application of our model for studying Māori health and identity development is discussed.

  17. Temporal measurement and analysis of high-resolution spectral signatures of plants and relationships to biophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Rebbman, Jan; Hall, Carlton; Provancha, Mark; Vieglais, David

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of temporal reflectance signatures as a function of growing season for sand live oak (Quercus geminata), myrtle oak (Q. myrtifolia, and saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) were collected during a two year study period. Canopy level spectral reflectance signatures, as a function of 252 channels between 368 and 1115 nm, were collected using near nadir viewing geometry and a consistent sun illumination angle. Leaf level reflectance measurements were made in the laboratory using a halogen light source and an environmental optics chamber with a barium sulfate reflectance coating. Spectral measurements were related to several biophysical measurements utilizing optimal passive ambient correlation spectroscopy (OPACS) technique. Biophysical parameters included percent moisture, water potential (MPa), total chlorophyll, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. Quantitative data processing techniques were used to determine optimal bands based on the utilization of a second order derivative or inflection estimator. An optical cleanup procedure was then employed that computes the double inflection ratio (DIR) spectra for all possible three band combinations normalized to the previously computed optimal bands. These results demonstrate a unique approach to the analysis of high spectral resolution reflectance signatures for estimation of several biophysical measures of plants at the leaf and canopy level from optimally selected bands or bandwidths.

  18. Vibrational analysis of α-cyanohydroxycinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojica, Elmer-Rico E.; Vedad, Jayson; Desamero, Ruel Z. B.

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, a comparative Raman vibrational analysis of alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CHCA) and its derivative, alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamic acid (3CHCA), was performed. The Raman spectra of the 4CHCA and 3CHCA in solid form were obtained and analyzed to determine differences between the two structurally similar derivatives. For comparison, the CHCA derivatives cyanocinnamic acid (CCA) and coumaric acid (CA) were also studied. The plausible vibrational assignments were made and matched with those obtained theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) based method employing a 6-31 g basis set. The computational wavenumbers obtained were in good agreement with the observed experimental results. This was the first reported Raman study of CCA, 3CHCA and 4CHCA.

  19. Analysis of the structure of Saturn's magnetic field using charged particle absorption signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chenette, D.L.; Davis, L. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    A new technique is derived for determining the structure of Saturn's magnetic field. This technique uses the observed positions of charged particle absorption signatures due to the satellites and rings of Saturn to determine the parameters of an axially symmetric, spherical harmonic model of the magnetic field using the method of least squares. Absorption signatures observed along the Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 spacecraft trajectories are used to derive values for the orientation of the magnetic symmetry axis relative to Saturn's axis of rotation, the axial displacement of the center of the magnetic dipole from the center of Saturn, and the magnitude of the external field component. Comparing these results with the magnetic field model parameters deduced from analyses of magnetometer data leads us to prefer models that incorporate a northward offset of the dipole center by about 0.05 R/sub s/.

  20. An analysis of the structure of Saturn's magnetic field using charged particle absorption signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chenette, D.L.; Davis, L. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    A technique is derived for determining the structure of Saturn's magnetic field. This technique uses the observed positions of charged particle absorption signatures due to the satellites and rings of Saturn to determine the parameters of an axially symmetric, spherical harmonic model of the magnetic field using the method of least squares. Absorption signatures observed along the Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 spacecraft trajectories are used to derive values for the orientation of the magnetic symmetry axis relative to Saturn's axis of rotation, the axial displacement of the center of the magnetic dipole from the center of Saturn, and the magnitude of the external field component. A comparison of these results with the magnetic field model parameters deduced from analyses of magnetometer data supports models which incorporate a northward offset of the dipole center by about 0.05 R(3).

  1. The spectral signature analysis of inland and coastal water bodies acquired from field spectroradiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoutsa, Christiana; Akylas, Evangelos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2013-08-01

    The main goal of this research is to examine the optical properties of different water bodies such as coastal water; oligotrophic and eutrophic inland water by observing their spectral signatures. Spectral profiles of sampling points, which correspond to water bodies with different water quality characteristics, are extracted and analyzed. Field spectroscopy is a very important tool giving critical information for the comprehension of spectral signatures of different water bodies. Field spectroradiometric measurements can assist to improve or develop new algorithms and methodology enables to classify several water bodies according to their water quality characteristics using remotely sensed data. Field spectroradiometric data presented at this study were obtained for inland water in Asprokremmos Dam, Paphos District/Cyprus; in Larnaca's Salt Lake, Larnaca District/Cyprus; and in Karla Lake, Volos District/Greece and for coastal water in Zugi-Vasilikos-Old Harbour, Limassol District/Cyprus.

  2. Intraindividual genome expression analysis reveals a specific molecular signature of psoriasis and eczema.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Maria; Knapp, Bettina; Garzorz, Natalie; Mattii, Martina; Pullabhatla, Venu; Pennino, Davide; Andres, Christian; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Cavani, Andrea; Theis, Fabian J; Ring, Johannes; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian

    2014-07-01

    Previous attempts to gain insight into the pathogenesis of psoriasis and eczema by comparing their molecular signatures were hampered by the high interindividual variability of those complex diseases. In patients affected by both psoriasis and nonatopic or atopic eczema simultaneously (n = 24), an intraindividual comparison of the molecular signatures of psoriasis and eczema identified genes and signaling pathways regulated in common and exclusive for each disease across all patients. Psoriasis-specific genes were important regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism, epidermal differentiation, as well as immune mediators of T helper 17 (TH17) responses, interleukin-10 (IL-10) family cytokines, and IL-36. Genes in eczema related to epidermal barrier, reduced innate immunity, increased IL-6, and a TH2 signature. Within eczema subtypes, a mutually exclusive regulation of epidermal differentiation genes was observed. Furthermore, only contact eczema was driven by inflammasome activation, apoptosis, and cellular adhesion. On the basis of this comprehensive picture of the pathogenesis of psoriasis and eczema, a disease classifier consisting of NOS2 and CCL27 was created. In an independent cohort of eczema (n = 28) and psoriasis patients (n = 25), respectively, this classifier diagnosed all patients correctly and also identified initially misdiagnosed or clinically undifferentiated patients.

  3. Developmental and spatial variations in the diet signatures of hyperbenthic shrimp Nauticaris marionis at the Prince Edward Islands based on stable isotope ratios and fatty acid profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richoux, Nicole B.; Allan, E. Louise; Froneman, P. William

    2016-04-01

    The caridean shrimp Nauticaris marionis is an ecologically important species in the benthic community around the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands (PEI) as it represents a key prey item for a variety of top predators breeding on the islands. We hypothesized that the diet of N. marionis shifts during its development, and that spatial variability in food availability results in differentiation in the diet signatures of specimens collected from various locations of the shelf waters around the PEI. Specimens were collected from nine stations (depth range 70 to 240 m) around the PEI at inter-island shelf (from west to east: upstream, between and downstream) and nearshore regions during austral autumn 2009. Stable isotope and fatty acid data both revealed spatial and developmental variations in the shrimp diet. Nearshore shrimp were more 13C-enriched than those from the inter-island region, suggesting increased kelp detritus entered the food web in the nearshore regions. The shrimp showed increases in δ13C and δ15N signatures (and trophic position) with an increase in body size, resulting in distinctions between size classes that reflected shifts in their trophic niche through development. The fatty acid profiles similarly indicated distinctions in diet with increased shrimp size (in the deep regions), and spatial variability was evident in relation to region and depth. All shrimp contained large proportions of polyunsaturated and essential fatty acids, indicating that the quality of food consumed was similar between regions despite the diet variability. Our results provide new dietary information about a key species operating near the base of the food web at the highly productive PEI, and show that there were no areas of enhanced nutrition available to the shrimp. As such, there was no nutritional advantage to shrimp inhabiting any specific region around the PEI.

  4. Impact of feeding and short-term temperature stress on the content and isotopic signature of fatty acids, sterols, and alcohols in the scleractinian coral Turbinaria reniformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, I.; Treignier, C.; Grover, R.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2011-09-01

    This study assesses the combined effect of feeding and short-term thermal stress on various physiological parameters and on the fatty acid, sterol, and alcohol composition of the scleractinian coral Turbinaria reniformis. The compound-specific carbon isotope composition of the lipids was also measured. Under control conditions (26°C), feeding with Artemia salina significantly increased the symbiont density and chlorophyll content and the growth rates of the corals. It also doubled the concentrations of almost all fatty acid (FA) compounds and increased the n-alcohol and sterol contents. δ13C results showed that the feeding enhancement of FA concentrations occurred either via a direct pathway, for one of the major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) compounds of the food (18:3n-3 FA), or via an enhancement of photosynthate transfer (indirect pathway), for the other coral FAs. Cholesterol (C27Δ5) was also directly acquired from the food. Thermal stress (31°C) affected corals, but differently according to their feeding status. Chlorophyll, protein content, and maximal photosynthetic efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) decreased to a greater extent in starved corals. In such corals, FA concentrations were reduced by 33%, (especially C16, C18 FAs, and n-3 PUFA) and the sterol content by 27% (especially the C28∆5,22 and C28∆5). The enrichment in the δ13C signature of the storage and structural FAs suggests that they were the main compounds respired during the stress to maintain the coral metabolism. Thermal stress had less effect on the lipid concentrations of fed corals, as only FA levels were reduced by 13%, with no major changes in their isotope carbon signatures. In conclusion, feeding plays an essential role in sustaining T. reniformis metabolism during the thermal stress.

  5. Amino acid binding by the class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: role for a conserved proline in the signature sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Burbaum, J. J.; Schimmel, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although partial or complete three-dimensional structures are known for three Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the amino acid-binding sites in these proteins remain poorly characterized. To explore the methionine binding site of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase, we chose to study a specific, randomly generated methionine auxotroph that contains a mutant methionyl-tRNA synthetase whose defect is manifested in an elevated Km for methionine (Barker, D.G., Ebel, J.-P., Jakes, R.C., & Bruton, C.J., 1982, Eur. J. Biochem. 127, 449-457), and employed the polymerase chain reaction to sequence this mutant synthetase directly. We identified a Pro 14 to Ser replacement (P14S), which accounts for a greater than 300-fold elevation in Km for methionine and has little effect on either the Km for ATP or the kcat of the amino acid activation reaction. This mutation destabilizes the protein in vivo, which may partly account for the observed auxotrophy. The altered proline is found in the "signature sequence" of the Class I synthetases and is conserved. This sequence motif is 1 of 2 found in the 10 Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and, in the known structures, it is in the nucleotide-binding fold as part of a loop between the end of a beta-strand and the start of an alpha-helix. The phenotype of the mutant and the stability and affinity for methionine of the wild-type and mutant enzymes are influenced by the amino acid that is 25 residues beyond the C-terminus of the signature sequence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1304356

  6. Multiple Transcriptome Data Analysis Reveals Biologically Relevant Atopic Dermatitis Signature Genes and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debajyoti; Ding, Lili; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Geh, Esmond; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Mersha, Tesfaye B.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have identified genes that are differentially expressed in atopic dermatitis (AD) compared to normal skin. However, there is also considerable variation in the list of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) reported by different groups and the exact cause of AD is still not fully understood. Using a rank-based approach, we analyzed gene expression data from five different microarray studies, comprising a total of 127 samples and more than 250,000 transcripts. A total of 89 AD gene expression signatures ‘89ADGES’, including FLG gene, were identified to show dysregulation consistently across these studies. Using a Support Vector Machine, we showed that the ‘89ADGES’ discriminates AD from normal skin with 98% predictive accuracy. Functional annotation of these genes implicated their roles in immune responses (e.g., betadefensin, microseminoprotein), keratinocyte differentiation/epidermal development (e.g., FLG, CORIN, AQP, LOR, KRT16), inflammation (e.g., IL37, IL27RA, CCL18) and lipid metabolism (e.g., AKR1B10, FAD7, FAR2). Subsequently, we validated a subset of signature genes using quantitative PCR in a mouse model. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified keratinocyte pathway over-represented (P = <0.0006) among the 89 signature genes. Keratinocytes are known to play a major role in barrier function due to their location in the epidermis. Our result suggests that besides immune- mediated pathway, skin barrier pathways such as the keratinocyte differentiation pathway play a key role in AD pathogenesis. A better understanding of the role of keratinocytes in AD will be important for developing novel “barrier therapy” for this disease. PMID:26717000

  7. Comment on ``Security analysis and improvements of arbitrated quantum signature schemes''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping; Chong, Song-Kong

    2012-05-01

    Recently, Zou, and Qiu [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.042325 82, 042325 (2010)] demonstrated that two arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) schemes are not secure because an arbitrator cannot arbitrate the dispute between two users when a receiver repudiates the integrity of a signature. By using a public board, Zou and Qiu's proposed two AQS schemes to solve the problem. This work shows that the same security problem may exist in Zou and Qiu's schemes. Moreover, a malicious verifier, Bob, can actively negate a signed order if he wants to. This attack, a special case of the denial-of-service (DoS) attack mentioned by Cai [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.91.109801 91, 109801 (2003)], is important in quantum cryptography. Bob may get some benefits from this DoS attack since he can actively deny Alice's signed order without being detected. This work also shows that a malicious signer can reveal the verifier's secret key without being detected by using Trojan-horse attacks.

  8. Analysis of passive microwave signatures over snow-covered mountainous area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R. S.; Durand, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of snow distribution over mountainous area is critical for climate studies and the passive microwave(PM) measurements have been widely used and invested in order to obtain information about snowpack properties. Understanding and analyzing the signatures for the explicit inversion of the remote sensing data from land surfaces is required for successful using of passive microwave sensors but this task is often ambiguous due to the large variability of physical conditions and object types. In this paper, we discuss the pattern of measured brightness temperatures and emissivities at vertical and horizontal polarization over the frequency range of 10.7 to 89 GHz of land surfaces under various snow and vegetation conditions. The Multiband polarimetric Scanning Radiometer(PSR) imagery is used over NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment(CLPX) study area with ground-based measurements of snow depth and snow properties. Classification of snow under various conditions in mountainous area is implemented based on different patterns of microwave signatures.

  9. Detecting Genomic Signatures of Natural Selection with Principal Component Analysis: Application to the 1000 Genomes Data

    PubMed Central

    Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Luu, Keurcien; Laval, Guillaume; Bazin, Eric; Blum, Michael G.B.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize natural selection, various analytical methods for detecting candidate genomic regions have been developed. We propose to perform genome-wide scans of natural selection using principal component analysis (PCA). We show that the common FST index of genetic differentiation between populations can be viewed as the proportion of variance explained by the principal components. Considering the correlations between genetic variants and each principal component provides a conceptual framework to detect genetic variants involved in local adaptation without any prior definition of populations. To validate the PCA-based approach, we consider the 1000 Genomes data (phase 1) considering 850 individuals coming from Africa, Asia, and Europe. The number of genetic variants is of the order of 36 millions obtained with a low-coverage sequencing depth (3×). The correlations between genetic variation and each principal component provide well-known targets for positive selection (EDAR, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, DARC), and also new candidate genes (APPBPP2, TP1A1, RTTN, KCNMA, MYO5C) and noncoding RNAs. In addition to identifying genes involved in biological adaptation, we identify two biological pathways involved in polygenic adaptation that are related to the innate immune system (beta defensins) and to lipid metabolism (fatty acid omega oxidation). An additional analysis of European data shows that a genome scan based on PCA retrieves classical examples of local adaptation even when there are no well-defined populations. PCA-based statistics, implemented in the PCAdapt R package and the PCAdapt fast open-source software, retrieve well-known signals of human adaptation, which is encouraging for future whole-genome sequencing project, especially when defining populations is difficult. PMID:26715629

  10. Use of the Signature Fatty Acid 16:1ω5 as a Tool to Determine the Distribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ngosong, Christopher; Gabriel, Elke; Ruess, Liliane

    2012-01-01

    Biomass estimation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi, widespread plant root symbionts, commonly employs lipid biomarkers, predominantly the fatty acid 16:1ω5. We briefly reviewed the application of this signature fatty acid, followed by a case study comparing biochemical markers with microscopic techniques in an arable soil following a change to AM non-host plants after 27 years of continuous host crops, that is, two successive cropping seasons with wheat followed by amaranth. After switching to the non-host amaranth, spore biomass estimated by the neutral lipid fatty acid (NLFA) 16:1ω5 decreased to almost nil, whereas microscopic spore counts decreased by about 50% only. In contrast, AM hyphal biomass assessed by the phospholipid (PLFA) 16:1ω5 was greater under amaranth than wheat. The application of PLFA 16:1ω5 as biomarker was hampered by background level derived from bacteria, and further enhanced by its incorporation from degrading spores used as microbial resource. Meanwhile, biochemical and morphological assessments showed negative correlation for spores and none for hyphal biomass. In conclusion, the NLFA 16:1ω5 appears to be a feasible indicator for AM fungi of the Glomales group in the complex field soils, whereas the use of PLFA 16:1ω5 for hyphae is unsuitable and should be restricted to controlled laboratory studies. PMID:22830034

  11. A meta-analysis of caloric restriction gene expression profiles to infer common signatures and regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Plank, Michael; Wuttke, Daniel; van Dam, Sipko; Clarke, Susan A; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-04-01

    Caloric restriction, a reduction in calorie intake without malnutrition, retards age-related degeneration and extends lifespan in several organisms. CR induces multiple changes, yet its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, we first performed a meta-analysis of microarray CR studies in mammals and identified genes and processes robustly altered due to CR. Our results reveal a complex array of CR-induced changes and we re-identified several genes and processes previously associated with CR, such as growth hormone signalling, lipid metabolism and immune response. Moreover, our results highlight novel associations with CR, such as retinol metabolism and copper ion detoxification, as well as hint of a strong effect of CR on circadian rhythms that in turn may contribute to metabolic changes. Analyses of our signatures by integrating co-expression data, information on genetic mutants, and transcription factor binding site analysis revealed candidate regulators of transcriptional modules in CR. Our results hint at a transcriptional module involved in sterol metabolism regulated by Srebf1. A putative regulatory role of Ppara was also identified. Overall, our conserved molecular signatures of CR provide a comprehensive picture of CR-induced changes and help understand its regulatory mechanisms.

  12. Methyl-CpG island-associated genome signature tags

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, John J

    2014-05-20

    Disclosed is a method for analyzing the organismic complexity of a sample through analysis of the nucleic acid in the sample. In the disclosed method, through a series of steps, including digestion with a type II restriction enzyme, ligation of capture adapters and linkers and digestion with a type IIS restriction enzyme, genome signature tags are produced. The sequences of a statistically significant number of the signature tags are determined and the sequences are used to identify and quantify the organisms in the sample. Various embodiments of the invention described herein include methods for using single point genome signature tags to analyze the related families present in a sample, methods for analyzing sequences associated with hyper- and hypo-methylated CpG islands, methods for visualizing organismic complexity change in a sampling location over time and methods for generating the genome signature tag profile of a sample of fragmented DNA.

  13. Integrative Pathway Analysis of Metabolic Signature in Bladder Cancer: A Linkage to The Cancer Genome Atlas Project and Prediction of Survival

    PubMed Central

    von Rundstedt, Friedrich-Carl; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Ma, Jing; Arnold, James M.; Gohlke, Jie; Putluri, Vasanta; Krishnapuram, Rashmi; Piyarathna, D. Badrajee; Lotan, Yair; Gödde, Daniel; Roth, Stephan; Störkel, Stephan; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun; Lerner, Seth P.; Coarfa, Cristian; Putluri, Nagireddy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We used targeted mass spectrometry to study the metabolic fingerprint of urothelial cancer and determine whether the biochemical pathway analysis gene signature would have a predictive value in independent cohorts of patients with bladder cancer. Materials and Methods Pathologically evaluated, bladder derived tissues, including benign adjacent tissue from 14 patients and bladder cancer from 46, were analyzed by liquid chromatography based targeted mass spectrometry. Differential metabolites associated with tumor samples in comparison to benign tissue were identified by adjusting the p values for multiple testing at a false discovery rate threshold of 15%. Enrichment of pathways and processes associated with the metabolic signature were determined using the GO (Gene Ontology) Database and MSigDB (Molecular Signature Database). Integration of metabolite alterations with transcriptome data from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) was done to identify the molecular signature of 30 metabolic genes. Available outcome data from TCGA portal were used to determine the association with survival. Results We identified 145 metabolites, of which analysis revealed 31 differential metabolites when comparing benign and tumor tissue samples. Using the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) Database we identified a total of 174 genes that correlated with the altered metabolic pathways involved. By integrating these genes with the transcriptomic data from the corresponding TCGA data set we identified a metabolic signature consisting of 30 genes. The signature was significant in its prediction of survival in 95 patients with a low signature score vs 282 with a high signature score (p = 0.0458). Conclusions Targeted mass spectrometry of bladder cancer is highly sensitive for detecting metabolic alterations. Applying transcriptome data allows for integration into larger data sets and identification of relevant metabolic pathways in bladder cancer progression. PMID:26802582

  14. Analysis of the Effects of Streamwise Lift Distribution on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, Seung Yeun (Paul)

    2010-01-01

    The streamwise lift distribution of a wing-canard-stabilator-body configuration was varied to study its effect on the near-field sonic boom signature. The investigation was carried out via solving the three-dimensional Euler equation with the OVERFLOW-2 flow solver. The computational meshes were created using the Chimera overset grid topology. The lift distribution was varied by first deflecting the canard then trimming the aircraft with the wing and the stabilator while maintaining constant lift coefficient of 0.05. A validation study using experimental results was also performed to determine required grid resolution and appropriate numerical scheme. A wide range of streamwise lift distribution was simulated. The result shows that the longitudinal wave propagation speed can be controlled through lift distribution thus controlling the shock coalescence.

  15. Security Analysis of an Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme with Bell States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoliang; Zou, Xiangfu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, to resist attacks using the anticommutativity of nontrivial Pauli operators, an arbitrated quantum signature scheme with Bell states (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 53(5), 1569-1579 2014) was proposed. The scheme randomly adds Hadamard operations to strengthen the quantum one-time pad encryption. Based on this, it claimed that the scheme could resist the receiver's existential forgery and no party had chances to change the message without being discovered. This paper introduces two security issues of the scheme: It can't resist the signer's disavowal and the receiver's existential forgery. Furthermore, we show that the scheme is still vulnerable to the receiver's existential forgery even if the Hadamard operation in the encryption algorithm is replaced with any 2nd-order unitary operation.

  16. Flight measurement and analysis of AAFE RADSCAT wind speed signature of the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, L. C.; Jones, W. L.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mitchell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The advanced aerospace flight experiment radiometer scatterometer (AAFE RADSCAT) which was developed as a research tool to evaluate the use of microwave frequency remote sensors to provide wind speed information at the ocean surface is discussed. The AAFE RADSCAT helped establish the feasibility of the satellite scatterometer for measuring both wind speed and direction. The most important function of the AAFE RADSCAT was to provide a data base of ocean normalized radar cross section (NRCS) measurements as a function of surface wind vector at 13.9 GHz. The NRCS measurements over a wide parametric range of incidence angles, azimuth angles, and winds were obtained in a series of RADSCAT aircraft missions. The obtained data base was used to model the relationship between k sub u band radar signature and ocean surface wind vector. The models developed therefrom are compared with those used for inversion of the SEASAT-A satellite scatterometer (SASS) radar measurements to wind speeds.

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of four Bacillus clausii strains: proteomic expression signature distinguishes protein profile of the strains.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Rosa; Gnoni, Antonio; Abbrescia, Anna; Panelli, Damiano; Maiorano, Stefania; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Papa, Sergio; Gaballo, Antonio

    2011-11-18

    A comparative proteomic approach, using two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, has been developed to compare and elucidate the differences among the cellular proteomes of four closely related isogenic O/C, SIN, N/R and T, B. clausii strains during both exponential and stationary phases of growth. Image analysis of the electropherograms reveals a high degree of concordance among the four proteomes, some proteins result, however, differently expressed. The proteins spots exhibiting high different expression level were identified, by mass-spectrometry analysis, as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHA, EC1.2.1.3; ABC0046 isoform) aldehyde dehydrogenase (DHAS, EC 1.2.1.3; ABC0047 isoform) and flagellin-protein of B. clausii KSM-k16. The different expression levels of the two dehydrogenases were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and dehydrogenases enzymatic activity. The different patterns of protein expression can be considered as cell proteome signatures of the different strains. PMID:21810490

  18. Intruder signature analysis from a phase-sensitive distributed fiber-optic perimeter sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. K.; Bae, T.; Snider, T.

    2007-09-01

    Using a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer developed at Texas A&M University, this paper reports on recent advances in intruder detection and classificatoin for long perimeters or borders. The system uses light pulses from a narrow linewidth CW laser with low frequency drift to interrogate an optical fiber. The backscattered light is detected, and real-time processing of the received signal is performed. Signatures from single and multiple humans on foot, nearby vehicle traffic on a road, construction-like vehicle activity, and animals have been obtained. Individual footsteps are clearly identified and the cadence readily observed. Time-frequency plots are used to compare the signatures. The detected signal contains information regarding the weight of the intruder as well. An adult weighing around 60kg may produce several π-radian shifts in the optical phase, which is detected by the system. While distances up to 20km have been monitored in previous remote field tests, we report measurements on a local test site with a total fiber length of 12km. A 3-mm diameter fiber cable is buried at a depth of 20-46 cm over a distance of 44m, with a 2km spool of fiber attached prior to the buried fiber and a 10km fiber spool connected in series after the buried section. Recent advances in data acquisition and signal processing allow us to avoid false alarms due to drifts in the laser center frequency and greatly improve the probability of detection. With these advancements, this technology is prime for low-cost perimeter monitoring of high-value and high-security installations such as nuclear power plants and military bases as well as national borders.

  19. Immune and inflammatory gene signature in rat cerebrum in subarachnoid hemorrhage with microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chu-I; Chou, An-Kuo; Lin, Ching-Chih; Chou, Chia-Hua; Loh, Joon-Khim; Lieu, Ann-Shung; Wang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Howng, Shen-Long; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been studied in terms of a contraction of the major cerebral arteries, but the effect of cerebrum tissue in SAH is not yet well understood. To gain insight into the biology of SAH-expressing cerebrum, we employed oligonucleotide microarrays to characterize the gene expression profiles of cerebrum tissue at the early stage of SAH. Functional gene expression in the cerebrum was analyzed 2 h following stage 1-hemorrhage in Sprague-Dawley rats. mRNA was investigated by performing microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. In this study, 18 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes displayed at least a 1.5-fold change. Five genes were verified by real-time PCR, including three upregulated genes [prostaglandin E synthase (PGES), CD14 antigen, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1)] as well as two downregulated genes [KRAB-zinc finger protein-2 (KZF-2) and γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABA B receptor)]. Notably, there were functional implications for the three upregulated genes involved in the inflammatory SAH process. However, the mechanisms leading to decreased KZF-2 and GABA B receptor expression in SAH have never been characterized. We conclude that oligonucleotide microarrays have the potential for use as a method to identify candidate genes associated with SAH and to provide novel investigational targets, including genes involved in the immune and inflammatory response. Furthermore, understanding the regulation of MMP9/TIMP1 during the early stages of SAH may elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms in SAH rats.

  20. Plasma amino acid and metabolite signatures tracking diabetes progression in the UCD-T2DM rat model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevations of plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are observed in human insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); however, there has been some controversy with respect to the passive or causative nature of the BCAA phenotype. Using untargeted metabolomics, plasm...

  1. A Resource for the Transcriptional Signature of Bona Fide Trophoblast Stem Cells and Analysis of Their Embryonic Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Dietmar; Arnold, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) represent the multipotent progenitors that give rise to the different cells of the embryonic portion of the placenta. Here, we analysed the expression of key TSC transcription factors Cdx2, Eomes, and Elf5 in the early developing placenta of mouse embryos and in cultured TSCs and reveal surprising heterogeneity in protein levels. We analysed persistence of TSCs in the early placenta and find that TSCs remain in the chorionic hinge until E9.5 and are lost shortly afterwards. To define the transcriptional signature of bona fide TSCs, we used inducible gain- and loss-of-function alleles of Eomes or Cdx2, and EomesGFP, to manipulate and monitor the core maintenance factors of TSCs, followed by genome-wide expression profiling. Combinatorial analysis of resulting expression profiles allowed for defining novel TSC marker genes that might functionally contribute to the maintenance of the TSC state. Analyses by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridisation validated novel TSC- and chorion-specific marker genes, such as Bok/Mtd, Cldn26, Duox2, Duoxa2, Nr0b1, and Sox21. Thus, these expression data provide a valuable resource for the transcriptional signature of bona fide and early differentiating TSCs and may contribute to an increased understanding of the transcriptional circuitries that maintain and/or establish stemness of TSCs. PMID:26783396

  2. Analysis of Peptides and Conjugates by Amino Acid Analysis.

    PubMed

    Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a highly accurate method for characterization of the composition of synthetic peptides. Together with mass spectrometry, it gives a reliable control of peptide quality and quantity before conjugation and immunization. Peptides are hydrolyzed, preferably in gas phase, with 6 M HCl at 110 °C for 20-24 h and the resulting amino acids analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography with post-column ninhydrin derivatization. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions, tryptophan is destroyed, and cysteine also, unless derivatized, and the amides, glutamine and asparagine, are deamidated to glutamic acid and aspartic acid, respectively. Three different ways of calculating results are suggested, and taking the above limitations into account, a quantitation better than 5% can usually be obtained. PMID:26424264

  3. Applications of cellular fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, D F

    1991-01-01

    More than ever, new technology is having an impact on the tools of clinical microbiologists. The analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) has become markedly more practical with the advent of the fused-silica capillary column, computer-controlled chromatography and data analysis, simplified sample preparation, and a commercially available GLC system dedicated to microbiological applications. Experience with applications in diagnostic microbiology ranges from substantial success in work with mycobacteria, legionellae, and nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli to minimal involvement with fungi and other nonbacterial agents. GLC is a good alternative to other means for the identification of mycobacteria or legionellae because it is rapid, specific, and independent of other specialized testing, e.g., DNA hybridization. Nonfermenters show features in their cellular fatty acid content that are useful in identifying species and, in some cases, subspecies. Less frequently encountered nonfermenters, including those belonging to unclassified groups, can ideally be characterized by GLC. Information is just beginning to materialize on the usefulness of cellular fatty acids for the identification of gram-positive bacteria and anaerobes, despite the traditional role of GLC in detecting metabolic products as an aid to identification of anaerobes. When species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci is called for, GLC may offer an alternative to biochemical testing. Methods for direct analysis of clinical material have been developed, but in practical and economic terms they are not yet ready for use in the clinical laboratory. Direct analysis holds promise for detecting markers of infection due to an uncultivable agent or in clinical specimens that presently require cultures and prolonged incubation to yield an etiologic agent. PMID:1747860

  4. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  5. Identifying the Molecular Signature of the Interstitial Deletion 7q Subgroup of Uterine Leiomyomata Using a Paired Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Jennelle C.; Park, Peter J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Assil-Kishawi, Iman; Somasundaram, Priya; Semere, Luwam G.; Quade, Bradley J.; Lynch, Allison M.; Stewart, Elizabeth A.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2009-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomata (UL), the most common neoplasm in reproductive-age women, have recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities including del(7)(q22q32). To develop a molecular signature, matched del(7q) and non-del(7q) tumors identified by FISH or karyotyping from 11 women were profiled with expression arrays. Our analysis using paired t-tests demonstrates this matched design is critical to eliminate confounding effects of genotype and environment that underlie patient variation. A gene list ordered by genome-wide significance showed enrichment for the 7q22 target region. Modification of the gene list by weighting each sample for percent of del(7q) cells to account for the mosaic nature of these tumors further enhanced the frequency of 7q22 genes. Pathway analysis revealed two of the 19 significant functional networks were associated with development and the most represented pathway was protein ubiquitination, which can influence tumor development by stabilizing oncoproteins and destabilizing tumor suppressor proteins. Array CGH (aCGH) studies determined the only consistent genomic imbalance was deletion of 9.5 megabases from 7q22-7q31.1. Combining the aCGH data with the del(7q) UL mosacism-weighted expression analysis resulted in a list of genes that are commonly deleted and whose copy number is correlated with significantly decreased expression. These genes include the proliferation inhibitor HPB1, the loss of expression of which has been associated with invasive breast cancer, as well as the mitosis integrity-maintenance tumor suppressor RINT1. This study provides a molecular signature of the del(7q) UL subgroup and will serve as a platform for future studies of tumor pathogenesis. PMID:19603527

  6. Carbon-13 natural abundance signatures of long-chain fatty acids to determinate sediment origin: A case study in northeast Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabit, Lionel; Gibbs, Max; Meusburger, Katrin; Toloza, Arsenio; Resch, Christian; Klik, Andreas; Swales, Andrew; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    - Several recently published information from scientific research have highlighted that compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) signatures of fatty acids (FAs) based on the measurement of carbon-13 natural abundance signatures showed great promises to identify sediment origin. The authors have used this innovative isotopic approach to investigate the sources of sediment in a three hectares Austrian sub-watershed (i.e. Mistelbach). Through a previous study using the Cs-137 technique, Mabit et al. (Geoderma, 2009) reported a local maximum sedimentation rate reaching 20 to 50 t/ha/yr in the lowest part of this watershed. However, this study did not identify the sources. Subsequently, the deposited sediment at its outlet (i.e. the sediment mixture) and representative soil samples from the four main agricultural fields - expected to be the source soils - of the site were investigated. The bulk delta carbon-13 of the samples and two long-chain FAs (i.e. C22:0 and C24:0) allowed the best statistical discrimination. Using two different mixing models (i.e. IsoSource and CSSIAR v1.00) and the organic carbon content of the soil sources and sediment mixture, the contribution of each source has been established. Results suggested that the grassed waterway contributed to at least 50% of the sediment deposited at the watershed outlet. This study, that will require further validation, highlights that CSSI and Cs-137 techniques are complementary as fingerprints and tracers for establishing land sediment redistribution and could provide meaningful information for optimized decision-making by land managers.

  7. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Living Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiangling; Lv, Yifan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-01

    Cells as the building blocks of life determine the basic functions and properties of a living organism. Understanding the structure and components of a cell aids in the elucidation of its biological functions. Moreover, knowledge of the similarities and differences between diseased and healthy cells is essential to understanding pathological mechanisms, identifying diagnostic markers, and designing therapeutic molecules. However, monitoring the structures and activities of a living cell remains a challenging task in bioanalytical and life science research. To meet the requirements of this task, aptamers, as “chemical antibodies,” have become increasingly powerful tools for cellular analysis. This article reviews recent advances in the development of nucleic acid aptamers in the areas of cell membrane analysis, cell detection and isolation, real-time monitoring of cell secretion, and intracellular delivery and analysis with living cell models. Limitations of aptamers and possible solutions are also discussed.

  8. Visualization and analysis for multidimensional gene expressions signature of cigarette smoking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changbo; Xiao, Zhao; Zhang, Tianlun; Cui, Jin; Pang, Chenming

    2011-11-01

    Biologists often use gene chip to get massive experimental data in the field of bioscience and chemical sciences. Facing a large amount of experimental data, researchers often need to find out a few interesting data or simple regulations. This paper presents a set of methods to visualize and analyze the data for gene expression signatures of people who smoke. We use the latest research data from National Center for Biotechnology Information. Totally, there are more than 400 thousand expressions data. Using these data, we can use parallel coordinates method to visualize the different gene expressions between smokers and nonsmokers and we can distinguish non-smokers, former smokers and current smokers by using the different colors. It can be easy to find out which gene is more important during the lung cancer angiogenesis in the smoking people. In another way, we can use a hierarchical model to visualize the inner relation of different genes. The location of the nodes shows different expression moment and the distance to the root shows the sequence of the expression. We can use the ring layout to represent all the nodes, and connect the different nodes which are related with color lines. Combined with the parallel coordinates method, the visualization result show the important genes and some inner relation obviously, which is useful for examination and prevention of lung cancer.

  9. Genome-wide analysis distinguishes hyperglycemia regulated epigenetic signatures of primary vascular cells

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Luciano; Balcerczyk, Aneta; Tothill, Richard W.; Haviv, Izhak; Kaspi, Antony; Lunke, Sebastian; Ziemann, Mark; Karagiannis, Tom; Tonna, Stephen; Kowalczyk, Adam; Beresford-Smith, Bryan; Macintyre, Geoff; Kelong, Ma; Hongyu, Zhang; Zhu, Jingde; El-Osta, Assam

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that poor glycemic control mediates post-translational modifications to the H3 histone tail. We are only beginning to understand the dynamic role of some of the diverse epigenetic changes mediated by hyperglycemia at single loci, yet elevated glucose levels are thought to regulate genome-wide changes, and this still remains poorly understood. In this article we describe genome-wide histone H3K9/K14 hyperacetylation and DNA methylation maps conferred by hyperglycemia in primary human vascular cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) as well as CpG methylation (CpG) assays, followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq and CpG-seq) identified unique hyperacetylation and CpG methylation signatures with proximal and distal patterns of regionalization associative with gene expression. Ingenuity knowledge-based pathway and gene ontology analyses indicate that hyperglycemia significantly affects human vascular chromatin with the transcriptional up-regulation of genes involved in metabolic and cardiovascular disease. We have generated the first installment of a reference collection of hyperglycemia-induced chromatin modifications using robust and reproducible platforms that allow parallel sequencing-by-synthesis of immunopurified content. We uncover that hyperglycemia-mediated induction of genes and pathways associated with endothelial dysfunction occur through modulation of acetylated H3K9/K14 inversely correlated with methyl-CpG content. PMID:21890681

  10. Comparative analysis of the domestic cat genome reveals genetic signatures underlying feline biology and domestication.

    PubMed

    Montague, Michael J; Li, Gang; Gandolfi, Barbara; Khan, Razib; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Steven M J; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W; Koboldt, Daniel C; Davis, Brian W; Driscoll, Carlos A; Barr, Christina S; Blackistone, Kevin; Quilez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Thomas, Gregg W C; Hahn, Matthew W; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; O'Brien, Stephen J; Wilson, Richard K; Lyons, Leslie A; Murphy, William J; Warren, Wesley C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the genetic changes that distinguish domestic cat populations from their wild progenitors. Here we describe a high-quality domestic cat reference genome assembly and comparative inferences made with other cat breeds, wildcats, and other mammals. Based upon these comparisons, we identified positively selected genes enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolism that underpin adaptations to a hypercarnivorous diet. We also found positive selection signals within genes underlying sensory processes, especially those affecting vision and hearing in the carnivore lineage. We observed an evolutionary tradeoff between functional olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene repertoires in the cat and dog genomes, with an expansion of the feline chemosensory system for detecting pheromones at the expense of odorant detection. Genomic regions harboring signatures of natural selection that distinguish domestic cats from their wild congeners are enriched in neural crest-related genes associated with behavior and reward in mouse models, as predicted by the domestication syndrome hypothesis. Our description of a previously unidentified allele for the gloving pigmentation pattern found in the Birman breed supports the hypothesis that cat breeds experienced strong selection on specific mutations drawn from random bred populations. Collectively, these findings provide insight into how the process of domestication altered the ancestral wildcat genome and build a resource for future disease mapping and phylogenomic studies across all members of the Felidae. PMID:25385592

  11. Comparative analysis of the domestic cat genome reveals genetic signatures underlying feline biology and domestication.

    PubMed

    Montague, Michael J; Li, Gang; Gandolfi, Barbara; Khan, Razib; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Steven M J; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W; Koboldt, Daniel C; Davis, Brian W; Driscoll, Carlos A; Barr, Christina S; Blackistone, Kevin; Quilez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Thomas, Gregg W C; Hahn, Matthew W; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; O'Brien, Stephen J; Wilson, Richard K; Lyons, Leslie A; Murphy, William J; Warren, Wesley C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the genetic changes that distinguish domestic cat populations from their wild progenitors. Here we describe a high-quality domestic cat reference genome assembly and comparative inferences made with other cat breeds, wildcats, and other mammals. Based upon these comparisons, we identified positively selected genes enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolism that underpin adaptations to a hypercarnivorous diet. We also found positive selection signals within genes underlying sensory processes, especially those affecting vision and hearing in the carnivore lineage. We observed an evolutionary tradeoff between functional olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene repertoires in the cat and dog genomes, with an expansion of the feline chemosensory system for detecting pheromones at the expense of odorant detection. Genomic regions harboring signatures of natural selection that distinguish domestic cats from their wild congeners are enriched in neural crest-related genes associated with behavior and reward in mouse models, as predicted by the domestication syndrome hypothesis. Our description of a previously unidentified allele for the gloving pigmentation pattern found in the Birman breed supports the hypothesis that cat breeds experienced strong selection on specific mutations drawn from random bred populations. Collectively, these findings provide insight into how the process of domestication altered the ancestral wildcat genome and build a resource for future disease mapping and phylogenomic studies across all members of the Felidae.

  12. Multifractality of sectoral price indices: Hurst signature analysis of Cantillon effects in disequilibrium factor markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Robert F.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents Hurst exponent signatures from time series of aggregate price indices for the US over the 1975-2011 time period. Though all highly aggregated, these indices include both broad measures of consumer and producer prices. The constellation of prices evolves as a complex system throughout processes of production and distribution, culminating in the final delivery of output to consumers. Massive feedback characterizes this system, where the demand for consumable output determines the demand for the inputs used to produce it, and supply scarcities for the necessary inputs in turn determine the supply of the final product. Prices in both factor and output markets are jointly determined by interdependent supply and demand conditions. Fractal examination of the interplay among market prices would be of interest regardless, but added interest arises from the consideration of how these markets respond to external shocks over the business cycle, particularly monetary expansion. Because the initial impact of monetary injection is localized in specific sectors, the way the impact on prices diffuses throughout the economy is of special interest.

  13. Comparative analysis of the domestic cat genome reveals genetic signatures underlying feline biology and domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Gandolfi, Barbara; Khan, Razib; Aken, Bronwen L.; Searle, Steven M. J.; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Davis, Brian W.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Barr, Christina S.; Blackistone, Kevin; Quilez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Thomas, Gregg W. C.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Lyons, Leslie A.; Murphy, William J.; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic changes that distinguish domestic cat populations from their wild progenitors. Here we describe a high-quality domestic cat reference genome assembly and comparative inferences made with other cat breeds, wildcats, and other mammals. Based upon these comparisons, we identified positively selected genes enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolism that underpin adaptations to a hypercarnivorous diet. We also found positive selection signals within genes underlying sensory processes, especially those affecting vision and hearing in the carnivore lineage. We observed an evolutionary tradeoff between functional olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene repertoires in the cat and dog genomes, with an expansion of the feline chemosensory system for detecting pheromones at the expense of odorant detection. Genomic regions harboring signatures of natural selection that distinguish domestic cats from their wild congeners are enriched in neural crest-related genes associated with behavior and reward in mouse models, as predicted by the domestication syndrome hypothesis. Our description of a previously unidentified allele for the gloving pigmentation pattern found in the Birman breed supports the hypothesis that cat breeds experienced strong selection on specific mutations drawn from random bred populations. Collectively, these findings provide insight into how the process of domestication altered the ancestral wildcat genome and build a resource for future disease mapping and phylogenomic studies across all members of the Felidae. PMID:25385592

  14. Gamma-Ray Signatures for State-Of-Health Analysis and Monitoring of Widely-Arrayed Radiation Portal Monitor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Ely, James H.; Angel, Linda K.; Wright, Ingrid H.; Eslinger, Melany A.; Pospical, A. Jill; Ellis, John E.

    2008-05-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has deployed a large array of radiation portal monitors for the Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border Protection. These portal monitors scan incoming vehicles crossing the U.S. border and shipping containers leaving international ports for radioactive material via gamma-ray and neutron detection. Data produced and captured by these systems are recorded for every vehicle related to radiation signature, sensor/system status, and local background, as well as a host of other variables. Within the Radiation Portal Monitor Project at PNNL, state-of-health observation and analysis for the whole RPM system using these data to determine functionality and performance is being developed. (PIET-43741-TM-492)

  15. Mechanical behavior analysis of a submerged fixed point anchoring system for a hydroacoustic signature measuring sensor for divers and ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamnoiu, G.; Radu, O.; Surdu, G.; Roşca, V.; Damian, R.; Pascu, C.; Curcă, E.; Rădulescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper has as its main objectives the presentation and the analysis of the numerical analysis results for the study of a fixed point anchoring system for a hydroacoustic sensor when measuring the hydroacoustic signature of divers and ships in real sea conditions. The study of the mechanical behavior of this system has as main objectives the optimization of the shape and weight of the anchorage ballast for the metallic structure while considering the necessity to maintain the sensor in a fixed point and the analysis of the sensor movements and the influences on the measurements caused by the sea current streams. The study was focused on the 3D model of metallic structure design; numerical modeling of the water flow around the sensor anchoring structure using volume of fluid analysis and the analysis of the forces and displacements using FEM when needed for the study. In this paper we have used data for the sea motion dynamics and in particular the velocity of the sea current streams as determined by experimental measurements that have been conducted for the western area of the Black Sea.

  16. Multimodal signature modeling of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian; Prussing, Keith; Lane, Sarah; Thomas, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Georgia Tech been investigating method for the detection of covert personnel in traditionally difficult environments (e.g., urban, caves). This program focuses on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. Both aspects are needed to support the development of personnel detection and tracking algorithms. The difficult nature of these personnel-related problems dictates a multimodal sensing approach. Human signature data of sufficient and accurate quality and quantity do not exist, thus the development of an accurate signature model for a human is needed. This model should also simulate various human activities to allow motion-based observables to be exploited. This paper will describe a multimodal signature modeling approach that incorporates human physiological aspects, thermoregulation, and dynamics into the signature calculation. This approach permits both passive and active signatures to be modeled. The focus of the current effort involved the computation of signatures in urban environments. This paper will discuss the development of a human motion model for use in simulating both electro-optical signatures and radar-based signatures. Video sequences of humans in a simulated urban environment will also be presented; results using these sequences for personnel tracking will be presented.

  17. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon.

  18. Recent advances in microchip electrophoresis for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Gaozhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-10-01

    With the maturation of microfluidic technologies, microchip electrophoresis has been widely employed for amino acid analysis owing to its advantages of low sample consumption, reduced analysis time, high throughput, and potential for integration and automation. In this article, we review the recent progress in amino acid analysis using microchip electrophoresis during the period from 2007 to 2012. Innovations in microchip materials, surface modification, sample introduction, microchip electrophoresis, and detection methods are documented, as well as nascent applications of amino acid analysis in single-cell analysis, microdialysis sampling, food analysis, and extraterrestrial exploration. Without doubt, more applications of microchip electrophoresis in amino acid analysis may be expected soon. PMID:23436170

  19. Functional analysis of abscisic acid 8'-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akira; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Naoto; Nambara, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the control of seed dormancy and germination. Identification of hormone metabolism genes from a particular plant species of interest is an essential step in hormone research. The function of these gene products is validated by biochemical analysis using heterologous expression systems, such as E. coli and yeast. ABA 8'-hydroxylase is a subfamily of P450 monooxygenases and is encoded by CYP707A genes. CYP707A catalyzes the committed step in the major ABA catabolic pathway. In this chapter, we describe the methods for RNA extraction from seeds, cloning the CYP707A cDNAs, protein expression in yeast, and biochemical analysis of their gene products.

  20. Exome Analysis Reveals Differentially Mutated Gene Signatures of Stage, Grade and Subtype in Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K.; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies. PMID:25803781

  1. Spatial changes in fatty acids signatures of the great scallop Pecten maximus across the Bay of Biscay continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerot, Caroline; Meziane, Tarik; Schaal, Gauthier; Grall, Jacques; Lorrain, Anne; Paulet, Yves-Marie; Kraffe, Edouard

    2015-10-01

    The spatial variability of food resources along continental margins can strongly influence the physiology and ecology of benthic bivalves. We explored the variability of food sources of the great scallop Pecten maximus, by determining their fatty acid (FA) composition along an inshore-offshore gradient in the Bay of Biscay (from 15 to 190 m depth). The FA composition of the digestive gland showed strong differences between shallow and deep-water habitats. This trend was mainly driven by their content in diatom-characteristic fatty acids, which are abundant near the coast. Scallops collected from the middle of the continental shelf were characterized by higher contents of flagellate markers than scallops from shallow habitats. This could be related to a permanent vertical stratification in the water column, which reduced vertical mixing of waters, thereby enhancing organic matter recycling through the microbial loop. In the deeper water station (190 m), FA compositions were close to the compositions found in scallops from shallow areas, which suggest that scallops could have access to the same resources (i.e. diatoms). Muscle FA composition was more indicative of the physiological state of scallops over this depth range, revealing contrasting reproductive strategies among the two coastal sites and metabolic or physiological adaptation at greater depth (e.g. structural and functional adjustments of membrane composition). This study therefore revealed contrasted patterns between shallow and deeper habitats for both P. maximus muscle and digestive gland tissues. This emphasizes the variability in the diet of this species along its distribution range, and stresses the importance of analyzing different tissues for their FA composition in order to better understand their physiology and ecology.

  2. Trophodynamics of euphausiids in the Amundsen Sea during the austral summer by fatty acid and stable isotopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ah-Ra; Yang, Eun Jin; Kim, Min-Seob; Ju, Se-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The Amundsen Sea is characterized by a continental shelf, long-term sea ice, and many coastal polynyas with high biological productivity. Euphausia superba and Euphausia crystallorophias, which are dominant Antarctic krill, are major prey for most predators, such as fishes, birds, and marine mammals. An understanding of the feeding ecology of krill may provide the information for the structure and function of the Amundsen Sea ecosystem. Thus, we applied two biochemical approaches (fatty acids and stable isotopes) to determine the trophodynamics of adult krill in the Amundsen Sea. There were no significant differences in lipid contents between the two species, but the dominant storage lipids were different. Triacylglycerol (TAG) was dominant in E. superba, but wax esters (WE) were dominant in E. crystallorophias due to their different living strategies. Furthermore, the lipid content of E. crystallorophias displayed a spatial variation, being highest on the glacial edge. It was difficult to understand the feeding strategy and food source using only the fatty acid compositions of krill and in situ particulate organic matter. However, we found that specific FA ratios (18:1ω9/18:1ω7 and PUFA/SFA) and the nitrogen isotope ratio (δ15N) provide more insight into the feeding ecology of krill, such as feeding strategy and trophic position. These ratios suggest that E. crystallorophias consistently showed a higher degree of carnivorous feeding than E. superba in the Amundsen Sea during the austral summer. In conclusion, adult E. superba might more directly obtain their energy from in situ primary producers in the open sea, but, in the Amundsen Sea Polynya, adult E. crystallorophias seems to obtain their energy mainly through the microbial loop (microzooplankton). If so, E. crystallolophias would be a key player not only to transfer the energy from microbes to higher trophic levels but also to control the carbon and nitrogen cycle in the Amundsen Sea Polynya.

  3. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  4. Inplementation of an automated signal processing approach for the analysis of chemical spectral signatures collected from FT-IR mounted in an aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kroutil, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    The automated detection of chemical spectral signatures using a passive infrared Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer mounted in an aircraft is a difficult challenge due to the small total infrared energy contribution of a particular chemical species compared to the background signature. The detection of spectral signatures is complicated by the fact that a large, widely varying infrared background is present that is coupled with the presence of a number of chemical interferents in the atmosphere. This paper describes a mathematical technique that has been demonstrated to automatically detect specific chemical species in an automated processing environment. The data analysis methodology has been demonstrated to be effective using data of low spectral resolution at low aircraft altitudes. An overview of the implementation and basic concepts of the approach are presented.

  5. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  6. Comparison of Rapid Methods for Analysis of Bacterial Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C. Wayne; Lambert, M. A.; Merwin, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    When rapid gas-liquid chromatography methods for determination of bacterial fatty acids were compared, results showed that saponification was required for total fatty acid analysis. Transesterification with boron-trihalide reagents (BF3-CH3OH, BCl3-CH3OH) caused extensive degradation of cyclopropane acids and was less effective than saponification in releasing cellular hydroxy fatty acids. Digestion of cells with tetramethylammonium hydroxide was unsatisfactory because of extraneous gas-liquid chromatography peaks and because of lower recovery of branched-chain and hydroxy fatty acids. A simple, rapid saponification procedure which can be used for total cellular fatty acid analysis of freshly grown cells is described. PMID:4844271

  7. Tissue and size-related changes in the fatty acid and stable isotope signatures of the deep sea grenadier fish Coryphaenoides armatus from the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Sharples, Caroline J.; Webster, Lynda; Walsham, Pamela; Lacaze, Jean-Pierre; Cousins, Nicola J.

    2013-12-01

    Coryphaenoides armatus is a cosmopolitan deep-sea fish that plays a major role in the ecology of abyssal ecosystems. We investigated the trophic ecology and physiology of this species by determining the δ13C, δ15N and fatty acid signatures of muscle, liver and ovary tissues of individuals collected from ∼2700 m to the north and south of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, NE Atlantic. Fatty acid and δ13C data both suggested that C. armatus shows an ontogenetic dietary shift, with the relative contributions of benthic and pelagic prey decreasing and increasing respectively as the animals grow. They also indicated that dietary overlap between animals living to the north and south of the CGFZ increases as they grow, suggesting that larger animals forage over greater distances and are not hindered by the presence of the CGFZ. Comparison of tissue-specific fatty acid signatures with previously published data suggests compositional homeostasis of the fatty acids 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3) in the muscle, and 18:1(n-9) in the liver tissues. We ascribe this primarily to strict physiological requirements for these compounds, rather than simply to their abundance in the diet. We pose several speculative mechanisms to explain the observed trends in tissue-specific δ13C and δ15N values, illustrating some of the numerous processes that can influence the isotopic signatures of bulk tissues.

  8. The Plasma Lipidomic Signature of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Puneet; Wiest, Michelle M.; Cheung, Onpan; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Sargeant, Carol; Min, Hae-Ki; Contos, Melissa J.; Sterling, Richard K.; Fuchs, Michael; Zhou, Huiping; Watkins, Steven M.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Specific alterations in hepatic lipid composition characterize the spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which extends from nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, the plasma lipidome of NAFLD and whether NASH has a distinct plasma lipidomic signature are unknown. A comprehensive analysis of plasma lipids and eicosanoid metabolites quantified by mass spectrometry was performed in NAFL (n = 25) and NASH (n = 50) subjects and compared with lean normal controls (n = 50). The key findings include significantly increased total plasma monounsaturated fatty acids driven by palmitoleic (16:1 n7) and oleic (18:1 n9) acids content (P < 0.01 for both acids in both NAFL and NASH). The levels of palmitoleic acid, oleic acid, and palmitoleic acid to palmitic acid (16:0) ratio were significantly increased in NAFLD across multiple lipid classes. Linoleic acid (8:2n6) was decreased (P < 0.05), with a concomitant increase in γ-linolenic (18:3n6) and dihomo γ-linolenic (20:3n6) acids in both NAFL and NASH (P < 0.001 for most lipid classes). The docosahexanoic acid (22:6 n3) to docosapentenoic acid (22:5n3) ratio was significantly decreased within phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) pools, which was most marked in NASH subjects (P < 0.01 for PC and P < 0.001 for PE). The total plasmalogen levels were significantly decreased in NASH compared with controls (P < 0.05). A stepwise increase in lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolites 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 8-HETE, and 15-HETE characterized progression from normal to NAFL to NASH. The level of 11-HETE, a nonenzymatic oxidation product of arachidonic (20:4) acid, was significantly increased in NASH only. Conclusions: Although increased lipogenesis, desaturases, and LOX activities characterize NAFL and NASH, impaired peroxisomal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolism and nonenzymatic oxidation is associated with progression to NASH. PMID

  9. Metabolic Signatures of Adiposity in Young Adults: Mendelian Randomization Analysis and Effects of Weight Change

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Peter; Wang, Qin; Kangas, Antti J.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Skarp, Joni; Tiainen, Mika; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Soininen, Pasi; Havulinna, Aki S.; Kaakinen, Marika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Savolainen, Markku J.; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Männistö, Satu; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Vanhala, Mauno; Elliott, Paul; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli T.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Smith, George Davey; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased adiposity is linked with higher risk for cardiometabolic diseases. We aimed to determine to what extent elevated body mass index (BMI) within the normal weight range has causal effects on the detailed systemic metabolite profile in early adulthood. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to estimate causal effects of BMI on 82 metabolic measures in 12,664 adolescents and young adults from four population-based cohorts in Finland (mean age 26 y, range 16–39 y; 51% women; mean ± standard deviation BMI 24±4 kg/m2). Circulating metabolites were quantified by high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics and biochemical assays. In cross-sectional analyses, elevated BMI was adversely associated with cardiometabolic risk markers throughout the systemic metabolite profile, including lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acid composition, amino acids, inflammatory markers, and various hormones (p<0.0005 for 68 measures). Metabolite associations with BMI were generally stronger for men than for women (median 136%, interquartile range 125%–183%). A gene score for predisposition to elevated BMI, composed of 32 established genetic correlates, was used as the instrument to assess causality. Causal effects of elevated BMI closely matched observational estimates (correspondence 87%±3%; R2 = 0.89), suggesting causative influences of adiposity on the levels of numerous metabolites (p<0.0005 for 24 measures), including lipoprotein lipid subclasses and particle size, branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, and inflammation-related glycoprotein acetyls. Causal analyses of certain metabolites and potential sex differences warrant stronger statistical power. Metabolite changes associated with change in BMI during 6 y of follow-up were examined for 1,488 individuals. Change in BMI was accompanied by widespread metabolite changes, which had an association pattern similar to that of the cross-sectional observations, yet with greater metabolic

  10. Global and Targeted Lipid Analysis of Gemmata obscuriglobus Reveals the Presence of Lipopolysaccharide, a Signature of the Classical Gram-Negative Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mahat, Rajendra; Seebart, Corrine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Planctomycete bacteria possess many unusual cellular properties, contributing to a cell plan long considered to be unique among the bacteria. However, data from recent studies are more consistent with a modified Gram-negative cell plan. A key feature of the Gram-negative plan is the presence of an outer membrane (OM), for which lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a signature molecule. Despite genomic evidence for an OM in planctomycetes, no biochemical verification has been reported. We attempted to detect and characterize LPS in the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus. We obtained direct evidence for LPS and lipid A using electrophoresis and differential staining. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) compositional analysis of LPS extracts identified eight different 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-HOFAs), 2-keto 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), glucosamine, and hexose and heptose sugars, a chemical profile unique to Gram-negative LPS. Combined with molecular/structural information collected from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS analysis of putative intact lipid A, these data led us to propose a heterogeneous hexa-acylated lipid A structure (multiple-lipid A species). We also confirmed previous reports of G. obscuriglobus whole-cell fatty acid (FA) and sterol compositions and detected a novel polyunsaturated FA (PUFA). Our confirmation of LPS, and by implication an OM, in G. obscuriglobus raises the possibility that other planctomycetes possess an OM. The pursuit of this question, together with studies of the structural connections between planctomycete LPS and peptidoglycans, will shed more light on what appears to be a planctomycete variation on the Gram-negative cell plan. IMPORTANCE Bacterial species are classified as Gram positive or negative based on their cell envelope structure. For 25 years, the envelope of planctomycete bacteria has been considered a unique exception, as it lacks peptidoglycan and an

  11. Remote sensing analysis of the Tiber River sediment plume (Tyrrhenian Sea): spectral signature of erratic vs. persistent events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcini, Federico; Di Cicco, Annalisa; Pitarch, Jaime; Marullo, Salvatore; Colella, Simone; Volpe, Gianluca; Nardin, William; Margiotta, Francesca; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade, several regions along the western Tyrrhenian coast have been dramatically affected by intense river runoffs, which delivered a significant amount of sediment off and along shore. A crucial question that coastal geomorphologists and marine scientists need to face is about the fate and impact of this impulsive sediment load, especially with respect to the historical trend, seasonal variability, and persistent events. A satellite-based analysis of these sediment discharges is a key ingredient for such a study since it represents the primary dataset for the recognition of coastal patterns of Total Suspended Matter (TSM) that may reflect erosional or depositional processes along the coats. On this regard, we developed and implemented a TSM regional product from remote sensing, which was calibrated and validated by in situ measurements collected in the Tyrrhenian Sea. We discuss spatial patterns and spectral signature of the TSM that we observe during the 2012 high river discharge event of the Tiber River. Our analysis gives some insights on the main differences of the geomorphological impacts related to erratic vs persistent events.

  12. Abnormal gene expression profile reveals the common key signatures associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H J; Sun, Z Q; Qian, W Q; Sheng, L

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the common gene signatures of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), and to expand the respective protein-protein interaction networks associated with CCRCC regulation. For the latter, we utilized multiple gene expression data sets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with which we could analyze the aberrant gene expression patterns at the transcriptome level that distinguish cancer from normal samples. We obtained the GSE781 and GSE6344 clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression datasets from GEO, which contained a total of 37 cancer and 37 normal samples. Subsequent R language analysis allowed identification of the differentially expressed genes. The genes that exhibited significant up or downregulation in cancers were entered into the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery to perform analysis of gene functional annotations, resulting in the generation of two protein-protein interaction networks that included the most significantly up or downregulated genes in CCRCC. These allowed us to identify the key factor genes, which could potentially be utilized to separate cancer versus normal samples. The differentially regulated genes are also highly likely to be functionally important regulatory factors in renal cell carcinoma: cell functions showing enrichment of these genes include amine biosynthetic and vitamin metabolic processes, ion binding, extracellular transport function, and regulation of biosynthesis. Together, the results from our study offer further reason to pursue diagnosis and therapy of CCRCC at the molecular level. PMID:25867368

  13. Blind separation of human- and horse-footstep signatures using independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Asif; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2012-06-01

    Seismic footstep detection based systems for homeland security applications are important to perimeter protection and other security systems. This paper reports seismic footstep signal separation for a walking horse and a walking human. The well-known Independent Component Analysis (ICA) approach is employed to accomplish this task. ICA techniques have become widely used in audio analysis and source separation. The concept of lCA may actually be seen as an extension of the principal component analysis (PCA), which can only impose independence up to the second order and, consequently, defines directions that are orthogonal. They can also be used in conjunction with a classification method to achieve a high percentage of correct classification and reduce false alarms. In this paper, an ICA based algorithm is developed and implemented on seismic data of human and horse footsteps. The performance of this method is very promising and is demonstrated by the experimental results.

  14. The Relationship between Branched-Chain Amino Acid Related Metabolomic Signature and Insulin Resistance: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue; Han, Qing; Liu, Yujia; Sun, Chenglin; Gang, Xiaokun; Wang, Guixia

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the positive association between increased circulating BCAAs (valine, leucine, and isoleucine) and insulin resistance (IR) in obese or diabetic patients. However, results seem to be controversial in different races, diets, and distinct tissues. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between BCAA and IR as well as later diabetes risk and explore the phenotypic and genetic factors influencing BCAA level based on available studies. We performed systematic review, searching MEDLINE, EMASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception to March 2016. After selection, 23 studies including 20,091 participants were included. Based on current evidence, we found that BCAA is a useful biomarker for early detection of IR and later diabetic risk. Factors influencing BCAA level can be divided into four parts: race, gender, dietary patterns, and gene variants. These factors might not only contribute to the elevated BCAA level but also show obvious associations with insulin resistance. Genes related to BCAA catabolism might serve as potential targets for the treatment of IR associated metabolic disorders. Moreover, these factors should be controlled properly during study design and data analysis. In the future, more large-scale studies with elaborate design addressing BCAA and IR are required. PMID:27642608

  15. The Relationship between Branched-Chain Amino Acid Related Metabolomic Signature and Insulin Resistance: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the positive association between increased circulating BCAAs (valine, leucine, and isoleucine) and insulin resistance (IR) in obese or diabetic patients. However, results seem to be controversial in different races, diets, and distinct tissues. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between BCAA and IR as well as later diabetes risk and explore the phenotypic and genetic factors influencing BCAA level based on available studies. We performed systematic review, searching MEDLINE, EMASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception to March 2016. After selection, 23 studies including 20,091 participants were included. Based on current evidence, we found that BCAA is a useful biomarker for early detection of IR and later diabetic risk. Factors influencing BCAA level can be divided into four parts: race, gender, dietary patterns, and gene variants. These factors might not only contribute to the elevated BCAA level but also show obvious associations with insulin resistance. Genes related to BCAA catabolism might serve as potential targets for the treatment of IR associated metabolic disorders. Moreover, these factors should be controlled properly during study design and data analysis. In the future, more large-scale studies with elaborate design addressing BCAA and IR are required.

  16. The Relationship between Branched-Chain Amino Acid Related Metabolomic Signature and Insulin Resistance: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the positive association between increased circulating BCAAs (valine, leucine, and isoleucine) and insulin resistance (IR) in obese or diabetic patients. However, results seem to be controversial in different races, diets, and distinct tissues. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between BCAA and IR as well as later diabetes risk and explore the phenotypic and genetic factors influencing BCAA level based on available studies. We performed systematic review, searching MEDLINE, EMASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception to March 2016. After selection, 23 studies including 20,091 participants were included. Based on current evidence, we found that BCAA is a useful biomarker for early detection of IR and later diabetic risk. Factors influencing BCAA level can be divided into four parts: race, gender, dietary patterns, and gene variants. These factors might not only contribute to the elevated BCAA level but also show obvious associations with insulin resistance. Genes related to BCAA catabolism might serve as potential targets for the treatment of IR associated metabolic disorders. Moreover, these factors should be controlled properly during study design and data analysis. In the future, more large-scale studies with elaborate design addressing BCAA and IR are required. PMID:27642608

  17. Application of spatial features to satellite land-use analysis. [spectral signature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Hornung, R.; Berry, J.

    1975-01-01

    A Level I land-use analysis of selected training areas of the Colorado Front Range was carried out using digital ERTS-A satellite imagery. Level I land-use categories included urban, agriculture (irrigated and dryland farming), rangeland, and forests. The spatial variations in spectral response for these land-use classes were analyzed using discrete two-dimensional Fourier transforms to isolate and extract spatial features. Analysis was performed on ERTS frame 1352-17134 (July 10, 1973) and frame number 1388-17131 (August 15, 1973). On training sets, spatial features yielded 80 to 100 percent classification accuracies with commission errors ranging from 0 to 20 percent.

  18. Combining parallel factor analysis and machine learning for the classification of dissolved organic matter according to source using fluorescence signatures.

    PubMed

    Cuss, C W; McConnell, S M; Guéguen, C

    2016-07-01

    Parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis of dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence has facilitated a surge of investigation into its biogeochemical cycling. However, rigorous, PARAFAC-based methods for holistically distinguishing DOM sources are lacking. This study classified 1029 PARAFAC-analyzed excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) measured using DOM isolated from 24 different leaf leachates, rivers, and organic matter standards using four machine learning methods (MLM). EEMs were also divided into subsets to assess the impact of experimental treatments (i.e. whole EEMs, size fractionation, mixtures, quenching) and dataset properties (i.e. different numbers of EEMs from each leachate/river) on classification. A split-half validated, 10-component PARAFAC model was extended to 12 components to remove consistent peaks evident in model residuals. The 12-component model performed better than the 10-component model, correctly classifying up to 80 additional EEMs, when the dataset included size-fractionated DOM or several different sources (i.e. many leaf species and rivers); however, the 10-component model performed better for whole-sample EEMs when comparing leaf leachates to rivers. The MLM correctly classified whole EEMs of riverine DOM by source with up to 87.0% accuracy, leachates with up to 92.5% accuracy, and distinguished leachates from rivers with 97.2% accuracy. A difference of up to 17.3% in classification accuracy was observed depending on the MLM method used with the following order: multilayer perceptron = support vector machine > k-nearest neighbours ≫ decision tree; however, performances differed widely depending on the data subset. Classification accuracy for whole and size-fractionated rivers compared to whole and size-fractionated leachates using N-way partial least-squares discriminant analysis (NPLS-DA; 97.7%) was similar to that achieved using MLM. Combining MLM with PARAFAC is an effective method for classifying DOM based on its

  19. Optimized use of Hough transform in an ultrasound measurement system for human signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, R.; Sona, A.

    2013-05-01

    Human motion analysis is a task of increasing importance in several modern application fields, such as in medicine, avionics, security, and disaster recovery. In this paper, the use of Hough transform is considered and discussed in the scenario of human motion analysis. In particular, the influence of some transform parameters is investigated with the aim of improving Hough transform set-up when used in a measurement approach for human motion analysis. To this purpose, Hough transform has been applied to a set of results obtained by exploiting a suitable measurement system developed by the same authors, in the specific case of ultrasound waves. Such results have been obtained by using some reference images in the form of spectrograms achieved by using the system along with a purposely developed reference target emulating some human body movements. The results show that the considered measurement system, and more generally the human motion analysis and detection system, can be optimized by a proper set-up and use of Hough transform algorithm.

  20. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  1. An analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: to what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects.

  2. Discovery of progenitor cell signatures by time-series synexpression analysis during Drosophila embryonic cell immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Dequéant, Mary-Lee; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Hu, Yanhui; Spirohn, Kerstin; Simcox, Amanda; Hannon, Gregory J.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The use of time series profiling to identify groups of functionally related genes (synexpression groups) is a powerful approach for the discovery of gene function. Here we apply this strategy during RasV12 immortalization of Drosophila embryonic cells, a phenomenon not well characterized. Using high-resolution transcriptional time-series datasets, we generated a gene network based on temporal expression profile similarities. This analysis revealed that common immortalized cells are related to adult muscle precursors (AMPs), a stem cell-like population contributing to adult muscles and sharing properties with vertebrate satellite cells. Remarkably, the immortalized cells retained the capacity for myogenic differentiation when treated with the steroid hormone ecdysone. Further, we validated in vivo the transcription factor CG9650, the ortholog of mammalian Bcl11a/b, as a regulator of AMP proliferation predicted by our analysis. Our study demonstrates the power of time series synexpression analysis to characterize Drosophila embryonic progenitor lines and identify stem/progenitor cell regulators. PMID:26438832

  3. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  4. Detecting of transient vibration signatures using an improved fast spatial-spectral ensemble kurtosis kurtogram and its applications to mechanical signature analysis of short duration data from rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, BinQiang; Zhang, ZhouSuo; Zi, YanYang; He, ZhengJia; Sun, Chuang

    2013-10-01

    Detecting transient vibration signatures is of vital importance for vibration-based condition monitoring and fault detection of the rotating machinery. However, raw mechanical signals collected by vibration sensors are generally mixtures of physical vibrations of the multiple mechanical components installed in the examined machinery. Fault-generated incipient vibration signatures masked by interfering contents are difficult to be identified. The fast kurtogram (FK) is a concise and smart gadget for characterizing these vibration features. The multi-rate filter-bank (MRFB) and the spectral kurtosis (SK) indicator of the FK are less powerful when strong interfering vibration contents exist, especially when the FK are applied to vibration signals of short duration. It is encountered that the impulsive interfering contents not authentically induced by mechanical faults complicate the optimal analyzing process and lead to incorrect choosing of the optimal analysis subband, therefore the original FK may leave out the essential fault signatures. To enhance the analyzing performance of FK for industrial applications, an improved version of fast kurtogram, named as "fast spatial-spectral ensemble kurtosis kurtogram", is presented. In the proposed technique, discrete quasi-analytic wavelet tight frame (QAWTF) expansion methods are incorporated as the detection filters. The QAWTF, constructed based on dual tree complex wavelet transform, possesses better vibration transient signature extracting ability and enhanced time-frequency localizability compared with conventional wavelet packet transforms (WPTs). Moreover, in the constructed QAWTF, a non-dyadic ensemble wavelet subband generating strategy is put forward to produce extra wavelet subbands that are capable of identifying fault features located in transition-band of WPT. On the other hand, an enhanced signal impulsiveness evaluating indicator, named "spatial-spectral ensemble kurtosis" (SSEK), is put forward and utilized

  5. Multivariate statistical analysis of heavy metal signature in the Dongjiang River Basin in southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, Cr, Pb, As, Cu, Ni, Hg, Cd) have been measured in water and bottom sediment for the main stream of the Dongjiang River Basin, where is the word's most populous (40,000,000 people) and highly economic development region over decades. While the enrichment of heavy metals in the sediment indicates a strong historical pollution, the heavy metal concentrations in water reflect a concurrent anthropogenic influence. Multiple 87 samples were taken from the tributaries of the river network to investigate the characteristics of heavy metal pollutants within the catchment. Different multivariate statistical techniques are combined to analyse the spatial pattern and the origin of, and the land-use effects on heavy metal pollutants. First, a clear regional similarity of the pollutants is exhibited by cluster analysis (CA), and no longitudinal accumulation along the river can be observed. Then, principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to group the different heavy metals according to their variability at different sites. The first principal component (PC) containing Cr, Mn, Ni and Cu shows the feature of point sources, whereas the second PC loaded with Zn and Cd is probably derived from non-point sources. It also implied the particular favorite conveyances and processes from sources to sediments for Hg within the third PC. In the last step, redundant analysis (RDA) is used to correlate environmental variables (e.g. land use types, physiochemical properties including PH, DOC, DO, TSS) to heavy metal pollutants. The correlation of different heavy metals with different physiochemical properties reveals the anthropogenic impacts on the water quality. Land use types exhibits the highest relevance to heavy metal pollution, i.e., intensive industrial areas shows aggravated pollution, whereas areas with mainly forest and agriculture are rarely polluted by heavy metals.

  6. The Bioinformatics Analysis of miRNAs Signatures Differentially Expressed in HER2(+) Versus HER2(−) Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Weiwei; Jin, Lei; Wang, Yanru; Wang, Zexing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify the signatures of miRNAs differentially expressed in HER2(+) versus HER2(−) breast cancers that accurately predict the HER2 status of breast cancer, and to provide further insight into breast cancer therapy. Methods By the methods of literature search, aberrant expressed miRNAs were collected. By target prediction algorithm of TargetScan and PicTar and the data enrichment analysis, target gene sets of miRNAs differentially expressed in HER2(+) versus HER2(−) breast cancers were built. Then, using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) database, the function modules of Gene Ontology categories and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and BIOCARTA pathway, biological functions and signaling pathways that are probably regulated by miRNAs, were analyzed. Results We got five sets of miRNAs expressed in different HER2 status of breast cancers finally. The five sets of data contain 22; 32; 3; 38; and 62 miRNAs, respectively. After miRNAs target prediction and data enrichment, 5,734; 22,409; 1,142; 22,293; and 43,460 target genes of five miRNA sets were collected. Gene ontology analysis found these genes may be involved in transcription, protein transport, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Moreover, certain KEGG and BIOCARTA signaling pathways related toHER2 status were found. Conclusion Using TargetScan and PicTar for data enrichment, and DAVID database, Gene Ontology categories, KEGG and BIOCARTA pathway for analysis of miRNAs different expression, we conducted a new method for biological interpretation of miRNA profiling data in HER2(+) versus HER2(−) breast cancers. It may improve understanding the regulatory roles of miRNAs in different molecular subtypes of breast cancers. Therefore, it is beneficial to improve the accuracy of experimental efforts to breast cancer and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23009584

  7. Hair sterol signatures coupled to multivariate data analysis reveal an increased 7β-hydroxycholesterol production in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyun-Hwa; Lee, Do-Yup; Seo, Hong Seog; Jeong, Jihyeon; Moon, Ju-Yeon; Lee, Jung-Eun; Chung, Bong Chul; Kim, Eosu; Choi, Man Ho

    2016-01-01

    Altered cholesterol metabolism could be associated with cognitive impairment. The quantitative profiling of 19 hair sterols was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled to multivariate data analysis. The limit of quantification of all sterols ranged from 5 to 20 ng/g, while the calibration linearity was higher than 0.98. The precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) ranged from 3.2% to 9.8% and from 83.2% to 119.4%, respectively. Among the sterols examined, 8 were quantitatively detected from two strands of 3-cm-long scalp hair samples of female participants, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=31), and healthy controls (HC, n=36). The cognitive impairment (MCI or AD) was correlated with a higher metabolic rate than that of HCs based on 7β-hydroxycholesterol (P<0.005). Significant negative correlations (r=-0.822) were detected between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and hair sample metabolic ratios of 7β-hydroxycholesterol to cholesterol, which is an accepted, sensitive, and specific tool for discriminating HCs from individuals with MCI or AD. In conclusion, improved diagnostic values can be obtained using hair sterol signatures coupled with MMSE scores. This method may prove useful for predictive diagnosis in population screening of cognitive impairment. PMID:26385606

  8. Signatures of positive selection in East African Shorthorn Zebu: A genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahbahani, Hussain; Clifford, Harry; Wragg, David; Mbole-Kariuki, Mary N; Van Tassell, Curtis; Sonstegard, Tad; Woolhouse, Mark; Hanotte, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    The small East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) is the main indigenous cattle across East Africa. A recent genome wide SNP analysis revealed an ancient stable African taurine x Asian zebu admixture. Here, we assess the presence of candidate signatures of positive selection in their genome, with the aim to provide qualitative insights about the corresponding selective pressures. Four hundred and twenty-five EASZ and four reference populations (Holstein-Friesian, Jersey, N'Dama and Nellore) were analysed using 46,171 SNPs covering all autosomes and the X chromosome. Following FST and two extended haplotype homozygosity-based (iHS and Rsb) analyses 24 candidate genome regions within 14 autosomes and the X chromosome were revealed, in which 18 and 4 were previously identified in tropical-adapted and commercial breeds, respectively. These regions overlap with 340 bovine QTL. They include 409 annotated genes, in which 37 were considered as candidates. These genes are involved in various biological pathways (e.g. immunity, reproduction, development and heat tolerance). Our results support that different selection pressures (e.g. environmental constraints, human selection, genome admixture constrains) have shaped the genome of EASZ. We argue that these candidate regions represent genome landmarks to be maintained in breeding programs aiming to improve sustainable livestock productivity in the tropics.

  9. Hair sterol signatures coupled to multivariate data analysis reveal an increased 7β-hydroxycholesterol production in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyun-Hwa; Lee, Do-Yup; Seo, Hong Seog; Jeong, Jihyeon; Moon, Ju-Yeon; Lee, Jung-Eun; Chung, Bong Chul; Kim, Eosu; Choi, Man Ho

    2016-01-01

    Altered cholesterol metabolism could be associated with cognitive impairment. The quantitative profiling of 19 hair sterols was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled to multivariate data analysis. The limit of quantification of all sterols ranged from 5 to 20 ng/g, while the calibration linearity was higher than 0.98. The precision (% CV) and accuracy (% bias) ranged from 3.2% to 9.8% and from 83.2% to 119.4%, respectively. Among the sterols examined, 8 were quantitatively detected from two strands of 3-cm-long scalp hair samples of female participants, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=31), and healthy controls (HC, n=36). The cognitive impairment (MCI or AD) was correlated with a higher metabolic rate than that of HCs based on 7β-hydroxycholesterol (P<0.005). Significant negative correlations (r=-0.822) were detected between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and hair sample metabolic ratios of 7β-hydroxycholesterol to cholesterol, which is an accepted, sensitive, and specific tool for discriminating HCs from individuals with MCI or AD. In conclusion, improved diagnostic values can be obtained using hair sterol signatures coupled with MMSE scores. This method may prove useful for predictive diagnosis in population screening of cognitive impairment.

  10. Signatures of positive selection in East African Shorthorn Zebu: A genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bahbahani, Hussain; Clifford, Harry; Wragg, David; Mbole-Kariuki, Mary N; Van Tassell, Curtis; Sonstegard, Tad; Woolhouse, Mark; Hanotte, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The small East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) is the main indigenous cattle across East Africa. A recent genome wide SNP analysis revealed an ancient stable African taurine x Asian zebu admixture. Here, we assess the presence of candidate signatures of positive selection in their genome, with the aim to provide qualitative insights about the corresponding selective pressures. Four hundred and twenty-five EASZ and four reference populations (Holstein-Friesian, Jersey, N’Dama and Nellore) were analysed using 46,171 SNPs covering all autosomes and the X chromosome. Following FST and two extended haplotype homozygosity-based (iHS and Rsb) analyses 24 candidate genome regions within 14 autosomes and the X chromosome were revealed, in which 18 and 4 were previously identified in tropical-adapted and commercial breeds, respectively. These regions overlap with 340 bovine QTL. They include 409 annotated genes, in which 37 were considered as candidates. These genes are involved in various biological pathways (e.g. immunity, reproduction, development and heat tolerance). Our results support that different selection pressures (e.g. environmental constraints, human selection, genome admixture constrains) have shaped the genome of EASZ. We argue that these candidate regions represent genome landmarks to be maintained in breeding programs aiming to improve sustainable livestock productivity in the tropics. PMID:26130263

  11. Investigating regulatory signatures of human autophagy related gene 5 (ATG5) through functional in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Vij, Avni; Randhawa, Rohit; Parkash, Jyoti; Changotra, Harish

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process which removes damaged cellular proteins and organelles for cellular renewal. ATG5, a part of E3 ubiquitin ligase-like complex (Atg12-Atg5/Atg16L1), is a key regulator involved in autophagosome formation - a crucial phase of autophagy. In this study, we used different in silico methods for comprehensive analysis of ATG5 to investigate its less explored regulatory activity. We have predicted various physico-chemical parameters and two possible transmembrane models that helped in exposing its functional regions. Twenty four PTM sites and 44 TFBS were identified which could be targeted to modulate the autophagy pathway. Furthermore, LD analysis identified 3 blocks of genotyped SNPs and 2 deleterious nsSNPs that may have damaging impact on protein function and thus could be employed for carrying genome-wide association studies. In conclusion, the information obtained in this study could be helpful for better understanding of regulatory roles of ATG5 and provides a base for its implication in population-based studies. PMID:27617225

  12. Biogeochemical Signatures of Contaminant Transport at the Watershed Scale: Spectral and Wavelet Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, K.; Harman, C. J.; Basu, N. B.; Rao, S. S.; Sivapalan, M.; Kalita, P. K.; Packman, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Agricultural watersheds are intensely managed systems, and consist of a large number of dynamic components that interact non-linearly to create emergent patterns in space and time. These systems can be conceptualized as input signals (“drivers”) that cascade through a hierarchy of non-linear “filters” to create the modulated spatial and temporal responses (“signatures”). The coupling between flow and transport (“hydrologic filter”) and transformations (“biogeochemical filter”) control the cascading processes from precipitation through stream flow, and finally to chemical concentrations and loads, at various nested spatial and temporal scales. To detect important “signatures”, we applied spectral analysis and wavelet coherence to the 10-year dataset (at daily resolution) collected from Little Vermillion River watershed (Illinois, USA), an agricultural watershed (~400 km2), drained by an extensive network of subsurface tiles, surface ditches, and streams. Watershed monitoring data includes hydrologic measurements (flow and stage), and concentrations of chemical constituents (nitrate, phosphate, and pesticides) across different spatial scales, from tile-flow stations (drainage area ~ 0.05 km2) to river stations (drainage area ~400 km2). We find that a power-law scaling behavior exists in all the smoothed power spectra for precipitation, stream flow, nitrate concentration and load. The slopes of power spectra increase from precipitation to stream flow to nitrate concentration, demonstrating the cascading effect of the filters. The spectral analysis further shows that the filters retain the major characteristics of long-term response (annual and sub-annual cycle), but smooth (or filter) the short-term responses. Steeper slopes are observed at larger spatial scales, indicating a stronger filtering effect due to greater averaging (buffering) with increasing residence time. Further data analysis using wavelet coherence suggests that at small spatial

  13. Using quantitative acid-base analysis in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, P; Freebairn, R

    2006-03-01

    The quantitative acid-base 'Strong Ion' calculator is a practical application of quantitative acid-base chemistry, as developed by Peter Stewart and Peter Constable. It quantifies the three independent factors that control acidity, calculates the concentration and charge of unmeasured ions, produces a report based on these calculations and displays a Gamblegram depicting measured ionic species. Used together with the medical history, quantitative acid-base analysis has advantages over traditional approaches.

  14. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1984-12-11

    Although science has largely determined that man-made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to await better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weigh the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. GAO examines the implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain and offers a series of observations on the following issues involved in the debate: To what extent has it been scientifically demonstrated that acid rain is resulting in damage to the environment. What are the causes of acid rain and where is it most prevalent. What alternatives exist for controlling acid rain and what are their economic effects. 5 figures, 20 tables.

  15. Septic Shock in Advanced Age: Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Molecular Signatures in Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira da Silva Pellegrina, Diogo; Severino, Patricia; Vieira Barbeiro, Hermes; Maziero Andreghetto, Flávia; Tadeu Velasco, Irineu; Possolo de Souza, Heraldo; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Reis, Eduardo Moraes; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the highest causes of mortality in hospitalized people and a common complication in both surgical and clinical patients admitted to hospital for non-infectious reasons. Sepsis is especially common in older people and its incidence is likely to increase substantially as a population ages. Despite its increased prevalence and mortality in older people, immune responses in the elderly during septic shock appear similar to that in younger patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide gene expression analysis of circulating neutrophils from old and young septic patients to better understand how aged individuals respond to severe infectious insult. We detected several genes whose expression could be used to differentiate immune responses of the elderly from those of young people, including genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and TGF-β signaling, among others. Our results identify major molecular pathways that are particularly affected in the elderly during sepsis, which might have a pivotal role in worsening clinical outcomes compared with young people with sepsis. PMID:26047321

  16. Analysis of the Effects of Streamwise Lift Distribution on Sonic Boom Signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of sonic boom has been one of the major areas of study in aeronautics due to the benefits a low-boom aircraft has in both civilian and military applications. This work conducts a numerical analysis of the effects of streamwise lift distribution on the shock coalescence characteristics. A simple wing-canard-stabilator body model is used in the numerical simulation. The streamwise lift distribution is varied by fixing the canard at a deflection angle while trimming the aircraft with the wing and the stabilator at the desired lift coefficient. The lift and the pitching moment coefficients are computed using the Missile DATCOM v. 707. The flow field around the wing-canard- stabilator body model is resolved using the OVERFLOW-2 flow solver. Overset/ chimera grid topology is used to simplify the grid generation of various configurations representing different streamwise lift distributions. The numerical simulations are performed without viscosity unless it is required for numerical stability. All configurations are simulated at Mach 1.4, angle-of-attack of 1.50, lift coefficient of 0.05, and pitching moment coefficient of approximately 0. Four streamwise lift distribution configurations were tested.

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals a classical interferon signature induced by IFNλ4 in human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Lauber, C; Vieyres, G; Terczyńska-Dyla, E; Anggakusuma; Dijkman, R; Gad, H H; Akhtar, H; Geffers, R; Vondran, F W R; Thiel, V; Kaderali, L; Pietschmann, T; Hartmann, R

    2015-09-01

    The IFNL4 gene is negatively associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C virus infection. The activity of IFNλ4 has an important causal role in the pathogenesis, but the molecular details are not fully understood. One possible reason for the detrimental effect of IFNλ4 could be a tissue-specific regulation of an unknown subset of genes. To address both tissue and subtype specificity in the interferon response, we treated primary human hepatocytes and airway epithelial cells with IFNα, IFNλ3 or IFNλ4 and assessed interferon mediated gene regulation using transcriptome sequencing. Our data show a surprisingly similar response to all three subtypes of interferon. We also addressed the tissue specificity of the response, and identified a subset of tissue-specific genes. However, the interferon response is robust in both tissues with the majority of the identified genes being regulated in hepatocytes as well as airway epithelial cells. Thus we provide an in-depth analysis of the liver interferon response seen over an array of interferon subtypes and compare it to the response in the lung epithelium. PMID:26066369

  18. Transcriptome analysis reveals a classical interferon signature induced by IFNλ4 in human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Lauber, C; Vieyres, G; Terczyńska-Dyla, E; Anggakusuma; Dijkman, R; Gad, H H; Akhtar, H; Geffers, R; Vondran, F W R; Thiel, V; Kaderali, L; Pietschmann, T; Hartmann, R

    2015-09-01

    The IFNL4 gene is negatively associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C virus infection. The activity of IFNλ4 has an important causal role in the pathogenesis, but the molecular details are not fully understood. One possible reason for the detrimental effect of IFNλ4 could be a tissue-specific regulation of an unknown subset of genes. To address both tissue and subtype specificity in the interferon response, we treated primary human hepatocytes and airway epithelial cells with IFNα, IFNλ3 or IFNλ4 and assessed interferon mediated gene regulation using transcriptome sequencing. Our data show a surprisingly similar response to all three subtypes of interferon. We also addressed the tissue specificity of the response, and identified a subset of tissue-specific genes. However, the interferon response is robust in both tissues with the majority of the identified genes being regulated in hepatocytes as well as airway epithelial cells. Thus we provide an in-depth analysis of the liver interferon response seen over an array of interferon subtypes and compare it to the response in the lung epithelium.

  19. Signatures of Steady Heating in Time Lag Analysis of Coronal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2016-09-01

    Among the multitude of methods used to investigate coronal heating, the time lag method of Viall & Klimchuk is becoming increasingly prevalent as an analysis technique that is complementary to those that are traditionally used. The time lag method cross correlates light curves at a given spatial location obtained in spectral bands that sample different temperature plasmas. It has been used most extensively with data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We have previously applied the time lag method to entire active regions and surrounding the quiet Sun and created maps of the results. We find that the majority of time lags are consistent with the cooling of coronal plasma that has been impulsively heated. Additionally, a significant fraction of the map area has a time lag of zero. This does not indicate a lack of variability. Rather, strong variability must be present, and it must occur in phase between the different channels. We have previously shown that these zero time lags are consistent with the transition region response to coronal nanoflares, although other explanations are possible. A common misconception is that the zero time lag indicates steady emission resulting from steady heating. Using simulated and observed light curves, we demonstrate here that highly correlated light curves at zero time lag are not compatible with equilibrium solutions. Such light curves can only be created by evolution.

  20. A mitochondrial analysis reveals distinct founder effect signatures in Canarian and Balearic goats.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, A; Manunza, A; Jordana, J; Capote, J; Pons, A; Pais, J; Delgado, T; Atoche, P; Cabrera, B; Martínez, A; Landi, V; Delgado, J V; Argüello, A; Vidal, O; Lalueza-Fox, C; Ramírez, O; Amills, M

    2015-08-01

    In the course of human migrations, domestic animals often have been translocated to islands with the aim of assuring food availability. These founder events are expected to leave a genetic footprint that may be recognised nowadays. Herewith, we have examined the mitochondrial diversity of goat populations living in the Canarian and Balearic archipelagos. Median-joining network analysis produced very distinct network topologies for these two populations. Indeed, a majority of Canarian goats shared a single ancestral haplotype that segregated in all sampled islands, suggesting a single founder effect followed by a stepping-stone pattern of diffusion. This haplotype also was present in samples collected from archaeological assemblies at Gran Canaria and Lanzarote, making evident its widespread distribution in ancient times. In stark contrast, goats from Majorca and Ibiza did not share any mitochondrial haplotypes, indicating the occurrence of two independent founder events. Furthermore, in Majorcan goats, we detected the segregation of the mitochondrial G haplogroup that has only been identified in goats from Egypt, Iran and Turkey. This finding suggests the translocation of Asian and/or African goats to Majorca, possibly as a consequence of the Phoenician and Carthaginian colonisations of this island. PMID:26153924

  1. Analysis of Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection Reveals Temporal Changes That Result from Type I Interferon Signaling.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Jonathan M; Blankley, Simon; Potempa, Krzysztof; Graham, Christine M; Moreira-Teixeira, Lucia; McNab, Finlay W; Howes, Ashleigh; Stavropoulos, Evangelos; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O'Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the mouse transcriptional response to Listeria monocytogenes infection reveals that a large set of genes are perturbed in both blood and tissue and that these transcriptional responses are enriched for pathways of the immune response. Further we identified enrichment for both type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling molecules in the blood and tissues upon infection. Since type I IFN signaling has been reported widely to impair bacterial clearance we examined gene expression from blood and tissues of wild type (WT) and type I IFNαβ receptor-deficient (Ifnar1-/-) mice at the basal level and upon infection with L. monocytogenes. Measurement of the fold change response upon infection in the absence of type I IFN signaling demonstrated an upregulation of specific genes at day 1 post infection. A less marked reduction of the global gene expression signature in blood or tissues from infected Ifnar1-/- as compared to WT mice was observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, with marked reduction in key genes such as Oasg1 and Stat2. Moreover, on in depth analysis, changes in gene expression in uninfected mice of key IFN regulatory genes including Irf9, Irf7, Stat1 and others were identified, and although induced by an equivalent degree upon infection this resulted in significantly lower final gene expression levels upon infection of Ifnar1-/- mice. These data highlight how dysregulation of this network in the steady state and temporally upon infection may determine the outcome of this bacterial infection and how basal levels of type I IFN-inducible genes may perturb an optimal host immune response to control intracellular bacterial infections such as L. monocytogenes. PMID:26918359

  2. Unraveling the Light-Specific Metabolic and Regulatory Signatures of Rice through Combined in Silico Modeling and Multiomics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ha, Sun-Hwa; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-12-01

    Light quality is an important signaling component upon which plants orchestrate various morphological processes, including seed germination and seedling photomorphogenesis. However, it is still unclear how plants, especially food crops, sense various light qualities and modulate their cellular growth and other developmental processes. Therefore, in this work, we initially profiled the transcripts of a model crop, rice (Oryza sativa), under four different light treatments (blue, green, red, and white) as well as in the dark. Concurrently, we reconstructed a fully compartmentalized genome-scale metabolic model of rice cells, iOS2164, containing 2,164 unique genes, 2,283 reactions, and 1,999 metabolites. We then combined the model with transcriptome profiles to elucidate the light-specific transcriptional signatures of rice metabolism. Clearly, light signals mediated rice gene expressions, differentially regulating numerous metabolic pathways: photosynthesis and secondary metabolism were up-regulated in blue light, whereas reserve carbohydrates degradation was pronounced in the dark. The topological analysis of gene expression data with the rice genome-scale metabolic model further uncovered that phytohormones, such as abscisate, ethylene, gibberellin, and jasmonate, are the key biomarkers of light-mediated regulation, and subsequent analysis of the associated genes' promoter regions identified several light-specific transcription factors. Finally, the transcriptional control of rice metabolism by red and blue light signals was assessed by integrating the transcriptome and metabolome data with constraint-based modeling. The biological insights gained from this integrative systems biology approach offer several potential applications, such as improving the agronomic traits of food crops and designing light-specific synthetic gene circuits in microbial and mammalian systems.

  3. Analysis of Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection Reveals Temporal Changes That Result from Type I Interferon Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Potempa, Krzysztof; Graham, Christine M.; Moreira-Teixeira, Lucia; McNab, Finlay W.; Howes, Ashleigh; Stavropoulos, Evangelos; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the mouse transcriptional response to Listeria monocytogenes infection reveals that a large set of genes are perturbed in both blood and tissue and that these transcriptional responses are enriched for pathways of the immune response. Further we identified enrichment for both type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling molecules in the blood and tissues upon infection. Since type I IFN signaling has been reported widely to impair bacterial clearance we examined gene expression from blood and tissues of wild type (WT) and type I IFNαβ receptor-deficient (Ifnar1-/-) mice at the basal level and upon infection with L. monocytogenes. Measurement of the fold change response upon infection in the absence of type I IFN signaling demonstrated an upregulation of specific genes at day 1 post infection. A less marked reduction of the global gene expression signature in blood or tissues from infected Ifnar1-/- as compared to WT mice was observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, with marked reduction in key genes such as Oasg1 and Stat2. Moreover, on in depth analysis, changes in gene expression in uninfected mice of key IFN regulatory genes including Irf9, Irf7, Stat1 and others were identified, and although induced by an equivalent degree upon infection this resulted in significantly lower final gene expression levels upon infection of Ifnar1-/- mice. These data highlight how dysregulation of this network in the steady state and temporally upon infection may determine the outcome of this bacterial infection and how basal levels of type I IFN-inducible genes may perturb an optimal host immune response to control intracellular bacterial infections such as L. monocytogenes. PMID:26918359

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Disease Stratified Human Pancreas Tissue Indicates Unique Signature of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burch, Tanya C; Morris, Margaret A; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Pugliese, Alberto; Nadler, Jerry L; Nyalwidhe, Julius O

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with functional beta cell loss due to ongoing inflammation. Despite shared similarities, T1D is an autoimmune disease with evidence of autoantibody production, as well as a role for exocrine pancreas involvement. Our hypothesis is that differential protein expression occurs in disease stratified pancreas tissues and regulated proteins from endocrine and exocrine tissues are potential markers of disease and potential therapeutic targets. The study objective was to identify novel proteins that distinguish the pancreas from donors with T1D from the pancreas from patients with T2D, or autoantibody positive non-diabetic donors. Detailed quantitative comprehensive proteomic analysis was applied to snap frozen human pancreatic tissue lysates from organ donors without diabetes, with T1D-associated autoantibodies in the absence of diabetes, with T1D, or with T2D. These disease-stratified human pancreas tissues contain exocrine and endocrine tissues (with dysfunctional islets) in the same microenvironment. The expression profiles of several of the proteins were further verified by western blot. We identified protein panels that are significantly and uniquely upregulated in the three disease-stratified pancreas tissues compared to non-disease control tissues. These proteins are involved in inflammation, metabolic regulation, and autoimmunity, all of which are pathways linked to, and likely involved in, T1 and T2 diabetes pathogenesis. Several new proteins were differentially upregulated in prediabetic, T1D, and T2D pancreas. The results identify proteins that could serve as novel prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic tools to preserve functional islet mass in Type 1 Diabetes.

  5. Transcript Analysis Reveals a Specific HOX Signature Associated with Positional Identity of Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toshner, Mark; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; McKinney, Eoin F.; Southwood, Mark; Caruso, Paola; Upton, Paul D.; Waters, John P.; Ormiston, Mark L.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Nash, Gerard; Rana, Amer A.; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell has a remarkable ability for sub-specialisation, adapted to the needs of a variety of vascular beds. The role of developmental programming versus the tissue contextual environment for this specialization is not well understood. Here we describe a hierarchy of expression of HOX genes associated with endothelial cell origin and location. In initial microarray studies, differential gene expression was examined in two endothelial cell lines: blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. This suggested shared and differential patterns of HOX gene expression between the two endothelial lines. For example, this included a cluster on chromosome 2 of HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8 and HOXD9 that was expressed at a higher level in BOECs. Quantative PCR confirmed the higher expression of these HOXs in BOECs, a pattern that was shared by a variety of microvascular endothelial cell lines. Subsequently, we analysed publically available microarrays from a variety of adult cell and tissue types using the whole “HOX transcriptome” of all 39 HOX genes. Using hierarchical clustering analysis the HOX transcriptome was able to discriminate endothelial cells from 61 diverse human cell lines of various origins. In a separate publically available microarray dataset of 53 human endothelial cell lines, the HOX transcriptome additionally organized endothelial cells related to their organ or tissue of origin. Human tissue staining for HOXD8 and HOXD9 confirmed endothelial expression and also supported increased microvascular expression of these HOXs. Together these observations suggest a significant involvement of HOX genes in endothelial cell positional identity. PMID:24651450

  6. Genome analysis and signature discovery for diving and sensory properties of the endangered Chinese alligator

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiu-Hong; Pan, Sheng-Kai; Hu, Li; Zhu, Ying; Xu, Peng-Wei; Xia, Jin-Quan; Chen, Hui; He, Gen-Yun; He, Jing; Ni, Xiao-Wei; Hou, Hao-Long; Liao, Sheng-Guang; Yang, Hai-Qiong; Chen, Ying; Gao, Shu-Kun; Ge, Yun-Fa; Cao, Chang-Chang; Li, Peng-Fei; Fang, Li-Ming; Liao, Li; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Meng-Zhen; Dong, Wei; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Crocodilians are diving reptiles that can hold their breath under water for long periods of time and are crepuscular animals with excellent sensory abilities. They comprise a sister lineage of birds and have no sex chromosome. Here we report the genome sequence of the endangered Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis) and describe its unique features. The next-generation sequencing generated 314 Gb of raw sequence, yielding a genome size of 2.3 Gb. A total of 22 200 genes were predicted in Alligator sinensis using a de novo, homology- and RNA-based combined model. The genetic basis of long-diving behavior includes duplication of the bicarbonate-binding hemoglobin gene, co-functioning of routine phosphate-binding and special bicarbonate-binding oxygen transport, and positively selected energy metabolism, ammonium bicarbonate excretion and cardiac muscle contraction. Further, we elucidated the robust Alligator sinensis sensory system, including a significantly expanded olfactory receptor repertoire, rapidly evolving nerve-related cellular components and visual perception, and positive selection of the night vision-related opsin and sound detection-associated otopetrin. We also discovered a well-developed immune system with a considerable number of lineage-specific antigen-presentation genes for adaptive immunity as well as expansion of the tripartite motif-containing C-type lectin and butyrophilin genes for innate immunity and expression of antibacterial peptides. Multifluorescence in situ hybridization showed that alligator chromosome 3, which encodes DMRT1, exhibits significant synteny with chicken chromosome Z. Finally, population history analysis indicated population admixture 0.60-1.05 million years ago, when the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau was uplifted. PMID:23917531

  7. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  8. Gas chromatographic analysis of total fatty acids in cider.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gomis, D; Alonso, J J; Cabrales, I M; Abrodo, P A

    2001-03-01

    This paper reports the composition of total fatty acids in an apple beverage, cider. Fatty acids are present in the free or esterified form and contribute to both the flavor and foam properties of cider. Fatty acids were separated and identified as methyl esters by GC-MS, and 12 of these were subsequently determined by GC-FID. The major fatty acids found in cider were caproic, caprylic, capric, and palmitic acid, the saturated acids predominating over the unsaturated ones. The proposed method was applied to 59 ciders from three consecutive harvests (1996, 1997, and 1998), which were made by 19 cider-makers from the region of Asturias (Spain). Linear discriminant analysis of fatty acids in these samples allowed selection of palmitoleic, pentadecanoic, linoleic, myristic, and linolenic acid as the most predictive variables to differentiate ciders made from apples grown in the Asturias region (1997 harvest) and ciders made from apples grown outside this region (1996 and 1998 harvests). PMID:11312846

  9. Fatty acid analysis as a tool to infer the diet in Illinois river otters (Lontra canadensis).

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite-Phillips, Damian; Novakofski, Jan; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) have recently been used in several studies to infer the diet in a number of species. While these studies have been largely successful, most have dealt with predators that have a fairly specialized diet. In this paper, we used FA analysis as a tool to infer the diet of the nearctic river otter (Lontra canadensis). The river otter is an opportunistic predator known to subsist on a wide variety of prey including, fishes, crayfish, molluscs, reptiles and amphibians, among others. We analyzed the principle components of 60 FA from otters and 25 potential prey species in Illinois, USA. Prey species came from 4 major taxonomic divisions: fishes, crayfish, molluscs and amphibians. Within each division, most, but not all, species had significantly different profiles. Using quantitative FA signature analysis, our results suggest that, by mass, fish species are the most significant component of Illinois River otters' diet (37.7 ± 1.0%). Molluscs ranked second (32.0 ± 0.8%), followed by amphibians (27.3 ± 4.3%), and finally, crayfish (3.0 ± 0.6%). Our analysis indicates that molluscs make up a larger portion of the otter diet than previously reported. Throughout much of the Midwest there have been numerous otter reintroduction efforts, many of which appear to be successful. In regions where mollusc species are endangered, these data are essential for management agencies to better understand the potential impact of otters on these species. Our analysis further suggests that quantitative FA signature analysis can be used to infer diet even when prey species are diverse, to the extent that their FA profiles differ. Better understanding of the otter's metabolism of FA would improve inferences of diet from FA analysis.

  10. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  11. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  12. Proteomic analysis of acquired tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 cells reveals expression signatures associated with enhanced migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acquired tamoxifen resistance involves complex signaling events that are not yet fully understood. Successful therapeutic intervention to delay the onset of hormone resistance depends critically on mechanistic elucidation of viable molecular targets associated with hormone resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate the global proteomic alterations in a tamoxifen resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cell line obtained by long term treatment of the wild type MCF-7 cell line with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OH Tam). Methods We cultured MCF-7 cells with 4-OH Tam over a period of 12 months to obtain the resistant cell line. A gel-free, quantitative proteomic method was used to identify and quantify the proteome of the resistant cell line. Nano-flow high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to analyze fractionated peptide mixtures that were isobarically labeled from the resistant and control cell lysates. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blots were used to verify selected proteomic changes. Lentiviral vector transduction was used to generate MCF-7 cells stably expressing S100P. Online pathway analysis was performed to assess proteomic signatures in tamoxifen resistance. Survival analysis was done to evaluate clinical relevance of altered proteomic expressions. Results Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed a wide breadth of signaling events during transition to acquired tamoxifen resistance. A total of 629 proteins were found significantly changed with 364 up-regulated and 265 down-regulated. Collectively, these changes demonstrated the suppressed state of estrogen receptor (ER) and ER-regulated genes, activated survival signaling and increased migratory capacity of the resistant cell line. The protein S100P was found to play a critical role in conferring tamoxifen resistance and enhanced cell motility. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the adaptive changes in the proteome of

  13. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one

  14. Application Power Signature Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Combs, Jacob; Nazor, Jolie; Santiago, Fabian; Thysell, Rachelle; Rivoire, Suzanne; Poole, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The high-performance computing (HPC) community has been greatly concerned about energy efficiency. To address this concern, it is essential to understand and characterize the electrical loads of HPC applications. In this work, we study whether HPC applications can be distinguished by their power-consumption patterns using quantitative measures in an automatic manner. Using a collection of 88 power traces from 4 different systems, we find that basic statistical measures do a surprisingly good job of summarizing applications' distinctive power behavior. Moreover, this study opens up a new area of research in power-aware HPC that has a multitude of potential applications.

  15. Explosives signatures and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountain, Augustus Way, III; Oyler, Jonathan M.; Ostazeski, Stanley A.

    2008-04-01

    The challenge of sampling explosive materials for various high threat military and civilian operational scenarios requires the community to identify and exploit other chemical compounds within the mixtures that may be available to support stand-off detection techniques. While limited surface and vapor phase characterization of IEDs exist, they are insufficient to guide the future development and evaluation of field deployable explosives detection (proximity and standoff) capabilities. ECBC has conducted a limited investigation of three artillery ammunition types to determine what chemical vapors, if any, are available for sensing; the relative composition of the vapors which includes the more volatile compounds in munitions, i.e., plastersizers and binders; and the sensitivity needed detect these vapors at stand-off. Also in partnership with MIT-Lincoln Laboratory, we performed a background measurement campaign at the National Training Center to determine the baseline ambient amounts and variability of nitrates and nitro-ester compounds as vapors, particulates, and on surfaces; as well as other chemical compounds related to non-energetic explosive additives. Environmental persistence studies in contexts relevant to counter-IED sensing operations, such as surface residues, are still necessary.

  16. XPS analysis of humic and fulvic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Desbene, P.L.; Silly, L.; Morizur, J.P.; Delamar, M.

    1986-01-01

    The composition of humic and fulvic acids is examined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS results are compared to that of elemental analyses. XPS permits an easy detection of the different chemical forms of carbon and sulfur that exist in these complex compounds.

  17. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  18. A preliminary analysis of trace-elemental signatures in statoliths of different spawning cohorts for Dosidicus gigas off EEZ waters of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Fang, Zhou; Hu, Song; Song, Qian

    2015-12-01

    We applied solution-based ICP-MS method to quantify the trace-elemental signatures in statoliths of jumbo flying squid, Dosidius gigas, which were collected from the waters off northern and central Chile during the scientific surveys carried out by Chinese squid jigging vessels in 2007 and 2008. The age and spawning date of the squid were back-calculated based on daily increments in statoliths. Eight elemental ratios (Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Mg/Ca, Mn/Ca, Na/Ca, Fe/Ca, Cu/Ca and Zn/Ca) were analyzed. It was found that Sr is the second most abundant element next to Ca, followed by Na, Fe, Mg, Zn, Cu, Ba and Mn. There was no significant relationship between element/Ca and sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS), although weak negative or positive tendency was found. MANOVA analysis showed that multivariate elemental signatures did not differ among the cohorts spawned in spring, autumn and winter, and no significant difference was found between the northern and central sampling locations. Classification results showed that all individuals of each spawned cohorts were correctly classified. This study demonstrates that the elemental signatures in D. gigas statoliths are potentially a useful tool to improve our understanding of its population structure and habitat environment.

  19. Analysis of fatty acid content and composition in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Guido; Evers, Wendy A C; de Vree, Jeroen H; Kleinegris, Dorinde M M; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H; Lamers, Packo P

    2013-01-01

    A method to determine the content and composition of total fatty acids present in microalgae is described. Fatty acids are a major constituent of microalgal biomass. These fatty acids can be present in different acyl-lipid classes. Especially the fatty acids present in triacylglycerol (TAG) are of commercial interest, because they can be used for production of transportation fuels, bulk chemicals, nutraceuticals (ω-3 fatty acids), and food commodities. To develop commercial applications, reliable analytical methods for quantification of fatty acid content and composition are needed. Microalgae are single cells surrounded by a rigid cell wall. A fatty acid analysis method should provide sufficient cell disruption to liberate all acyl lipids and the extraction procedure used should be able to extract all acyl lipid classes. With the method presented here all fatty acids present in microalgae can be accurately and reproducibly identified and quantified using small amounts of sample (5 mg) independent of their chain length, degree of unsaturation, or the lipid class they are part of. This method does not provide information about the relative abundance of different lipid classes, but can be extended to separate lipid classes from each other. The method is based on a sequence of mechanical cell disruption, solvent based lipid extraction, transesterification of fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), and quantification and identification of FAMEs using gas chromatography (GC-FID). A TAG internal standard (tripentadecanoin) is added prior to the analytical procedure to correct for losses during extraction and incomplete transesterification. PMID:24121679

  20. Signatures support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.

    2009-05-01

    The Signatures Support Program (SSP) leverages the full spectrum of signature-related activities (collections, processing, development, storage, maintenance, and dissemination) within the Department of Defense (DOD), the intelligence community (IC), other Federal agencies, and civil institutions. The Enterprise encompasses acoustic, seismic, radio frequency, infrared, radar, nuclear radiation, and electro-optical signatures. The SSP serves the war fighter, the IC, and civil institutions by supporting military operations, intelligence operations, homeland defense, disaster relief, acquisitions, and research and development. Data centers host and maintain signature holdings, collectively forming the national signatures pool. The geographically distributed organizations are the authoritative sources and repositories for signature data; the centers are responsible for data content and quality. The SSP proactively engages DOD, IC, other Federal entities, academia, and industry to locate signatures for inclusion in the distributed national signatures pool and provides world-wide 24/7 access via the SSP application.

  1. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  2. Novel Quantum Proxy Signature without Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-bao

    2015-08-01

    Proxy signature is an important research topic in classic cryptography since it has many application occasions in our real life. But only a few quantum proxy signature schemes have been proposed up to now. In this paper, we propose a quantum proxy signature scheme, which is designed based on quantum one-time pad. Our scheme can be realized easily since it only uses single-particle states. Security analysis shows that it is secure and meets all the properties of a proxy signature, such as verifiability, distinguishability, unforgeability and undeniability.

  3. Integrative Metabolic Signatures for Hepatic Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gang; Meng, Fan; Liu, Laibin; Mohney, Robert; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a dose-limiting factor in curative radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancers, making early detection of radiation-associated liver injury absolutely essential for medical intervention. A metabolomic approach was used to determine metabolic signatures that could serve as biomarkers for early detection of RILD in mice. Methods Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received 0, 10 or 50 Gy Whole Liver Irradiation (WLI) and were contrasted to mice, which received 10 Gy whole body irradiation (WBI). Liver and plasma samples were collected at 24 hours after irradiation. The samples were processed using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Results Twenty four hours after WLI, 407 metabolites were detected in liver samples while 347 metabolites were detected in plasma. Plasma metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine metabolites, microbial metabolites, and most prominently bradykinin and 3-indoxyl-sulfate. Liver metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included pentose phosphate, purine, and pyrimidine metabolites in liver. Plasma biomarkers in common between WLI and WBI were enriched in microbial metabolites such as 3 indoxyl sulfate, indole-3-lactic acid, phenyllactic acid, pipecolic acid, hippuric acid, and markers of DNA damage such as 2-deoxyuridine. Metabolites associated with tryptophan and indoles may reflect radiation-induced gut microbiome effects. Predominant liver biomarkers in common between WBI and WLI were amino acids, sugars, TCA metabolites (fumarate), fatty acids (lineolate, n-hexadecanoic acid) and DNA damage markers (uridine). Conclusions We identified a set of metabolomic markers that may prove useful as plasma biomarkers of RILD and WBI. Pathway analysis also suggested that the unique metabolic changes observed after liver irradiation was an integrative response of the intestine, liver and kidney. PMID:26046990

  4. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  5. Analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maglia, Giovanni; Heron, Andrew J.; Stoddart, David; Japrung, Deanpen; Bayley, Hagan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the methods used in our laboratory for the analysis of single nucleic acid molecules with protein nanopores. The technical section is preceded by a review of the variety of experiments that can be done with protein nanopores. The end goal of much of this work is single-molecule DNA sequencing, although sequencing is not discussed explicitly here. The technical section covers the equipment required for nucleic acid analysis, the preparation and storage of the necessary materials, and aspects of signal processing and data analysis. PMID:20627172

  6. Dynamics of carbon in deep soils inferred from carbon stable isotopes signatures : a worldwide meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balesdent, Jérôme; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Chadoeuf, Joël; Cornu, Sophie; Derrien, Delphine; Fekiacova, Zuzana; Hatté, Christine

    2014-05-01

    The contribution of soil carbon deeper than 30 cm to the atmospheric carbon balance is still poorly understood. A very straightforward quantification of the gross exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and soil organic matter can be obtained at places where the 13C/12C signature of vegetation has been changed for known durations, due to switch of the photosynthetic metabolism (C3 or C4) or to Free Air Carbon Enrichment experiments. We compiled C and 13C profile data of 113 sites of this type, either gahered from the literature or from our own measurements. Each site comprised two profiles : one where the 13C/12C of the vegetation had been changed, and a reference profile with unchanged vegetation 13C/12C. An isotope mixing equation was used, which takes into account the natural isotope enrichments with depth and decay. Three main variables were calculated at any depth from 0 to 100 cm and in a few sites down to 200 cm : the carbon content, the proportion of new carbon (aged less than the duration of change t) and the amount of new carbon. The database concerned 23 countries, various climates (58% intertropical and 42% between 23° to 56° latitude) and various soil types and textures. Landuses and vegetation consisted in 26% of forests and woodlands, 35% of grasslands and 38% of cropped systems. The duration of the natural labelling t ranged from 2 years to ca. 4000 years. Peatlands, boreal, and desert environments were absent from the database. Non-linear regressions with time across the dataset yielded kinetic parameters of the age distribution on one hand and of the flux of new carbon incorporation (kg C m-2 yr-1) on the other, each calculated by 10 cm depth increments. On the average, the median ages of carbon increase from ca. 15 years at 0 cm to more than 1000 years at 100 cm. Turnover is on the average 2 to 3 times slower for the subsoil (30-100 cm) than for the topsoil (0-30 cm). Based on the incorporation of new C in the first decades, the carbon input

  7. Ballistic Signature Identification System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The first phase of a research project directed toward development of a high speed automatic process to be used to match gun barrel signatures imparted to fired bullets was documented. An optical projection technique has been devised to produce and photograph a planar image of the entire signature, and the phototransparency produced is subjected to analysis using digital Fourier transform techniques. The success of this approach appears to be limited primarily by the accuracy of the photographic step since no significant processing limitations have been encountered.

  8. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J.; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W.; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the “window period” of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:26873097

  9. Immunological metagene signatures derived from immunogenic cancer cell death associate with improved survival of patients with lung, breast or ovarian malignancies: A large-scale meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emerging role of the cancer cell-immune cell interface in shaping tumorigenesis/anticancer immunotherapy has increased the need to identify prognostic biomarkers. Henceforth, our primary aim was to identify the immunogenic cell death (ICD)-derived metagene signatures in breast, lung and ovarian cancer that associate with improved patient survival. To this end, we analyzed the prognostic impact of differential gene-expression of 33 pre-clinically-validated ICD-parameters through a large-scale meta-analysis involving 3,983 patients (‘discovery’ dataset) across lung (1,432), breast (1,115) and ovarian (1,436) malignancies. The main results were also substantiated in ‘validation’ datasets consisting of 818 patients of same cancer-types (i.e. 285 breast/274 lung/259 ovarian). The ICD-associated parameters exhibited a highly-clustered and largely cancer type-specific prognostic impact. Interestingly, we delineated ICD-derived consensus-metagene signatures that exhibited a positive prognostic impact that was either cancer type-independent or specific. Importantly, most of these ICD-derived consensus-metagenes (acted as attractor-metagenes and thereby) ‘attracted’ highly co-expressing sets of genes or convergent-metagenes. These convergent-metagenes also exhibited positive prognostic impact in respective cancer types. Remarkably, we found that the cancer type-independent consensus-metagene acted as an ‘attractor’ for cancer-specific convergent-metagenes. This reaffirms that the immunological prognostic landscape of cancer tends to segregate between cancer-independent and cancer-type specific gene signatures. Moreover, this prognostic landscape was largely dominated by the classical T cell activity/infiltration/function-related biomarkers. Interestingly, each cancer type tended to associate with biomarkers representing a specific T cell activity or function rather than pan-T cell biomarkers. Thus, our analysis confirms that ICD can serve as a

  10. Analysis of Free Amino Acid Pools in Fungal Mycelia

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, J. G.; Davies, D. M.; Haworth, C.

    1972-01-01

    Free amino acid pools derived from three different types of fungal mycelia have been analyzed by the method of Heathcote and Haworth by using thinlayer chromatography. The preliminary extraction was carried out with boiling water and interfering proteins; peptides and salts were first removed by means of an ion-retardation resin. As far as determined, the results obtained represent the first quantitative analysis of fungal amino acid pools. PMID:4622829

  11. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. PMID:26748867

  12. Typing of Histoplasma capsulatum strains by fatty acid profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarnowski, Robert; Miyazaki, Makoto; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Ntambi, James M; Woods, Jon P

    2007-06-01

    The performance of fatty acid profiling for strain differentiation of Histoplasma capsulatum was assessed. Total fatty acids were isolated from the yeast-phase cells of seven stock and two previously unreported clinical strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum, as well as from one unreported clinical strain and one stock strain of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, and one strain of each of three other dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii. Different colony morphology and pigmentation types of the H. capsulatum strains were also included. The most frequently occurring fatty acids were oleic, palmitic, stearic and linoleic acids. There were variations in the relative percentage fatty acid contents of H. capsulatum strains that could be used for strain identification and discrimination. Differentiation between H. capsulatum strains was achieved by the comparison of detected fatty acids accompanied by principal component analysis using calculated Varimax-rotated principal component loadings. Statistical analysis yielded three major principal components that explained over 94 % of total variance in the data. All the strains of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum RFLP classes II and III were grouped into two distinct clusters: the heterogenic RFLP class I formed a large, but also well-defined group, whereas the outgroup strains of H. capsulatum var. duboisii, B. dermatitidis, P. brasiliensis and S. schenckii were shifted away. These data suggest that fatty acid profiling can be used in H. capsulatum strain classification and epidemiological studies that require strain differentiation at the intraspecies level. PMID:17510264

  13. Analysis and Annotation of Nucleic Acid Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    States, David J.

    2004-07-28

    The aims of this project were to develop improved methods for computational genome annotation and to apply these methods to improve the annotation of genomic sequence data with a specific focus on human genome sequencing. The project resulted in a substantial body of published work. Notable contributions of this project were the identification of basecalling and lane tracking as error processes in genome sequencing and contributions to improved methods for these steps in genome sequencing. This technology improved the accuracy and throughput of genome sequence analysis. Probabilistic methods for physical map construction were developed. Improved methods for sequence alignment, alternative splicing analysis, promoter identification and NF kappa B response gene prediction were also developed.

  14. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of methyl esters of N,N-dialkylaminoethane-2-sulfonic acids for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    PubMed

    Pardasani, Deepak; Gupta, Arvinda K; Palit, Meehir; Shakya, Purushottam; Kanaujia, Pankaj K; Sekhar, K; Dubey, Devendra K

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and gas chromatography/electron ionization mass spectrometric (GC/EI-MS) analysis of methyl esters of N,N-dialkylaminoethane-2-sulfonic acids (DAESAs). These sulfonic acids are important environmental signatures of nerve agent VX and its toxic analogues, hence GC/EI-MS analysis of their methyl esters is of paramount importance for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention. DAESAs were prepared by condensation of 2-bromoethane sulfonic acid with dialkylamines, and by condensation of dialkylaminoethyl chloride with sodium bisulfite. GC/EI-MS analysis of methyl esters of DAESAs yielded mass spectra; based on these spectra, generalized fragmentation routes are proposed that rationalize most of the characteristic ions. PMID:16196000

  15. Digital PCR analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Detection of plasma circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) requires the use of extremely sensitive and precise methods. The commonly used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) poses certain technical limitations in relation to the precise measurement of CNAs whereas the costs of massively parallel sequencing are still relatively high. Digital PCR (dPCR) now represents an affordable and powerful single molecule counting strategy to detect minute amounts of genetic material with performance surpassing many quantitative methods. Microfluidic (chip) and emulsion (droplet)-based technologies have already been integrated into platforms offering hundreds to millions of nanoliter- or even picoliter-scale reaction partitions. The compelling observations reported in the field of cancer research, prenatal testing, transplantation medicine and virology support translation of this technology into routine use. Extremely sensitive plasma detection of rare mutations originating from tumor or placental cells among a large background of homologous sequences facilitates unraveling of the early stages of cancer or the detection of fetal mutations. Digital measurement of quantitative changes in plasma CNAs associated with cancer or graft rejection provides valuable information on the monitoring of disease burden or the recipient's immune response and subsequent therapy treatment. Furthermore, careful quantitative assessment of the viral load offers great value for effective monitoring of antiviral therapy for immunosuppressed or transplant patients. The present review describes the inherent features of dPCR that make it exceptionally robust in precise and sensitive quantification of CNAs. Moreover, I provide an insight into the types of potential clinical applications that have been developed by researchers to date. PMID:25828047

  16. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals a dysregulation in extra cellular matrix and cell junction associated gene signatures during Dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Sumbul; Giddaluru, Jeevan; Abbas, Mohd Manzar; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Viruses (DENVs) cause one of the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Identification of genes involved in DENV pathogenesis would help in deciphering molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease progression. Here, we carried out a meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression data of dengue patients and further validated the meta-profile using in-vitro infection in THP-1 cells. Our findings reveal that DENV infection modulates expression of several genes and signalling pathways including interferons, detoxification of ROS and viral assembly. Interestingly, we have identified novel gene signatures comprising of INADL/PATJ and CRTAP (Cartilage Associated Protein), which were significantly down-regulated across all patient data sets as well as in DENV infected THP-1 cells. PATJ and CRTAP genes are involved in maintaining cell junction integrity and collagen assembly (extracellular matrix component) respectively, which together play a crucial role in cell-cell adhesion. Our results categorically reveal that overexpression of CRTAP and PATJ genes restrict DENV infection, thereby suggesting a critical role of these genes in DENV pathogenesis. Conclusively, these findings emphasize the utility of meta-analysis approach in identifying novel gene signatures that might provide mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis and possibly lead towards the development of better therapeutic interventions. PMID:27651116

  17. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals a dysregulation in extra cellular matrix and cell junction associated gene signatures during Dengue virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Sumbul; Giddaluru, Jeevan; Abbas, Mohd. Manzar; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Viruses (DENVs) cause one of the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Identification of genes involved in DENV pathogenesis would help in deciphering molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease progression. Here, we carried out a meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression data of dengue patients and further validated the meta-profile using in-vitro infection in THP-1 cells. Our findings reveal that DENV infection modulates expression of several genes and signalling pathways including interferons, detoxification of ROS and viral assembly. Interestingly, we have identified novel gene signatures comprising of INADL/PATJ and CRTAP (Cartilage Associated Protein), which were significantly down-regulated across all patient data sets as well as in DENV infected THP-1 cells. PATJ and CRTAP genes are involved in maintaining cell junction integrity and collagen assembly (extracellular matrix component) respectively, which together play a crucial role in cell-cell adhesion. Our results categorically reveal that overexpression of CRTAP and PATJ genes restrict DENV infection, thereby suggesting a critical role of these genes in DENV pathogenesis. Conclusively, these findings emphasize the utility of meta-analysis approach in identifying novel gene signatures that might provide mechanistic insights into disease pathogenesis and possibly lead towards the development of better therapeutic interventions. PMID:27651116

  18. Analysis of the generating action of the acid from PAG using acid sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Konishi, Hiroko; Moriyasu, Kengo; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of acid sensitive dyes to determine the quantity of acid generated from PAG and in the analysis of acid-generating reaction is currently being studied. The method would allow an easy understanding of the PAG acid-generating reaction simply by adding an acid sensitive dye to the resist. In the conventional method, a resist containing a chromogenic substance is applied to a quartz substrate, which is then exposed. Following the exposure, the absorbance of chromogenic component near 530 nm is measured and evaluated with a spectroscope. The rate constant for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) during the exposure is determined based on the relationship between transmittance at 530 nm and the exposure dose. However, the chromogenic substance used in this method degrades over time (fading reaction) after the exposure, resulting in variations in transmittance measurements due to the effects of time between the completion of the exposure and the measurement of transmittance. We devised a prototype instrument capable of in situ measurements of absorbance at 530 nm while irradiating a 193-nm light beam. Using this instrument, we obtained rate constants for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) and examined the differing results obtained with ArF resist polymers of differing PAG concentrations and structures as well as dependence on the quantity of the chromogenic substance.

  19. A group signature scheme based on quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Tian, Yuan; Ji, Liping; Niu, Xiamu

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we present a group signature scheme using quantum teleportation. Different from classical group signature and current quantum signature schemes, which could only deliver either group signature or unconditional security, our scheme guarantees both by adopting quantum key preparation, quantum encryption algorithm and quantum teleportation. Security analysis proved that our scheme has the characteristics of group signature, non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. Our quantum group signature scheme has a foreseeable application in the e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc.

  20. Acid rain: Some preliminary results from global data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, R.

    1981-02-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of global precipitation data from WMO (World Meteorological Organization) stations suggest that even remote maritime baseline stations, far removed from major continents, could become predisposed to acid rain if there is a deficiency of non-marine calcium relative to non-marine sulfate. The regional stations show greater complexity than the baseline stations in their precipitation chemistry. The overall results of this analysis suggest that not all non-marine sulfate and nitrate in precipitation could be present as acid.

  1. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for

  2. Comprehensive analysis of the functional microRNA–mRNA regulatory network identifies miRNA signatures associated with glioma malignant progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Bai, Jing; Li, Shengli; Zhao, Zheng; Shao, Tingting; Jiang, Tao; Ren, Huan; Kang, Chunsheng; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Glioma is the most common and fatal primary brain tumour with poor prognosis; however, the functional roles of miRNAs in glioma malignant progression are insufficiently understood. Here, we used an integrated approach to identify miRNA functional targets during glioma malignant progression by combining the paired expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs across 160 Chinese glioma patients, and further constructed the functional miRNA–mRNA regulatory network. As a result, most tumour-suppressive miRNAs in glioma progression were newly discovered, whose functions were widely involved in gliomagenesis. Moreover, three miRNA signatures, with different combinations of hub miRNAs (regulations≥30) were constructed, which could independently predict the survival of patients with all gliomas, high-grade glioma and glioblastoma. Our network-based method increased the ability to identify the prognostic biomarkers, when compared with the traditional method and random conditions. Hsa-miR-524-5p and hsa-miR-628-5p, shared by these three signatures, acted as protective factors and their expression decreased gradually during glioma progression. Functional analysis of these miRNA signatures highlighted their critical roles in cell cycle and cell proliferation in glioblastoma malignant progression, especially hsa-miR-524-5p and hsa-miR-628-5p exhibited dominant regulatory activities. Therefore, network-based biomarkers are expected to be more effective and provide deep insights into the molecular mechanism of glioma malignant progression. PMID:24194606

  3. Bile acids: analysis in biological fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, William J.; Sjövall, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The formation of bile acids/bile alcohols is of major importance for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Besides their functions in lipid absorption, bile acids/bile alcohols are regulatory molecules for a number of metabolic processes. Their effects are structure-dependent, and numerous metabolic conversions result in a complex mixture of biologically active and inactive forms. Advanced methods are required to characterize and quantify individual bile acids in these mixtures. A combination of such analyses with analyses of the proteome will be required for a better understanding of mechanisms of action and nature of endogenous ligands. Mass spectrometry is the basic detection technique for effluents from chromatographic columns. Capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization provides the highest sensitivity in metabolome analysis. Classical gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is less sensitive but offers extensive structure-dependent fragmentation increasing the specificity in analyses of isobaric isomers of unconjugated bile acids. Depending on the nature of the bile acid/bile alcohol mixture and the range of concentration of individuals, different sample preparation sequences, from simple extractions to group separations and derivatizations, are applicable. We review the methods currently available for the analysis of bile acids in biological fluids and tissues, with emphasis on the combination of liquid and gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometry. PMID:20008121

  4. Persistence of virus lipid signatures upon silicification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Stedman, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    To date there is no known evidence of viruses within the rock record. Their small size and absence of a metabolism has led to the hypothesis that they lack unique biological signatures, and the potential to become preserved. Biosignature research relevant to early Earth has focused on prokaryotic communities; however, the most abundant member of modern ecosystems, viruses, have been ignored. In order to establish a baseline for research on virus biosignatures, we have initiated laboratory research on known lipid-containing viruses. PRD1 is a lipid-containing virus that infects and replicates in Salmonella typhimurium LT2. PRD1 is a 65 nm spherical virus with an internal lipid membrane, which is a few nanometers thick. When the PRD1 virus stock was mixed with a 400 ppm SiO2 (final concentration) solution and incubated for six months. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and lipid analysis using gas chromatography revealed that the virus lipids were still detectable despite complete removal of dissolved silica. Free fatty acids were also detected. Titers of infectious PRD1 viruses after six months in the presence of silica decreased 40 times more than without silica. Though virus biosignature research is in its incipient stages, the data suggest that virus lipid signatures are preserved under laboratory conditions and may offer the potential for contribution to the organic geochemical record.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis and molecular signatures defining a monophyletic clade of heterocystous cyanobacteria and identifying its closest relatives.

    PubMed

    Howard-Azzeh, Mohammad; Shamseer, Larissa; Schellhorn, Herb E; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-11-01

    Detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses are reported on 140 genome sequenced cyanobacteria with the main focus on the heterocyst-differentiating cyanobacteria. In a phylogenetic tree for cyanobacteria based upon concatenated sequences for 32 conserved proteins, the available cyanobacteria formed 8-9 strongly supported clades at the highest level, which may correspond to the higher taxonomic clades of this phylum. One of these clades contained all heterocystous cyanobacteria; within this clade, the members exhibiting either true (Nostocales) or false (Stigonematales) branching of filaments were intermixed indicating that the division of the heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria into these two groups is not supported by phylogenetic considerations. However, in both the protein tree as well as in the 16S rRNA gene tree, the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria formed a distinct clade. Within this clade, the members which differentiate into hormogonia or those which lack this ability were also separated into distinct groups. A novel molecular signature identified in this work that is uniquely shared by the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria provides further evidence that the members of this group are specifically related and they shared a common ancestor exclusive of the other cyanobacteria. Detailed comparative analyses on protein sequences from the genomes of heterocystous cyanobacteria reported here have also identified eight conserved signature indels (CSIs) in proteins involved in a broad range of functions, and three conserved signature proteins, that are either uniquely or mainly found in all heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria, but generally not found in other cyanobacteria. These molecular markers provide novel means for the identification of heterocystous cyanobacteria, and they provide evidence of their monophyletic origin. Additionally, this work has also identified seven CSIs in other proteins which in addition to the heterocystous

  6. Spatially resolved analysis of plutonium isotopic signatures in environmental particle samples by laser ablation-MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Konegger-Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation-multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) was optimized and investigated with respect to its performance for determining spatially resolved Pu isotopic signatures within radioactive fuel particle clusters. Fuel particles had been emitted from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) where the 1986 accident occurred and were deposited in the surrounding soil, where weathering processes caused their transformation into radioactive clusters, so-called micro-samples. The size of the investigated micro-samples, which showed surface alpha activities below 40 mBq, ranged from about 200 to 1000 μm. Direct single static point ablations allowed to identify variations of Pu isotopic signatures not only between distinct fuel particle clusters but also within individual clusters. The resolution was limited to 100 to 120 μm as a result of the applied laser ablation spot sizes and the resolving power of the nuclear track radiography methodology that was applied for particle pre-selection. The determined (242)Pu/(239)Pu and (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratios showed a variation from low to high Pu isotope ratios, ranging from 0.007(2) to 0.047(8) for (242)Pu/(239)Pu and from 0.183(13) to 0.577(40) for (240)Pu/(239)Pu. In contrast to other studies, the applied methodology allowed for the first time to display the Pu isotopic distribution in the Chernobyl fallout, which reflects the differences in the spent fuel composition over the reactor core. The measured Pu isotopic signatures are in good agreement with the expected Pu isotopic composition distribution that is typical for a RBMK-1000 reactor, indicating that the analyzed samples are originating from the ill-fated Chernobyl reactor. The average Pu isotope ratios [(240)Pu/(239)Pu = 0.388(86), (242)Pu/(239)Pu = 0.028(11)] that were calculated from all investigated samples (n = 48) correspond well to previously published results of Pu analyses in contaminated samples from

  7. Phylogenetic analysis and molecular signatures defining a monophyletic clade of heterocystous cyanobacteria and identifying its closest relatives.

    PubMed

    Howard-Azzeh, Mohammad; Shamseer, Larissa; Schellhorn, Herb E; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-11-01

    Detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses are reported on 140 genome sequenced cyanobacteria with the main focus on the heterocyst-differentiating cyanobacteria. In a phylogenetic tree for cyanobacteria based upon concatenated sequences for 32 conserved proteins, the available cyanobacteria formed 8-9 strongly supported clades at the highest level, which may correspond to the higher taxonomic clades of this phylum. One of these clades contained all heterocystous cyanobacteria; within this clade, the members exhibiting either true (Nostocales) or false (Stigonematales) branching of filaments were intermixed indicating that the division of the heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria into these two groups is not supported by phylogenetic considerations. However, in both the protein tree as well as in the 16S rRNA gene tree, the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria formed a distinct clade. Within this clade, the members which differentiate into hormogonia or those which lack this ability were also separated into distinct groups. A novel molecular signature identified in this work that is uniquely shared by the akinete-forming heterocystous cyanobacteria provides further evidence that the members of this group are specifically related and they shared a common ancestor exclusive of the other cyanobacteria. Detailed comparative analyses on protein sequences from the genomes of heterocystous cyanobacteria reported here have also identified eight conserved signature indels (CSIs) in proteins involved in a broad range of functions, and three conserved signature proteins, that are either uniquely or mainly found in all heterocysts-forming cyanobacteria, but generally not found in other cyanobacteria. These molecular markers provide novel means for the identification of heterocystous cyanobacteria, and they provide evidence of their monophyletic origin. Additionally, this work has also identified seven CSIs in other proteins which in addition to the heterocystous

  8. Spatially resolved analysis of plutonium isotopic signatures in environmental particle samples by laser ablation-MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Konegger-Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation-multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) was optimized and investigated with respect to its performance for determining spatially resolved Pu isotopic signatures within radioactive fuel particle clusters. Fuel particles had been emitted from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) where the 1986 accident occurred and were deposited in the surrounding soil, where weathering processes caused their transformation into radioactive clusters, so-called micro-samples. The size of the investigated micro-samples, which showed surface alpha activities below 40 mBq, ranged from about 200 to 1000 μm. Direct single static point ablations allowed to identify variations of Pu isotopic signatures not only between distinct fuel particle clusters but also within individual clusters. The resolution was limited to 100 to 120 μm as a result of the applied laser ablation spot sizes and the resolving power of the nuclear track radiography methodology that was applied for particle pre-selection. The determined (242)Pu/(239)Pu and (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratios showed a variation from low to high Pu isotope ratios, ranging from 0.007(2) to 0.047(8) for (242)Pu/(239)Pu and from 0.183(13) to 0.577(40) for (240)Pu/(239)Pu. In contrast to other studies, the applied methodology allowed for the first time to display the Pu isotopic distribution in the Chernobyl fallout, which reflects the differences in the spent fuel composition over the reactor core. The measured Pu isotopic signatures are in good agreement with the expected Pu isotopic composition distribution that is typical for a RBMK-1000 reactor, indicating that the analyzed samples are originating from the ill-fated Chernobyl reactor. The average Pu isotope ratios [(240)Pu/(239)Pu = 0.388(86), (242)Pu/(239)Pu = 0.028(11)] that were calculated from all investigated samples (n = 48) correspond well to previously published results of Pu analyses in contaminated samples from

  9. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  10. Detection of COL III in parchment by amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Dorte V P; Larsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Cultural heritage parchments made from the reticular dermis of animals have been subject to studies of deterioration and conservation by amino acid analysis. The reticular dermis contains a varying mixture of collagen I and III (COL I and III). When dealing with the results of the amino acid analyses, till now the COL III content has not been taken into account. Based on the available amino acid sequences, we present a method for determining the amount of COL III in the reticular dermis of new and historical parchments calculated from the ratio of Ile/Val. We find COL III contents between 7 and 32 % in new parchments and between 0.2 and 40 % in the historical parchments. This is consistent with results in the literature. The varying content of COL III has a significant influence on the uncertainty of the amino acid analysis. Although we have not found a simple correlation between the COL III content and the degree of deterioration, our results show that this question must be taken into consideration in future studies of the chemical and physical deterioration of parchment measured by amino acid analysis and other analytical methods.

  11. The Effect of Point-spread Function Interaction with Radiance from Heterogeneous Scenes on Multitemporal Signature Analysis. [soybean stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggin, M. J.; Schoch, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The point-spread function is an important factor in determining the nature of feature types on the basis of multispectral recorded radiance, particularly from heterogeneous scenes and particularly from scenes which are imaged repetitively, in order to provide thematic characterization by means of multitemporal signature. To demonstrate the effect of the interaction of scene heterogeneity with the point spread function (PSF)1, a template was constructed from the line spread function (LSF) data for the thematic mapper photoflight model. The template was in 0.25 (nominal) pixel increments in the scan line direction across three scenes of different heterogeneity. The sensor output was calculated by considering the calculated scene radiance from each scene element occurring between the contours of the PSF template, plotted on a movable mylar sheet while it was located at a given position.

  12. Quality Analysis of Chlorogenic Acid and Hyperoside in Crataegi fructus

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Jin Bae; Jung, Youn Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crataegi fructus is a herbal medicine for strong stomach, sterilization, and alcohol detoxification. Chlorogenic acid and hyperoside are the major compounds in Crataegi fructus. Objective: In this study, we established novel high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detection analysis method of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside for quality control of Crataegi fructus. Materials and Methods: HPLC analysis was achieved on a reverse-phase C18 column (5 μm, 4.6 mm × 250 mm) using water and acetonitrile as mobile phase with gradient system. The method was validated for linearity, precision, and accuracy. About 31 batches of Crataegi fructus samples collected from Korea and China were analyzed by using HPLC fingerprint of developed HPLC method. Then, the contents of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside were compared for quality evaluation of Crataegi fructus. Results: The results have shown that the average contents (w/w %) of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside in Crataegi fructus collected from Korea were 0.0438% and 0.0416%, respectively, and the average contents (w/w %) of 0.0399% and 0.0325%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, established HPLC analysis method was stable and could provide efficient quality evaluation for monitoring of commercial Crataegi fructus. SUMMARY Quantitative analysis method of chlorogenic acid and hyperoside in Crataegi fructus is developed by high.performance liquid chromatography.(HPLC).diode array detectionEstablished HPLC analysis method is validated with linearity, precision, and accuracyThe developed method was successfully applied for quantitative analysis of Crataegi fructus sample collected from Korea and China. Abbreviations used: HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography, GC: Gas chromatography, MS: Mass spectrometer, LOD: Limits of detection, LOQ: Limits of quantification, RSD: Relative standard deviation, RRT: Relative retention time, RPA: Relation peak area. PMID:27076744

  13. GENOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE TESTICULAR TOXICITY OF HALOACETIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genomic analysis of the testicular toxicity of haloacetic acids

    David J. Dix and John C. Rockett
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, R...

  14. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark; Gosnell, Tom B.; Ham, Cheryl; Perkins, Dwight; Wong, James

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  15. Security Weaknesses in Arbitrated Quantum Signature Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Kejia; Cao, Tianqing

    2014-01-01

    Arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) is a cryptographic scenario in which the sender (signer), Alice, generates the signature of a message and then a receiver (verifier), Bob, can verify the signature with the help of a trusted arbitrator, Trent. In this paper, we point out there exist some security weaknesses in two AQS protocols. Our analysis shows Alice can successfully disavow any of her signatures by a simple attack in the first protocol. Furthermore, we study the security weaknesses of the second protocol from the aspects of forgery and disavowal. Some potential improvements of this kind of protocols are given. We also design a new method to authenticate a signature or a message, which makes AQS protocols immune to Alice's disavowal attack and Bob's forgery attack effectively.

  16. Draft versus finished sequence data for DNA and protein diagnostic signature development

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M W; Smith, J R; Torres, C L; Slezak, T R

    2004-10-29

    Sequencing pathogen genomes is costly, demanding careful allocation of limited sequencing resources. We built a computational Sequencing Analysis Pipeline (SAP) to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing necessary to develop high-quality diagnostic DNA and protein signatures. SAP uses simulations to estimate the number of target genomes and close phylogenetic relatives (near neighbors, or NNs) to sequence. We use SAP to assess whether draft data is sufficient or finished sequencing is required using Marburg and variola virus sequences. Simulations indicate that intermediate to high quality draft with error rates of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5} ({approx} 8x coverage) of target organisms is suitable for DNA signature prediction. Low quality draft with error rates of {approx} 1% (3x to 6x coverage) of target isolates is inadequate for DNA signature prediction, although low quality draft of NNs is sufficient, as long as the target genomes are of high quality. For protein signature prediction, sequencing errors in target genomes substantially reduce the detection of amino acid sequence conservation, even if the draft is of high quality. In summary, high quality draft of target and low quality draft of NNs appears to be a cost-effective investment for DNA signature prediction, but may lead to underestimation of predicted protein signatures.

  17. Acid rain research: a review and analysis of methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The acidic deposition phenomena, when implicated as a factor potentially responsible for crop and forest yield losses and destruction of aquatic life, has gained increasing attention. The widespread fear that acid rain is having or may have devastating effects has prompted international debates and legislative proposals. An analysis of research on the effects of acid rain, however, reveals serious questions concerning the applicability and validity of conclusions of much of the work and thus conclusive estimations of impacts are lacking. In order to establish cause-effect relationships between rain acidity and the response of a receptor, controlled studies are necessary to verify observations in the field since there are many natural processes that produce and consume acidity and because numerous other environmental variables affect ecosystem response. Only when the response of an entire system is understood (i.e., interactions between plant, soil, soil microbes, and groundwater) can economic impacts be assessed and tolerance thresholds established for the wet deposition of acids. 14 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  18. Signature Genes as a Phylogenomic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Snel, Berend; Ettema, Thijs J. G.; Huynen, Martijn A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene content has been shown to contain a strong phylogenetic signal, yet its usage for phylogenetic questions is hampered by horizontal gene transfer and parallel gene loss and until now required completely sequenced genomes. Here, we introduce an approach that allows the phylogenetic signal in gene content to be applied to any set of sequences, using signature genes for phylogenetic classification. The hundreds of publicly available genomes allow us to identify signature genes at various taxonomic depths, and we show how the presence of signature genes in an unspecified sample can be used to characterize its taxonomic composition. We identify 8,362 signature genes specific for 112 prokaryotic taxa. We show that these signature genes can be used to address phylogenetic questions on the basis of gene content in cases where classic gene content or sequence analyses provide an ambiguous answer, such as for Nanoarchaeum equitans, and even in cases where complete genomes are not available, such as for metagenomics data. Cross-validation experiments leaving out up to 30% of the species show that ∼92% of the signature genes correctly place the species in a related clade. Analyses of metagenomics data sets with the signature gene approach are in good agreement with the previously reported species distributions based on phylogenetic analysis of marker genes. Summarizing, signature genes can complement traditional sequence-based methods in addressing taxonomic questions. PMID:18492663

  19. A Real Quantum Designated Verifier Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Min; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Yang, Yu-Guang

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of most quantum signature schemes reported in the literature can be verified by a designated person, however, those quantum signature schemes aren't the real traditional designated verifier signature schemes, because the designated person hasn't the capability to efficiently simulate a signature which is indistinguishable from a signer, which cannot satisfy the requirements in some special environments such as E-voting, call for tenders and software licensing. For solving this problem, a real quantum designated verifier signature scheme is proposed in this paper. According to the property of unitary transformation and quantum one-way function, only a verifier designated by a signer can verify the "validity of a signature" and the designated verifier cannot prove to a third party that the signature was produced by the signer or by himself through a transcript simulation algorithm. Moreover, the quantum key distribution and quantum encryption algorithm guarantee the unconditional security of this scheme. Analysis results show that this new scheme satisfies the main security requirements of designated verifier signature scheme and the major attack strategies.

  20. Graph signatures for visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pak Chung; Foote, Harlan; Chin, George; Mackey, Patrick; Perrine, Ken

    2006-01-01

    We present a visual analytics technique to explore graphs using the concept of a data signature. A data signature, in our context, is a multidimensional vector that captures the local topology information surrounding each graph node. Signature vectors extracted from a graph are projected onto a low-dimensional scatterplot through the use of scaling. The resultant scatterplot, which reflects the similarities of the vectors, allows analysts to examine the graph structures and their corresponding real-life interpretations through repeated use of brushing and linking between the two visualizations. The interpretation of the graph structures is based on the outcomes of multiple participatory analysis sessions with intelligence analysts conducted by the authors at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The paper first uses three public domain data sets with either well-known or obvious features to explain the rationale of our design and illustrate its results. More advanced examples are then used in a customized usability study to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach. The study results reveal not only the limitations and weaknesses of the traditional approach based solely on graph visualization, but also the advantages and strengths of our signature-guided approach presented in the paper.

  1. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  2. Controlling radar signature

    SciTech Connect

    Foulke, K.W. )

    1992-08-01

    Low observable technologies for military and tactical aircraft are reviewed including signature-reduction techniques and signal detection/jamming. Among the applications considered are low-signature sensors and the reduction of radar cross section in conjunction with radar-absorbing structures and materials. Technologies for reducing radar cross section are shown to present significant technological challenges, although they afford enhanced aircraft survivability.

  3. Determining important regulatory relations of amino acids from dynamic network analysis of plasma amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Nahoko; Maki, Yukihiro; Nakatsui, Masahiko; Mori, Masato; Noguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shintaro; Takahashi, Michio; Kondo, Nobuo; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the concentrations of plasma amino acids do not always follow the flow-based metabolic pathway network. We have previously shown that there is a control-based network structure among plasma amino acids besides the metabolic pathway map. Based on this network structure, in this study, we performed dynamic analysis using time-course data of the plasma samples of rats fed single essential amino acid deficient diet. Using S-system model (conceptual mathematical model represented by power-law formalism), we inferred the dynamic network structure which reproduces the actual time-courses within the error allowance of 13.17%. By performing sensitivity analysis, three of the most dominant relations in this network were selected; the control paths from leucine to valine, from methionine to threonine, and from leucine to isoleucine. This result is in good agreement with the biological knowledge regarding branched-chain amino acids, and suggests the biological importance of the effect from methionine to threonine.

  4. DNA methylation analysis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease suggests distinct disease-specific and remodeling signatures after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Markus; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Kolarova, Julia; Bens, Susanne; Itzel, Timo; Teufel, Andreas; Herrmann, Alexander; Brosch, Mario; Hinrichsen, Holger; Erhart, Wiebke; Egberts, Jan; Sipos, Bence; Schreiber, Stefan; Häsler, Robert; Stickel, Felix; Becker, Thomas; Krawczak, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Siebert, Reiner; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder in industrialized countries. Liver samples from morbidly obese patients (n = 45) with all stages of NAFLD and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by array-based DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiling. NAFLD-specific expression and methylation differences were seen for nine genes coding for key enzymes in intermediate metabolism (including PC, ACLY, and PLCG1) and insulin/insulin-like signaling (including IGF1, IGFBP2, and PRKCE) and replicated by bisulfite pyrosequening (independent n = 39). Transcription factor binding sites at NAFLD-specific CpG sites were >1,000-fold enriched for ZNF274, PGC1A, and SREBP2. Intraindividual comparison of liver biopsies before and after bariatric surgery showed NAFLD-associated methylation changes to be partially reversible. Postbariatric and NAFLD-specific methylation signatures were clearly distinct both in gene ontology and transcription factor binding site analyses, with >400-fold enrichment of NRF1, HSF1, and ESRRA sites. Our findings provide an example of treatment-induced epigenetic organ remodeling in humans.

  5. DNA methylation analysis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease suggests distinct disease-specific and remodeling signatures after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Markus; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Kolarova, Julia; Bens, Susanne; Itzel, Timo; Teufel, Andreas; Herrmann, Alexander; Brosch, Mario; Hinrichsen, Holger; Erhart, Wiebke; Egberts, Jan; Sipos, Bence; Schreiber, Stefan; Häsler, Robert; Stickel, Felix; Becker, Thomas; Krawczak, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Siebert, Reiner; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder in industrialized countries. Liver samples from morbidly obese patients (n = 45) with all stages of NAFLD and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by array-based DNA methylation and mRNA expression profiling. NAFLD-specific expression and methylation differences were seen for nine genes coding for key enzymes in intermediate metabolism (including PC, ACLY, and PLCG1) and insulin/insulin-like signaling (including IGF1, IGFBP2, and PRKCE) and replicated by bisulfite pyrosequening (independent n = 39). Transcription factor binding sites at NAFLD-specific CpG sites were >1,000-fold enriched for ZNF274, PGC1A, and SREBP2. Intraindividual comparison of liver biopsies before and after bariatric surgery showed NAFLD-associated methylation changes to be partially reversible. Postbariatric and NAFLD-specific methylation signatures were clearly distinct both in gene ontology and transcription factor binding site analyses, with >400-fold enrichment of NRF1, HSF1, and ESRRA sites. Our findings provide an example of treatment-induced epigenetic organ remodeling in humans. PMID:23931760

  6. Eukaryotic signature proteins of Prosthecobacter dejongeii and Gemmata sp. Wa-1 as revealed by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Staley, James T; Bouzek, Heather; Jenkins, Cheryl

    2005-02-01

    The genomes of representatives of three bacterial phyla have been compared with the list of 347 eukaryotic signature proteins (ESPs) derived by Hartman and Fedorov [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 1420]. The species included Prosthecobacter dejongeii of the Verrucomicrobia phylum, Gemmata sp. Wa-1 of the Planctomycetes phylum and Caulobacter crescentus of the Proteobacteria. The protist Trypanosoma brucei was used as a eukaryotic control. P. dejongeii had unique ERGO blast matches to alpha-, beta-, and gamma-tubulin, to Set2, a transcriptional factor associated with eukaryotic DNA, and to LAMMER protein kinase for a total of 10 high-scoring ESP matches altogether. Gemmata sp. Wa-1 shared four of its 17 high-scoring ESP matches with P. dejongeii, and that information coupled with other genomic data provides strong support that these two phyla are related to one another. If the ESP list is an accurate listing of unique eukaryotic proteins, then the low number of high-scoring matches between the proteins of these two bacteria with the list raises doubts about these phyla being direct ancestors of the Eucarya. However, this does not rule out the possibility that ancestral members of either the Verrucomicrobia or Planctomycetes may have played an important role in the evolution of a proto-eukaryotic organism. PMID:15667994

  7. Whole-Genome Resequencing Analysis of Hanwoo and Yanbian Cattle to Identify Genome-Wide SNPs and Signatures of Selection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Woo; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Soo; Kim, Hyeong-Cheol; Yu, Dayeong; Chung, Won-Hyong; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Chai, Han-Ha; Cho, Yong-Min; Lim, Dajeong

    2015-05-01

    Over the last 30 years, Hanwoo has been selectively bred to improve economically important traits. Hanwoo is currently the representative Korean native beef cattle breed, and it is believed that it shared an ancestor with a Chinese breed, Yanbian cattle, until the last century. However, these two breeds have experienced different selection pressures during recent decades. Here, we whole-genome sequenced 10 animals each of Hanwoo and Yanbian cattle (20 total) using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer. A total of approximately 3.12 and 3.07 billion sequence reads were mapped to the bovine reference sequence assembly (UMD 3.1) at an average of approximately 10.71- and 10.53-fold coverage for Hanwoo and Yanbian cattle, respectively. A total of 17,936,399 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were yielded, of which 22.3% were found to be novel. By annotating the SNPs, we further retrieved numerous nonsynonymous SNPs that may be associated with traits of interest in cattle. Furthermore, we performed whole-genome screening to detect signatures of selection throughout the genome. We located several promising selective sweeps that are potentially responsible for economically important traits in cattle; the PPP1R12A gene is an example of a gene that potentially affects intramuscular fat content. These discoveries provide valuable genomic information regarding potential genomic markers that could predict traits of interest for breeding programs of these cattle breeds.

  8. Enhanced meta-analysis of acetylcholine binding protein structures reveals conformational signatures of agonism in nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stober, Spencer T; Abrams, Cameron F

    2012-01-01

    The soluble acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) is the default structural proxy for pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs). Unfortunately, it is difficult to recognize conformational signatures of LGIC agonism and antagonism within the large set of AChBP crystal structures in both apo and ligand-bound states, primarily because AChBP conformations in this set are nearly superimposable (root mean square deviation < 1.5 Å). We have undertaken a systematic, alignment-free approach to elucidate conformational differences displayed by AChBP that cleanly differentiate apo/antagonist-bound from agonist-bound states. Our approach uses statistical inference based on both crystallographic states and conformations sampled during long molecular dynamics simulations to select important inter-Cα distances and map their collective values onto functional states. We observe that binding of (nAChR) agonists to AChBP elicits clockwise rotation of the inner β-sheet with respect to the outer β-sheet, causing tilting of the cys-loop away from the five-fold axis, in a manner quite similar to that speculated for α-subunits of the heteromeric nAChR structure (Unwin, J Mol Biol 2005;346:967), making this motion potentially important in transmission of the gating signal to the transmembrane domain of a LGIC. The method is also successful at discriminating partial from full agonists and supports the hypothesis that a particularly controversial ligand, lobeline, is in fact an LGIC antagonist. PMID:22170867

  9. Whole-Genome Resequencing Analysis of Hanwoo and Yanbian Cattle to Identify Genome-Wide SNPs and Signatures of Selection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Woo; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Soo; Kim, Hyeong-Cheol; Yu, Dayeong; Chung, Won-Hyong; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Chai, Han-Ha; Cho, Yong-Min; Lim, Dajeong

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, Hanwoo has been selectively bred to improve economically important traits. Hanwoo is currently the representative Korean native beef cattle breed, and it is believed that it shared an ancestor with a Chinese breed, Yanbian cattle, until the last century. However, these two breeds have experienced different selection pressures during recent decades. Here, we whole-genome sequenced 10 animals each of Hanwoo and Yanbian cattle (20 total) using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer. A total of approximately 3.12 and 3.07 billion sequence reads were mapped to the bovine reference sequence assembly (UMD 3.1) at an average of approximately 10.71- and 10.53-fold coverage for Hanwoo and Yanbian cattle, respectively. A total of 17,936,399 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were yielded, of which 22.3% were found to be novel. By annotating the SNPs, we further retrieved numerous nonsynonymous SNPs that may be associated with traits of interest in cattle. Furthermore, we performed whole-genome screening to detect signatures of selection throughout the genome. We located several promising selective sweeps that are potentially responsible for economically important traits in cattle; the PPP1R12A gene is an example of a gene that potentially affects intramuscular fat content. These discoveries provide valuable genomic information regarding potential genomic markers that could predict traits of interest for breeding programs of these cattle breeds. PMID:26018558

  10. The Metabolic Signature of Biomass Formation in Barley.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Mohammad R; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Usadel, Björn; Junker, Björn; Schreiber, Falk; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R

    2016-09-01

    The network analysis of genome-wide transcriptome responses, metabolic signatures and enzymes' relationship to biomass formation has been studied in a diverse panel of 12 barley accessions during vegetative and reproductive stages. The primary metabolites and enzymes involved in central metabolism that determine the accumulation of shoot biomass at the vegetative stage of barley development are primarily being linked to sucrose accumulation and sucrose synthase activity. Interestingly, the metabolic and enzyme links which are strongly associated with biomass accumulation during reproductive stages are related to starch accumulation and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates citrate, malate, trans-aconitate and isocitrate. Additional significant associations were also found for UDP glucose, ATP and the amino acids isoleucine, valine, glutamate and histidine during the reproductive stage. A network analysis resulted in a combined identification of metabolite and enzyme signatures indicative for grain weight accumulation that was correlated with the activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in starch biosynthesis, and with that of alanine amino transferase involved in the synthesis of storage proteins. We propose that the mechanism related to vegetative and reproductive biomass formation vs. seed biomass formation is being linked to distinct fluxes regulating sucrose, starch, sugars and amino acids as central resources. These distinct biomarkers can be used to engineer biomass production and grain weight in barley. PMID:27388338

  11. Harmonic 'signatures' of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Blake-Coleman, B C; Hutchings, M J; Silley, P

    1994-01-01

    The frequency/amplitude effect of various microorganisms exposed to periodic (time varying) electric fields, when proximate to immersed electrodes, has been studied using a novel analytical instrument. The harmonic distribution, in complex signals caused by cells exposed to harmonic free waveforms and occupying part of the electrode/suspension interface volume, was shown to be almost entirely due to the change in the standing interfacial transfer function by the (dielectrically nonlinear) presence of cells. Thus, the characteristic interfacial non-linearity is viewed as variable, being uniquely modulated by the presence of particular cells in the interfacial region. Little can be attributed to bulk (far field) effects. The tendency for subtle (characteristic) signal distortion to occur as a function of particulate (cell or molecular) occupancy of the near electrode interfacial region under controlled current conditions leads to the method of sample characterisation by harmonic (Fourier) analysis. We report here, as a sequel to our original studies (Hutchings et al., 1993; Hutchings and Blake-Coleman, 1993), preliminary results of the harmonic analysis of microbial suspensions under controlled signal conditions using a three-electrode configuration. These data provide three-dimensional graphical representations producing harmonic 'surfaces' for various microorganisms. Thus, cell type differences are characterised by their 'harmonic signature'. The visual distinction provided by these 'surface' forming three-dimensional plots is striking and gives a convincing impression of the ability to identify and enumerate specific microorganisms by acquisition of cell-modulated electrode interfacial Fourier spectra. PMID:8060593

  12. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious.

  13. Differential sensory fMRI signatures in autism and schizophrenia: Analysis of amplitude and trial-to-trial variability.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Sarah M; Gupta, Akshat; Barb, Scott M; Glass, Summer A F; Minshew, Nancy J; Dinstein, Ilan; Heeger, David J; Eack, Shaun M; Behrmann, Marlene

    2016-08-01

    Autism and schizophrenia share multiple phenotypic and genotypic markers, and there is ongoing debate regarding the relationship of these two disorders. To examine whether cortical dynamics are similar across these disorders, we directly compared fMRI responses to visual, somatosensory and auditory stimuli in adults with autism (N=15), with schizophrenia (N=15), and matched controls (N=15). All participants completed a one-back letter detection task presented at fixation (to control attention) while task-irrelevant sensory stimulation was delivered to the different modalities. We focused specifically on the response amplitudes and the variability in sensory fMRI responses of the two groups, given the evidence of greater trial-to-trial variability in adults with autism. Both autism and schizophrenia individuals showed weaker signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) in sensory-evoked responses compared to controls (d>0.42), but for different reasons. For the autism group, the fMRI response amplitudes were indistinguishable from controls but were more variable trial-to-trial (d=0.47). For the schizophrenia group, response amplitudes were smaller compared to autism (d=0.44) and control groups (d=0.74), but were not significantly more variable (d<0.29). These differential group profiles suggest (1) that greater trial-to-trial variability in cortical responses may be specific to autism and is not a defining characteristic of schizophrenia, and (2) that blunted response amplitudes may be characteristic of schizophrenia. The relationship between the amplitude and the variability of cortical activity might serve as a specific signature differentiating these neurodevelopmental disorders. Identifying the neural basis of these responses and their relationship to the underlying genetic bases may substantially enlighten the understanding of both disorders. PMID:27083780

  14. Integrated Molecular Signature of Disease: Analysis of Influenza Virus-Infected Macaques through Functional Genomics and Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, T.; Baskin, C. R.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Garcia-Sastre, A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H.; Tumpey, T. M.; Thomas, M. J.; Carter, V. S.; Teal, T. H.; Van Hoven, N.; Proll, Sean; Jacobs, Jon M.; Caldwell, Z.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hukkanen, R.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2006-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of avian influenza in humans have stressed the need for an improved non-human primate model of influenza pathogenesis. In order to develop our macaque model, we expanded our in vivo and functional genomics experiments: We focused on the innate immune response at day 2 post-inoculation and on gene expression in affected lung tissue with viral genetic material present; finally, we sought to identify signature genes for early infection in whole blood. For these purposes, we infected six pigtailed macaques with 107 TCID50 of influenza A/Texas/36/91 virus and three control animals with a sham inoculate. We sacrificed one control and two experimental animals at day 2, 4, and 7 and lung tissue was harvested for pathology, gene expression profiling, and proteomics. Additionally, blood was collected for genomics every other day from each animal until its endpoint. Gross and microscopic pathology, immunohistochemistry, viral gene expression by arrays and/or quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed successful yet mild infection in all experimental animals. Genomic experiments were performed using second generation macaque-specific oligonucleotide arrays and high-throughput proteomics revealed host response to infection at the protein level. Our data showed dramatic differences in gene expression within the same influenza-induced lesion based on the presence or absence of viral mRNA. We also identified genes tightly co-regulated in peripheral white blood cells and in lung tissue at day 2 post-inoculation. This latter finding opens the possibility of using gene expression arrays on whole blood to detect infection after exposure but prior to onset of symptoms or shedding.

  15. Improved Quantum Signature Scheme with Weak Arbitrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Wen-Min

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we find a man-in-the-middle attack on the quantum signature scheme with a weak arbitrator (Luo et al., Int. J. Theor. Phys., 51:2135, 2012). In that scheme, the authors proposed a quantum signature based on quantum one way function which contains both verifying the signer phase and verifying the signed message phase. However, after our analysis we will show that Eve can adopt different strategies in respective phases to forge the signature without being detected. Then we present an improved scheme to increase the security.

  16. Mathematical Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis of Acid Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seog-Yeon

    Atmospheric processes influencing acid deposition are investigated by using mathematical model and sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis techniques including Green's function analysis, constraint sensitivities, and lumped sensitivities are applied to temporal problems describing gas and liquid phase chemistry and to space-time problems describing pollutant transport and deposition. The sensitivity analysis techniques are used to; (1) investigate the chemical and physical processes related to acid depositions and (2) evaluate the linearity hypothesis, and source and receptor relationships. Results from analysis of the chemistry processes show that the relationship between SO(,2) concentration and the amount of sulfate produced is linear in gas phase but it may be nonlinear in liquid phase when there exists an excess amount of SO(,2) compared to H(,2)O(,2). Under the simulated conditions, the deviation of linearity between ambient sulfur present and the amount of sulfur deposited after 2 hours, is less than 10% in a convective storm situation when the liquid phase chemistry, gas phases chemistry, and cloud processes are considered simultaneously. Efficient ways of sensitivity analysis of time-space problems are also developed and used to evaluate the source and receptor relationships in an Eulerian transport, chemistry, removal model.

  17. Investigation of amino acid δ 13C signatures in bone collagen to reconstruct human palaeodiets using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Kyungcheol; Smith, Colin I.; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Richards, Michael P.

    2010-11-01

    This research presents the individual amino acid δ 13C values in bone collagen of humans ( n = 9) and animals ( n = 27) from two prehistoric shell midden sites in Korea. We obtained complete baseline separation of 16 of the 18 amino acids found in bone collagen by using liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). The isotopic results reveal that the humans and animals in the two sites had similar patterns in essential amino acids (EAAs) and non-essential amino acids (NEAAs). The EAA and NEAA δ 13C values in humans are intermediate between those in marine and terrestrial animals. However, the threonine δ 13C values in humans and animals measured in this study are more highly enriched than those of other amino acids. At both sites, all amino acids in marine animals are 13C-enriched relative to those of the terrestrial animals. The isotopic evidence suggests that the Tongsamdong human had EAAs and NEAAs from marine food resources, while the Nukdo humans mainly had EAAs from terrestrial food resources but obtained NEAAs from both terrestrial and marine resources. The δ 13C isotopic differences in amino acids between marine and terrestrial animals were the largest for glycine (NEAA) and histidine (EAA) and the smallest for tyrosine (NEAA) and phenylalanine (EAA). In addition, threonine among the EAAs also had a large difference (˜8‰) in δ 13C values between marine and terrestrial animals, and has the potential to be used as an isotopic marker in palaeodietary studies. Threonine δ 13C values were used in conjunction with the established Δ 13C Glycine-phenylalanine values and produced three distinct dietary groups (terrestrial, omnivorous, and marine). In addition, threonine δ 13C values and Δ 13C Serine-phenylalanine values were discovered to separate between two dietary groups (terrestrial vs. marine), and these δ 13C values may provide a potential new indicator for investigating the distinction between marine and terrestrial protein

  18. Recent advances in amino acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Poinsot, Véréna; Carpéné, Marie-Anne; Bouajila, Jalloul; Gavard, Pierre; Feurer, Bernard; Couderc, François

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the most important articles that have been published on amino acid analysis using CE during the period from June 2009 to May 2011 and follows the format of the previous articles of Smith (Electrophoresis 1999, 20, 3078-3083), Prata et al. (Electrophoresis 2001, 22, 4129-4138) and Poinsot et al. (Electrophoresis 2003, 24, 4047-4062; Electrophoresis 2006, 27, 176-194; Electrophoresis 2008, 29, 207-223; Electrophoresis 2010, 31, 105-121). We present new developments in amino acid analysis with CE, which are reported describing the use of lasers or light emitting diodes for fluorescence detection, conductimetry electrochemiluminescence detectors, mass spectrometry applications, and lab-on-a-chip applications using CE. In addition, we describe articles concerning clinical studies and neurochemical applications of these techniques.

  19. Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score of three Mediterranean cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Feist, Christian; Sagredos, Angelos

    2006-10-01

    Proximate composition, fatty acid analysis and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) in three commercially important cephalopods of the Mediterranean sea (cuttlefish, octopus and squid) were determined. The results of the proximate analysis showed that these species had very high protein:fat ratios similar to lean beef. Docosahexaenoic, palmitic and eicosipentaenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids among analyzed species. The amount of n-3 fatty acids was higher than that of saturated, monounsaturated and n-6 fatty acids. Despite the fact that cephalopods contain small amounts of fat they were found quite rich in n-3 fatty acids. Finally, PDCAAS indicated that these organisms had a very good protein quality.

  20. Infrasound Rocket Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation reviews the work performed by our research group at the Geophysical Institute as we have applied the tools of infrasound research to rocket studies. This report represents one aspect of the effort associated with work done for the National Consortium for MASINT Research (NCMR) program operated by the National MASINT Office (NMO) of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Infrasound, the study of acoustic signals and their propagation in a frequency band below 15 Hz, enables an investigator to collect and diagnose acoustic signals from distant sources. Absorption of acoustic energy in the atmosphere decreases as the frequency is reduced. In the infrasound band signals can propagate hundreds and thousands of kilometers with little degradation. We will present an overview of signatures from rockets ranging from small sounding rockets such as the Black Brandt and Orion series to larger rockets such as Delta 2,4 and Atlas V. Analysis of the ignition transients provides information that can uniquely identify the motor type. After the rocket ascends infrasound signals can be used to characterize the rocket and identify the various events that take place along a trajectory such as staging and maneuvering. We have also collected information on atmospheric shocks and sonic booms from the passage of supersonic vehicles such as the shuttle. This review is intended to show the richness of the unique signal set that occurs in the low-frequency infrasound band.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of acetic acid steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Saioa; Ehrich, Heike; Arias, Pedro L.; Kockmann, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen generation by acetic acid steam reforming has been carried out with respect to applications in solid oxide fuel cells. The effect of operating parameters on equilibrium composition has been examined focusing especially on hydrogen and carbon monoxide production, which are the fuels in this type of fuel cell. The temperature, steam to acetic acid ratio, and to a lesser extent pressure affect significantly the equilibrium product distribution due to their influence on steam reforming, thermal decomposition and water-gas shift reaction. The study shows that steam reforming of acetic acid with a steam to acetic acid ratio of 2 to 1 is thermodynamically feasible with hydrogen, carbon monoxide and water as the main products at the equilibrium at temperatures higher than 700 °C, and achieving CO/CO2 ratios higher than 1. Thus, it can be concluded that within the operation temperature range of solid oxide fuel cells - between 700 °C and 1000 °C - the production of a gas rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is promoted.

  2. Fluoroalkyl chloroformates in treating amino acids for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Husek, Petr; Simek, Petr; Hartvich, Petr; Zahradnícková, Helena

    2008-04-01

    Novel fluoroalkyl chloroformates with three and four carbon atoms were investigated for the immediate conversion of amino acids into hydrophobic derivatives in water-containing media. Derivatization conditions were extensively studied and optimized sample preparation protocols elaborated. More than 30 amino acids were treated with the particular reagent in isooctane by simply vortexing the reactive organic phase with a slightly basified aqueous medium containing pyridine or 3-picoline as a catalyst. Outstanding separation of nearly all components on 5% phenylmethylsilicone phase in gas chromatographic (GC) analysis with mass spectrometric (MS) or flame ionization detection (FID) required <10 min. Quantitation characteristics involving linearity in the range of 0.1-100 nmol, regression coefficients of 0.999-0.953 (histidine), MS limit of detection (LOD) reaching 0.03 pmol at proline to nearly 20 pmol at glutamic acid, plus electron impact (EI) spectra and diagnostic SIM fragment ions of the derivatives are reported. The novel method is simple, robust and rapid, enabling to treat amino acids in aqueous environment and to analyze them in <15 min. PMID:18242622

  3. Meteor signature interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  4. Extraction and analysis of trifluoroacetic Acid in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, C E; Cahill, T M; Seiber, J N

    1998-10-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), a mildly phytotoxic compound, is a stable atmospheric breakdown product of HFC-134a, HCFC-123, and HCFC-124. An extraction and analytical method has been developed for the routine analysis of low ppt levels of TFA in aqueous samples. TFA can be quantitatively recovered from most environmental waters by an extraction procedure using a commercial anion-exchange disk. In saline samples (conductivity >620 μS), where the presence of competing anions interfered with recovery, a liquid-liquid extraction cleanup was necessary. After extraction of TFA from water, the dried disk was placed in a headspace vial containing 10% sulfuric acid in methanol and the vial sealed and then vortexed for 30 s. The sulfuric acid-methanol solution extracts trifluoroacetate anion (TFA) from the anion-exchange matrix and, when heated, quantitatively converts it to the methyl ester, which is then analyzed by automated headspace gas chromatography using electron capture or mass spectrometry detection. Several environmental samples in addition to laboratory spike solutions were successfully extracted and analyzed with this technique. Recoveries averaged 108.2% for reagent water spiked at levels from 53 to 2110 ng/L with relative standard deviations ranging from 0.3 to 8.4%. The instrument's limit of detection for TFA standard was 3.3 ng. The limit of quantitation for the extraction and analytical technique was 36 ng/L. Three water samples can be prepared for automated analysis in 20 min using this technique. PMID:21651243

  5. Metabolic signatures of extreme longevity in northern Italian centenarians reveal a complex remodeling of lipids, amino acids, and gut microbiota metabolism.

    PubMed

    Collino, Sebastiano; Montoliu, Ivan; Martin, François-Pierre J; Scherer, Max; Mari, Daniela; Salvioli, Stefano; Bucci, Laura; Ostan, Rita; Monti, Daniela; Biagi, Elena; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Rezzi, Serge

    2013-01-01

    The aging phenotype in humans has been thoroughly studied but a detailed metabolic profiling capable of shading light on the underpinning biological processes of longevity is still missing. Here using a combined metabonomics approach compromising holistic (1)H-NMR profiling and targeted MS approaches, we report for the first time the metabolic phenotype of longevity in a well characterized human aging cohort compromising mostly female centenarians, elderly, and young individuals. With increasing age, targeted MS profiling of blood serum displayed a marked decrease in tryptophan concentration, while an unique alteration of specific glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are seen in the longevity phenotype. We hypothesized that the overall lipidome changes specific to longevity putatively reflect centenarians' unique capacity to adapt/respond to the accumulating oxidative and chronic inflammatory conditions characteristic of their extreme aging phenotype. Our data in centenarians support promotion of cellular detoxification mechanisms through specific modulation of the arachidonic acid metabolic cascade as we underpinned increased concentration of 8,9-EpETrE, suggesting enhanced cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity. Such effective mechanism might result in the activation of an anti-oxidative response, as displayed by decreased circulating levels of 9-HODE and 9-oxoODE, markers of lipid peroxidation and oxidative products of linoleic acid. Lastly, we also revealed that the longevity process deeply affects the structure and composition of the human gut microbiota as shown by the increased extrection of phenylacetylglutamine (PAG) and p-cresol sulfate (PCS) in urine of centenarians. Together, our novel approach in this representative Italian longevity cohort support the hypothesis that a complex remodeling of lipid, amino acid metabolism, and of gut microbiota functionality are key regulatory processes marking exceptional longevity in humans.

  6. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics. PMID:27083372

  7. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Lam, Ho-Sun; Kossenkov, Andrew; Ge, Jingping; Showe, Louise C; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal protein

  8. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature

    PubMed Central

    Pesciotta, Esther N.; Lam, Ho-Sun; Kossenkov, Andrew; Ge, Jingping; Showe, Louise C.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal protein

  9. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Lam, Ho-Sun; Kossenkov, Andrew; Ge, Jingping; Showe, Louise C; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal protein

  10. Comparative analysis of hydrologic signatures in two agricultural watersheds in east-central Illinois: legacies of the past to inform the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaeger, M. A.; Sivapalan, M.; McIsaac, G. F.; Cai, X.

    2013-11-01

    Historically, the central Midwestern US has undergone drastic anthropogenic land use change, having been transformed, in part through government policy, from a natural grassland system to an artificially drained agricultural system devoted to row cropping corn and soybeans. Current federal policies are again influencing land use in this region with increased corn acreage and new biomass crops proposed as part of an energy initiative emphasizing biofuels. To better address these present and future challenges it is helpful to understand whether and how the legacies of past changes have shaped the current response of the system. To this end, a comparative analysis of the hydrologic signatures in both spatial and time series data from two central Illinois watersheds was undertaken. The past history of these catchments is reflected in their current hydrologic responses, which are highly heterogeneous due to differences in geologic history, artificial drainage patterns, and reservoir operation, and manifest temporally, from annual to daily timescales, and spatially, both within and between the watersheds. These differences are also apparent from analysis of the summer low flows, where the more tile-drained watershed shows greater variability overall than does the more naturally drained one. In addition, precipitation in this region is also spatially heterogeneous even at small scales, and this, interacting with and filtering through the historical modifications to the system, increases the complexity of the problem of predicting the catchment response to future changes.

  11. Modeling the lexical morphology of Western handwritten signatures.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Cabrera, Moises; Ferrer, Miguel A; Morales, Aythami

    2015-01-01

    A handwritten signature is the final response to a complex cognitive and neuromuscular process which is the result of the learning process. Because of the many factors involved in signing, it is possible to study the signature from many points of view: graphologists, forensic experts, neurologists and computer vision experts have all examined them. Researchers study written signatures for psychiatric, penal, health and automatic verification purposes. As a potentially useful, multi-purpose study, this paper is focused on the lexical morphology of handwritten signatures. This we understand to mean the identification, analysis, and description of the signature structures of a given signer. In this work we analyze different public datasets involving 1533 signers from different Western geographical areas. Some relevant characteristics of signature lexical morphology have been selected, examined in terms of their probability distribution functions and modeled through a General Extreme Value distribution. This study suggests some useful models for multi-disciplinary sciences which depend on handwriting signatures.

  12. Modeling the Lexical Morphology of Western Handwritten Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cabrera, Moises; Ferrer, Miguel A.; Morales, Aythami

    2015-01-01

    A handwritten signature is the final response to a complex cognitive and neuromuscular process which is the result of the learning process. Because of the many factors involved in signing, it is possible to study the signature from many points of view: graphologists, forensic experts, neurologists and computer vision experts have all examined them. Researchers study written signatures for psychiatric, penal, health and automatic verification purposes. As a potentially useful, multi-purpose study, this paper is focused on the lexical morphology of handwritten signatures. This we understand to mean the identification, analysis, and description of the signature structures of a given signer. In this work we analyze different public datasets involving 1533 signers from different Western geographical areas. Some relevant characteristics of signature lexical morphology have been selected, examined in terms of their probability distribution functions and modeled through a General Extreme Value distribution. This study suggests some useful models for multi-disciplinary sciences which depend on handwriting signatures. PMID:25860942

  13. Network Signatures of Survival in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishal N.; Gokulrangan, Giridharan; Chowdhury, Salim A.; Chen, Yanwen; Sloan, Andrew E.; Koyutürk, Mehmet; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Chance, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    To determine a molecular basis for prognostic differences in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we employed a combinatorial network analysis framework to exhaustively search for molecular patterns in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. We identified a dysregulated molecular signature distinguishing short-term (survival<225 days) from long-term (survival>635 days) survivors of GBM using whole genome expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A 50-gene subnetwork signature achieved 80% prediction accuracy when tested against an independent gene expression dataset. Functional annotations for the subnetwork signature included “protein kinase cascade,” “IκB kinase/NFκB cascade,” and “regulation of programmed cell death” – all of which were not significant in signatures of existing subtypes. Finally, we used label-free proteomics to examine how our subnetwork signature predicted protein level expression differences in an independent GBM cohort of 16 patients. We found that the genes discovered using network biology had a higher probability of dysregulated protein expression than either genes exhibiting individual differential expression or genes derived from known GBM subtypes. In particular, the long-term survivor subtype was characterized by increased protein expression of DNM1 and MAPK1 and decreased expression of HSPA9, PSMD3, and CANX. Overall, we demonstrate that the combinatorial analysis of gene expression data constrained by PPIs outlines an approach for the discovery of robust and translatable molecular signatures in GBM. PMID:24068912

  14. Selection signatures in Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, M; Flury, C; Leeb, T; Rieder, S; Neuditschko, M

    2016-06-01

    Shetland ponies were selected for numerous traits including small stature, strength, hardiness and longevity. Despite the different selection criteria, Shetland ponies are well known for their small stature. We performed a selection signature analysis including genome-wide SNPs of 75 Shetland ponies and 76 large-sized horses. Based upon this dataset, we identified a selection signature on equine chromosome (ECA) 1 between 103.8 Mb and 108.5 Mb. A total of 33 annotated genes are located within this interval including the IGF1R gene at 104.2 Mb and the ADAMTS17 gene at 105.4 Mb. These two genes are well known to have a major impact on body height in numerous species including humans. Homozygosity mapping in the Shetland ponies identified a region with increased homozygosity between 107.4 Mb and 108.5 Mb. None of the annotated genes in this region have so far been associated with height. Thus, we cannot exclude the possibility that the identified selection signature on ECA1 is associated with some trait other than height, for which Shetland ponies were selected. PMID:26857482

  15. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets.

    PubMed

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI. PMID:27530814

  16. Analysis of Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Gene Expression Signature Reveals Tubulins, Nfe2l2, Nfkb, Cd44, and S100a4 as Treatment Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lipponen, Anssi; Paananen, Jussi; Puhakka, Noora; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to define the chronically altered gene expression signature of traumatic brain injury (TBI-sig) to discover novel treatments to reverse pathologic gene expression or reinforce the expression of recovery-related genes. Genome-wide RNA-sequencing was performed at 3 months post-TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats. We found 4964 regulated genes in the perilesional cortex and 1966 in the thalamus (FDR < 0.05). TBI-sig was used for a LINCS analysis which identified 11 compounds that showed a strong connectivity with the TBI-sig in neuronal cell lines. Of these, celecoxib and sirolimus were recently reported to have a disease-modifying effect in in vivo animal models of epilepsy. Other compounds revealed by the analysis were BRD-K91844626, BRD-A11009626, NO-ASA, BRD-K55260239, SDZ-NKT-343, STK-661558, BRD-K75971499, ionomycin, and desmethylclomipramine. Network analysis of overlapping genes revealed the effects on tubulins (Tubb2a, Tubb3, Tubb4b), Nfe2l2, S100a4, Cd44, and Nfkb2, all of which are linked to TBI-relevant outcomes, including epileptogenesis and tissue repair. Desmethylclomipramine modulated most of the gene targets considered favorable for TBI outcome. Our data demonstrate long-lasting transcriptomics changes after TBI. LINCS analysis predicted that these changes could be modulated by various compounds, some of which are already in clinical use but never tested in TBI. PMID:27530814

  17. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  18. Structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  19. Cloning and transcriptional analysis of Crepis alpina fatty acid desaturases affecting the biosynthesis of crepenynic acid.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeong-Won; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Crepis alpina acetylenase is a variant FAD2 desaturase that catalyses the insertion of a triple bond at the Delta12 position of linoleic acid, forming crepenynic acid in developing seeds. Seeds contain a high level of crepenynic acid but other tissues contain none. Using reverse transcriptase-coupled PCR (RT-PCR), acetylenase transcripts were identified in non-seed C. alpina tissues, which were highest in flower heads. To understand why functional expression of the acetylenase is limited to seeds, genes that affect acetylenase activity by providing substrate (FAD2) or electrons (cytochrome b5), or that compete for substrate (FAD3), were cloned. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the availability of a preferred cytochrome b5 isoform is not a limiting factor. Developing seeds co-express acetylenase and FAD2 isoform 2 (FAD2-2) at high levels. Flower heads co-express FAD2-3 and FAD3 at high levels, and FAD2-2 and acetylenase at moderate levels. FAD2-3 was not expressed in developing seed. Real-time RT-PCR absolute transcript quantitation showed 10(4)-fold higher acetylenase expression in developing seeds than in flower heads. Collectively, the results show that both the acetylenase expression level and the co-expression of other desaturases may contribute to the tissue specificity of crepenynate production. Helianthus annuus contains a Delta12 acetylenase in a polyacetylene biosynthetic pathway, so does not accumulate crepenynate. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed relatively strong acetylenase expression in young sunflowers. Acetylenase transcription is observed in both species without accumulation of the enzymatic product, crepenynate. Functional expression of acetylenase appears to be affected by competition and collaboration with other enzymes. PMID:17329262

  20. Organic matter in sediments of an acidic mining lake as assessed by lipid analysis. Part I: fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Koschorreck, Matthias; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) patterns of sediments collected from the bottom of an acidic mine pit lake (AML) at different depths (surface sediment: 0 to 1cm; deep sediment: 4 to 5 cm) were studied to characterize microbial communities and the sources of sedimentary organic matter (SOM). Studies were performed on the molecular level utilizing source-specific, diagnostic FA biomarkers. The biomarker-based approach has been used widely in marine sediment studies, but has not been applied for sediments from AMLs so far. Combined FA concentrations in the surface sediment were higher compared to those in the deep sediment (497 vs. 127 μg g(-1)d.w., respectively). This was related to deposition of autochthonous biomass and higher terrestrial plants onto the surface sediment, as well as--to lesser extent--with higher bacterial activity on the sediment-water interface. The FA distribution in both sediments was characterized by a strong even-over-odd preference and was bimodal in nature: there was a cluster at nC(14)-nC(18) characteristic of chiefly autochthonous (algal and bacterial) SOM production, and another cluster at nC(22-28) related to input from higher plants. The FA distribution in the surface sediment pointed to higher terrestrial input compared to autochthonous contribution to SOM (67%:33%) as an estimate. Fingerprinting of viable bacteria was accomplished through signature FA markers including branched C(15) and C(17) surrogates, cyclopropanoic acids, 3-hydroxy (OH) acids and monounsaturated surrogates with unusual double bond localization. The abundance of Gram-negative bacteria was higher in the surface sediment as evidenced by total diagnostic 3-OH-fatty acids (37 μg g(-1) versus 25 μg g(-1)). Potential source taxa in both sediment layers included acidophilic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria including Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. High abundances of terminally branched C(15) and C(17) surrogates in both sediments pointed to sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria

  1. Hyperspectral analysis for qualitative and quantitative features related to acid mine drainage at a remediated open-pit mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, G.; Calvin, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    The exposure of pyrite to oxygen and water in mine waste environments is known to generate acidity and the accumulation of secondary iron minerals. Sulfates and secondary iron minerals associated with acid mine drainage (AMD) exhibit diverse spectral properties in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The use of hyperspectral imagery for identification of AMD mineralogy and contamination has been well studied. Fewer studies have examined the impacts of hydrologic variations on mapping AMD or the unique spectral signatures of mine waters. Open-pit mine lakes are an additional environmental hazard which have not been widely studied using imaging spectroscopy. A better understanding of AMD variation related to climate fluctuations and the spectral signatures of contaminated surface waters will aid future assessments of environmental contamination. This study examined the ability of multi-season airborne hyperspectral data to identify the geochemical evolution of substances and contaminant patterns at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site. The mine is located 24 miles southeast of Lake Tahoe and contains remnant tailings piles and several AMD collection ponds. The objectives were to 1) distinguish temporal changes in mineralogy at a the remediated open-pit sulfur mine, 2) identify the absorption features of mine affected waters, and 3) quantitatively link water spectra to known dissolved iron concentrations. Images from NASA's AVIRIS instrument were collected in the spring, summer, and fall seasons for two consecutive years at Leviathan (HyspIRI campaign). Images had a spatial resolution of 15 meters at nadir. Ground-based surveys using the ASD FieldSpecPro spectrometer and laboratory spectral and chemical analysis complemented the remote sensing data. Temporal changes in surface mineralogy were difficult to distinguish. However, seasonal changes in pond water quality were identified. Dissolved ferric iron and chlorophyll

  2. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  3. Analysis of Cell Wall Teichoic Acids in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Covas, Gonçalo; Vaz, Filipa; Henriques, Gabriela; Pinho, Mariana G; Filipe, Sérgio R

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial cells are surrounded by a surface composed mainly of peptidoglycan (PGN), a glycopolymer responsible for ensuring the bacterial shape and a telltale molecule that betrays the presence of bacteria to the host immune system. In Staphylococcus aureus, as in most gram-positive bacteria, peptidoglycan is concealed by covalently linked molecules of wall teichoic acids (WTA)-phosphate rich molecules made of glycerol and ribitol phosphates which may be tailored by different amino acids and sugars.In order to analyze and compare the composition of WTA produced by different S. aureus strains, we describe methods to: (1) quantify the total amount of WTA present at the bacterial cell surface, through the determination of the inorganic phosphate present in phosphodiester linkages of WTA; (2) identify which sugar constituents are present in the assembled WTA molecules, by detecting the monosaccharides, released by acid hydrolysis, through an high-performance anion exchange chromatography analysis coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) and (3) compare the polymerization degree of WTA found at the cell surface of different S. aureus strains, through their different migration in a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). PMID:27311674

  4. Electrical signature analysis to quantify human and animal performance on fitness and therapy equipment such as a treadmill

    DOEpatents

    Cox, Daryl F.; Hochanadel, Charles D.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2010-05-18

    The invention is a human and animal performance data acquisition, analysis, and diagnostic system for fitness and therapy devices having an interface box removably disposed on incoming power wiring to a fitness and therapy device, at least one current transducer removably disposed on said interface box for sensing current signals to said fitness and therapy device, and a means for analyzing, displaying, and reporting said current signals to determine human and animal performance on said device using measurable parameters.

  5. Neural signatures of human fear conditioning: an updated and extended meta-analysis of fMRI studies.

    PubMed

    Fullana, M A; Harrison, B J; Soriano-Mas, C; Vervliet, B; Cardoner, N; Àvila-Parcet, A; Radua, J

    2016-04-01

    Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning remains the most widely employed experimental model of fear and anxiety, and continues to inform contemporary pathophysiological accounts of clinical anxiety disorders. Despite its widespread application in human and animal studies, the neurobiological basis of fear conditioning remains only partially understood. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of human fear-conditioning studies carried out with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), yielding a pooled sample of 677 participants from 27 independent studies. As a distinguishing feature of this meta-analysis, original statistical brain maps were obtained from the authors of 13 of these studies. Our primary analyses demonstrate that human fear conditioning is associated with a consistent and robust pattern of neural activation across a hypothesized genuine network of brain regions resembling existing anatomical descriptions of the 'central autonomic-interoceptive network'. This finding is discussed with a particular emphasis on the neural substrates of conscious fear processing. Our associated meta-analysis of functional deactivations-a scarcely addressed dynamic in fMRI fear-conditioning studies-also suggests the existence of a coordinated brain response potentially underlying the 'safety signal' (that is, non-threat) processing. We attempt to provide an integrated summary on these findings with the view that they may inform ongoing studies of fear-conditioning processes both in healthy and clinical populations, as investigated with neuroimaging and other experimental approaches.

  6. Directed Evolution and In Silico Analysis of Reaction Centre Proteins Reveal Molecular Signatures of Photosynthesis Adaptation to Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya; Polticelli, Fabio; Bertalan, Ivo; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Damasso, Mario; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary mechanisms adopted by the photosynthetic apparatus to modifications in the Earth's atmosphere on a geological time-scale remain a focus of intense research. The photosynthetic machinery has had to cope with continuously changing environmental conditions and particularly with the complex ionizing radiation emitted by solar flares. The photosynthetic D1 protein, being the site of electron tunneling-mediated charge separation and solar energy transduction, is a hot spot for the generation of radiation-induced radical injuries. We explored the possibility to produce D1 variants tolerant to ionizing radiation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and clarified the effect of radiation-induced oxidative damage on the photosynthetic proteins evolution. In vitro directed evolution strategies targeted at the D1 protein were adopted to create libraries of chlamydomonas random mutants, subsequently selected by exposures to radical-generating proton or neutron sources. The common trend observed in the D1 aminoacidic substitutions was the replacement of less polar by more polar amino acids. The applied selection pressure forced replacement of residues more sensitive to oxidative damage with less sensitive ones, suggesting that ionizing radiation may have been one of the driving forces in the evolution of the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus. A set of the identified aminoacidic substitutions, close to the secondary plastoquinone binding niche and oxygen evolving complex, were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in un-transformed strains, and their sensitivity to free radicals attack analyzed. Mutants displayed reduced electron transport efficiency in physiological conditions, and increased photosynthetic performance stability and oxygen evolution capacity in stressful high-light conditions. Finally, comparative in silico analyses of D1 aminoacidic sequences of organisms differently located in the evolution chain, revealed a higher ratio of residues more sensitive to

  7. Davydov coupling as a factor influencing the H-bond IR signature: Computational study of the IR spectra of 3-thiopheneacrylic acid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekik, Najeh; Al-Agel, Faisal A.; Flakus, Henryk T.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we have studied the role played by Davydov coupling in the evolution of the fine structure of the IR spectra of 3-thiopheneacrylic acid dimer crystal. For this purpose, we took into account the linear dependence of the Davydov coupling on the position coordinate Qi(i = 1, 2) of the slow frequency O←sbnd H …O→ mode of the two H-bond bridges of the cyclic dimer. The Davydov coupling VD term was expanded up to first order with respect to the slow mode coordinate Qi. We have considered: VD (Q1 ,Q2) =VD0 + Θ (Q1 +Q2). That leads to the anharmonic expression of the Davydov coupling parameter VD: VD(Qg) =VD0 +√{ 2} ΘQg within the symmetrized coordinates. The effect of the second order parameter (Θ) of Davydov coupling on to the spectral density was undertaken. The numerical calculations clearly show that the crystal spectral properties of the infrared υOsbnd H stretching band remain in a close relation with the new anharmonic coupling parameter and provide a direct evidence of the increase of the level density and the spectral broadening.

  8. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey.

  9. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey. PMID:10794629

  10. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  11. Practical quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  12. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment. PMID:26147197

  13. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment.

  14. Comparative analysis of hydrologic signatures in two agricultural watersheds in east-central Illinois: legacies of the past to inform the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaeger, M. A.; Sivapalan, M.; McIsaac, G. F.; Cai, X.

    2013-05-01

    Historically, the central Midwestern US has undergone drastic anthropogenic land use change, having been transformed, in part through federal government policy, from a natural grassland system to an artificially-drained agricultural system devoted to row cropping corn and soybeans. Current federal policies are again influencing land use change in this region with increased corn acreage and new biomass crops proposed as part of an energy initiative emphasizing biofuels. To better address these present and future challenges it is helpful to understand how the legacies of past changes have shaped the current response of the system. To this end, a comparative analysis of the hydrologic signatures in both spatial and time series data from two central Illinois watersheds was undertaken. The past history of these catchments is reflected in their current hydrologic responses, which are highly heterogeneous, more so in the extensively tile-drained Sangamon watershed. The differences in geologic history, artificial drainage patterns, and to some extent, reservoir construction, manifest at all time scales, from annual to daily, and spatially within the watersheds. These differences can also be seen in the summer low flow patterns, where the more tile-drained watershed shows more variability than does the more naturally drained one. Of interest is the scaling behavior of the low flows; generally as drainage area increases, small-scale heterogeneity decreases. This is not seen in the more tile-drained watershed, thus adding complexity to the problem of predicting the catchment response to future changes.

  15. Newborn Urinary Metabolic Signatures of Prematurity and Other Disorders: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Sílvia O; Pinto, Joana; Barros, António S; Morais, Elisabete; Duarte, Daniela; Negrão, Fátima; Pita, Cristina; Almeida, Maria do Céu; Carreira, Isabel M; Spraul, Manfred; Gil, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    This work assesses the urinary metabolite signature of prematurity in newborns by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, while establishing the role of possible confounders and signature specificity, through comparison to other disorders. Gender and delivery mode are shown to impact importantly on newborn urine composition, their analysis pointing out at specific metabolite variations requiring consideration in unmatched subject groups. Premature newborns are, however, characterized by a stronger signature of varying metabolites, suggestive of disturbances in nucleotide metabolism, lung surfactants biosynthesis and renal function, along with enhancement of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, fatty acids oxidation, and oxidative stress. Comparison with other abnormal conditions (respiratory depression episode, large for gestational age, malformations, jaundice and premature rupture of membranes) reveals that such signature seems to be largely specific of preterm newborns, showing that NMR metabolomics can retrieve particular disorder effects, as well as general stress effects. These results provide valuable novel information on the metabolic impact of prematurity, contributing to the better understanding of its effects on the newborn's state of health. PMID:26566167

  16. Reattack of a Certificateless Aggregate Signature Scheme with Constant Pairing Computations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Baojun

    2014-01-01

    A new attack against a novel certificateless aggregate signature scheme with constant pairing computations is presented. To enhance security, a new certificateless signature scheme is proposed first. Then a new certificateless aggregate signature scheme with constant pairing computations based on the new certificateless signature scheme is presented. Security analysis shows that the proposed certificateless aggregate signature scheme is provably secured in the random oracle. PMID:24715811

  17. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study. PMID:27495086

  18. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study. PMID:27495086

  19. The lung cancer breath signature: a comparative analysis of exhaled breath and air sampled from inside the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Rosamaria; Santonico, Marco; Pennazza, Giorgio; Ghezzi, Silvia; Martinelli, Eugenio; Roscioni, Claudio; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Galluccio, Giovanni; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado; D’Amico, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    Results collected in more than 20 years of studies suggest a relationship between the volatile organic compounds exhaled in breath and lung cancer. However, the origin of these compounds is still not completely elucidated. In spite of the simplistic vision that cancerous tissues in lungs directly emit the volatile metabolites into the airways, some papers point out that metabolites are collected by the blood and then exchanged at the air-blood interface in the lung. To shed light on this subject we performed an experiment collecting both the breath and the air inside both the lungs with a modified bronchoscopic probe. The samples were measured with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and an electronic nose. We found that the diagnostic capability of the electronic nose does not depend on the presence of cancer in the sampled lung, reaching in both cases an above 90% correct classification rate between cancer and non-cancer samples. On the other hand, multivariate analysis of GC-MS achieved a correct classification rate between the two lungs of only 76%. GC-MS analysis of breath and air sampled from the lungs demonstrates a substantial preservation of the VOCs pattern from inside the lung to the exhaled breath. PMID:26559776

  20. The lung cancer breath signature: a comparative analysis of exhaled breath and air sampled from inside the lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Rosamaria; Santonico, Marco; Pennazza, Giorgio; Ghezzi, Silvia; Martinelli, Eugenio; Roscioni, Claudio; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Galluccio, Giovanni; Paolesse, Roberto; di Natale, Corrado; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2015-11-01

    Results collected in more than 20 years of studies suggest a relationship between the volatile organic compounds exhaled in breath and lung cancer. However, the origin of these compounds is still not completely elucidated. In spite of the simplistic vision that cancerous tissues in lungs directly emit the volatile metabolites into the airways, some papers point out that metabolites are collected by the blood and then exchanged at the air-blood interface in the lung. To shed light on this subject we performed an experiment collecting both the breath and the air inside both the lungs with a modified bronchoscopic probe. The samples were measured with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and an electronic nose. We found that the diagnostic capability of the electronic nose does not depend on the presence of cancer in the sampled lung, reaching in both cases an above 90% correct classification rate between cancer and non-cancer samples. On the other hand, multivariate analysis of GC-MS achieved a correct classification rate between the two lungs of only 76%. GC-MS analysis of breath and air sampled from the lungs demonstrates a substantial preservation of the VOCs pattern from inside the lung to the exhaled breath.

  1. Donor-specific indirect pathway analysis reveals a B-cell-independent signature which reflects outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Haynes, L D; Jankowska-Gan, E; Sheka, A; Keller, M R; Hernandez-Fuentes, M P; Lechler, R I; Seyfert-Margolis, V; Turka, L A; Newell, K A; Burlingham, W J

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the role of donor-specific indirect pathway T cells in renal transplant tolerance, we analyzed responses in peripheral blood of 45 patients using the trans-vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity assay. Subjects were enrolled into five groups-identical twin, clinically tolerant (TOL), steroid monotherapy (MONO), standard immunosuppression (SI) and chronic rejection (CR)-based on transplant type, posttransplant immunosuppression and graft function. The indirect pathway was active in all groups except twins but distinct intergroup differences were evident, corresponding to clinical status. The antidonor indirect pathway T effector response increased across patient groups (TOL < MONO < SI < CR; p < 0.0001) whereas antidonor indirect pathway T regulatory response decreased (TOL > MONO = SI > CR; p < 0.005). This pattern differed from that seen in circulating naïve B-cell numbers and in a cross-platform biomarker analysis, where patients on monotherapy were not ranked closest to TOL patients, but rather were indistinguishable from chronically rejecting patients. Cross-sectional analysis of the indirect pathway revealed a spectrum in T-regulatory:T-effector balance, ranging from TOL patients having predominantly regulatory responses to CR patients having predominantly effector responses. Therefore, the indirect pathway measurements reflect a distinct aspect of tolerance from the recently reported elevation of circulating naïve B cells, which was apparent only in recipients off immunosuppression. PMID:22151236

  2. Human Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Second- and Third-Trimester Amniocentesis: Differentiation Potential, Molecular Signature, and Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Savickiene, Jurate; Treigyte, Grazina; Baronaite, Sandra; Valiuliene, Giedre; Kaupinis, Algirdas; Valius, Mindaugas; Arlauskiene, Audrone; Navakauskiene, Ruta

    2015-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem cells have become an attractive stem cell source for potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to characterize amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) from second- and third-trimester of gestation. Using two-stage protocol, MSCs were successfully cultured and exhibited typical stem cell morphological, specific cell surface, and pluripotency markers characteristics. AF-MSCs differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes, chondrocytes, myocytes, and neuronal cells, as determined by morphological changes, cell staining, and RT-qPCR showing the tissue-specific gene presence for differentiated cell lineages. Using SYNAPT G2 High Definition Mass Spectrometry technique approach, we performed for the first time the comparative proteomic analysis between undifferentiated AF-MSCs from late trimester of gestation and differentiated into myogenic, adipogenic, osteogenic, and neurogenic lineages. The analysis of the functional and expression patterns of 250 high abundance proteins selected from more than 1400 demonstrated the similar proteome of cultured and differentiated AF-MSCs but the unique changes in their expression profile during cell differentiation that may help the identification of key markers in differentiated cells. Our results provide evidence that human amniotic fluid of second- and third-trimester contains stem cells with multilineage potential and may be attractive source for clinical applications. PMID:26351462

  3. Current signature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor); Ihlefeld, Curtis (Inventor); Burns, Bradley (Inventor); Bassignani, Karin E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A solenoid health monitoring system uses a signal conditioner and controller assembly in one embodiment that includes analog circuitry and a DSP controller. The analog circuitry provides signal conditioning to the low-level raw signal coming from a signal acquisition assembly. Software running in a DSP analyzes the incoming data (recorded current signature) and determines the state of the solenoid whether it is energized, de-energized, or in a transitioning state. In one embodiment, the software identifies key features in the current signature during the transition phase and is able to determine the health of the solenoid.

  4. Factor models for cancer signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel method for extracting cancer signatures by applying statistical risk models (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2732453) from quantitative finance to cancer genome data. Using 1389 whole genome sequenced samples from 14 cancers, we identify an "overall" mode of somatic mutational noise. We give a prescription for factoring out this noise and source code for fixing the number of signatures. We apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to genome data aggregated by cancer subtype and filtered using our method. The resultant signatures have substantially lower variability than those from unfiltered data. Also, the computational cost of signature extraction is cut by about a factor of 10. We find 3 novel cancer signatures, including a liver cancer dominant signature (96% contribution) and a renal cell carcinoma signature (70% contribution). Our method accelerates finding new cancer signatures and improves their overall stability. Reciprocally, the methods for extracting cancer signatures could have interesting applications in quantitative finance.

  5. Australian Acid Playa Lake as a Mars Analog: Results from Sediment Lipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H.; Baldridge, A. M.; Stern, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ephemeral saline acidic lakes on the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia have been suggested as geochemical analogues to martian terrains. Both are characterized by interbedded phyllosilicates and hydrated sulfates. On Mars, these areas indicate shifting environmental conditions, from the neutral/alkaline and wet conditions that dominated during the Noachian era to the more familiar dry, acidic conditions that began in the Hesperian. The habitability of such a dynamic environment can be informed by investigation of the Yilgarn Lake system. Previous work has found phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) evidence of microbial communities in sections of sediment cores taken from Lake Gilmore. These communities include both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, Actinomycetes, and even methanotrophs. Given recurring detection of methane on the martian surface, evidence of a methane cycling community in an analogous environment is of particular interest. In this study we analyze the carbon isotope composition of bulk organic material as well as extracted lipids from the Lake Gilmore sediment cores at both a near-shore and mid-lake location. These analyses reveal very low accumulations of organic carbon, concentrated primarily in the gypsum-rich near-shore core. The near-shore sediments show a down-core decrease in abundance of organic carbon as well as depletion in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) with depth. Bulk carbon did not exhibit the unique, highly depleted, diagnostic signature associated with methanotrophic biomass. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of carbon in extracted methanotroph PFLAs can confirm the presence of a methane cycling metabolism at depth. Also, additional extractions have isolated lipids associated with lake-edge grasses. These analyses consider both the chain-length distribution and carbon CSIA of these lipids in order to understand the effect of terrestrial detritus on any preserved methanotroph carbon signal, given the very low

  6. Genetic signatures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Nonthaburi genotype revealed by whole genome analysis of isolates from tuberculous meningitis patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Coker, Olabisi Oluwabukola; Ngamphiw, Chumpol; Tongsima, Sissades; Regmi, Sanjib Mani; Clark, Taane G.; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Teo, Yik-Ying; Prammananan, Therdsak; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing plays a key role in understanding the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). The genotype-specific character of M. tb contributes to tuberculosis severity and emergence of drug resistance. Strains of M. tb complex can be classified into seven lineages. The Nonthaburi (NB) genotype, belonging to the Indo-Oceanic lineage (lineage 1), has a unique spoligotype and IS6110-RFLP pattern but has not previously undergone a detailed whole genome analysis. In addition, there is not much information available on the whole genome analysis of M. tb isolates from tuberculous meningitis (TBM) patients in public databases. Isolates CSF3053, 46-5069 and 43-13838 of NB genotype were obtained from the cerebrospinal fluids of TBM Thai patients in Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok. The whole genomes were subjected to high throughput sequencing. The sequence data of each isolate were assembled into draft genome. The sequences were also aligned to reference genome, to determine genomic variations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were obtained and grouped according to the functions of the genes containing them. They were compared with SNPs from 1,601 genomes, representing the seven lineages of M. tb complex, to determine the uniqueness of NB genotype. Susceptibility to first-line, second-line and other antituberculosis drugs were determined and related to the SNPs previously reported in drug-resistant related genes. The assembled genomes have an average size of 4,364,461 bp, 4,154 genes, 48 RNAs and 64 pseudogenes. A 500 base pairs deletion, which includes ppe50, was found in all isolates. RD239, specific for members of Indo Oceanic lineage, and RD147c were identified. A total of 2,202 SNPs were common to the isolates and used to classify the NB strains as members of sublineage 1.2.1. Compared with 1,601 genomes from the seven lineages of M. tb complex, mutation G2342203C was found novel to the isolates in this study. Three mutations (T28910C, C1180580T

  7. Transcriptome Analysis in Haematococcus pluvialis: Astaxanthin Induction by Salicylic Acid (SA) and Jasmonic Acid (JA)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guanxun; Li, Guoqiang; Sun, Haifeng; Deng, Suzhen; Shen, Yicheng; Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Ruihao; Meng, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is an astaxanthin-rich microalga that can increase its astaxanthin production by salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA) induction. The genetic transcriptome details of astaxanthin biosynthesis were analyzed by exposing the algal cells to 25 mg/L of SA and JA for 1, 6 and 24 hours, plus to the control (no stress). Based on the RNA-seq analysis, 56,077 unigenes (51.7%) were identified with functions in response to the hormone stress. The top five identified subcategories were cell, cellular process, intracellular, catalytic activity and cytoplasm, which possessed 5600 (~9.99%), 5302 (~9.45%), 5242 (~9.35%), 4407 (~7.86%) and 4195 (~7.48%) unigenes, respectively. Furthermore, 59 unigenes were identified and assigned to 26 putative transcription factors (TFs), including 12 plant-specific TFs. They were likely associated with astaxanthin biosynthesis in Haematococcus upon SA and JA stress. In comparison, the up-regulation of differential expressed genes occurred much earlier, with higher transcript levels in the JA treatment (about 6 h later) than in the SA treatment (beyond 24 h). These results provide valuable information for directing metabolic engineering efforts to improve astaxanthin biosynthesis in H. pluvialis. PMID:26484871

  8. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  9. Combining random forest and 2D correlation analysis to identify serum spectral signatures for neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin R; Ashton, Katherine M; Brodbelt, Andrew; Dawson, Timothy; Jenkinson, Michael D; Hunt, Neil T; Palmer, David S; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has long been established as an analytical technique for the measurement of vibrational modes of molecular systems. More recently, FTIR has been used for the analysis of biofluids with the aim of becoming a tool to aid diagnosis. For the clinician, this represents a convenient, fast, non-subjective option for the study of biofluids and the diagnosis of disease states. The patient also benefits from this method, as the procedure for the collection of serum is much less invasive and stressful than traditional biopsy. This is especially true of patients in whom brain cancer is suspected. A brain biopsy is very unpleasant for the patient, potentially dangerous and can occasionally be inconclusive. We therefore present a method for the diagnosis of brain cancer from serum samples using FTIR and machine learning techniques. The scope of the study involved 433 patients from whom were collected 9 spectra each in the range 600-4000 cm(-1). To begin the development of the novel method, various pre-processing steps were investigated and ranked in terms of final accuracy of the diagnosis. Random forest machine learning was utilised as a classifier to separate patients into cancer or non-cancer categories based upon the intensities of wavenumbers present in their spectra. Generalised 2D correlational analysis was then employed to further augment the machine learning, and also to establish spectral features important for the distinction between cancer and non-cancer serum samples. Using these methods, sensitivities of up to 92.8% and specificities of up to 91.5% were possible. Furthermore, ratiometrics were also investigated in order to establish any correlations present in the dataset. We show a rapid, computationally light, accurate, statistically robust methodology for the identification of spectral features present in differing disease states. With current advances in IR technology, such as the development of rapid discrete

  10. Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.; Rutter, N.W.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed amino acid analysis of bones, teeth, and antler from several mammal species have shown that concentrations of several amino acids can be related to three factors: type of material analyzed, diagenetic alteration of the material, and relative age of the fossil. Concentrations of several amino acids are significantly different in enamel compared to those of dentine or cement. This can be used to check that no contamination of one material by another has occurred, which is critical for using the data for amino acid dating, since all three materials have different racemization rates for some acids. With increased in growth of secondary minerals, generally reduced amino acid concentrations are observed. Interacid ratios and concentrations vary significantly the norms expected for the type of material with increasing degrees of alteration. These effects can be linked to abnormal racemization ratios observed in the same samples. Therefore, abnormal concentrations and/or interacid ratios can be used to detect samples in which the D/L amino acid ratios otherwise appear normal, thereby insuring better accuracy of amino acid racemization analysis. For unaltered fossils, with increasing sample age regardless the type of material, some amino acids steadily degrade, while others actually increase in concentration initially due to their generation as by-products of decay. Preliminary studies indicate that this progressive alteration can used to complement racemization data for determining relative stratigraphic sequences.

  11. Microevolution in time and space: SNP analysis of historical DNA reveals dynamic signatures of selection in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Therkildsen, Nina O; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Als, Thomas D; Swain, Douglas P; Morgan, M Joanne; Trippel, Edward A; Palumbi, Stephen R; Meldrup, Dorte; Nielsen, Einar E

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how quickly natural populations adapt to changes in their environment and how temporal and spatial variation in selection pressures interact to shape patterns of genetic diversity. We here address these issues with a series of genome scans in four overfished populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) studied over an 80-year period. Screening of >1000 gene-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified 77 loci that showed highly elevated levels of differentiation, likely as an effect of directional selection, in either time, space or both. Exploratory analysis suggested that temporal allele frequency shifts at certain loci may correlate with local temperature variation and with life history changes suggested to be fisheries induced. Interestingly, however, largely nonoverlapping sets of loci were temporal outliers in the different populations and outliers from the 1928 to 1960 period showed almost complete stability during later decades. The contrasting microevolutionary trajectories among populations resulted in sequential shifts in spatial outliers, with no locus maintaining elevated spatial differentiation throughout the study period. Simulations of migration coupled with observations of temporally stable spatial structure at neutral loci suggest that population replacement or gene flow alone could not explain all the observed allele frequency variation. Thus, the genetic changes are likely to at least partly be driven by highly dynamic temporally and spatially varying selection. These findings have important implications for our understanding of local adaptation and evolutionary potential in high gene flow organisms and underscore the need to carefully consider all dimensions of biocomplexity for evolutionarily sustainable management.

  12. Latch-up signature analysis technique for plastic dual-in-line package (PDIP) devices using scanning acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahanpour, M.; Morgan, I.; Li, S.; Kaufmann, M.

    1995-12-31

    Cracks in the top surface of plastic package product (PDIP), as shown in a figure, resulting from Latch-Up (LU), DC Vcc Over-Voltage, or Reverse Insertion in the socket are usually similar in appearance. A scanning acoustic microscope can not determine the root cause of this Electrical Over-Stress (EOS) damage since all of the above show similar delamination. Even after device decapsulation, carbonized epoxy around Vcc and Vss bond wires doesn`t always indicate the exact root cause of failure. However, a nondestructive technique has been developed to distinguish (LU) from other EOS failures using a Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM). Finally, to verify the validity of the results, a computer analysis using a 3-Dimensional Finite Element Model (FEM) was used. The calculated stress distribution in the plastic IC package in the sustained LU condition agreed with the observations of delamination using SAM on product subjected to Transient Latch-Up (TLU) simulation on the power supply pin.

  13. Unraveling the Light-Specific Metabolic and Regulatory Signatures of Rice through Combined in Silico Modeling and Multiomics Analysis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ha, Sun-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Light quality is an important signaling component upon which plants orchestrate various morphological processes, including seed germination and seedling photomorphogenesis. However, it is still unclear how plants, especially food crops, sense various light qualities and modulate their cellular growth and other developmental processes. Therefore, in this work, we initially profiled the transcripts of a model crop, rice (Oryza sativa), under four different light treatments (blue, green, red, and white) as well as in the dark. Concurrently, we reconstructed a fully compartmentalized genome-scale metabolic model of rice cells, iOS2164, containing 2,164 unique genes, 2,283 reactions, and 1,999 metabolites. We then combined the model with transcriptome profiles to elucidate the light-specific transcriptional signatures of rice metabolism. Clearly, light signals mediated rice gene expressions, differentially regulating numerous metabolic pathways: photosynthesis and secondary metabolism were up-regulated in blue light, whereas reserve carbohydrates degradation was pronounced in the dark. The topological analysis of gene expression data with the rice genome-scale metabolic model further uncovered that phytohormones, such as abscisate, ethylene, gibberellin, and jasmonate, are the key biomarkers of light-mediated regulation, and subsequent analysis of the associated genes’ promoter regions identified several light-specific transcription factors. Finally, the transcriptional control of rice metabolism by red and blue light signals was assessed by integrating the transcriptome and metabolome data with constraint-based modeling. The biological insights gained from this integrative systems biology approach offer several potential applications, such as improving the agronomic traits of food crops and designing light-specific synthetic gene circuits in microbial and mammalian systems. PMID:26453433

  14. Why do Sequence Signatures Predict Enzyme Mechanism? Homology versus Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Kirsten E.; De Ferrari, Luna; Mitchell, John B. O.

    2015-01-01

    First, we identify InterPro sequence signatures representing evolutionary relatedness and, second, signatures identifying specific chemical machinery. Thus, we predict the chemical mechanisms of enzyme-catalyzed reactions from catalytic and non-catalytic subsets of InterPro signatures. We first scanned our 249 sequences using InterProScan and then used the MACiE database to identify those amino acid residues that are important for catalysis. The sequences were mutated in silico to replace these catalytic residues with glycine and then again scanned using InterProScan. Those signature matches from the original scan that disappeared on mutation were called catalytic. Mechanism was predicted using all signatures, only the 78 “catalytic” signatures, or only the 519 “non-catalytic” signatures. The non-catalytic signatures gave indistinguishable results from those for the whole feature set, with precision of 0.991 and sensitivity of 0.970. The catalytic signatures alone gave less impressive predictivity, with precision and sensitivity of 0.791 and 0.735, respectively. These results show that our successful prediction of enzyme mechanism is mostly by homology rather than by identifying catalytic machinery. PMID:26740739

  15. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Signature Profile for Tick-Borne Flavivirus Persistence in HEK 293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jennifer; Offerdahl, Danielle K.; Martens, Craig; Sturdevant, Daniel; Turner, Charles V.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFVs) cause febrile illnesses, which may progress to severe encephalitis and/or death in humans globally. Most people who recover from severe acute disease suffer from debilitating neurological sequelae, which may be due to viral persistence, infection-induced neurological cell damage, host response, or some combination of these. Acute TBFV infection of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells in vitro results in the death of >95% of infected cells by day 5. However, replacing cell growth medium allows surviving cells to repopulate and become persistently infected for extended periods of time. The mechanisms responsible for initiation and maintenance of viral persistence remain vague. We subjected the HEK 293T cell transcriptome to deep sequencing to identify genes differentially expressed during acute infection and persistent infection. A total of 451 genes showed unique significant differential expression levels in persistently infected cells relative to the acute phase of infection. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis results suggested that the expression of prosurvival oncogenes AKT2 and ERBB2 was upregulated in persistently infected cells, whereas proapoptotic genes, such as Bad and the beta interferon 1 (IFN-β1) gene, were downregulated. Genes encoding antiviral cytokines such as the CCL5, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CXCL10 genes were upregulated during the acute phase, but the same genes were relatively quiescent in persistently infected cells. Exogenous induction of apoptosis demonstrated that persistently infected cells were resistant to apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, the differential transcriptome profiles of acute-phase compared to persistently infected HEK 293T cells demonstrated an evasion of apoptosis, which may be critical for a chronic TBFV infection state. These results provide a basis for further study of the mechanisms of TBFV persistence. PMID:27222466

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts Reveals a Disease Extracellular Matrix Signature and Key Molecular Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Maria Angels; Jou, Cristina; Puigdelloses, Montserrat; Ortez, Carlos I.; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduardo; Colomer, Jaume; Nascimento, Andrés; Kalko, Susana G.; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background Collagen VI related myopathies encompass a range of phenotypes with involvement of skeletal muscle, skin and other connective tissues. They represent a severe and relatively common form of congenital disease for which there is no treatment. Collagen VI in skeletal muscle and skin is produced by fibroblasts. Aims & Methods In order to gain insight into the consequences of collagen VI mutations and identify key disease pathways we performed global gene expression analysis of dermal fibroblasts from patients with Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with and without vitamin C treatment. The expression data were integrated using a range of systems biology tools. Results were validated by real-time PCR, western blotting and functional assays. Findings We found significant changes in the expression levels of almost 600 genes between collagen VI deficient and control fibroblasts. Highly regulated genes included extracellular matrix components and surface receptors, including integrins, indicating a shift in the interaction between the cell and its environment. This was accompanied by a significant increase in fibroblasts adhesion to laminin. The observed changes in gene expression profiling may be under the control of two miRNAs, miR-30c and miR-181a, which we found elevated in tissue and serum from patients and which could represent novel biomarkers for muscular dystrophy. Finally, the response to vitamin C of collagen VI mutated fibroblasts significantly differed from healthy fibroblasts. Vitamin C treatment was able to revert the expression of some key genes to levels found in control cells raising the possibility of a beneficial effect of vitamin C as a modulator of some of the pathological aspects of collagen VI related diseases. PMID:26670220

  17. Comprehensive DNA Methylation Analysis Reveals a Common Ten-Gene Methylation Signature in Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Árpád V.; Valcz, Gábor; Hollósi, Péter; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Patai, Árpád; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Leiszter, Katalin; Tóth, Kinga; Sipos, Ferenc; Kovalszky, Ilona; Péter, Zoltán; Miheller, Pál; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Microarray analysis of promoter hypermethylation provides insight into the role and extent of DNA methylation in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) and may be co-monitored with the appearance of driver mutations. Colonic biopsy samples were obtained endoscopically from 10 normal, 23 adenoma (17 low-grade (LGD) and 6 high-grade dysplasia (HGD)), and 8 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (4 active and 4 inactive). CRC samples were obtained from 24 patients (17 primary, 7 metastatic (MCRC)), 7 of them with synchronous LGD. Field effects were analyzed in tissues 1 cm (n = 5) and 10 cm (n = 5) from the margin of CRC. Tissue materials were studied for DNA methylation status using a 96 gene panel and for KRAS and BRAF mutations. Expression levels were assayed using whole genomic mRNA arrays. SFRP1 was further examined by immunohistochemistry. HT29 cells were treated with 5-aza-2’ deoxycytidine to analyze the reversal possibility of DNA methylation. More than 85% of tumor samples showed hypermethylation in 10 genes (SFRP1, SST, BNC1, MAL, SLIT2, SFRP2, SLIT3, ALDH1A3, TMEFF2, WIF1), whereas the frequency of examined mutations were below 25%. These genes distinguished precancerous and cancerous lesions from inflamed and healthy tissue. The mRNA alterations that might be caused by systematic methylation could be partly reversed by demethylation treatment. Systematic changes in methylation patterns were observed early in CRC carcinogenesis, occuring in precursor lesions and CRC. Thus we conclude that DNA hypermethylation is an early and systematic event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and it could be potentially reversed by systematic demethylation therapy, but it would need more in vitro and in vivo experiments to support this theory. PMID:26291085

  18. Macular edema in underserved diabetic patients: Improving detection by enhancing the optical signature and data analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamami, Mastour Abdullah

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are chief causes of vision loss in working adults. Thus, retinal screening of patients with diabetes has become standard practice in some countries to prevent visual impairment and blindness from diabetic retinopathy. One goal is to improve techniques currently used to diagnose diabetic retinopathy. Another goal is to probe pathophysiological changes seen with imaging methods. Analysis was performed on a novel dataset from more than 2000 underserved adult diabetic patients, who were recruited for a screening study for diabetic eye disease. Data were collected from four county clinics at Alameda Health, Alameda County, CA. Over 90% of patients self-identified as a racial/ethnic identity other than non-Hispanic white. We investigated the prevalence and optical properties of macular edema. In the first study, a retrospective cohort study was performed to compare macular thickness in diabetic patients with and without macular edema to determine the presence of damage to the external limiting membrane or and the relation of damage to the ELM to damage to photoreceptors. In the second study, we investigated whether the information in red light better visualizes cysts in diabetic macular edema, as compared to green light. In the third study, we investigated whether the demographic and blood glucose information predict diabetic macular edema. Three logistic regression analyses were compared. In the fourth study, we examined how different outcome measures of retinal thickness vary with demographic and blood glucose measures, using a trichotomous variable for retinal thickness. The findings point strongly to large individual differences in the development of macular edema, which is difficult to diagnose with the most common methods in dark eyes. Further, while blood glucose was found to be important, there are additional differences in the potential for macular edema that are associated with ethnic group and gender.

  19. A Signature Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin V.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses Dr. Amalia Amaki and her approach to art as her signature style by turning everyday items into fine art. Amaki is an assistant professor of art, art history, and Black American studies at the University of Delaware. She loves taking unexpected an object and redefining it in the context of art--like a button, a fan, a faded…

  20. Quantitative analysis of seasonal variation in the amino acids in phloem sap of Salix alba L.

    PubMed

    Leckstein, P M; Llewellyn, M

    1975-01-01

    Phloem sap of Salix alba L. was collected at monthly intervals between May and October. Amino acid analysis was carried out by ion exchange chromatography. The concentrations of individual amino acids are reported.

  1. Folic acid fortification of grain: an economic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, P S; Waitzman, N J; Scheffler, R M; Pi, R D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to compare the economic costs and benefits of fortifying grain with folic acid to prevent neural tube defects. METHODS. A cost-benefit analysis based on the US population, using the human capital approach to estimate the costs associated with preventable neural tube defects, was conducted. RESULTS. Under a range of assumptions about discount rates, baseline folate intake, the effectiveness of folate in preventing neural tube defects, the threshold dose that minimizes risk, and the cost of surveillance, fortification would likely yield a net economic benefit. The best estimate of this benefit is $94 million with low-level (140 micrograms [mcg] per 100 g grain) fortification and $252 million with high-level (350 mcg/100 g) fortification. The benefit-to-cost ratio is estimated at 4.3:1 for low-level and 6.1:1 for high-level fortification. CONCLUSIONS. By averting costly birth defects, folic acid fortification of grain in the United States may yield a substantial economic benefit. We may have underestimated net benefits because of unmeasured costs of neural tube defects and unmeasured benefits of higher folate intake. We may have overestimated net benefits if the cost of neurologic sequelae related to delayed diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency exceeds our projection. PMID:7733427

  2. Quantum mechanical stabilization of Minkowski signature wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1989-05-19

    When one attempts to construct classical wormholes in Minkowski signature Lorentzian spacetimes violations of both the weak energy hypothesis and averaged weak energy hypothesis are encountered. Since the weak energy hypothesis is experimentally known to be violated quantum mechanically, this suggests that a quantum mechanical analysis of Minkowski signature wormholes is in order. In this note I perform a minisuperspace analysis of a simple class of Minkowski signature wormholes. By solving the Wheeler-de Witt equation for pure Einstein gravity on this minisuperspace the quantum mechanical wave function of the wormhole is obtained in closed form. The wormhole is shown to be quantum mechanically stabilized with an average radius of order the Planck length. 8 refs.

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  4. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K S; Periandy, S; Govindarajan, M

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  5. A new method to detect transitory signatures and local time/space variability structures in the climate system: the scale-dependent correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodó, Xavier; Rodríguez-Arias, Miquel-Àngel

    2006-10-01

    The study of transitory signals and local variability structures in both/either time and space and their role as sources of climatic memory, is an important but often neglected topic in climate research despite its obvious importance and extensive coverage in the literature. Transitory signals arise either from non-linearities, in the climate system, transitory atmosphere-ocean couplings, and other processes in the climate system evolving after a critical threshold is crossed. These temporary interactions that, though intense, may not last long, can be responsible for a large amount of unexplained variability but are normally considered of limited relevance and often, discarded. With most of the current techniques at hand these typology of signatures are difficult to isolate because the low signal-to-noise ratio in midlatitudes, the limited recurrence of the transitory signals during a customary interval of data considered. Also, there is often a serious problem arising from the smoothing of local or transitory processes if statistical techniques are applied, that consider all the length of data available, rather than taking into account the size of the specific variability structure under investigation. Scale-dependent correlation (SDC) analysis is a new statistical method capable of highlighting the presence of transitory processes, these former being understood as temporary significant lag-dependent autocovariance in a single series, or covariance structures between two series. This approach, therefore, complements other approaches such as those resulting from the families of wavelet analysis, singular-spectrum analysis and recurrence plots. A main feature of SDC is its high-performance for short time series, its ability to characterize phase-relationships and thresholds in the bivariate domain. Ultimately, SDC helps tracking short-lagged relationships among processes that locally or temporarily couple and uncouple. The use of SDC is illustrated in the present

  6. Adansonian Analysis and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Base Composition of Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.; Mandel, M.

    1965-01-01

    Colwell, R. R. (Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.), and M. Mandel. Adansonian analysis and deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 89:454–461. 1965.—A total of 33 strains of Serratia marcescens were subjected to Adansonian analysis for which more than 200 coded features for each of the organisms were included. In addition, the base composition [expressed as moles per cent guanine + cytosine (G + C)] of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) prepared from each of the strains was determined. Except for four strains which were intermediate between Serratia and the Hafnia and Aerobacter group C of Edwards and Ewing, the S. marcescens species group proved to be extremely homogeneous, and the different strains showed high affinities for each other (mean similarity, ¯S = 77%). The G + C ratio of the DNA from the Serratia strains ranged from 56.2 to 58.4% G + C. Many species names have been listed for the genus, but only a single clustering of the strains was obtained at the species level, for which the species name S. marcescens was retained. S. kiliensis, S. indica, S. plymuthica, and S. marinorubra could not be distinguished from S. marcescens; it was concluded, therefore, that there is only a single species in the genus. The variety designation kiliensis does not appear to be valid, since no subspecies clustering of strains with negative Voges-Proskauer reactions could be detected. The characteristics of the species are listed, and a description of S. marcescens is presented. PMID:14255714

  7. Qualitative urinary organic acid analysis: 10 years of quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Bonham, James R; Hoffmann, Georg F; Scott, Camilla; Langhans, Claus-Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 10 years, a total of 90 urine samples from patients with metabolic disorders and controls were circulated to different laboratories in Europe and overseas, starting with 67 laboratories in 2005 and reaching 101 in 2014. The participants were asked to analyse the samples in their usual way and to prepare a report as if to a non-specialist pediatrician. The performance for the detection of fumarase deficiency, glutaric aciduria type I, isovaleric aciduria, methylmalonic aciduria, mevalonic aciduria, phenylketonuria and propionic aciduria was excellent (98-100 %). Over the last few years, detection has clearly improved for tyrosinaemia type I (39 % in 2008 to over 80 % in 2011/2014), maple syrup urine disease (85 % in 2005 to 98 % in 2012), hawkinsinuria (62 % in 2010 to 88 % in 2014), aminoacylase I deficiency (43 % in 2009 to 73 % in 2012) and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (60 % in 2005 to 93 % by 2011). Normal urines were mostly considered as normal (83-100 %), but laboratories often made additional diagnostic suggestions. When the findings were unambiguous, the reports were mostly clear. However, when they were less obvious, the content and quality of reports varied greatly. Repetition of organic acid measurements on a fresh sample was rarely suggested, while more complex or invasive diagnostic strategies, including further metabolic screening or biopsy were recommended. Surprisingly very few participants suggested referral from the general paediatrician to a specialist metabolic centre to confirm a diagnosis and, if applicable, to initiate treatment despite evidence suggesting that this improves the outcome for patients with inherited metabolic disorders. The reliability of qualitative organic acid analysis has improved over the last few years. However, several aspects of reporting to non-specialists may need discussion and clinicians need to be aware of the uncertainty inherent in all forms of laboratory diagnostic

  8. Qualitative urinary organic acid analysis: 10 years of quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Bonham, James R; Hoffmann, Georg F; Scott, Camilla; Langhans, Claus-Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 10 years, a total of 90 urine samples from patients with metabolic disorders and controls were circulated to different laboratories in Europe and overseas, starting with 67 laboratories in 2005 and reaching 101 in 2014. The participants were asked to analyse the samples in their usual way and to prepare a report as if to a non-specialist pediatrician. The performance for the detection of fumarase deficiency, glutaric aciduria type I, isovaleric aciduria, methylmalonic aciduria, mevalonic aciduria, phenylketonuria and propionic aciduria was excellent (98-100 %). Over the last few years, detection has clearly improved for tyrosinaemia type I (39 % in 2008 to over 80 % in 2011/2014), maple syrup urine disease (85 % in 2005 to 98 % in 2012), hawkinsinuria (62 % in 2010 to 88 % in 2014), aminoacylase I deficiency (43 % in 2009 to 73 % in 2012) and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (60 % in 2005 to 93 % by 2011). Normal urines were mostly considered as normal (83-100 %), but laboratories often made additional diagnostic suggestions. When the findings were unambiguous, the reports were mostly clear. However, when they were less obvious, the content and quality of reports varied greatly. Repetition of organic acid measurements on a fresh sample was rarely suggested, while more complex or invasive diagnostic strategies, including further metabolic screening or biopsy were recommended. Surprisingly very few participants suggested referral from the general paediatrician to a specialist metabolic centre to confirm a diagnosis and, if applicable, to initiate treatment despite evidence suggesting that this improves the outcome for patients with inherited metabolic disorders. The reliability of qualitative organic acid analysis has improved over the last few years. However, several aspects of reporting to non-specialists may need discussion and clinicians need to be aware of the uncertainty inherent in all forms of laboratory diagnostic

  9. Automated protein hydrolysis delivering sample to a solid acid catalyst for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic protein hydrolysis system using strong cation-exchange resins as solid acid catalysts. Examining several kinds of inorganic solid acids and cation-exchange resins, we found that a few cation-exchange resins worked as acid catalysts for protein hydrolysis when heated in the presence of water. The most efficient resin yielded amounts of amino acids that were over 70% of those recovered after conventional hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid and resulted in amino acid compositions matching the theoretical values. The solid-acid hydrolysis was automated by packing the resin into columns, combining the columns with a high-performance liquid chromatography system, and heating them. The amino acids that constitute a protein can thereby be determined, minimizing contamination from the environment.

  10. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; de Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  11. Sensitive Amino Acid Composition and Chirality Analysis with the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Alison M.; Scherer, James R.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Grover, William H.; Ivester, Robin H. C.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive yet compact instrumentation capable of performing in situ analyses. Our studies are focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. Amino acid composition and chirality analysis has been previously demonstrated in the lab using microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) chips. To analyze amino acids in the field, we have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip.

  12. The potential of circulating extracellular small RNAs (smexRNA) in veterinary diagnostics—Identifying biomarker signatures by multivariate data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melanie, Spornraft; Benedikt, Kirchner; Pfaffl, Michael W.; Irmgard, Riedmaier

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide growth and performance-enhancing substances are used in cattle husbandry to increase productivity. In certain countries however e.g., in the EU, these practices are forbidden to prevent the consumers from potential health risks of substance residues in food. To maximize economic profit, ‘black sheep‘ among farmers might circumvent the detection methods used in routine controls, which highlights the need for an innovative and reliable detection method. Transcriptomics is a promising new approach in the discovery of veterinary medicine biomarkers and also a missing puzzle piece, as up to date, metabolomics and proteomics are paramount. Due to increased stability and easy sampling, circulating extracellular small RNAs (smexRNAs) in bovine plasma were small RNA-sequenced and their potential to serve as biomarker candidates was evaluated using multivariate data analysis tools. After running the data evaluation pipeline, the proportion of miRNAs (microRNAs) and piRNAs (PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNAs) on the total sequenced reads was calculated. Additionally, top 10 signatures were compared which revealed that the readcount data sets were highly affected by the most abundant miRNA and piRNA profiles. To evaluate the discriminative power of multivariate data analyses to identify animals after veterinary drug application on the basis of smexRNAs, OPLS-DA was performed. In summary, the quality of miRNA models using all mapped reads for both treatment groups (animals treated with steroid hormones or the β-agonist clenbuterol) is predominant to those generated with combined data sets or piRNAs alone. Using multivariate projection methodologies like OPLS-DA have proven the best potential to generate discriminative miRNA models, supported by small RNA-Seq data. Based on the presented comparative OPLS-DA, miRNAs are the favorable smexRNA biomarker candidates in the research field of veterinary drug abuse. PMID:27077039

  13. Identification and analysis of genome-wide SNPs provide insight into signatures of selection and domestication in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Sun, Luyang; Liu, Shikai; Wang, Ruijia; Jiang, Yanliang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jiaren; Bao, Lisui; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Dunham, Rex; Waldbieser, Geoff; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Domestication and selection for important performance traits can impact the genome, which is most often reflected by reduced heterozygosity in and surrounding genes related to traits affected by selection. In this study, analysis of the genomic impact caused by domestication and artificial selection was conducted by investigating the signatures of selection using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). A total of 8.4 million candidate SNPs were identified by using next generation sequencing. On average, the channel catfish genome harbors one SNP per 116 bp. Approximately 6.6 million, 5.3 million, 4.9 million, 7.1 million and 6.7 million SNPs were detected in the Marion, Thompson, USDA103, Hatchery strain, and wild population, respectively. The allele frequencies of 407,861 SNPs differed significantly between the domestic and wild populations. With these SNPs, 23 genomic regions with putative selective sweeps were identified that included 11 genes. Although the function for the majority of the genes remain unknown in catfish, several genes with known function related to aquaculture performance traits were included in the regions with selective sweeps. These included hypoxia-inducible factor 1β. HIFιβ.. and the transporter gene ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 5 (ABCB5). HIF1β. is important for response to hypoxia and tolerance to low oxygen levels is a critical aquaculture trait. The large numbers of SNPs identified from this study are valuable for the development of high-density SNP arrays for genetic and genomic studies of performance traits in catfish. PMID:25313648

  14. The potential of circulating extracellular small RNAs (smexRNA) in veterinary diagnostics-Identifying biomarker signatures by multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Melanie, Spornraft; Benedikt, Kirchner; Pfaffl, Michael W; Irmgard, Riedmaier

    2015-09-01

    Worldwide growth and performance-enhancing substances are used in cattle husbandry to increase productivity. In certain countries however e.g., in the EU, these practices are forbidden to prevent the consumers from potential health risks of substance residues in food. To maximize economic profit, 'black sheep' among farmers might circumvent the detection methods used in routine controls, which highlights the need for an innovative and reliable detection method. Transcriptomics is a promising new approach in the discovery of veterinary medicine biomarkers and also a missing puzzle piece, as up to date, metabolomics and proteomics are paramount. Due to increased stability and easy sampling, circulating extracellular small RNAs (smexRNAs) in bovine plasma were small RNA-sequenced and their potential to serve as biomarker candidates was evaluated using multivariate data analysis tools. After running the data evaluation pipeline, the proportion of miRNAs (microRNAs) and piRNAs (PIWI-interacting small non-coding RNAs) on the total sequenced reads was calculated. Additionally, top 10 signatures were compared which revealed that the readcount data sets were highly affected by the most abundant miRNA and piRNA profiles. To evaluate the discriminative power of multivariate data analyses to identify animals after veterinary drug application on the basis of smexRNAs, OPLS-DA was performed. In summary, the quality of miRNA models using all mapped reads for both treatment groups (animals treated with steroid hormones or the β-agonist clenbuterol) is predominant to those generated with combined data sets or piRNAs alone. Using multivariate projection methodologies like OPLS-DA have proven the best potential to generate discriminative miRNA models, supported by small RNA-Seq data. Based on the presented comparative OPLS-DA, miRNAs are the favorable smexRNA biomarker candidates in the research field of veterinary drug abuse.

  15. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Sedger, Lisa M.; Tull, Dedreia L.; McConville, Malcolm J.; De Souza, David P.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Williams, Spencer J.; Dayalan, Saravanan; Lanzer, Daniel; Mackie, Helen; Lam, Thomas C.; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained within the normal range, with no alterations in individual fatty acids. The lipidomic analysis also identified 275 lipid-based molecules, including triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, fatty acids and phospholipids in AT oil and fat. Although the majority of lipid molecules were present in a similar abundance in LE and non-LE samples, there were several small changes: increased C20:5-containing triacylglycerides, reduced C10:0 caprinic and C24:1 nervonic acids. LE AT oil also contained a signature of increased cyclopropane-type fatty acids and inflammatory mediators arachidonic acid and ceramides. Interestingly C20:5 and C22:6 omega-3-type lipids are increased in LE AT, correlating with LE years. Hence, LE AT has a normal lipid profile containing a signature of inflammation and omega-3-lipids. It remains unclear, however, whether these differences reflect a small-scale global metabolic disturbance or effects within localised inflammatory foci. PMID:27182733

  16. A weak blind signature scheme based on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Niu, Xiamu; Ji, Liping; Tian, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a weak blind signature scheme based on the correlation of EPR (Einstein-Padolsky-Rosen) pairs. Different from classical blind signature schemes and current quantum signature schemes, our quantum blind signature scheme could guarantee not only the unconditionally security but also the anonymity of the message owner. To achieve that, quantum key distribution and one-time pad are adopted in our scheme. Experimental analysis proved that our scheme have the characteristics of non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. It has a wide application to E-payment system, E-government, E-business, and etc.

  17. GLC analysis of Indian rapeseed-mustard to study the variability of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, N; Agnihotri, A

    2000-12-01

    Rapeseed-mustard is one of the most economically important oilseed crops in India. Speciality oils having high amounts of a specific fatty acid are of immense importance for both nutritional and industrial purposes. Oil high in oleic acid has demand in commercial food-service applications due to a long shelf-life and cholesterol-reducing properties. Both linoleic and linolenic acids are essential fatty acids; however, less than 3% linolenic acid is preferred for oil stability. High erucic acid content is beneficial for the polymer industry, whereas low erucic acid is recommended for food purposes. Therefore, it is important to undertake systematic characterization of the available gene pool for its variable fatty acid profile to be utilized for specific purposes. In the present study the Indian rapeseed-mustard germplasm and some newly developed low-erucic-acid strains were analysed by GLC to study the fatty acid composition in these lines. The GLC analysis revealed that the rapeseed-mustard varieties being commonly grown in India are characterized by high erucic acid content (30-51%) in the oil with low levels of oleic acid (13-23%). However, from among the recently developed low-erucic-acid strains, several lines were identified with comparatively high oleic acid (60-70%), moderate to high linoleic acid (13-40%) and low linolenic acid (< 10%) contents. Work is in progress at TERI (New Delhi, India) to utilize these lines for development of strains with particular fatty acid compositions for specific purposes.

  18. [A comprehensive signature biomarker analysis of the in-situ viable biomass, community composition, and nutritional status attributes of deep subsurface microbiota]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The TAN sites contains subsurface sediment contaminated with trichloroethylene (TC). A suite of microbiological analyses, including ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, were performed to ascertain the microbial ecology associated with TCE degradation processes. The objective of the PLFA analyses were: (1) to determine the distribution of viable microbes throughout a vertical depth profile through the TCE plume, (2) determine the community composition of the viable extant microbiota and (3) relate the data derived from the PLFA analyses to other measures of the in situ microbiota as well as to the presence of TCE degradative products.

  19. Wake Signature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    An accumulated body of quantitative evidence shows that bluff-body wakes in stably stratified environments have an unusual degree of coherence and organization, so characteristic geometries such as arrays of alternating-signed vortices have very long lifetimes, as measured in units of buoyancy timescales, or in the downstream distance scaled by a body length. The combination of pattern geometry and persistence renders the detection of these wakes possible in principle. It now appears that identifiable signatures can be found from many disparate sources: Islands, fish, and plankton all have been noted to generate features that can be detected by climate modelers, hopeful navigators in open oceans, or hungry predators. The various types of wakes are reviewed with notes on why their signatures are important and to whom. A general theory of wake pattern formation is lacking and would have to span many orders of magnitude in Reynolds number.

  20. [Determination of body fluid based on analysis of nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent methodological approaches of molecular genetics allow isolation of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) from negligible forensic samples. Analysis of these molecules may be used not only for individual identification based on DNA profiling but also for the detection of origin of the body fluid which (alone or in mixture with other body fluids) forms the examined biological trace. Such an examination can contribute to the evaluation of procedural, technical and tactical value of the trace. Molecular genetic approaches discussed in the review offer new possibilities in comparison with traditional spectrum of chemical, immunological and spectroscopic tests especially with regard to the interpretation of mixtures of biological fluids and to the confirmatory character of the tests. Approaches based on reverse transcription of tissue specific mRNA and their subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragmentation analysis are applicable on samples containing minimal amounts of biological material. Methods for body fluid discrimination based on examination of microRNA in samples provided so far confusing results therefore further development in this field is needed. The examination of tissue specific methylation of nucleotides in selected gene sequences seems to represent a promising enrichment of the methodological spectrum. The detection of DNA sequences of tissue related bacteria has been established and it provides satisfactory results mainly in combination with above mentioned methodological approaches. PMID:26419517

  1. Tracing carbon flow in an arctic marine food web using fatty acid-stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Budge, S M; Wooller, M J; Springer, A M; Iverson, S J; McRoy, C P; Divoky, G J

    2008-08-01

    Global warming and the loss of sea ice threaten to alter patterns of productivity in arctic marine ecosystems because of a likely decline in primary productivity by sea ice algae. Estimates of the contribution of ice algae to total primary production range widely, from just 3 to >50%, and the importance of ice algae to higher trophic levels remains unknown. To help answer this question, we investigated a novel approach to food web studies by combining the two established methods of stable isotope analysis and fatty acid (FA) analysis--we determined the C isotopic composition of individual diatom FA and traced these biomarkers in consumers. Samples were collected near Barrow, Alaska and included ice algae, pelagic phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, seabirds, pinnipeds and cetaceans. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton had distinctive overall FA signatures and clear differences in delta(13)C for two specific diatom FA biomarkers: 16:4n-1 (-24.0+/-2.4 and -30.7+/-0.8 per thousand, respectively) and 20:5n-3 (-18.3+/-2.0 and -26.9+/-0.7 per thousand, respectively). Nearly all delta(13)C values of these two FA in consumers fell between the two stable isotopic end members. A mass balance equation indicated that FA material derived from ice algae, compared to pelagic diatoms, averaged 71% (44-107%) in consumers based on delta(13)C values of 16:4n-1, but only 24% (0-61%) based on 20:5n-3. Our estimates derived from 16:4n-1, which is produced only by diatoms, probably best represented the contribution of ice algae relative to pelagic diatoms. However, many types of algae produce 20:5n-3, so the lower value derived from it likely represented a more realistic estimate of the proportion of ice algae material relative to all other types of phytoplankton. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential value of compound-specific isotope analysis of marine lipids to trace C flow through marine food webs and provide a foundation for future work.

  2. 2D signature for detection and identification of drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.; Shen, Jingling; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhou, Qingli; Shi, Yulei

    2011-06-01

    The method of spectral dynamics analysis (SDA-method) is used for obtaining the2D THz signature of drugs. This signature is used for the detection and identification of drugs with similar Fourier spectra by transmitted THz signal. We discuss the efficiency of SDA method for the identification problem of pure methamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Ketamine.

  3. Electromembrane extraction and HPLC analysis of haloacetic acids and aromatic acetic acids in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Alhooshani, Khalid; Basheer, Chanbasha; Kaur, Jagjit; Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut E; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Lee, Hian Kee

    2011-10-30

    For the first time, haloacetic acids and aromatic acetic acids were extracted from wastewater samples using electromembrane extraction (EME). A thin layer of toluene immobilized on the walls of a polypropylene membrane envelope served as an artificial supported liquid membrane (SLM). The haloacetic acids (HAAs) (chloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, and trifluoroacetic acid) and aromatic acetic acids (phenylacetic acid and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) were extracted through the SLM and into an alkalized aqueous buffer solution. The buffer solution was located inside the membrane envelope. The electrical potential difference sustained over the membrane acted as the driving force for the transport of haloacetic acids into the membrane by electrokinetic migration. After extraction, the extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection. The detection limits were between 0.072 and 40.3 ng L(-1). The calibration plot linearity was in the range of 5 and 200 μg L(-1) while the correlation coefficients for the analytes ranged from 0.9932 to 0.9967. Relative recoveries were in the range of 87-106%. The extraction efficiency was found to be comparable to that of solid-phase extraction.

  4. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-04-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  5. [Vanguard Signature TKR--first experiences].

    PubMed

    Stempin, Radosław; Kotela, Andrzej; Ostrowska, Monika; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2011-01-01

    On 15th May 2010 in Poland first computer planned total knee arthroplasty Vanguard Signature was performed and until now, including Orthopedic Traumatology Department of Central Clinical Hospital Ministry of Interior and Administration in Warsaw and Orthopedic Surgery Department of Promienista Clinic in Poznan, 65 patients have been operated with this method. The new system includes programming technical parameters of operation on the basis of diagnostic analysis of lower extremity using CT or MRI scans. Data are transmitted on Signature Positioning Guides (SPG) which implements function of navigation during surgery. Minimal bone resection, implants sizing and placement with reconstruction of mechanical axis of the limb provides proper functioning of the knee joint and reduces the risk of implants loosening. Further benefits include: instrument reduction, lower degree of femur trauma and reduction of average postoperative blood transfusion volume. The operator using Signature technology is required to have advanced knowledge in the conventional method TKR and medium level computer skills. Access to the program and materials and online communication with the Signature team in the USA allows the surgeon to modify the parameters of the operation and the necessary expert feedback. The rapid increase in the number of registered surgeons in Signature system shows a considerable interest in this technology.

  6. Quantitative analysis of 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves using an amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yihang; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-06-01

    A method was developed for quantifying 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves by using an A300 amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution. In the method, amino acids were eluted by the buffer solution on an ion-exchange column. After reacting with ninhydrin, the derivatives of amino acids were detected by ultraviolet detection. Most amino acids are separated by the elution program. However, five peaks of the derivatives are still overlapping. A non-negative immune algorithm was employed to extract the profiles of the derivatives from the overlapping signals, and then peak areas were adopted for quantitative analysis of the amino acids. The method was validated by the determination of amino acids in tobacco leaves. The relative standard deviations (n = 5) are all less than 2.54% and the recoveries of the spiked samples are in a range of 94.62-108.21%. The feasibility of the method was proved by analyzing the 17 amino acids in 30 tobacco leaf samples. PMID:25866370

  7. Quantitative analysis of 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves using an amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yihang; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-06-01

    A method was developed for quantifying 17 amino acids in tobacco leaves by using an A300 amino acid analyzer and chemometric resolution. In the method, amino acids were eluted by the buffer solution on an ion-exchange column. After reacting with ninhydrin, the derivatives of amino acids were detected by ultraviolet detection. Most amino acids are separated by the elution program. However, five peaks of the derivatives are still overlapping. A non-negative immune algorithm was employed to extract the profiles of the derivatives from the overlapping signals, and then peak areas were adopted for quantitative analysis of the amino acids. The method was validated by the determination of amino acids in tobacco leaves. The relative standard deviations (n = 5) are all less than 2.54% and the recoveries of the spiked samples are in a range of 94.62-108.21%. The feasibility of the method was proved by analyzing the 17 amino acids in 30 tobacco leaf samples.

  8. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectra, as well as other properties, of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. Quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication have been employed to optimize molecular geometries, compute unscaled vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase species. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A full statistical analysis and reliability assessment of computational results is currently underway. A comparison of theoretical results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess any affects of functional choice and basis set on calculation accuracy. The status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, DoD HPCMP, and USMA.

  9. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  11. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  12. Uncovering the exercise-related proteome signature in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Padrão, Ana Isabel; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui; Duarte, José Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Exercise training has been recommended as a nonpharmacological strategy for the prevention and attenuation of skeletal muscle atrophy in distinct pathophysiological conditions. Despite the well-established phenotypic alterations, the molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced skeletal muscle remodeling are poorly characterized. Proteomics based on mass spectrometry have been successfully applied for the characterization of skeletal muscle proteome, representing a pivotal approach for the wide characterization of the molecular networks that lead to skeletal muscle remodeling. Nevertheless, few studies were performed to characterize the exercise-induced proteome remodeli